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Sample records for assaying quantitative

  1. Dynamic, Quantitative Assays of Phagosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    Podinovskaia, Maria; VanderVen, Brian C.; Yates, Robin M.; Glennie, Sarah; Fullerton, Duncan; Mwandumba, Henry C.; Russell, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the activity of the macrophage as an effector cell is performed within its phagocytic compartment. This ranges from the degradation of tissue debris as part of its homeostatic function, to the generation of the superoxide burst as part of its microbicidal response to infection. We have developed a range of real-time readouts of phagosomal function that enables these activities to be rigorously quantified. This chapter contains the description of several of these assays assessed by different methods of quantitation; including a Fluorescence Resonance Emission Transfer (FRET) assay for phagosome/lysosome fusion measured by spectrofluorometer, a fluorogenic assay for the superoxide burst measured by flow cytometry, and a fluorogenic assay for bulk proteolysis measure by confocal microscope. These assays illustrate both the range parameters that can be quantified as well as the flexibility of instrumentation that can be exploited for their quantitation. PMID:24510516

  2. Quantitation of flaviviruses by fluorescent focus assay.

    PubMed

    Payne, Anne F; Binduga-Gajewska, Iwona; Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Kramer, Laura D

    2006-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence assay for quantitation of flaviviruses was developed as an alternative to the standard plaque assay. The assay was validated with West Nile virus (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), and Dengue virus (DENV) types 1-4. Vero cells were plated in 8-well chamber slides, and infected with 10-fold serial dilutions of virus. About 1-3 days after infection, cells were fixed, incubated with specific monoclonal antibody, and stained with a secondary antibody labeled with a fluorescent tag. Fluorescent foci of infection were observed and counted using a fluorescence microscope, and viral titers were calculated as fluorescent focus units (FFU) per ml. The optimal time for performing the fluorescent focus assay (FFA) on Vero cells was 24 h for WNV, and 48 h for SLEV and the four DENV serotypes. In contrast, the time required to complete a standard Vero cell plaque assay for these viruses range from 3 days for WNV to 11 days for DENV-1. Thus, the FFA method of virus titration is useful for viruses whose plaques develop slowly. In addition, these viruses can be quantitated by FFA on a mosquito cell line (C6/36), which does not support plaque formation. The FFA for flaviviruses was validated for accuracy, precision, specificity, and robustness of the assay.

  3. Quantitative comparisons of in vitro assays for estrogenic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, H; Tong, W; Perkins, R; Soto, A M; Prechtl, N V; Sheehan, D M

    2000-01-01

    Substances that may act as estrogens show a broad chemical structural diversity. To thoroughly address the question of possible adverse estrogenic effects, reliable methods are needed to detect and identify the chemicals of these diverse structural classes. We compared three assays--in vitro estrogen receptor competitive binding assays (ER binding assays), yeast-based reporter gene assays (yeast assays), and the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN assay)--to determine their quantitative agreement in identifying structurally diverse estrogens. We examined assay performance for relative sensitivity, detection of active/inactive chemicals, and estrogen/antiestrogen activities. In this examination, we combined individual data sets in a specific, quantitative data mining exercise. Data sets for at least 29 chemicals from five laboratories were analyzed pair-wise by X-Y plots. The ER binding assay was a good predictor for the other two assay results when the antiestrogens were excluded (r(2) is 0.78 for the yeast assays and 0.85 for the E-SCREEN assays). Additionally, the examination strongly suggests that biologic information that is not apparent from any of the individual assays can be discovered by quantitative pair-wise comparisons among assays. Antiestrogens are identified as outliers in the ER binding/yeast assay, while complete antagonists are identified in the ER binding and E-SCREEN assays. Furthermore, the presence of outliers may be explained by different mechanisms that induce an endocrine response, different impurities in different batches of chemicals, different species sensitivity, or limitations of the assay techniques. Although these assays involve different levels of biologic complexity, the major conclusion is that they generally provided consistent information in quantitatively determining estrogenic activity for the five data sets examined. The results should provide guidance for expanded data mining examinations and the selection of appropriate

  4. A quantitative comet infection assay for influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Stephen M; Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2012-02-01

    The virus comet assay is a cell-based virulence assay used to evaluate an antiviral drug or antibody against a target virus. The comet assay differs from the plaque assay in allowing spontaneous flows in 6-well plates to spread virus. When implemented quantitatively the comet assay has been shown to have an order-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to antivirals than the plaque assay. In this study, a quantitative comet assay for influenza virus is demonstrated, and is shown to have a 13-fold increase in sensitivity to ribavirin. AX4 cells (MDCK cells with increased surface concentration of α2-6 sialic acid, the influenza virus receptor) have reduced the comet size variability relative to MDCK cells, making them a better host cell for use in this assay. Because of enhanced antiviral sensitivity in flow-based assays, less drug is required, which could lead to lower reagent costs, reduced cytotoxicity, and fewer false-negative drug screen results. The comet assay also serves as a readout of flow conditions in the well. Observations from comets formed at varying humidity levels indicate a role for evaporation in the mechanism of spontaneous fluid flow in wells.

  5. Quantitative assessment of hemadsorption by myxoviruses: virus hemadsorption assay.

    PubMed

    Hahon, N; Booth, J A; Eckert, H L

    1973-04-01

    The standardization and quantitative evaluation of an assay for myxoviruses, based on the enumeration of individual infected clone 1-5C-4 cells manifesting hemadsorption within 24 h of infection, are described. Hemadsorption was detectable earlier than immunofluorescence in infected cells or hemagglutinins in culture medium. The relationship between virus concentration and cells exhibiting hemadsorption was linear. The assay was highly precise, sensitive, and reproducible. PMID:4349248

  6. Molecular genotyping and quantitation assay for rotavirus surveillance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lurain, Kate; Sobuz, Shihab U; Begum, Sharmin; Kumburu, Happiness; Gratz, Jean; Kibiki, Gibson; Toney, Denise; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D; Petri, William A; Haque, Rashidul; Houpt, Eric R

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus genotyping is useful for surveillance purposes especially in areas where rotavirus vaccination has been or will be implemented. RT-PCR based molecular methods have been applied widely, but quantitative assays targeting a broad spectrum of genotypes have not been developed. Three real time RT-PCR panels were designed to identify G1, G2, G9, G12 (panel GI), G3, G4, G8, G10 (panel GII), and P[4], P[6], P[8], P[10], P[11] (panel P), respectively. An assay targeting NSP3 was included in both G panels as an internal control. The cognate assays were also formulated as one RT-PCR-Luminex panel for simultaneous detection of all the genotypes listed above plus P[9]. The assays were evaluated with various rotavirus isolates and 89 clinical samples from Virginia, Bangladesh and Tanzania, and exhibited 95% (81/85) sensitivity compared with the conventional RT-PCR-Gel-electrophoresis method, and 100% concordance with sequencing. Real time assays identified a significantly higher rate of mixed genotypes in Bangladeshi samples than the conventional gel-electrophoresis-based RT-PCR assay (32.5% versus 12.5%, P<0.05). In these mixed infections, the relative abundance of the rotavirus types could be estimated by Cq values. These typing assays detect and discriminate a broad range of G/P types circulating in different geographic regions with high sensitivity and specificity and can be used for rotavirus surveillance.

  7. Field-based multiplex and quantitative assay platforms for diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Dixon, C. Edward; Chipman, Russell; Scherer, Axel; Beshay, Manal; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chandra Sekhar, Jai Ganesh; Yan, Hong; Puccio, Ava; Okonkwo, David; McClain, Stephen; Gilbert, Noah; Vyawahare, Saurabh

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. military has a continued interest in the development of handheld, field-usable sensors and test kits for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and infectious diseases. Field-use presents unique challenges for biosensor design, both for the readout unit and for the biological assay platform. We have developed robust biosensor devices that offer ultra-high sensitivity and also meet field-use needs. The systems under development include a multiplexed quantitative lateral flow test strip for TBI diagnostics, a field test kit for the diagnosis of pathogens endemic to the Middle East, and a microfluidic assay platform with a label-free reader for performing complex biological automated assays in the field.

  8. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A; Bradford, William D; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S; Li, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein-based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation.

  9. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein−based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  10. Quantitative In Vitro Assay for “Corncob” Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lancy, P.; Appelbaum, B.; Holt, S. C.; Rosan, B.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of Bacterionema matruchotii with strains of Streptococcus sanguis produces a structure which morphologically resembles a corncob. To determine the specific bacterial surface receptors involved in the interaction, we developed a quantitative assay. The assay consisted of mixing saline suspensions of [CH3-3H]thymidine-labeled streptococci and B. matruchotii, incubating at 37°C for 2 h, and filtering the mixture through a 5-μm polycarbonate membrane filter. The free cocci and filaments passed through the filter, but the corncobs were retained. Estimates of the number of corncobs formed were obtained by quantitating the radioactivity retained on the membranes relative to that of controls of streptococci alone. Although saturation of the Bacterionema occurred at a ratio of streptococci to Bacterionema of 10:1 (Klett units), a 2:1 ratio was chosen because of the increased sensitivity of the assay at this ratio. The percentage of streptococci binding at this ratio was 18.6 ± 8.1 (standard deviation). All five Bacterionema strains tested formed corncobs; in contrast, only three strains of S. sanguis were positive. These were serotype 1 strains which had localized surface “fuzz.” Although scanning electron microscopic observations revealed an almost random distribution of cocci along the filament surface, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the streptococci were attached to the Bacterionema by the surface fuzz. No differences in corncob formation were observed in sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6 to 8, at phosphate concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 0.05 M. Concentrations of NaCl or KCl up to 0.25 M did not affect corncob formation, and low concentrations of CaCl2 increased corncob formation slightly, whereas MgCl2, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and citrate buffers reduced the number of streptococci binding to the filaments. These results suggest that divalent cations may play a role in this process. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:7011981

  11. [Clinical evaluation of a novel HBsAg quantitative assay].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kazumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Naganuma, Hatsue; Hiramatsu, Kumiko; Iida, Takayasu; Takasaka, Yoshimitsu; Mizokami, Masashi

    2007-07-01

    The clinical implication of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) concentrations in HBV-infected individuals remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel fully automated Chemiluminescence Enzyme Immunoassay (Sysmex HBsAg quantitative assay) by comparative measurements of the reference serum samples versus two independent commercial assays (Lumipulse f or Architect HBsAg QT). Furthermore, clinical usefulness was assessed for monitoring of the serum HBsAg levels during antiviral therapy. A dilution test using 5 reference-serum samples showed linear correlation curve in range from 0.03 to 2,360 IU/ml. The HBsAg was measured in total of 400 serum samples and 99.8% had consistent results between Sysmex and Lumipulse f. Additionally, a positive linear correlation was observed between Sysmex and Architect. To compare the Architect and Sysmex, both methods were applied to quantify the HBsAg in serum samples with different HBV genotypes/subgenotypes, as well as in serum contained HBV vaccine escape mutants (126S, 145R). Correlation between the methods was observed in results for escape mutants and common genotypes (A, B, C) in Japan. Observed during lamivudine therapy, an increase in HBsAg and HBV DNA concentrations preceded the aminotransferase (ALT) elevation associated with drug-resistant HBV variant emergence (breakthrough hepatitis). In conclusion, reliability of the Sysmex HBsAg quantitative assay was confirmed for all HBV genetic variants common in Japan. Monitoring of serum HBsAg concentrations in addition to HBV DNA quantification, is helpful in evaluation of the response to lamivudine treatment and diagnosis of the breakthrough hepatitis.

  12. A new trend to determine biochemical parameters by quantitative FRET assays

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jia-yu; Song, Yang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been widely used in biological and biomedical research because it can determine molecule or particle interactions within a range of 1–10 nm. The sensitivity and efficiency of FRET strongly depend on the distance between the FRET donor and acceptor. Historically, FRET assays have been used to quantitatively deduce molecular distances. However, another major potential application of the FRET assay has not been fully exploited, that is, the use of FRET signals to quantitatively describe molecular interactive events. In this review, we discuss the use of quantitative FRET assays for the determination of biochemical parameters, such as the protein interaction dissociation constant (Kd), enzymatic velocity (kcat) and Km. We also describe fluorescent microscopy-based quantitative FRET assays for protein interaction affinity determination in cells as well as fluorimeter-based quantitative FRET assays for protein interaction and enzymatic parameter determination in solution. PMID:26567729

  13. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  14. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Xia, Qingyan; Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  15. A quantitative high throughput assay for identifying gametocytocidal compounds.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Dehdashti, Seameen J; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Kim C

    2013-03-01

    Current antimalarial drug treatment does not effectively kill mature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for malaria transmission from human to human via a mosquito. Consequently, following standard therapy malaria can still be transmitted for over a week after the clearance of asexual parasites. A new generation of malaria drugs with gametocytocidal properties, or a gametocytocidal drug that could be used in combinational therapy with currently available antimalarials, is needed to control the spread of the disease and facilitate eradication efforts. We have developed a 1536-well gametocyte viability assay for the high throughput screening of large compound collections to identify novel compounds with gametocytocidal activity. The signal-to-basal ratio and Z'-factor for this assay were 3.2-fold and 0.68, respectively. The IC(50) value of epoxomicin, the positive control compound, was 1.42±0.09 nM that is comparable to previously reported values. This miniaturized assay significantly reduces the number of gametocytes required for the AlamarBlue viability assay, and enables high throughput screening for lead discovery efforts. Additionally, the screen does not require a specialized parasite line, gametocytes from any strain, including field isolates, can be tested. A pilot screen utilizing the commercially available LOPAC library, consisting of 1280 known compounds, revealed two selective gametocytocidal compounds having 54- and 7.8-fold gametocytocidal selectivity in comparison to their cell cytotoxicity effect against the mammalian SH-SY5Y cell line.

  16. A Quantitative High Throughput Assay for Identifying Gametocytocidal Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C.; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Kim C.

    2013-01-01

    Current antimalarial drug treatment does not effectively kill mature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for malaria transmission from human to human via a mosquito. Consequently, following standard therapy malaria can still be transmitted for over a week after the clearance of asexual parasites. A new generation of malaria drugs with gametocytocidal properties, or a gametocytocidal drug that could be used in combinational therapy with currently available antimalarials, is needed to control the spread of the disease and facilitate eradication efforts. We have developed a 1,536-well gametocyte viability assay for the high throughput screening of large compound collections to identify novel compounds with gametocytocidal activity. The signal-to-basal ratio and Z′-factor for this assay were 3.2-fold and 0.68, respectively. The IC50 value of epoxomicin, the positive control compound, was 1.42 ± 0.09 nM that is comparable to previously reported values. This miniaturized assay significantly reduces the number of gametocytes required for the alamarBlue viability assay, and enables high throughput screening for lead discovery efforts. Additionally, the screen does not require a specialized parasite line, gametocytes from any strain, including field isolates, can be tested. A pilot screen utilizing the commercially available LOPAC library, consisting of 1,280 known compounds, revealed two selective gametocytocidal compounds having 54 and 7.8-fold gametocytocidal selectivity in comparison to their cell cytotoxicity effect against the mammalian SH-SY5Y cell line. PMID:23454872

  17. Quantitative turbidity assay for lipolytic enzymes in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Barig, Susann; Schiemann, Manja; Mirsky, Vladimir M; Stahmann, K Peter

    2013-10-01

    A clearing assay for lipolytic enzymes has been realized in 96-well microtiter plates. A thin layer containing emulsified tributyrin as turbidity-generating substrate was placed on a thicker supporting aqueous layer. Both layers were stabilized by a gel-forming agent. Enzyme addition leads to clearing of the emulsion detected with a standard microtiter plate reader as a decrease of extinction. Dependencies of the signal kinetics on the substrate and enzyme concentrations were studied. For 0.5-1% tributyrin content the reaction rate is not substrate-limited. An initial slope of the signal kinetics is proportional to the lipase activity. A detailed characterization of the assay was performed. Lipolysis of tributyrin was confirmed by glycerol detection. Various gel-forming agents were compared and diffusion conditions in these gels were analyzed. Agar and agarose were found to be the most suitable gel-forming agents, which do not affect enzyme diffusion whereas polyacrylamide gels block lipase diffusion and therefore are not suitable for the assay. The optimized assay prepared from 1% tributyrin emulsion in 2% agar gel was tested with six microbial lipases and porcine pancreatic lipase. The detection limit is 20-60 ng/well which is equivalent to 30 μU/well for T. lanuginosus lipase.

  18. Improved assay for quantitating adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, M A; White, B A; Hespell, R B

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative technique suitable for the determination of adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose was developed. This technique employs adherence of cells to cellulose disks and alleviates the problem of nonspecific cell entrapment within cellulose particles. By using this technique, it was demonstrated that the adherence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 to cellulose was inhibited by formaldehyde, methylcellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose. Adherence was unaffected by acid hydrolysates of methylcellulose, glucose, and cellobiose. PMID:2782879

  19. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  20. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for the Detection of Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays available to detect and enumerate fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and probes that target different rRNA genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in concentration es...

  1. A semi-quantitative dipstick assay for microcystin.

    PubMed

    Tippkötter, Nils; Stückmann, Henning; Kroll, Stephen; Winkelmann, Gunda; Noack, Udo; Scheper, Thomas; Ulber, Roland

    2009-06-01

    An immunochromatographic lateral flow dipstick assay for the fast detection of microcystin-LR was developed. Colloid gold particles with diameters of 40 nm were used as red-colored antibody labels for the visual detection of the antigen. The new dipstick sensor is capable of detecting down to 5 microg x l(-1) (ppb; total inversion of the color signal) or 1 ppb (observation of color grading) of microcystin-LR. The course of the labeling reaction was observed via spectrometric wave shifts caused by the change of particle size during the binding of antibodies. Different stabilizing reagents showed that especially bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein increase the assays sensitivity and the conjugate stability. Performance of the dipsticks was quantified by pattern processing of capture zone CCD images. Storage stability of dipsticks and conjugate suspensions over 115 days under different conditions were monitored. The ready-to-use dipsticks were successfully tested with microcystin-LR-spiked samples of outdoor drinking- and salt water and applied to the tissue of microcystin-fed mussels.

  2. Pre-incubation and low temperatures in quantitative radioreceptor assays

    SciTech Connect

    Ensing, K.; de Zeeuw, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The detection limits of drugs in quantitative RRA are primarily determined by their affinities towards the receptor. Yet, the concentration of radiolabeled ligand, necessary for quantification of receptor-bound drug, increases the theoretical detection limit. Therefore the influences of low temperatures and pre-incubation on the detection limit was studied. Analysis of experimental data suggests that when a well-defined incubation procedure is used, pre-incubation and low temperatures will increase sensitivity without loss of accuracy and precision. 6 references, 2 figures.

  3. Quantitative IgE antibody assays in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yunginger, J W; Ahlstedt, S; Eggleston, P A; Homburger, H A; Nelson, H S; Ownby, D R; Platts-Mills, T A; Sampson, H A; Sicherer, S H; Weinstein, A M; Williams, P B; Wood, R A; Zeiger, R S

    2000-06-01

    During the past several years, immunoassays for specific IgE antibodies have been refined to permit reporting results in mass units. Thus quantitative immunoassays for IgE antibodies may be an adjunct to skin tests. In cases of food allergy among children with atopic dermatitis, cutoff values for IgE antibody concentrations to egg, milk, peanut, and fish have been derived to provide 95% positive and 90% negative predictive values. Food-specific IgE antibody determinations can also be used to predict which food allergies are resolving spontaneously. Elevated egg-specific IgE antibody levels in infancy are associated with significantly increased risk for development of inhalant allergies later in childhood. In cases of inhalant allergy, specific IgE antibody levels correlate closely with results of inhalation challenge studies in cat-sensitive persons. Also, mite-specific IgE antibody levels correlate significantly with the mite allergen contents of reservoir dust in the homes of mite-sensitive persons. Immunoassays for quantitation of specific IgE antibodies may be used to document allergen sensitization over time and to evaluate the risk of reaction on allergen exposure. However, immunoassays and skin tests are not entirely interchangeable, and neither will replace the other in appropriate circumstances.

  4. Smartphone based visual and quantitative assays on upconversional paper sensor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Qingsong; Jing, Huarong; Li, You; Yisibashaer, Wuerzha; Chen, Jian; Nan Li, Bing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    The integration of smartphone with paper sensors recently has been gain increasing attentions because of the achievement of quantitative and rapid analysis. However, smartphone based upconversional paper sensors have been restricted by the lack of effective methods to acquire luminescence signals on test paper. Herein, by the virtue of 3D printing technology, we exploited an auxiliary reusable device, which orderly assembled a 980nm mini-laser, optical filter and mini-cavity together, for digitally imaging the luminescence variations on test paper and quantitative analyzing pesticide thiram by smartphone. In detail, copper ions decorated NaYF4:Yb/Tm upconversion nanoparticles were fixed onto filter paper to form test paper, and the blue luminescence on it would be quenched after additions of thiram through luminescence resonance energy transfer mechanism. These variations could be monitored by the smartphone camera, and then the blue channel intensities of obtained colored images were calculated to quantify amounts of thiram through a self-written Android program installed on the smartphone, offering a reliable and accurate detection limit of 0.1μM for the system. This work provides an initial demonstration of integrating upconversion nanosensors with smartphone digital imaging for point-of-care analysis on a paper-based platform.

  5. Smartphone based visual and quantitative assays on upconversional paper sensor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Qingsong; Jing, Huarong; Li, You; Yisibashaer, Wuerzha; Chen, Jian; Nan Li, Bing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    The integration of smartphone with paper sensors recently has been gain increasing attentions because of the achievement of quantitative and rapid analysis. However, smartphone based upconversional paper sensors have been restricted by the lack of effective methods to acquire luminescence signals on test paper. Herein, by the virtue of 3D printing technology, we exploited an auxiliary reusable device, which orderly assembled a 980nm mini-laser, optical filter and mini-cavity together, for digitally imaging the luminescence variations on test paper and quantitative analyzing pesticide thiram by smartphone. In detail, copper ions decorated NaYF4:Yb/Tm upconversion nanoparticles were fixed onto filter paper to form test paper, and the blue luminescence on it would be quenched after additions of thiram through luminescence resonance energy transfer mechanism. These variations could be monitored by the smartphone camera, and then the blue channel intensities of obtained colored images were calculated to quantify amounts of thiram through a self-written Android program installed on the smartphone, offering a reliable and accurate detection limit of 0.1μM for the system. This work provides an initial demonstration of integrating upconversion nanosensors with smartphone digital imaging for point-of-care analysis on a paper-based platform. PMID:26356763

  6. Image based quantitative reader for Lateral flow immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Kaushik Basak; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) have wide range of applications in point-of-care testing (POCT). An integrated, motion-free, accurate, reliable reader that performs automated quantitative analysis of LFIA is essential for POCT diagnosis. We demonstrate an image based quantitative method to read the lateral flow immunofluorescence test strips. The developed reader uses line laser diode module to illuminate the LFIA test strip having fluorescent dye. Fluorescence light coming from the region of interest (ROI) of the LFIA test strip was filtered using an emission filter and imaged using a camera following which images were processed in computer. A dedicated control program was developed that automated the entire process including illumination of the test strip using laser diode, capturing the ROI of the test strip, processing and analyzing the images and displaying of results. Reproducibility of the reader has been evaluated using few reference cartridges and HbA1c (Glycated haemoglobin) test cartridges. The proposed system can be upgraded to a compact reader for widespread testing of LFIA test strips. PMID:26736487

  7. Rapid method for protein quantitation by Bradford assay after elimination of the interference of polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yongfeng; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Bradford assay is one of the most common methods for measuring protein concentrations. However, some pharmaceutical excipients, such as detergents, interfere with Bradford assay even at low concentrations. Protein precipitation can be used to overcome sample incompatibility with protein quantitation. But the rate of protein recovery caused by acetone precipitation is only about 70%. In this study, we found that sucrose not only could increase the rate of protein recovery after 1 h acetone precipitation, but also did not interfere with Bradford assay. So we developed a method for rapid protein quantitation in protein drugs even if they contained interfering substances.

  8. Interpretation of protein quantitation using the Bradford assay: comparison with two calculation models.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hyung-Keun; Lim, Hyuk-Min; Oh, Kyong-Hwa; Yang, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Kim, Sook-Kyung

    2013-03-01

    The Bradford assay is a simple method for protein quantitation, but variation in the results between proteins is a matter of concern. In this study, we compared and normalized quantitative values from two models for protein quantitation, where the residues in the protein that bind to anionic Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 comprise either Arg and Lys (Method 1, M1) or Arg, Lys, and His (Method 2, M2). Use of the M2 model yielded much more consistent quantitation values compared with use of the M1 model, which exhibited marked overestimations against protein standards.

  9. Quantitative detection of RT activity by PERT assay: feasibility and limits to a standardized screening assay for human vaccines.

    PubMed

    André, M; Morgeaux, S; Fuchs, F

    2000-06-01

    The detection of adventitious retroviruses has always been critical for assessing the safety concerns associated with viral vaccines. Assays for the enzymatic activity of reverse transcriptase (RT) are used as general methods for the detection of both known and unknown retroviruses. Several studies using newly-developed ultrasensitive PCR-based RT assays reported RT activity in viral vaccines grown in chicken cells. Here, we have assessed the performances of such a PCR-based RT assay--PERT assay--for the quantitative detection of RT activity in vaccines. Sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the method were studied on purified RT and viral vaccines treated to release RT from potentially contaminant retroviruses. The level of RT activity detected in chicken cell-derived vaccines was higher for live attenuated vaccines compared to inactivated ones. Contrary to other studies, RT activity was found in some mammalian cell-derived vaccines. AZT-TP sensitivity of RT activities detected in these vaccines and discrimination between retroviral and RT-like activities was further investigated. Feasibility and limits of PERT assay as a broad-spectrum retroviruses detection method in vaccines are discussed.

  10. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Conor J.; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  11. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays for Detection and Characterization of Protein Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Farris, M Heath; Ford, Kara A; Doyle, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Initial evaluations of large microbial libraries for potential producers of novel antimicrobial proteins require both qualitative and quantitative methods to screen for target enzymes prior to investing greater research effort and resources. The goal of this protocol is to demonstrate two complementary assays for conducting these initial evaluations. The microslide diffusion assay provides an initial or simple detection screen to enable the qualitative and rapid assessment of proteolytic activity against an array of both viable and heat-killed bacterial target substrates. As a counterpart, the increased sensitivity and reproducibility of the dye-release assay provides a quantitative platform for evaluating and comparing environmental influences affecting the hydrolytic activity of protein antimicrobials. The ability to label specific heat-killed cell culture substrates with Remazol brilliant blue R dye expands this capability to tailor the dye-release assay to characterize enzymatic activity of interest.

  12. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays for Detection and Characterization of Protein Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Farris, M. Heath; Ford, Kara A.; Doyle, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Initial evaluations of large microbial libraries for potential producers of novel antimicrobial proteins require both qualitative and quantitative methods to screen for target enzymes prior to investing greater research effort and resources. The goal of this protocol is to demonstrate two complementary assays for conducting these initial evaluations. The microslide diffusion assay provides an initial or simple detection screen to enable the qualitative and rapid assessment of proteolytic activity against an array of both viable and heat-killed bacterial target substrates. As a counterpart, the increased sensitivity and reproducibility of the dye-release assay provides a quantitative platform for evaluating and comparing environmental influences affecting the hydrolytic activity of protein antimicrobials. The ability to label specific heat-killed cell culture substrates with Remazol brilliant blue R dye expands this capability to tailor the dye-release assay to characterize enzymatic activity of interest. PMID:27166738

  13. High performance liquid chromatographic assay for the quantitation of total glutathione in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abukhalaf, Imad K.; Silvestrov, Natalia A.; Menter, Julian M.; von Deutsch, Daniel A.; Bayorh, Mohamed A.; Socci, Robin R.; Ganafa, Agaba A.

    2002-01-01

    A simple and widely used homocysteine HPLC procedure was applied for the HPLC identification and quantitation of glutathione in plasma. The method, which utilizes SBDF as a derivatizing agent utilizes only 50 microl of sample volume. Linear quantitative response curve was generated for glutathione over a concentration range of 0.3125-62.50 micromol/l. Linear regression analysis of the standard curve exhibited correlation coefficient of 0.999. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values were 5.0 and 15 pmol, respectively. Glutathione recovery using this method was nearly complete (above 96%). Intra-assay and inter-assay precision studies reflected a high level of reliability and reproducibility of the method. The applicability of the method for the quantitation of glutathione was demonstrated successfully using human and rat plasma samples.

  14. Quantitative comparison between microfluidic and microtiter plate formats for cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huabing; Pattrick, Nicola; Zhang, Xunli; Klauke, Norbert; Cordingley, Hayley C; Haswell, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we compare a quantitative cell-based assay measuring the intracellular Ca2+ response to the agonist uridine 5'-triphosphate in Chinese hamster ovary cells, in both microfluidic and microtiter formats. The study demonstrates that, under appropriate hydrodynamic conditions, there is an excellent agreement between traditional well-plate assays and those obtained on-chip for both suspended immobilized cells and cultured adherent cells. We also demonstrate that the on-chip assay, using adherent cells, provides the possibility of faster screening protocols with the potential for resolving subcellular information about local Ca2+ flux.

  15. Development and validation of a quantitative real time PCR assay for BK virus.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Midori; Leos, N Kristine; Lacey, Damon; Doern, Christopher; Rogers, Beverly B; Park, Jason Y

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that BK viral load in plasma and urine are reliable markers for the detection of BK virus associated nephropathy (BKVAN) in renal transplant patients. We developed a quantitative real time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology for the measurement of BK viral load in plasma and urine. Considering the high similarity of the nucleotide sequence of the BK virus (BKV) with the JC virus (JCV), we designed this assay to specifically amplify BKV. We determined the viral DNA recovery rate on manual (QIAGEN's QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit) and automated (BioMerieux's NucliSENS EasyMAG) extraction methods. The comparison showed a higher viral DNA recovery rate on the automated extraction (61-76% in plasma and 52-65% in urine) as compared to the manual method (49-52% in plasma and 33-56% in urine). Quantitation of the viral load was performed using an external standard curve that was constructed with serial dilution of a plasmid containing the full length of the BKV genome. Commercially available quantitative BKV standards showed good correlation with the plasmid standard. The reproducibility of the assay was determined based on the Ct values of the amplified products as well as in BK copies per milliliter of sample. This assay is linear over a 7 log range (10 to 1 × 10(7) copies per reaction), no cross-reactivity was detected with the closest-related polyomavirus JCV, as well as other viruses that may be found in immunocompromised patients, and human genomic DNA. The limit of detection of the assay is 300 copies per milliliter in both plasma and urine and the limit of quantitation is 1000 copies per milliliter using the NATtrol BK Virus Linearity Panel (ZeptoMetrix). This real time PCR assay provides a reliable and sensitive method for the quantitation of BKV in plasma and urine samples.

  16. Quantitative lipopolysaccharide analysis using HPLC/MS/MS and its combination with the limulus amebocyte lysate assay[S

    PubMed Central

    Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Gautier, Thomas; Sali, Wahib; Adrie, Christophe; Choubley, Hélène; Charron, Emilie; Lalande, Caroline; Le Guern, Naig; Deckert, Valérie; Monchi, Mehran; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Lagrost, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Quantitation of plasma lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) might be used to document Gram-negative bacterial infection. In the present work, LPS-derived 3-hydroxymyristate was extracted from plasma samples with an organic solvent, separated by reversed phase HPLC, and quantitated by MS/MS. This mass assay was combined with the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) bioassay to monitor neutralization of LPS activity in biological samples. The described HPLC/MS/MS method is a reliable, practical, accurate, and sensitive tool to quantitate LPS. The combination of the LAL and HPLC/MS/MS analyses provided new evidence for the intrinsic capacity of plasma lipoproteins and phospholipid transfer protein to neutralize the activity of LPS. In a subset of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, with documented infection but with a negative plasma LAL test, significant amounts of LPS were measured by the HPLC/MS/MS method. Patients with the highest plasma LPS concentration were more severely ill. HPLC/MS/MS is a relevant method to quantitate endotoxin in a sample, to assess the efficacy of LPS neutralization, and to evaluate the proinflammatory potential of LPS in vivo. PMID:26023073

  17. Assessing the Validity of Diagnostic Quantitative PCR Assays for Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are 123 confirmed species in the genus Phakopsora worldwide, with 19 species reported in the continental United States. In 2002, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) diagnostic assay was developed by Frederick et al. that has been used for detecting Phakopsora pachyrhizi in spore trapping studies. Based ...

  18. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  19. A fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR assay for accurate Pocillopora damicornis species identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Luke; Stat, Michael; Evans, Richard D.; Kennington, W. Jason

    2016-09-01

    Pocillopora damicornis is one of the most extensively studied coral species globally, but high levels of phenotypic plasticity within the genus make species identification based on morphology alone unreliable. As a result, there is a compelling need to develop cheap and time-effective molecular techniques capable of accurately distinguishing P. damicornis from other congeneric species. Here, we develop a fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to genotype a single nucleotide polymorphism that accurately distinguishes P. damicornis from other morphologically similar Pocillopora species. We trial the assay across colonies representing multiple Pocillopora species and then apply the assay to screen samples of Pocillopora spp. collected at regional scales along the coastline of Western Australia. This assay offers a cheap and time-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and has broad applications including studies on gene flow, dispersal, recruitment and physiological thresholds of P. damicornis.

  20. A DNA immunoprecipitation assay used in quantitative detection of in vitro DNA-protein complex binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Young; Chae, Ji Hyung; Oh, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chul Geun

    2013-10-15

    To begin gene transcription, several transcription factors must bind to specific DNA sequences to form a complex via DNA-protein interactions. We established an in vitro method for specific and sensitive analyses of DNA-protein interactions based on a DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) method. We verified the accuracy and efficiency of the DIP assay in quantitatively measuring DNA-protein binding using transcription factor CP2c as a model. With our DIP assay, we could detect specific interactions within a DNA-CP2c complex, with reproducible and quantitative binding values. In addition, we were able to effectively measure the changes in DNA-CP2c binding by the addition of a small molecule, FQI1 (factor quinolinone inhibitor 1), previously identified as a specific inhibitor of this binding. To identify a new regulator of DNA-CP2c binding, we analyzed several CP2c binding peptides and found that only one class of peptide severely inhibits DNA-CP2c binding. These data show that our DIP assay is very useful in quantitatively detecting the binding dynamics of DNA-protein complex. Because DNA-protein interaction is very dynamic in different cellular environments, our assay can be applied to the detection of active transcription factors, including promoter occupancy in normal and disease conditions. Moreover, it may be used to develop a targeted regulator of specific DNA-protein interaction.

  1. A siphonage flow and thread-based low-cost platform enables quantitative and sensitive assays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Mao, Qingqing; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Shenghai; Du, Jianxiu; Lv, Jiagen

    2015-01-21

    For pump-free, material abundant, portable, and easy-to-operate low-cost microfluidics, a siphonage flow microfluidic thread-based analytical device (S-μTAD) platform enabling quantitative and sensitive assays was designed. Renewable and continuous siphonage flow allowed replicate sampling and detection on one channel/device, obviating some possible inconsistencies among channels or devices. Y-shaped channels were fabricated with polyester cotton blend thread, due to its greater chemiluminescent sensitivity in comparison with that of cotton and polyester threads. S-μTAD sensors for glucose and uric acid were fabricated by using oxidase-immobilized cotton thread as the sample arm of the channels. The acceptable reproducibility and high sensitivity, demonstrated by the relative standard deviations of less than 5% in all cases and the detection limits of 4 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) for hydrogen peroxide, 1 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for glucose, and 3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) for uric acid, demonstrated the feasibility of the S-μTAD for quantitative assays. Good agreements between S-μTAD/sensor results and hospital results for blood glucose and uric acid assays indicated the capability of S-μTAD/sensors for the analysis of real samples. These findings proved the utility of siphonage for low-cost microfluidics and the suitability of our S-μTAD design for quantitative assays.

  2. Evaluation of Large Scale Quantitative Proteomic Assay Development Using Peptide Affinity-based Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Zhao, Lei; Abbatiello, Susan E.; Burgess, Michael; Kuhn, Eric; Lin, ChenWei; Pope, Matthew E.; Razavi, Morteza; Anderson, N. Leigh; Pearson, Terry W.; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-01-01

    Stable isotope standards and capture by antipeptide antibodies (SISCAPA) couples affinity enrichment of peptides with stable isotope dilution and detection by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to provide quantitative measurement of peptides as surrogates for their respective proteins. In this report, we describe a feasibility study to determine the success rate for production of suitable antibodies for SISCAPA assays in order to inform strategies for large-scale assay development. A workflow was designed that included a multiplex immunization strategy in which up to five proteotypic peptides from a single protein target were used to immunize individual rabbits. A total of 403 proteotypic tryptic peptides representing 89 protein targets were used as immunogens. Antipeptide antibody titers were measured by ELISA and 220 antipeptide antibodies representing 89 proteins were chosen for affinity purification. These antibodies were characterized with respect to their performance in SISCAPA-multiple reaction monitoring assays using trypsin-digested human plasma matrix. More than half of the assays generated were capable of detecting the target peptide at concentrations of less than 0.5 fmol/μl in human plasma, corresponding to protein concentrations of less than 100 ng/ml. The strategy of multiplexing five peptide immunogens was successful in generating a working assay for 100% of the targeted proteins in this evaluation study. These results indicate it is feasible for a single laboratory to develop hundreds of assays per year and allow planning for cost-effective generation of SISCAPA assays. PMID:21245105

  3. Lactate as a Novel Quantitative Measure of Viability in Schistosoma mansoni Drug Sensitivity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Stephanie; Zöphel, Dorina; Subbaraman, Harini; Unger, Clemens; Held, Jana; Engleitner, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-organism compound sensitivity assays are a valuable strategy in infectious diseases to identify active molecules. In schistosomiasis drug discovery, larval-stage Schistosoma allows the use of a certain degree of automation in the screening of compounds. Unfortunately, the throughput is limited, as drug activity is determined by manual assessment of Schistosoma viability by microscopy. To develop a simple and quantifiable surrogate marker for viability, we targeted glucose metabolism, which is central to Schistosoma survival. Lactate is the end product of glycolysis in human Schistosoma stages and can be detected in the supernatant. We assessed lactate as a surrogate marker for viability in Schistosoma drug screening assays. We thoroughly investigated parameters of lactate measurement and performed drug sensitivity assays by applying schistosomula and adult worms to establish a proof of concept. Lactate levels clearly reflected the viability of schistosomula and correlated with schistosomulum numbers. Compounds with reported potencies were tested, and activities were determined by lactate assay and by microscopy. We conclude that lactate is a sensitive and simple surrogate marker to be measured to determine Schistosoma viability in compound screening assays. Low numbers of schistosomula and the commercial availability of lactate assay reagents make the assay particularly attractive to throughput approaches. Furthermore, standardization of procedures and quantitative evaluation of compound activities facilitate interassay comparisons of potencies and, thus, concerted drug discovery approaches. PMID:25487803

  4. Quantitative Molecular Assay for Fingerprinting Microbial Communities of Wastewater and Estrogen-Degrading Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-Ping; Ahuja, Rajiv; Sayler, Gary; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative fingerprinting method, called the real-time terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (real-time-t-RFLP) assay, was developed for simultaneous determination of microbial diversity and abundance within a complex community. The real-time-t-RFLP assay was developed by incorporating the quantitative feature of real-time PCR and the fingerprinting feature of t-RFLP analysis. The assay was validated by using a model microbial community containing three pure strains, an Escherichia coli strain (gram negative), a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain (gram negative), and a Bacillus thuringiensis strain (gram positive). Subsequently, the real-time-t-RFLP assay was applied to and proven to be useful for environmental samples; the richness and abundance of species in microbial communities (expressed as the number of 16S rRNA gene copies of each ribotype per milliliter) of wastewater and estrogen-degrading consortia (enriched with 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, or estrone) were successfully characterized. The results of this study strongly suggested that the real-time-t-RFLP assay can be a powerful molecular tool for gaining insight into microbial communities in various engineered systems and natural habitats. PMID:15746346

  5. A single-vial analytical and quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay for terpene synthases.

    PubMed

    O'Maille, Paul E; Chappell, Joe; Noel, Joseph P

    2004-12-15

    A quantitative assay for the analysis of sesquiterpene synthases, wherein each reaction mixture is formulated in glass gas chromatography vials, overlaid with organic solvent such as ethyl acetate, and subsequently vortexed to extract hydrocarbon reaction products into the organic phase after a suitable incubation period, was developed. The product-enriched organic phase is then sampled in an automated fashion and injected directly into a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer without further workup for analysis and quantification of hydrocarbon products. Application of the vial assay to the analysis of amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), a sesquiterpene synthase, demonstrated the sensitivity of the assay for detection of major and minor reaction products and most notably for the identification of several sesquiterpene products that had escaped previous detection. A steady-state kinetic analysis of tobacco 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS), another sesquiterpene synthase, validated the quantitative nature of the assay, providing an alternative means to the established method of using radiolabeled substrate, extraction, and scintillation counting. This simplified assay provides a standardized method to facilitate analysis of terpene synthases and diverse mutant enzyme libraries by supplanting the common practice of using larger scale reactions, multiple extractions, and evaporative concentration of the organic phase prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. PMID:15556559

  6. Influence of hydrodynamic conditions on quantitative cellular assays in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huabing; Zhang, Xunli; Pattrick, Nicola; Klauke, Norbert; Cordingley, Hayley C; Haswell, Stephen J; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2007-09-15

    This study demonstrates the importance of the hydrodynamic environment in microfluidic systems in quantitative cellular assays using live cells. Commonly applied flow conditions used in microfluidics were evaluated using the quantitative intracellular Ca2+ analysis of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as a model system. Above certain thresholds of shear stress, hydrodynamically induced intracellular Ca2+ fluxes were observed which mimic the responses induced by chemical stimuli, such as the agonist uridine 5'-triphosphate tris salt (UTP). This effect is of significance given the increasing application of microfluidic devices in high-throughput cellular analysis for biophysical applications and pharmacological screening.

  7. Quantitative assay of photoinduced DNA strand breaks by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Rak, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) - a modern methodology primarily used for studying gene expression has been employed for the quantitative assay of an important class of DNA damage - single strand breaks. These DNA lesions which may lead to highly cytotoxic double strand breaks were quantified in a model system where double stranded DNA was sensitized to UV photons by labeling with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The amount of breaks formed due to irradiation with several doses of 320nm photons was assayed by two independent methods: LC-MS and qPCR. A very good agreement between the relative damage measured by the two completely different analytical tools proves the applicability of qPCR for the quantitative analysis of SSBs. Our results suggest that the popularity of the hitherto underestimated though accurate and site-specific technique of real-time PCR may increase in future DNA damage studies.

  8. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  9. A Data Analysis Pipeline Accounting for Artifacts in Tox21 Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sedykh, Alexander; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    A main goal of the U.S. Tox21 program is to profile a 10K-compound library for activity against a panel of stress-related and nuclear receptor signaling pathway assays using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. However, assay artifacts, including nonreproducible signals and assay interference (e.g., autofluorescence), complicate compound activity interpretation. To address these issues, we have developed a data analysis pipeline that includes an updated signal noise-filtering/curation protocol and an assay interference flagging system. To better characterize various types of signals, we adopted a weighted version of the area under the curve (wAUC) to quantify the amount of activity across the tested concentration range in combination with the assay-dependent point-of-departure (POD) concentration. Based on the 32 Tox21 qHTS assays analyzed, we demonstrate that signal profiling using wAUC affords the best reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.91) in comparison with the POD (0.82) only or the AC(50) (i.e., half-maximal activity concentration, 0.81). Among the activity artifacts characterized, cytotoxicity is the major confounding factor; on average, about 8% of Tox21 compounds are affected, whereas autofluorescence affects less than 0.5%. To facilitate data evaluation, we implemented two graphical user interface applications, allowing users to rapidly evaluate the in vitro activity of Tox21 compounds.

  10. A Data Analysis Pipeline Accounting for Artifacts in Tox21 Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sedykh, Alexander; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    A main goal of the U.S. Tox21 program is to profile a 10K-compound library for activity against a panel of stress-related and nuclear receptor signaling pathway assays using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. However, assay artifacts, including nonreproducible signals and assay interference (e.g., autofluorescence), complicate compound activity interpretation. To address these issues, we have developed a data analysis pipeline that includes an updated signal noise–filtering/curation protocol and an assay interference flagging system. To better characterize various types of signals, we adopted a weighted version of the area under the curve (wAUC) to quantify the amount of activity across the tested concentration range in combination with the assay-dependent point-of-departure (POD) concentration. Based on the 32 Tox21 qHTS assays analyzed, we demonstrate that signal profiling using wAUC affords the best reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.91) in comparison with the POD (0.82) only or the AC50 (i.e., half-maximal activity concentration, 0.81). Among the activity artifacts characterized, cytotoxicity is the major confounding factor; on average, about 8% of Tox21 compounds are affected, whereas autofluorescence affects less than 0.5%. To facilitate data evaluation, we implemented two graphical user interface applications, allowing users to rapidly evaluate the in vitro activity of Tox21 compounds. PMID:25904095

  11. Multicenter Evaluation of the Elecsys Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Quantitative Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zacher, B. J.; Moriconi, F.; Bowden, S.; Hammond, R.; Louisirirotchanakul, S.; Phisalprapa, P.; Tanwandee, T.; Wursthorn, K.; Brunetto, M. R.; Wedemeyer, H.; Bonino, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Elecsys hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) II quantitative assay is a new quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay which uses onboard dilution and a simple algorithm to determine HBsAg levels expressed in international units (IU)/ml (standardized against the World Health Organization [WHO] Second International Standard). This study evaluated its performance using routine serum samples from a wide range of HBsAg carriers and patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBsAg levels were measured in serum samples collected independently by five centers in Europe, Australia, and Asia. Serial dilution analyses were performed to assess the recommended dilution algorithm and determine the assay range free of hook effect. Assay precision was also established. Following assessment of serial dilutions (1:100 to 1:1,000,000) of the 611 samples analyzed, 70.0% and 85.6% of samples tested with analyzers incorporating 1:100 (Elecsys 2010 and cobas e 411) and 1:400 (Modular Analytics E170) onboard dilution, respectively, fell within the linear range of the assay, providing a final result on the first test. No high-dose hook effect was seen up to the maximum HBsAg serum level tested (870,000 IU/ml) using the dilution algorithm. HBsAg levels were reliably determined across all hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, phases of HBV infection, and stages of disease tested. Precision was high across all analyzers (% coefficient of variation [CV], 1.4 to 9.6; HBsAg concentrations, 0.1 to 37,300 IU/ml). The Elecsys HBsAg II quantitative assay accurately and reliably quantifies HBsAg in routine clinical samples. Onboard dilution minimizes retesting and reduces the potential for error. PMID:21880853

  12. Multicenter evaluation of the Elecsys hepatitis B surface antigen quantitative assay.

    PubMed

    Zacher, B J; Moriconi, F; Bowden, S; Hammond, R; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Phisalprapa, P; Tanwandee, T; Wursthorn, K; Brunetto, M R; Wedemeyer, H; Bonino, F

    2011-11-01

    The Elecsys hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) II quantitative assay is a new quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay which uses onboard dilution and a simple algorithm to determine HBsAg levels expressed in international units (IU)/ml (standardized against the World Health Organization [WHO] Second International Standard). This study evaluated its performance using routine serum samples from a wide range of HBsAg carriers and patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBsAg levels were measured in serum samples collected independently by five centers in Europe, Australia, and Asia. Serial dilution analyses were performed to assess the recommended dilution algorithm and determine the assay range free of hook effect. Assay precision was also established. Following assessment of serial dilutions (1:100 to 1:1,000,000) of the 611 samples analyzed, 70.0% and 85.6% of samples tested with analyzers incorporating 1:100 (Elecsys 2010 and cobas e 411) and 1:400 (Modular Analytics E170) onboard dilution, respectively, fell within the linear range of the assay, providing a final result on the first test. No high-dose hook effect was seen up to the maximum HBsAg serum level tested (870,000 IU/ml) using the dilution algorithm. HBsAg levels were reliably determined across all hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, phases of HBV infection, and stages of disease tested. Precision was high across all analyzers (% coefficient of variation [CV], 1.4 to 9.6; HBsAg concentrations, 0.1 to 37,300 IU/ml). The Elecsys HBsAg II quantitative assay accurately and reliably quantifies HBsAg in routine clinical samples. Onboard dilution minimizes retesting and reduces the potential for error.

  13. Performance of two real-time PCR assays for hepatitis B virus DNA detection and quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kania, Dramane; Ottomani, Laure; Meda, Nicolas; Peries, Marianne; Dujols, Pierre; Bolloré, Karine; Rénier, Wendy; Viljoen, Johannes; Ducos, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-06-01

    In-house developed real-time PCR (qPCR) techniques could be useful conjunctives to the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in resource-limited settings with high prevalence. Two qPCR assays (qPCR1 and qPCR2), based on primers/probes targeting conserved regions of the X and S genes of HBV respectively, were evaluated using clinical samples of varying HBV genotypes, and compared to the commercial Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV Test v2.0. The lower detection limit (LDL) was established at 104 IU/ml for qPCR1, and 91 IU/ml for qPCR2. Good agreement and correlation were obtained between the Roche assay and both qPCR assays (r = 0.834 for qPCR1; and r = 0.870 for qPCR2). Differences in HBV DNA load of > 0.5 Log10 IU/ml between the Roche and the qPCR assays were found in 49/122 samples of qPCR1, and 35/122 samples of qPCR2. qPCR1 tended to underestimate HBV DNA quantity in samples with a low viral load and overestimate HBV DNA concentration in samples with a high viral load when compared to the Roche test. Both molecular tools that were developed, used on an open real-time PCR system, were reliable for HBV DNA detection and quantitation. The qPCR2 performed better than the qPCR1 and had the additional advantage of various HBV genotype detection and quantitation. This low cost quantitative HBV DNA PCR assay may be an alternative solution when implementing national programmes to diagnose, monitor and treat HBV infection in low- to middle-income countries where testing for HBV DNA is not available in governmental health programmes.

  14. Low cost HIV-1 quantitative RT-PCR assay in resource-limited settings: improvement and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fibriani, Azzania; Farah, Nadya; Kusumadewi, Inri; Pas, Suzan D; van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre; Boucher, Charles A B; Schutten, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of HIV viral load in low and middle income settings is limited by high cost of the commercial assays. Therefore, we developed a novel RT-PCR quantitative assay was developed. This assay targets the HIV-1 pol integrase gene (INT). Subsequently, the performance of the INT assay, described previously as a Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) assay and a combined INT/LTR dual target RT-PCR assay was compared. The LTR-assay was found to be sensitive and cost-effective (50-70% cheaper than commercial assays) with the lowest coefficient of variation (%CV). Introduction of an internal standard further improved assay reliability. Therefore, this LTR assay was implemented in West Java, Indonesia. Linearity and precision of the LTR assay were good: %CV ranged from 1.0% to 10.4%. The limit of quantitation was 616 copies/ml. Performance was comparable with the commercial assay (Abbott assay) (r(2)=0.01), although on average the viral loads were 0.39 log(10)copies/ml lower. In clinical practice, it had excellent capability for monitoring treatment failure, the positive predictive value was 99% and the negative predictive value was 93%. In conclusion, the implementation of the improved HIV-1 viral load LTR-assay for routine diagnosis in resource poor settings can be a good alternative when commercial assays are unaffordable.

  15. A quantitative stopped-flow fluorescence assay for measuring polymerase elongation rates

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peng; Campagnola, Grace; Peersen, Olve B.

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of nucleic acid polymerase elongation rates is often done via a lengthy experimental process involving radiolabeled substrates, quenched elongation experiments, electrophoretic product separation, and band quantitation. In this work we describe an alternative real-time stopped-flow assay for obtaining kinetic parameters for elongation of extended sequences. The assay builds on our earlier PETE assay designed for high-throughput screening purposes (Anal. Biochem. 365, 194-200) and relies of measuring how long it takes a polymerase to reach the end of a defined length template. Using poliovirus polymerase and self-priming hairpin RNA substrates with 6 to 26 nucleotide long templating regions, we demonstrate that the assay can be used to determine Vmax rates for elongation and apparent Km values for NTP utilization. Modeling the reaction kinetics as a series of irreversible steps allows us to numerically fit the entire time-based dataset by properly accounting for the temporal distribution of intermediate species. This enables us to determine average elongation rates over heterogeneous templating regions that mimic viral genome substrates. The assay is easily extendable to other RNA and DNA polymerases, can accommodate secondary structures in the template, and can in principle be used for any enzyme traversing along an extended substrate. PMID:19406094

  16. Use of coefficient of variation in assessing variability of quantitative assays.

    PubMed

    Reed, George F; Lynn, Freyja; Meade, Bruce D

    2002-11-01

    We have derived the mathematical relationship between the coefficient of variation associated with repeated measurements from quantitative assays and the expected fraction of pairs of those measurements that differ by at least some given factor, i.e., the expected frequency of disparate results that are due to assay variability rather than true differences. Knowledge of this frequency helps determine what magnitudes of differences can be expected by chance alone when the particular coefficient of variation is in effect. This frequency is an operational index of variability in the sense that it indicates the probability of observing a particular disparity between two measurements under the assumption that they measure the same quantity. Thus the frequency or probability becomes the basis for assessing if an assay is sufficiently precise. This assessment also provides a standard for determining if two assay results for the same subject, separated by an intervention such as vaccination or infection, differ by more than expected from the variation of the assay, thus indicating an intervention effect. Data from an international collaborative study are used to illustrate the application of this proposed interpretation of the coefficient of variation, and they also provide support for the assumptions used in the mathematical derivation.

  17. Use of Coefficient of Variation in Assessing Variability of Quantitative Assays

    PubMed Central

    Reed, George F.; Lynn, Freyja; Meade, Bruce D.

    2002-01-01

    We have derived the mathematical relationship between the coefficient of variation associated with repeated measurements from quantitative assays and the expected fraction of pairs of those measurements that differ by at least some given factor, i.e., the expected frequency of disparate results that are due to assay variability rather than true differences. Knowledge of this frequency helps determine what magnitudes of differences can be expected by chance alone when the particular coefficient of variation is in effect. This frequency is an operational index of variability in the sense that it indicates the probability of observing a particular disparity between two measurements under the assumption that they measure the same quantity. Thus the frequency or probability becomes the basis for assessing if an assay is sufficiently precise. This assessment also provides a standard for determining if two assay results for the same subject, separated by an intervention such as vaccination or infection, differ by more than expected from the variation of the assay, thus indicating an intervention effect. Data from an international collaborative study are used to illustrate the application of this proposed interpretation of the coefficient of variation, and they also provide support for the assumptions used in the mathematical derivation. PMID:12414755

  18. Real-time PCR assay for rapid qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Erika; Perkátai, Katalin; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Farkas, Agnes; Kucsera, István

    2012-12-01

    Simple real-time PCR assay with one set of primer and probe for rapid, sensitive qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica has been used. Consensus sequences were used to amplify a species-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probes were used for detection in a LightCycler platform (Roche). The anchor probe sequence was designed to be a perfect match for the 16S rRNA gene of Entamoeba species, while the acceptor probe sequence was designed for Entamoeba histolytica, which allowed differentiation. The performed characteristics of the real-time PCR assay were compared with ELISA antigen and microscopical detection from 77 samples of individuals with suspected clinical diagnosis of imported E. histolytica infection. Stool and liver abscess pus samples were examined with analytical sensitivity of 5 parasites per PCR reaction. The melting curve means Tms (standard deviation) in clinical isolates were 54°C. The real-time assay was 100% sensitive and specific for differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, compared with conventional ELISA or microscopy. This real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis is rapid, and specific for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica. The suitability for routine use of this assay in clinical diagnostic laboratories is discussed.

  19. Quantitative rRNA-targeted solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-12-01

    The potential of a solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) molecular beacon (MB) probes to quantify 16S rRNA of specific populations in RNA extracts of environmental samples was evaluated by designing PNA MB probes for the genera Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma. In a kinetic study with 16S rRNA from pure cultures, the hybridization of PNA MB to target 16S rRNA exhibited a higher final hybridization signal and a lower apparent rate constant than the hybridizations to nontarget 16S rRNAs. A concentration of 10 mM NaCl in the hybridization buffer was found to be optimal for maximizing the difference between final hybridization signals from target and nontarget 16S rRNAs. Hybridization temperatures and formamide concentrations in hybridization buffers were optimized to minimize signals from hybridizations of PNA MB to nontarget 16S rRNAs. The detection limit of the PNA MB hybridization assay was determined to be 1.6 nM of 16S rRNA. To establish proof for the application of PNA MB hybridization assays in complex systems, target 16S rRNA from Dechlorosoma suillum was spiked at different levels to RNA isolated from an environmental (bioreactor) sample, and the PNA MB assay enabled effective quantification of the D. suillum RNA in this complex mixture. For another environmental sample, the quantitative results from the PNA MB hybridization assay were compared with those from clone libraries.

  20. Detection of Thielaviopsis basicola in soil with real-time quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junli; Kang, Zhenhui

    2010-07-20

    Thielaviopsis basicola is a soil-borne fungus with a wide host range and a cosmopolitan distribution. It causes disease on many agricultural crops and in China it is the causal agent of black root rot on tobacco plant. Early diagnosis and detection of the pathogen in soil are critical to control this disease in field. The objective of this study was to develop sensitive and effective methods suitable for large-scale detection and quantification of T. basicola. Based on the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of Thielaviopsis spp, primers and TaqMan probe were designed specifically to amplify DNA from T. basicola and real-time, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed for rapid, specific and sensitive detection and quantification of T. basicola. It was sensitive with the detection limit of 100 fg microl(-1) genomic DNA of T. basicola in qPCR assays. By combining the qPCR assays with the efficient protocol to extract DNA from soil, it was possible to achieve real-time detection of T. basicola in soil in 4-5 h and the detection limit of 3 conidia per reaction in qPCR was recorded. The assays were applied to survey soils from tobacco fields in China for the presence of T. basicola and the analyses of naturally infested soil showed the reliability of the qPCR assays.

  1. Development of a quantitative recombinase polymerase amplification assay with an internal positive control.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary A; Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-03-30

    It was recently demonstrated that recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), an isothermal amplification platform for pathogen detection, may be used to quantify DNA sample concentration using a standard curve. In this manuscript, a detailed protocol for developing and implementing a real-time quantitative recombinase polymerase amplification assay (qRPA assay) is provided. Using HIV-1 DNA quantification as an example, the assembly of real-time RPA reactions, the design of an internal positive control (IPC) sequence, and co-amplification of the IPC and target of interest are all described. Instructions and data processing scripts for the construction of a standard curve using data from multiple experiments are provided, which may be used to predict the concentration of unknown samples or assess the performance of the assay. Finally, an alternative method for collecting real-time fluorescence data with a microscope and a stage heater as a step towards developing a point-of-care qRPA assay is described. The protocol and scripts provided may be used for the development of a qRPA assay for any DNA target of interest.

  2. Specific PCR and real-time PCR assays for detection and quantitation of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'.

    PubMed

    Jawhari, Maan; Abrahamian, Peter; Sater, Ali Abdel; Sobh, Hana; Tawidian, Patil; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Almond witches' broom (AlmWB) is a fast-spreading lethal disease of almond, peach and nectarine associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'. The development of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for the sensitive and specific detection of the phytoplasma is of prime importance for early detection of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and for epidemiological studies. The developed qPCR assay herein uses a TaqMan(®) probe labeled with Black Hole Quencher Plus. The specificity of the PCR and that of the qPCR detection protocols were tested on 17 phytoplasma isolates belonging to 11 phytoplasma 16S rRNA groups, on samples of almond, peach, nectarine, native plants and insects infected or uninfected with the phytoplasma. The developed assays showed high specificity against 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and no cross-reactivity against any other phytoplasma, plant or insect tested. The sensitivity of the developed PCR and qPCR assays was similar to the conventional nested PCR protocol using universal primers. The qPCR assay was further validated by quantitating AlmWB phytoplasma in different hosts, plant parts and potential insect vectors. The highest titers of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' were detected in the phloem tissues of stems and roots of almond and nectarine trees, where they averaged from 10(5) to 10(6) genomic units per nanogram of host DNA (GU/ng of DNA). The newly developed PCR and qPCR protocols are reliable, specific and sensitive methods that are easily applicable to high-throughput diagnosis of AlmWB in plants and insects and can be used for surveys of potential vectors and alternative hosts.

  3. BactQuant: An enhanced broad-coverage bacterial quantitative real-time PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial load quantification is a critical component of bacterial community analysis, but a culture-independent method capable of detecting and quantifying diverse bacteria is needed. Based on our analysis of a diverse collection of 16 S rRNA gene sequences, we designed a broad-coverage quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay—BactQuant—for quantifying 16 S rRNA gene copy number and estimating bacterial load. We further utilized in silico evaluation to complement laboratory-based qPCR characterization to validate BactQuant. Methods The aligned core set of 4,938 16 S rRNA gene sequences in the Greengenes database were analyzed for assay design. Cloned plasmid standards were generated and quantified using a qPCR-based approach. Coverage analysis was performed computationally using >670,000 sequences and further evaluated following the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines. Results A bacterial TaqMan® qPCR assay targeting a 466 bp region in V3-V4 was designed. Coverage analysis showed that 91% of the phyla, 96% of the genera, and >80% of the 89,537 species analyzed contained at least one perfect sequence match to the BactQuant assay. Of the 106 bacterial species evaluated, amplification efficiencies ranged from 81 to 120%, with r2-value of >0.99, including species with sequence mismatches. Inter- and intra-run coefficient of variance was <3% and <16% for Ct and copy number, respectively. Conclusions The BactQuant assay offers significantly broader coverage than a previously reported universal bacterial quantification assay BactQuant in vitro performance was better than the in silico predictions. PMID:22510143

  4. A universal, high recovery assay for protein quantitation through temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC).

    PubMed

    Orton, Dennis J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-03-15

    As an alternative to direct UV absorbance measurements, estimation of total protein concentration is typically conducted through colorimetric reagent assays. However, for protein-limited applications, the proportion of the sample sacrificed to the assay becomes increasingly significant. This work demonstrates a method for quantitation of protein samples with high recovery. Temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC) with absorbance detection at 214nm permits accurate estimation of total protein concentration from samples containing as little as 0.75μg. The method incorporates a temperature gradient from 25 to 80°C to facilitate elution of total protein into a single fraction. Analyte recovery, as measured from 1 and 10μg protein extracts of Escherichia coli, is shown to exceed 93%. Extinction coefficients at 214nm were calculated across the human proteome, providing a relative standard deviation of 21% (versus 42% at 280nm), suggesting absorbance values at 214nm provide a more consistent measure of protein concentration. These results translate to a universal protein detection strategy exhibiting a coefficient of variation below 10%. Together with the sensitivity and tolerance to contaminants, TPLC with UV detection is a favorable alternative to colorimetric assay for total protein quantitation, particularly in sample-limited applications.

  5. Validation of a quantitative PCR assay for detection and quantification of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carolyn S; Wight, Nate; Crosson, Lisa M; White, Samuel J; Strenge, Robyn M

    2014-04-01

    Withering syndrome (WS), a serious disease affecting abalone Haliotis spp., is caused by infection from an intracellular Rickettsia-like organism (WS-RLO). Diagnosis of the disease currently relies on a combination of histological examination and molecular methods (in situ hybridization, standard PCR, and sequence analysis). However, these techniques only provide a semi-quantitative assessment of bacterial load. We created a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to specifically identify and enumerate bacterial loads of WS-RLO in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples based on 16S rDNA gene copy numbers. The qPCR assay designed to detect DNA of the WS-RLO was validated according to standards set by the World Organisation for Animal Health. Standard curves derived from purified plasmid dilutions were linear across 7 logs of concentration, and efficiencies ranged from 90.2 to 97.4%. The limit of detection was 3 gene copies per reaction. Diagnostic sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 99.8%. The qPCR assay was robust, as evidenced by its high level of repeatability and reproducibility. This study has shown for the first time that WS-RLO DNA can be detected and quantified in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples. The ability to detect and quantify RLO gene copies in a variety of materials will enable us to better understand transmission dynamics in both farmed and natural environments. PMID:24695238

  6. A universal, high recovery assay for protein quantitation through temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC).

    PubMed

    Orton, Dennis J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-03-15

    As an alternative to direct UV absorbance measurements, estimation of total protein concentration is typically conducted through colorimetric reagent assays. However, for protein-limited applications, the proportion of the sample sacrificed to the assay becomes increasingly significant. This work demonstrates a method for quantitation of protein samples with high recovery. Temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC) with absorbance detection at 214nm permits accurate estimation of total protein concentration from samples containing as little as 0.75μg. The method incorporates a temperature gradient from 25 to 80°C to facilitate elution of total protein into a single fraction. Analyte recovery, as measured from 1 and 10μg protein extracts of Escherichia coli, is shown to exceed 93%. Extinction coefficients at 214nm were calculated across the human proteome, providing a relative standard deviation of 21% (versus 42% at 280nm), suggesting absorbance values at 214nm provide a more consistent measure of protein concentration. These results translate to a universal protein detection strategy exhibiting a coefficient of variation below 10%. Together with the sensitivity and tolerance to contaminants, TPLC with UV detection is a favorable alternative to colorimetric assay for total protein quantitation, particularly in sample-limited applications. PMID:23435344

  7. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test. PMID:26491289

  8. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site "yes" or "no" determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test.

  9. Multiple reaction monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring cubed based assays for the quantitation of apolipoprotein F.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinav; Gangadharan, Bevin; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-10-15

    Apolipoprotein F (APO-F) is a novel low abundance liver fibrosis biomarker and its concentration decreases in human serum and plasma across liver fibrosis stages. Current antibody based assays for APO-F suffer from limitations such as unspecific binding, antibody availability and undetectable target if the protein is degraded; and so an antibody-free assay has the potential to be a valuable diagnostic tool. We report an antibody-free, rapid, sensitive, selective and robust LC-MS/MS (MRM and MRM(3)) method for the detection and quantitation of APO-F in healthy human plasma. With further analysis of clinical samples, this LC-MS based method could be established as the first ever antibody-free biomarker assay for liver fibrosis. We explain the use of Skyline software for peptide selection and the creation of a reference library to aid in true peak identification of endogenous APO-F peptides in digests of human plasma without protein or peptide enrichment. Detection of a glycopeptide using MRM-EPI mode and reduction of interferences using MRM3 are explained. The amount of APO-F in human plasma from a healthy volunteer was determined to be 445.2ng/mL, the coefficient of variation (CV) of precision for 20 injections was <12% and the percentage error of each point along the calibration curve was calculated to be <8%, which is in line with the assay requirements for clinical samples. PMID:27592286

  10. A quantitative comet assay: imaging and analysis of virus plaques formed with a liquid overlay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Yin, John

    2007-01-01

    Although the plaque assay defines a "gold-standard" for measuring virus infectivity, its reliance on plaque counting limits its sensitivity. When the assay is performed with a liquid overlay, instead of agar overlay, spontaneous flows can promote a uni-directional spread of infection, creating elongated regions of cytopathology that resemble comets. As a model system comet and plaque cultures of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) on baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells were compared. Host-cell monolayers were infected with VSV particles, incubated 15 h in the presence of liquid or agar overlays and stained. VSV formed significantly larger comets than plaques, consistent with a mechanism of flow-enhanced spread. When antiviral drug (5-fluorouracil) was incorporated into the liquid overlay, comet sizes were reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Images of infected monolayers, acquired using a simple digital scanner, enabled a quantification of the inhibitory effect of the drug on infectivity. The resulting measure of drug susceptibility was found to be 18-fold more sensitive than the IC(50) measure attained by the traditional plaque-reduction assay. This quantitative comet assay has the potential to similarly enhance the sensitivity of infection measures for other plaque-forming viruses. PMID:17092573

  11. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  12. Multiple reaction monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring cubed based assays for the quantitation of apolipoprotein F.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinav; Gangadharan, Bevin; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-10-15

    Apolipoprotein F (APO-F) is a novel low abundance liver fibrosis biomarker and its concentration decreases in human serum and plasma across liver fibrosis stages. Current antibody based assays for APO-F suffer from limitations such as unspecific binding, antibody availability and undetectable target if the protein is degraded; and so an antibody-free assay has the potential to be a valuable diagnostic tool. We report an antibody-free, rapid, sensitive, selective and robust LC-MS/MS (MRM and MRM(3)) method for the detection and quantitation of APO-F in healthy human plasma. With further analysis of clinical samples, this LC-MS based method could be established as the first ever antibody-free biomarker assay for liver fibrosis. We explain the use of Skyline software for peptide selection and the creation of a reference library to aid in true peak identification of endogenous APO-F peptides in digests of human plasma without protein or peptide enrichment. Detection of a glycopeptide using MRM-EPI mode and reduction of interferences using MRM3 are explained. The amount of APO-F in human plasma from a healthy volunteer was determined to be 445.2ng/mL, the coefficient of variation (CV) of precision for 20 injections was <12% and the percentage error of each point along the calibration curve was calculated to be <8%, which is in line with the assay requirements for clinical samples.

  13. A quantitative minimally invasive assay for the detection of metals in the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Cullander, C; Jeske, S; Imbert, D; Grant, P G; Bench, G

    2000-03-01

    A quantitative, minimally invasive tape-stripping assay for the detection of metals on and in skin that also has application to the detection of metallic elements on dry surfaces (where human contact could occur) has been developed. This development included construction, using commercial products, of an approximately 25 microm thick, low-metal content tape suitable both for tape-stripping and elemental analysis. Individual tapes were sequentially applied to the skin surface and then removed, taking with them a sample of the dead outer layer of the skin (stratum corneum). Analysis of such tape strip samples by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)--a well-characterized, sensitive, analytical technique based on X-ray spectrometry--identified and accurately quantified the metals in the sample. The assay had elemental sensitivities of approximately 1 ng/cm2 for many metals and analysis of elemental contents could be performed in as little as 5 min. The feasibility of the assay for measuring metals in the stratum corneum was demonstrated on the forearms of healthy human volunteers. Samples from approximately half the subjects were found to contain zirconium, possibly arising from the use of roll-on antiperspirants. The assay has potential as a tool: (1) for risk assessment, (2) to identify exposure levels following possible contact with a hazardous metal, and (3) to determine the effectiveness of cleanup or removal measures. PMID:10719909

  14. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Thermophilic Spore-Forming Geobacillus stearothermophilus in Canned Food.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic spore forming bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus is recognized as a major cause of spoilage in canned food. A quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to specifically detect and quantify the species G. stearothermophilus in samples from canned food. The selected primer pairs amplified a 163-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene in a specific PCR assay with a detection limit of 12.5 fg of pure culture DNA, corresponding to DNA extracted from approximately 0.7 CFU/mL of G. stearothermophilus. Analysis showed that the bacterial species G. stearothermophilus was not detected in any canned food sample. Our approach presented here will be useful for tracking or quantifying species G. stearotethermophilus in canned food and ingredients. PMID:26412704

  15. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  16. Timed ELISA: an alternative approach to quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Muller, R

    1997-10-01

    As the uses for ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) increase, so does the need for a quantitative procedure that does not require a spectrophotometer or other expensive equipment. 'Timed ELISA' employs an 'iodine clock' as the final step such that quantitative measurements may be made using a stopwatch. Catalase, coupled to the primary antibody, reduces the concentration of H2O2 available to generate iodine in the clock reaction. Iodine stains the starch component blue, but catalase prolongs the time taken for the change in colour to be observed. After the time delay occurs the transition to full colour development is extremely rapid (< 1 s) at all analyte concentrations, allowing clear definition of the end point. The performance of Timed ELISA is similar to that obtained using a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated system employing the customary spectrophotometric determination. PMID:9357102

  17. Portable paper-based device for quantitative colorimetric assays relying on light reflectance principle.

    PubMed

    Li, Bowei; Fu, Longwen; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel paper-based analytical device based on the colorimetric paper assays through its light reflectance. The device is portable, low cost (<20 dollars), and lightweight (only 176 g) that is available to assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of the original health care or on-site detection information. Based on the light reflectance principle, the signal can be obtained directly, stably and user-friendly in our device. We demonstrated the utility and broad applicability of this technique with measurements of different biological and pollution target samples (BSA, glucose, Fe, and nitrite). Moreover, the real samples of Fe (II) and nitrite in the local tap water were successfully analyzed, and compared with the standard UV absorption method, the quantitative results showed good performance, reproducibility, and reliability. This device could provide quantitative information very conveniently and show great potential to broad fields of resource-limited analysis, medical diagnostics, and on-site environmental detection.

  18. Importance of Purity Evaluation and the Potential of Quantitative 1H NMR as a Purity Assay

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In any biomedical and chemical context, a truthful description of chemical constitution requires coverage of both structure and purity. This qualification affects all drug molecules, regardless of development stage (early discovery to approved drug) and source (natural product or synthetic). Purity assessment is particularly critical in discovery programs and whenever chemistry is linked with biological and/or therapeutic outcome. Compared with chromatography and elemental analysis, quantitative NMR (qNMR) uses nearly universal detection and provides a versatile and orthogonal means of purity evaluation. Absolute qNMR with flexible calibration captures analytes that frequently escape detection (water, sorbents). Widely accepted structural NMR workflows require minimal or no adjustments to become practical 1H qNMR (qHNMR) procedures with simultaneous qualitative and (absolute) quantitative capability. This study reviews underlying concepts, provides a framework for standard qHNMR purity assays, and shows how adequate accuracy and precision are achieved for the intended use of the material. PMID:25295852

  19. A quantitative TaqMan PCR assay for the detection of Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucas M; Amorim, Aline T; Martins, Hellen Braga; Rezende, Izadora Souza; Barbosa, Maysa Santos; Lobão, Tassia Neves; Campos, Guilherme B; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2013-12-27

    Ureaplasma diversum in veterinary studies is an undesirable microbe, which may cause infection in bulls and may result in seminal vesiculitis, balanopostitis, and alterations in spermatozoids, whereas in cows, it may cause placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion, and birth of weak calves. U. diversum is released through organic secretions, especially semen, preputial and vaginal mucus, conjunctival secretion, and milk. The aim of the present study was to develop a TaqMan probe, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and quantification of U. diversum from genital swabs of bovines. Primers and probes specific to U. diversum 16S rRNA gene were designed. The specificity, detection limit, intra- and inter-assay variability of qPCR to detect this ureaplasma was compared with the results of the conventional PCR assay (cPCR). Swabs of vaginal mucus from 169 cows were tested. The qPCR assay detected as few as 10 copies of U. diversum and was 100-fold more sensitive than the cPCR. No cross-reactivity with other Mollicutes or eubacteria was observed. U. diversum was detected in 79 swabs (46.42%) by qPCR, while using cPCR it was detected in 42 (25%) samples. The difference in cPCR and qPCR ureaplasma detection between healthy and sick animals was not statistically significant. But the U. diversum load in samples from animals with genital disorders was higher than in healthy animals. The qPCR assay developed herein is highly sensitive and specific for the detection and quantification of U. diversum in vaginal bovine samples.

  20. Flow Cytometry and Transplantation-Based Quantitative Assays for Satellite Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arpke, Robert W; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In response to muscle damage, satellite cells proliferate and undertake both differentiation and self-renewal, generating new functional muscle tissue and repopulating this new muscle with stem cells for future injury responses. For many questions relating to the physiological regulation of satellite cells, quantitative readouts of self-renewal and differentiation can be very useful. There is a particular need for a quantitative assay for satellite cell self-renewal that does not rely solely upon sectioning, staining and counting cells in sections. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods for quantifying the self-renewal and differentiation potential of a given population of satellite cells using an assay involving transplantation into injured, regenerating muscle together with specific markers for donor cell identity and state of differentiation. In particular, using the Pax7-ZsGreen transgene as a marker of satellite cell state, self-renewal can be quantified by FACS on transplanted muscle to actually count the total number of resident satellite cells at time points following transplantation.

  1. Evaluation of a Quantitative Serological Assay for Diagnosing Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuka; Suzuki, Hokuto; Doushita, Kazushi; Kuroda, Hikaru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Tadakatsu; Fujikane, Toshiaki; Osanai, Shinobu; Sasaki, Takaaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of a quantitative Aspergillus IgG assay for diagnosing chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. We examined Aspergillus-specific IgG levels in patients who met the following criteria: (i) chronic (duration of >3 months) pulmonary or systemic symptoms, (ii) radiological evidence of a progressive (over months or years) pulmonary lesion with surrounding inflammation, and (iii) no major discernible immunocompromising factors. Anti-Aspergillus IgG serum levels were retrospectively analyzed according to defined classifications. Mean Aspergillus IgG levels were significantly higher in the proven group than those in the possible and control groups (P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the Aspergillus IgG cutoff value for diagnosing proven cases was 50 mg of antigen-specific antibodies/liter (area under the curve, 0.94; sensitivity, 0.98; specificity, 0.84). The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing proven cases using this cutoff were 0.77 and 0.78, respectively. The positive rates of Aspergillus IgG in the proven and possible groups were 97.9% and 39.2%, respectively, whereas that of the control group was 6.6%. The quantitative Aspergillus IgG assay offers reliable sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing chronic pulmonary aspergillosis and may be an alternative to the conventional precipitin test. PMID:27008878

  2. A Caco-2 cell-based quantitative antioxidant activity assay for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongxia; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xiangying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    A Caco-2 cell-based antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantitative evaluation of antioxidants was developed by optimizing seeding density and culture time of Caco-2 cells, incubation time and concentration of fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, DCFH-DA), incubation way and incubation time of antioxidants (pure phytochemicals) and DCFH-DA with cells, and detection time of fluorescence. Results showed that the CAA assay was of good reproducibility and could be used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of antioxidants at the following conditions: seeding density of 5 × 10(4)/well, cell culture time of 24h, co-incubation of 60 μM DCFH-DA and pure phytochemicals with Caco-2 cells for 20 min and fluorescence recorded for 90 min. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between CAA values and rat plasma ORAC values following the intake of antioxidants for selected pure phytochemicals (R(2) = 0.815, p < 0.01), demonstrating the good biological relevance of CAA assay.

  3. A smartphone-readable barcode assay for the detection and quantitation of pesticide residues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juan; Wong, Jessica X H; Cui, Caie; Li, Xiaochun; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2015-08-21

    In this paper, we present a smartphone-readable barcode assay for the qualitative detection of methyl parathion residues, a toxic organophosphorus pesticide that is popularly used in agriculture worldwide. The detection principle is based on the irreversible inhibition of the enzymatic activity of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) by methyl parathion; AchE catalytically hydrolyzes acetylthiocholine iodine to thiocholine that in turn dissociates dithiobis-nitrobenzoate to produce a yellow product (deprotonated thio-nitrobenzoate). The yellow intensity of the product was confirmed to be inversely dependent on the concentration of the pesticide. We have designed a barcode-formatted assay chip by using a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) channel plate (as the reaction reservoir), situated under a printed partial barcode, to complete the whole barcode such that it can be directly read by a barcode scanning app installed on a smartphone. The app is able to qualitatively present the result of the pesticide test; the absence or a low concentration of methyl parathion results in the barcode reading as "-", identifying the test as negative for pesticides. Upon obtaining a positive result (the app reads a "+" character), the captured image can be further analyzed to quantitate the methyl parathion concentration in the sample. Besides the portability and simplicity, this mobile-app based colorimetric barcode assay compares favorably with the standard spectrophotometric method. PMID:26087169

  4. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  5. Determination of infectious retrovirus concentration from colony-forming assay with quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Jik; Hung, Gene; Anderson, W French; Peng, Ching-An; Yu, Hong

    2003-05-01

    The colony formation assay is the most commonly used titration method for defining the concentration of replication-incompetent murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vectors. However, titer varies with target cell type and number, transduction time, and concentration of polycation (e.g., Polybrene). Moreover, because most of the viruses cannot encounter target cells due to Brownian motion, their short half-lives, and the requirement for target cell division for activity, the actual infectious retrovirus concentration in the collected supernatant is higher than the viral titer. Here we correlate the physical viral particle concentration with the infectious virus concentration and colony formation titer with the help of a mathematical model. Ecotropic murine leukemia retrovirus supernatant, collected from the GP+E86/LNCX retroviral vector producer cell line, was concentrated by centrifugation and further purified by a sucrose density gradient. The physical concentration of purified viral vectors was determined by direct particle counting with an electron microscope. The concentrations of fresh and concentrated supernatant were determined by a quantitative reverse transcriptase activity assay. Titration of all supernatants by neomycin-resistant colony formation assay was also performed. There were 767 +/- 517 physical viral particles per infectious CFU in the crude viral supernatant. However, the infectious viral concentration determined by mathematical simulation was 143 viral particles per infectious unit, which is more consistent with the concentration determined by particle counting in purified viral solution. Our results suggest that the mathematical model can be used to extract a more accurate and reliable concentration of infectious retrovirus.

  6. Effect of purification followed by solubilization of receptor material on quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Smisterová, J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1996-08-01

    In order to optimize quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergics, the different receptor preparations resulting from the purification and the solubilization of the P2 pellet from the calf striatum were evaluated. The dissociation constants for two chemically different anticholinergics, the tertiary amine scopolamine and the quaternary amine oxyphenonium, were calculated from inhibition studies of 3H-NMS binding in buffer and plasma. The Kd values for both anticholinergics were similar for all the membrane-bound receptor preparations (unpurified and the purified P2 pellet) either in buffer or in plasma. More pronounced differences were observed between the membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. By introducing the solubilized receptor as well, differences between the individual anticholinergics appeared. On the one hand, for scopolamine, a gain in sensitivity of 1.5-2.8 in plasma was observed for the solubilized receptor. On the other hand, in the case of oxyphenonium, a dramatic loss in sensitivity (by a factor of about 24) was observed with the solubilized receptor, as compared to the membrane-bound receptor, in buffer. Very interestingly, however, when the solubilized receptor was used in plasma, a lowering of the Kd value was found for both anticholinergics, i.e. the assays became more sensitive. Such an effect (not observed for the membrane-bound receptor) could be obtained only when the percentage of digitonin present in the assay was at least 0.12% (w/v) or higher. PMID:8877848

  7. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Timothy A.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  8. Rapid Detection of Ceratocystis platani Inoculum by Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Luisa; Belbahri, Lassaâd; Quartier, Marion; Santini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis platani is the causal agent of canker stain of plane trees, a lethal disease able to kill mature trees in one or two successive growing seasons. The pathogen is a quarantine organism and has a negative impact on anthropogenic and natural populations of plane trees. Contaminated sawdust produced during pruning and sanitation fellings can contribute to disease spread. The goal of this study was to design a rapid, real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect a C. platani airborne inoculum. Airborne inoculum traps (AITs) were placed in an urban setting in the city of Florence, Italy, where the disease was present. Primers and TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes were designed to target cerato-platanin (CP) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) genes. The detection limits of the assay were 0.05 pg/μl and 2 fg/μl of fungal DNA for CP and ITS, respectively. Pathogen detection directly from AITs demonstrated specificity and high sensitivity for C. platani, detecting DNA concentrations as low as 1.2 × 10−2 to 1.4 × 10−2 pg/μl, corresponding to ∼10 conidia per ml. Airborne inoculum traps were able to detect the C. platani inoculum within 200 m of the closest symptomatic infected plane tree. The combination of airborne trapping and real-time quantitative PCR assay provides a rapid and sensitive method for the specific detection of a C. platani inoculum. This technique may be used to identify the period of highest risk of pathogen spread in a site, thus helping disease management. PMID:23811499

  9. Performance evaluation of new automated hepatitis B viral markers in the clinical laboratory: two quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen assays and an HBV core-related antigen assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongjung; Hong, Duck Jin; Shin, Saeam; Cho, Yonggeun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) assays and a hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) assay. A total of 529 serum samples from patients with hepatitis B were tested. HBsAg levels were determined by using the Elecsys (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and Architect (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) qHBsAg assays. HBcrAg was measured by using Lumipulse HBcrAg assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). Serum aminotransferases and HBV DNA were respectively quantified by using the Hitachi 7600 analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies, Tokyo, Japan) and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test (Roche). Precision of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays was assessed, and linearity of the qHBsAg assays was verified. All assays showed good precision performance with coefficients of variation between 4.5% and 5.3% except for some levels. Both qHBsAg assays showed linearity from 0.1 to 12,000.0 IU/mL and correlated well (r = 0.9934). HBsAg levels correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.3373) and with HBcrAg (r = 0.5164), and HBcrAg also correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.5198; P < .0001). This observation could provide impetus for further research to elucidate the clinical usefulness of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays.

  10. Quantitation of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in fecal samples by direct immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, L; Herd, R P

    1993-01-01

    The lack of quick, simple, and sensitive quantitative tests has impeded studies on infection patterns and treatment of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. A quantitative direct immunofluorescence assay (FA) using a commercial FA kit was developed and evaluated. Recovery rates of the FA for Cryptosporidium oocysts in calf feces seeded with 1,000, 10,000, 100,000, and 1,000,000 oocysts per g were 14.8, 40.8, 84.2, and 78.2%, respectively. Interassay coefficients of variation were 10.6 to 47.1%. Recovery rates of the FA for Giardia cysts in feces seeded with 1,000, 10,000, and 100,000 cysts per g were 76.4, 96.9, and 89.6%, respectively. Interassay coefficients of variation were 7.4 to 22.1%. By comparison, recovery rates of Giardia cyst by sucrose gradient flotation were only 20.5, 51.2, and 42.9%, respectively. Counts of cysts-per-gram obtained by sucrose gradient flotation with samples from calves, lambs, and ewes were only 49.1 to 54.8% of those obtained by the FA. Zinc sulfate flotation detected only 36.4% of infections when there were < or = 1,000 cysts per g. The quantitative FA offers a useful technique for epidemiological and control studies of these two parasites. PMID:8263179

  11. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics.

  12. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assays for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Scabies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Samson S. Y.; Poon, Rosana W. S.; Chau, Sandy; Wong, Sally C. Y.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Fung, Kitty S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Scabies remains the most prevalent, endemic, and neglected ectoparasitic infestation globally and can cause institutional outbreaks. The sensitivity of routine microscopy for demonstration of Sarcoptes scabiei mites or eggs in skin scrapings is only about 50%. Except for three studies using conventional or two-tube nested PCR on a small number of cases, no systematic study has been performed to improve the laboratory diagnosis of this important infection. We developed a conventional and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of S. scabiei. The cox1 gene is relatively well conserved, with its sequence having no high levels of similarity to the sequences of other human skin mites, pathogenic zoonotic mites, or common house dust mite species. This mitochondrial gene is also present in large quantities in arthropod cells, potentially improving the sensitivity of a PCR-based assay. In our study, both assays were specific and were more sensitive than microscopy in diagnosing scabies, with positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The S. scabiei DNA copy number in the microscopy-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in the microscopy-negative specimens (median S. scabiei DNA copy number, 3.604 versus 2.457 log10 copies per reaction; P = 0.0213). In the patient with crusted scabies, the qPCR assay performed on lesional skin swabs instead of scrapings revealed that the parasite DNA load took about 2 weeks to become negative after treatment. The utility of using lesional skin swabs as an alternative sample for diagnosis of scabies by PCR should be further evaluated. PMID:25903566

  13. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  14. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assays for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Scabies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Poon, Rosana W S; Chau, Sandy; Wong, Sally C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Fung, Kitty S C; Yuen, K Y

    2015-07-01

    Scabies remains the most prevalent, endemic, and neglected ectoparasitic infestation globally and can cause institutional outbreaks. The sensitivity of routine microscopy for demonstration of Sarcoptes scabiei mites or eggs in skin scrapings is only about 50%. Except for three studies using conventional or two-tube nested PCR on a small number of cases, no systematic study has been performed to improve the laboratory diagnosis of this important infection. We developed a conventional and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of S. scabiei. The cox1 gene is relatively well conserved, with its sequence having no high levels of similarity to the sequences of other human skin mites, pathogenic zoonotic mites, or common house dust mite species. This mitochondrial gene is also present in large quantities in arthropod cells, potentially improving the sensitivity of a PCR-based assay. In our study, both assays were specific and were more sensitive than microscopy in diagnosing scabies, with positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The S. scabiei DNA copy number in the microscopy-positive specimens was significantly higher than that in the microscopy-negative specimens (median S. scabiei DNA copy number, 3.604 versus 2.457 log10 copies per reaction; P = 0.0213). In the patient with crusted scabies, the qPCR assay performed on lesional skin swabs instead of scrapings revealed that the parasite DNA load took about 2 weeks to become negative after treatment. The utility of using lesional skin swabs as an alternative sample for diagnosis of scabies by PCR should be further evaluated. PMID:25903566

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Fecal Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  16. Quantitative and robust assay to measure cell-cell contact assembly and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Nola, Sébastien; Erasmus, Jennifer C; Braga, Vania M M

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial junction formation and maintenance are multistep processes that rely on the clustering of macromolecular complexes. These events are highly regulated by signalling pathways that involve Rho small GTPases. Usually, when analysing the contribution of different components of Rho-dependent pathways to cell-cell adhesion, the localisation of adhesion receptors at junctions is evaluated by immunofluorescence. However, we find that this method has limitations on the quantification (dynamic range), ability to detect partial phenotypes and to differentiate between the participation of a given regulatory protein in assembly and/or maintenance of cell-cell contacts.In this chapter, we describe a suitable method, the aggregation assay, in which we adapted a quantitative strategy to allow objective and reproducible detection of partial phenotypes. Importantly, this methodology estimates the ability of cells to form junctions and their resistance to mechanical shearing forces (stabilisation).

  17. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  18. LUCID: A Quantitative Assay of ESCRT-Mediated Cargo Sorting into Multivesicular Bodies.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Daniel P; Merz, Alexey J

    2015-12-01

    Endosomes are transportation nodes, mediating selective transport of soluble and transmembrane cargos to and from the Golgi apparatus, plasma membrane and lysosomes. As endosomes mature to become multivesicular bodies (MVBs), Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRTs) selectively incorporate transmembrane cargos into vesicles that bud into the endosome lumen. Luminal vesicles and their cargoes are targeted for destruction when MVBs fuse with lysosomes. Common assays of endosomal luminal targeting, including fluorescence microscopy and monitoring of proteolytic cargo maturation, possess significant limitations. We present a quantitative assay system called LUCID (LUCiferase reporter of Intraluminal Deposition) that monitors exposure of chimeric luciferase-cargo reporters to cytosol. Luciferase-chimera signal increases when sorting to the endosome lumen is disrupted, and silencing of signal from the chimera depends upon luminal delivery of the reporter rather than proteolytic degradation. The system presents several advantages, including rapidity, microscale operation and a high degree of reproducibility that enables detection of subtle phenotypic differences. Luciferase reporters provide linear signal over an extremely broad dynamic range, allowing analysis of reporter traffic even at anemic levels of expression. Furthermore, LUCID reports transport kinetics when applied to inducible trafficking reporters.

  19. A rapid and quantitative assay for measuring neutralizing antibodies of Coxsackievirus B3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Wu, Xing; Mao, Qunying; Gao, Fan; Hao, Xiaotian; Bian, Lianlian; Zhu, Fengcai; Li, Wenhui; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-06-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection has been found to account for an increasing proportion cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in recent epidemiology studies. CVB3 is a single stranded, non-enveloped RNA virus and the infection can cause prominent health threat to pre-school children. Here, by taking approaches of reverse genetics, we established a single-round infection system for CVB3. The pseudovirus was produced by sequential transfection of CVB3 capsid expresser plasmid and CVB3 replicon RNA bearing firefly luciferase as a reporter. The CVB3 pseudovirus system was used for quantifying neutralizing antibody (NtAb) levels of 720 human serum samples and showed superior specificity and sensitivity comparing traditional cytopathic effect (CPE) assay. Furthermore, we compared the seroprevalence of CVB3 NtAbs in pre-school children and healthy adults, and found that only 11.94% of pre-school children were NtAbs positive which suggested that most children were naive to CVB3 infection; while there is much higher positive rate in adults (60%) indicating that most adults have experienced CVB3 infection during childhood. This rapid and quantitative assay greatly facilitates evaluating the level of NtAbs against CVB3 in populations and will help to advance CVB3 vaccine development. PMID:26947399

  20. A quantitative chemiluminescent assay for analysis of peroxide-based explosives.

    PubMed

    Girotti, S; Ferri, E; Maiolini, E; Bolelli, L; D'Elia, M; Coppe, D; Romolo, F S

    2011-04-01

    A quantitative chemiluminescent method, enabling indirect identification of the peroxide-based explosives TATP (triacetone triperoxide) and HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine) has been developed. Treatment of these compounds with acidic solutions produced peroxides, which were transformed into radical derivatives by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and then quantified by measuring the light emitted during their oxidation of luminol. The method was first developed in the microplate format and later optimized for a portable luminometer, to enable rapid application of the assay directly on site. When the portable luminometer was used each analysis took only 5-10 min. The method had good selectivity, sensitivity, and reproducibility; in the microplate format the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 40 and 50 ng mL(-1), respectively, for both TATP and HMTD. When the portable luminometer was used the LOD and LOQ were 50 and 100 ng mL(-1), respectively, for both compounds. Introduction of light emission-enhancing compounds did not improve the analytical performance of the assay. Imprecision (CV values) was always below 10%. Recovery varied rapidly with time, with an average value of 78% after 5 min. No false-positive result was detected on measurement of a variety of samples; this is an important feature for analysis on site. The method was applied both to contaminated materials and to fortified soil samples, simulating operational conditions. PMID:21249343

  1. LUCID: A Quantitative Assay of ESCRT-Mediated Cargo Sorting into Multivesicular Bodies.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Daniel P; Merz, Alexey J

    2015-12-01

    Endosomes are transportation nodes, mediating selective transport of soluble and transmembrane cargos to and from the Golgi apparatus, plasma membrane and lysosomes. As endosomes mature to become multivesicular bodies (MVBs), Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRTs) selectively incorporate transmembrane cargos into vesicles that bud into the endosome lumen. Luminal vesicles and their cargoes are targeted for destruction when MVBs fuse with lysosomes. Common assays of endosomal luminal targeting, including fluorescence microscopy and monitoring of proteolytic cargo maturation, possess significant limitations. We present a quantitative assay system called LUCID (LUCiferase reporter of Intraluminal Deposition) that monitors exposure of chimeric luciferase-cargo reporters to cytosol. Luciferase-chimera signal increases when sorting to the endosome lumen is disrupted, and silencing of signal from the chimera depends upon luminal delivery of the reporter rather than proteolytic degradation. The system presents several advantages, including rapidity, microscale operation and a high degree of reproducibility that enables detection of subtle phenotypic differences. Luciferase reporters provide linear signal over an extremely broad dynamic range, allowing analysis of reporter traffic even at anemic levels of expression. Furthermore, LUCID reports transport kinetics when applied to inducible trafficking reporters. PMID:26424513

  2. A Quantitative Microtiter Assay for Sialylated Glycoform Analyses Using Lectin Complexes.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Karunya; Roy, Sucharita; Washburn, Nathaniel; Sipsey, Sandra F; Meccariello, Robin; Meador, James W; Ling, Leona E; Manning, Anthony M; Kaundinya, Ganesh V

    2015-07-01

    Fidelity of glycan structures is a key requirement for biotherapeutics, with carbohydrates playing an important role for therapeutic efficacy. Comprehensive glycan profiling techniques such as liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS), while providing detailed description of glycan structures, require glycan cleavage, labeling, and paradigms to deconvolute the considerable data sets they generate. On the other hand, lectins as probes on microarrays have recently been used in orthogonal approaches for in situ glycoprofiling but require analyte labeling to take advantage of the capabilities of automated microarray readers and data analysis they afford. Herein, we describe a lectin-based microtiter assay (lectin-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) to quantify terminal glycan moieties, applicable to in vitro and in-cell glycan-engineered Fc proteins as well as intact IgGs from intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a blood product containing pooled polyvalent IgG antibodies extracted from plasma from healthy human donors. We corroborate our findings with industry-standard LC-MS profiling. This "customizable" ELISA juxtaposes readouts from multiple lectins, focusing on a subset of glycoforms, and provides the ability to discern single- versus dual-arm glycosylation while defining levels of epitopes at sensitivities comparable to MS. Extendable to other biologics, this ELISA can be used stand-alone or complementary to MS for quantitative glycan analysis. PMID:25851037

  3. A Quantitative Microtiter Assay for Sialylated Glycoform Analyses Using Lectin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karunya; Washburn, Nathaniel; Sipsey, Sandra F.; Meccariello, Robin; Meador, James W.; Ling, Leona E.; Manning, Anthony M.; Kaundinya, Ganesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Fidelity of glycan structures is a key requirement for biotherapeutics, with carbohydrates playing an important role for therapeutic efficacy. Comprehensive glycan profiling techniques such as liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS), while providing detailed description of glycan structures, require glycan cleavage, labeling, and paradigms to deconvolute the considerable data sets they generate. On the other hand, lectins as probes on microarrays have recently been used in orthogonal approaches for in situ glycoprofiling but require analyte labeling to take advantage of the capabilities of automated microarray readers and data analysis they afford. Herein, we describe a lectin-based microtiter assay (lectin–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) to quantify terminal glycan moieties, applicable to in vitro and in-cell glycan-engineered Fc proteins as well as intact IgGs from intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a blood product containing pooled polyvalent IgG antibodies extracted from plasma from healthy human donors. We corroborate our findings with industry-standard LC-MS profiling. This “customizable” ELISA juxtaposes readouts from multiple lectins, focusing on a subset of glycoforms, and provides the ability to discern single- versus dual-arm glycosylation while defining levels of epitopes at sensitivities comparable to MS. Extendable to other biologics, this ELISA can be used stand-alone or complementary to MS for quantitative glycan analysis. PMID:25851037

  4. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27142574

  5. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for Clostridium septicum in poultry gangrenous dermatitis associated samples.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A P; Dunham, S M; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium septicum is a spore-forming anaerobe frequently implicated in cases of gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and other spontaneously occurring myonecrotic infections of poultry. Although C. septicum is readily cultured from diseased tissues it can be difficult to enumerate due to its tendency to swarm over the surface of agar plates. In this study a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed in order to more accurately measure the levels of C. septicum in healthy as well as GD associated poultry samples. The assay was specifically designed to target the C. septicum alpha toxin gene, csa, which is, to our knowledge, carried by all strains of C. septicum and has been shown to be essential for virulence. Genomic DNAs from a diverse collection of bacterial species, including closely related Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium carnis, Clostridium tertium as well as several strains of Clostridium perfringens, all failed to produce a positive reaction. An approximate reproducible limit of detection in spiked extracts of at least 10(3) cfu/g of C. septicum was observed for a variety of different sample types. C. septicum levels in broiler chicken field samples estimated from the results of qPCR were statistically correlated to culture based enumerations obtained from those same tissues.

  6. A quantitative high-throughput in vitro splicing assay identifies inhibitors of spliceosome catalysis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michael G; Wan, Lili; Younis, Ihab; Diem, Michael D; Soo, Michael; Wang, Congli; Dreyfuss, Gideon

    2012-04-01

    Despite intensive research, there are very few reagents with which to modulate and dissect the mRNA splicing pathway. Here, we describe a novel approach to identify such tools, based on detection of the exon junction complex (EJC), a unique molecular signature that splicing leaves on mRNAs. We developed a high-throughput, splicing-dependent EJC immunoprecipitation (EJIPT) assay to quantitate mRNAs spliced from biotin-tagged pre-mRNAs in cell extracts, using antibodies to EJC components Y14 and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4aIII (eIF4AIII). Deploying EJIPT we performed high-throughput screening (HTS) in conjunction with secondary assays to identify splicing inhibitors. We describe the identification of 1,4-naphthoquinones and 1,4-heterocyclic quinones with known anticancer activity as potent and selective splicing inhibitors. Interestingly, and unlike previously described small molecules, most of which target early steps, our inhibitors represented by the benzothiazole-4,7-dione, BN82685, block the second of two trans-esterification reactions in splicing, preventing the release of intron lariat and ligation of exons. We show that BN82685 inhibits activated spliceosomes' elaborate structural rearrangements that are required for second-step catalysis, allowing definition of spliceosomes stalled in midcatalysis. EJIPT provides a platform for characterization and discovery of splicing and EJC modulators. PMID:22252314

  7. A high throughput MHC II binding assay for quantitative analysis of peptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Salvat, Regina; Moise, Leonard; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-03-25

    Biochemical assays with recombinant human MHC II molecules can provide rapid, quantitative insights into immunogenic epitope identification, deletion, or design(1,2). Here, a peptide-MHC II binding assay is scaled to 384-well format. The scaled down protocol reduces reagent costs by 75% and is higher throughput than previously described 96-well protocols(1,3-5). Specifically, the experimental design permits robust and reproducible analysis of up to 15 peptides against one MHC II allele per 384-well ELISA plate. Using a single liquid handling robot, this method allows one researcher to analyze approximately ninety test peptides in triplicate over a range of eight concentrations and four MHC II allele types in less than 48 hr. Others working in the fields of protein deimmunization or vaccine design and development may find the protocol to be useful in facilitating their own work. In particular, the step-by-step instructions and the visual format of JoVE should allow other users to quickly and easily establish this methodology in their own labs.

  8. A High Throughput MHC II Binding Assay for Quantitative Analysis of Peptide Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Salvat, Regina; Moise, Leonard; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical assays with recombinant human MHC II molecules can provide rapid, quantitative insights into immunogenic epitope identification, deletion, or design1,2. Here, a peptide-MHC II binding assay is scaled to 384-well format. The scaled down protocol reduces reagent costs by 75% and is higher throughput than previously described 96-well protocols1,3-5. Specifically, the experimental design permits robust and reproducible analysis of up to 15 peptides against one MHC II allele per 384-well ELISA plate. Using a single liquid handling robot, this method allows one researcher to analyze approximately ninety test peptides in triplicate over a range of eight concentrations and four MHC II allele types in less than 48 hr. Others working in the fields of protein deimmunization or vaccine design and development may find the protocol to be useful in facilitating their own work. In particular, the step-by-step instructions and the visual format of JoVE should allow other users to quickly and easily establish this methodology in their own labs. PMID:24686319

  9. Limitations of the ferrozine method for quantitative assay of mineral systems for ferrous and total iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastácio, Alexandre S.; Harris, Brittany; Yoo, Hae-In; Fabris, José Domingos; Stucki, Joseph W.

    2008-10-01

    The quantitative assay of clay minerals, soils, and sediments for Fe(II) and total Fe is fundamental to understanding biogeochemical cycles occurring therein. The commonly used ferrozine method was originally designed to assay extracted forms of Fe(II) from non-silicate aqueous systems. It is becoming, however, increasingly the method of choice to report the total reduced state of Fe in soils and sediments. Because Fe in soils and sediments commonly exists in the structural framework of silicates, extraction by HCl, as used in the ferrozine method, fails to dissolve all of the Fe. The phenanthroline (phen) method, on the other hand, was designed to assay silicate minerals for Fe(II) and total Fe and has been proven to be highly reliable. In the present study potential sources of error in the ferrozine method were evaluated by comparing its results to those obtained by the phen method. Both methods were used to analyze clay mineral and soil samples for Fe(II) and total Fe. Results revealed that the conventional ferrozine method under reports total Fe in samples containing Fe in silicates and gives erratic results for Fe(II). The sources of error in the ferrozine method are: (1) HCl fails to dissolve silicates and (2) if the analyte solution contains Fe 3+, the analysis for Fe 2+ will be photosensitive, and reported Fe(II) values will likely be greater than the actual amount in solution. Another difficulty with the ferrozine method is that it is tedious and much more labor intensive than the phen method. For these reasons, the phen method is preferred and recommended. Its procedure is simpler, takes less time, and avoids the errors found in the ferrozine method.

  10. Characterization of a method for quantitating food consumption for mutation assays in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, E.D.; Reeder, B.A.; Bruce, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Quantitation of food consumption is necessary when determining mutation responses to multiple chemical exposures in the sex-linked recessive lethal assay in Drosophila. One method proposed for quantitating food consumption by Drosophila is to measure the incorporation of 14C-leucine into the flies during the feeding period. Three sources of variation in the technique of Thompson and Reeder have been identified and characterized. First, the amount of food consumed by individual flies differed by almost 30% in a 24 hr feeding period. Second, the variability from vial to vial (each containing multiple flies) was around 15%. Finally, the amount of food consumed in identical feeding experiments performed over the course of 1 year varied nearly 2-fold. The use of chemical consumption values in place of exposure levels provided a better means of expressing the combined mutagenic response. In addition, the kinetics of food consumption over a 3 day feeding period for exposures to cyclophosphamide which produce lethality were compared to non-lethal exposures. Extensive characterization of lethality induced by exposures to cyclophosphamide demonstrate that the lethality is most likely due to starvation, not chemical toxicity.

  11. [Use of procalcitonine in intensive care units: comparison of semi quantitative PCT-Q Brahms assay with automated PCT-Kryptor assay].

    PubMed

    Schuch, Géraldine; Duc-Marchand, Catherine; Venet, Cyrille; Mann, Hubert; Tixier, Anne; Bionda, Clara

    2011-01-01

    Procalcitonine (PCT) is recognized as a major and specific biomarker in diagnosis of bacterial infection. Used early in sepsis, it allows immediate administration of antibiotics and monitoring its effectiveness. Confronted on systemic inflammation response syndrom (SIRS), physicians must react quickly and effectively to evaluate bacterial infection and sepsis. The objective of this study was to compare analytical and clinical performances of semi-quantitative PCT-Q assay (Brahms) with quantitative and automated assay such on Kryptor (Brahms). Fifty blood samples of intensive care patients were compared. The analytical performance observed with PCT-Q assay is accurate: linear ratio kappa of 0.912 (95% CI 0.61, 0.97) and a good correlation between these techniques (p < 0.0001) (MedCalc software) were observed. Three discordances were observed and confirm the difficulties of reading for values close to 0.5 ng/mL. For these patients, PCT result showed its interest to discriminate local infection of a sepsis, to stop antibiotherapy with broad spectrum and to consolidate a therapeutic effectiveness in multi-visceral failure context. The semi-quantitative assay seems adapted for a fast and reliable evaluation of PCT in a general-purpose laboratory, not requiring neither dedicated analyzer, nor complex technicality but a control of the visual evaluation of results. It could be used for diagnosis of sepsis without monitoring precisely therapeutic follow-up.

  12. [Use of procalcitonine in intensive care units: comparison of semi quantitative PCT-Q Brahms assay with automated PCT-Kryptor assay].

    PubMed

    Schuch, Géraldine; Duc-Marchand, Catherine; Venet, Cyrille; Mann, Hubert; Tixier, Anne; Bionda, Clara

    2011-01-01

    Procalcitonine (PCT) is recognized as a major and specific biomarker in diagnosis of bacterial infection. Used early in sepsis, it allows immediate administration of antibiotics and monitoring its effectiveness. Confronted on systemic inflammation response syndrom (SIRS), physicians must react quickly and effectively to evaluate bacterial infection and sepsis. The objective of this study was to compare analytical and clinical performances of semi-quantitative PCT-Q assay (Brahms) with quantitative and automated assay such on Kryptor (Brahms). Fifty blood samples of intensive care patients were compared. The analytical performance observed with PCT-Q assay is accurate: linear ratio kappa of 0.912 (95% CI 0.61, 0.97) and a good correlation between these techniques (p < 0.0001) (MedCalc software) were observed. Three discordances were observed and confirm the difficulties of reading for values close to 0.5 ng/mL. For these patients, PCT result showed its interest to discriminate local infection of a sepsis, to stop antibiotherapy with broad spectrum and to consolidate a therapeutic effectiveness in multi-visceral failure context. The semi-quantitative assay seems adapted for a fast and reliable evaluation of PCT in a general-purpose laboratory, not requiring neither dedicated analyzer, nor complex technicality but a control of the visual evaluation of results. It could be used for diagnosis of sepsis without monitoring precisely therapeutic follow-up. PMID:22123565

  13. Comparison of colorimetric assays with quantitative amino acid analysis for protein quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Interfering assays using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard with quantitative amino acid (AA) analysis, the most accurate currently available method for protein quantification. The Lowry assay has the lowest inter- and intra-assay variation and gives the best linearity between protein amount and absorbance. In all three assays, the color yield (optical density per mass of protein) of GMMA was markedly different from that of BSA with a ratio of approximately 4 for the Bradford assay, and highly variable between different GMMA; and approximately 0.7 for the Lowry and Non-Interfering assays, highlighting the need for calibrating the standard used in the colorimetric assay against GMMA quantified by AA analysis. In terms of a combination of ease, reproducibility, and proportionality of protein measurement, and comparability between samples, the Lowry assay was superior to Bradford and Non-Interfering assays for GMMA quantification.

  14. Interlaboratory study evaluating quantitation of antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Madore, D V; Anderson, P; Baxter, B D; Carlone, G M; Edwards, K M; Hamilton, R G; Holder, P; Käyhty, H; Phipps, D C; Peeters, C C; Schneerson, R; Siber, G R; Ward, J I; Frasch, C E

    1996-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was conducted to determine whether an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with an antigen preparation composed of various-sized fragments of Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide conjugated to human serum albumin could be standardized across laboratories and whether the ELISA-derived results from different laboratories are equivalent to those obtained by the standard radioactive antigen binding assay (RABA) for quantitation of anti-H, influenzae type b polysaccharide antibodies. Twenty coded human serum samples were quantitated by ELISA in 11 laboratories and by RABA in 5 laboratories. The mean RABA-derived values served as the basis for all comparisons. While the overall correspondence of antibody values between the two methods was good, significant differences were found among some of the 11 ELISA data sets and among the mean RABA values. Seven laboratories generated higher ELISA antibody values for low-titered sera. Four laboratories generated antibody concentrations that were not statistically different between the two assay methods. The results therefore indicate that the ELISA can tolerate substantial variations in protocol, such as the use of different plates and different antibody reagents, without affecting the quantitation of serum antibodies. However, attention should be focused on low-titered sera, as some assay conditions may yield spurious results. This ELISA is a serologic assay which can serve as an alternative to the RABA for quantitation of antibodies to H. influenzae type h polysaccharide. PMID:8770509

  15. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of /sup 3/H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence.

  16. Serial Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection, Species Discrimination, and Quantification of Leishmania spp. in Human Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Weirather, Jason L.; Jeronimo, Selma M. B.; Gautam, Shalini; Sundar, Shyam; Kang, Mitchell; Kurtz, Melissa A.; Haque, Rashidul; Schriefer, Albert; Talhari, Sinésio; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The Leishmania species cause a variety of human disease syndromes. Methods for diagnosis and species differentiation are insensitive and many require invasive sampling. Although quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods are reported for leishmania detection, no systematic method to quantify parasites and determine the species in clinical specimens is established. We developed a serial qPCR strategy to identify and rapidly differentiate Leishmania species and quantify parasites in clinical or environmental specimens. SYBR green qPCR is mainly employed, with corresponding TaqMan assays for validation. The screening primers recognize kinetoplast minicircle DNA of all Leishmania species. Species identification employs further qPCR set(s) individualized for geographic regions, combining species-discriminating probes with melt curve analysis. The assay was sufficient to detect Leishmania parasites, make species determinations, and quantify Leishmania spp. in sera, cutaneous biopsy specimens, or cultured isolates from subjects from Bangladesh or Brazil with different forms of leishmaniasis. The multicopy kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) probes were the most sensitive and useful for quantification based on promastigote standard curves. To test their validity for quantification, kDNA copy numbers were compared between Leishmania species, isolates, and life stages using qPCR. Maxicircle and minicircle copy numbers differed up to 6-fold between Leishmania species, but the differences were smaller between strains of the same species. Amastigote and promastigote leishmania life stages retained similar numbers of kDNA maxi- or minicircles. Thus, serial qPCR is useful for leishmania detection and species determination and for absolute quantification when compared to a standard curve from the same Leishmania species. PMID:22042830

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance method for the quantitative assay of ketoconazole in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Mohamed A; Sultan, Salah M; Dafalla, Hatim

    2009-08-15

    In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used, for the first time, as an analytical tool for the quantitative assay of ketoconazole (KTZ) in drug formulations. The drug was successfully characterized by the prominent signals by two radical species produced as a result of its oxidation with 400 microg/mL cerium(IV) in 0.10 mol dm(-3) sulfuric acid. The EPR signal of the reaction mixture was measured in eight capillary tubes housed in a 4 mm EPR sample tube. The radical stability was investigated by obtaining multi-EPR scans of each KTZ sample solution at time intervals of 2.5 min of the reaction mixing time. The plot of the disappearance of the radical species show that the disappearance is apparently of zero order. The zero-time intercept of the EPR signal amplitude, which should be proportional to the initial radical concentration, is linear in the sample concentration in the range between 100 and 400 microg/mL, with a correlation coefficient, r, of 0.999. The detection limit was determined to be 11.7 +/- 2.5 microg/mL. The method newly adopted was fully validated following the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph protocol in both the generic and the proprietary forms. The method is very accurate, such that we were able to measure the concentration at confidence levels of 99.9%. The method was also found to be suitable for the assay of KTZ in its tablet and cream pharmaceutical preparations, as no interferences were encountered from excipients of the proprietary drugs. High specificity, simplicity, and rapidity are the merits of the present method compared to the previously reported methods.

  18. Botulinum Neurotoxins: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis Using the Mouse Phrenic Nerve Hemidiaphragm Assay (MPN).

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Hans; Rummel, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The historical method for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is represented by the mouse bioassay (MBA) measuring the animal survival rate. Since the endpoint of the MBA is the death of the mice due to paralysis of the respiratory muscle, an ex vivo animal replacement method, called mouse phrenic nerve (MPN) assay, employs the isolated N. phrenicus-hemidiaphragm tissue. Here, BoNT causes a dose-dependent characteristic decrease of the contraction amplitude of the indirectly stimulated muscle. Within the EQuATox BoNT proficiency 13 test samples were analysed using the MPN assay by serial dilution to a bath concentration resulting in a paralysis time within the range of calibration curves generated with BoNT/A, B and E standards, respectively. For serotype identification the diluted samples were pre-incubated with polyclonal anti-BoNT/A, B or E antitoxin or a combination of each. All 13 samples were qualitatively correctly identified thereby delivering superior results compared to single in vitro methods like LFA, ELISA and LC-MS/MS. Having characterized the BoNT serotype, the final bath concentrations were calculated using the calibration curves and then multiplied by the respective dilution factor to obtain the sample concentration. Depending on the source of the BoNT standards used, the quantitation of ten BoNT/A containing samples delivered a mean z-score of 7 and of three BoNT/B or BoNT/E containing samples z-scores <2, respectively.

  19. Rapid detection and quantitation of Bluetongue virus (BTV) using a Molecular Beacon fluorescent probe assay.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Germano; Ferrando, Maria Laura; Meloni, Mauro; Liciardi, Manuele; Savini, Giovanni; De Santis, Paola

    2006-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of Bluetongue (BT) disease in ruminant livestock and occurs almost worldwide between latitudes 35 degrees S and 50 degrees N; 24 serotypes of BTV are known of which 8 circulate periodically within parts of the Mediterranean Region. A fast (about 3.5 h) and versatile diagnostic procedure able to detect and quantify BTV-RNA, has been developed using a Molecular Beacon (MB) fluorescent probe; PCR primers were designed to target 91 bp within the NS3 conserved region of the viral RNA segment 10 (S10) and bracketed the MB fluorescence probe hybridisation site. The MB fluorescent probe was used to develop two Bluetongue serogroup-specific assays: a quantitative real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a traditional RT-PCR. These were tested using BTV-RNAs extracted from the blood and organs of BT-affected animals, and from virus isolate suspensions. The samples included ten serotypes (BTV-1-BTV-9 and BTV-16); of these, BTV serotypes -1, -2, -4, -9 and -16 have since 1998 been involved in the extensive outbreaks of BT across the Mediterranean Region. To evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the MB probe, all positive samples (and negative controls) were tested using the developed quantitative real time RT-PCR and traditional RT-PCR assays. The former test had a detection limit of 10(3) cDNA molecules per reaction with a log-linear quantification range of up to 10(11) (R2 = 0.98), while the latter test was able to detect 500 cDNA-BTV molecules/PCR. The results show that the MB fluorescent probe is both rapid and versatile for the laboratory diagnosis of Bluetongue and for quantifying levels of viraemia in BTV-affected animals. An "in silico" comparison of the primers and MB fluorescent probe used in this study showed that it is possible to detect all 24 serotypes of BTV.

  20. Single-Plex Quantitative Assays for the Detection and Quantification of Most Pneumococcal Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chochua, Sopio; Satzke, Catherine; Dunne, Eileen M.; Mulholland, Kim; Klugman, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae globally kills more children than any other infectious disease every year. A prerequisite for pneumococcal disease and transmission is colonization of the nasopharynx. While the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has reduced the burden of pneumococcal disease, understanding the impact of vaccination on nasopharyngeal colonization has been hampered by the lack of sensitive quantitative methods for the detection of >90 known S. pneumoniae serotypes. In this work, we developed 27 new quantitative (q)PCR reactions and optimized 26 for a total of 53 qPCR reactions targeting pneumococcal serotypes or serogroups, including all vaccine types. Reactions proved to be target-specific with a limit of detection of 2 genome equivalents per reaction. Given the number of probes required for these assays and their unknown shelf-life, the stability of cryopreserved reagents was evaluated. Our studies demonstrate that two-year cryopreserved probes had similar limit of detection as freshly-diluted probes. Moreover, efficiency and limit of detection of 1-month cryopreserved, ready-to-use, qPCR reaction mixtures were similar to those of freshly prepared mixtures. Using these reactions, our proof-of-concept studies utilizing nasopharyngeal samples (N=30) collected from young children detected samples containing ≥2 serotypes/serogroups. Samples colonized by multiple serotypes/serogroups always had a serotype that contributes at least 50% of the pneumococcal load. In addition, a molecular approach called S6-q(PCR)2 was developed and proven to individually detect and quantify epidemiologically-important serogroup 6 strains including 6A, 6B, 6C and 6D. This technology will be useful for epidemiological studies, diagnostic platforms and to study the pneumobiome. PMID:25798884

  1. Single-plex quantitative assays for the detection and quantification of most pneumococcal serotypes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Fuminori; Chochua, Sopio; Satzke, Catherine; Dunne, Eileen M; Mulholland, Kim; Klugman, Keith P; Vidal, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae globally kills more children than any other infectious disease every year. A prerequisite for pneumococcal disease and transmission is colonization of the nasopharynx. While the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has reduced the burden of pneumococcal disease, understanding the impact of vaccination on nasopharyngeal colonization has been hampered by the lack of sensitive quantitative methods for the detection of >90 known S. pneumoniae serotypes. In this work, we developed 27 new quantitative (q)PCR reactions and optimized 26 for a total of 53 qPCR reactions targeting pneumococcal serotypes or serogroups, including all vaccine types. Reactions proved to be target-specific with a limit of detection of 2 genome equivalents per reaction. Given the number of probes required for these assays and their unknown shelf-life, the stability of cryopreserved reagents was evaluated. Our studies demonstrate that two-year cryopreserved probes had similar limit of detection as freshly-diluted probes. Moreover, efficiency and limit of detection of 1-month cryopreserved, ready-to-use, qPCR reaction mixtures were similar to those of freshly prepared mixtures. Using these reactions, our proof-of-concept studies utilizing nasopharyngeal samples (N=30) collected from young children detected samples containing ≥2 serotypes/serogroups. Samples colonized by multiple serotypes/serogroups always had a serotype that contributes at least 50% of the pneumococcal load. In addition, a molecular approach called S6-q(PCR)2 was developed and proven to individually detect and quantify epidemiologically-important serogroup 6 strains including 6A, 6B, 6C and 6D. This technology will be useful for epidemiological studies, diagnostic platforms and to study the pneumobiome.

  2. Development of stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of Amadori compounds in foods.

    PubMed

    Meitinger, Michael; Hartmann, Sandra; Schieberle, Peter

    2014-06-01

    During thermal processing of foods, reducing carbohydrates and amino acids may form 1-amino-1-desoxyketoses named Amadori rearrangement products after the Italian chemist Mario Amadori. Although these compounds are transient intermediates of the Maillard reaction, they are often used as suitable markers to measure the extent of a thermal food processing, such as for spray-dried milk or dried fruits. Several methods are already available in the literature for their quantitation, but measurements are often done with external calibration without addressing losses during the workup procedure. To cope with this challenge, stable isotope dilution assays in combination with LC-MS/MS were developed for the glucose-derived Amadori products of the seven amino acids valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine, and histidine using the respective synthesized [(13)C6]-labeled isotopologues as internal standards. The quantitation of the analytes added to a model matrix showed a very good sensitivity with the lowest limits of detection for the Amadori compound of phenylalanine of 0.1 μg/kg starch and 0.2 μg/kg oil, respectively. Also, the standard deviation measured in, for example, wheat beer was only ±2% for this analyte. Application of the method to several foods showed the highest concentrations of the Amadori product of valine in unroasted cocoa (342 mg/kg) as well as in dried bell pepper (3460 mg/kg). In agreement with literature data, drying of foods led to the formation of Amadori products, whereas they were degraded during roasting of, for example, coffee or cocoa. The study presents for the first time results on concentrations of the Amadori compounds of tyrosine and histidine in foods. PMID:24865106

  3. Single-tube fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay with Ampliwax (STF-PERT) for retrovirus quantitation.

    PubMed

    Sears, Johnna F; Khan, Arifa S

    2003-03-01

    A TaqMan fluorescent probe-based product enhanced reverse transcriptase (RT) assay is described in which the RT and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) steps are set-up in a single tube, in two compartments separated by Ampliwax (designated as single-tube fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay (STF-PERT)). This simplification of the two-step method resulted in increased assay reproducibility and handling efficiency while maintaining the sensitivity of the PERT assay (<10 virions). The STF-PERT assay can be used to quantitate low amounts of retrovirus in clinical and research materials and to evaluate retrovirus contamination in cell substrates and biological products in human use.

  4. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay for High-throughput and Mechanistic Genotoxicity Assessment and Screening of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaqi; Gou, Na; Rahman, Sheikh Mokhles; Gao, Ce; He, Miao; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    The ecological and health concern of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity potentially associated with an overwhelmingly large and ever-increasing number of chemicals demands for cost-effective and feasible method for genotoxicity screening and risk assessment. This study proposed a genotoxicity assay using GFP-tagged yeast reporter strains, covering 38 selected protein biomarkers indicative of all the seven known DNA damage repair pathways. The assay was applied to assess four model genotoxic chemicals, eight environmental pollutants and four negative controls across six concentrations. Quantitative molecular genotoxicity end points were derived based on dose response modeling of a newly developed integrated molecular effect quantifier, Protein Effect Level Index (PELI). The molecular genotoxicity end points were consistent with multiple conventional in vitro genotoxicity assays, as well as with in vivo carcinogenicity assay results. Further more, the proposed genotoxicity end point PELI values quantitatively correlated with both comet assay in human cell and carcinogenicity potency assay in mice, providing promising evidence for linking the molecular disturbance measurements to adverse outcomes at a biological relevant level. In addition, the high-resolution DNA damaging repair pathway alternated protein expression profiles allowed for chemical clustering and classification. This toxicogenomics-based assay presents a promising alternative for fast, efficient and mechanistic genotoxicity screening and assessment of drugs, foods, and environmental contaminants.

  5. Quantitative Fluorescence Assays Using a Self-Powered Paper-Based Microfluidic Device and a Camera-Equipped Cellular Phone

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Nicole K.; Lewis, Gregory G.; Yeung, Kimy

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence assays often require specialized equipment and, therefore, are not easily implemented in resource-limited environments. Herein we describe a point-of-care assay strategy in which fluorescence in the visible region is used as a readout, while a camera-equipped cellular phone is used to capture the fluorescent response and quantify the assay. The fluorescence assay is made possible using a paper-based microfluidic device that contains an internal fluidic battery, a surface-mount LED, a 2-mm section of a clear straw as a cuvette, and an appropriately-designed small molecule reagent that transforms from weakly fluorescent to highly fluorescent when exposed to a specific enzyme biomarker. The resulting visible fluorescence is digitized by photographing the assay region using a camera-equipped cellular phone. The digital images are then quantified using image processing software to provide sensitive as well as quantitative results. In a model 30 min assay, the enzyme β-D-galactosidase was measured quantitatively down to 700 pM levels. This Communication describes the design of these types of assays in paper-based microfluidic devices and characterizes the key parameters that affect the sensitivity and reproducibility of the technique. PMID:24490035

  6. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the seagrass pathogen Labyrinthula zosterae.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Fricke, Birgit; Schmidt, Martina C; Tams, Verena; Beining, Katrin; Schwitte, Hildegard; Boettcher, Anne A; Martin, Daniel L; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Rauch, Gisep

    2011-11-01

    The protist Labyrinthula zosterae (Phylum Bigyra, sensu Tsui et al. 2009) has been identified as a causative agent of wasting disease in eelgrass (Zostera marina), of which the most intense outbreak led to the destruction of 90% of eelgrass beds in eastern North America and western Europe in the 1930s. Outbreaks still occur today, albeit at a smaller scale. Traditionally, L. zosterae has been quantified by measuring the necrotic area of Z. marina leaf tissue. This indirect method can however only lead to a very rough estimate of pathogen load. Here, we present a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) approach to directly detect and quantify L. zosterae in eelgrass tissue. Based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of rRNA genes, species-specific primers were designed. Using our qPCR, we were able to quantify accurately and specifically L. zosterae load both from culture and eelgrass leaves using material from Europe and North America. Our detection limit was less than one L. zosterae cell. Our results demonstrate the potential of this qPCR assay to provide rapid, accurate and sensitive molecular identification and quantification of L. zosterae. In view of declining seagrass populations worldwide, this method will provide a valuable tool for seagrass ecologists and conservation projects. PMID:21777400

  7. Quantitative lateral flow strip assays as User-Friendly Tools To Detect Biomarker Profiles For Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    van Hooij, Anouk; Tjon Kon Fat, Elisa M.; Richardus, Renate; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; de Dood, Claudia J.; Faber, Roel; Alam, Korshed; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Geluk, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a debilitating, infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Despite the availability of multidrug therapy, transmission is unremitting. Thus, early identification of M. leprae infection is essential to reduce transmission. The immune response to M. leprae is determined by host genetics, resulting in paucibacillary (PB) and multibacillary (MB) leprosy associated with dominant cellular or humoral immunity, respectively. This spectral pathology of leprosy compels detection of immunity to M. leprae to be based on multiple, diverse biomarkers. In this study we have applied quantitative user friendly lateral flow assays (LFAs) for four immune markers (anti-PGL-I antibodies, IL-10, CCL4 and IP-10) for whole blood samples from a longitudinal BCG vaccination field-trial in Bangladesh. Different biomarker profiles, in contrast to single markers, distinguished M. leprae infected from non-infected test groups, patients from household contacts (HHC) and endemic controls (EC), or MB from PB patients. The test protocol presented in this study merging detection of innate, adaptive cellular as well as humoral immunity, thus provides a convenient tool to measure specific biomarker profiles for M. leprae infection and leprosy utilizing a field-friendly technology. PMID:27682181

  8. A quantitative multiplexed mass spectrometry assay for studying the kinetic of residue-specific histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Histone acetylation is involved in gene regulation and, most importantly, aberrant regulation of histone acetylation is correlated with major human diseases. Although many lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) have been characterized as being capable of acetylating multiple lysine residues on histones, how different factors such as enzyme complexes or external stimuli (e.g. KAT activators or inhibitors) alter KAT specificity remains elusive. In order to comprehensively understand how the homeostasis of histone acetylation is maintained, a method that can quantitate acetylation levels of individual lysines on histones is needed. Here we demonstrate that our mass spectrometry (MS)-based method accomplishes this goal. In addition, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and high dynamic range of this method allows for effectively and accurately studying steady-state kinetics. Based on the kinetic parameters from in vitro enzymatic assays, we can determine the specificity and selectivity of a KAT and use this information to understand what factors influence histone acetylation. These approaches can be used to study the enzymatic mechanisms of histone acetylation as well as be adapted to other histone modifications. Understanding the post-translational modification of individual residues within the histones will provide a better picture of chromatin regulation in the cell.

  9. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  10. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the seagrass pathogen Labyrinthula zosterae.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Fricke, Birgit; Schmidt, Martina C; Tams, Verena; Beining, Katrin; Schwitte, Hildegard; Boettcher, Anne A; Martin, Daniel L; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Rauch, Gisep

    2011-11-01

    The protist Labyrinthula zosterae (Phylum Bigyra, sensu Tsui et al. 2009) has been identified as a causative agent of wasting disease in eelgrass (Zostera marina), of which the most intense outbreak led to the destruction of 90% of eelgrass beds in eastern North America and western Europe in the 1930s. Outbreaks still occur today, albeit at a smaller scale. Traditionally, L. zosterae has been quantified by measuring the necrotic area of Z. marina leaf tissue. This indirect method can however only lead to a very rough estimate of pathogen load. Here, we present a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) approach to directly detect and quantify L. zosterae in eelgrass tissue. Based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of rRNA genes, species-specific primers were designed. Using our qPCR, we were able to quantify accurately and specifically L. zosterae load both from culture and eelgrass leaves using material from Europe and North America. Our detection limit was less than one L. zosterae cell. Our results demonstrate the potential of this qPCR assay to provide rapid, accurate and sensitive molecular identification and quantification of L. zosterae. In view of declining seagrass populations worldwide, this method will provide a valuable tool for seagrass ecologists and conservation projects.

  11. Multilaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from Soybean Roots and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Yuba R; Haudenshield, James S; Srour, Ali Y; Islam, Kazi Tariqul; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Santos, Patricia; Wang, Jie; Chilvers, Martin I; Hartman, Glen L; Malvick, Dean K; Floyd, Crystal M; Mueller, Daren S; Leandro, Leonor F S

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, in samples such as plant root tissue and soil is extremely valuable for accurate disease diagnoses and to address research questions. Numerous quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays have been developed for this pathogen but their sensitivity and specificity for F. virguliforme have not been compared. In this study, six qPCR assays were compared in five independent laboratories using the same set of DNA samples from fungi, plants, and soil. Multicopy gene-based assays targeting the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) or the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) showed relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection [LOD] = 0.05 to 5 pg) compared with a single-copy gene (FvTox1)-based assay (LOD = 5 to 50 pg). Specificity varied greatly among assays, with the FvTox1 assay ranking the highest (100%) and two IGS assays being slightly less specific (95 to 96%). Another IGS assay targeting four SDS-causing fusaria showed lower specificity (70%), while the two mtSSU assays were lowest (41 and 47%). An IGS-based assay showed consistently highest sensitivity (LOD = 0.05 pg) and specificity and inclusivity above 94% and, thus, is suggested as the most useful qPCR assay for F. virguliforme diagnosis and quantification. However, specificity was also above 94% in two other assays and their selection for diagnostics and research will depend on objectives, samples, and materials used. These results will facilitate both fundamental and disease management research pertinent to SDS.

  12. Multilaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from Soybean Roots and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Yuba R; Haudenshield, James S; Srour, Ali Y; Islam, Kazi Tariqul; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Santos, Patricia; Wang, Jie; Chilvers, Martin I; Hartman, Glen L; Malvick, Dean K; Floyd, Crystal M; Mueller, Daren S; Leandro, Leonor F S

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately detect and quantify Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, in samples such as plant root tissue and soil is extremely valuable for accurate disease diagnoses and to address research questions. Numerous quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays have been developed for this pathogen but their sensitivity and specificity for F. virguliforme have not been compared. In this study, six qPCR assays were compared in five independent laboratories using the same set of DNA samples from fungi, plants, and soil. Multicopy gene-based assays targeting the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) or the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) showed relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection [LOD] = 0.05 to 5 pg) compared with a single-copy gene (FvTox1)-based assay (LOD = 5 to 50 pg). Specificity varied greatly among assays, with the FvTox1 assay ranking the highest (100%) and two IGS assays being slightly less specific (95 to 96%). Another IGS assay targeting four SDS-causing fusaria showed lower specificity (70%), while the two mtSSU assays were lowest (41 and 47%). An IGS-based assay showed consistently highest sensitivity (LOD = 0.05 pg) and specificity and inclusivity above 94% and, thus, is suggested as the most useful qPCR assay for F. virguliforme diagnosis and quantification. However, specificity was also above 94% in two other assays and their selection for diagnostics and research will depend on objectives, samples, and materials used. These results will facilitate both fundamental and disease management research pertinent to SDS. PMID:26368513

  13. The rapid quantitation of the filamentous blue-green alga plectonema boryanum by the luciferase assay for ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.

    1974-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum is a filamentous blue green alga. Blue green algae have a procaryotic cellular organization similar to bacteria, but are usually obligate photoautotrophs, obtaining their carbon and energy from photosynthetic mechanism similar to higher plants. This research deals with a comparison of three methods of quantitating filamentous populations: microscopic cell counts, the luciferase assay for ATP and optical density measurements.

  14. Multi-laboratory comparison of quantitative PCR assays for detection and quantification of Fusarium virguliforme from soybean roots and soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate identification and quantification of Fusarium virguliforme, the cause of sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, within root tissue and soil are important tasks. Several quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays have been developed but there are no reports comparing their use in sensitive and specific...

  15. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method ...

  16. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method p...

  17. Development of a non invasion real-time PCR assay for the quantitation of chicken parvovirus in fecal swabs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study describes the development of a real time Taqman polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using a fluorescent labeled probe for the detection and quantitation of chicken parvovirus (ChPV) in feces. The primers and probes were designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the non struct...

  18. QUANTITATIVE ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantitative determination of Aroclors 1242, 1248, 1254, and 1260 in soil and sediments was developed and its performance compared with that of gas chromatography (GC). The detection limits for Aroclors 1242 and 1248 in soil ar...

  19. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster are considered to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In response, the United States Environmental Protectio...

  20. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  1. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  2. Quantitative one-step RT-PCR assay for rapid and sensitive identification and titration of polioviruses in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Laassri, Majid; Dipiazza, Anthony; Bidzhieva, Bella; Zagorodnyaya, Tatiana; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Rapid identification and quantitation of polioviruses in clinical specimens is important for surveillance and analysis of virus shedding by vaccine recipients, which could be used to assess the level of mucosal immunity. A quantitative one step RT-PCR was developed for identification and titration of all three poliovirus serotypes. The assay could be an alternative to the traditional procedure based on cell culture isolation and subsequent determination of poliovirus serotype and virus titration. The method is based on quantitative PCR performed with reverse transcription reaction in the same tube. The multiplex assay that quantifies all three serotypes of poliovirus was found to be highly specific, sensitive, and takes only one day to complete.

  3. Measuring stem cell frequency in epidermis: A quantitative in vivo functional assay for long-term repopulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T. E.; Barland, C.; Alex, A. M.; Mancianti, M. L.; Lu, Y.; Cleaver, J. E.; Lawrence, H. J.; Ghadially, R.

    2003-09-01

    Epidermal stem cells play a central role in tissue homeostasis, wound repair, tumor initiation, and gene therapy. A major impediment to the purification and molecular characterization of epidermal stem cells is the lack of a quantitative assay for cells capable of long-term repopulation in vivo, such as exists for hematopoietic cells. The tremendous strides made in the characterization and purification of hematopoietic stem cells have been critically dependent on the availability of competitive transplantation assays, because these assays permit the accurate quantitation of long-term repopulating cells in vivo. We have developed an analogous functional assay for epidermal stem cells, and have measured the frequency of functional epidermal stem cells in interfollicular epidermis. These studies indicate that cells capable of long-term reconstitution of a squamous epithelium reside in the interfollicular epidermis. We find that the frequency of these long-term repopulating cells is 1 in 35,000 total epidermal cells, or in the order of 1 in 104 basal epidermal cells, similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and much lower than previously estimated in epidermis. Furthermore, these studies establish a novel functional assay that can be used to validate immunophenotypic markers and enrichment strategies for epidermal stem cells, and to quantify epidermal stem cells in various keratinocyte populations. Thus further studies using this type of assay for epidermis should aid in the progress of cutaneous stem cell-targeted gene therapy, and in more basic studies of epidermal stem cell regulation and differentiation.

  4. Blu-ray Technology-Based Quantitative Assays for Cardiac Markers: From Disc Activation to Multiplex Detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Samuel; Li, Xiaochun; Niu, Michelle; Ge, Bixia; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. To reduce the number of mortalities, reliable and rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of AMI is extremely critical. We herein present a Blu-ray technology-based assay platform for multiplex cardiac biomarker detection; not only off-the-shelf Blu-ray discs (BDs) were adapted as substrates to prepare standard immunoassays and DNA aptamer/antibody hybrid assays for the three key cardiac marker proteins (myoglobin, troponin I, and C-creative protein) but also an unmodified optical drive was directly employed to read the assay results digitally. In particular, we have shown that all three cardiac markers can be quantitated in their respective physiological ranges of interest, and the detection limits achieved are comparable with conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The Blu-ray assay platform was further validated by measuring real-world samples and establishing a linear correlation with the simultaneously obtained ELISA data. Without the need to modify either the hardware (Blu-ray discs and optical drives) or the software driver, this assay-on-a-BD technique promises to be a low-cost user-friendly quantitative tool for on-site chemical analysis and POC medical diagnosis.

  5. Blu-ray Technology-Based Quantitative Assays for Cardiac Markers: From Disc Activation to Multiplex Detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Samuel; Li, Xiaochun; Niu, Michelle; Ge, Bixia; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. To reduce the number of mortalities, reliable and rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of AMI is extremely critical. We herein present a Blu-ray technology-based assay platform for multiplex cardiac biomarker detection; not only off-the-shelf Blu-ray discs (BDs) were adapted as substrates to prepare standard immunoassays and DNA aptamer/antibody hybrid assays for the three key cardiac marker proteins (myoglobin, troponin I, and C-creative protein) but also an unmodified optical drive was directly employed to read the assay results digitally. In particular, we have shown that all three cardiac markers can be quantitated in their respective physiological ranges of interest, and the detection limits achieved are comparable with conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The Blu-ray assay platform was further validated by measuring real-world samples and establishing a linear correlation with the simultaneously obtained ELISA data. Without the need to modify either the hardware (Blu-ray discs and optical drives) or the software driver, this assay-on-a-BD technique promises to be a low-cost user-friendly quantitative tool for on-site chemical analysis and POC medical diagnosis. PMID:27268387

  6. Development of a real time quantitative PCR assay for the hard clam pathogen Quahog Parasite Unknown (QPX).

    PubMed

    Lyons, M Maille; Smolowitz, Roxanna; Dungan, Christopher F; Roberts, Steven B

    2006-09-14

    Quahog Parasite Unknown (QPX) is a thraustochytrid pathogen responsible for catastrophic mortalities of the northern quahog (hard clam) Mercenaria mercenaria. A real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to assist research efforts on QPX ecology and pathology. Sensitivity of the assay was evaluated with serial dilutions of QPX-cultured cells to determine the lowest concentration of DNA that remained detectable in both the presence and absence of extraneous environmental substances. QPX cells were quantified before DNA extraction to calibrate standard curves to cell counts. Based on our results, the qPCR assay is able to quantify QPX within the range of 1 to several thousand organisms per reaction. Specificity of the assay was assessed by testing 29 thraustochytrid-like protists isolated from suspension-feeding bivalves from China, Oregon, Maryland, and Virginia. Application of the assay was demonstrated with positive qPCR results from naturally contaminated environmental samples including marine aggregates (i.e. marine snow), clam pseudofeces, and inflammatory nodules from infected clams. This quantitative assay for QPX will provide a valuable tool for characterizing QPX parasite abundances in coastal environments and for improving clam disease diagnostics.

  7. A novel quantitative PCR assay for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae using the competence regulator gene target comX.

    PubMed

    Habets, Marrit N; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Bos, Martine P; Savelkoul, Paul; Eleveld, Marc J; Meis, Jacques F; Hermans, Peter W M; Melchers, Willem J; de Jonge, Marien I; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for an estimated 1.6 million deaths worldwide every year. While rapid detection and timely treatment with appropriate antibiotics is preferred, this is often difficult due to the amount of time that detection with blood cultures takes. In this study, a novel quantitative PCR assay for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae was developed. To identify novel targets, we analysed the pneumococcal genome for unique, repetitive DNA sequences. This approach identified comX, which is conserved and present in duplicate copies in Streptococcus pneumoniae but not in other bacterial species. Comparison with lytA, the current 'gold standard' for detection by quantitative PCR, demonstrated an analytic specificity of 100% for both assays on a panel of 10 pneumococcal and 18 non-pneumococcal isolates, but a reduction of 3.5 quantitation cycle values (± 0.23 sem), resulting in an increased analytical detection rate of comX. We validated our assay on DNA extracted from the serum of 30 bacteraemic patients who were blood culture positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae and 51 serum samples that were culture positive for other bacteria. This resulted in a similar clinical sensitivity between the comX and lytA assays (47%) and in a diagnostic specificity of 98.2 and 100% for the lytA and comX assays, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed a novel quantitative PCR assay with increased analytical sensitivity for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, which may be used to develop a rapid bedside test for the direct detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical specimens.

  8. A rapid, quantitative assay for titration of bovine virus diarrhoea-mucosal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Roberts, P C; Etchison, J R; Bond, C W

    1988-12-01

    An end point dilution microtitration assay is described that can be used for the titration of both cytopathic and non-cytopathic isolates of bovine virus diarrhoea-mucosal disease virus. Indirect immunofluorescence is used to detect infected MDBK cells in the wells of Terasaki plates. The virus titre is derived from the number of uninfected wells, using the Poisson distribution. The assay is simple, fast and economical. Titres of cytopathic virus determined by the microtitration assay and standard plaque assay are equivalent.

  9. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical assay versus oncotype DX(®) qRT-PCR assay for estrogen and progesterone receptors: an independent quality assurance study.

    PubMed

    Kraus, James A; Dabbs, David J; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhargava, Rohit

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) status is a strong predictor of response to hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients. Presence of ER and level of expression have been shown to correlate with time to recurrence in patients undergoing therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors. Risk reduction is also known to occur in ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-positive patients treated with hormonal therapy. Since the 1990s, immunohistochemistry has been the primary method for assessing hormone receptor status. Recently, as a component of its oncotype DX(®) assay, Genomic Health began reporting quantitative estrogen and PR results determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). As part of an ongoing quality assurance program at our institution, we reviewed 464 breast cancer cases evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and oncotype DX(®) assay for estrogen and PR. We found good correlation for ER status between both assays (98.9% concordance), with immunohistochemistry being slightly more sensitive. Concordance for PR was 94.2% between immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR with immunohistochemistry again more sensitive than RT-PCR. The results also showed linear correlation between immunohistochemistry H-scores and qRT-PCR expression values for ER (correlation coefficient of 0.579), and PR (correlation coefficient of 0.685). Due to the higher sensitivity of hormone receptor immunohistochemistry and additional advantages (ie preservation of morphology, less expensive, faster, more convenient), we conclude immunohistochemistry is preferable to qRT-PCR for determination of estrogen and PR expression.

  10. Laboratory Assay of Brood Care for Quantitative Analyses of Individual Differences in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Affiliative Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shpigler, Hagai Y.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2015-01-01

    Care of offspring is a form of affiliative behavior that is fundamental to studies of animal social behavior. Insects do not figure prominently in this topic because Drosophila melanogaster and other traditional models show little if any paternal or maternal care. However, the eusocial honey bee exhibits cooperative brood care with larvae receiving intense and continuous care from their adult sisters, but this behavior has not been well studied because a robust quantitative assay does not exist. We present a new laboratory assay that enables quantification of group or individual honey bee brood “nursing behavior” toward a queen larva. In addition to validating the assay, we used it to examine the influence of the age of the larva and the genetic background of the adult bees on nursing performance. This new assay also can be used in the future for mechanistic analyses of eusociality and comparative analyses of affilative behavior with other animals. PMID:26569402

  11. Development of a colorimetric assay for rapid quantitative measurement of clavulanic acid in microbial samples.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xida; Xiang, Sihai; Li, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Yang, Keqian

    2012-02-01

    We developed a colorimetric assay to quantify clavulanic acid (CA) in culture broth of Streptomyces clavuligerus, to facilitate screening of a large number of S. clavuligerus mutants. The assay is based on a β-lactamase-catalyzed reaction, in which the yellow substrate nitrocefin (λ (max)=390 nm) is converted to a red product (λ (max)=486 nm). Since CA can irreversibly inhibit β-lactamase activity, the level of CA in a sample can be measured as a function of the A (390)/A (486) ratio in the assay mixture. The sensitivity and detection window of the assay were determined to be 50 μg L(-1) and 50 μg L(-1) to 10 mg L(-1), respectively. The reliability of the assay was confirmed by comparing assay results with those obtained by HPLC. The assay was used to screen a pool of 65 S. clavuligerus mutants and was reliable for identifying CA over-producing mutants. Therefore, the assay saves time and labor in large-scale mutant screening and evaluation tasks. The detection window and the reliability of this assay are markedly better than those of previously reported CA assays. This assay method is suitable for high throughput screening of microbial samples and allows direct visual observation of CA levels on agar plates.

  12. Novel wide-range quantitative nested real-time PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA: development and methodology.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tamura, Masato; Asami, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Eiko; Saito, Kosuke; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Takahashi, Sachiko Nonaka; Matsumoto, Koichi; Sawada, Shigemasa; Yokoyama, Eise; Takasu, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Previously, we designed an internally controlled quantitative nested real-time (QNRT) PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in order to rapidly diagnose tuberculous meningitis. This technique combined the high sensitivity of nested PCR with the accurate quantification of real-time PCR. In this study, we attempted to improve the original QNRT-PCR assay and newly developed the wide-range QNRT-PCR (WR-QNRT-PCR) assay, which is more accurate and has a wider detection range. For use as an internal-control "calibrator" to measure the copy number of M. tuberculosis DNA, an original new-mutation plasmid (NM-plasmid) was developed. It had artificial random nucleotides in five regions annealing specific primers and probes. The NM-plasmid demonstrated statistically uniform amplifications (F = 1.086, P = 0.774) against a range (1 to 10(5)) of copy numbers of mimic M. tuberculosis DNA and was regarded as appropriate for use as a new internal control in the WR-QNRT-PSR assay. In addition, by the optimization of assay conditions in WR-QNRT-PCR, two-step amplification of target DNA was completely consistent with the standard curve of this assay. Due to the development of the NM-plasmid as the new internal control, significantly improved quantitative accuracy and a wider detection range were realized with the WR-QNRT-PCR assay. In the next study, we will try to use this novel assay method with actual clinical samples and examine its clinical usefulness.

  13. Improved HF183 Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Characterization of Human Fecal Pollution in Ambient Surface Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hyatt C.; Haugland, Richard A.; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Field, Katharine G.; Walters, William A.; Knight, R.; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters. PMID:24610857

  14. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays of Transposition and Homologous Recombination of the Retrotransposon Tf1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sangesland, Maya; Atwood-Moore, Angela; Rai, Sudhir K; Levin, Henry L

    2016-01-01

    Transposition and homologous recombination assays are valuable genetic tools to measure the production and integration of cDNA from the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon Tf1 in the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Here we describe two genetic assays, one that measures the transposition activity of Tf1 by monitoring the mobility of a drug resistance marked Tf1 element expressed from a multi-copy plasmid and another assay that measures homologous recombination between Tf1 cDNA and the expression plasmid. While the transposition assay measures insertion of full-length Tf1 cDNA mediated by the transposon integrase, the homologous recombination assay measures levels of cDNA present in the nucleus and is independent of integrase activity. Combined, these assays can be used to systematically screen large collections of strains to identify mutations that specifically inhibit the integration step in the retroelement life cycle. Such mutations can be identified because they reduce transposition activity but nevertheless have wild-type frequencies of homologous recombination. Qualitative assays of yeast patches on agar plates detect large defects in integration and recombination, while the quantitative approach provides a precise method of determining integration and recombination frequencies.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF SEMI-QUANTITATIVE PCR ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF GAMBIERDISCUS SPECIES (GONYAULACALES, DINOPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Vandersea, Mark W; Kibler, Steven R; Holland, William C; Tester, Patricia A; Schultz, Thomas F; Faust, Maria A; Holmes, Michael J; Chinain, Mirelle; Wayne Litaker, R

    2012-08-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a serious health problem in tropical regions and is caused by the bioaccumulation of lipophilic toxins produced by dinoflagellates in the genus Gambierdiscus. Gambierdiscus species are morphologically similar and are difficult to distinguish from one another even when using scanning electron microscopy. Improved identification and detection methods that are sensitive and rapid are needed to identify toxic species and investigate potential distribution and abundance patterns in relation to incidences of CFP. This study presents the first species-specific, semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays that can be used to address these questions. These assays are specific for five Gambierdiscus species and one undescribed ribotype. The assays utilized a SYBR green format and targeted unique sequences found within the SSU, ITS, and the D1/D3 LSU ribosomal domains. Standard curves were constructed using known concentrations of cultured cells and 10-fold serial dilutions of rDNA PCR amplicons containing the target sequence for each specific assay. Assay sensitivity and accuracy were tested using DNA extracts purified from known concentrations of multiple Gambierdiscus species. The qPCR assays were used to assess Gambierdiscus species diversity and abundance in samples collected from nearshore areas adjacent to Ft. Pierce and Jupiter, Florida USA. The results indicated that the practical limit of detection for each assay was 10 cells per sample. Most interestingly, the qPCR analysis revealed that as many as four species of Gambierdiscus were present in a single macrophyte sample.

  16. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; Haugland, Richard A; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T; Borchardt, Mark A; Field, Katharine G; Walters, William A; Knight, R; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters.

  17. High-throughput quantitation of metabolically labeled anionic glycoconjugates by scintillation proximity assay utilizing binding to cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rees-Milton, Karen J; Anastassiades, Tassos P

    2006-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative methods suited to a large number of samples are required for studies into the determination of disease etiology and in the evaluation of drugs and biological agents. This chapter describes an assay for anionic glycoconjugates (GCs), including glycosaminoglycans, which are major gene products of chondrocytes appearing in the extracellular matrix. The assay utilizes the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate and carboxyl groups of anionic GCs synthesized and secreted by chondrocytes with the cationic dye Alcian blue, immobilized to scintillant-coated 96-well plates. Metabolic labeling with D-[1, 6-3H (N)]-glucosamine allows all anionic GCs, including cartilage-specific and hyperglycosylated variants of fibronectin, to be quantitated. If Na235SO4 is used for the metabolic labeling instead, only glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans will be quantitated. The samples are counted using a multi-detector instrument for scintillation proximity assays, such as the Wallac 1450 Microbeta Trilux, designed for detection of samples in 96-well plates and, as such, can be a high-throughput system. The bound anionic GCs can be visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after quantitation by elution with denaturing buffers. The method can be modified to include predigestion of the sample with a specific lyase, e.g., chondroitinase ABC or testicular hyaluronidase. To separate polyanions from other digested material after ethanol precipitation, the sample can be assayed as described in this chapter for a particular subtype of anionic GC. This assay addresses the need for high-throughput applications in arthritis and other medical and biological problems. PMID:17072016

  18. Real-time PCR assay using molecular beacon for quantitation of hepatitis B virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Sum, Simon Siu-Man; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Yuen, Man-Fung; Yuan, He-Jun; Yu, Jian; Lai, Ching-Lung; Ho, David; Zhang, Linqi

    2004-08-01

    Levels of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the blood serve as an important marker in monitoring the disease progression and treatment efficacy of chronic HBV infection. Several commercial assays are available for accurate measurement of HBV genomic DNA, but many of them are hampered by relatively low sensitivity and limited dynamic range. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and accurate assay for measuring HBV genomic DNA using real-time PCR with a molecular beacon (HBV beacon assay). The performance of this assay was validated by testing serial dilutions of the two EUROHEP HBV DNA standards (ad and ay subtypes) of known concentrations. The assay showed low intra-assay (<7%) and interassay (<5%) variations for both subtypes. Its dynamic range was found to be 10(1) to 10(7) copies per reaction (1.0 x 10(2) to 1.0 x 10(9) copies ml(-1)). The assay was further evaluated clinically using serum samples from 175 individuals with chronic hepatitis B. The HBV DNA level measured by this assay showed good correlation with that measured by the commercially available COBAS AMPLICOR HBV Monitor test (r = 0.901; P < 0.001). The higher sensitivity and broader dynamic range of this assay compared to the existing commercial assays will provide an ideal tool for monitoring disease progression and treatment efficacy in HBV-infected patients, in particular for those with low levels of HBV viremia.

  19. Strand-Specific Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus Genomic and Antigenomic RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Haist, Kelsey; Ziegler, Christopher; Botten, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses are bi-segmented, single-stranded RNA viruses that cause significant human disease. The manner in which they regulate the replication of their genome is not well-understood. This is partly due to the absence of a highly sensitive assay to measure individual species of arenavirus replicative RNAs. To overcome this obstacle, we designed a quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay for selective quantitation of each of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) genomic or antigenomic RNAs. During the course of assay design, we identified a nonspecific priming phenomenon whereby, in the absence of an RT primer, cDNAs complementary to each of the LCMV replicative RNA species are generated during RT. We successfully circumvented this nonspecific priming event through the use of biotinylated primers in the RT reaction, which permitted affinity purification of primer-specific cDNAs using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. As proof of principle, we used the assay to map the dynamics of LCMV replication at acute and persistent time points and to determine the quantities of genomic and antigenomic RNAs that are incorporated into LCMV particles. This assay can be adapted to measure total S or L segment-derived viral RNAs and therefore represents a highly sensitive diagnostic platform to screen for LCMV infection in rodent and human tissue samples and can also be used to quantify virus-cell attachment. PMID:25978311

  20. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Joseph C; Carim, Kellie J; Paroz, Yvette M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species' distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur.

  1. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Joseph C; Carim, Kellie J; Paroz, Yvette M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species' distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur. PMID:27583576

  2. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Carim, Kellie J.; Paroz, Yvette M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species’ distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur. PMID:27583576

  3. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for detection of Paenibacillus polymyxa using membrane-fusion protein-based primers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Park, Dong Suk; Lee, Jung Won; Chi, Hee Youn; Sohn, Soo-In; Jeon, Bong-Kyun; Ma, Jong-Beom

    2012-11-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa is known to be a plant-growthpromoting rhizobacterium. The present study describes a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the specific detection and quantitation of P. polymyxa using a primer pair based on the sequence of a membranefusion protein for the amplification of a 268 bp DNA fragment. This study reports that the qPCR-based method is applicable for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. polymyxa and can be used as an alternative method for agricultural soil monitoring.

  4. A competitive and reversible deactivation approach to catalysis-based quantitative assays

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Kazunori; Tracey, Matthew P.; Bu, Xiaodong; Jo, Junyong; Williams, Michael J.; Welch, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis-based signal amplification makes optical assays highly sensitive and widely useful in chemical and biochemical research. However, assays must be fine-tuned to avoid signal saturation, substrate depletion and nonlinear performance. Furthermore, once stopped, such assays cannot be restarted, limiting the dynamic range to two orders of magnitude with respect to analyte concentrations. In addition, abundant analytes are difficult to quantify under catalytic conditions due to rapid signal saturation. Herein, we report an approach in which a catalytic reaction competes with a concomitant inactivation of the catalyst or consumption of a reagent required for signal generation. As such, signal generation proceeds for a limited time, then autonomously and reversibly stalls. In two catalysis-based assays, we demonstrate restarting autonomously stalled reactions, enabling accurate measurement over five orders of magnitude, including analyte levels above substrate concentration. This indicates that the dynamic range of catalysis-based assays can be significantly broadened through competitive and reversible deactivation. PMID:26891765

  5. Quantitative analysis of G-protein-coupled receptor internalization using DnaE intein-based assay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Chen, Linjie; Zhang, Yaping; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of cell surface receptors, are involved in many physiological processes. They represent highly important therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Currently, there are numerous cell-based assays developed for the pharmacological profiling of GPCRs and the identification of novel agonists and antagonists. However, the development of new, faster, easier, and more cost-effective approaches to detect GPCR activity remains highly desirable. β-arrestin-dependent internalization has been demonstrated to be a common mechanism for most GPCRs. Here we describe a novel assay for quantitative analysis of GPCR internalization based on DnaE intein-mediated reconstitution of fragmented Renilla luciferase or Firefly luciferase when activated GPCRs interact with β-arrestin2 or Rab5. Further validation, using functionally divergent GPCRs, showed that EC50 values obtained for the known agonists and antagonists were in close agreement with the results of previous reports. This suggests that this assay is sensitive enough to permit quantification of GPCR internalization. Compared with conventional assays, this novel assay system is cost-effective, rapid, and easy to manipulate. These advantages may allow this assay to be used universally as a functional cell-based system for GPCR characterization and in the screening process of drug discovery. PMID:26928549

  6. A real-time quantitative assay for hepatitis B DNA virus (HBV) developed to detect all HBV genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Roberta; Paes, Angela; Mangueira, Cristovão Pitangueira; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Besides genotype, quantitative analysis of HBV infection is extensively used for monitoring disease progression and treatment. Affordable viral load monitoring is desirable in resource-limited settings and it has been already shown to be useful in developing countries for other viruses such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV. In this paper, we describe the validation of a real-time PCR assay for HBV DNA quantification with TaqMan chemistry and MGB probes. Primers and probes were designed using an alignment of sequences from all HBV genotypes in order to equally amplify all of them. The assay is internally controlled and was standardized with an international HBV panel. Its efficacy was evaluated comparing the results with two other methods: Versant HBV DNA Assay 3.0 (bDNA, Siemens, NY, USA) and another real-time PCR from a reference laboratory. Intra-assay and inter-assay reproducibilities were determined and the mean of CV values obtained were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively. The assay was validated with a broad dynamic range and is efficient for amplifying all HBV genotypes, providing a good option to quantify HBV DNA as a routine procedure, with a cheap and reliable protocol. PMID:20602019

  7. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001).

  8. Improved methods for capture, extraction, and quantitative assay of environmental DNA from Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.).

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Miller, Derryl J; Coyne, Kathryn J; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species.

  9. Improved Methods for Capture, Extraction, and Quantitative Assay of Environmental DNA from Asian Bigheaded Carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cameron R.; Miller, Derryl J.; Coyne, Kathryn J.; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  10. A new approach for quantitative analysis of L-phenylalanine using a novel semi-sandwich immunometric assay.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kazuyuki; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Miyano, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for L-phenylalanine analysis using a sandwich-type immunometric assay approach for use as a new method for amino acid analysis. To overcome difficulties of the preparation of high-affinity and selectivity monoclonal antibodies against L-phenylalanine and the inability to use sandwich-type immunometric assays due to their small molecular weight, three procedures were examined. First, amino groups of L-phenylalanine were modified by "N-Fmoc-L-cysteine" (FC) residues and the derivative (FC-Phe) was used as a hapten. Immunization of mice with bovine serum albumin/FC-Phe conjugate successfully yielded specific monoclonal anti-FC-Phe antibodies. Second, a new derivatization reagent, "biotin linker conjugate of FC-Phe N-succinimidyl ester" (FC(Biotin)-NHS), was synthesized to convert L-phenylalanine to FC-(Biotin)-Phe as a hapten structure. The biotin moiety linked to the thiol group of cysteine formed a second binding site for streptavidin/horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugates for optical detection. Third, a new semi-sandwich-type immunometric assay was established using pre-derivatized L-phenylalanine, the monoclonal anti-FC-Phe antibody, and streptavidin/HRP conjugate (without second antibody). Using the new "semi-sandwich" immunometric assay system, a detection limit of 35 nM (60 amol per analysis) and a detection range of 0.1-20 μM were attained using a standard L-phenylalanine solution. Rat plasma samples were analyzed to test reliability. Intra-day assay precision was within 6% of the coefficient of variation; inter-day variation was 0.1%. The recovery rates were from 92.4 to 123.7%. This is the first report of the quantitative determination of L-phenylalanine using a reliable semi-sandwich immunometric assay approach and will be applicable to the quantitative determination of other amino acids.

  11. Quantitation of HIV-1 DNA with a sensitive TaqMan assay that has broad subtype specificity.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; van Montfort, Thijs; Centlivre, Mireille; Schopman, Nick C T; Cornelissen, Marion; Sanders, Rogier W; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Paxton, William A; Pollakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    The increasing diversity of HIV-1 isolates makes virus quantitation challenging, especially when diverse isolates co-circulate in a geographical area. Measuring the HIV-1 DNA levels in cells has become a valuable practical tool for fundamental and clinical research. A quantitative HIV-1 DNA assay was developed based on TaqMan(®) technology. Primers that target the highly conserved LTR region were designed to detect a broad array of HIV-1 variants, including viral isolates from many subtypes, with high sensitivity. Introduction of a pre-amplification step prior to the TaqMan(®) reaction allowed the specific amplification of fully reverse transcribed viral DNA. Execution of the pre-amplification step with a second primer set enables for the exclusive quantitation of the 2-LTR circular HIV-1 DNA form. PMID:23059551

  12. Performance Assessment of Human and Cattle Associated Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation overview is (1) Single laboratory performance assessment of human- and cattle associated PCR assays and (2) A Field Study: Evaluation of two human fecal waste management practices in Ohio watershed.

  13. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergauwe, Nicolas; Witters, Daan; Ceyssens, Frederik; Vermeir, Steven; Verbruggen, Bert; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To demonstrate

  14. Development of a SYBR Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection and quantification of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Kirkpatrick, Naomi C; Coppo, Mauricio; Lee, Sang-Won; Devlin, Joanne M; Markham, Philip F; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-06-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis is an acute viral respiratory disease of chickens with a worldwide distribution. Sensitive detection of the causative herpesvirus is particularly important because it can persist in the host at a very low copy number and be transmitted to other birds. Quantification of viral genome copy number is also useful for clinical investigations and experimental studies. In the study presented here, a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed using SYBR Green chemistry and the viral gene UL15a to detect and quantify infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in ILTV-inoculated chicken embryos or naturally infected birds. The specificity of the assay was confirmed using a panel of viral and bacterial pathogens of poultry. The sensitivity of the assay was compared with two conventional PCR assays, virus titration and an antigen-detecting enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The qPCR developed in this study was highly sensitive and specific, and has potential for quantification of ILTV in tissues from naturally and experimentally infected birds and embryos.

  15. NEW TARGET AND CONTROL ASSAYS FOR QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) ANALYSIS OF ENTEROCOCCI IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently monitored in water samples as indicators of fecal pollution. Attention is now shifting from culture based methods for enumerating these organisms to more rapid molecular methods such as QPCR. Accurate quantitative analyses by this method requires highly...

  16. Development of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio tubiashii targeting the metalloprotease gene.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Dima N; Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-03-01

    Vibrio tubiashii has recently re-emerged as a pathogen of bivalve larvae, causing a marked increase in the mortality of these species within shellfish rearing facilities. This has resulted in substantial losses of seed production and thus created the need for specific as well as sensitive detection methods for this pathogen. In this project, quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers were developed and optimized based upon analysis of the V. tubiashii vtpA gene sequence, encoding a metalloprotease known to cause larval mortality. Standard curves were developed utilizing dilutions of known quantities of V. tubiashii cells that were compared to colony forming unit (CFU) plate counts. The assay was optimized for detection of vtpA with both lab-grown V. tubiashii samples and filter-captured environmental seawater samples seeded with V. tubiashii. In addition, the primers were confirmed to specifically detect only V. tubiashii when tested against a variety of non-target Vibrio species. Validation of the assay was completed by analyzing samples obtained from a shellfish hatchery. The development of this rapid and sensitive assay for quantitative detection of V. tubiashii will accurately determine levels of this bacterium in a variety of seawater samples, providing a useful tool for oyster hatcheries and a method to assess the presence of this bacterium in the current turbulent ocean environment.

  17. Antibody performance in ChIP-sequencing assays: From quality scores of public data sets to quantitative certification.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Saravaki, Vincent; Cholley, Pierre-Etienne; Blum, Matthias; Billoré, Benjamin; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    We have established a certification system for antibodies to be used in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays coupled to massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). This certification comprises a standardized ChIP procedure and the attribution of a numerical quality control indicator (QCi) to biological replicate experiments. The QCi computation is based on a universally applicable quality assessment that quantitates the global deviation of randomly sampled subsets of ChIP-seq dataset with the original genome-aligned sequence reads. Comparison with a QCi database for >28,000 ChIP-seq assays were used to attribute quality grades (ranging from 'AAA' to 'DDD') to a given dataset. In the present report we used the numerical QC system to assess the factors influencing the quality of ChIP-seq assays, including the nature of the target, the sequencing depth and the commercial source of the antibody.  We have used this approach specifically to certify mono and polyclonal antibodies obtained from Active Motif directed against the histone modification marks H3K4me3, H3K27ac and H3K9ac for ChIP-seq. The antibodies received the grades AAA to BBC ( www.ngs-qc.org). We propose to attribute such quantitative grading of all antibodies attributed with the label "ChIP-seq grade". PMID:27335635

  18. Antibody performance in ChIP-sequencing assays: From quality scores of public data sets to quantitative certification

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Saravaki, Vincent; Cholley, Pierre-Etienne; Blum, Matthias; Billoré, Benjamin; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    We have established a certification system for antibodies to be used in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays coupled to massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). This certification comprises a standardized ChIP procedure and the attribution of a numerical quality control indicator (QCi) to biological replicate experiments. The QCi computation is based on a universally applicable quality assessment that quantitates the global deviation of randomly sampled subsets of ChIP-seq dataset with the original genome-aligned sequence reads. Comparison with a QCi database for >28,000 ChIP-seq assays were used to attribute quality grades (ranging from ‘AAA’ to ‘DDD’) to a given dataset. In the present report we used the numerical QC system to assess the factors influencing the quality of ChIP-seq assays, including the nature of the target, the sequencing depth and the commercial source of the antibody.  We have used this approach specifically to certify mono and polyclonal antibodies obtained from Active Motif directed against the histone modification marks H3K4me3, H3K27ac and H3K9ac for ChIP-seq. The antibodies received the grades AAA to BBC ( www.ngs-qc.org). We propose to attribute such quantitative grading of all antibodies attributed with the label “ChIP-seq grade”. PMID:27335635

  19. Antibody performance in ChIP-sequencing assays: From quality scores of public data sets to quantitative certification.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Saravaki, Vincent; Cholley, Pierre-Etienne; Blum, Matthias; Billoré, Benjamin; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    We have established a certification system for antibodies to be used in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays coupled to massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). This certification comprises a standardized ChIP procedure and the attribution of a numerical quality control indicator (QCi) to biological replicate experiments. The QCi computation is based on a universally applicable quality assessment that quantitates the global deviation of randomly sampled subsets of ChIP-seq dataset with the original genome-aligned sequence reads. Comparison with a QCi database for >28,000 ChIP-seq assays were used to attribute quality grades (ranging from 'AAA' to 'DDD') to a given dataset. In the present report we used the numerical QC system to assess the factors influencing the quality of ChIP-seq assays, including the nature of the target, the sequencing depth and the commercial source of the antibody.  We have used this approach specifically to certify mono and polyclonal antibodies obtained from Active Motif directed against the histone modification marks H3K4me3, H3K27ac and H3K9ac for ChIP-seq. The antibodies received the grades AAA to BBC ( www.ngs-qc.org). We propose to attribute such quantitative grading of all antibodies attributed with the label "ChIP-seq grade".

  20. Endotoxin Detection in Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices with Kinetic-QCL, a Kinetic-Quantitative Chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate Assay.

    PubMed

    Berzofsky, Ronald N.

    1995-01-01

    The observation that endotoxin caused gelation in extracts of Limulus amebocytes has been expanded to the development of an in vitro kinetic, quantitative chromogenic LAL assay (Kinetic-QCL) for the detection of endotoxin in aqueous fluids. Within the last 15 years, the use of Limulus amebocyte lysate to detect and control the presence of pyrogenic substances in pharmaceuticals and medical devices has gained wide international acceptance. Both the United States and European Pharmacopoeias contain descriptions of and requirements for the LAL Bacterial Endotoxin Test. Both pharmacopoeias have begun to remove the rabbit pyrogen test requirement in a majority of drug monographs and have substituted endotoxin limits to be determined by LAL. The use of LAL has proved invaluable in controlling the level of endotoxin in finished product. The endotoxin contribution of raw materials and packaging material can be monitored as well. In-process testing at critical production steps can identify additional sources of endotoxin contamination, and depyrogenation processes can be validated by quantitating the degradation of endotoxin challenges. The speed, reproducibility, sensitivity, and economics of the Kinetic-QCL assay, in conjunction with the ppropriate equipment and software, over both the in vivo rabbit pyrogen test and the more traditional LAL gel-clot assay allow a more in-depth approach to the control of endotoxin in pharmaceuticals and medical devices.

  1. Printing 2-dimentional droplet array for single-cell reverse transcription quantitative PCR assay with a microfluidic robot.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yun-Xia; Liu, Wen-Wen; Ma, Yan; Fang, Qun; Yao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a nanoliter droplet array-based single-cell reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay method for quantifying gene expression in individual cells. By sequentially printing nanoliter-scale droplets on microchip using a microfluidic robot, all liquid-handling operations including cell encapsulation, lysis, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR with real-time fluorescence detection, can be automatically achieved. The inhibition effect of cell suspension buffer on RT-PCR assay was comprehensively studied to achieve high-sensitivity gene quantification. The present system was applied in the quantitative measurement of expression level of mir-122 in single Huh-7 cells. A wide distribution of mir-122 expression in single cells from 3061 copies/cell to 79998 copies/cell was observed, showing a high level of cell heterogeneity. With the advantages of full-automation in liquid-handling, simple system structure, and flexibility in achieving multi-step operations, the present method provides a novel liquid-handling mode for single cell gene expression analysis, and has significant potentials in transcriptional identification and rare cell analysis. PMID:25828383

  2. Commercially available antibodies can be applied in quantitative multiplexed peptide immunoaffinity enrichment targeted mass spectrometry assays

    PubMed Central

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Kennedy, Jacob; Yan, Ping; Lin, Chenwei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides coupled to multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (immuno-MRM) enables highly specific, sensitive, and precise quantification of peptides and post-translational modifications. Major obstacles to developing a large number of immuno-MRM assays are the poor availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) validated for immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides and the cost and lead time of developing the antibodies de novo. Although many thousands of mAbs are commercially offered, few have been tested for application to immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides. In this study we tested the success rate of using commercially available mAbs for peptide immuno-MRM assays. We selected 105 commercial mAbs (76 targeting non-modified “pan” epitopes, 29 targeting phosphorylation) to proteins associated with the DNA damage response network. We found that 8 of the 76 pan (11%) and 5 of the 29 phospho-specific mAbs (17%) captured tryptic peptides (detected by LC-MS/MS) of their protein targets from human cell lysates. Seven of these mAbs were successfully used to configure and analytically characterize immuno-MRM assays. By applying selection criteria upfront, the results indicate that a screening success rate of up to 24% is possible, establishing the feasibility of screening a large number of catalog antibodies to provide readily-available assay reagents. PMID:27094115

  3. A Call for Nominations of Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays from Relevant Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council of the United States National Academies of Science has recently released a document outlining a long-range vision and strategy for transforming toxicity testing from largely whole animal-based testing to one based on in vitro assays. “Toxicity Testin...

  4. Direct dye binding--a quantitative assay for solid-phase immobilized protein.

    PubMed

    Bonde, M; Pontoppidan, H; Pepper, D S

    1992-01-01

    A direct dye-binding procedure was established for the quantification of protein after its immobilization on a solid phase, using IgG and BSA as model proteins. The assay, which in the range 0-5 mg protein/ml gel correlates well with indirect protein determination by A280 as well as determination of protein hydrolyzed from the gel, is based on a modified Bradford dye-binding assay. As the protein coupled to the gel binds the dye, a decrease in A465 of the supernatant is measured. Three solid supports commonly used for protein immobilization (Sepharose, Sephadex, Sephacryl) were found to be compatible with the dye-binding assay while nonspecific dye binding was found to HEMA gels. Protein was coupled to Sephacryl S-1000 using three different activation methods (aldehyde, hydrazine, and adipic acid dihydrazide). Artifactual dye-binding was not observed using any of the three different "linkers." The assay is easily carried out and represents a useful tool, e.g., when optimizing procedures for protein immobilization. PMID:1595895

  5. Characterization of Diversity in Toxicity Mechanism Using In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assays in Quantitative High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruili; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Xia, Menghang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the potential health risks of environmental chemical compounds is an expensive undertaking which has motivated the development of new alternatives to traditional in vivo toxicological testing. One approach is to stage the evaluation, beginning with less expensive and higher throughput in vitro testing before progressing to more definitive trials. In vitro testing can be used to generate a hypothesis about a compound's mechanism of action, which can then be used to design an appropriate in vivo experiment. Here we begin to address the question of how to design such a battery of in vitro cell-based assays by combining data from two different types of assays, cell viability and caspase activation, with the aim of elucidating mechanism of action. Because caspase activation is a transient event during apoptosis, it is not possible to design a single end-point assay protocol that would identify all instances of compound-induced caspase activation. Nevertheless, useful information about compound mechanism of action can be obtained from these assays in combination with cell viability data. Unsupervised clustering in combination with Dunn's cluster validity index is a robust method for identifying mechanisms of action without requiring any a priori knowledge about mechanisms of toxicity. The performance of this clustering method is evaluated by comparing the clustering results against literature annotations of compound mechanisms. PMID:18281954

  6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate serum ferritin in black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata).

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gordon A; Chavey, Patricia Sue; Crawford, Graham

    2005-12-01

    Lemurs in captivity progressively accumulate iron deposits in a variety of organs (hemosiderosis) including duodenum, liver, and spleen throughout their lives. When excessive, the toxic effects of intracellular iron on parenchymal cells, particularly the liver, can result in clinical disease and death. The pathogenesis of excessive iron storage in these species has been attributed to dietary factors related to diets commonly fed in captivity. Tissue iron stores can be directly estimated by tissue biopsy and histologic examination, or quantitated by chemical analysis of biopsy tissue, However, expense and risk associated with anesthesia and surgery prevent routine use of tissue biopsy to assess iron status. A noninvasive means of assessing total body iron stores is needed to monitor iron stores in lemurs to determine whether dietary modification is preventing excessive iron deposition, and to monitor potential therapies such as phlebotomy or chelation. Serum ferritin concentration correlates with tissue iron stores in humans, horses, calves, dogs, cats, and pigs. Serum ferritin is considered the best serum analyte to predict total body iron stores in these species and is more reliable than serum iron or total iron binding capacity, both of which may be affected by disorders unrelated to iron adequacy or excess including hypoproteinemia, chronic infection, hemolytic anemia, hypothyroidism, renal disease, and drug administration. We have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum ferritin in lemurs. The assay uses polyclonal rabbit anti-human ferritin antibodies in a sandwich arrangement. Ferritin isolated from liver and spleen of a black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) was used as a standard. Ferritin standards were linear from 0 to 50 microg/L. Recovery of purified ferritin from lemur serum varied from 95% to 110%. The within-assay variability was 4.5%, and the assay-to-assay variability for three different samples ranged

  7. A Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Detection and Quantification of Epizootic Epitheliotropic Disease Virus (EEDV; Salmonid Herpesvirus 3).

    PubMed

    Glenney, Gavin W; Barbash, Patricia A; Coll, John A

    2016-03-01

    Epizootic epitheliotropic disease virus (EEDV; salmonid herpesvirus [SalHV3]; family Alloherpesviridae) causes a systemic disease of juvenile and yearling Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush. No cell lines are currently available for the culture and propagation of EEDV, so primary diagnosis is limited to PCR and electron microscopy. To better understand the pervasiveness of EEDV (carrier or latent state of infection) in domesticated and wild Lake Trout populations, we developed a sensitive TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect the presence of the EEDV terminase gene in Lake Trout tissues. This assay was able to detect a linear standard curve over nine logs of plasmid dilution and was sensitive enough to detect single-digit copies of EEDV. The efficiency of the PCR assay was 99.4 ± 0.06% (mean ± SD), with a 95% confidence limit of 0.0296 (R(2) = 0.994). Methods were successfully applied to collect preliminary data from a number of species and water bodies in the states of Pennsylvania, New York, and Vermont, indicating that EEDV is more common in wild fish than previously known. In addition, through the development of this qPCR assay, we detected EEDV in a new salmonid species, the Cisco Coregonus artedi. The qPCR assay was unexpectedly able to detect two additional herpesviruses, the Atlantic Salmon papillomatosis virus (ASPV; SalHV4) and the Namaycush herpesvirus (NamHV; SalHV5), which both share high sequence identity with the EEDV terminase gene. With these unexpected findings, we subsequently designed three primer sets to confirm initial TaqMan qPCR assay positives and to differentiate among EEDV, ASPV, and NamHV by detecting the glycoprotein genes via SYBR Green qPCR. Received April 20, 2015; accepted November 10, 2015. PMID:26980561

  8. A Versatile Panel of Reference Gene Assays for the Measurement of Chicken mRNA by Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Helena J.; Van Borm, Steven; Young, John R.; Fife, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays are widely used for the quantification of mRNA within avian experimental samples. Multiple stably-expressed reference genes, selected for the lowest variation in representative samples, can be used to control random technical variation. Reference gene assays must be reliable, have high amplification specificity and efficiency, and not produce signals from contaminating DNA. Whilst recent research papers identify specific genes that are stable in particular tissues and experimental treatments, here we describe a panel of ten avian gene primer and probe sets that can be used to identify suitable reference genes in many experimental contexts. The panel was tested with TaqMan and SYBR Green systems in two experimental scenarios: a tissue collection and virus infection of cultured fibroblasts. GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms were able to select appropriate reference gene sets in each case. We show the effects of using the selected genes on the detection of statistically significant differences in expression. The results are compared with those obtained using 28s ribosomal RNA, the present most widely accepted reference gene in chicken work, identifying circumstances where its use might provide misleading results. Methods for eliminating DNA contamination of RNA reduced, but did not completely remove, detectable DNA. We therefore attached special importance to testing each qPCR assay for absence of signal using DNA template. The assays and analyses developed here provide a useful resource for selecting reference genes for investigations of avian biology. PMID:27537060

  9. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  10. A protocol for the systematic and quantitative measurement of protein-lipid interactions using the liposome-microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Vonkova, Ivana; Deghou, Samy; Ceschia, Stefano; Tischer, Christian; Kugler, Karl G; Bork, Peer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Lipids organize the activity of the cell's proteome through a complex network of interactions. The assembly of comprehensive atlases embracing all protein-lipid interactions is an important challenge that requires innovative methods. We recently developed a liposome-microarray-based assay (LiMA) that integrates liposomes, microfluidics and fluorescence microscopy and which is capable of measuring protein recruitment to membranes in a quantitative and high-throughput manner. Compared with previous assays that are labor-intensive and difficult to scale up, LiMA improves the protein-lipid interaction assay throughput by at least three orders of magnitude. Here we provide a step-by-step LiMA protocol that includes the following: (i) the serial and generic production of the liposome microarray; (ii) its integration into a microfluidic format; (iii) the measurement of fluorescently labeled protein (either purified proteins or from cell lysate) recruitment to liposomal membranes using high-throughput microscopy; (iv) automated image analysis pipelines to quantify protein-lipid interactions; and (v) data quality analysis. In addition, we discuss the experimental design, including the relevant quality controls. Overall, the protocol-including device preparation, assay and data analysis-takes 6-8 d. This protocol paves the way for protein-lipid interaction screens to be performed on the proteome and lipidome scales. PMID:27149326

  11. Development and evaluation of a pseudovirus-luciferase assay for rapid and quantitative detection of neutralizing antibodies against enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing; Mao, Qunying; Yao, Xin; Chen, Pan; Chen, Xiangmei; Shao, Jie; Gao, Fan; Yu, Xiang; Zhu, Fengcai; Li, Rongcheng; Li, Wenhui; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Junzhi; Lu, Fengmin

    2013-01-01

    The level of neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) induced by vaccine inoculation is an important endpoint to evaluate the efficacy of EV71 vaccine. In order to evaluate the efficacy of EV71 vaccine, here, we reported the development of a novel pseudovirus system expression firefly luciferase (PVLA) for the quantitative measurement of NtAb. We first evaluated and validated the sensitivity and specificity of the PVLA method. A total of 326 serum samples from an epidemiological survey and 144 serum specimens from 3 clinical trials of EV71 vaccines were used, and the level of each specimen's neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) was measured in parallel using both the conventional CPE-based and PVLA-based assay. Against the standard neutralization assay based on the inhibition of the cytopathic effect (CPE), the sensitivity and specificity of the PVLA method are 98% and 96%, respectively. Then, we tested the potential interference of NtAb against hepatitis A virus, Polio-I, Polio-II, and Polio-III standard antisera (WHO) and goat anti-G10/CA16 serum, the PVLA based assay showed no cross-reactivity with NtAb against other specific sera. Importantly, unlike CPE based method, no live replication-competent EV71 is used during the measurement. Taken together, PVLA is a rapid and specific assay with higher sensitivity and accuracy. It could serve as a valuable tool in assessing the efficacy of EV71 vaccines in clinical trials and disease surveillance in epidemiology studies.

  12. A Versatile Panel of Reference Gene Assays for the Measurement of Chicken mRNA by Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Staines, Karen; Batra, Ambalika; Mwangi, William; Maier, Helena J; Van Borm, Steven; Young, John R; Fife, Mark; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays are widely used for the quantification of mRNA within avian experimental samples. Multiple stably-expressed reference genes, selected for the lowest variation in representative samples, can be used to control random technical variation. Reference gene assays must be reliable, have high amplification specificity and efficiency, and not produce signals from contaminating DNA. Whilst recent research papers identify specific genes that are stable in particular tissues and experimental treatments, here we describe a panel of ten avian gene primer and probe sets that can be used to identify suitable reference genes in many experimental contexts. The panel was tested with TaqMan and SYBR Green systems in two experimental scenarios: a tissue collection and virus infection of cultured fibroblasts. GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms were able to select appropriate reference gene sets in each case. We show the effects of using the selected genes on the detection of statistically significant differences in expression. The results are compared with those obtained using 28s ribosomal RNA, the present most widely accepted reference gene in chicken work, identifying circumstances where its use might provide misleading results. Methods for eliminating DNA contamination of RNA reduced, but did not completely remove, detectable DNA. We therefore attached special importance to testing each qPCR assay for absence of signal using DNA template. The assays and analyses developed here provide a useful resource for selecting reference genes for investigations of avian biology. PMID:27537060

  13. A protocol for the systematic and quantitative measurement of protein-lipid interactions using the liposome-microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Vonkova, Ivana; Deghou, Samy; Ceschia, Stefano; Tischer, Christian; Kugler, Karl G; Bork, Peer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Lipids organize the activity of the cell's proteome through a complex network of interactions. The assembly of comprehensive atlases embracing all protein-lipid interactions is an important challenge that requires innovative methods. We recently developed a liposome-microarray-based assay (LiMA) that integrates liposomes, microfluidics and fluorescence microscopy and which is capable of measuring protein recruitment to membranes in a quantitative and high-throughput manner. Compared with previous assays that are labor-intensive and difficult to scale up, LiMA improves the protein-lipid interaction assay throughput by at least three orders of magnitude. Here we provide a step-by-step LiMA protocol that includes the following: (i) the serial and generic production of the liposome microarray; (ii) its integration into a microfluidic format; (iii) the measurement of fluorescently labeled protein (either purified proteins or from cell lysate) recruitment to liposomal membranes using high-throughput microscopy; (iv) automated image analysis pipelines to quantify protein-lipid interactions; and (v) data quality analysis. In addition, we discuss the experimental design, including the relevant quality controls. Overall, the protocol-including device preparation, assay and data analysis-takes 6-8 d. This protocol paves the way for protein-lipid interaction screens to be performed on the proteome and lipidome scales.

  14. INTERNAL AMPLIFICATION CONTROL FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) can be used as a rapid method for detecting fecal indicator bacteria. Because false negative results can be caused by PCR inhibitors that co-extract with the DNA samples, an internal amplification control (IAC) should be run with eac...

  15. A sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based assay for quantitation of amino-containing moieties in lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Kalhorn, Thomas F.; Kiavand, Anahita; Cohen, Ilana E.; Nelson, Amanda K.; Ernst, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    A novel sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based assay was developed for the quantitation of aminosugars, including 2-amino-2-deoxyglucose (glucosamine, GlcN), 2-amino-2-deoxygalactose (galactosamine, GalN), and 4-amino-4-deoxyarabinose (aminoarabinose, AraN), and for ethanolamine (EtN), present in lipid A. This assay enables the identification and quantitation of all amino-containing moieties present in lipopolysaccharide or lipid A from a single sample. The method was applied to the analysis of lipid A (endotoxin) isolated from a variety of biosynthetic and regulatory mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida. Lipid A is treated with trifluoroacetic acid to liberate and deacetylate individual aminosugars and mass tagged with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate, which reacts with primary and secondary amines. The derivatives are separated using reversed-phase chromatography and analyzed using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer to detect quantities as small as 20 fmol. GalN was detected only in Francisella and AraN only in Salmonella, while GlcN was detected in lipid A samples from both species of bacteria. Additionally, we found an approximately 10-fold increase in the level of AraN in lipid A isolated from Salmonella grown in magnesium-limited versus magnesium-replete conditions. Salmonella with defined mutations in lipid A synthesis and regulatory genes were used to further validate the assay. Salmonella with null mutations in the phoP, pmrE, and prmF genes were unable to add AraN to their lipid A, while Salmonella with constitutively active phoP and pmrA exhibited AraN modification of lipid A even in the normally repressive magnesium-replete growth condition. The described assay produces excellent repeatability and reproducibility for the detection of amino-containing moieties in lipid A from a variety of bacterial sources. PMID:19130491

  16. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001). PMID:27335148

  17. Molecular beacon-style hybridization assay for quantitative analysis of surface invasive cleavage reactions.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Matthew R; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    A hybridization-based FRET format for the scoring of SNPs in surface invasive cleavage reactions is described. In early versions of the surface invasive cleavage reaction, dual-labeled oligonucleotides, containing both a quencher moiety and a fluorophore, were attached to the substrate. The invasive cleavage reaction cleaved the DNA strand between the two, resulting in an increase in fluorescence signal due to the separation of the quencher from the fluorophore. A limitation of this assay format was the relatively low quenching efficiency of 84% obtained, as well as the complexity of synthesis for these dual-labeled probes. In the assay format presented here, singly labeled oligonucleotides are employed, with the quencher and fluorophore placed on separate complementary oligonucleotides. The surface-bound probe is terminated at the 5' end with the quencher and the complement is terminated at its 3' end with a fluorophore, such that upon hybridization the two are positioned directly across from one another in the duplex. Quenching efficiency in this "molecular beacon" format is increased to 88%, much closer to the 91% level that has been reported for molecular beacon assays. A second benefit of the approach described here is that the portion of probe oligonucleotide that is removed by the enzyme is shorter, thus increasing the rate of probe cleavage. The improved quenching efficiency and increased probe cleavage rate result in a lower detection limit for the assay. A theoretical model of the FRET process occurring on the surfaces was used to relate the observed surface fluorescence intensity to the progress of the invasive cleavage reaction.

  18. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples. PMID:26142386

  19. Viral Multiplex Quantitative PCR Assays for Tracking Sources of Fecal Contamination▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Sandro; Hewitt, Joanne; Greening, Gail E.

    2010-01-01

    Human and animal fecal pollution of the environment presents a risk to human health because of the presence of pathogenic viruses and bacteria. To distinguish between human and animal sources of pollution, we designed specific real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays for human and animal enteric viruses, including norovirus genogroups I, II, and III; porcine adenovirus types 3 and 5; ovine adenovirus; atadenovirus; and human adenovirus species C and F, which are excreted by infected humans, pigs, cattle, sheep, deer, and goats, and for the detection of F+ RNA bacteriophage genogroups I to IV, which are associated with human and animal wastes. The sensitivity of this viral toolbox (VTB) was tested against 10-fold dilution series of DNA plasmids that carry the target sequences of the respective viruses and was shown to detect at least 10 plasmid copies for each assay. A panel of human and animal enteric and respiratory viruses showed these assays to be highly sensitive and specific to their respective targets. The VTB was used to detect viruses in fecal and environmental samples, including raw sewage and biosolids from municipal sewage treatment plants, abattoir sewage, and fecally contaminated shellfish and river water, which were likely to contain animal or human viruses. PMID:20061455

  20. Applications of gamma-ray spectrometry in the quantitative nondestructive assay of special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Parker, J.L.

    1990-04-16

    Nearly all applications of gamma-ray spectrometry in the quanitative assay of special nuclear materials can be grouped into five general categories. They are as follows: (1) Quanitative passive assay, of which transmission-corrected passive assay methods for measuring isotopic masses/concentrations are an important subset; (2) Enrichment measurements on infinitely thick'' samples for absolute determination of isotopic fractions/concentrations; (3) Measurements of isotopic ratios using relative detection efficiency principles resulting in absolute isotopic distributions without recourse to standards; (4) Absorption-edge densitometry measurements of elemental concentrations; and (5) X-ray fluorescence measurements of elemental concentrations. Careful and correct practice of these techniques can yield measurement accuracies in the range of 0.1% to 1.0% in favorable situations with measurement times generally in the range of 15 minutes to 1 hour. We present examples of these general categories with emphasis on those measurements and techniques exhibiting the best accuracy, as well as those which are not routinely practiced in many other applications of gamma-ray spectrometry. 20 refs., 6 fig.

  1. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples.

  2. Development and Validation of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Scedosporiosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Maria V.; Buitrago, Maria J.; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are fungal pathogens that can cause severe human infections, including disseminated mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Two real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the diagnosis of these species were developed and validated for the classification of clinical strains and for the detection of DNA in clinical samples by use of a murine model of invasive infection. A total of 14 clinical strains and 141 samples, including blood, serum, and lung samples from infected CD1 mice, were analyzed. Each RT-PCR methodology used a species-specific molecular beacon probe targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal ribosomal DNA gene. Results showed 100% specificity and a detection limit of 10 fg of DNA for both assays. The sensitivities for the S. prolificans-specific PCR assay were 100% for cultured clinical strains, 95.5% for lung tissues, 85% for serum, and 83.3% for blood. For S. apiospermum, the sensitivities were 100% for clinical strains and 97.2%, 81.8%, and 54.5% for lung tissues, serum, and blood, respectively. Both techniques can be useful for clinical diagnosis, and further studies are warranted. PMID:18684999

  3. Development and validation of a quantitative PCR assay for diagnosis of scedosporiosis.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maria V; Buitrago, Maria J; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are fungal pathogens that can cause severe human infections, including disseminated mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Two real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the diagnosis of these species were developed and validated for the classification of clinical strains and for the detection of DNA in clinical samples by use of a murine model of invasive infection. A total of 14 clinical strains and 141 samples, including blood, serum, and lung samples from infected CD1 mice, were analyzed. Each RT-PCR methodology used a species-specific molecular beacon probe targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal ribosomal DNA gene. Results showed 100% specificity and a detection limit of 10 fg of DNA for both assays. The sensitivities for the S. prolificans-specific PCR assay were 100% for cultured clinical strains, 95.5% for lung tissues, 85% for serum, and 83.3% for blood. For S. apiospermum, the sensitivities were 100% for clinical strains and 97.2%, 81.8%, and 54.5% for lung tissues, serum, and blood, respectively. Both techniques can be useful for clinical diagnosis, and further studies are warranted.

  4. Development of quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of three classes of HHV-6B gene transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ihira, Masaru; Enomoto, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Nakai, Hidetaka; Sugata, Ken; Asano, Yoshizo; Tsuzuki, Motohiro; Emi, Nobuhiko; Goto, Tatsunori; Miyamura, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kato, Koji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of active human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) B infection is important for distinguishing between the reactivation and latent state of the virus. The aim of this present study is to develop a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for diagnosis of active viral infection. Primers and probes for in house quantitative RT-PCR methods were designed to detect the three kinetic classes of HHV-6B mRNAs (U90, U12, U100). Stored PBMCs samples collected from 10 patients with exanthem subitum (primary HHV-6B infection) and 15 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with HHV-6B reactivation were used to evaluate reliability for testing clinical samples. Excellent linearity was obtained with high correlation efficiency between the diluted RNA (1-100 ng/reaction) and C(t) value of each gene transcript. The U90 and U12 gene transcripts were detected in all of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) samples collected in acute period of primary HHV-6B infection. Only one convalescent PBMCs sample was positive for the U90 gene transcript. Additionally, the reliability of HHV-6B quantitative RT-PCRs for diagnosis of viral reactivation in hematopoietic transplant recipients was evaluated. Relative to virus culture, U90 quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated the highest assay sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Thus, this method could be a rapid and lower cost alternative to virus culture, which is difficult to perform generally, for identifying active HHV-6B infection. PMID:22825817

  5. Quantitative lipopolysaccharide analysis using HPLC/MS/MS and its combination with the limulus amebocyte lysate assay.

    PubMed

    Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Gautier, Thomas; Sali, Wahib; Adrie, Christophe; Choubley, Hélène; Charron, Emilie; Lalande, Caroline; Le Guern, Naig; Deckert, Valérie; Monchi, Mehran; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Lagrost, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    Quantitation of plasma lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) might be used to document Gram-negative bacterial infection. In the present work, LPS-derived 3-hydroxymyristate was extracted from plasma samples with an organic solvent, separated by reversed phase HPLC, and quantitated by MS/MS. This mass assay was combined with the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) bioassay to monitor neutralization of LPS activity in biological samples. The described HPLC/MS/MS method is a reliable, practical, accurate, and sensitive tool to quantitate LPS. The combination of the LAL and HPLC/MS/MS analyses provided new evidence for the intrinsic capacity of plasma lipoproteins and phospholipid transfer protein to neutralize the activity of LPS. In a subset of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, with documented infection but with a negative plasma LAL test, significant amounts of LPS were measured by the HPLC/MS/MS method. Patients with the highest plasma LPS concentration were more severely ill. HPLC/MS/MS is a relevant method to quantitate endotoxin in a sample, to assess the efficacy of LPS neutralization, and to evaluate the proinflammatory potential of LPS in vivo. PMID:26023073

  6. A versatile quantitation platform based on platinum nanoparticles incorporated volumetric bar-chart chip for highly sensitive assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhen; Zhu, Guixian; Qi, Wenjin; Li, Ying; Song, Yujun

    2016-11-15

    Platinum nanoparticles incorporated volumetric bar-chart chip (PtNPs-V-Chip) is able to be used for point-of-care tests by providing quantitative and visualized readout without any assistance from instruments, data processing, or graphic plotting. To improve the sensitivity of PtNPs-V-Chip, hybridization chain reaction was employed in this quantitation platform for highly sensitive assays that can detect as low as 16 pM Ebola Virus DNA, 0.01ng/mL carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and the 10 HER2-expressing cancer cells. Based on this amplified strategy, a 100-fold decrease of detection limit was achieved for DNA by improving the number of platinum nanoparticle catalyst for the captured analyte. This quantitation platform can also distinguish single base mismatch of DNA hybridization and observe the concentration threshold of CEA. The new strategy lays the foundation for this quantitation platform to be applied in forensic analysis, biothreat detection, clinical diagnostics and drug screening.

  7. Slot immunoblot assay for detection and quantitation of periodontal disease-associated microorganisms in dental plaque.

    PubMed Central

    van Poperin, N; Lopatin, D E

    1991-01-01

    A rapid method for qualitative and quantitative detection of specific oral microorganisms from subgingival dental plaque is described. Plaque samples were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline containing protease inhibitors and 0.5% formaldehyde, briefly sonicated to disperse bacterial aggregates, and applied to nitrocellulose membranes in a slot blot manifold. Subsequent incubations with species-specific rabbit antibody and anti-rabbit antibody-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and development with BCIP-NBT substrate resulted in an easily discernible, permanent stain being deposited at the sample application site. Comparison with known concentrations of pure, cultured microorganisms applied to the same membranes permitted qualitative or semiquantitative plaque characterization by visual inspection. Analysis of the blots with a computer-linked flatbed scanner provided quantitative data on microbial content. The reproducibility of the results (standard error of the mean, less than 10%) obtained with slot immunoblotting greatly exceeded that of the results obtained with immunofluorescence analysis (standard error of the mean, greater than 57%). Because it is versatile, rapid, sensitive, reproducible, permanent, and relatively inexpensive, slot immunoblotting lends itself to use in large-scale investigations for the detection and quantitation of specific microbial species. PMID:1663511

  8. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.

    1982-03-31

    A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as /sup 240/Pu, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 252/Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter /sup 241/Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether permanent low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

  9. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, John T.; Kunz, Walter E.; Atencio, James D.

    1984-01-01

    A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify .sup.233 U, .sup.235 U and .sup.239 Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as .sup.240 Pu, .sup.244 Cm and .sup.252 Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter .sup.241 Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether "permanent" low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

  10. Japanese Reference Panel of Blood Specimens for Evaluation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA and Core Antigen Quantitative Assays

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Asako; Sugiyama, Nao; Watashi, Koichi; Masaki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Aizaki, Hideki; Mizuochi, Toshiaki; Wakita, Takaji

    2012-01-01

    An accurate and reliable quantitative assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is essential for measuring viral propagation and the efficacy of antiviral therapy. There is a growing need for domestic reference panels for evaluation of clinical assay kits because the performance of these kits may vary with region-specific genotypes or polymorphisms. In this study, we established a reference panel by selecting 80 donated blood specimens in Japan that tested positive for HCV. Using this panel, we quantified HCV viral loads using two HCV RNA kits and five core antigen (Ag) kits currently available in Japan. The data from the two HCV RNA assay kits showed excellent correlation. All RNA titers were distributed evenly across a range from 3 to 7 log IU/ml. Although the data from the five core Ag kits also correlated with RNA titers, the sensitivities of individual kits were not sufficient to quantify viral load in all samples. As calculated by the correlation with RNA titers, the theoretical lower limits of detection by these core Ag assays were higher than those for the detection of RNA. Moreover, in several samples in our panel, core Ag levels were underestimated compared to RNA titers. Sequence analysis in the HCV core region suggested that polymorphisms at amino acids 47 to 49 of the core Ag were responsible for this underestimation. The panel established in this study will be useful for estimating the quality of currently available and upcoming HCV assay kits; such quality control is essential for clinical usage of these kits. PMID:22495557

  11. Effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants: quantitative measurement using a calmodulin assay.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, B; Rosendal, S; Ruhnke, H L; Plante, C; O'Brien, P J; Miller, R B

    1994-01-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) acts as an intracellular regulator of calcium, an important mediator of many cell processes. We used the CAM assay and electron microscopy to investigate the effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants obtained aseptically from slaughtered cows. A stock suspension of U. diversum (treated specimens) and sterile broth (controls) was added to replicates of cultured explants and incubated at 38 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5.5% CO2 for 48 hours. Explants were examined for ciliary activity, extracellular CAM loss, and for histological and ultrastructural changes. Explants and their culture media were examined for changes in CAM concentration. All experiments were replicated three times. In addition, U. diversum, medium and broth were assayed for CAM content. The concentrations of CAM in explants and media changed significantly (p < 0.05) in samples which were inoculated with U. diversum when compared to controls. The controls and infected specimens did not differ histologically or ultrastructurally, but U. diversum was seen to be closely associated with infected explant tissue. In view of this close affinity it is assumed the loss of CAM from the oviductal cells was causally related, but this was not proven. The failure to show cell membrane injury on light and electron microscopic examination was probably related to the short duration of the experiment and may only point out the sensitivity of the CAM assay in detecting early cell membrane injury. Compromise in characteristics of the medium to support both, the viability of oviductal cells and U. diversum limited the experimental time to 48 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:8004536

  12. Tracking the Invasion of Small Numbers of Cells in Paper-Based Assays with Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Truong, Andrew S; Lochbaum, Christian A; Boyce, Matthew W; Lockett, Matthew R

    2015-11-17

    Paper-based scaffolds are an attractive material for culturing mammalian cells in a three-dimensional environment. There are a number of previously published studies, which utilize these scaffolds to generate models of aortic valves, cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and solid tumors. These models have largely relied on fluorescence imaging and microscopy to quantify cells in the scaffolds. We present here a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method, capable of quantifying multiple cell types in a single culture with the aid of DNA barcodes: unique sequences of DNA introduced to the genome of individual cells or cell types through lentiviral transduction. PCR-based methods are highly specific and are amenable to high-throughput and multiplexed analyses. To validate this method, we engineered two different breast cancer lines to constitutively express either a green or red fluorescent protein. These cells lines allowed us to directly compare the ability of fluorescence imaging (of the fluorescent proteins) and qPCR (of the unique DNA sequences of the fluorescent proteins) to quantify known numbers of cells in the paper based-scaffolds. We also used both methods to quantify the distribution of these breast cell lines in homotypic and heterotypic invasion assays. In the paper-based invasion assays, a single sheet of paper containing cells suspended in a hydrogel was sandwiched between sheets of paper containing only hydrogel. The stack was incubated, and the cells invaded the adjacent layers. The individual sheets of the invasion assay were then destacked and the number of cells in each layer quantified. Our results show both methods can accurately detect cell populations of greater than 500 cells. The qPCR method can repeatedly and accurately detect as few as 50 cells, allowing small populations of highly invasive cells to be detected and differentiated from other cell types.

  13. TGS[underscore]FIT: Image reconstruction software for quantitative, low-resolution tomographic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R J

    1993-01-01

    We developed the computer program TGS[underscore]FIT to aid in researching the tomographic gamma scanner method of nondestructive assay. This software, written in C-programming, language, implements a full Beer's Law attenuation correction in reconstructing low-resolution emission tomograms. The attenuation coefficients for the corrections are obtained by reconstructing a transmission tomogram of the same resolution. The command-driven interface, combined with (crude) simulation capabilities and command file control, allows design studies to be performed in a semi-automated manner.

  14. Immunoradiometric assay for quantitation of Dirofilaria immitis antigen in dogs with heartworm infections

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.G.; Scott, A.L.

    1984-10-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) was developed, optimized, and validated for detection of parasite-specific antigen in sera from hosts with filarial infections, using Dirofilaria immitis in dogs as a model. The precision, reproducibility, and parallelism of the IRMA were examined, using precision profile analysis. The IRMA had acceptable precision and reproducibility (less than 15% intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV)) over a working range of 10 to 2000 ng of D immitis-antigen (AG)/ml. The IRMA parallelism (agreement between dilutions) was acceptable (less than 10% interdilutional CV) with laboratory-spiked D immitis AG sera containing no D immitis-antibody (AB). However, it was not acceptable (greater than 20% interdilutional CV) for analysis of sera from naturally infected dogs containing D immitis AB, probably due to dissociation of immune-complexed AG with increasing serum dilution. Nonparallelism limited the accuracy of binding data interpolation from the standard curve. Specificity of the IRMA was enhanced by preabsorption of the radiolabeled detection antibody with Toxocara canis AG before use. Varying amounts of D immitis AG (22 to 1000 ng/ml) were detected in 42% (20/48) of microfilaremic dogs. The presence of AG-specific AB at concentrations as low as 1 microgram/ml reduced the ability of the IRMA to detect D immitis AG. Factors that influence the accuracy and sensitivity of immunoassays for circulating filarial antigens are discussed.

  15. Quantitative analysis of amplifiable DNA in tissues exposed to various environments using competitive PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Imaizuml, K; Miyasaka, S; Yoshino, M

    2004-01-01

    Competitive PCR assays were established for the mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region I and the human amelogenin locus. Using these assays, the copy numbers of DNA participating in PCR (amplifiable DNA) were quantified in tissues exposed to different environments. Human ribs, skin and nails were left in three exposure conditions (in the open air, in soil and in water). The amounts of amplifiable DNA in these tissues were quantified during a time period of up to two months. The amount of amplifiable DNA was well preserved in hard tissues (ribs and nails) regardless of the exposure conditions, whereas the soft tissues immersed in water showed a rapid decrease in amplifiable DNA. Strong PCR inhibition was observed in the DNA extracts obtained from buried bones. This phenomenon was clearly identified from an amplification failure of the internal standards in the competitive PCR. A preliminary examination to identify the PCR inhibitor suggested that the soil itself contributed to the inhibition. In addition, the amounts of amplifiable DNA in case samples were also investigated.

  16. High-Throughput Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays for Quantitative Analysis of Molecular Binding Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a platform for high-throughput electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) for identification and characterization of molecular binding reactions. A photopatterned free-standing polyacrylamide gel array comprised of 8 mm-scale polyacrylamide gel strips acts as a chassis for 96 concurrent EMSAs. The high-throughput EMSAs was employed to assess binding of the Vc2 cyclic-di-GMP riboswitch to its ligand. In optimizing the riboswitch EMSAs on the free-standing polyacrylamide gel array, three design considerations were made: minimizing sample injection dispersion, mitigating evaporation from the open free-standing polyacrylamide gel structures during electrophoresis, and controlling unit-to-unit variation across the large-format free-standing polyacrylamide gel array. Optimized electrophoretic mobility shift conditions allowed for 10% difference in mobility shift baseline resolution within 3 min. The powerful 96-plex EMSAs increased the throughput to ∼10 data/min, notably more efficient than either conventional slab EMSAs (∼0.01 data/min) or even microchannel based microfluidic EMSAs (∼0.3 data/min). The free-standing polyacrylamide gel EMSAs yielded reliable quantification of molecular binding and associated mobility shifts for a riboswitch–ligand interaction, thus demonstrating a screening assay platform suitable for riboswitches and potentially a wide range of RNA and other macromolecular targets. PMID:25233437

  17. Sandwich hybridisation assay for quantitative detection of yeast RNAs in crude cell lysates

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Jari; Barken, Kim Bundvig; Lahdenperä, Juhani; Breitenstein, Antje; Molin, Søren; Neubauer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Background A rapid microtiter plate based sandwich hybridization assay was developed for detection and quantification of single RNA species using magnetic beads. Following solution hybridization target RNA molecules were collected by biotin-streptavidin affinity binding and detected by fluorescence signal generated by alkaline phosphatase. The 18S rRNA and SUC2 mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as model RNA target molecules. Results The sensitivity of the assay was approximately 1.2 × 109 (2 fmol) molecules of target RNA. The developed method was feasible with crude cell lysates of S. cerevisiae carlsbergensis and was evaluated by measuring the levels of 18S rRNA during cell growth and SUC2 mRNA under repressive and inductive conditions. The 18S rRNA expression level followed the changes in the specific growth rate. SUC2 mRNA levels were in good correlation with the measured invertase enzyme activities. Conclusions The here presented sandwich hybridisation method was succefully applied for monitoring the amounts of ribosomal RNA and mRNA with high expression level in shake flask cultivation conditions. Sandwich hybridisation method offers a fast and convenient tool for following single key RNA species of interest in the production conditions. PMID:12780940

  18. Quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay development and validation: from small molecules to proteins.

    PubMed

    Božović, Andrea; Kulasingam, Vathany

    2013-04-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool for the identification, characterization and quantification of various biomolecules (small molecules, drug metabolites and proteins) in biological specimens. The use of mass spectrometers in the clinical diagnostic laboratories have gained popularity due to its ease of development of new assays, ability to measure multiple analytes in a single analytical run, low volume requirements and low reagent costs. Novel technological advancements in ionization sources, instrumentation and software have increased the popularity of these platforms. Consequently, a number of home-brew assays, utilizing the power of MS, are being developed and validated for clinical diagnostic use. In this review, we will discuss the two phases that precede method implementation: method development and validation for both small molecule analysis and protein quantification using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Some of the challenges facing protein quantification will be highlighted and an outlook for the future of laboratory medicine and MS will be provided. PMID:23041077

  19. A novel quantitative kinase assay using bacterial surface display and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Thorstholm, Louise; Huang, Yen-Hua; Getz, Jennifer A; Daugherty, Patrick S; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition of tyrosine kinases is a successful approach for the treatment of cancers and the discovery of kinase inhibitor drugs is the focus of numerous academic and pharmaceutical laboratories. With this goal in mind, several strategies have been developed to measure kinase activity and to screen novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nevertheless, a general non-radioactive and inexpensive approach, easy to implement and adapt to a range of applications, is still missing. Herein, using Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, an oncogenic target and a model protein for cancer studies, we describe a novel cost-effective high-throughput screening kinase assay. In this approach, named the BacKin assay, substrates displayed on a Bacterial cell surface are incubated with Kinase and their phosphorylation is examined and quantified by flow cytometry. This approach has several advantages over existing approaches, as using bacteria (i.e. Escherichia coli) to display peptide substrates provides a self renewing solid support that does not require laborious chemical strategies. Here we show that the BacKin approach can be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies, as well as a platform to characterize and identify small-molecule or peptide-based kinase inhibitors with potential applications in drug development.

  20. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate acyclovir and BW B759U in human plasma and urine.

    PubMed Central

    Tadepalli, S M; Quinn, R P; Averett, D R

    1986-01-01

    A simple and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection and quantitation of acyclovir in human plasma and urine was developed. Acyclovir immobilized on a solid phase and free acyclovir in the sample solution were allowed to compete for a limited amount of anti-acyclovir monoclonal antibody. The specific antibody bound to the immobilized acyclovir was detected by the use of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-mouse immunoglobulin. The resulting enzyme activity was inversely related to acyclovir concentration in the sample. The Hill plot of standard acyclovir concentrations was linear over a 100-fold concentration range, with a lower detection limit of 0.2 nM and a concentration of soluble ligand displacing 50% of available antibody of approximately 1 nM. The metabolites of acyclovir cross-reacted minimally, and there was no detectable interference by various unrelated compounds tested in the assay. However, BW B759U [9-(2-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethylethoxy)methylguanine], a congener of acyclovir, cross-reacted significantly. As a consequence, the assay was found useful in measuring the concentrations of BW B759U in clinical samples devoid of acyclovir. PMID:3488016

  1. Development and validation of a real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. allii from onion seed.

    PubMed

    Robène, Isabelle; Perret, Marion; Jouen, Emmanuel; Escalon, Aline; Maillot, Marie-Véronique; Chabirand, Aude; Moreau, Aurélie; Laurent, Annie; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Pruvost, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial blight of onion is an emerging disease threatening world onion production. The causal agent Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. allii is seed transmitted and a reliable and sensitive tool is needed to monitor seed exchanges. A triplex quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed targeting two X. axonopodis pv. allii-specific markers and an internal control chosen in 5.8S rRNA gene from Alliaceae. Amplification of at least one marker indicates the presence of the bacterium in seed extracts. This real-time PCR assay detected all the 79 X. axonopodis pv. allii strains tested and excluded 85.2% of the 135 non-target strains and particularly all 39 saprophytic and pathogenic bacteria associated with onion. Cross-reactions were mainly obtained for strains assigned to nine phylogenetically related X. axonopodis pathovars. The cycle cut-off was estimated statistically at 36.3 considering a risk of false positive of 1%. The limit of detection obtained in at least 95% of the time (LOD 95%) was 5×10(3) CFU/g (colony forming unit/g). The sensitivity threshold was found to be 1 infected seed in 32,790 seeds. This real-time PCR assay should be useful for preventing the long-distance spread of X. axonopodis pv. allii via contaminated seed lots and determining the epidemiology of the bacterium.

  2. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for human-dog-cat species identification and nuclear DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S; Premasuthan, A; Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Goyal, V

    2012-03-01

    In the United States, human forensic evidence collected from crime scenes is usually comingled with biomaterial of canine and feline origins. Knowledge of the concentration of nuclear DNA extracted from a crime scene biological sample and the species from which the sample originated is essential for DNA profiling. The ability to accurately detect and quantify target DNA in mixed-species samples is crucial when target DNA may be overwhelmed by non-target DNA. We have designed and evaluated a species-specific (human, dog and cat) nuclear DNA identification assay based on the TaqMan(®) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technology that can simultaneously detect and measure minute quantities of DNA specific to either humans, dogs and/or cats. The fluorogenic triplex assay employs primers and hydrolysis probes that target the human TH01 locus as well as the dog and cat Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) sequences in a species-specific manner. We also demonstrate that the assay is a highly sensitive, reliable and robust method for identifying and quantifying mixed-species templates of human-dog-cat origin with as little as 0.4 pg of human and cat nuclear DNA, respectively, and 4.0 pg of dog nuclear DNA.

  3. Development and validation of a real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. allii from onion seed.

    PubMed

    Robène, Isabelle; Perret, Marion; Jouen, Emmanuel; Escalon, Aline; Maillot, Marie-Véronique; Chabirand, Aude; Moreau, Aurélie; Laurent, Annie; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Pruvost, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial blight of onion is an emerging disease threatening world onion production. The causal agent Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. allii is seed transmitted and a reliable and sensitive tool is needed to monitor seed exchanges. A triplex quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed targeting two X. axonopodis pv. allii-specific markers and an internal control chosen in 5.8S rRNA gene from Alliaceae. Amplification of at least one marker indicates the presence of the bacterium in seed extracts. This real-time PCR assay detected all the 79 X. axonopodis pv. allii strains tested and excluded 85.2% of the 135 non-target strains and particularly all 39 saprophytic and pathogenic bacteria associated with onion. Cross-reactions were mainly obtained for strains assigned to nine phylogenetically related X. axonopodis pathovars. The cycle cut-off was estimated statistically at 36.3 considering a risk of false positive of 1%. The limit of detection obtained in at least 95% of the time (LOD 95%) was 5×10(3) CFU/g (colony forming unit/g). The sensitivity threshold was found to be 1 infected seed in 32,790 seeds. This real-time PCR assay should be useful for preventing the long-distance spread of X. axonopodis pv. allii via contaminated seed lots and determining the epidemiology of the bacterium. PMID:25940928

  4. Quantitative High Throughput Screening Using a Live Cell cAMP Assay Identifies Small Molecule Agonists of the TSH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steve; Neumann, Susanne; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Michael, Sam; Klumpp, Carleen; Yasgar, Adam; Shinn, Paul; Thomas, Craig J.; Inglese, Jim; Gershengorn, Marvin C.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) belongs to the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily of seven-transmembrane spanning receptors. TSHR is expressed in thyroid follicular cells and is activated by TSH, which regulates growth and function of these cells. Recombinant TSH is used in diagnostic screens for thyroid cancer, especially in patients after thyroid cancer surgery. Currently, no selective small molecule agonist of the TSHR is available. To screen for novel TSHR agonists, we miniaturized a cell-based cAMP assay into 1536-well plate format. This assay uses a HEK293 cell line stably expressing the TSHR and a cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel (CNG), which functions as a biosensor. From a quantitative high-throughput screen of 73,180 compounds in parallel with a parental cell line (without the TSHR), 276 primary active compounds were identified. The activities of the selected active compounds were further confirmed in an orthogonal HTRF cAMP-based assay. 49 compounds in several structural classes have been confirmed as small molecule TSHR agonists that will serve as starting compounds for chemical optimization and studies of thyroid physiology in health and disease. PMID:18216391

  5. Validation of a quantitative cerebrospinal fluid alpha-synuclein assay in a European-wide interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Niels; Persson, Staffan; Alcolea, Daniel; Bahl, Justyna M C; Baldeiras, Ines; Capello, Elisabetta; Chiasserini, Davide; Bocchio Chiavetto, Luisella; Emersic, Andreja; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Eren, Erden; Fladby, Tormod; Frisoni, Giovanni; García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Genc, Sermin; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Heegaard, Niels H H; Janeiro, André M; Kováčech, Branislav; Kuiperij, H Bea; Leitão, Maria J; Lleó, Alberto; Martins, Madalena; Matos, Mafalda; Mollergard, Hanne M; Nobili, Flavio; Öhrfelt, Annika; Parnetti, Lucilla; de Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Rot, Uros; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Struyfs, Hanne; Tanassi, Julia T; Taylor, Peggy; Tsolaki, Magda; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Verbeek, Marcel M; Zilka, Norbert; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2015-09-01

    Decreased levels of alpha-synuclein (aSyn) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in Parkinson's disease and related synucleinopathies have been reported, however, not consistently in all cross-sectional studies. To test the performance of one recently released human-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of aSyn in CSF, we carried out a round robin trial with 18 participating laboratories trained in CSF ELISA analyses within the BIOMARKAPD project in the EU Joint Program - Neurodegenerative Disease Research. CSF samples (homogeneous aliquots from pools) and ELISA kits (one lot) were provided centrally and data reported back to one laboratory for data analysis. Our study showed that although factors such as preanalytical sample handling and lot-to-lot variability were minimized by our study design, we identified high variation in absolute values of CSF aSyn even when the same samples and same lots of assays were applied. We further demonstrate that although absolute concentrations differ between laboratories the quantitative results are comparable. With further standardization this assay may become an attractive tool for comparing aSyn measurements in diverse settings. Recommendations for further validation experiments and improvement of the interlaboratory results obtained are given.

  6. Quantitative analysis of energy metabolic pathways in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by selected reaction monitoring assay.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Pavlou, Maria P; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the quantitative response of energy metabolic pathways in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells to hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and estradiol stimulation, we developed a targeted proteomics assay for accurate quantification of protein expression in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, and pentose phosphate pathways. Cell growth conditions were selected to roughly mimic the exposure of cells in the cancer tissue to the intermittent hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and hormonal stimulation. Targeted proteomics assay allowed for reproducible quantification of 76 proteins in four different growth conditions after 24 and 48 h of perturbation. Differential expression of a number of control and metabolic pathway proteins in response to the change of growth conditions was found. Elevated expression of the majority of glycolytic enzymes was observed in hypoxia. Cancer cells, as opposed to near-normal MCF-10A cells, exhibited significantly increased expression of key energy metabolic pathway enzymes (FBP1, IDH2, and G6PD) that are known to redirect cellular metabolism and increase carbon flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. Our quantitative proteomic protocol is based on a mass spectrometry-compatible acid-labile detergent and is described in detail. Optimized parameters of a multiplex selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay for 76 proteins, 134 proteotypic peptides, and 401 transitions are included and can be downloaded and used with any SRM-compatible mass spectrometer. The presented workflow is an integrated tool for hypothesis-driven studies of mammalian cells as well as functional studies of proteins, and can greatly complement experimental methods in systems biology, metabolic engineering, and metabolic transformation of cancer cells.

  7. A Novel Qualitative and Quantitative Biofilm Assay Based on 3D Soft Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hakonen, Bodil; Lönnberg, Linnea K; Larkö, Eva; Blom, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The lack of predictable in vitro methods to analyze antimicrobial activity could play a role in the development of resistance to antibiotics. Current used methods analyze planktonic cells but for the method to be clinically relevant, biofilm in in vivo like conditions ought to be studied. Hence, our group has developed a qualitative and quantitative method with in vivo like 3D tissue for prediction of antimicrobial activity in reality. Devices (wound dressings) were applied on top of Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated Muller-Hinton (MH) agar or 3D synthetic soft tissues (SST) and incubated for 24 hours. The antibacterial activity was then analyzed visually and by viable counts. On MH agar two out of three silver containing devices showed zone of inhibitions (ZOI) and on SST, ZOI were detected for all three. Corroborating results were found upon evaluating the bacterial load in SST and shown to be silver concentration dependent. In conclusion, a novel method was developed combining visual rapid screening and quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity in both tissue and devices. It uses tissue allowing biofilm formation thus mimicking reality closely. These conditions are essential in order to predict antimicrobial activity of medical devices in the task to prevent device related infections.

  8. Quantification Bias Caused by Plasmid DNA Conformation in Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the gold standard for the quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences. However, a serious concern has been revealed in a recent report: supercoiled plasmid standards cause significant over-estimation in qPCR quantification. In this study, we investigated the effect of plasmid DNA conformation on the quantification of DNA and the efficiency of qPCR. Our results suggest that plasmid DNA conformation has significant impact on the accuracy of absolute quantification by qPCR. DNA standard curves shifted significantly among plasmid standards with different DNA conformations. Moreover, the choice of DNA measurement method and plasmid DNA conformation may also contribute to the measurement error of DNA standard curves. Due to the multiple effects of plasmid DNA conformation on the accuracy of qPCR, efforts should be made to assure the highest consistency of plasmid standards for qPCR. Thus, we suggest that the conformation, preparation, quantification, purification, handling, and storage of standard plasmid DNA should be described and defined in the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) to assure the reproducibility and accuracy of qPCR absolute quantification. PMID:22194997

  9. A Pyrosequencing Assay for the Quantitative Methylation Analysis of GALR1 in Endometrial Samples: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Kottaridi, Christine; Koureas, Nikolaos; Margari, Niki; Terzakis, Emmanouil; Bilirakis, Evripidis; Pappas, Asimakis; Chrelias, Charalampos; Spathis, Aris; Aga, Evangelia; Pouliakis, Abraham; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Karakitsos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract while aberrant DNA methylation seems to play a critical role in endometrial carcinogenesis. Galanin's expression has been involved in many cancers. We developed a new pyrosequencing assay that quantifies DNA methylation of galanin's receptor-1 (GALR1). In this study, the preliminary results indicate that pyrosequencing methylation analysis of GALR1 promoter can be a useful ancillary marker to cytology as the histological status can successfully predict. This marker has the potential to lead towards better management of women with endometrial lesions and eventually reduce unnecessary interventions. In addition it can provide early warning for women with negative cytological result. PMID:26504828

  10. Quantitative Analysis of NF-κB Transactivation Specificity Using a Yeast-Based Functional Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vasundhara; Jordan, Jennifer J.; Ciribilli, Yari; Resnick, Michael A.; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB transcription factor family plays a central role in innate immunity and inflammation processes and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. We developed an NF-κB functional assay in yeast to investigate the following issues: transactivation specificity of NF-κB proteins acting as homodimers or heterodimers; correlation between transactivation capacity and in vitro DNA binding measurements; impact of co-expressed interacting proteins or of small molecule inhibitors on NF-κB-dependent transactivation. Full-length p65 and p50 cDNAs were cloned into centromeric expression vectors under inducible GAL1 promoter in order to vary their expression levels. Since p50 lacks a transactivation domain (TAD), a chimeric construct containing the TAD derived from p65 was also generated (p50TAD) to address its binding and transactivation potential. The p50TAD and p65 had distinct transactivation specificities towards seventeen different κB response elements (κB-REs) where single nucleotide changes could greatly impact transactivation. For four κB-REs, results in yeast were predictive of transactivation potential measured in the human MCF7 cell lines treated with the NF-κB activator TNFα. Transactivation results in yeast correlated only partially with in vitro measured DNA binding affinities, suggesting that features other than strength of interaction with naked DNA affect transactivation, although factors such as chromatin context are kept constant in our isogenic yeast assay. The small molecules BAY11-7082 and ethyl-pyruvate as well as expressed IkBα protein acted as NF-κB inhibitors in yeast, more strongly towards p65. Thus, the yeast-based system can recapitulate NF-κB features found in human cells, thereby providing opportunities to address various NF-κB functions, interactions and chemical modulators. PMID:26147604

  11. Comparison between Culture and a Multiplex Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay Detecting Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum

    PubMed Central

    Frølund, Maria; Björnelius, Eva; Lidbrink, Peter; Ahrens, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for simultaneous detection of U. urealyticum and U. parvum was developed and compared with quantitative culture in Shepard's 10 C medium for ureaplasmas in urethral swabs from 129 men and 66 women, and cervical swabs from 61 women. Using culture as the gold standard, the sensitivity of the qPCR was 96% and 95% for female urethral and cervical swabs, respectively. In male urethral swabs the sensitivity was 89%. The corresponding specificities were 100%, 87% and 99%. The qPCR showed a linear increasing DNA copy number with increasing colour-changing units. Although slightly less sensitive than culture, this multiplex qPCR assay detecting U. urealyticum and U. parvum constitutes a simple and fast alternative to the traditional methods for identification of ureaplasmas and allows simultaneous species differentiation and quantitation in clinical samples. Furthermore, specimens overgrown by other bacteria using the culture method can be evaluated in the qPCR. PMID:25047036

  12. Potential of monitoring isotopologues by quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry for metabolomic assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Hu, Haiyan; Su, Yue; Zhang, Fang; Guo, Yinlong

    2016-03-01

    Because of the extreme complexity of metabolomic samples, the effectiveness of quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry depends substantially on the expansion of the linear dynamic range. Facing the existence of numerous saturated detector signals, a data processing method based on monitoring isotopologues has been developed. The monoisotopic ion kept the high mass spectrometry sensitivity, and the less abundant isotopologue ions extended the linear dynamic range. This alternative method was proved to extend the linear dynamic range to five orders of magnitude successfully and overcome the quantitative problems induced by the ion detector saturation. Finally, to validate the applicability, the method was applied to a metabolomic assay of Alzheimer's disease. Comparing with the traditional monoisotopic method, the use of monitoring isotopologues helped us to discover an additional eight metabolites with significant difference and to conduct a more reliable principal component analysis as well. The results demonstrated that monitoring isotopologues in quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry could improve the authenticity of metabolomic analysis. PMID:26763370

  13. Multiplex time-reducing quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for determination of telomere length in blood and tissue DNA.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jingjing; Kang, Jing X; Tan, Rui; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Yu

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we describe a multiplex time-reducing quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for determination of telomere length. This multiplex qPCR assay enables two pairs of primers to simultaneously amplify telomere and single copy gene (albumin) templates, thus reducing analysis time and labor compared with the previously established singleplex assay. The chemical composition of the master mix and primers for the telomere and albumin were systematically optimized. The thermal cycling program was designed to ensure complete separation of the melting processes of the telomere and albumin. Semi-log standard curves of DNA concentration versus cycle threshold (C (t)) were established, with a linear relationship over an 81-fold DNA concentration range. The well-performed intra-assay (RSD range 2.4-4.7%) and inter-assay (RSD range: 3.1-5.0%) reproducibility were demonstrated to ensure measurement stability. Using wild-type, Lewis lung carcinoma and H22 liver carcinoma C57BL/6 mouse models, significantly different telomere lengths among different DNA samples were not observed in wild-type mice. However, the relative telomere lengths of the tumor DNA in the two strains of tumor-bearing mice were significantly shorter than the lengths in the surrounding non-tumor DNA of tumor-bearing mice and the tissue DNA of wild-type mice. These results suggest that the shortening of telomere lengths may be regarded as an important indicator for cancer control and prevention. Quantification of telomere lengths was further confirmed by the traditional Southern blotting method. This method could be successfully used to reduce the time needed for rapid, precise measurement of telomere lengths in biological samples.

  14. Real-time quantitative PCR for the design of lentiviral vector analytical assays.

    PubMed

    Delenda, C; Gaillard, C

    2005-10-01

    From the recent and emerging concerns for approving lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer in human clinical applications, several analytical methods have been applied in preclinical models to address the lentiviral vector load in batches, cells or tissues. This review points out the oldest generation methods (blots, RT activity, standard PCR) as well as a full description of the newest real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) applications. Combinations of primer and probe sequences, which have worked in the lentiviral amplification context, have been included in the effort to dress an exhaustive list. Also, great variations have been observed from interlaboratory results, we have tempted to compare between them the different analytical methods that have been used to consider (i) the titration of lentiviral vector batches, (ii) the absence of the susceptible emerging replicative lentiviruses or (iii) the lentiviral vector biodistribution in the organism.

  15. Quantitative high-throughput single-cell cytotoxicity assay for T cells.

    PubMed

    Liadi, Ivan; Roszik, Jason; Romain, Gabrielle; Cooper, Laurence J N; Varadarajan, Navin

    2013-02-02

    Cancer immunotherapy can harness the specificity of immune response to target and eliminate tumors. Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) based on the adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown considerable promise in clinical trials(1-4). There are several advantages to using CAR(+) T cells for the treatment of cancers including the ability to target non-MHC restricted antigens and to functionalize the T cells for optimal survival, homing and persistence within the host; and finally to induce apoptosis of CAR(+) T cells in the event of host toxicity(5). Delineating the optimal functions of CAR(+) T cells associated with clinical benefit is essential for designing the next generation of clinical trials. Recent advances in live animal imaging like multiphoton microscopy have revolutionized the study of immune cell function in vivo(6,7). While these studies have advanced our understanding of T-cell functions in vivo, T-cell based ACT in clinical trials requires the need to link molecular and functional features of T-cell preparations pre-infusion with clinical efficacy post-infusion, by utilizing in vitro assays monitoring T-cell functions like, cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. Standard flow-cytometry based assays have been developed that determine the overall functioning of populations of T cells at the single-cell level but these are not suitable for monitoring conjugate formation and lifetimes or the ability of the same cell to kill multiple targets(8). Microfabricated arrays designed in biocompatible polymers like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are a particularly attractive method to spatially confine effectors and targets in small volumes(9). In combination with automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, thousands of effector-target interactions can be monitored simultaneously by imaging individual wells of a nanowell array. We present here a high-throughput methodology for monitoring T-cell mediated

  16. Rapid agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay for quantitating protein: RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ream, Jennifer A; Lewis, L Kevin; Lewis, Karen A

    2016-10-15

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are frequently analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). This technique separates bound protein:nucleic acid complexes from free nucleic acids by electrophoresis, most commonly using polyacrylamide gels. The current study utilizes recent advances in agarose gel electrophoresis technology to develop a new EMSA protocol that is simpler and faster than traditional polyacrylamide methods. Agarose gels are normally run at low voltages (∼10 V/cm) to minimize heating and gel artifacts. In this study we demonstrate that EMSAs performed using agarose gels can be run at high voltages (≥20 V/cm) with 0.5 × TB (Tris-borate) buffer, allowing for short run times while simultaneously yielding high band resolution. Several parameters affecting band and image quality were optimized for the procedure, including gel thickness, agarose percentage, and applied voltage. Association of the siRNA-binding protein p19 with its target RNA was investigated using the new system. The agarose gel and conventional polyacrylamide gel methods generated similar apparent binding constants in side-by-side experiments. A particular advantage of the new approach described here is that the short run times (5-10 min) reduce opportunities for dissociation of bound complexes, an important concern in non-equilibrium nucleic acid binding experiments. PMID:27495142

  17. Quantitation of Haemopoietic Cells from Normal and Leukaemic RFM Mice Using an In Vivo Colony Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, M. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The conventional diffusion chamber (CDC) as described by Benestad (1970) had been modified to assay the colony forming capacity of RFM bone marrow and spleen cells in agar diffusion chambers (ADCs). The colonies are morphologically identical to those formed by the CFUc in agar culture in vitro and have an incidence of approximately 1 in 103 normal nucleated bone marrow cells, and 1 in 104 nucleated spleen cells. Comparison of the growth of normal bone marrow cells in CDCs and in ADCs suggests that cell proliferation in diffusion chambers may result from the same precursor cell as detected by colony formation in agar culture in vitro. This proposal is supported by the suicide of approximately 46% of the ADC colony precursor cells following incubation with 3H-labelled thymidine. Colony formation by haemopoietic cells taken from leukaemic mice appears to be due to the proliferation of a remaining normal cell population alone, while the leukaemic cells in the inoculum form a background of uniformly distributed blast cells. In the case of leukaemic cell culture, there are differences in the results from CDCs and ADCs, and data from colonies in leukaemic ADC cultures are similar to those from normal ADC colonies. These comparisons imply that the ADC technique may be used to monitor the functional capacity of normal bone marrow, by its ability to form colonies, during the development of leukaemia. A humoral effect of a leukaemic environment on the growth of normal bone marrow cells in ADCs has also been detected. PMID:4534200

  18. Semi-quantitative assay for polyketide prymnesins isolated from Prymnesium parvum (Haptophyta) cultures.

    PubMed

    La Claire, J W; Manning, S R; Talarski, A E

    2015-08-01

    A fluorometric assay was developed to semi-quantify co-purified polyketide prymnesins-1 and -2 (PPs) from Prymnesium parvum cultures. Evaluations performed throughout the growth cycle of 5 practical salinity unit (PSU) cultures detected relatively 8-10 × more PPs in the culture medium (exotoxins) than in cells (endotoxins). The [exotoxin] remained stable and relatively low until post-log growth, when they increased significantly. However, on a per-cell basis, [exotoxin] declined throughout log phase and subsequently increased dramatically during late- and post-log phases. The [endotoxin] remained stable until late- and post-log phases, when it achieved its highest level before declining sharply. Shaking cultures of strains from Texas, South Carolina and the United Kingdom displayed dramatically different [exotoxin] during post-log decline. Cultures adapted to 30 PSU had significantly lower [exotoxin] over the course of cultivation than those grown at 5 PSU. Phosphate limitation enhanced [exotoxin] on a per-cell basis, especially in late- and post-log cultures. Media containing streptomycin exhibited a ∼20% increase in [exotoxin] in post-log cultures vs. control treatments, but it had only negligible effects on endotoxin levels. Brefeldin A had minimal effects on [exotoxin], suggesting that the presence of PPs in the medium may be largely derived from cell lysis or some other passive means.

  19. A Quantitative Assay Using Mycelial Fragments to Assess Virulence of Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, Bruno Giuliano Garisto; Churchill, Alice C L

    2007-08-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a method to evaluate the virulence of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease (BLSD) of banana and plantain. The method is based on the delivery of weighed slurries of fragmented mycelia by camel's hair brush to 5-by-5-cm areas on the abaxial surface of banana leaf blades. Reliable BLSD development was attained in an environmental growth chamber with stringent lighting and humidity controls. By localizing inoculum onto small areas of large leaves, we achieved a dramatic increase in the number of strains that can be tested on each leaf and plant, which is critical for comparing the virulence of numerous strains concurrently. Image analysis software was used to measure the percentage of each inoculated leaf section showing BLSD symptoms over time. We demonstrated that the level of disease of four isolates was correlated with the weight of the mycelium applied and relatively insensitive to the degree of fragmentation of hyphae. This is the first report demonstrating that weighed mycelial inoculum, combined with image analysis software to measure disease severity, can be used to quantitatively assess the virulence of M. fijiensis under rigorously controlled environmental conditions. PMID:18943631

  20. Gene Profiling Studies in Skeletal Muscle by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Shephali; Panguluri, Siva K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Summary Gene profiling is an excellent tool to identify the genetic mechanisms, networks, and molecular pathways involved in skeletal muscle development and muscular disorders. Oligonucleotide or cDNA microarray can be the first step to identify the global gene expression in the study of interest. As microarray techniques provide a large set of differentially expressed genes in a given comparison, the expression profile can be narrowed down by taking various parameters into consideration such as fold values, p-values, and their relevance to the study. Every technique has its own limitations. Therefore, further validation of the results with a different technique is always necessary. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is the most common technique to validate microarray data and to study the relative expression of specific genes in any experimental set-up. Here, we describe, the qRT-PCR technique, in detail, for -successful gene expression studies in skeletal muscle cells and tissues. PMID:22130845

  1. Protocol: High-throughput and quantitative assays of auxin and auxin precursors from minute tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plant hormone auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), plays important roles in plant growth and development. The signaling response to IAA is largely dependent on the local concentration of IAA, and this concentration is regulated by multiple mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the precise quantification of local IAA concentration provides insights into the regulation of IAA and its biological roles. Meanwhile, pathways and genes involved in IAA biosynthesis are not fully understood, so it is necessary to analyze the production of IAA at the metabolite level for unbiased studies of IAA biosynthesis. Results We have developed high-throughput methods to quantify plant endogenous IAA and its biosynthetic precursors including indole, tryptophan, indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA), and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The protocol starts with homogenizing plant tissues with stable-labeled internal standards added, followed by analyte purification using solid phase extraction (SPE) tips and analyte derivatization. The derivatized analytes are finally analyzed by selected reaction monitoring on a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS/MS) to determine the precise abundance of analytes. The amount of plant tissue required for the assay is small (typically 2–10 mg fresh weight), and the use of SPE tips is simple and convenient, which allows preparation of large sets of samples within reasonable time periods. Conclusions The SPE tips and GC-MS/MS based method enables high-throughput and accurate quantification of IAA and its biosynthetic precursors from minute plant tissue samples. The protocol can be used for measurement of these endogenous compounds using isotope dilution, and it can also be applied to analyze IAA biosynthesis and biosynthetic pathways using stable isotope labeling. The method will potentially advance knowledge of the role and regulation of IAA. PMID:22883136

  2. Odorant Screening and Quantitation of Thiols in Carmenere Red Wine by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry and Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Pavez, Carolina; Agosin, Eduardo; Steinhaus, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The sensory impact of thiols in Vitis vinifera 'Carmenere' red wines was evaluated. For this purpose, aroma extract dilution analysis was applied to the thiols isolated from a Carmenere red wine by affinity chromatography with a mercurated agarose gel. Results revealed the presence of four odorants, identified as 2-furanylmethanethiol, 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol, and 2-methyl-3-sulfanyl-1-butanol, with the latter being described here for the first time in Carmenere red wines. Quantitation of the four thiols in the Carmenere wine screened by aroma extract dilution analysis and in three additional Carmenere wines by stable isotope dilution assays resulted in concentrations above the respective orthonasal odor detection threshold values. Triangle tests applied to wine model solutions with and without the addition of the four thiols showed significant differences, thus suggesting that the compounds do have the potential to influence the overall aroma of red wine. PMID:27070203

  3. Odorant Screening and Quantitation of Thiols in Carmenere Red Wine by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry and Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Pavez, Carolina; Agosin, Eduardo; Steinhaus, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The sensory impact of thiols in Vitis vinifera 'Carmenere' red wines was evaluated. For this purpose, aroma extract dilution analysis was applied to the thiols isolated from a Carmenere red wine by affinity chromatography with a mercurated agarose gel. Results revealed the presence of four odorants, identified as 2-furanylmethanethiol, 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol, and 2-methyl-3-sulfanyl-1-butanol, with the latter being described here for the first time in Carmenere red wines. Quantitation of the four thiols in the Carmenere wine screened by aroma extract dilution analysis and in three additional Carmenere wines by stable isotope dilution assays resulted in concentrations above the respective orthonasal odor detection threshold values. Triangle tests applied to wine model solutions with and without the addition of the four thiols showed significant differences, thus suggesting that the compounds do have the potential to influence the overall aroma of red wine.

  4. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, C.A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Zajicek, J.L.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity.

  5. A Dual Electrochemical Sensor Based on a Test-strip Assay for the Quantitative Determination of Albumin and Creatinine.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kiba, Yuya; Mizutani, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    A dual-electrochemical sensor based on a test-strip assay with immunochemistry and enzyme reactions has been developed for the determination of albumin and creatinine. Each nitrocellulose membrane with an immobilization area of an anti-albumin antibody or three enzymes was prepared in the device with three working electrodes for measuring albumin, creatinine, and ascorbic acid, as well as an Ag/AgCl electrode used as a counter/pseudo-reference electrode. The reactions of three enzymes were initiated by flowing a solution containing creatinine to detect an oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide. A sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed by albumin and antibody labeled with glucose oxidase (GOx). Captured GOx catalyzed the reduction of Fe(CN)6(3-) to Fe(CN)6(4-), which was oxidized electrochemically to determine the captured albumin. The responses for creatinine and albumin increased with the concentrations in millimolar order and over the range 18.75 - 150 μg mL(-1), respectively. The present sensor would be a distinct demonstration for producing quantitative dual-assays for various biomolecules used for clinical diagnoses.

  6. A Dual Electrochemical Sensor Based on a Test-strip Assay for the Quantitative Determination of Albumin and Creatinine.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kiba, Yuya; Mizutani, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    A dual-electrochemical sensor based on a test-strip assay with immunochemistry and enzyme reactions has been developed for the determination of albumin and creatinine. Each nitrocellulose membrane with an immobilization area of an anti-albumin antibody or three enzymes was prepared in the device with three working electrodes for measuring albumin, creatinine, and ascorbic acid, as well as an Ag/AgCl electrode used as a counter/pseudo-reference electrode. The reactions of three enzymes were initiated by flowing a solution containing creatinine to detect an oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide. A sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed by albumin and antibody labeled with glucose oxidase (GOx). Captured GOx catalyzed the reduction of Fe(CN)6(3-) to Fe(CN)6(4-), which was oxidized electrochemically to determine the captured albumin. The responses for creatinine and albumin increased with the concentrations in millimolar order and over the range 18.75 - 150 μg mL(-1), respectively. The present sensor would be a distinct demonstration for producing quantitative dual-assays for various biomolecules used for clinical diagnoses. PMID:26165278

  7. Quantitative liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry warfarin assay for in vitro cytochrome P450 studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y; King, B M; Wong, Y N

    2001-11-01

    A sensitive assay using high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been established for the quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 form-specific activities using warfarin as a probe substrate. Four metabolites, 6-, 7-, 8-, and 10-hydroxywarfarin, were chromatographically resolved within 10 min using gradient mobile phases. The mass spectrometry was operated under negative ionization mode. The MS/MS product ion spectra of warfarin and the metabolites were generated using collision-activated dissociation and interpreted. The abundant product ions of the metabolites were selected for quantification applying multiple reaction monitoring. Quantification was based on a quadratic or power curve of the peak area ratio of the metabolite over the internal standard against the respective concentration of the metabolite. This assay has been validated from 2 to 1000 nM for 10-hydroxywarfarin and from 2 to 5000 nM for 6-, 7-, and 8-hydroxywarfarin and successfully applied to evaluate cytochrome P450-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro using human hepatocytes and liver microsomal preparations. PMID:11673893

  8. Universal real-time PCR assay for quantitation and size evaluation of residual cell DNA in human viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    André, Murielle; Reghin, Sylviane; Boussard, Estelle; Lempereur, Laurent; Maisonneuve, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    Residual host cellular DNA (rcDNA) is one of the principal risk associated with continuous cell lines derived medicines such as viral vaccines. To assess rcDNA degradation, we suggest two quantitative real-time PCR assays designed to separately quantify target sequences shorter and longer than the 200 bp risk limit, the relative abundance of both targets reflecting the extent of rcDNA fragmentation. The conserved multicopy ribosomal 18S RNA gene was targeted to detect host cell templates from most mammalian cell substrates commonly used in the manufacture of human viral vaccines. The detection range of the method was assessed on purified DNA templates from different animal origins. The standard calibrator origin and structural conformation were shown crucial to achieve accurate quantification. Artificial mixtures of PCR products shorter and longer than 200 bp were used as a model to check the ability of the assay to estimate the fragment size distribution. The method was successfully applied to a panel of Vero cell derived vaccines and could be used as a universal method for determination of both content and size distribution of rcDNA in vaccines.

  9. Quantitative PCR assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and application to environmental samples and fishes from the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Reece, K S; Xiao, J; Rhodes, M W; Kator, H I; Latour, R J; Bonzek, C F; Hoenig, J M; Vogelbein, W K

    2010-09-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass. PMID:20656856

  10. Quantitative in vivo islet potency assay in normoglycemic nude mice correlates with primary graft function after clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Robert; Gmyr, Valery; Kremer, Bertrand; Hubert, Thomas; Soudan, Benoit; Lukowiak, Bruno; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Pattou, Francois; Kerr-Conte, Julie

    2008-07-27

    Reliable assays are critically needed to monitor graft potency in islet transplantation (IT). We tested a quantitative in vivo islet potency assay (QIVIPA) based on human C-peptide (hCP) measurements in normoglycemic nude mice after IT under the kidney capsule. QIVIPA was initially tested by transplanting incremental doses of human islets. hCP levels in mice were correlated with the number of transplanted islet equivalents (r(2) = 0.6, P<0.01). We subsequently evaluated QIVIPA in eight islet preparations transplanted in type 1 diabetic patients. Conversely to standard criteria including islet mass, viability, purity, adenosine triphosphate content, or glucose stimulated insulin secretion, hCP in mice receiving 1% of the final islet product was correlated to primary graft function (hCP increase) after IT (r(2)=0.85, P<0.01). QIVIPA appears as a reliable test to monitor islet graft potency, applicable to validate new methods to produce primary islets or other human insulin secreting cells. PMID:18645503

  11. Quantitative PCR assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and application to environmental samples and fishes from the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Reece, K S; Xiao, J; Rhodes, M W; Kator, H I; Latour, R J; Bonzek, C F; Hoenig, J M; Vogelbein, W K

    2010-09-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass.

  12. Establishment of a 10-Plex Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR Assay for rapid diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xingmei; Liang, Qiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies occur commonly in the general population, with an incidence of 1 in 400 newborns. However, no tests specifically targeting sex chromosomes have been carried out in prenatal diagnosis or newborn screening, resulting in late recognition of these diseases. In this study, a rapid diagnostic method for sex chromosome aneuploidies was established using Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR (QF-PCR). Ten markers were included in one multiplex QF-PCR assay, including two sex determination genes (AMXY and SRY), five X-linked short tandem repeats (STRs; DXS1053, DXS981, DXS6809, DXS1187, and DXS8377), one X/Y-common STR (X22), and two autosomal STRs (D13S305 and D21S11). Retrospective tests of 70 cases with known cytogenetic results indicated that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could well determine sex chromosome copy numbers by both allelic peak numbers and a sex chromosome dosage calculation with the autosomal STRs as internal controls. Prospective comparison with cytogenetic karyotyping on 534 cases confirmed that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could be well employed for sex chromosome aneuploidy diagnosis in at least the Chinese Han population. This is the first QF-PCR test for the diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies in the Chinese population. This test is superior to previous designs by including up to 8 sex-linked markers covering different parts of sex chromosomes as well as employing internal controls for copy number dosage calculation in a single PCR reaction. Due to simple technique and data analysis, as well as easy implementation within routine clinical services, this method is of great clinical application value and could be widely applied.

  13. Real-time PCR-based assay for quantitative detection of Hematodinium sp. in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Nagle, L; Place, A R; Schott, E J; Jagus, R; Messick, G; Pitula, J S

    2009-03-01

    Hematodinium sp. is a parasitic dinoflagellate infecting the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and other crustaceans. PCR-based assays are currently being used to identify infections in crabs that would have been undetectable by traditional microscopic examination. We therefore sought to define the limits of quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection within the context of field collection protocols. We present a qPCR assay based on the Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene that can detect 10 copies of the gene per reaction. Analysis of a cell dilution series vs. defined numbers of a cloned Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene suggests a copy number of 10,000 per parasite and predicts a sensitivity of 0.001 cell equivalents. In practice, the assays are based on analysis of 1% of the DNA extracted from 200 microl of serum, yielding a theoretical detection limit of 5 cells ml(-1) hemolymph, assuming that 1 cell is present per sample. When applied to a limited field survey of blue crabs collected in Maryland coastal bays from May to August 2005, 24 of 128 crabs (18.8%) were identified as positive for Hematodinium sp. infection using qPCR. In comparison, only 6 of 128 crabs (4.7%) were identified as positive using traditional hemolymph microscopic examination. The qPCR method also detected the parasite in gill, muscle, heart and hepatopancreas tissues, with 17.2% of the crabs showing infection in at least one of these tissues. Importantly, it is now possible to enumerate parasites within defined quantities of crab tissue, which permits collection of more detailed information on the epizootiology of the pathogen.

  14. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  15. A two-step real-time PCR assay for quantitation and genotyping of human parvovirus 4.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, E; Lahtinen, A; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Lappalainen, M; Hedman, K; Söderlund-Venermo, M

    2014-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) of the family Parvoviridae was discovered in a plasma sample of a patient with an undiagnosed acute infection in 2005. Currently, three PARV4 genotypes have been identified, however, with an unknown clinical significance. Interestingly, these genotypes seem to differ in epidemiology. In Northern Europe, USA and Asia, genotypes 1 and 2 have been found to occur mainly in persons with a history of injecting drug use or other parenteral exposure. In contrast, genotype 3 appears to be endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where it infects children and adults without such risk behaviour. In this study, a novel straightforward and cost-efficient molecular assay for both quantitation and genotyping of PARV4 DNA was developed. The two-step method first applies a single-probe pan-PARV4 qPCR for screening and quantitation of this relatively rare virus, and subsequently, only the positive samples undergo a real-time PCR-based multi-probe genotyping. The new qPCR-GT method is highly sensitive and specific regardless of the genotype, and thus being suitable for studying the clinical impact and occurrence of the different PARV4 genotypes.

  16. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason

    2016-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  17. Quantitation of Gingerols in Human Plasma by Newly Developed Stable Isotope Dilution Assays and Assessment of Their Immunomodulatory Potential.

    PubMed

    Schoenknecht, Carola; Andersen, Gaby; Schmidts, Ines; Schieberle, Peter

    2016-03-23

    In a pilot study with two volunteers, the main pungent and bioactive ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) compounds, the gingerols, were quantitated in human plasma after ginger tea consumption using a newly established HPLC-MS/MS(ESI) method on the basis of stable isotope dilution assays. Limits of quantitation for [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols were determined as 7.6, 3.1, and 4.0 nmol/L, respectively. The highest plasma concentrations of [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols (42.0, 5.3, and 4.8 nmol/L, respectively) were reached 30-60 min after ginger tea intake. Incubation of activated human T lymphocytes with gingerols increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration as well as the IFN-γ secretion by about 20-30%. This gingerol-induced increase of IFN-γ secretion could be blocked by the specific TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791. The results of the present study point to an interaction of gingerols with TRPV1 in activated T lymphocytes leading to an augmentation of IFN-γ secretion. PMID:26939769

  18. Quantitation of Gingerols in Human Plasma by Newly Developed Stable Isotope Dilution Assays and Assessment of Their Immunomodulatory Potential.

    PubMed

    Schoenknecht, Carola; Andersen, Gaby; Schmidts, Ines; Schieberle, Peter

    2016-03-23

    In a pilot study with two volunteers, the main pungent and bioactive ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) compounds, the gingerols, were quantitated in human plasma after ginger tea consumption using a newly established HPLC-MS/MS(ESI) method on the basis of stable isotope dilution assays. Limits of quantitation for [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols were determined as 7.6, 3.1, and 4.0 nmol/L, respectively. The highest plasma concentrations of [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols (42.0, 5.3, and 4.8 nmol/L, respectively) were reached 30-60 min after ginger tea intake. Incubation of activated human T lymphocytes with gingerols increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration as well as the IFN-γ secretion by about 20-30%. This gingerol-induced increase of IFN-γ secretion could be blocked by the specific TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791. The results of the present study point to an interaction of gingerols with TRPV1 in activated T lymphocytes leading to an augmentation of IFN-γ secretion.

  19. Quantitative detection of methanotrophs in soil by novel pmoA-targeted real-time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Steffen; Knief, Claudia; Stubner, Stephan; Conrad, Ralf

    2003-05-01

    Methane oxidation in soils is mostly accomplished by methanotrophic bacteria. Little is known about the abundance of methanotrophs in soils, since quantification by cultivation and microscopic techniques is cumbersome. Comparison of 16S ribosomal DNA and pmoA (alpha subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase) phylogenetic trees showed good correlation and revealed five distinct groups of methanotrophs within the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria: the Methylococcus group, the Methylobacter/Methylosarcina group, the Methylosinus group, the Methylocapsa group, and the forest clones group (a cluster of pmoA sequences retrieved from forest soils). We developed quantitative real-time PCR assays with SybrGreen for each of these five groups and for all methanotrophic bacteria by targeting the pmoA gene. Detection limits were between 10(1) and 10(2) target molecules per reaction for all assays. Real-time PCR analysis of soil samples spiked with cells of Methylococcus capsulatus, Methylomicrobium album, and Methylosinus trichosporium recovered almost all the added bacteria. Only the Methylosinus-specific assay recovered only 20% of added cells, possibly due to a lower lysis efficiency of type II methanotrophs. Analysis of the methanotrophic community structure in a flooded rice field soil showed (5.0 +/- 1.4) x 10(6) pmoA molecules g(-1) for all methanotrophs. The Methylosinus group was predominant (2.7 x 10(6) +/- 1.1 x 10(6) target molecules g(-1)). In addition, bacteria of the Methylobacter/Methylosarcina group were abundant (2.0 x 10(6) +/- 0.9 x 10(6) target molecules g of soil(-1)). On the other hand, pmoA affiliated with the forest clones and the Methylocapsa group was below the detection limit of 1.9 x 10(4) target molecules g of soil(-1). Our results showed that pmoA-targeted real-time PCR allowed fast and sensitive quantification of the five major groups of methanotrophs in soil. This approach will thus be useful for quantitative analysis of the

  20. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay Reveals the Evolution and Nature of Toxicity during the Transformation of Environmental Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete mineralization of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) during the advanced oxidation processes can generate transformation products that exhibit toxicity comparable to or greater than that of the original contaminant. In this study, we demonstrated the application of a novel, fast, and cost-effective quantitative toxicogenomics-based approach for the evaluation of the evolution and nature of toxicity along the electro-Fenton oxidative degradation of three representative CECs whose oxidative degradation pathways have been relatively well studied, bisphenol A, triclosan, and ibuprofen. The evolution of toxicity as a result of the transformation of parent chemicals and production of intermediates during the course of degradation are monitored, and the quantitative toxicogenomics assay results revealed the dynamic toxicity changes and mechanisms, as well as their association with identified intermediates during the electro-Fenton oxidation process of the selected CECs. Although for the three CECs, a majority (>75%) of the parent compounds disappeared at the 15 min reaction time, the nearly complete elimination of toxicity required a minimal 30 min reaction time, and they seem to correspond to the disappearance of identified aromatic intermediates. Bisphenol A led to a wide range of stress responses, and some identified transformation products containing phenolic or quinone group, such as 1,4-benzoquinone and hydroquinone, likely contributed to the transit toxicity exhibited as DNA stress (genotoxicity) and membrane stress during the degradation. Triclosan is known to cause severe oxidative stress, and although the oxidative damage potential decreased concomitantly with the disappearance of triclosan after a 15 min reaction, the sustained toxicity associated with both membrane and protein stress was likely attributed at least partially to the production of 2,4-dichlorophenol that is known to cause the production of abnormal proteins and affect the cell

  1. Sperm-macrophage interaction in the mouse: a quantitative assay in vitro using 111indium oxine-labeled sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, D.L.; Weinberg, J.B.; Haney, A.F.

    1987-12-01

    The role of reproductive tract macrophages in contraception and reproductive failure has become widely recognized. However, in vitro analysis of sperm phagocytosis by macrophages has relied upon a semi-quantitative method of sperm counting that is of limited accuracy and reproducibility. We have developed an assay using murine sperm labeled with /sup 111/indium oxine, and results indicate the labeling to be rapid and efficient. Incorporation of /sup 111/indium into sperm increased the dose and sperm concentration and reached 90% maximal uptake after 15 min incubation, with maximal uptake occurring at 30 min. No decrease in sperm motility was noted with levels of oxine in excess of those required for significant labeling. Maximal labeling efficiency occurred in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% adult bovine serum (ABS) producing significantly less uptake. Label dissociation was detectable in PBS at room temperature, but at 37 degrees C in DMEM + 10% ABS, loss of label occurred at a rate of 23.5%/h. Addition of labeled sperm to murine macrophage monolayers under optimal conditions resulted in uptake of /sup 111/indium by macrophages, while free label was unincorporated. Results indicated assay specificity for macrophage-limited uptake, with insignificant label uptake by nonphagocytic murine fibroblasts and better sensitivity than sperm counting. Macrophages from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-infected mice resulted in a decrease in sperm uptake. Female macrophages showed greater capacity for sperm uptake than those of the male mouse. These initial studies demonstrated the utility of this model system in enhancing the understanding of sperm-macrophage interaction in the female reproductive tract.

  2. Detection of Nonhemagglutinating Influenza A(H3) Viruses by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in Quantitative Influenza Virus Culture

    PubMed Central

    Els, C.; Sprong, L.; van Beek, R.; van der Vries, E.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of novel antiviral drugs against influenza virus in clinical trials, it is necessary to quantify infectious virus titers in respiratory tract samples from patients. Typically, this is achieved by inoculating virus-susceptible cells with serial dilutions of clinical specimens and detecting the production of progeny virus by hemagglutination, since influenza viruses generally have the capacity to bind and agglutinate erythrocytes of various species through their hemagglutinin (HA). This readout method is no longer adequate, since an increasing number of currently circulating influenza A virus H3 subtype (A[H3]) viruses display a reduced capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. Here, we report the magnitude of this problem by analyzing the frequency of HA-deficient A(H3) viruses detected in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2012. Furthermore, we report the development and validation of an alternative method for monitoring the production of progeny influenza virus in quantitative virus cultures, which is independent of the capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. This method is based on the detection of viral nucleoprotein (NP) in virus culture plates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and it produced results similar to those of the hemagglutination assay using strains with good HA activity, including A/Brisbane/059/07 (H1N1), A/Victoria/210/09 (H3N2), other seasonal A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, and the majority of A(H3) virus strains isolated in 2009. In contrast, many A(H3) viruses that have circulated since 2010 failed to display HA activity, and infectious virus titers were determined only by detecting NP. The virus culture ELISA described here will enable efficacy testing of new antiviral compounds in clinical trials during seasons in which nonhemagglutinating influenza A viruses circulate. PMID:24622097

  3. Studies of plant colonisation by closely related Bacillus amyloliquefaciens biocontrol agents using strain specific quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna H; Bejai, Sarosh; Niazi, Adnan; Manzoor, Shahid; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Meijer, Johan

    2014-12-01

    Certain strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens can colonize plants and improve growth and stress management. In order to study these effects, bacterial growth dynamics on plants and in the rhizosphere are of interest calling for specific analytical tools. For that purpose, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were developed in order to differentiate among three closely related B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains (UCMB5033, UCMB5036, UCMB5113) and to determine their levels with high accuracy. Oligonucleotide primers were designed for strain unique gene sequences and used for SYBR green based qPCR analysis. Standard curves covered a wide linear range (10(6)) of DNA amounts with the lowest detection level at 50 fg. Post-reaction melting curve analysis showed only a single product. Accurate threshold cycles were obtained, even in the presence of high excess of related Bacillus strains and total bacterial DNA from soil. Analysis of Bacillus colonisation after seed treatment of two oilseed rape cultivars (Oase and Ritz) grown on agar support showed a time dependent effect but that the bacteria mostly were found on root tissues and little on green tissues. The colonisation on plants grown in soil varied among the Bacillus strains where Oase seemed to house more bacteria than Ritz. Applied as a mixture, all three Bacillus strains co-existed on the roots of plants grown in soil. The qPCR assay in combination with other techniques will be a powerful tool to study plant interactions of these B. amyloliquefaciens biocontrol agents to further understand the requirements for successful interactions and improvement of plant properties.

  4. Detection of nonhemagglutinating influenza a(h3) viruses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in quantitative influenza virus culture.

    PubMed

    van Baalen, C A; Els, C; Sprong, L; van Beek, R; van der Vries, E; Osterhaus, A D M E; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2014-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of novel antiviral drugs against influenza virus in clinical trials, it is necessary to quantify infectious virus titers in respiratory tract samples from patients. Typically, this is achieved by inoculating virus-susceptible cells with serial dilutions of clinical specimens and detecting the production of progeny virus by hemagglutination, since influenza viruses generally have the capacity to bind and agglutinate erythrocytes of various species through their hemagglutinin (HA). This readout method is no longer adequate, since an increasing number of currently circulating influenza A virus H3 subtype (A[H3]) viruses display a reduced capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. Here, we report the magnitude of this problem by analyzing the frequency of HA-deficient A(H3) viruses detected in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2012. Furthermore, we report the development and validation of an alternative method for monitoring the production of progeny influenza virus in quantitative virus cultures, which is independent of the capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes. This method is based on the detection of viral nucleoprotein (NP) in virus culture plates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and it produced results similar to those of the hemagglutination assay using strains with good HA activity, including A/Brisbane/059/07 (H1N1), A/Victoria/210/09 (H3N2), other seasonal A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, and the majority of A(H3) virus strains isolated in 2009. In contrast, many A(H3) viruses that have circulated since 2010 failed to display HA activity, and infectious virus titers were determined only by detecting NP. The virus culture ELISA described here will enable efficacy testing of new antiviral compounds in clinical trials during seasons in which nonhemagglutinating influenza A viruses circulate.

  5. Immunochromatographic assay for quantitative and sensitive detection of hepatitis B virus surface antigen using highly luminescent quantum dot-beads.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Yaofeng; Fu, Fen; Xu, Hengyi; Lv, Jiaofeng; Xiong, Yonghua; Wang, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is one of the major causes of hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. In this study, we used highly luminescent quantum dot-beads (QBs) as signal amplification probes in the sandwich immunochromatographic assay (ICA) for ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) in human serum. Various parameters that influenced the sensitivity and stability of the QB-based ICA (QB-ICA) sensor were investigated. Two linear independent regression equations for detection of serum HBsAg were expressed with Y=0.3361X-0.0059 (R(2)=0.9983) for low HBsAg concentrations between 75 pg mL(-1) and 4.8 ng mL(-1), and Y=0.8404 X-2.9364 (R(2)=0.9939) for high HBsAg concentrations in the range from 4.8 ng mL(-1) to 75 ng mL(-1). The detection limit of the proposed ICA sensor achieved was 75 pg mL(-1), which is much higher than that of the routinely-used gold nanoparticle based ICA. The intra- and inter-assays recovery rates for spiked serum samples at HBsAg concentrations of 75 pg mL(-1), 3.75 ng mL(-1) and 18.75 ng mL(-1) ranged from 90.14% to 97.6%, and coefficients of variation were all below 7%, indicating that the QB-ICA sensor has an acceptable accuracy for HBsAg detection. Additionally, the quantitative method developed showed no false positive results in an analysis of 49 real HBsAg-negative serum samples, and exhibited excellent agreement (R(2)=0.9209) with a commercial chemiluminescence immunoassay kit in identifying 47 HBsAg-positive serum samples. In summary, due to its high fluorescence intensity, the sandwich QB-ICA sensor is a very promising point-of-care test for rapid, simple and ultrasensitive detection of HBsAg, as well as other disease-related protein biomarkers.

  6. Development of quantitative real-time PCR assays to detect Rickettsia typhi and Rickettsia felis, the causative agents of murine typhus and flea-borne spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Henry, Katherine M; Jiang, Ju; Rozmajzl, Patrick J; Azad, Abdu F; Macaluso, Kevin R; Richards, Allen L

    2007-02-01

    Rickettsia typhi and Rickettsia felis are the etiologic agents of murine typhus and flea-borne spotted fever, respectively. We have constructed two quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays to detect these pathogenic rickettsiae. The qPCR assays were developed utilizing unique sequences of the R. typhi and R. felis outer membrane protein B genes (ompB) to design the specific primers and molecular beacon probes. The assays were found to be species-specific and did not yield false-positive reactions with nucleic acid from other rickettsiae, orientiae, neorickettsiae or unrelated bacteria. In addition, the assays were sensitive enough to detect three target sequence copies per reaction and were capable of detecting R. typhi and R. felis nucleic acid in the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis. These results demonstrate that two sensitive and specific qPCR assays have been successfully developed to detect and enumerate R. typhi and R. felis.

  7. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M. Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180–240 days old) and 56 old (300–440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta. PMID:27711171

  8. Implementation of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for the detection of Mycobacterium immunogenum in metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Glenn; Fluri, Alexandra; Ruefenacht, Andrea; Gerber, Marco; Pickup, Roger

    2011-08-01

    The bacterium Mycobacterium immunogenum has been implicated in causing the lung condition hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in factory workers exposed to colonized metalworking fluids (MWFs). M. immunogenum-specific, real-time quantitative PCR detection technique (MiRT-qPCR) was implemented on a large scale to 363 MWFs of varying types, originating from the United States and Europe, that had been in use for between 30 days and 1 year. In MWFs that contained between 10(3) and 10(9) culturable general heterotrophs mL(-1) the technique detected between 5 and 2 × 10(6) mL(-1) M. immunogenum cell equivalents (CE) in 12.2% (23 of 189) of U.S. samples and between 8 and 6 × 10(5) mL(-1) CE in 39.1% (68 of 174) of samples from Europe. In contrast, only three cultured presumptive mycobacterial isolates across all samples were confirmed as M. immunogenum. Implementation of the assay demonstrated its practicality and further emphasized the limitations of using cultivation alone. Interestingly, no M. immunogenum were detected in mineral oil-based Bio-Concept MWFs from the United States, while it was more commonly detected in used MWFs based on formaldehyde-releasing biocides than in MWFs free of formaldehyde-depot biocides. PMID:21756137

  9. Analysis of DNA damage and repair in murine leukemia L1210 cells using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, D P; Illenye, S; Van Houten, B

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) represents an alternative to the current methods for investigating DNA damage and repair in specific genomic segments. In theory, any DNA lesion which blocks Taq polymerase can be measured by this assay. We used quantitative PCR (QPCR) to determine the lesion frequencies produced by cisplatin and ultraviolet light (UV) in a 2.3 kilobase (kb) segment of mitochondrial DNA and a 2.6 kb segment of the DHFR gene in mouse leukemia L1210 cells. The frequency of UV-induced lesions increased linearly with dose, and was 0.58 lesions/10 kb/10 J/m2 in the mitochondrial DNA, and 0.37 lesions/10 kb/10 J/m2 in the DHFR gene. With cisplatin, the lesion frequency also increased linearly with dose, and was 0.17 lesions/10 kb/10 microM in the DHFR gene, and 0.07 lesions/10 kb/10 microM in mitochondrial DNA. This result is contrary to that of Murata et al., 1990 (1), in which mitochondrial DNA received greater cisplatin damage than did nuclear DNA. Using PCR to measure the repair of UV-induced lesions in the DHFR gene segment, we observed that less than 10% of the lesions were removed by 4 h, but over 70% of the lesions were removed by 8 h. Repair of 43% of UV-induced lesions in mitochondrial DNA was also observed during a 24 h period. Images PMID:1630919

  10. mRNA analysis of intracytoplasmically-stained, FACS-purified pancreatic islet cells using the quantitative nuclease protection assay

    PubMed Central

    Pechhold, S; Stouffer, M; Walker, G; Martel, R; Seligmann, B; Hang, Y; Stein, R; Harlan, DM; Pechhold, K

    2009-01-01

    Exploring the pathophysiology underlying diabetes mellitus requires characterizing the cellular constituents of pancreatic islets, primarily insulin-producing β-cells. Such efforts have been limited by inadequate techniques for purifying islet cellular subsets for further biochemical and gene-expression studies. Using intracytoplasmic staining and fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) followed by quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA™) technology, we examined 30 relevant genes expressed by islet subpopulations. Purified islet cell subsets expressed all four tested “housekeeping” genes with a surprising variability, dependent on both cell lineage and developmental stage, suggesting caution when interpreting housekeeping gene-normalized mRNA quantifications. Our new approach confirmed expected islet cell lineage-specific gene expression patterns at the transcriptional level, but also detected new phenotypes, including mRNA-profiles (supported by immunohistology) demonstrating that during pregnancy, some β-cells express Mafb, previously found only in immature β-cells during embryonic development. Overall, qNPA™ gene expression analysis using intracellular-stained then FACS-sorted cells has broad applications beyond islet cell biology. PMID:19838197

  11. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantitation of antibodies to Junin virus in human sera.

    PubMed

    García Franco, S; Ambrosio, A M; Feuillade, M R; Maiztegui, J I

    1988-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated for the quantitation of anti-Junin virus (JV) antibodies, in 83 selected cases of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF). Serum samples were studied in two groups to facilitate comparative analysis; the first group was ELISA with indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, in the second ELISA with plaque reduction neutralization test (PRINT). From the results obtained by using ELISA and IF on the same serum samples, a clear tendency of ELISA to demonstrate seroconversion for JV earlier and at higher frequency than IF test was noted. Simultaneous titration of specific antibodies by ELISA and PRNT tests rendered significantly correlated titers (r = 0.81), both methods being equivalently specific (100%). The demonstration of specific antibodies by ELISA in two cases that were undetected by the PRNT test resulted in a higher sensitivity index for ELISA than for PRNT (100% vs 97%). It is concluded that ELISA could efficiently replace IF and PRNT tests for the diagnosis of AHF.

  12. New molecular quantitative PCR assay for detection of host-specific Bifidobacteriaceae suitable for microbial source tracking.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Ballesté, Elisenda; Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R

    2012-08-01

    Bifidobacterium spp. belong to the commensal intestinal microbiota of warm-blooded animals. Some strains of Bifidobacterium show host specificity and have thus been proposed as host-specific targets to determine the origin of fecal pollution. Most strains have been used in microbial-source-tracking (MST) studies based on culture-dependent methods. Although some of these approaches have proved very useful, the low prevalence of culturable Bifidobacterium strains in the environment means that molecular culture-independent procedures could provide practical applications for MST. Reported here is a set of common primers and four Bifidobacterium sp. host-associated (human, cattle, pig, and poultry) probes for quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assessment of fecal source tracking. This set was tested using 25 water samples of diverse origin: urban sewage samples, wastewater from four abattoirs (porcine, bovine, and poultry), and water from a river with a low pollution load. The selected sequences showed a high degree of host specificity. There were no cross-reactions between the qPCR assays specific for each origin and samples from different fecal origins. On the basis of the findings, it was concluded that the host-specific qPCRs are sufficiently robust to be applied in environmental MST studies.

  13. Generation of a recombinant classical swine fever virus stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene for quantitative antiviral assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Chen, Jianing; Li, Chao; Huang, Junhua; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious swine disease leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Vaccines are widely used to control the disease, and no CSFV-specific antivirals are currently available. To facilitate anti-CSFV molecule discovery, we developed a reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc stably expressing the firefly luciferase (Fluc) gene in the N(pro) gene. The reporter virus enabled more sensitive and convenient detection of the N(pro) protein expression and the viral replication by luciferase reporter assay than by traditional methods. The CSFV N(pro) protein was detectable as early as 4.5h post-infection. As a proof-of-concept for its utility in rapid antiviral screening, this reporter virus was used to quantify anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies of 50 swine sera and to assess 12 small interfering RNAs targeting different regions of the CSFV genome. The results were comparable to those obtained by traditional methods. Taken together, the reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc represents a useful tool for rapid and quantitative screening and evaluation of antivirals against CSFV.

  14. The applicability of TaqMan-based quantitative real-time PCR assays for detecting and enumeratIng Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in the environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular detection methods such as PCR have been extensively used to type Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in the environment. More recently, studies have developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of microbial contaminants in water as well as ...

  15. Serum Neutralization Assay Can Efficiently Replace Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test for Detection and Quantitation of West Nile Virus Antibodies in Human and Animal Serum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Annapia; Casaccia, Claudia; Conte, Annamaria; Monaco, Federica; Savini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A serum neutralization assay (SN) was compared with the official plaque reduction neutralization test for the quantitation of West Nile virus antibodies. A total of 1,348 samples from equid sera and 38 from human sera were tested by these two methods. Statistically significant differences were not observed, thus supporting the use of SN for routine purposes. PMID:25100824

  16. Development of a quantitative loop-mediated isothermal amplification (qLAMP) assay for the detection of Magnaporthe oryzae airborne inoculum in turf ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grey Leaf Spot (GLS) is a detrimental disease of perennial ryegrass caused by a host-specialized form of Magnaporthe oryzae (Mot). In order to improve turf management, a quantitative loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay coupled with a simple spore trap is being developed to monitor GL...

  17. Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation using quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation via quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status Chandler KJ,Hansen JM, Knudsen T,and Hunter ES 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  18. Factors That Contribute to Assay Variation in Quantitative Analysis of Sex Steroid Hormones Using Liquid and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The list of physiological events in which sex steroids play a role continues to increase. To decipher the roles that sex steroids play in any condition requires high quality cohorts of samples and assays that provide highly accurate quantitative measures. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS and GC-MS) have…

  19. Comparative quantitative analysis of 14 types of human papillomavirus by real-time polymerase chain reaction monitoring Invader reaction (Q-Invader assay).

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Akutsu, Yuki; Tanaka, Kazuya; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Egashira, Toru; Ishiwata, Isamu; Hara, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with several cervical diseases. A simple, rapid, cost-effective assay for identifying viral genotypes would greatly aid efforts for early detection and disease prevention. A real-time polymerase chain reaction monitoring Invader reaction assay (Q-Invader assay) was developed for genotyping and comparative quantitative analysis of 14 high-risk HPV genotypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 67, and 68). A total of 131 cervical samples containing HPV in Japan were examined by Q-Invader assay, and the results were compared with those from sequencing with consensus and genotype-specific primers. Genotypes determined by Q-Invader agreed with those of sequencing in all samples. Coinfections with multiple high-risk genotypes were correctly identified by Q-Invader assay in 27 samples. In addition, the relative ratios of the genotypes were determined. Thus, Q-Invader assay is a useful tool for genotyping and comparative quantitative analysis of high-risk HPV types. PMID:19733028

  20. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fichorova, Raina N.; Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Murray, Ryan; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV + 2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P < 0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P < 0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P < 0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. - Highlights: • A transcriptome nuclease protection assay assessed microbicides for vaginal safety. • Biomarkers were

  1. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  2. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fichorova, Raina N; Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Murray, Ryan; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV+2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P<0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P<0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P<0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product.

  3. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fichorova, Raina N; Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Murray, Ryan; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV+2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P<0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P<0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P<0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. PMID:25818602

  4. A quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR assay for the assessment of drug activities against intracellular Theileria annulata schizonts

    PubMed Central

    Hostettler, Isabel; Müller, Joachim; Stephens, Chad E.; Haynes, Richard; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular schizonts of the apicomplexans Theileria annulata and Theileria parva immortalize bovine leucocytes thereby causing fatal immunoproliferative diseases. Buparvaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone related to parvaquone, is the only drug available against Theileria. The drug is only effective at the onset of infection and emerging resistance underlines the need for identifying alternative compounds. Current drug assays employ monitoring of proliferation of infected cells, with apoptosis of the infected host cell as a read-out, but it is often unclear whether active compounds directly impair the viability of the parasite or primarily induce host cell death. We here report on the development of a quantitative reverse transcriptase real time PCR method based on two Theileria genes, tasp and tap104, which are both expressed in schizonts. Upon in vitro treatment of T. annulata infected bovine monocytes with buparvaquone, TaSP and Tap104 mRNA expression levels significantly decreased in relation to host cell actin already within 4 h of drug exposure, while significant differences in host cell proliferation were detectable only after 48–72 h. TEM revealed marked alterations of the schizont ultrastructure already after 2 h of buparvaquone treatment, while the host cell remained unaffected. Expression of TaSP and Tap104 proteins showed a marked decrease only after 24 h. Therefore, the analysis of expression levels of mRNA coding for TaSP and Tap104 allows to directly measuring impairment of parasite viability. We subsequently applied this method using a series of compounds affecting different targets in other apicomplexan parasites, and show that monitoring of TaSP- and Tap104 mRNA levels constitutes a suitable tool for anti-theilerial drug development. PMID:25516828

  5. Development & validation of a quantitative anti-protective antigen IgG enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of cutaneous anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, N.; Gunti, D.; Lukka, H.; Reddy, B.R.; Padmaja, Jyothi; Goel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Anthrax caused by Bacillus anthracis is primarily a disease of herbivorous animals, although several mammals are vulnerable to it. ELISA is the most widely accepted serodiagnostic assay for large scale surveillance of cutaneous anthrax. The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate a quantitative ELISA for determination of IgG antibodies against B. anthracis protective antigen (PA) in human cutaneous anthrax cases. Methods: Quantitative ELISA was developed using the recombinant PA for coating and standard reference serum AVR801 for quantification. A total of 116 human test and control serum samples were used in the study. The assay was evaluated for its precision, accuracy and linearity. Results: The minimum detection limit and lower limit of quantification of the assay for anti-PA IgG were 3.2 and 4 µg/ml, respectively. The serum samples collected from the anthrax infected patients were found to have anti-PA IgG concentrations of 5.2 to 166.3 µg/ml. The intra-assay precision per cent CV within an assay and within an operator ranged from 0.99 to 7.4 per cent and 1.7 to 3.9 per cent, respectively. The accuracy of the assay was high with a per cent error of 6.5 - 24.1 per cent. The described assay was found to be linear between the range of 4 to 80 ng/ml (R2=0.9982; slope=0.9186; intercept = 0.1108). Interpretation & conclusions: The results suggested that the developed assay could be a useful tool for quantification of anti-PA IgG response in human after anthrax infection or vaccination. PMID:26354217

  6. Development of an event-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Treml, Diana; Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-12-10

    A genetically modified (GM) common bean event, namely Embrapa 5.1, resistant to the bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV), was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Brazilian regulation for genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling requires that any food containing more than 1% GMO be labeled. The event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been the primary trend for GMO identification and quantitation because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence. This work reports the development of an event-specific assay, named FGM, for Embrapa 5.1 detection and quantitation by use of SYBR Green or hydrolysis probe. The FGM assay specificity was tested for Embrapa 2.3 event (a noncommercial GM common bean also resistant to BGMV), 46 non-GM common bean varieties, and other crop species including maize, GM maize, soybean, and GM soybean. The FGM assay showed high specificity to detect the Embrapa 5.1 event. Standard curves for the FGM assay presented a mean efficiency of 95% and a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 genome copies in the presence of background DNA. The primers and probe developed are suitable for the detection and quantitation of Embrapa 5.1.

  7. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  8. Development and validation of a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay specific for the detection of Rickettsia felis and not Rickettsia felis-like organisms.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, Antony M; Maina, Alice N; Taylor, Melissa L; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L

    2014-07-01

    Human infections with Rickettsia felis have been reported worldwide. Recent studies have revealed the presence of many closely related but unique rickettsiae, referred to as Rickettsia felis-like organisms (RFLO), identified in various arthropods. Due to the recent discovery of the lack of specificity of earlier R. felis-specific assays, there has become a need to develop a new generation of R. felis-specific molecular assays that will differentiate R. felis not only from other rickettsiae but more importantly from other members of the R. felis genogroup that may not be pathogenic to humans. This new generation of assays is essential for determining the true risk for flea-borne spotted fever (FBSF) by surveying arthropod vectors/hosts. Because of the lack of specificity of previous assays developed to detect R. felis infections, prior surveys may have overestimated the prevalence of R. felis in arthropod vectors and thus the perceived risk of FBSF. We have developed a specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to detect R. felis (RfelB). Specificity of the assay was determined by testing it with a panel of 17 related Rickettsia species and 12 nonrickettsial bacterial DNA preparations. The RfelB qPCR assay was positive for R. felis DNA and negative for all of the 17 related Rickettsia species and 12 nonrickettsia bacterial DNA preparations. The limit of detection of the RfelB qPCR assay was determined to be two copies (two genoequivalents) per microliter of R. felis target ompB fragment-containing plasmid. Validation of the RfelB qPCR assay was accomplished by testing 83 previously sequence-confirmed R. felis and RFLOs containing DNA preparations from human and flea samples collected from different geographical locations around the world. This assay will be useful for rapid detection, identification, and enumeration of R. felis, an emerging human pathogen of worldwide importance, from both clinical and environmental samples.

  9. Quantitative Validation of the Presto Blue Metabolic Assay for Online Monitoring of Cell Proliferation in a 3D Perfusion Bioreactor System.

    PubMed

    Sonnaert, Maarten; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan Ir

    2015-06-01

    As the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine mature toward clinical applications, the need for online monitoring both for quantitative and qualitative use becomes essential. Resazurin-based metabolic assays are frequently applied for determining cytotoxicity and have shown great potential for monitoring 3D bioreactor-facilitated cell culture. However, no quantitative correlation between the metabolic conversion rate of resazurin and cell number has been defined yet. In this work, we determined conversion rates of Presto Blue, a resazurin-based metabolic assay, for human periosteal cells during 2D and 3D static and 3D perfusion cultures. Our results showed that for the evaluated culture systems there is a quantitative correlation between the Presto Blue conversion rate and the cell number during the expansion phase with no influence of the perfusion-related parameters, that is, flow rate and shear stress. The correlation between the cell number and Presto Blue conversion subsequently enabled the definition of operating windows for optimal signal readouts. In conclusion, our data showed that the conversion of the resazurin-based Presto Blue metabolic assay can be used as a quantitative readout for online monitoring of cell proliferation in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system, although a system-specific validation is required.

  10. Molecular phylogeny of Pseudocapillaroides xenopi (Moravec et Cosgrov 1982) and development of a quantitative PCR assay for its detection in aquarium sediment.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sanford H; Ramirez, Micaela P

    2014-11-01

    We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify a portion of the small ribosomal subunit (18S rRNA) of Pseudocapillaroides xenopi, a nematode that parasitizes the skin of Xenopus laevis. The 1113-bp amplicon was cloned, sequenced, and aligned with sequences from 22 other nematodes in the order Trichocephalida; Caenorhabditis elegans was used as the outgroup. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses clustered P. xenopi in a clade containing only members of the genus Capillaria. Our analyses support the following taxonomic relationships: 1) members of the family Trichuridae form a clade distinct from those in the family Trichocephalida; 2) members of the genera Trichuris and Capillaria form 2 distinct clades within the family Trichuridae; and 3) the genus Trichuris includes 2 distinct clades, one representing parasites that infect herbivores and the other representing parasites that infect omnivores and carnivores. Using 18S rRNA sequence unique to P. xenopi, we developed a Taq Man quantitative PCR assay to detect this P. xenopi sequence in total DNA isolated from aquarium sediment. The assay's lower limit of detection is 3 copies of target sequence in a reaction. The specificity of our assay was validated by using negative control DNA from 9 other pathogens of Xenopus. Our quantitative PCR assay detected P. xenopi DNA in the sediment of 2 of 12 aquaria from the source institution of the specimen used to develop the assay; these aquaria had been treated with ivermectin 6 mo previously. PMID:25650974

  11. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru

    2015-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques—qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples. PMID:26025892

  12. Development and validation of a quantitative PCR assay using multiplexed hydrolysis probes for detection and quantification of Theileria orientalis isolates and differentiation of clinically relevant subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bogema, D R; Deutscher, A T; Fell, S; Collins, D; Eamens, G J; Jenkins, C

    2015-03-01

    Theileria orientalis is an emerging pathogen of cattle in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. This organism is a vector-borne hemoprotozoan that causes clinical disease characterized by anemia, abortion, and death, as well as persistent subclinical infections. Molecular methods of diagnosis are preferred due to their sensitivity and utility in differentiating between pathogenic and apathogenic genotypes. Conventional PCR (cPCR) assays for T. orientalis detection and typing are laborious and do not provide an estimate of parasite load. Current real-time PCR assays cannot differentiate between clinically relevant and benign genotypes or are only semiquantitative without a defined clinical threshold. Here, we developed and validated a hydrolysis probe quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay which universally detects and quantifies T. orientalis and identifies the clinically associated Ikeda and Chitose genotypes (UIC assay). Comparison of the UIC assay results with previously validated universal and genotype-specific cPCR results demonstrated that qPCR detects and differentiates T. orientalis with high sensitivity and specificiy. Comparison of quantitative results based on percent parasitemia, determined via blood film analysis and packed cell volume (PCV) revealed significant positive and negative correlations, respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that blood samples from animals with clinical signs of disease contained statistically higher concentrations of T. orientalis DNA than animals with subclinical infections. We propose clinical thresholds to assist in classifying high-, moderate-, and low-level infections and describe how parasite load and the presence of the Ikeda and Chitose genotypes relate to disease.

  13. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2015-08-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques-qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples.

  14. Development of a real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and quantitative detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum in soil.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Zhan, Yuanfeng; Zeng, Fanyun; Long, Haibo; Pei, Yuelin; Guo, Jianrong

    2013-12-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon) is one of the major limiting factors for watermelon production worldwide. Rapid and accurate detection of the causal pathogen is the cornerstone of integrated disease management. In this paper, a real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RealAmp) assay was developed for the rapid and quantitative detection of Fon in soil. Positive products were amplified only from Fon isolates and not from any other species or formae speciales of F. oxysporum tested, showing a high specificity of the primer sets. The detection limit of the RealAmp assay was 1.2 pg μL(-1) genomic DNA or 10(3) spores g(-1) of artificially inoculated soil, whereas real-time PCR could detect as low as 12 fg μL(-1) or 10(2) spores g(-1). The RealAmp assay was further applied to detect eight artificially inoculated and 85 field soil samples. No significant differences were found between the results tested by the RealAmp and real-time PCR assays. The RealAmp assay is a simple, rapid and effective technique for the quantitative detection and monitoring of Fon in soil under natural conditions.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Pseudocapillaroides xenopi (Moravec et Cosgrov 1982) and development of a quantitative PCR assay for its detection in aquarium sediment.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sanford H; Ramirez, Micaela P

    2014-11-01

    We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify a portion of the small ribosomal subunit (18S rRNA) of Pseudocapillaroides xenopi, a nematode that parasitizes the skin of Xenopus laevis. The 1113-bp amplicon was cloned, sequenced, and aligned with sequences from 22 other nematodes in the order Trichocephalida; Caenorhabditis elegans was used as the outgroup. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses clustered P. xenopi in a clade containing only members of the genus Capillaria. Our analyses support the following taxonomic relationships: 1) members of the family Trichuridae form a clade distinct from those in the family Trichocephalida; 2) members of the genera Trichuris and Capillaria form 2 distinct clades within the family Trichuridae; and 3) the genus Trichuris includes 2 distinct clades, one representing parasites that infect herbivores and the other representing parasites that infect omnivores and carnivores. Using 18S rRNA sequence unique to P. xenopi, we developed a Taq Man quantitative PCR assay to detect this P. xenopi sequence in total DNA isolated from aquarium sediment. The assay's lower limit of detection is 3 copies of target sequence in a reaction. The specificity of our assay was validated by using negative control DNA from 9 other pathogens of Xenopus. Our quantitative PCR assay detected P. xenopi DNA in the sediment of 2 of 12 aquaria from the source institution of the specimen used to develop the assay; these aquaria had been treated with ivermectin 6 mo previously.

  16. Discovery of novel poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors by a quantitative assay system using dot-blot with anti-poly(ADP-ribose)

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Naoyuki; Ashizawa, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo; Abe, Hideaki; Tanuma, Sei-ichi

    2010-02-19

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which is mainly regulated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), is a unique protein modification involved in cellular responses such as DNA repair and replication. PARG hydrolyzes glycosidic linkages of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized by PARP and liberates ADP-ribose residues. Recent studies have suggested that inhibitors of PARG are able to be potent anti-cancer drug. In order to discover the potent and specific Inhibitors of PARG, a quantitative and high-throughput screening assay system is required. However, previous PARG assay systems are not appropriate for high-throughput screening because PARG activity is measured by radioactivities of ADP-ribose residues released from radioisotope (RI)-labeled poly(ADP-ribose). In this study, we developed a non-RI and quantitative assay system for PARG activity based on dot-blot assay using anti-poly(ADP-ribose) and nitrocellulose membrane. By our method, the maximum velocity (V{sub max}) and the michaelis constant (k{sub m}) of PARG reaction were 4.46 {mu}M and 128.33 {mu}mol/min/mg, respectively. Furthermore, the IC50 of adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD), known as a non-competitive PARG inhibitor, was 0.66 {mu}M. These kinetics values were similar to those obtained by traditional PARG assays. By using our assay system, we discovered two novel PARG inhibitors that have xanthene scaffold. Thus, our quantitative and convenient method is useful for a high-throughput screening of PARG specific inhibitors.

  17. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    PubMed

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates.

  18. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    PubMed

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates. PMID:11150540

  19. Development of quantitative PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of Enterococcus spp. and their application to the identification of enterococcus species in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water.

  20. Development of Quantitative PCR Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Genes of Enterococcus spp. and Their Application to the Identification of Enterococcus Species in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water. PMID:23087032

  1. A quantitative real-time PCR assay for the identification and enumeration of Alexandrium cysts in marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Erdner, D.L.; Percy, L.; Keafer, B.; Lewis, J.; Anderson, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a global problem that affects both human and ecosystem health. One of the most serious and widespread HAB poisoning syndromes is paralytic shellfish poisoning, commonly caused by Alexandrium spp. dinoflagellates. Like many toxic dinoflagellates, Alexandrium produces resistant resting cysts as part of its life cycle. These cysts play a key role in bloom initiation and decline, as well as dispersal and colonization of new areas. Information on cyst numbers and identity is essential for understanding and predicting blooms, yet comprehensive cyst surveys are extremely time- and labor-intensive. Here we describe the development and validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technique for the enumeration of cysts of A. tamarense of the toxic North American/Group I ribotype. The method uses a cloned fragment of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene as a standard for cyst quantification, with an experimentally determined conversion factor of 28,402±6152 LSU ribosomal gene copies per cyst. Tests of DNA extraction and PCR efficiency show that mechanical breakage is required for adequate cyst lysis, and that it was necessary to dilute our DNA extracts 50-fold in order to abolish PCR inhibition from compounds co-extracted from the sediment. The resulting assay shows a linear response over 6 orders of magnitude and can reliably quantify ≥10cysts/cc sediment. For method validation, 129 natural sediment samples were split and analyzed in parallel, using both the qPCR and primulin-staining techniques. Overall, there is a significant correlation (p<0.001) between the cyst abundances determined by the two methods, although the qPCR counts tend to be lower than the primulin values. This underestimation is less pronounced in those samples collected from the top 1 cm of sediment, and more pronounced in those derived from the next 1–3 cm of the core. These differences may be due to the condition of the cysts in the different layers, as the top

  2. A quantitative real-time PCR assay for the identification and enumeration of Alexandrium cysts in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdner, D. L.; Percy, L.; Keafer, B.; Lewis, J.; Anderson, D. M.

    2010-02-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a global problem that affects both human and ecosystem health. One of the most serious and widespread HAB poisoning syndromes is paralytic shellfish poisoning, commonly caused by Alexandrium spp. dinoflagellates. Like many toxic dinoflagellates, Alexandrium produces resistant resting cysts as part of its life cycle. These cysts play a key role in bloom initiation and decline, as well as dispersal and colonization of new areas. Information on cyst numbers and identity is essential for understanding and predicting blooms, yet comprehensive cyst surveys are extremely time- and labor-intensive. Here we describe the development and validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technique for the enumeration of cysts of A. tamarense of the toxic North American/Group I ribotype. The method uses a cloned fragment of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene as a standard for cyst quantification, with an experimentally determined conversion factor of 28,402±6152 LSU ribosomal gene copies per cyst. Tests of DNA extraction and PCR efficiency show that mechanical breakage is required for adequate cyst lysis, and that it was necessary to dilute our DNA extracts 50-fold in order to abolish PCR inhibition from compounds co-extracted from the sediment. The resulting assay shows a linear response over 6 orders of magnitude and can reliably quantify ≥10 cysts/cm 3 sediment. For method validation, 129 natural sediment samples were split and analyzed in parallel, using both the qPCR and primulin-staining techniques. Overall, there is a significant correlation ( p<0.001) between the cyst abundances determined by the two methods, although the qPCR counts tend to be lower than the primulin values. This underestimation is less pronounced in those samples collected from the top 1 cm of sediment, and more pronounced in those derived from the next 1-3 cm of the core. These differences may be due to the condition of the cysts in the different layers, as the

  3. Assay of S for Quantitation of PEG and TNF Ligated Au Nanoparticles using ID-HR-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, J. L.; Vocke, R. D.; Newman, J. D.; Kelly, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    The use of nanomaterials in medicine has recently increased with the discovery that these materials can deliver drugs to specific sites within the body. An active area of nanomedicine involves the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a delivery platform for anti-cancer agents such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). TNF-α molecules attack the blood vessels in a tumor causing them to hemorrhage profusely. TNF-α is also highly toxic to normal cells, making targeted delivery to the tumor site crucial. AuNPs ensure the ligated TNF-α is delivered to its appropriate target, mitigating systemic toxicity. Additionally, coating AuNPs with the surface modifier polyethylene glycol (PEG) promotes bioavailability and biodistribution of TNF-α by preventing protein binding and bodily uptake thereby increasing the lifetime in the bloodstream. The FDA will likely mandate all nanotechnologies of this sort undergo quality control to ensure the nanoplatforms are modified with approximately the same number of drug molecules and other surface modifiers. Quality control methods, such as visible spectroscopy, can be used to qualitatively assess the total amounts of TNF-α and PEG on AuNPs, however, these methods need to be validated via calibration by an absolute technique. The sulfur content can be used as a proxy for both PEG and TNF-α concentrations because of the presence of at least one thiol in each of the ligands. The goal of this work was to provide a benchmark for future spectroscopic results by providing an accurate assessment of the TNF-α and PEG concentrations through the accurate quantitation of S. The sulfur concentration was assayed using isotope dilution (ID) combined with high resolution multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-MC-ICPMS). The measurement of S using ICPMS instrumentation is challenging because 1) molecular interferences (e.g. oxides, nitrides, and hydrides) exist on each of the S isotopes and 2) the need to perform the

  4. Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterial Infections and Quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Load by Two Real-Time Calibrated PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Broccolo, Francesco; Scarpellini, Paolo; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Zingale, Anna; Brambilla, Anna M.; Cichero, Paola; Sechi, Leonardo A.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lusso, Paolo; Malnati, Mauro S.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitive and specific techniques to detect and identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly in clinical specimens are important for the diagnosis and management of patients with tuberculosis (TB). We developed two real-time PCR assays, based on the IS6110 multicopy element and on the senX3-regX3 intergenic region, which provide a rapid method for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infections. The sensitivity and specificity of both assays were established by using purified DNA from 71 clinical isolates and 121 clinical samples collected from 83 patients, 20 of whom were affected by TB. Both assays are accurate, sensitive, and specific, showing a complementary pattern of Mycobacterium recognition: broader for the IS6110-based assay and restricted to the M. tuberculosis complex for the senX3-regX3-based assay. Moreover, the addition of a synthetic DNA calibrator prior to DNA extraction allowed us to measure the efficiency of DNA recovery and to control for the presence of PCR inhibitors. The mycobacterial burden of the clinical samples, as assessed by direct microscopy, correlates with the M. tuberculosis DNA load measured by the senX3-regX3-based assay. In addition, reduced levels of M. tuberculosis DNA load are present in those patients subjected to successful therapy, suggesting a potential use of this assay for monitoring treatment efficacy. Therefore, these assays represent a fully controlled high-throughput system for the evaluation of mycobacterial burden in clinical specimens. PMID:14532183

  5. Layer plate CAS assay for the quantitation of siderophore production and determination of exudation patterns for fungi.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-02-01

    The chrome azurol S (CAS) assay measures the chelating activity of siderophores, but its application (especially to fungi) is limited by toxicity issues. In this note, we describe a modified version of the CAS assay that is suitable for quantifying siderophore exudation for microorganisms, including fungi. PMID:26712125

  6. Serum virus neutralization assay for detection and quantitation of serum neutralizing antibodies to influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The serum virus neutralization (SVN) assay is a serological test to detect the presence and magnitude of functional systemic antibodies that prevent infectivity of a virus. The SVN assay is a highly sensitive and specific test that may be applied to influenza A viruses (IAV) in swine to measure the ...

  7. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Winton, James R.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  8. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L; Gregg, Jacob L; Hart, Lucas M; Winton, James R; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea. PMID:27154315

  9. Evaluation of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; King, Dawn; Haugland, Richard; Pfaller, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium (MA), Mycobacterium intracellulare (MI), and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are difficult to culture due to their slow growing nature. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for the rapid detection of MA, MI, and MAP can be used to provide data supporting drinking water biofilms as potential sources of human exposure. The aim of this study was to characterize two qPCR assays targeting partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of MA and MI and use these assays, along with two previously reported MAP qPCR assays (IS900 and Target 251), to investigate Mycobacterium occurrence in kitchen faucet biofilms. MA and MI qPCR assays demonstrated 100% specificity and sensitivity when evaluated against 18 non-MA complex, 76 MA, and 17 MI isolates. Both assays detected approximately 1,000 cells from a diluted cell stock inoculated on a sampling swab 100% of the time. DNA analysis by qPCR indicated that 35.3, 56.9 and 11.8% of the 51 kitchen faucet biofilm samples collected contained MA, MI, and MAP, respectively. This study introduces novel qPCR assays designed to specifically detect MA and MI in biofilm. Results support the use of qPCR as an alternative to culture for detection and enumeration of MA, MI, and MAP in microbiologically complex samples.

  10. Quantitation of virus using laser-based scanning of near-infrared fluorophores replaces manual plate reading in a virus titration assay.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Sally K; Mischnick, Shawn L; Urlacher, Teresa M; Ambroz, Kristi L H

    2010-09-01

    A method was developed for quantitation of a virus titration assay for minimally cytopathic and noncytopathic viruses that utilizes laser-based scanning of near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores. This automated method bypasses the need for manual plate reading thus eliminating human bias and error. The image data is translated by LI-COR's Odyssey software into numerical data which is used directly in the virus titer calculations.

  11. Quantitation of virus using laser-based scanning of near-infrared fluorophores replaces manual plate reading in a virus titration assay.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Sally K; Mischnick, Shawn L; Urlacher, Teresa M; Ambroz, Kristi L H

    2010-09-01

    A method was developed for quantitation of a virus titration assay for minimally cytopathic and noncytopathic viruses that utilizes laser-based scanning of near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores. This automated method bypasses the need for manual plate reading thus eliminating human bias and error. The image data is translated by LI-COR's Odyssey software into numerical data which is used directly in the virus titer calculations. PMID:20438762

  12. Development of a quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR assay for testing the susceptibility of feline herpesvirus-1 to antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Islam T M; Field, Hugh J

    2008-09-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) is considered as the most common viral infection of domestic cats worldwide. It causes a disease characterized by upper respiratory and ocular clinical signs. Several attempts are currently underway to develop antiviral chemotherapy for treating FHV-1 infections. The availability of a rapid quantitative method for detecting FHV-1 would greatly facilitate prompt therapy, and hence enhance the success of any antiviral regime. In this study, a TaqMan real-time PCR assay was established for measuring FHV-1 DNA levels in culture supernatants. This assay was shown to be highly specific, reproducible and allows quantitation over a range of 2 to 2 x 10(8) copies per reaction. The assay was then applied to measure the reduction of FHV-1 DNA levels in the presence of increasing concentrations of acyclovir (ACV), penciclovir (PCV) and cidofovir (CDV). The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50s)) obtained with the B927 laboratory strain of FHV-1 were 15.8 microM for ACV, 7.93 microM for CDV and 1.2 microM for PCV. The assay described here is sensitive, time-saving and does not involve prior titration of virus stocks or monitoring virus-induced cytopathic effects. Therefore, it is suitable for routine anti-FHV-1 drug susceptibility testing in veterinary clinics.

  13. Quantitative detection of pork in commercial meat products by TaqMan® real-time PCR assay targeting the mitochondrial D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miju; Yoo, Insuk; Lee, Shin-Young; Hong, Yeun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2016-11-01

    The TaqMan® real-time PCR assay using the mitochondrial D-loop region was developed for the quantitative detection of pork in processed meat products. The newly designed primers and probe specifically amplified pork without any cross-reactivity with non-target animal species. The limit of detection of the real-time PCR assay was 0.1pg of heat-treated pork meat and 0.1% (w/w) pork meat in beef and chicken meat mixtures. The quantitative real-time PCR assay was applied to analyze the pork meat content in 22 commercial processed meat products including jerkies, press hams, sausages, hamburger patties and steaks, grilled short rib patties, and nuggets. The developed real-time PCR method was able to detect pork meat in various types of processed meat products that declared the use of pork meat on their label. All processed meat products that declared no use of pork meat showed a negative result in the assay. The method developed in this study showed sensitivity and specificity in the quantification of pork meat in commercial processed meat products.

  14. Generation of HIV-1 and Internal Control Transcripts as Standards for an In-House Quantitative Competitive RT-PCR Assay to Determine HIV-1 Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Armas Cayarga, Anny; Perea Hernández, Yenitse; González González, Yaimé J.; Dueñas Carrera, Santiago; González Pérez, Idania; Robaina Álvarez, René

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) viral load is useful for monitoring disease progression in HIV-infected individuals. We generated RNA standards of HIV-1 and internal control (IC) by in vitro transcription and evaluated its performance in a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay. HIV-1 and IC standards were obtained at high RNA concentrations, without DNA contamination. When these transcripts were included as standards in a qRT-PCR assay, it was obtained a good accuracy (±0.5 log10 unit of the expected results) in the quantification of the HIV-1 RNA international standard and controls. The lower limit detection achieved using these standards was 511.0 IU/mL. A high correlation (r = 0.925) was obtained between the in-house qRT-PCR assay and the NucliSens easyQ HIV-1 test (bioMerieux) for HIV-1 RNA quantitation with clinical samples (N = 14). HIV-1 and IC RNA transcripts, generated in this study, proved to be useful as standards in an in-house qRT-PCR assay for determination of HIV-1 viral load. PMID:21766036

  15. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in rainwater tank samples: comparison of culture-based methods and 23S rRNA gene quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Richardson, K; Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S

    2012-10-16

    In this study, culture-based methods and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were compared with each other for the measurement of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in water samples collected from rainwater tanks in Southeast Queensland, Australia. Among the 50 rainwater tank samples tested, 26 (52%) and 46 (92%) samples yielded E. coli numbers as measured by EPA Method 1603 and E. coli 23S rRNA gene qPCR assay, respectively. Similarly, 49 (98%) and 47 (94%) samples yielded Enterococcus spp. numbers as measured by EPA Method 1600 and Enterococcus spp. 23S rRNA gene qPCR assay, respectively. The mean E. coli (2.49 ± 0.85) log(10) and Enterococcus spp. (2.72 ± 0.32) log(10) numbers as measured by qPCR assays were significantly (P < 0001) different than E. coli (0.91 ± 0.80) log(10) and Enterococcus spp. (1.86 ± 0.60) log(10) numbers as measured by culture-based method. Weak but significant correlations were observed between both EPA Method 1603 and the E. coli qPCR assay (r = 0.47, P = 0.0009), and EPA Method 1600 and the Enterococcus spp. qPCR assay (r = 0.42, P = 0.002). Good qualitative agreement was found between the culture-based method and the Enterococcus spp. qPCR assay in terms of detecting fecal pollution in water samples from the studied rainwater tanks. More research studies, however, are needed to shed some light on the discrepancies associated with the culture-based methods and qPCR assays for measuring fecal indicator bacteria.

  16. Detection of hemoplasma infection of goats by use of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and risk factor analysis for infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathy A; do Nascimento, Naíla C; Bauer, Amy E; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Hammac, G Kenitra; Messick, Joanne B

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and quantification of Mycoplasma ovis in goats and investigate the prevalence and risk factors for hemoplasma infection of goats located in Indiana. ANIMALS 362 adult female goats on 61 farms. PROCEDURES Primers were designed for amplification of a fragment of the dnaK gene of M ovis by use of a qPCR assay. Blood samples were collected into EDTA-containing tubes for use in total DNA extraction, blood film evaluation, and determination of PCV. Limit of detection, intra-assay variability, interassay variability, and specificity of the assay were determined. RESULTS Reaction efficiency of the qPCR assay was 94.45% (R(2), 0.99; slope, -3.4623), and the assay consistently detected as few as 10 copies of plasmid/reaction. Prevalence of infection in goats on the basis of results for the qPCR assay was 18.0% (95% confidence interval, 14% to 22%), with infected goats ranging from 1 to 14 years old, whereby 61% (95% confidence interval, 47% to 73%) of the farms had at least 1 infected goat. Bacterial load in goats infected with M ovis ranged from 1.05 × 10(3) target copies/mL of blood to 1.85 × 10(5) target copies/mL of blood; however, no bacteria were observed on blood films. Production use of a goat was the only risk factor significantly associated with hemoplasma infection. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The qPCR assay was more sensitive for detecting hemoplasma infection than was evaluation of a blood film, and production use of a goat was a risk factor for infection. PMID:27463552

  17. Development of a highly sensitive semi-quantitative real-time PCR and molecular beacon probe assay for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Matthew K; Cane, Patricia A

    2004-06-15

    Molecular beacons are a novel class of oligonucleotide probe capable of reporting the accumulation of target amplicon during real-time PCR by the emission of a fluorescent signal. A novel assay for the detection and estimation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleic acid in clinical specimens based on real-time PCR utilising such a probe was developed. The probe consisted of two short arm sequences and a central loop sequence complementary to a region of the N gene (the target amplicon). The probe was characterised and a semi-quantitative nested real-time PCR using a LightCycler instrument was optimised. Standard curves were generated using cycle threshold (C(t)) values calculated from several assays over a range of logarithmic RSV titres. Linear coefficient correlations were close to one ( r(2) = 0.998) and the detection limit of the optimised assay was reproducibly shown to be 1 x 10 (-4) pfu/ml. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) of C(t) values of the optimal assay was 0.8% and the CV of quantification data was 6.6%. The interassay CV of C(t) values was 2.0% and the quantification CV was 6.7%. The validity of the assay for the detection of RSV in clinical specimens was assessed by analysing ten specimens previously assayed in a different laboratory. Real-time PCR analysis was completely consistent with the results of prior analysis. The rapidity, sensitivity and specificity of the assay should greatly facilitate epidemiological studies, particularly in adults as existing methods perform better on clinical specimens from children.

  18. Accurate, quantitative assays for the hydrolysis of soluble type I, II, and III /sup 3/H-acetylated collagens by bacterial and tissue collagenases

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, S.K.; Mookhtiar, K.A.; Van Wart, H.E.

    1986-11-01

    Accurate and quantitative assays for the hydrolysis of soluble /sup 3/H-acetylated rat tendon type I, bovine cartilage type II, and human amnion type III collagens by both bacterial and tissue collagenases have been developed. The assays are carried out at any temperature in the 1-30/sup 0/C range in a single reaction tube and the progress of the reaction is monitored by withdrawing aliquots as a function of time, quenching with 1,10-phenanthroline, and quantitation of the concentration of hydrolysis fragments. The latter is achieved by selective denaturation of these fragments by incubation under conditions described in the previous paper of this issue. The assays give percentages of hydrolysis of all three collagen types by neutrophil collagenase that agree well with the results of gel electrophoresis experiments. The initial rates of hydrolysis of all three collagens are proportional to the concentration of both neutrophil or Clostridial collagenases over a 10-fold range of enzyme concentrations. All three assays can be carried out at collagen concentrations that range from 0.06 to 2 mg/ml and give linear double reciprocal plots for both tissue and bacterial collagenases that can be used to evaluate the kinetic parameters K/sub m/ and k/sub cat/ or V/sub max/. The assay developed for the hydrolysis of rat type I collagen by neutrophil collagenase is shown to be more sensitive by at least one order of magnitude than comparable assays that use rat type I collagen fibrils or gels as substrate.

  19. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  20. Dose metric considerations in in vitro assays to improve quantitative in vitro-in vivo dose extrapolations.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, Floris A; Heringa, Minne B; Nicol, Beate; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Kramer, Nynke I

    2015-06-01

    Challenges to improve toxicological risk assessment to meet the demands of the EU chemical's legislation, REACH, and the EU 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive have accelerated the development of non-animal based methods. Unfortunately, uncertainties remain surrounding the power of alternative methods such as in vitro assays to predict in vivo dose-response relationships, which impedes their use in regulatory toxicology. One issue reviewed here, is the lack of a well-defined dose metric for use in concentration-effect relationships obtained from in vitro cell assays. Traditionally, the nominal concentration has been used to define in vitro concentration-effect relationships. However, chemicals may differentially and non-specifically bind to medium constituents, well plate plastic and cells. They may also evaporate, degrade or be metabolized over the exposure period at different rates. Studies have shown that these processes may reduce the bioavailable and biologically effective dose of test chemicals in in vitro assays to levels far below their nominal concentration. This subsequently hampers the interpretation of in vitro data to predict and compare the true toxic potency of test chemicals. Therefore, this review discusses a number of dose metrics and their dependency on in vitro assay setup. Recommendations are given on when to consider alternative dose metrics instead of nominal concentrations, in order to reduce effect concentration variability between in vitro assays and between in vitro and in vivo assays in toxicology. PMID:23978460

  1. Dose metric considerations in in vitro assays to improve quantitative in vitro-in vivo dose extrapolations.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, Floris A; Heringa, Minne B; Nicol, Beate; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Kramer, Nynke I

    2015-06-01

    Challenges to improve toxicological risk assessment to meet the demands of the EU chemical's legislation, REACH, and the EU 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive have accelerated the development of non-animal based methods. Unfortunately, uncertainties remain surrounding the power of alternative methods such as in vitro assays to predict in vivo dose-response relationships, which impedes their use in regulatory toxicology. One issue reviewed here, is the lack of a well-defined dose metric for use in concentration-effect relationships obtained from in vitro cell assays. Traditionally, the nominal concentration has been used to define in vitro concentration-effect relationships. However, chemicals may differentially and non-specifically bind to medium constituents, well plate plastic and cells. They may also evaporate, degrade or be metabolized over the exposure period at different rates. Studies have shown that these processes may reduce the bioavailable and biologically effective dose of test chemicals in in vitro assays to levels far below their nominal concentration. This subsequently hampers the interpretation of in vitro data to predict and compare the true toxic potency of test chemicals. Therefore, this review discusses a number of dose metrics and their dependency on in vitro assay setup. Recommendations are given on when to consider alternative dose metrics instead of nominal concentrations, in order to reduce effect concentration variability between in vitro assays and between in vitro and in vivo assays in toxicology.

  2. Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in Sugarcane Stalk Juice Using a Real-Time Fluorescent (TaqMan) PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hua-Ying; Sun, Sheng-Ren; Wang, Jin-Da; Ahmad, Kashif; Wang, Heng-Bo; Chen, Ru-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Ratoon stunting disease (RSD) of sugarcane, one of the most important diseases seriously affecting the productivity of sugarcane crops, was caused by the bacterial agent Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx). A TaqMan probe-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was established in this study for the quantification of Lxx detection in sugarcane stalk juice. A pair of PCR primers (Pat1-QF/Pat1-QR) and a fluorogenic probe (Pat1-QP) targeting the Part1 gene of Lxx were used for the qPCR assay. The assay had a detection limit of 100 copies of plasmid DNA and 100 fg of Lxx genomic DNA, which was 100-fold more sensitive than the conventional PCR. Fifty (28.7%) of 174 stalk juice samples from two field trials were tested to be positive by qPCR assay, whereas, by conventional PCR, only 12.1% (21/174) were tested to be positive with a published primer pair CxxITSf#5/CxxITSr#5 and 15.5% (27/174) were tested to be positive with a newly designed primer pair Pat1-F2/Pat1-R2. The new qPCR assay can be used as an alternative to current diagnostic methods for Lxx, especially when dealing with certificating a large number of healthy cane seedlings and determining disease incidence accurately in commercial fields. PMID:27725937

  3. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Timothy E; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T; Ebentier, Darcy L; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Shanks, Orin C; Weisberg, Stephen B; Jay, Jennifer A

    2014-04-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  4. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G.; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T.; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Griffith, John F.; Holden, Patricia A.; Shanks, Orin C.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  5. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  6. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Melina; Milenkov, Milen; Albrich, Werner C; van der Linden, Mark P G; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P; Endtz, Hubert P; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  7. A Novel Quantitative Hemolytic Assay Coupled with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms Analysis Enabled Early Diagnosis of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Identified Unique Predisposing Mutations in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoko; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Uchida, Yumiko; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    For thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs), the diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is made by ruling out Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-associated HUS and ADAMTS13 activity-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), often using the exclusion criteria for secondary TMAs. Nowadays, assays for ADAMTS13 activity and evaluation for STEC infection can be performed within a few hours. However, a confident diagnosis of aHUS often requires comprehensive gene analysis of the alternative complement activation pathway, which usually takes at least several weeks. However, predisposing genetic abnormalities are only identified in approximately 70% of aHUS. To facilitate the diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS, we describe a quantitative hemolytic assay using sheep red blood cells (RBCs) and human citrated plasma, spiked with or without a novel inhibitory anti-complement factor H (CFH) monoclonal antibody. Among 45 aHUS patients in Japan, 24% (11/45) had moderate-to-severe (≥50%) hemolysis, whereas the remaining 76% (34/45) patients had mild or no hemolysis (<50%). The former group is largely attributed to CFH-related abnormalities, and the latter group has C3-p.I1157T mutations (16/34), which were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Thus, a quantitative hemolytic assay coupled with RFLP analysis enabled the early diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS in 60% (27/45) of patients in Japan within a week of presentation. We hypothesize that this novel quantitative hemolytic assay would be more useful in a Caucasian population, who may have a higher proportion of CFH mutations than Japanese patients. PMID:25951460

  8. Evaluation of Various Campylobacter-Specific Quantitative PCR (qPCR) Assays for Detection and Enumeration of Campylobacteraceae in Irrigation Water and Wastewater via a Miniaturized Most-Probable-Number–qPCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Banting, Graham S.; Braithwaite, Shannon; Scott, Candis; Kim, Jinyong; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Ruecker, Norma; Tymensen, Lisa; Charest, Jollin; Pintar, Katarina; Checkley, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and water is increasingly seen as a risk factor in transmission. Here we describe a most-probable-number (MPN)–quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay in which water samples are centrifuged and aliquoted into microtiter plates and the bacteria are enumerated by qPCR. We observed that commonly used Campylobacter molecular assays produced vastly different detection rates. In irrigation water samples, detection rates varied depending upon the PCR assay and culture method used, as follows: 0% by the de Boer Lv1-16S qPCR assay, 2.5% by the Van Dyke 16S and Jensen glyA qPCR assays, and 75% by the Linton 16S endpoint PCR when cultured at 37°C. Primer/probe specificity was the major confounder, with Arcobacter spp. routinely yielding false-positive results. The primers and PCR conditions described by Van Dyke et al. (M. I. Van Dyke, V. K. Morton, N. L. McLellan, and P. M. Huck, J Appl Microbiol 109:1053–1066, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04730.x) proved to be the most sensitive and specific for Campylobacter detection in water. Campylobacter occurrence in irrigation water was found to be very low (<2 MPN/300 ml) when this Campylobacter-specific qPCR was used, with the most commonly detected species being C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari. Campylobacters in raw sewage were present at ∼102/100 ml, with incubation at 42°C required for reducing microbial growth competition from arcobacters. Overall, when Campylobacter prevalence and/or concentration in water is reported using molecular methods, considerable validation is recommended when adapting methods largely developed for clinical applications. Furthermore, combining MPN methods with molecular biology-based detection algorithms allows for the detection and quantification of Campylobacter spp. in environmental samples and is potentially suited to quantitative microbial risk assessment for improved public health disease

  9. Development and validation of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for the early diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sara; Buitrago, María José; Clemons, Karl V; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mirels, Laurence F; Stevens, David A

    2014-06-01

    A new real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay based on a Coccidioides genus-specific molecular beacon probe was developed for the detection of coccidioidomycosis and validated with tissues from animal models and clinical samples. The assay showed high analytic reproducibility (r(2) > 0.99) and specificity for cultured strains (100%); the lower limit of detection was 1 fg of genomic DNA/μL of reaction. Fungal burdens in the organs of mice infected with Coccidioides posadasii strain Silveira were more accurately quantified by RT-PCR compared to colony-forming unit for all tissues. The RT-PCR assay was positive for 97.7% of spleen and 100% of liver or lung. Progression of infection in all organs was similar by both methods (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of the assay also was 100% for paraffin-embedded samples and samples from patients with positive cultures. Our RT-PCR assay is effective for the diagnosis and monitoring of Coccidioides infection, and its use also avoids the biohazard and time delay of identifying cultures in the clinical setting.

  10. A sensitive and quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based cell free in vitro non-homologous end joining assay for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lijian; Feng, Wei; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Chen, Benjamin P C; Zhou, Daohong

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for sustaining hematopoietic homeostasis and regeneration after injury for the entire lifespan of an organism. Maintenance of genomic stability is crucial for the preservation of HSCs, which depends on their efficient repair of DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Because of the paucity of HSCs and lack of sensitive assays, directly measuring the ability of HSCs to repair DSBs has been difficult. Therefore, we developed a sensitive and quantitative cell free in vitro non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) assay using linearized plasmids as the substrates and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) technique. This assay can sensitively detect DSB repair via NHEJ in less than 1 µg 293T cell nuclear proteins or nuclear extracts from about 5,000 to 10,000 human BM CD34(+) hematopoietic cells. Using this assay, we confirmed that human bone marrow HSCs (CD34(+)CD38(-) cells) are less proficient in the repair of DSBs by NHEJ than HPCs (CD34(+)CD38(+) cells). In contrast, mouse quiescent HSCs (Pyronin-Y(low) LKS(+) cells) and cycling HSCs (Pyronin-Y(hi) LKS(+) cells) repaired the damage more efficiently than HPCs (LKS(-) cells). The difference in the abilities of human and mouse HSCs and HPCs to repair DSBs through NHEJ is likely attributed to their differential expression of key NHEJ DNA damage repair genes such as LIG4. These findings suggest that the qPCR-based cell free in vitro NHEJ assay can be used to sensitively measure the ability of human and mouse HSCs to repair DSBs.

  11. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for rapid detection of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum in cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schwendimann, Livia; Kauf, Peter; Fieseler, Lars; Gantenbein-Demarchi, Corinne; Miescher Schwenninger, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    To monitor dominant species of lactic acid bacteria during cocoa bean fermentation, i.e. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum, a fast and reliable culture-independent qPCR assay was developed. A modified DNA isolation procedure using a commercial kit followed by two species-specific qPCR assays resulted in 100% sensitivity for L. plantarum and L. fermentum. Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc analyses of data obtained from experiments with cocoa beans that were artificially spiked with decimal concentrations of L. plantarum and L. fermentum strains allowed the calculation of a regression line suitable for the estimation of both species with a detection limit of 3 to 4 Log cells/g cocoa beans. This process was successfully tested for efficacy through the analyses of samples from laboratory-scale cocoa bean fermentations with both the qPCR assay and a culture-dependent method which resulted in comparable results.

  12. Quantitative assessment of the proliferation of the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus using a bioluminescence assay for ATP content.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Surekha; Hassan, Kolaleh; Sullivan, David J; Vasta, Gerardo R; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2013-12-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a protozoan parasite that causes "Dermo" disease in the eastern oyster Crasssostrea virginica in coastal areas of the USA. Until now, intervention strategies against the parasite have found limited success, and Dermo still remains one of the main hurdles for the restoration of oyster populations. We adapted a commercial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) content-based assay to assess the in vitro proliferation of P. marinus in a 96-well plate format, and validated the method by measuring the effects of potential anti-proliferative compounds. The sensitivity (1.5-3.1 × 10(4) cells/well), linearity (R (2) = 0.983), and signal stability (60 min) support the reliability of the assay for assessing cell proliferation. Validation of the assay by culturing P. marinus in the presence of increasing concentrations of triclosan showed a dose-response profile. The IC50 value obtained was higher than that reported earlier, possibly due to the use of different viability assay methods and a different P. marinus strain. The antibiotics G418 and tetracycline and the herbicide fluridone were active against P. marinus proliferation; the IC50 of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and atrazine was relatively high suggesting either off-target effects or inability to reach the targets. The validation of the ATP-based assay, together with significant advantages of the Perkinsus culture methodology (homogeneity, reproducibility, and high cell densities), underscores the value of this assay for developing high-throughput screens for the identification of novel leader compounds against Perkinsus species, and most importantly, for the closely-related apicomplexan parasites.

  13. Quantitative assessment of the proliferation of the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus using a bioluminescence assay for ATP content

    PubMed Central

    Shridhar, Surekha; Hassan, Kolaleh; Sullivan, David J.; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Fernández Robledo, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a protozoan parasite that causes “Dermo” disease in the eastern oyster Crasssostrea virginica in coastal areas of the USA. Until now, intervention strategies against the parasite have found limited success, and Dermo still remains one of the main hurdles for the restoration of oyster populations. We adapted a commercial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) content-based assay to assess the in vitro proliferation of P. marinus in a 96-well plate format, and validated the method by measuring the effects of potential anti-proliferative compounds. The sensitivity (1.5–3.1 × 104 cells/well), linearity (R2 = 0.983), and signal stability (60 min) support the reliability of the assay for assessing cell proliferation. Validation of the assay by culturing P. marinus in the presence of increasing concentrations of triclosan showed a dose–response profile. The IC50 value obtained was higher than that reported earlier, possibly due to the use of different viability assay methods and a different P. marinus strain. The antibiotics G418 and tetracycline and the herbicide fluridone were active against P. marinus proliferation; the IC50 of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and atrazine was relatively high suggesting either off-target effects or inability to reach the targets. The validation of the ATP-based assay, together with significant advantages of the Perkinsus culture methodology (homogeneity, reproducibility, and high cell densities), underscores the value of this assay for developing high-throughput screens for the identification of novel leader compounds against Perkinsus species, and most importantly, for the closely-related apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24533297

  14. The utility of quantitative methylation assays at imprinted genes for the diagnosis of fetal and placental disorders.

    PubMed

    Bourque, D K; Peñaherrera, M S; Yuen, R K C; Van Allen, M I; McFadden, D E; Robinson, W P

    2011-02-01

    An imbalance of imprinted gene expression within 11p15.5 is observed in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), as well as in a variety of placental abnormalities including complete hydatidiform mole (CHM), placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) and triploidy. To facilitate the diagnosis of epigenetic errors and chromosomal imbalance of 11p15.5, we validated a pyrosequencing assay to measure methylation at KvDMR1 using blood samples from 13 BWS cases, 8 of which showed reduced methylation as compared to control blood. An imbalance between maternal and paternal genomes as is found in triploidy, CHM or PMD was also associated with altered KvDMR1 methylation. A reciprocal pattern of methylation was obtained in the triploid cases by assaying the proximal 11p15.5 ICR associated with H19. To distinguish chromosome 11 specific alterations from whole genome imbalance, other imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) can be utilized. Thus, pyrosequencing assays for DMRs associated with SGCE, SNRPN, and MEST were also compared for their utility in diagnosing parental imbalance in placental samples. While each of these assays could successfully distinguish parental origin of triploidy, SGCE showed the clearest separation between groups. The combined use of a chromosome 11p15.5 assay (e.g. KvDMR1 or H19-ICR) and non-chromosome 11 assay (e.g. SGCE) provides a potentially valuable diagnostic tool in the rapid screening of methylation errors in placental disorders. These results also show the maintenance of imprinting status at these loci in the human placenta, even in the presence of abnormal pathology.

  15. A spectrophotometric assay for quantitative determination of kcat of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Schelling, P; Folkers, G; Scapozza, L

    2001-08-01

    A simple method to determine the in vitro catalytic turnover constant of several substrates of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase is presented in this study. The method is based on a continuous spectroscopic enzyme-coupled assay and allows one to monitor the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase activity in the presence of unlabeled substrates. A clear correlation between the catalytic turnover constant and the rate of decrease in absorbance over time during the assay has been demonstrated. Exploiting this correlation, this method has been used to determine rapidly and precisely the catalytic turnover constant of antiviral lead compounds not readily available in the radioactive labeled form.

  16. Validation of Bacteroidales quantitative PCR assays targeting human and animal fecal contamination in the public and domestic domains in India.

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Wuertz, Stefan; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-01-01

    We compared host-associated Bacteroidales qPCR assays developed in the continental United States and Europe for the purpose of measuring the effect of improved sanitation on human fecal exposure in rural Indian communities where both human and animal fecal loading are high. Ten candidate Bacteroidales qPCR assays were tested against fecal samples (human, sewage, cow, buffalo, goat, sheep, dog and chicken) from a test set of 30 individual human, 5 sewage, and 60 pooled animal samples collected in coastal Odisha, India. The two universal/general Bacteroidales assays tested (BacUni, GenBac3) performed equally well, achieving 100% sensitivity on the test set. Across the five human-associated assays tested (HF183 Taqman, BacHum, HumM2, BacH, HF183 SYBR), we found low sensitivity (17 to 49%) except for HF183 SYBR (89%), and moderate to high cross-reactivity with dog (20 to 80%) and chicken fecal samples (60 to 100%). BacHum had the highest accuracy (67%), amplified all sewage samples within the range of quantification (ROQ), and did not cross-react with any fecal samples from cows, the most populous livestock animal in India. Of the ruminant- and cattle-associated assays tested (BacCow, CowM2), BacCow was more sensitive in detecting the full range of common Indian livestock animal fecal sources, while CowM2 only detected cow sources with 50% sensitivity. Neither assay cross-reacted with human sources. BacCan, the dog-associated assay tested, showed no cross-reactivity with human sources, and high sensitivity (90%) for dog fecal samples. Overall, our results indicate BacUni, BacHum, HumM2, BacCan and BacCow would be the most suitable MST assays to distinguish and quantify relative amounts of human-associated and livestock/domestic animal-associated contributions to fecal contamination in Odisha, India.

  17. Establishment and Validation of a Non-Radioactive Method for In Vitro Transcription Assay Using Primer Extension and Quantitative Real Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Shasha; Zhou, Ying; Wei, Yun; Deng, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Primer extension-dependent in vitro transcription assay is one of the most important approaches in the research field of gene transcription. However, conventional in vitro transcription assays incorporates radioactive isotopes that cause environmental and health concerns and restricts its scope of application. Here we report a novel non-radioactive method for in vitro transcription analysis by combining primer extension with quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We show that the DNA template within the transcription system can be effectively eliminated to a very low level by our specially designed approach, and that the primers uniquely designed for primer extension and qPCR can specifically recognize the RNA transcripts. Quantitative PCR data demonstrate that the novel method has successfully been applied to in vitro transcription analyses using the adenovirus E4 and major late promoters. Furthermore, we show that the TFIIB recognition element inhibits transcription of TATA-less promoters using both conventional and nonradioactive in vitro transcription assays. Our method will benefit the laboratories that need to perform in vitro transcription but either lack of or choose to avoid radioactive facilities.

  18. Development of a one-step SYBR Green I real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection and quantitation of Araraquara and Rio Mamore hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Machado, Alex Martins; de Souza, William Marciel; de Pádua, Michelly; da Silva Rodrigues Machado, Aline Rafaela; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2013-09-19

    Hantaviruses are members of the family Bunyaviridae and are an emerging cause of disease worldwide with high lethality in the Americas. In Brazil, the diagnosis for hantaviruses is based on immunologic techniques associated with conventional RT-PCR. A novel one-step SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR was developed for the detection and quantitation of Araraquara (ARAV) and Rio Mamore hantavirus (RIOMV). The detection limit of assay was 10 copies/μL of RNA in vitro transcribed of segment S. The specificity of assay was evaluated by melting curve analysis, which showed that the Araraquara virus amplified product generated a melt peak at 80.83 ± 0.89 °C without generating primer-dimers or non-specific products. The assay was more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR and we detected two samples undetected by conventional RT-PCR. The one-step SYBR Green real-time quantitative RT-PCR is specific, sensible and reproducible, which makes it a powerful tool in both diagnostic applications and general research of ARAV and RIOMV and possibly other Brazilian hantaviruses.

  19. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for sensitive detection of Canada goose-specific fecal pollution in water sources.

    PubMed

    Fremaux, B; Boa, T; Yost, C K

    2010-07-01

    Canada geese (Branta canadensis) are prevalent in North America and may contribute to fecal pollution of water systems where they congregate. This work provides two novel real-time PCR assays (CGOF1-Bac and CGOF2-Bac) allowing for the specific and sensitive detection of Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene markers present within Canada goose feces.

  20. A Rapid Fluorescence Assay for Danofloxacin in Beef Muscle. Effect of Muscle Type on Limit of Quantitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, rapid fluorescence screening assay was applied to the analysis of beef muscle for danofloxacin at the U.S. tolerance level of 200 ng/g. Muscle samples were homogenized in acetic acid/acetonitrile, the resultant mixture centrifuged, and fluorescence of the supernatants was then measured. ...

  1. Two quantitative real-time PCR assays for the detection of penaeid shrimp and blue crab, crustacean shellfish allergens.

    PubMed

    Eischeid, Anne C; Kim, Bang-hyun; Kasko, Sasha M

    2013-06-19

    Food allergen detection methods must be able to specifically detect minute quantities of an allergenic food in a complex food matrix. One technique that can be used is real-time PCR. For the work described here, real-time PCR assays were developed to detect penaeid shrimp and blue crab, crustacean shellfish allergens. The method was tested using shrimp meat and crab meat spiked into several types of foods, including canned soups, deli foods, meat, seafood, and prepared seafood products. Foods were spiked with either shrimp or crab at levels ranging from 0.1 to 10⁶ parts per million (ppm) and analyzed either raw or cooked by a variety of methods. Real-time PCR data were used to generate linear standard curves, and assays were evaluated with respect to linear range and reaction efficiency. Results indicate that both assays performed well in a variety of food types. High reaction efficiencies were achieved across a linear range of 6-8 orders of magnitude. Limits of detection were generally between 0.1 and 1 ppm. Cooking methods used to simulate thermal processing of foods had little effect on assay performance. This work demonstrates that real-time PCR can be a valuable tool in the detection of crustacean shellfish.

  2. A RAPID INFECTION ASSAY FOR ARMILLARIA AND REAL-TIME PCR QUANTITATION OF THE FUNGAL BIOMASS IN PLANTA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slow and unreliable infection in the greenhouse has been a barrier to research on Armillaria root disease. The existing infection assay takes 7-18 months for detectable infection, during which time the inoculum often dies, resulting in unequal challenge among plants. As symptom expression and mort...

  3. Development and Validation of a Quantitative, One-Step, Multiplex, Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay for Detection of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Monika; Myers, Todd; Guevara, Carolina; Jungkind, Donald; Williams, Maya; Houng, Huo-Shu

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are important human pathogens with common transmission vectors and similar clinical presentations. Patient care may be impacted by the misdiagnosis of DENV and CHIKV in areas where both viruses cocirculate. In this study, we have developed and validated a one-step multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) to simultaneously detect, quantify, and differentiate between four DENV serotypes (pan-DENV) and chikungunya virus. The assay uses TaqMan technology, employing two forward primers, three reverse primers, and four fluorophore-labeled probes in a single-reaction format. Coextracted and coamplified RNA was used as an internal control (IC), and in vitro-transcribed DENV and CHIKV RNAs were used to generate standard curves for absolute quantification. The diagnostic 95% limits of detection (LOD) within the linear range were 50 and 60 RNA copies/reaction for DENV (serotypes 1 to 4) and CHIKV, respectively. Our assay was able to detect 53 different strains of DENV, representing four serotypes, and six strains of CHIKV. No cross-reactivity was observed with related flaviviruses and alphaviruses, To evaluate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, 89 clinical samples positive or negative for DENV (serotypes 1 to 4) and CHIKV by the standard virus isolation method were tested in our assay. The multiplex RT-PCR assay showed 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity for DENV and 100% sensitivity and specificity for CHIKV. With an assay turnaround time of less than 2 h, including extraction of RNA, the multiplex quantitative RT-PCR assay provides rapid diagnosis for the differential detection of two clinically indistinguishable diseases, whose geographical occurrence is increasingly overlapping. PMID:27098955

  4. Distribution of Human-Specific Bacteroidales and Fecal Indicator Bacteria in an Urban Watershed Impacted by Sewage Pollution, Determined Using RNA- and DNA-Based Quantitative PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Vikram; Pitkänen, Tarja; Ryu, Hodon; Elk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The identification of fecal pollution sources is commonly carried out using DNA-based methods. However, there is evidence that DNA can be associated with dead cells or present as “naked DNA” in the environment. Furthermore, it has been shown that rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays can be more sensitive than rRNA gene-based qPCR assays since metabolically active cells usually contain higher numbers of ribosomes than quiescent cells. To this end, we compared the detection frequency of host-specific markers and fecal bacteria using RNA-based RT-qPCR and DNA-based qPCR methods for water samples collected in sites impacted by combined sewer overflows. As a group, fecal bacteria were more frequently detected in most sites using RNA-based methods. Specifically, 8, 87, and 85% of the samples positive for general enterococci, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium markers, respectively, were detected using RT-qPCR, but not with the qPCR assay counterpart. On average, two human-specific Bacteroidales markers were not detected when using DNA in 12% of the samples, while they were positive for all samples when using RNA (cDNA) as the template. Moreover, signal intensity was up to three orders of magnitude higher in RT-qPCR assays than in qPCR assays. The human-specific Bacteroidales markers exhibited moderate correlation with conventional fecal indicators using RT-qPCR results, suggesting the persistence of nonhuman sources of fecal pollution or the presence of false-positive signals. In general, the results from this study suggest that RNA-based assays can increase the detection sensitivity of fecal bacteria in urban watersheds impacted with human fecal sources. PMID:25326295

  5. Distribution of human-specific bacteroidales and fecal indicator bacteria in an urban watershed impacted by sewage pollution, determined using RNA- and DNA-based quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; Pitkänen, Tarja; Ryu, Hodon; Elk, Michael; Wendell, David; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of fecal pollution sources is commonly carried out using DNA-based methods. However, there is evidence that DNA can be associated with dead cells or present as "naked DNA" in the environment. Furthermore, it has been shown that rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays can be more sensitive than rRNA gene-based qPCR assays since metabolically active cells usually contain higher numbers of ribosomes than quiescent cells. To this end, we compared the detection frequency of host-specific markers and fecal bacteria using RNA-based RT-qPCR and DNA-based qPCR methods for water samples collected in sites impacted by combined sewer overflows. As a group, fecal bacteria were more frequently detected in most sites using RNA-based methods. Specifically, 8, 87, and 85% of the samples positive for general enterococci, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium markers, respectively, were detected using RT-qPCR, but not with the qPCR assay counterpart. On average, two human-specific Bacteroidales markers were not detected when using DNA in 12% of the samples, while they were positive for all samples when using RNA (cDNA) as the template. Moreover, signal intensity was up to three orders of magnitude higher in RT-qPCR assays than in qPCR assays. The human-specific Bacteroidales markers exhibited moderate correlation with conventional fecal indicators using RT-qPCR results, suggesting the persistence of nonhuman sources of fecal pollution or the presence of false-positive signals. In general, the results from this study suggest that RNA-based assays can increase the detection sensitivity of fecal bacteria in urban watersheds impacted with human fecal sources.

  6. Single-Tubed Wild-Type Blocking Quantitative PCR Detection Assay for the Sensitive Detection of Codon 12 and 13 KRAS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guang-Jie; Shi, Yan; Deng, Guo-Hong; Xia, Han; Xu, Han-Qing; Zhao, Na; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The high degree of intra-tumor heterogeneity has meant that it is important to develop sensitive and selective assays to detect low-abundance KRAS mutations in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients. As a major potential source of tumor DNA in the aforementioned genotyping assays, it was necessary to conduct an analysis on both the quality and quantity of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE). Therefore, four commercial FFPE DNA extraction kits were initially compared with respect to their ability to facilitate extraction of amplifiable DNA. The results showed that TrimGen kits showed the greatest performance in relation to the quality and quantity of extracted FFPE DNA solutions. Using DNA extracted by TrimGen kits as a template for tumor genotyping, a real-time wild-type blocking PCR (WTB-PCR) assay was subsequently developed to detect the aforementioned KRAS mutations in mCRC patients. The results showed that WTB-PCR facilitated the detection of mutated alleles at a ratio of 1:10,000 (i.e. 0.01%) wild-type alleles. When the assay was subsequently used to test 49 mCRC patients, the results showed that the mutation detection levels of the WTB-PCR assay (61.8%; 30/49) were significantly higher than that of traditional PCR (38.8%; 19/49). Following the use of the real-time WTB-PCR assay, the ΔCq method was used to quantitatively analyze the mutation levels associated with KRAS in each FFPE sample. The results showed that the mutant levels ranged from 53.74 to 0.12% in the patients analyzed. In conclusion, the current real-time WTB-PCR is a rapid, simple, and low-cost method that permits the detection of trace amounts of the mutated KRAS gene. PMID:26701781

  7. A rapid real-time quantitative PCR assay to determine the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration of antibiotics against an intracellular Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Shifman, Ohad; Lazar, Shlomi; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular bacterium. The lack of a safe and efficient vaccine makes antibiotics the preferred treatment. F. tularensis antibiotic susceptibility tests are based on the in vitro standard CLSI-approved microdilution method for determining the MIC. However, limited data are available regarding the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration (MIEC) needed to eradicate intracellular bacteria. Here, we evaluated the MIEC values of various WHO-recommended antibiotics and compared the MIEC values to the established MICs. We describe a rapid 3-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) intracellular antibiogram assay, which yields comparable MIEC values to those obtained by the classical 72-h cfu assay. This rapid qPCR assay is highly advantageous in light of the slow growth rates of F. tularensis. Our results showed that the MIECs obtained for doxycycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin were indicative of intracellular activity. Gentamicin was not effective against intracellular bacteria for at least 32 h post treatment, raising the question of whether slow-penetrating gentamicin should be used for certain stages of the disease. We suggest that the qPCR intracellular antibiogram assay may be used to screen for potentially active antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis as well as to detect strains with acquired resistance to recommended antibiotics. PMID:26579112

  8. An improved validated SYBR green-based real-time quantitative PCR assay for the detection of the Penaeus stylirostris densovirus in penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Encinas-García, Trinidad; Mendoza-Cano, Fernando; Enríquez-Espinoza, Tania; Luken-Vega, Leonardo; Vichido-Chávez, Rodrigo; Sánchez-Paz, Arturo

    2015-02-01

    The Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDV) (also known as infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus, IHHNV), one of the major shrimp pathogens, has a worldwide distribution in farmed and wild shrimp populations. Outbreaks of IHHNV have been associated with substantial economic losses which are accompanied by a negative social impact. Current diagnostic PCR tests may result in false-positive results as several parts of PstDV genome may be endogenized in the nuclear genome of the shrimp P. stylirostris. A one-step qPCR SYBR-Green based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to detect different isolates of the IHHNV in shrimp samples was developed. The detection limit of the assay was 81 viral copies of targeted DNA per reaction. The specificity of the assay was evaluated by melting curve analysis, which showed that the IHHNV product generated a single melt peak at 81.4±0.044°C. The assay was more sensitive than conventional PCR. The standardized PCR was shown to be highly sensible, specific, robust, and reproducible, which makes it an economical and powerful tool for both diagnostic applications and general research of IHHNV.

  9. Real-time quantitative PCR assay with Taqman(®) probe for rapid detection of MCR-1 plasmid-mediated colistin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chabou, S; Leangapichart, T; Okdah, L; Le Page, S; Hadjadj, L; Rolain, J-M

    2016-09-01

    Here we report the development of two rapid real-time quantitative PCR assays with TaqMan(®) probes to detect the MCR-1 plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene from bacterial isolates and faecal samples from chickens. Specificity and sensitivity of the assay were 100% on bacterial isolates including 18 colistin-resistant isolates carrying the mcr-1 gene (six Klebsiella pneumoniae and 12 Escherichia coli) with a calibration curve that was linear from 10(1) to 10(8) DNA copies. Five out of 833 faecal samples from chickens from Algeria were positive, from which three E. coli strains were isolated and confirmed to harbour the mcr-1 gene by standard PCR and sequencing. PMID:27489722

  10. [Accuracy of a real-time polymerase-chain-reaction assay for a quantitative estimation of genetically modified sources in food products].

    PubMed

    Abramov, D D; Trofimov, D Iu; Rebrikov, D V

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of a real-time polymerase-chain-reaction assay for genetically modified sources in food products was determined using two official test systems (kits) of primers and samples. These kits were recommended by the Federal Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance (Russian Ministry of Health) and the European Commission. We used the following three models of thermocyclers: iCycler iQ (BioRad, United States), Rotor-Gene 3000 (Corbett Research, Australia), and DT-322 (DNA-Technology, Russia). Studies of samples that contained 1% genetically modified sources showed that the error of a quantitative assay for genetically modified sources in food products corresponds to 20-30% and does not depend on the kit type and the thermocycler model used.

  11. Validation of a quantitative 12-multigene expression assay (Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay) in Korean patients with stage II colon cancer: implication of ethnic differences contributing to differences in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Duck Hyoun; Kim, Woo Ram; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Young Wan; Song, Mi Kyung; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the Recurrence Score® of the quantitative 12-multigene expression assay and to determine risk groups based on the continuous Recurrence Score® in Korean patients. Method A total of 95 patients with pathological T3N0 tumors and mismatch repair-proficient tumors were enrolled. The Recurrence Score® was used to classify risk groups (low risk, <30; intermediate risk, 30–40; high risk, ≥41). Results Fifty-four patients (56.8%) were aged over 70 years. There were 49 men (51.6%) and 56 cases of right-sided colon cancer (58.9%). Eight cases (8.4%) had well-differentiated tumors, and 86 cases (90.5%) showed moderate differentiation. Only one case (1.1%) had a poorly differentiated tumor. Three patients (3.2%) had lymphovascular invasion. Sixty-one patients were identified as low risk (64.2%) and 34 patients as intermediate risk (35.8%). There were no high-risk patients. Although not significant, the 3-year recurrence risk increased with the Recurrence Score®. Conclusion Distribution patterns of risk groups based on the Recurrence Score®, particularly the absence of a high-risk group, were different from the prior validation studies. These findings suggest that ethnic differences between Koreans and Western patients are potential contributing factors for different gene expressions in the quantitative 12-multigene expression assay. PMID:26719709

  12. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assays for the sensitive detection of Besnoitia besnoiti infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine besnoitiosis, an economically important disease in cattle in many countries of Africa and Asia, has re-emerged in Europe. Sensitive and quantitative DNA detection methods are needed to determine whether serologically positive animals are infectious and to examine the role of vectors (e.g. ha...

  13. Development of a real-time RT-PCR assay for the simultaneous identification, quantitation and differentiation of avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, Mattia; Lupini, Caterina; Munoz Pogoreltseva, Olga Svetlana; Listorti, Valeria; Mondin, Alessandra; Drigo, Michele; Catelli, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, special attention has been paid to real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) diagnosis, due to its numerous advantages over classical PCR. A new multiplex quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) with molecular beacon probe assay, designed to target the SH gene, was developed. The test was evaluated in terms of specificity, sensitivity and repeatability, and compared with conventional RT nested-PCR based on the G gene. All of the AMPV subtype A and B strains tested were amplified and specifically detected while no amplification occurred with other non-target bird respiratory pathogens. The detection limit of the assay was 10(-0.41) median infectious dose/ml and 10(1.15) median infectious dose/ml when the AMPV-B strain IT/Ty/B/Vr240/87 and the AMPV-A strain IT/Ty/A/259-01/03 were used, respectively, as templates. In all cases, the amplification efficiency was approximately 2 and the error values were <0.2. Standard curves, generated either using the serial dilution of an RNA suspension or RNA extracted from the serial dilution of titrated viral suspensions as templates, exhibited good linearity (R (2)>0.9375) between crossing point values and virus quantities, making the assay herein designed reliable for quantification. When the newly developed qRT-PCR was compared with a conventional RT nested-PCR, it showed greater sensitivity with RNA extracted from both positive controls and from experimentally infected birds. This assay can be effectively used for the detection, identification, differentiation and quantitation of AMPV subtype A or subtype B to assist in disease diagnosis and to carry out rapid surveillance with high levels of sensitivity and specificity.

  14. A real-time PCR assay for the quantitative detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhong-Hua; Li, Bo; Allen, Caitilyn; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2010-01-01

    A specific and rapid real-time PCR assay for detecting Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues was developed in this study. The specific primers RSF/RSR were designed based on the upstream region of UDP-3-O-acyl-GlcNAc deacetylase gene from R. solanacearum, and a PCR product of 159 bp was amplified specifically from 28 strains of R. solanacearum, which represent all genetically diverse AluI types and all 6 biovars, but not from any other nontarget species. The detection limit of 102 CFU/g tomato stem and horticultural soil was achieved in this real-time PCR assay. The high sensitivity and specificity observed with filed samples as well as with artificially infected samples suggested that this method might be a useful tool for detection and quantification of R. solanacearum in precise forecast and diagnosis.

  15. Practical automation and interpretation of quantitative assays of antibodies to therapeutic proteins, illustrated with human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, J R; Smith, W C; Winely, C L

    1989-08-01

    To quantify concentrations of anti-growth hormone antibody in less than 600 serum samples by radioimmunoassay, we devised a system ("BOLAC") to process data and to execute the curve-fitting program LIGAND-PC automatically with an IBM PC-compatible computer. We fit data from each sample to four binding and one or two-antibody binding sites. Total antibody concentration is then calculated from the model that is statistically "best". This process occasionally selects a two-binding-site model that severely overestimates the antibody concentration. Errors of this kind are discarded by constraining the product of the second-site antibody's affinity and its concentration to exceed a minimum value (0.05). We evaluated the performance of the BOLAC system by assaying controls and by using computer simulations to demonstrate the high confidence levels attainable in estimation of antibody concentrations. Between-assay variability (CV) was less than 25%, and analytical recovery exceeded 90%. These figures are acceptable for an assay based on curve-fitting of competitive radioimmunoassay data, allowing clinically relevant assessments of antibody responses in patient's samples. The advantages of the BOLAC system include high throughput and the reporting of results in absolute units of affinities and concentrations. PMID:2758631

  16. Evaluation of two quantitative PCR assays using Bacteroidales and mitochondrial DNA markers for tracking dog fecal contamination in waterbodies.

    PubMed

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Boa, Tyler; Liljebjelke, Karen; Yost, Christopher K

    2012-12-01

    This study describes a comparative performance evaluation of two qPCR assays targeting a dog-associated Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genetic marker (CanBac-UCD) and a dog mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker. The same fecal and environmental samples were assayed for the two markers thereby allowing direct comparison. A wide range of non-target species including, human, pig, horse, deer, mountain goat, bison, caribou, and moose were tested. Marker persistence was also monitored in freshwater microcosms. Both markers were prevalent in the canine samples collected in Regina, Saskatchewan and Calgary, Alberta, Canada (91% and 98% sensitivity, respectively). The mtDNA marker was detected exclusively in the target species while the CanBac-UCD marker was detected in all the non-target species (31% specificity). The CanBac-UCD marker exhibited faster decay in freshwater microcosms. The markers were rarely detected in the water samples collected from dog parks in Calgary and in Regina as well as from waterbodies and sewage influents in Saskatchewan, indicating possibly low to negligible levels of dog fecal contamination in the sampling areas. Altogether, the results of this study support the utility of the dog mtDNA assay in detecting dog fecal contamination in waterbodies. PMID:23041493

  17. Evaluation of two quantitative PCR assays using Bacteroidales and mitochondrial DNA markers for tracking dog fecal contamination in waterbodies.

    PubMed

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Boa, Tyler; Liljebjelke, Karen; Yost, Christopher K

    2012-12-01

    This study describes a comparative performance evaluation of two qPCR assays targeting a dog-associated Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genetic marker (CanBac-UCD) and a dog mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker. The same fecal and environmental samples were assayed for the two markers thereby allowing direct comparison. A wide range of non-target species including, human, pig, horse, deer, mountain goat, bison, caribou, and moose were tested. Marker persistence was also monitored in freshwater microcosms. Both markers were prevalent in the canine samples collected in Regina, Saskatchewan and Calgary, Alberta, Canada (91% and 98% sensitivity, respectively). The mtDNA marker was detected exclusively in the target species while the CanBac-UCD marker was detected in all the non-target species (31% specificity). The CanBac-UCD marker exhibited faster decay in freshwater microcosms. The markers were rarely detected in the water samples collected from dog parks in Calgary and in Regina as well as from waterbodies and sewage influents in Saskatchewan, indicating possibly low to negligible levels of dog fecal contamination in the sampling areas. Altogether, the results of this study support the utility of the dog mtDNA assay in detecting dog fecal contamination in waterbodies.

  18. High performance liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay for the quantitation of BMS-204352 in dog K(3)EDTA plasma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ming; Mantha, Subbarao; Shah, Vinod R; Vachharajani, Nimish N; Arnold, Mark E; Pursley, Janice M; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2002-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric (LC/MS) assay was developed and validated for the determination of BMS-204352 in dog K(3)EDTA plasma. A 0.5 mL aliquot of control plasma was spiked with BMS-204352 and internal standard (IS) and buffered with 1 mL of 5 mM ammonium acetate. The mixture was then extracted with 3 mL of toluene. After separation and evaporation of the organic phase to dryness using nitrogen at 40 degrees C, the residue was reconstituted in the mobile phase and 25 microL of the sample were injected onto a Hypersil C(18) column (2 x 50 mm; 3 microm) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The mobile phase was consisted of two solvent mixtures (A and B). Solvent A was composed of 5 mM ammonium acetate and 0.1% triethylamine in 75:25 v/v water:methanol, pH adjusted to 5.5 with glacial acetic acid, and solvent B was 5 mM ammonium acetate in methanol. A linear gradient system was used to elute the analytes. The mass spectrometer was programmed to admit the de-protonated molecules at m/z 352.7 (IS) and m/z 357.9 (BMS-204352). Standard curves of BMS-204352 were linear (r(2) > or = 0.998) over the concentration range of 0.5-1000 ng/mL. The mean predicted quality control (QC) concentrations deviated less than 5.1% from the corresponding nominal values (ie 4, 80, 400 and 2000 ng/mL); the within- and between-assay precision of the assay were within 5.5% relative standard deviation. Stability of BMS-204352 was confirmed after at least three freeze/thaw cycles and BMS-204532 was stable in dog plasma when stored frozen at or below -20 degrees C for at least 16 weeks in spiked QC samples and for at least 4 1/2 weeks for in vivo study samples. BMS-204352 and IS were stable in the injection solvent at room temperature for at least 24 h. The assay was applied to delineate the pharmacokinetic disposition of BMS-204352 in dogs following a single intravenous dose administration. In conclusion, the assay is accurate, precise, specific, sensitive and

  19. Development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of surrogate biological warfare agents in building debris and leachate.

    PubMed

    Saikaly, Pascal E; Barlaz, Morton A; de Los Reyes, Francis L

    2007-10-01

    Evaluation of the fate and transport of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills requires the development of specific and sensitive detection assays. The objective of the current study was to develop and validate SYBR green quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assays for the specific detection and quantification of surrogate BW agents in synthetic building debris (SBD) and leachate. Bacillus atrophaeus (vegetative cells and spores) and Serratia marcescens were used as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) and Yersinia pestis (plague), respectively. The targets for SYBR green Q-PCR assays were the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and recA gene for B. atrophaeus and the gyrB, wzm, and recA genes for S. marcescens. All assays showed high specificity when tested against 5 ng of closely related Bacillus and Serratia nontarget DNA from 21 organisms. Several spore lysis methods that include a combination of one or more of freeze-thaw cycles, chemical lysis, hot detergent treatment, bead beat homogenization, and sonication were evaluated. All methods tested showed similar threshold cycle values. The limit of detection of the developed Q-PCR assays was determined using DNA extracted from a pure bacterial culture and DNA extracted from sterile water, leachate, and SBD samples spiked with increasing quantities of surrogates. The limit of detection for B. atrophaeus genomic DNA using the ITS and B. atrophaeus recA Q-PCR assays was 7.5 fg per PCR. The limits of detection of S. marcescens genomic DNA using the gyrB, wzm, and S. marcescens recA Q-PCR assays were 7.5 fg, 75 fg, and 7.5 fg per PCR, respectively. Quantification of B. atrophaeus vegetative cells and spores was linear (R(2) > 0.98) over a 7-log-unit dynamic range down to 10(1) B. atrophaeus cells or spores. Quantification of S. marcescens (R(2) > 0.98) was linear over a 6-log-unit dynamic range down to 10(2) S. marcescens cells. The developed Q-PCR assays are highly specific and sensitive

  20. Development of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Surrogate Biological Warfare Agents in Building Debris and Leachate▿

    PubMed Central

    Saikaly, Pascal E.; Barlaz, Morton A.; de los Reyes, Francis L.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of the fate and transport of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills requires the development of specific and sensitive detection assays. The objective of the current study was to develop and validate SYBR green quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assays for the specific detection and quantification of surrogate BW agents in synthetic building debris (SBD) and leachate. Bacillus atrophaeus (vegetative cells and spores) and Serratia marcescens were used as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) and Yersinia pestis (plague), respectively. The targets for SYBR green Q-PCR assays were the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and recA gene for B. atrophaeus and the gyrB, wzm, and recA genes for S. marcescens. All assays showed high specificity when tested against 5 ng of closely related Bacillus and Serratia nontarget DNA from 21 organisms. Several spore lysis methods that include a combination of one or more of freeze-thaw cycles, chemical lysis, hot detergent treatment, bead beat homogenization, and sonication were evaluated. All methods tested showed similar threshold cycle values. The limit of detection of the developed Q-PCR assays was determined using DNA extracted from a pure bacterial culture and DNA extracted from sterile water, leachate, and SBD samples spiked with increasing quantities of surrogates. The limit of detection for B. atrophaeus genomic DNA using the ITS and B. atrophaeus recA Q-PCR assays was 7.5 fg per PCR. The limits of detection of S. marcescens genomic DNA using the gyrB, wzm, and S. marcescens recA Q-PCR assays were 7.5 fg, 75 fg, and 7.5 fg per PCR, respectively. Quantification of B. atrophaeus vegetative cells and spores was linear (R2 > 0.98) over a 7-log-unit dynamic range down to 101 B. atrophaeus cells or spores. Quantification of S. marcescens (R2 > 0.98) was linear over a 6-log-unit dynamic range down to 102 S. marcescens cells. The developed Q-PCR assays are highly specific and sensitive and can

  1. Multiplex Quantitative PCR Assays for the Detection and Quantification of the Six Major Non-O157 Escherichia coli Serogroups in Cattle Feces.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, P B; Noll, L W; Shi, X; An, B; Cernicchiaro, N; Renter, D G; Nagaraja, T G; Bai, J

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, called non-O157 STEC, are important foodborne pathogens. Cattle, a major reservoir, harbor the organisms in the hindgut and shed them in the feces. Although limited data exist on fecal shedding, concentrations of non-O157 STEC in feces have not been reported. The objectives of our study were (i) to develop and validate two multiplex quantitative PCR (mqPCR) assays, targeting O-antigen genes of O26, O103, and O111 (mqPCR-1) and O45, O121, and O145 (mqPCR-2); (ii) to utilize the two assays, together with a previously developed four-plex qPCR assay (mqPCR-3) targeting the O157 antigen and three virulence genes (stx1, stx2, and eae), to quantify seven serogroups and three virulence genes in cattle feces; and (iii) to compare the three mqPCR assays to a 10-plex conventional PCR (cPCR) targeting seven serogroups and three virulence genes and culture methods to detect seven E. coli serogroups in cattle feces. The two mqPCR assays (1 and 2) were shown to be specific to the target genes, and the detection limits were 4 and 2 log CFU/g of pure culture-spiked fecal samples, before and after enrichment, respectively. A total of 576 fecal samples collected from a feedlot were enriched in E. coli broth and were subjected to quantification (before enrichment) and detection (after enrichment). Of the 576 fecal samples subjected, before enrichment, to three mqPCR assays for quantification, 175 (30.4%) were quantifiable (≥4 log CFU/g) for at least one of the seven serogroups, with O157 being the most common serogroup. The three mqPCR assays detected higher proportions of postenriched fecal samples (P > 0.01) as positive for one or more serogroups compared with cPCR and culture methods. This is the first study to assess the applicability of qPCR assays to detect and quantify six non-O157 serogroups in cattle feces and to generate data on fecal concentration of the six serogroups.

  2. Real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR assay for the expression of metallothioneins in rat hippocampal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hai-Hong; Wang, Fu-Di; Guo, Jun-Sheng; Shen, Hui; Li, Run-Ping

    2004-07-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are short, cysteine-rich proteins for heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification; they can bind a variety of heavy metals and also act as radical scavengers. In brain cells, they play a neuroprotective role in many aspects. However, because the previous methods can't quantify their gene expression at the mRNA level, their regulation in brain, especially in neurons, is not well known by now. In this study, we use a more accurate method, the real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR technique, to determine the expression of three MT isomers on 100 μM zinc exposure after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours in primary culture rat hippocampal neurons. The result shows that the expression of all three MT isomers was higher compared with the values determined by other methods. This means that the roles played by neuron MTs in protecting neurons injury on zinc fluctuation was even stronger than what has been suspected before. In conclusion, our study proved that the real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR technique is a simple, rapid and more precise method than previous techniques in the detection of gene expression, especially for those genes with low abundant mRNA. Our study also suggest that may of the past studies about gene expression should be verified by real-time Fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR once more in order to reach a more scientific explanation on certain problem.

  3. Interlaboratory comparison of three microbial source tracking quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays from fecal-source and environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Strickler, Kriston M.; Schill, William B.

    2012-01-01

    During summer and early fall 2010, 15 river samples and 6 fecal-source samples were collected in West Virginia. These samples were analyzed by three laboratories for three microbial source tracking (MST) markers: AllBac, a general fecal indicator; BacHum, a human-associated fecal indicator; and BoBac, a ruminant-associated fecal indicator. MST markers were analyzed by means of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. The aim was to assess interlaboratory precision when the three laboratories used the same MST marker and shared deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracts of the samples, but different equipment, reagents, and analyst experience levels. The term assay refers to both the markers and the procedure differences listed above. Interlaboratory precision was best for all three MST assays when using the geometric mean absolute relative percent difference (ARPD) and Friedman's statistical test as a measure of interlaboratory precision. Adjustment factors (one for each MST assay) were calculated using results from fecal-source samples analyzed by all three laboratories and applied retrospectively to sample concentrations to account for differences in qPCR results among labs using different standards and procedures. Following the application of adjustment factors to qPCR results, ARPDs were lower; however, statistically significant differences between labs were still observed for the BacHum and BoBac assays. This was a small study and two of the MST assays had 52 percent of samples with concentrations at or below the limit of accurate quantification; hence, more testing could be done to determine if the adjustment factors would work better if the majority of sample concentrations were above the quantification limit.

  4. Duplex quantitative real-time PCR assay for the detection and discrimination of the eggs of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati (Nematoda, Ascaridoidea) in soil and fecal samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxocarosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) and/or Toxocara cati (T. cati), two worldwide distributed roundworms which are parasites of canids and felids, respectively. Infections of humans occur through ingestion of embryonated eggs of T. canis or T. cati, when playing with soils contaminated with dogs or cats feces. Accordingly, the assessment of potential contamination of these areas with these roundworms eggs is paramount. Methods A duplex quantitative real-time PCR (2qPCR) targeting the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) has been developed and used for rapid and specific identification of T. canis and T. cati eggs in fecal and soil samples. The assay was set up on DNA samples extracted from 53 adult worms including T. canis, T. cati, T. leonina, Ascaris suum (A. suum) and Parascaris equorum (P. equorum). The assay was used to assess the presence of T. cati eggs in several samples, including 12 clean soil samples spiked with eggs of either T. cati or A. suum, 10 actual soil samples randomly collected from playgrounds in Brussels, and fecal samples from cats, dogs, and other animals. 2qPCR results on dogs and cats fecal samples were compared with results from microscopic examination. Results 2qPCR assay allowed specific detection of T. canis and T. cati, whether adult worms, eggs spiked in soil or fecal samples. The 2qPCR limit of detection (LOD) in spiked soil samples was 2 eggs per g of soil for a turnaround time of 3 hours. A perfect concordance was observed between 2qPCR assay and microscopic examination on dogs and cats feces. Conclusion The newly developed 2qPCR assay can be useful for high throughput prospective or retrospective detection of T.canis and/or T. cati eggs in fecal samples as well as in soil samples from playgrounds, parks and sandpits. PMID:23216873

  5. A Fluorescence Immunochromatographic Assay Using Europium (III) Chelate Microparticles for Rapid, Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of Creatine Kinase MB.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Hong; Liang, Rong-Liang; Liu, Tian-Cai; Dong, Zhi-Ning; Wu, Ying-Song; Li, Lin-Hai

    2016-05-01

    The isoenzyme creatine kinase MB is very important for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Some CK-MB immunoassays are sensitive, accurate and available for clinical application, but they are expensive and time-consuming procedures. Furthermore, conventional fluorescence immunochromatographic assays (FL-ICAs) have suffered from background fluorescence interference and low analytical sensitivity. A rapid and simple FL-ICA with Eu (III) chelate polystyrene microparticles was developed to determine CK-MB in 50uL serum samples using a portable test strip reader by measuring the fluorescence peak heights of the test line (HT) and the control line (HC) in 12 min. The assay was reliable with a good correlation coefficient between HT/HC ratio and CK-MB concentration in samples. A linear range was 0.85-100.29 ng/mL for CK-MB, and the LOD was 0.029 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were both <10 % and the average recoveries were from 90.17 % -112.63 % for CK-MB. The system performed well in interference experiments. Furthermore, a highly significant correlation (r = 0.9794, P < 0.001) between this method and the commercially available bioMérieux mini VIDAS system were attained for measuring 120 CK-MB samples. These results indicated that the Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based FL-ICA is simple, fast, highly sensitive, reliable, and reproducible for point-of-care testing of CK-MB concentrations in serum. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Quantitative analysis of steroid hormones in human hair using a column-switching LC-APCI-MS/MS assay.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Stalder, Tobias; Foley, Paul; Rauh, Manfred; Deng, Huihua; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2013-06-01

    The analysis of steroid hormones in hair is increasingly used in the field of stress-related research to obtain a retrospective index of integrated long-term hormone secretion. Here, most laboratories have so far relied on immunochemical assays originally developed for salivary analyses. Although these assays are fast and easy to perform, they have a reduced reliability and specificity due to cross-reactivity with other substances and are limited to the detection of one hormone at a time. Here, we report the development of a LC-MS/MS-based method for simultaneous identification of endogenous concentrations of seven steroid hormones (cortisol, cortisone, testosterone, progesterone, corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione) in human hair. Hair samples were washed with isopropanol and steroid hormones were extracted from 10mg whole, nonpulverized hair by methanol incubation. A column switching strategy for on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) was applied, followed by analyte detection on an AB Sciex API 5000 QTrap mass spectrometer. Results indicated linearity of the method for all steroids over ranges of 0.09-90pg/mg (0.9-900pg/mg for DHEA) with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9995 and 0.9999. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were between 3.7 and 9.1%. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were below (or equal to) 0.1pg/mg for all steroids, except of DHEA for which the LOQ was 0.9pg/mg. An analysis of 30 natural hair samples (15 men/15 women) using this method confirmed that all steroid hormones could be quantified at endogenous levels in each individual. In addition, the use of whole hair samples and on-line SPE resulted in a significant reduction in sample throughput times, increasing the applicability of this method for research questions where a larger number of samples needs to be processed.

  7. A Fluorescence Immunochromatographic Assay Using Europium (III) Chelate Microparticles for Rapid, Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of Creatine Kinase MB.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Hong; Liang, Rong-Liang; Liu, Tian-Cai; Dong, Zhi-Ning; Wu, Ying-Song; Li, Lin-Hai

    2016-05-01

    The isoenzyme creatine kinase MB is very important for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Some CK-MB immunoassays are sensitive, accurate and available for clinical application, but they are expensive and time-consuming procedures. Furthermore, conventional fluorescence immunochromatographic assays (FL-ICAs) have suffered from background fluorescence interference and low analytical sensitivity. A rapid and simple FL-ICA with Eu (III) chelate polystyrene microparticles was developed to determine CK-MB in 50uL serum samples using a portable test strip reader by measuring the fluorescence peak heights of the test line (HT) and the control line (HC) in 12 min. The assay was reliable with a good correlation coefficient between HT/HC ratio and CK-MB concentration in samples. A linear range was 0.85-100.29 ng/mL for CK-MB, and the LOD was 0.029 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were both <10 % and the average recoveries were from 90.17 % -112.63 % for CK-MB. The system performed well in interference experiments. Furthermore, a highly significant correlation (r = 0.9794, P < 0.001) between this method and the commercially available bioMérieux mini VIDAS system were attained for measuring 120 CK-MB samples. These results indicated that the Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based FL-ICA is simple, fast, highly sensitive, reliable, and reproducible for point-of-care testing of CK-MB concentrations in serum. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27034063

  8. The development of quick, robust, quantitative phenotypic assays for describing the host–nonhost landscape to stripe rust

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Andrew M.; Bettgenhaeuser, Jan; Gardiner, Matthew; Green, Phon; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Hubbard, Amelia; Moscou, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhost resistance is often conceptualized as a qualitative separation from host resistance. Classification into these two states is generally facile, as they fail to fully describe the range of states that exist in the transition from host to nonhost. This poses a problem when studying pathosystems that cannot be classified as either host or nonhost due to their intermediate status relative to these two extremes. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the Poaceae-stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend.) interaction for describing the host–nonhost landscape. First, using barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv. We observed that macroscopic symptoms of chlorosis and leaf browning were associated with hyphal colonization by P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, respectively. This prompted us to adapt a protocol for visualizing fungal structures into a phenotypic assay that estimates the percent of leaf colonized. Use of this assay in intermediate host and intermediate nonhost systems found the frequency of infection decreases with evolutionary divergence from the host species. Similarly, we observed that the pathogen’s ability to complete its life cycle decreased faster than its ability to colonize leaf tissue, with no incidence of pustules observed in the intermediate nonhost system and significantly reduced pustule formation in the intermediate host system as compared to the host system, barley-P. striiformis f. sp. hordei. By leveraging the stripe rust pathosystem in conjunction with macroscopic and microscopic phenotypic assays, we now hope to dissect the genetic architecture of intermediate host and intermediate nonhost resistance using structured populations in barley and B. distachyon. PMID:26579142

  9. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of samples of transuranic waste contained in barrels in the presence of matrix material

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Shunk, E.R.; Kunz, W.E.

    1987-08-28

    Apparatus and method for performing corrections for matrix material effects on the neutron measurements generated from analysis of transuranic waste drums using the differential-dieaway technique. By measuring the absorption index and the moderator index for a particular drum, correction factors can be determined for the effects of matrix materials on the ''observed'' quantity of fissile and fertile material present therein in order to determine the actual assays thereof. A barrel flux monitor is introduced into the measurement chamber to accomplish these measurements as a new contribution to the differential-dieaway technology. 9 figs.

  10. Development of a SYBR-Green Ⅰ quantitative PCR assay for the detection and genotyping of different hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyu; Wang, Fang; Yuan, Lijuan; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Ying, Qikang; Yu, Lan; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Linfeng; Zhang, Fanglin; Lu, Jianguo; Wu, Xing'an

    2016-09-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a severe, viral zoonotic disease which occurs worldwide, particularly in Asia and Europe. In China, the Hantaan virus (HTNV) and the Seoul virus (SEOV) are known to be the most prevalent causative agents of HFRS. Since no protective vaccines or effective treatments are available for human use, accurate and reliable diagnostic methods are essential for disease surveillance. In the present study, the viral loads in cell culture supernatant, infected mice blood and clinical serum samples were quantified using the SYBR‑Green I-based reverse transcription-quantitiative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay, which targeted the S gene sequence of the HTNV and SEOV genomes. The cRNA of these two viruses were synthesized as a positive control and 10-fold serially diluted from 1x105 to 1x100 copies/µl. Standard curves were generated by plotting the mean cycle threshold (Ct) values versus copy numbers. The standard curve of HTNV had a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.994, efficiency of amplification (E) of 101.9%, and the slope of -3.278, whereas that of SEOV had an R2 of 0.993, E of 104.8%, and the slope of -3.212. The minimum detection limit of the RT-qPCR assay for HTNV and SEOV was 101 copies/µl. Two qPCR assays were successfully established for the detection of HTNV and SEOV, respectively. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that using the SYBR‑Green I-based RT-qPCR assay, the HTNV and SEOV may be genotyped precisely without cross-reactivity. Furthermore, viral RNA may be detected and quantified in cells, mice and infected individuals, which may be useful in epidemiological studies as well as for early monitoring and further preventative treatment against SEOV and HTNV-induced diseases.

  11. Development of a SYBR-Green Ⅰ quantitative PCR assay for the detection and genotyping of different hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyu; Wang, Fang; Yuan, Lijuan; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Ying, Qikang; Yu, Lan; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Linfeng; Zhang, Fanglin; Lu, Jianguo; Wu, Xing'an

    2016-09-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a severe, viral zoonotic disease which occurs worldwide, particularly in Asia and Europe. In China, the Hantaan virus (HTNV) and the Seoul virus (SEOV) are known to be the most prevalent causative agents of HFRS. Since no protective vaccines or effective treatments are available for human use, accurate and reliable diagnostic methods are essential for disease surveillance. In the present study, the viral loads in cell culture supernatant, infected mice blood and clinical serum samples were quantified using the SYBR‑Green I-based reverse transcription-quantitiative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay, which targeted the S gene sequence of the HTNV and SEOV genomes. The cRNA of these two viruses were synthesized as a positive control and 10-fold serially diluted from 1x105 to 1x100 copies/µl. Standard curves were generated by plotting the mean cycle threshold (Ct) values versus copy numbers. The standard curve of HTNV had a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.994, efficiency of amplification (E) of 101.9%, and the slope of -3.278, whereas that of SEOV had an R2 of 0.993, E of 104.8%, and the slope of -3.212. The minimum detection limit of the RT-qPCR assay for HTNV and SEOV was 101 copies/µl. Two qPCR assays were successfully established for the detection of HTNV and SEOV, respectively. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that using the SYBR‑Green I-based RT-qPCR assay, the HTNV and SEOV may be genotyped precisely without cross-reactivity. Furthermore, viral RNA may be detected and quantified in cells, mice and infected individuals, which may be useful in epidemiological studies as well as for early monitoring and further preventative treatment against SEOV and HTNV-induced diseases. PMID:27430149

  12. Development of an in vitro high content imaging assay for quantitative assessment of CAR-dependent mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Soldatow, Valerie; Peffer, Richard C; Trask, O Joseph; Cowie, David E; Andersen, Melvin E; LeCluyse, Edward; Deisenroth, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Rodent liver tumors promoted by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are known to be mediated by key events that include CAR-dependent gene expression and hepatocellular proliferation. Here, an in vitro high content imaging based assay was developed for quantitative assessment of nascent DNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures from mouse, rat, and human species. Detection of DNA synthesis was performed using direct DNA labeling with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The assay was multiplexed to enable direct quantitation of DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity, and cell count endpoints. An optimized defined medium cocktail was developed to sensitize hepatocytes to cell cycle progression. The baseline EdU response to defined medium was greatest for mouse, followed by rat, and then human. Hepatocytes from all three species demonstrated CAR activation in response to the CAR agonists TCPOBOP, CITCO, and phenobarbital based on increased gene expression for Cyp2b isoforms. When evaluated for a proliferation phenotype, TCPOBOP and CITCO exhibited significant dose-dependent increases in frequency of EdU labeling in mouse and rat hepatocytes that was not observed in hepatocytes from three human donors. The observed species differences are consistent with CAR activators inducing a proliferative response in rodents, a key event in the liver tumor mode of action that is not observed in humans.

  13. Development of an in vitro high content imaging assay for quantitative assessment of CAR-dependent mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Soldatow, Valerie; Peffer, Richard C; Trask, O Joseph; Cowie, David E; Andersen, Melvin E; LeCluyse, Edward; Deisenroth, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Rodent liver tumors promoted by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are known to be mediated by key events that include CAR-dependent gene expression and hepatocellular proliferation. Here, an in vitro high content imaging based assay was developed for quantitative assessment of nascent DNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures from mouse, rat, and human species. Detection of DNA synthesis was performed using direct DNA labeling with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The assay was multiplexed to enable direct quantitation of DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity, and cell count endpoints. An optimized defined medium cocktail was developed to sensitize hepatocytes to cell cycle progression. The baseline EdU response to defined medium was greatest for mouse, followed by rat, and then human. Hepatocytes from all three species demonstrated CAR activation in response to the CAR agonists TCPOBOP, CITCO, and phenobarbital based on increased gene expression for Cyp2b isoforms. When evaluated for a proliferation phenotype, TCPOBOP and CITCO exhibited significant dose-dependent increases in frequency of EdU labeling in mouse and rat hepatocytes that was not observed in hepatocytes from three human donors. The observed species differences are consistent with CAR activators inducing a proliferative response in rodents, a key event in the liver tumor mode of action that is not observed in humans. PMID:27530964

  14. Development and validation of RP-HPLC-fluorescence method for quantitative determination of quinidine, a probe substrate for P-glycoprotein inhibition assay using Caco-2 cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Patil, Anand G; Reddy, Dilip; D'Souza, Russell; Damre, Anagha

    2010-06-01

    A simple, sensitive and specific reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method with fluorescence detection was developed for quantitation of quinidine from HBSS buffer. The method was applicable in the bi-directional transport assay for evaluation of the inhibitory effect of test compounds on P-glycoprotein-mediated quinidine transport; quinidine was used as a probe P-glycoprotein substrate. The calibration curve was linear (correlation coefficient >/=99) in the range 0.30-100.00 nm. The method was validated and is specific and sensitive with limit of quantitation of 300 pm for quinidine. The method was found to be accurate and precise in the working calibration range. Stability studies were carried out at different storage conditions where the analyte was found to be stable. The applicability and reliability of the analytical method was evaluated by successful demonstration of efflux ratio (P(app)B --> A/P(app)A --> B) in the Caco-2 cell monolayer efflux assay. The efflux ratio for quinidine (100 nm) alone was 10.8, which reduced to less than 2 in the presence of the classical P-gp inhibitors verapamil and ketoconazole (100 mum each).

  15. A Powerful New Quantitative Genetics Platform, Combining Caenorhabditis elegans High-Throughput Fitness Assays with a Large Collection of Recombinant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Erik C.; Shimko, Tyler C.; Crissman, Jonathan R.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Seidel, Hannah S.; Gerke, Justin P.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    The genetic variants underlying complex traits are often elusive even in powerful model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans with controlled genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. Two major contributing factors are: (1) the lack of statistical power from measuring the phenotypes of small numbers of individuals, and (2) the use of phenotyping platforms that do not scale to hundreds of individuals and are prone to noisy measurements. Here, we generated a new resource of 359 recombinant inbred strains that augments the existing C. elegans N2xCB4856 recombinant inbred advanced intercross line population. This new strain collection removes variation in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1, known to have large physiological and behavioral effects on C. elegans and mitigates the hybrid strain incompatibility caused by zeel-1 and peel-1, allowing for identification of quantitative trait loci that otherwise would have been masked by those effects. Additionally, we optimized highly scalable and accurate high-throughput assays of fecundity and body size using the COPAS BIOSORT large particle nematode sorter. Using these assays, we identified quantitative trait loci involved in fecundity and growth under normal growth conditions and after exposure to the herbicide paraquat, including independent genetic loci that regulate different stages of larval growth. Our results offer a powerful platform for the discovery of the genetic variants that control differences in responses to drugs, other aqueous compounds, bacterial foods, and pathogenic stresses. PMID:25770127

  16. Quantitative measurement of bitagged recombinant proteins using an immunometric assay: application to an anti-substance P recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Boquet, D; Créminon, C; Clément, G; Frobert, Y; Nevers, M C; Essono, S; Grassi, J

    2000-09-10

    We have developed two different immunometric assays to directly quantify both the total and the active fractions of a recombinant antibody (single chain fragment variable, or ScFv) as obtained in a crude extract from an Escherichia coli expression system. For total determination, the assay is based on the simultaneous recognition of two different peptide Tag sequences (Ha-Tag and Myc-Tag) at each of the N- and C-terminal extremities of the recombinant protein. A monoclonal antibody (mAb 12CA5, directed against Ha-Tag), coated on microtiter plates, is used for capture, and the mAb 9E10 (directed against Myc-Tag), labeled with acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7), acts as tracer. In parallel, for the determination of the active fraction, the capture is performed using microtiter plates coated with the antigen, while solid-phase-immobilized ScFv is measured using the same 9E10 tracer mAb. A synthetic peptide in which the two Tag sequences were joined was used as a standard, thus avoiding the laborious purification of a recombinant protein as reference. The method was applied to the direct measurement, in periplasmic extracts, of the total and active fractions of an ScFv produced at different induction temperatures.

  17. Development of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for the characteristic sialoglycoprotein of edible bird's nest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwei; Lai, Xintian; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yun; Li, Bifang; Huang, Xiuli; Zhang, Qinlei; Chen, Wei; Lin, Lin; Yang, Guowu

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for identification of edible bird's nest. The characteristic sialoglycoproteins were found by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and purified by liquid-phase isoelectric focusing (LIEF). According to the analysis, the molecular weight was 106-128 kDa and the isoelectric point was ≤pH 3.0. Two anti-characteristic sialoglycoprotein monoclonal antibodies were produced. The monoclonal antibodies were examined by western-blot assay. One of the monoclonal antibody was used as coating and the other as the enzyme-labeled antibody after being coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Based on the optimized ELISA condition, the method was established with IC(50) of 1.5 ng/mL, and low cross-reactivity with various fake materials (<0.01%). ELISA provided a suitable means for screening of a large number of samples. The coefficients of variation were between 2.9% and 5.8%.

  18. Quantitative analysis of binding of transcription factor complex to biotinylated DNA probe by a streptavidin-agarose pulldown assay.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wu-Guo; Zhu, Ying; Montero, Alberto; Wu, Kenneth K

    2003-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by a large complex of proteins that bind to the promoter/enhancer region of a gene. We determined whether a streptavidin-bead binding assay might be useful in detecting individual proteins in the complex comprising transactivators, coactivators, mediators, and general transcription factors. We used biotinylated cyclooxygenase-2 promoter probes as a model. Nuclear extracts obtained from human fibroblasts treated with or without an agonist were incubated with a 5(')-biotinylated probe and streptavidin-agarose beads at room temperature for 1h. After centrifugation, the pellet was washed and proteins in the complex were assessed by immunoblots. An array of transcription factors was detectable concurrently in the same batch of pellets at basal state. p300 and its associated factor PCAF levels but not Srb7, Med7, or TFII(B) were increased by phorbol ester or tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulation. Only trace of CREB-binding protein was detected. These results suggest that p300 and PCAF are the predominant coactivators for COX-2 promoter activation. Our findings indicate that the streptavidin-bead pulldown assay is valuable for determining the binding of a large number of transcription factors to promoter/enhancer and evaluating the relationship of protein binding with regulation of gene expression.

  19. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P < 0.0001) and mean differences of measurement, conducted according to Bland-Altman method, was low (0.115 log10  copies/ml). The Aptima HIV quantified the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard diluted from 2000 to 31 cp/ml (5,700-88 IU/ml) at expected values with excellent linearity (R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P < 0.0001) and mean differences of measurement, conducted according to Bland-Altman method, was low (0.115 log10  copies/ml). The Aptima HIV quantified the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard diluted from 2000 to 31 cp/ml (5,700-88 IU/ml) at expected values with excellent linearity (R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864171

  1. Quantitative integration of the Salmonella microsuspension assay with supercritical fluid extraction of model airborne vapor-phase mutagens.

    PubMed

    Kado, N Y; Wong, J M; Kuzmicky, P A; Woodrow, J E; Ning, H; Seiber, J N; Hsieh, D P

    1992-06-01

    Vapor-phase mutagens are potentially a major class of toxic contaminants in ambient and indoor air. These compounds are not routinely analyzed due to a lack of an established integrated methodology to quantitatively trap, extract and test the compounds in a bioassay. In a previous report, we emphasized the trapping of volatile and semi-volatile mutagens and the extraction of these compounds using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2). In the present study, we discuss the use of a bioassay for the quantitation of the model mutagens, ethylene dibromide(EDB) and 4-nitrobiphenyl (4-NB), trapped from an airstream. The compounds EDB and 4-NB were released into a controlled airstream, trapped on XAD-4 adsorbent, and were extracted using supercritical CO2. The extract was tested in a microsuspension modification of the Ames Salmonella/microsome test adapted for volatile compounds. Linear dose-response relationships were obtained for supercritical CO2-extracted EDB using tester strain TA100 (+/- S9) and for 4-NB using tester strains TA98 and TA100 (-S9). Standard dose-response curves with known amounts of the compounds were also determined for comparison with measured amounts of the model compounds collected in an airstream. The gas chromatographic (GC)- and bioassay-determined quantities of EDB and 4-NB were highly correlated, accurate and precise. For example, bioassay-determined EDB concentrations were within 10% of the GC-determined concentrations. Our results demonstrate that the integrated methodology for vapor-phase mutagens developed in this study would be useful for quantitative analysis of these and related airborne vapor-phase mutagenic compounds.

  2. The development of a quantitative assay for the detection of anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-LA/SS-B autoantibodies using purified recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Veldhoven, C H; Meilof, J F; Huisman, J G; Smeenk, R J

    1992-07-01

    A characteristic of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus is the presence of anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B autoantibodies in their circulation. In order to investigate specific autoantibody levels in the sera of these patients quantitative assays for the detection of both anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B reactivity were developed. Ro/SS-A (60 kDa) and La-SS-B (50 kDa) cDNAs were cloned and expressed in E. coli as non-fusion proteins. These were purified to homogeneity using two different purification protocols. With these recombinant antigens, specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed. 40 sera positive for anti-Ro/SS-A autoantibodies in counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were tested in both the Ro/SS-A and La/SS-B ELISA. Activity values reproducibly ranged from 1536 to 120,000 U in the Ro/SS-A ELISA and from 763 to 2,500,000 U in the La/SS-B ELISA. The suitability of these ELISAs as screening assays was further investigated by testing 200 sera sent to our laboratory for routine detection of autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigen (ENA: anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B). Both ELISAs showed a high sensitivity and specificity (Ro/SS-A ELISA 85% and 94%, La/SS-B ELISA 100% and 98% respectively), when compared to the standard assays, the RNA-precipitation assay and the HeLa immunoblotting test. From these data we conclude that a quantitative analysis of both anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B autoantibodies is now possible using purified recombinant non-fusion proteins. For screening purposes the La/SS-B ELISA showed a great improvement in sensitivity for the detection of anti-La/SS-B activity in comparison to the La/SS-B CIE, while the Ro/SS-A ELISA almost equalled the performance of the Ro/SS-A CIE.

  3. Dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay: a quantitative method for oxidative stress assessment of nanoparticle-treated cells.

    PubMed

    Aranda, A; Sequedo, L; Tolosa, L; Quintas, G; Burello, E; Castell, J V; Gombau, L

    2013-03-01

    No consensus exists on how to address possible toxicity of nanomaterials as they interfere with most in vitro screening tests based on colorimetric and fluorimetric probes such as the dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay for detection of oxidative species. In the present research, nanomaterial interaction with DCFH-DA was studied in relation to its nature and/or assay conditions (cell-based and time exposure) by incubating Rhodamine (Rhd)-labeled 25nm and 50nm silica (SiO2), naked and oleic acid coated magnetite, (Fe3O4) and maghemite (Fe2O3) iron oxide, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(lactide/glycolide) acid (PLGA-PEO) nanoparticles (NPs) with metabolically active rat hepatocytes for 4 and 24-h periods. Data indicated that nanoparticle uptake correlated with quenching of dye fluorescence emission. In spite of their masking effect, the oxidative potential of NPs could be detected at a limited threshold concentration when exposed for periods of time longer than those frequently used for this test. However, changes in the experimental conditions did not systematically result in free radical formation for all nanomaterials tested. Overall data indicate that despite the quenching effect of nanoparticles on DCFH-DA assay, it can be considered as a useful tool for quantitative measurement of NPs-induced oxidative stress by minor modifications of standardized protocols. PMID:23357416

  4. Quantitative predictability of carcinogenicity of the covalent binding index of chemicals to DNA: Comparison of the in vivo and in vitro assays

    SciTech Connect

    Taningher, M.; Saccomanno, G.; Santi, L.; Parodi, S. ); Grilli, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The capability of covalent binding to DNA to predict the initiating potential of chemical carcinogens was compared for the assays performed in vivo (rodent liver DNA) and in vitro (purified DNA incubated in the presence of mouse and rat liver microsomes). A quantitative correlation between DNA adducts and carcinogenic potency was investigated. The in vivo assay appeared slightly, but not significantly, more predictive than the in vitro assay. Also predictivity was slightly higher both in vivo and in vitro when we referred to liver carcinogenicity instead of overall carcinogenicity. The predictive ability found for DNA covalent binding (both in vivo and in vitro) was similar to that of many short-term tests (such as mutagenicity, DNA damage/repair, SCEs, and cell transformation tests). The covalent DNA binding, measured after incubation with DNA in vitro in the presence of liver microsomes, could therefore be a reasonable short-term test offering greater rapidity of execution and requiring the sacrifice of fewer animals than the corresponding in vivo test.

  5. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  6. A One-Step Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for the Detection and Quantitation of Sugarcane Streak Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Sheng-Ren; Fu, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ru-Kai; Su, Jin-Wei; Gao, San-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane mosaic disease is caused by the Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV; genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) which is common in some Asian countries. Here, we established a protocol of a one-step real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) using the TaqMan probe for the detection of SCSMV in sugarcane. Primers and probes were designed within the conserved region of the SCSMV coat protein (CP) gene sequences. Standard single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) generated by PCR-based gene transcripts of recombinant pGEM-CP plasmid in vitro and total RNA extracted from SCSMV-infected sugarcane were used as templates of qRT-PCR. We further performed a sensitivity assay to show that the detection limit of the assay was 100 copies of ssRNA and 2 pg of total RNA with good reproducibility. The values obtained were approximately 100-fold more sensitive than those of the conventional RT-PCR. A higher incidence (68.6%) of SCSMV infection was detected by qRT-PCR than that (48.6%) with conventional RT-PCR in samples showing mosaic symptoms. SCSMV-free samples were verified by infection with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) or a combination of both. The developed qRT-PCR assay may become an alternative molecular tool for an economical, rapid, and efficient detection and quantification of SCSMV. PMID:26185758

  7. Allele specific locked nucleic acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): an accurate and cost-effective assay to diagnose and quantify KRAS and BRAF mutation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes.

  8. Development of a rapid, sensitive, and field-deployable razor ex BioDetection system and quantitative PCR assay for detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora using multiple gene targets.

    PubMed

    Arif, M; Fletcher, J; Marek, S M; Melcher, U; Ochoa-Corona, F M

    2013-04-01

    A validated, multigene-based method using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and the Razor Ex BioDetection system was developed for detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. This soilborne fungus causes Phymatotrichopsis root rot of cotton, alfalfa, and other dicot crops in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, leading to significant crop losses and limiting the range of crops that can be grown in soils where the fungus is established. It is on multiple lists of regulated organisms. Because P. omnivora is difficult to isolate, accurate and sensitive culture-independent diagnostic tools are needed to confirm infections by this fungus. Specific PCR primers and probes were designed based on P. omnivora nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding rRNA internal transcribed spacers, beta-tubulin, and the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). PCR products were cloned and sequenced to confirm their identity. All primer sets allowed early detection of P. omnivora in infected but asymptomatic plants. A modified rapid DNA purification method, which facilitates a quick (∼30-min) on-site assay capability for P. omnivora detection, was developed. Combined use of three target genes increased the assay accuracy and broadened the range of detection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a multigene-based, field-deployable, rapid, and reliable identification method for a fungal plant pathogen and should serve as a model for the development of field-deployable assays of other phytopathogens.

  9. Development of an Escherichia coli K12-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and DNA isolation suited to biofilms associated with iron drinking water pipe corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingrang; Gerke, Tammie L; Buse, Helen Y; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay (115 bp amplicon) specific to Escherichia coli K12 with an ABI(TM) internal control was developed based on sequence data encoding the rfb gene cluster. Assay specificity was evaluated using three E. coli K12 strains (ATCC W3110, MG1655 & DH1), 24 non-K12 E. coli and 23 bacterial genera. The biofilm detection limit was 10(3) colony-forming units (CFU) E. coli K12 mL(-1), but required a modified protocol, which included a bio-blocker Pseudomonas aeruginosa with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid buffered to pH 5 prior to cell lysis/DNA extraction. The novel protocol yielded the same sensitivity for drinking water biofilms associated with Fe3O4 (magnetite)-coated SiO2 (quartz) grains and biofilm-surface iron corrosion products from a drinking water distribution system. The novel DNA extraction protocol and specific E. coli K12 assay are sensitive and robust enough for detection and quantification within iron drinking water pipe biofilms, and are particularly well suited for studying enteric bacterial interactions within biofilms.

  10. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Murray, Shauna A.; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r = 0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r = 0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. PMID:26231652

  11. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Murray, Shauna A; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r=0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r=0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms.

  12. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Murray, Shauna A; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r=0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r=0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. PMID:26231652

  13. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk. PMID:27120637

  14. Development of a quantitative PCR assay for monitoring Streptococcus agalactiae colonization and tissue tropism in experimentally infected tilapia.

    PubMed

    Su, Y-L; Feng, J; Li, Y-W; Bai, J-S; Li, A-X

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has become one of the most important emerging pathogens in the aquaculture industry and has resulted in large economic losses for tilapia farms in China. In this study, three pairs of specific primers were designed and tested for their specificities and sensitivities in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs) after optimization of the annealing temperature. The primer pair IGS-s/IGS-a, which targets the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region, was finally chosen, having a detection limit of 8.6 copies of S. agalactiae DNA in a 20 μL reaction mixture. Bacterial tissue tropism was demonstrated by qPCR in Oreochromis niloticus 5 days post-injection with a virulent S. agalactiae strain. Bacterial loads were detected at the highest level in brain, followed by moderately high levels in kidney, heart, spleen, intestines, and eye. Significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in muscle, gill and liver. In addition, significantly lower bacterial loads were observed in the brain of convalescent O. niloticus 14 days post-injection with several different S. agalactiae strains. The qPCR for the detection of S. agalactiae developed in this study provides a quantitative tool for investigating bacterial tissue tropism in infected fish, as well as for monitoring bacterial colonization in convalescent fish.

  15. Subtissue-Specific Evaluation of Promoter Efficiency by Quantitative Fluorometric Assay in Laser Microdissected Tissues of Rapeseed[W

    PubMed Central

    Jasik, Jan; Schiebold, Silke; Rolletschek, Hardy; Denolf, Peter; Van Adenhove, Katrien; Altmann, Thomas; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase (GUS) is a useful reporter for the evaluation of promoter characteristics in transgenic plants. Here, we introduce an original technique to quantify the strength of promoters at subtissue resolution of cell clusters. The method combines cryotomy, laser microdissection, and improved fluorometric analysis of GUS activity using 6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide as an efficient fluorogenic substrate for kinetic studies in plants. The laser microdissection/6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide method is robust and reliable in a wide range of GUS expression levels and requires extremely low (few cells) tissue amounts. Suitability of the assay was demonstrated on rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants transformed with a P35S2::GUS construct. GUS expression patterns were visualized and quantified in approximately 30 tissues of vegetative and generative organs. Considerable differences in promoter activity within the tissues are discussed in relation to the cell type and developmental state. PMID:21825109

  16. High throughput quantitative colorimetric microneutralization assay for the confirmation and differentiation of West Nile Virus and St. Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Taketa-Graham, Michael; Powell Pereira, Jaime L; Baylis, Elizabeth; Cossen, Cynthia; Oceguera, Leopoldo; Patiris, Peter; Chiles, Robert; Hanson, Carl V; Forghani, Bagher; Forghani, BagHer

    2010-03-01

    An automated colorimetric micro-neutralization assay (CmNt) was developed for confirmation and differentiation of West Nile Virus (WNV)-positive human sera as a higher throughput alternative to the standard six-well plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT). CmNt was performed in high-capacity 96-well micro-titer plates and required 4-6 days to complete. Inhibition of infection was determined by reduced neutral red-dye retention and conveniently recorded by a colorimetric plate reader. Human sera previously confirmed by PRNT as either negative (N = 52), WNV positive (N = 81), or St. Louis encephalitis virus positive (N = 12) were tested by CmNt; interpreted results were virtually identical to PRNT with a reduced turnaround time and higher throughput. Additionally, a handful of dengue virus positive and negative specimens (four each) were tested by CmNt; interpreted results were identical to PRNT.

  17. Comparative quantitation for the protein content of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids by DC protein assay and Kjeldahl method.

    PubMed

    Doshi, J B; Ravetkar, S D; Ghole, V S; Rehani, K

    2003-09-01

    DPT, a combination vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis is available since many years and still continued in the national immunisation schedule of many countries. Although highly potent, reactions to DPT vaccine are well known, mainly attributed to the factors like Pertussis component, aluminum adjuvant and lower purity of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids. The latter most important aspect has become a matter of concern, specially for the preparation of next generation combination vaccines with more number of antigens in combination with DPT. Purity of toxoid is expressed as Lf (Limes flocculation) per mg of protein nitrogen. The Kjeldahl method (KM) of protein nitrogen estimation suggested by WHO and British Pharmacopoeia is time consuming and less specific. Need has been felt to explore an alternative method which is quick and more specific for toxoid protein determination. DC (detergent compatible) protein assay, an improved Lowry's method, has been found to be much more advantageous than Kjeldahl method.

  18. Development and application of a quantitative PCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium for assessing gull-associated fecal contamination at Lake Erie beaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-06-01

    Gulls represent one of the major fecal contamination sources responsible for the degradation of water quality at Lake Erie beaches. For assessing gull-associated fecal contamination, a real-time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR) targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences from Catellicoccus marimammalium, which are abundant in gull feces, was developed and evaluated by comparing assay results with beach survey data that included gull counting, and quantifying densities of Escherichia coli and human-associated fecal markers at two Lake Erie beaches. In evaluating the specificity and sensitivity of the qPCR assay with animal and wastewater samples, C. marimammalium was detected in most gull fecal samples (80.7%), some chicken fecal samples (24.1%), but was not readily detected from other fecal samples of animals and humans, and wastewater. Among 66 Lake Erie water samples collected in 2010, C. marimammalium was frequently detected from Villa Angela (36.4%) and Headlands beaches (57.6%). C. marimammalium densities were not associated with E. coli densities or sanitary survey data. E. coli counts were likely driven by other sources, such as human, rather than gulls at the study sites. The presumption that human contamination influenced E. coli counts was supported by more frequent detection of the human-specific Bacteroides gyrB marker (gyrB) at Villa Angela (33.3%) than Headlands (6.1%). Since E. coli may not be an effective indicator for assessing gull-related fecal contamination at these beaches, where contamination sources are mixed, our novel qPCR assay can be useful for understanding fecal source contributions from gulls not explained by gull abundance or E. coli densities.

  19. Gene expression analysis in biomarker research and early drug development using function tested reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Sabine; Herold, Andrea; Bergauer, Tobias; Belousov, Anton; Betzl, Gisela; Demario, Mark; Dietrich, Manuel; Luistro, Leopoldo; Poignée-Heger, Manuela; Schostack, Kathy; Simcox, Mary; Walch, Heiko; Yin, Xuefeng; Zhong, Hua; Weisser, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers is essential in the implementation of personalized health care strategies that offer new therapeutic approaches with optimized and individualized treatment. In support of hypothesis generation and testing in the course of our biomarker research an online portal and respective function-tested reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR assays (RT-qPCR) facilitated the selection of relevant biomarker genes. We have established workflows applicable for convenient high throughput gene expression analysis in biomarker research with cell lines (in vitro studies) and xenograft mouse models (in vivo studies) as well as formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) sections from various human research and clinical tumor samples. Out of 92 putative biomarker candidate genes selected in silico, 35 were shown to exhibit differential expression in various tumor cell lines. These were further analysed by in vivo xenograft mouse models, which identified 13 candidate genes including potential response prediction biomarkers and a potential pharmacodynamic biomarker. Six of these candidate genes were selected for further evaluation in FFPET samples, where optimized RNA isolation, reverse transcription and qPCR assays provided reliable determination of relative expression levels as precondition for differential gene expression analysis of FFPET samples derived from projected clinical studies. Thus, we successfully applied function tested RT-qPCR assays in our biomarker research for hypothesis generation with in vitro and in vivo models as well as for hypothesis testing with human FFPET samples. Hence, appropriate function-tested RT-qPCR assays are available in biomarker research accompanying the different stages of drug development, starting from target identification up to early clinical development. The workflow presented here supports the identification and validation of new biomarkers and may lead to advances in efforts to achieve the

  20. Quantitation of minimal disease levels in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using a sensitive flow cytometric assay improves the prediction of outcome and can be used to optimize therapy.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Kennedy, B; Evans, P A; Davies, F E; Richards, S J; Haynes, A P; Russell, N H; Hale, G; Morgan, G J; Jack, A S; Hillmen, P

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the level of residual disease at the end of therapy predicts outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, available methods for detecting CLL cells are either insensitive or not routinely applicable. A flow cytometric assay was developed that can differentiate CLL cells from normal B cells on the basis of their CD19/CD5/CD20/CD79b expression. The assay is rapid and can detect one CLL cell in 10(4) to 10(5) leukocytes in all patients. We have compared this assay to conventional assessment in 104 patients treated with CAMPATH-1H and/or autologous transplant. During CAMPATH-1H therapy, circulating CLL cells were rapidly depleted in responding patients, but remained detectable in nonresponders. Patients with more than 0.01 x 10(9)/L circulating CLL cells always had significant (> 5%) marrow disease, and blood monitoring could be used to time marrow assessments. In 25 out of 104 patients achieving complete remission by National Cancer Institute (NCI) criteria, the detection of residual bone marrow disease at more than 0.05% of leukocytes in 6 out of 25 patients predicted significantly poorer event-free (P =.0001) and overall survival (P =.007). CLL cells are detectable at a median of 15.8 months (range, 5.5-41.8) posttreatment in 9 out of 18 evaluable patients with less than 0.05% CLL cells at end of treatment. All patients with detectable disease have progressively increasing disease levels on follow-up. The use of sensitive techniques, such as the flow assay described here, allow accurate quantitation of disease levels and provide an accurate method for guiding therapy and predicting outcome. These results suggest that the eradication of detectable disease may lead to improved survival and should be tested in future studies.

  1. LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitation of FdCyd and its metabolites FdUrd and FU in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Julianne L; Eiseman, Julie L; Parise, Robert A; Kummar, Shivaani; Beumer, Jan H

    2016-09-10

    The hypomethylating agent 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (FdCyd, NSC 48006) is being evaluated clinically both via the intravenous route and via the oral route in combination with 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrouridine (THU), a potent inhibitor of FdCyd catabolism. To determine the pharmacokinetics of FdCyd and downstream metabolites, we developed and validated an LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitation of FdCyd, 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FdUrd), and 5-fluorouracil (FU) in 0.2mL human plasma. After acetonitrile protein precipitation, the sample was split and separate chromatography was achieved for FdCyd with a Synergi Polar-RP column and for FdUrd and FU with a Shodex Asahipak NH2P-50 2D column. Gradients of 0.1% acetic acid in acetonitrile and water were used. Detection with a Quattromicro quadrupole mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization in positive-ion (FdCyd) or negative-ion (FdUrd and FU) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The assay was linear from 5 to 3000ng/mL for all three analytes and proved to be accurate (96.7-105.5%) and precise (<8.1%CV), and fulfilled FDA criteria for bioanalytical method validation. We demonstrated the suitability of this assay for measuring FdCyd and metabolites FdUrd and FU in plasma from a patient who was administered 120mg PO FdCyd 30min after 3000mg THU. Our LC-MS/MS assay will be an essential tool to further define the pharmacology of FdCyd in ongoing and future studies. PMID:27454087

  2. Further probes into quantitative aspects of competitive binding assays: allowance for effects of antigen multivalency in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Winzor, D J

    1987-04-01

    Effects of antigen multivalency on procedures for the analysis of immunoassays are examined on the basis of a theoretical expression developed in the context of quantitative affinity chromatography [Nichol, L. W., Ward, L. D., and Winzor, D. J. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 4856-4860] but which is also pertinent to antigen-antibody interactions that may be described in terms of a single intrinsic association constant. Quantitative relationships are generated which provide the basis for more rigorous logit-log analyses of radioimmunoassays in which the antigen is multivalent, and an additional, theoretically superior, linear transform of the basic expression is developed. Simulated binding data for a tetravalent antigen system are then used to demonstrate the curvilinearity of the conventional Scatchard plot for such a system despite the homogeneity of binding sites, and the application of the various linear transforms involving logarithmic functions. Of particular interest in that regard is the observation that the traditional logit-log analyses yield linear plots with the predicted slope of unity even though antigen univalence is an implicit assumption in their application. Results obtained in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay of triiodothyronine are then presented to provide, for that system at least, experimental justification of the above-mentioned assumption that the antibody-antigen interactions may be described in terms of a single intrinsic association constant. Finally, an enzyme-linked immunoassay of ferritin is used to illustrate the possibility that a linear Scatchard plot may be obtained with a multivalent antigen under conditions where steric factors restrict participation of an antigen molecule to a single interaction with immobilized antibody. PMID:3579309

  3. Ultra-low Flow Liquid Chromatography Assay with Ultraviolet (UV) Detection for Piperine Quantitation in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Dubey, Shiv Kumar; Tarnowski, Malloree; Cheng, Connie; Liyanage, Samadhi; Strawder, Terrence; Tazi, Karim; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    A robust and sensitive ultra-low flow liquid chromatography (UFLC) method that can reproducibly, at reasonable cost, detect low concentrations of piperine from human plasma is necessary. Piperine in plasma was separated and quantified by a gradient method using ultraviolet detection at a maximal absorbance wavelength of 340 nm. An aliquot was injected onto a reversed-phase column Waters SymmetryShield, 2.1 × 100 mm, 3.5 μm, C18 column, attached to a Waters absorbosphere, 4.6 × 30 mm, C18 guard column and eluted with a mobile phase containing a mixture of acetonitrile/water/ acetic acid (25:74.9:0.1, v/v/v) on line A and acetonitrile/acetic acid (99.9:0.1, v/v) on line B. The flow rate was 0.3 mL/min. The gradient method consisted of an opening condition of 20% pump B, with a linear increase to 37% pump B over 8 min, then a linear increase to 100% pump B at 11 min, 2 min at 100% pump B, and then a return to the opening condition (20% pump B) via a linear gradient over 2 min, followed by 5 min re-equilibration at opening conditions. The total run time was 20 min for each sample. All samples were processed protected from ambient light to avoid isomerization of piperine. The plasma assay was linear with R = 0.9995, with a lower limit of detection [signal-to-noise (S/N) > 5:1] of 100 pg of piperine loaded into the analytical system with acceptable accuracy and precision. Extraction recoveries of piperine from human plasma were 88% for quality control high (QCH), 93% for quality control medium (QCM), and 90% for quality control low (QCL), and the matrix effect was <12%. Piperine was quantifiable from a 50 mg oral dose given to human volunteers. A UFLC method for the rapid assay of human plasma with sensitivity to detect as low as 5 ng/mL piperine was developed. The method sensitivity equals that of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MSMS) methods with much less cost. PMID:20465211

  4. Absolute Quantitation of Met Using Mass Spectrometry for Clinical Application: Assay Precision, Stability, and Correlation with MET Gene Amplification in FFPE Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Liao, Wei-Li; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Henderson, Les; Xu, Peng; Zhao, Lei; Rambo, Brittany; Hart, John; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Bengali, Kathleen; Uzzell, Jamar; Darfler, Marlene; Krizman, David B.; Cecchi, Fabiola; Bottaro, Donald P.; Karrison, Theodore; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Hembrough, Todd; Burrows, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Met tyrosine kinase receptor is associated with poor prognosis. Overexpression, and particularly MET amplification, are predictive of response to Met-specific therapy in preclinical models. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is currently used to select for ‘high Met’ expressing tumors for Met inhibitor trials. IHC suffers from antibody non-specificity, lack of quantitative resolution, and, when quantifying multiple proteins, inefficient use of scarce tissue. Methods After describing the development of the Liquid-Tissue-Selected Reaction Monitoring-mass spectrometry (LT-SRM-MS) Met assay, we evaluated the expression level of Met in 130 FFPE gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) tissues. We assessed the correlation of SRM Met expression to IHC and mean MET gene copy number (GCN)/nucleus or MET/CEP7 ratio by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Proteomic mapping of recombinant Met identified 418TEFTTALQR426 as the optimal SRM peptide. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for this peptide were 150 and 200 amol/µg tumor protein, respectively. The assay demonstrated excellent precision and temporal stability of measurements in serial sections analyzed one year apart. Expression levels of 130 GEC tissues ranged (<150 amol/µg to 4669.5 amol/µg. High correlation was observed between SRM Met expression and both MET GCN and MET/CEP7 ratio as determined by FISH (n = 30; R2 = 0.898). IHC did not correlate well with SRM (n = 44; R2 = 0.537) nor FISH GCN (n = 31; R2 = 0.509). A Met SRM level of ≥1500 amol/µg was 100% sensitive (95% CI 0.69–1) and 100% specific (95% CI 0.92–1) for MET amplification. Conclusions The Met SRM assay measured the absolute Met levels in clinical tissues with high precision. Compared to IHC, SRM provided a quantitative and linear measurement of Met expression, reliably distinguishing between non-amplified and amplified MET

  5. Development of three stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food.

    PubMed

    Granvogl, Michael

    2014-02-12

    Three stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) were developed for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food using synthesized [¹³C₄]-crotonaldehyde as internal standard. First, a direct headspace GC-MS method, followed by two indirect methods on the basis of derivatization with either pentafluorophenylhydrazine (GC-MS) or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (LC-MS/MS), was developed. All methods are also suitable for the quantitation of acrolein using the standard [¹³C₃]-acrolein. Applying these three methods on five different types of fats and oils varying in their fatty acid compositions revealed significantly varying crotonaldehyde concentrations for the different samples, but nearly identical quantitative data for all methods. Formed amounts of crotonaldehyde were dependent not only on the type of oil, e.g., 0.29-0.32 mg/kg of coconut oil or 33.9-34.4 mg/kg of linseed oil after heat-processing for 24 h at 180 °C, but also on the applied temperature and time. The results indicated that the concentration of formed crotonaldehyde seemed to be correlated with the amount of linolenic acid in the oils. Furthermore, the formation of crotonaldehyde was compared to that of its homologue acrolein, demonstrating that acrolein was always present in higher amounts in heat-processed oils, e.g., 12.3 mg of crotonaldehyde/kg of rapeseed oil in comparison to 23.4 mg of acrolein/kg after 24 h at 180 °C. Finally, crotonaldehyde was also quantitated in fried food, revealing concentrations from 12 to 25 μg/kg for potato chips and from 8 to 19 μg/kg for donuts, depending on the oil used.

  6. Development of three stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food.

    PubMed

    Granvogl, Michael

    2014-02-12

    Three stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) were developed for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food using synthesized [¹³C₄]-crotonaldehyde as internal standard. First, a direct headspace GC-MS method, followed by two indirect methods on the basis of derivatization with either pentafluorophenylhydrazine (GC-MS) or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (LC-MS/MS), was developed. All methods are also suitable for the quantitation of acrolein using the standard [¹³C₃]-acrolein. Applying these three methods on five different types of fats and oils varying in their fatty acid compositions revealed significantly varying crotonaldehyde concentrations for the different samples, but nearly identical quantitative data for all methods. Formed amounts of crotonaldehyde were dependent not only on the type of oil, e.g., 0.29-0.32 mg/kg of coconut oil or 33.9-34.4 mg/kg of linseed oil after heat-processing for 24 h at 180 °C, but also on the applied temperature and time. The results indicated that the concentration of formed crotonaldehyde seemed to be correlated with the amount of linolenic acid in the oils. Furthermore, the formation of crotonaldehyde was compared to that of its homologue acrolein, demonstrating that acrolein was always present in higher amounts in heat-processed oils, e.g., 12.3 mg of crotonaldehyde/kg of rapeseed oil in comparison to 23.4 mg of acrolein/kg after 24 h at 180 °C. Finally, crotonaldehyde was also quantitated in fried food, revealing concentrations from 12 to 25 μg/kg for potato chips and from 8 to 19 μg/kg for donuts, depending on the oil used. PMID:24428123

  7. sxtA-based quantitative molecular assay to identify saxitoxin-producing harmful algal blooms in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Murray, Shauna A; Wiese, Maria; Stüken, Anke; Brett, Steve; Kellmann, Ralf; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Neilan, Brett A

    2011-10-01

    The recent identification of genes involved in the production of the potent neurotoxin and keystone metabolite saxitoxin (STX) in marine eukaryotic phytoplankton has allowed us for the first time to develop molecular genetic methods to investigate the chemical ecology of harmful algal blooms in situ. We present a novel method for detecting and quantifying the potential for STX production in marine environmental samples. Our assay detects a domain of the gene sxtA that encodes a unique enzyme putatively involved in the sxt pathway in marine dinoflagellates, sxtA4. A product of the correct size was recovered from nine strains of four species of STX-producing Alexandrium and Gymnodinium catenatum and was not detected in the non-STX-producing Alexandrium species, other dinoflagellate cultures, or an environmental sample that did not contain known STX-producing species. However, sxtA4 was also detected in the non-STX-producing strain of Alexandrium tamarense, Tasmanian ribotype. We investigated the copy number of sxtA4 in three strains of Alexandrium catenella and found it to be relatively constant among strains. Using our novel method, we detected and quantified sxtA4 in three environmental blooms of Alexandrium catenella that led to STX uptake in oysters. We conclude that this method shows promise as an accurate, fast, and cost-effective means of quantifying the potential for STX production in marine samples and will be useful for biological oceanographic research and harmful algal bloom monitoring.

  8. Development of a quantitative immunocapture real-time PCR assay for detecting structurally intact adenoviral particles in water.

    PubMed

    Ogorzaly, Leslie; Bonot, Sébastien; Moualij, Benaissa El; Zorzi, Willy; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2013-12-01

    Development of rapid, sensitive and specific methods for detection of infectious enteric viruses in water is challenging but crucial for gaining reliable information for risk assessment. An immunocapture real-time PCR (IC-qPCR) was designed to detect jointly the two major viral particle components, i.e. the capsid protein and the viral genome. Targeting both constituents helps circumventing the technical limits of cell culture approaches and the inability of PCR based methods to predict the infectious status. Two waterborne pathogenic virus models, human adenovirus types 2 and 41, were chosen for this study. IC-qPCR showed a detection limit of 10MPNCU/reaction with a dynamic range from 10(2) to 10(6)MPNCU/reaction. Sensitivity was thus 100-fold higher compared to ELISA-based capture employing the same anti-hexon antibodies. After optimisation, application on environmental water samples was validated, and specificity towards the targeted virus types was obtained through the qPCR step. Heat-treated pure samples as well as surface water samples brought evidence that this method achieves detection of encapsidated viral genomes while excluding free viral genome amplification. As a consequence, adenovirus concentrations estimated by IC-qPCR were below those calculated by direct qPCR. The results demonstrate that the IC-qPCR method is a sensitive and rapid tool for detecting, in a single-tube assay, structurally intact and thus potentially infectious viral particles in environmental samples. PMID:23850702

  9. Radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay for the analysis of alternative splicing of interleukin genes.

    PubMed

    Shakola, Felitsiya; Byrne, Stephen; Javed, Kainaat; Ruggiu, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing evolved as a very efficient way to generate proteome diversity from a limited number of genes, while at the same time modulating posttranscriptional events of gene expression-such as stability, turnover, subcellular localization, binding properties, and general activity of both mRNAs and proteins. Since the vast majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing, it comes to no surprise that interleukin genes also show extensive alternative splicing. In fact, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that alternative splicing plays a central role in modulating the pleiotropic functions of cytokines, and aberrant expression of alternatively spliced interleukin mRNAs has been linked to disease. However, while several interleukin splice variants have been described, their function is still poorly understood. This is particularly relevant, since alternatively spliced cytokine isoforms can act both as disease biomarkers and as candidate entry points for therapeutic intervention. In this chapter we describe a protocol that uses radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR to efficiently detect, analyze, and quantify alternative splicing patterns of cytokine genes. PMID:24908320

  10. An in vitro system combined with an in-house quantitation assay for screening hepatitis C virus inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tin-Yun; Wu, Shih-Lu; Lai, I-Lu; Cheng, Ken-Sheng; Kao, Shung-Te; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2003-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious global health problem. Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and ribavirin have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of HCV infection; however, these therapies display many side effects. To screen the anti-HCV compounds from plants, we established an in vitro model for inoculation of HCV by centrifugation-facilitated method. The HCV RNA molecules were then quantitated by nested competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) using fluorescein-labeled primers, and analyzed by ABI Prism 310. The positive and negative strands of HCV RNA were detectable in Vero cells on Day 7 post-infection, suggesting that the HCV RNA was present in the cell model system. The cell culture system was further used to screen the anti-HCV activities of 4 Chinese herbal formulas and 15 formula components. IFN-alpha showed an antiviral effect. The formulas exhibited no anti-HCV activities, while Arnebia euchroma, Thlaspi arvense, and Poncirus trifoliata displayed anti-HCV activities. Therefore, these results pointed out the possibility by using the cell culture system established in this study to screen the herb extracts for their anti-HCV activities. PMID:12767467

  11. Identification and quantitative detection of Legionella spp. in various aquatic environments by real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Kao, Po-Min; Tung, Min-Che; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Chiu, Yi-Chou; She, Cheng-Yu; Shen, Shu-Min; Huang, Yu-Li; Huang, Wen-Chien

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a SYBR green quantitative real-time PCR was developed to quantify and detect the Legionella spp. in various environmental water samples. The water samples were taken from watershed, water treatment plant, and thermal spring area in Taiwan. Legionella was detected in 13.6 % (24/176), and the detection rate for river water, raw drinking water, and thermal spring water was 10, 21.4, and 16.6 %, respectively. Using real-time PCR, concentration of Legionella spp. in detected samples ranged between 9.75 × 10(4) and 3.47 × 10(5) cells/L in river water, 6.92 × 10(4) and 4.29 × 10(5) cells/L in raw drinking water, and 5.71 × 10(4) and 2.12 × 10(6) cells/L for thermal spring water samples. The identified species included Legionella pneumophila (20.8 %), Legionella jordanis (4.2 %), Legionella nautarum (4.2 %), Legionella sp. (4.2 %), and uncultured Legionella sp. (66.6 %). The presence of L. pneumophila in aquatic environments suggested a potential public health threat that must be further examined.

  12. Radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay for the analysis of alternative splicing of interleukin genes.

    PubMed

    Shakola, Felitsiya; Byrne, Stephen; Javed, Kainaat; Ruggiu, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing evolved as a very efficient way to generate proteome diversity from a limited number of genes, while at the same time modulating posttranscriptional events of gene expression-such as stability, turnover, subcellular localization, binding properties, and general activity of both mRNAs and proteins. Since the vast majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing, it comes to no surprise that interleukin genes also show extensive alternative splicing. In fact, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that alternative splicing plays a central role in modulating the pleiotropic functions of cytokines, and aberrant expression of alternatively spliced interleukin mRNAs has been linked to disease. However, while several interleukin splice variants have been described, their function is still poorly understood. This is particularly relevant, since alternatively spliced cytokine isoforms can act both as disease biomarkers and as candidate entry points for therapeutic intervention. In this chapter we describe a protocol that uses radiolabeled semi-quantitative RT-PCR to efficiently detect, analyze, and quantify alternative splicing patterns of cytokine genes.

  13. A quantitative receptor assay using Triton X-114 for plasminogen activator binding proteins in solubilized membranes from human liver and placenta.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G; Kruithof, E K

    1993-02-01

    Cell surface binding proteins play an important role in the localization of plasminogen activator (PA) activity at the cell surface or in the clearance of PAs. We describe a rapid and quantitative receptor assay applicable to the quantification and affinity determination of binding proteins for tissue-type PA and urokinase-type PA in solubilized membranes obtained from human liver, human placenta, or human monocyte-like cells. The method is based on the ability of a solution of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 to phase separate at temperatures above 20 degrees C. After incubation of integral membrane proteins with radiolabeled ligand, a solution of Triton X-114 is added at 4 degrees C and warmed to 37 degrees C to allow phase partitioning. Radiolabeled ligand bound to membrane protein is recovered in the detergent-rich lower phase which is separated by centrifugation from the detergent-poor upper phase containing free radiolabeled ligand.

  14. A duplex real-time PCR assay for the quantitative detection of Naegleria fowleri in water samples.

    PubMed

    Behets, Jonas; Declerck, Priscilla; Delaedt, Yasmine; Verelst, Lieve; Ollevier, Frans

    2007-01-01

    A fast and accurate duplex real-time PCR (qPCR) was developed to detect and quantify the human pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri in water samples. In this study, primers and probe based on the Mp2Cl5 gene were designed to amplify and quantify N. fowleri DNA in a single duplex reaction. The qPCR detection limit (DL) corresponds to the minimum DNA quantity showing significant fluorescence with at least 90% of the positive controls in a duplex reaction. Using fluorescent Taqman technology the qPCR was found to be 100% specific for N. fowleri with a DL of 3 N. fowleri cell equivalents and a PCR efficiency of 99%. The quantification limit (QL) was 16 N. fowleri cell equivalents (corresponded with 320 N. fowleri cell equivalents l(-1) water sample) in a duplex qPCR reaction and corresponds to the lowest DNA quantity amplifiable with a coefficient of variation less than 25%. To detect inhibition an exogenous internal positive control (IPC) was included in each PCR reaction preventing false negative results. Comparison of qPCR and most probable number (MPN) culture results confirms that the developed qPCR is well suited for rapid and quantitative detection of this human pathogen in real water samples. Nevertheless 'low contamination levels' of water samples (<200 N. fowleri cells l(-1)) still require culture method analyses. When other thermophilic Naegleria are very dominant, the MPN culture method could result in an underestimation in the real number of N. fowleri and some caution is necessary to interpret the data. The N. fowleri qPCR could be a useful tool to study further competitive phenomena between thermophilic Naegleria strains.

  15. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) Assays in Tissue from Human Ascending Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Lamas, Oscar; Mataró, María José; Robledo-Carmona, Juan; Sánchez-Espín, Gemma; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Such-Martínez, Miguel; Fernández, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta (AAD) is a prevalent aortopathy that occurs frequently associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common human congenital cardiac malformation. The molecular mechanisms leading to AAD associated with BAV are still poorly understood. The search for differentially expressed genes in diseased tissue by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is an invaluable tool to fill this gap. However, studies dedicated to identify reference genes necessary for normalization of mRNA expression in aortic tissue are scarce. In this report, we evaluate the qPCR expression of six candidate reference genes in tissue from the ascending aorta of 52 patients with a variety of clinical and demographic characteristics, normal and dilated aortas, and different morphologies of the aortic valve (normal aorta and normal valve n = 30; dilated aorta and normal valve n = 10; normal aorta and BAV n = 4; dilated aorta and BAV n = 8). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined with three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable genes for the three algorithms employed were CDKN1β, POLR2A and CASC3, independently of the structure of the aorta and the valve morphology. In conclusion, we propose the use of these three genes as reference genes for mRNA expression analysis in human ascending aorta. However, we suggest searching for specific reference genes when conducting qPCR experiments with new cohort of samples. PMID:24841551

  16. Succession patterns of fungi associated to wound-induced agarwood in wild Aquilaria malaccensis revealed from quantitative PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Rozi; Jong, Phai Lee; Nurul Irdayu, Ismail

    2014-09-01

    Aquilaria malaccensis produces agarwood in response to wounding and fungal attack. However, information is limited regarding Aquilaria's interaction with its diverse fungal community. In this study, time-related changes of three natural fungal colonizers in two wounded wild A. malaccensis were tracked, beginning a few hours after wounding up to 12 months. Using species-specific primers derived from their nrITS sequences in quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), we quantified the amount of Cunninghamella bainieri, Fusarium solani and Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Because time is a major factor affecting agarwood quantity and quality, 14 wood samples were collected at different time points, i.e., 0-18 h, 2-13 days, 2-18 weeks, and 6-12 months after wounding. qPCR data revealed that the abundance of the three species decreased over time. The fungi were detected in high numbers during the first few hours and days after wounding (40- to 25,000-fold higher levels compared with initial counts) and in low numbers (<1- to 3,200-fold higher than initially) many months later. Consistent with its role in defense response, the accumulation of secondary metabolites at the wounding site could have caused the decline in fungal abundance. Succession patterns of the two trees were not identical, indicating that fungal populations may have been affected by tree environment and wound microclimate. Our results are important for understanding the diversity of microbial community in wild Aquilaria species and their association to wound-induced agarwood formation. Fungi could be secondary triggers to agarwood production in situations where trees are wounded in attempt to induce agarwood. PMID:24840100

  17. Development of a Sequence-Characterized Amplified Region Marker-Targeted Quantitative PCR Assay for Strain-Specific Detection of Oenococcus oeni during Wine Malolactic Fermentation▿

    PubMed Central

    Solieri, Lisa; Giudici, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Control over malolactic fermentation (MLF) is a difficult goal in winemaking and needs rapid methods to monitor Oenococcus oeni malolactic starters (MLS) in a stressful environment such as wine. In this study, we describe a novel quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay enabling the detection of an O. oeni strain during MLF without culturing. O. oeni strain LB221 was used as a model to develop a strain-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker derived from a discriminatory OPA20-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) band. The 5′ and 3′ flanking regions and the copy number of the SCAR marker were characterized using inverse PCR and Southern blotting, respectively. Primer pairs targeting the SCAR sequence enabled strain-specific detection without cross amplification of other O. oeni strains or wine species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), acetic acid bacteria (AAB), and yeasts. The SCAR-QPCR assay was linear over a range of cell concentrations (7 log units) and detected as few as 2.2 × 102 CFU per ml of red wine with good quantification effectiveness, as shown by the correlation of QPCR and plate counting results. Therefore, the cultivation-independent monitoring of a single O. oeni strain in wine based on a SCAR marker represents a rapid and effective strain-specific approach. This strategy can be adopted to develop easy and rapid detection techniques for monitoring the implantation of inoculated O. oeni MLS on the indigenous LAB population, reducing the risk of unsuccessful MLF. PMID:20935116

  18. A multiplexed targeted assay for high-throughput quantitative analysis of serum methylamines by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Hanane; Dubus, Justine; Dutot, Jérémie; Hedjazi, Lyamine; Srinivasa, Suman; Fitch, Kathleen V; Grinspoon, Steven K; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Gauguier, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Methylamines are biologically-active metabolites present in serum and urine samples, which play complex roles in metabolic diseases. Methylamines can be detected by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), but specific methods remain to be developed for their routine assay in human serum in clinical settings. Here we developed and validated a novel reliable "methylamine panel" method for simultaneous quantitative analysis of trimethylamine (TMA), its major detoxification metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), and precursors choline, betaine and l-carnitine in human serum using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) coupled to High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRMS). Metabolite separation was carried out on a HILIC stationary phase. For all metabolites, the assay was linear in the range of 0.25-12.5 μmol/L and enabled to reach limit of detection of about 0.10 μmol/L. Relative standard deviations were below 16% for the three levels of concentrations. We demonstrated the strong reliability and robustness of the method, which was applied to serum samples from healthy individuals to establish the range of concentrations of the metabolites and their correlation relationships and detect gender differences. Our data provide original information for implementing in a clinical environment a MS-based diagnostic method with potential for targeted metabolic screening of patients at risk of cardiometabolic diseases.

  19. A multiplexed targeted assay for high-throughput quantitative analysis of serum methylamines by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Hanane; Dubus, Justine; Dutot, Jérémie; Hedjazi, Lyamine; Srinivasa, Suman; Fitch, Kathleen V; Grinspoon, Steven K; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Gauguier, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Methylamines are biologically-active metabolites present in serum and urine samples, which play complex roles in metabolic diseases. Methylamines can be detected by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), but specific methods remain to be developed for their routine assay in human serum in clinical settings. Here we developed and validated a novel reliable "methylamine panel" method for simultaneous quantitative analysis of trimethylamine (TMA), its major detoxification metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), and precursors choline, betaine and l-carnitine in human serum using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) coupled to High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRMS). Metabolite separation was carried out on a HILIC stationary phase. For all metabolites, the assay was linear in the range of 0.25-12.5 μmol/L and enabled to reach limit of detection of about 0.10 μmol/L. Relative standard deviations were below 16% for the three levels of concentrations. We demonstrated the strong reliability and robustness of the method, which was applied to serum samples from healthy individuals to establish the range of concentrations of the metabolites and their correlation relationships and detect gender differences. Our data provide original information for implementing in a clinical environment a MS-based diagnostic method with potential for targeted metabolic screening of patients at risk of cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:27036856

  20. Quantitative bioanalysis of antibody-conjugated payload in monkey plasma using a hybrid immuno-capture LC-MS/MS approach: Assay development, validation, and a case study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ang; Kozhich, Alexander; Passmore, David; Gu, Huidong; Wong, Richard; Zambito, Frank; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Myler, Heather; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Arnold, Mark E; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex molecules composed of two pharmacologically distinct components, the cytotoxic payload and the antibody. The measurement of the payload molecules that are attached to the antibody in vivo is important for the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of ADCs, and can also provide distinct information compared to the antibody-related analytes. However, analyzing the antibody-conjugated payload is challenging and in some cases may not be feasible. The in vivo change in drug antibody ratio (DAR), due to deconjugation, biotransformation or other clearance phenomena, generates unique and additional challenges for ADC analysis in biological samples. Here, we report a novel hybrid approach with immuno-capture of the ADC, payload cleavage by specific enzyme, and LC-MS/MS of the cleaved payload to quantitatively measure the concentration of payload molecules still attached to the antibody via linker in plasma. The ADC reference material used for the calibration curve is not likely to be identical to the ADC measured in study samples due to the change in DAR distribution over the PK time course. The assay clearly demonstrated that there was no bias in the measurement of antibody-conjugated payload for ADC with varying DAR, which thus allowed accurate quantification even when the DAR distribution dynamically changes in vivo. This hybrid assay was fully validated based on a combination of requirements for both chromatographic and ligand binding methods, and was successfully applied to support a GLP safety study in monkeys.

  1. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii)

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management. PMID:24964150

  2. Development of an internal control for evaluation and standardization of a quantitative PCR assay for detection of Helicobacter pylori in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sen, Keya; Schable, Nancy A; Lye, Dennis J

    2007-11-01

    Due to metabolic and morphological changes that can prevent Helicobacter pylori cells in water from growing on conventional media, an H. pylori-specific TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay was developed that uses a 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled probe (A. E. McDaniels, L. Wymer, C. Rankin, and R. Haugland, Water Res. 39:4808-4816, 2005). However, proper internal controls are needed to provide an accurate estimate of low numbers of H. pylori in drinking water. In this study, the 135-bp amplicon described by McDaniels et al. was modified at the probe binding region, using PCR mutagenesis. The fragment was incorporated into a single-copy plasmid to serve as a PCR-positive control and cloned into Escherichia coli to serve as a matrix spike. It was shown to have a detection limit of five copies, using a VIC dye-labeled probe. A DNA extraction kit was optimized that allowed sampling of an entire liter of water. Water samples spiked with the recombinant E. coli cells were shown to behave like H. pylori cells in the qPCR assay. The recombinant E. coli cells were optimized to be used at 10 cells/liter of water, where they were shown not to compete with 5 to 3,000 cells of H. pylori in a duplex qPCR assay. Four treated drinking water samples spiked with H. pylori (100 cells) demonstrated similar cycle threshold values if the chlorine disinfectant was first neutralized by sodium thiosulfate.

  3. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii).

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Steven J; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T; Subbarao, Krishna V; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N

    2014-12-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management.

  4. Development and assessment of a novel real-time PCR assay for quantitation of hepatitis D virus RNA to study viral kinetics in chronic hepatitis D.

    PubMed

    Katsoulidou, A; Manesis, E; Rokka, C; Issaris, C; Pagoni, A; Sypsa, V; Hatzakis, A

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection is a usually severe type of viral hepatitis associated with increased mortality and rapid evolution to cirrhosis. Currently, treatment is limited to extended interferon administration and measurement of HDV RNA blood levels is essential to judge the response. The aim of this study was to develop a highly sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) for the quantitation of circulating HDV RNA of all clades (1-8), and assess its usefulness in the follow-up of patients. The amplification was combined with molecular beacon technology using the LightCycler 2.0 system. The assay was specific and showed linearity over a wide range from 13 to 13 × 10(10) copies/mL. The 95% detection limit was 43.2 copies/mL. Intra-assay reproducibility, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 1.84 to 18.61%, whereas the corresponding estimates for the inter-assay variability ranged from 0.57 to 10.18%. Finally, the dynamic profiles of six patients regarding virological (HDV RNA, HBV DNA), biochemical and serological data were constructed. We were able to observe that most patients who were treated with an interferon-based regime showed a significant reduction in delta viremia. In conclusion, our real-time RT-PCR for HDV RNA quantification combines high sensitivity and reproducibility in a high dynamic range, can provide important information for patient management and can be a useful tool for monitoring the response to antiviral therapies.

  5. Quantification of Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines isolates in soybean roots by colony-forming unit assays and real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Hartman, G L; Domier, L L; Boykin, D

    2008-08-01

    Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG; syn. F. virguliforme Akoi, O'Donnell, Homma & Lattanzi) is a soil-borne fungus that infects soybean roots and causes sudden death syndrome (SDS), a widespread and destructive soybean disease. The goal of this study was to develop and use a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assay to compare the accumulation of genomic DNA among 30 FSG isolates in inoculated soybean roots. Isolates differed significantly (P < or = 0.05) in their DNA accumulation on a susceptible soybean cultivar when detected and quantified using a FSG-specific probe/primers set derived from the sequences of the nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. QPCR results that were normalized as the fold change over the sample collection times after inoculation were significantly (P < or = 0.001) correlated with the log(10) transformed colony-forming unit (CFU) values of FSG obtained from plating of inoculated ground roots on FSG semi-selective agar medium. Several isolates were identified that accumulated more FSG DNA and had higher CFU values than the reference isolate FSG1 (Mont-1). Compared to other isolates, FSG5 was the most aggressive root colonizer based on DNA accumulation and CFU values in infested roots. The described QPCR assay should provide more specificity, greater sensitivity, and less variability than alternatives to the culturing-dependent and time-consuming plating assays. Evaluation of isolate relative DNA differences on host plants using the QPCR approach provides useful information for evaluating isolates based on the extent and/or degree of colonization on soybean roots and for selecting isolates for breeding SDS-resistant soybean lines. PMID:18461301

  6. A novel robust quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer assay for protease SENP2 kinetics determination against its all natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yali; Zheng, Shasha; Liao, Jiayu

    2015-12-01

    SUMOylation (the process of adding the SUMO [small ubiquitin-like modifier] to substrates) is an important post-translational modification of critical proteins in multiple processes. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as endopeptidases to process the pre-SUMO or as isopeptidases to deconjugate the SUMO from its substrate. Determining the kinetics of SENPs is important for understanding their activities. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biomedical research and is a powerful tool for elucidating protein interactions. In this paper we report a novel quantitative FRET-based protease assay for SENP2 endopeptidase activity that accounts for the self-fluorescent emissions of the donor (CyPet) and the acceptor (YPet). The kinetic parameters, k(cat), K(M), and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) of catalytic domain SENP2 toward pre-SUMO1/2/3, were obtained by this novel design. Although we use SENP2 to demonstrate our method, the general principles of this quantitative FRET-based protease kinetic determination can be readily applied to other proteases.

  7. Re-evaluation of dioxygenase gene phylogeny for the development and validation of a quantitative assay for environmental aromatic hydrocarbon degraders

    PubMed Central

    Meynet, Paola; Head, Ian M.; Werner, David; Davenport, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases enzymes have been widely studied, as they catalyse essential reactions initiating the bacterial degradation of organic compounds, for instance aromatic hydrocarbons. The genes encoding these enzymes offer a potential target for studying aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in the environment. However, previously reported primer sets that target dioxygenase gene sequences or the common conserved Rieske centre of aromatics dioxygenases have limited specificity and/or target non-dioxygenase genes. In this work, an extensive database of dioxygenase α-subunit gene sequences was constructed, and primer sets targeting the conserved Rieske centre were developed. The high specificity of the primers was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were also developed and optimized, following MIQE guidelines (Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments). Comparison of the qPCR quantification of dioxygenases in spiked sediment samples and in pure cultures demonstrated an underestimation of the Ct value, and the requirement for a correction factor at gene abundances below 108 gene copies per g of sediment. Externally validated qPCR provides a valuable tool to monitor aromatic hydrocarbon degrader population abundances at contaminated sites. PMID:25944871

  8. Evaluation of a purification procedure for the muscarinic receptor for the purpose of quantitative receptor assays of anticholinergics. Part B: The solubilized receptor.

    PubMed

    Smisterová, J; Ensing, K; de Boer, J; de Zeeuw, R A

    1995-11-01

    For the purpose of quantitative receptor assays, a three-step solubilization procedure including three optimization sets for muscarinic receptor from calf striatum was developed. The first step includes the extraction of the P2-pellet with n-hexane and consequently with 2 M NaCl. By the latter, 39% of non-receptor proteins was extracted. The resulting pellet (NaCl-pellet), enriched in muscarinic receptors by a factor of 1.5-1.7, was solubilized with 1% digitonin. The binding parameters of the solubilized receptor were determined for the tertiary 3H-dexetimide (3H-DEX) and the quaternary 3H-N-methylscopolamine (3H-NMS). The resulting receptor density measured with 3H-dexetimide was lower (43.3% of that for the NaCl-pellet) than that for 3H-N-methyl-scopolamine (56.7%). The treatment with digitonin preserved the high affinity for 3H-N-methylscopolamine (Kd = 0.645 nM), however the affinity of 3H-dexetimide decreased after solubilization (Kd = 8.526 nM). The use of solubilized receptors in combination with hydrophilic 3H-NMS allows to increase the ratio specific/non-specific binding, since the non-specific binding for this ligand to the solubilized preparation is lower when compared with membrane-bound receptors. The above solubilization procedure was found preferable over directly solubilizing the P2-pellet since (a) the receptor density for 3H-NMS was higher for the solubilized NaCl-pellet by a factor of about 1.7, and (b) the treatment of the P2-pellet with digitonin resulted in a lowering of the Kd to 2.422 nM. However, with respect to the plasma effect on the ligand binding, both solubilized preparations give similar results. The use of the solubilized NaCl-pellet or the P2-pellet can considerably improve the quantitative receptor assays of plasma samples. Unlike the membrane-bound receptor, a high volume of plasma, such as 400 microliters, can be added to the assay without any influence on the 3H-DEX binding when solubilized preparation is used. PMID:8570570

  9. Validation and Application of a Commercial Quantitative Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase-PCR Assay in Investigation of a Large Dengue Virus Outbreak in Southern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Huey-Pin; Tsai, You-Yuan; Lin, I-Ting; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Chang, Kung-Chao; Chen, Jung-Chin; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate, rapid, and early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) infections is essential for optimal clinical care. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of the quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-LightMix dengue virus EC kit for DENV detection using samples from a dengue outbreak in Taiwan in 2015. Methods Sera from patients with suspected DENV infection were analyzed and compared using the LightMix kit, a Dengue NS1 Ag + Ab Combo kit for detection of NS1 antigen and DENV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies, and an “in-house” qualitative DENV-specific RT-PCR assay. Results A total of 8,989, 8,954, and 1581 samples were subjected to NS1 antigen detection, IgM and IgG detection, and LightMix assays, respectively. The LightMix assay yielded a linear curve for viral loads (VL) between 102 and 106 copies/reaction, and the minimum detection limits for DENV serotype 1 (DENV1) and DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4 were 1, 10, and 100 focus forming units (FFU)/mL, respectively. There was 88.9% concordance between the results obtained using the NS1 antigen combo kit and by LightMix analysis, and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the two methods were 89.4 and 100%, and 84.7 and 100%, respectively. Notably, fatal cases were attributed to DENV2 infection, and 79.5% (27/34) of these cases occurred in patients ≥ 71 years of age. Among these older patients, 82.3% (14/17) were NS1/IgM/IgG (+/-/-), exhibiting VLs between 106–109 copies/mL, which was markedly higher than the rate observed in the other age groups. Conclusions The LightMix assay was effective for early diagnosis of DENV infection. Our data indicate that high VLs during primary infection in elderly patients may be a positive predictor for severe illness, and may contribute to high mortality rates. PMID:27732593

  10. Development of an mlrA gene-directed TaqMan PCR assay for quantitative assessment of microcystin-degrading bacteria within water treatment plant sand filter biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hoefel, Daniel; Adriansen, Caroline M M; Bouyssou, Magali A C; Saint, Christopher P; Newcombe, Gayle; Ho, Lionel

    2009-08-01

    We report for the first time a quantitative mlrA gene-directed TaqMan PCR assay for the rapid detection of microcystin-degrading bacteria. This was applied, in combination with 16S ribosomal DNA-directed quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, to study virgin sand filter column biofilm development and to correlate mlrA gene abundance with microcystin removal efficiency.

  11. Correlation Between Pneumocystis jirovecii Mitochondrial Genotypes and High and Low Fungal Loads Assessed by Single Nucleotide Primer Extension Assay and Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Olivi, Martine; Cabaret, Odile; Foulet, Françoise; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Millon, Laurence; Berceanu, Ana; Cordonnier, Catherine; Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We designed a single nucleotide primer extension (SNaPshot) assay for Pneumocystis jirovecii genotyping, targeting mt85 SNP of the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA locus, to improve minority allele detection. We then analyzed 133 consecutive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids tested positive for P. jirovecii DNA by quantitative real-time PCR, obtained from two hospitals in different locations (Hospital 1 [n = 95] and Hospital 2 [n = 38]). We detected three different alleles, either singly (mt85C: 39.1%; mt85T: 24.1%; mt85A: 9.8%) or together (27%), and an association between P. jirovecii mt85 genotype and the patient's place of hospitalization (p = 0.011). The lowest fungal loads (median = 0.82 × 10(3) copies/μl; range: 15-11 × 10(3) ) were associated with mt85A and the highest (median = 1.4 × 10(6) copies/μl; range: 17 × 10(3) -1.3 × 10(7) ) with mt85CTA (p = 0.010). The ratios of the various alleles differed between the 36 mixed-genotype samples. In tests of serial BALs (median: 20 d; range 4-525) from six patients with mixed genotypes, allele ratio changes were observed five times and genotype replacement once. Therefore, allele ratio changes seem more frequent than genotype replacement when using a SNaPshot assay more sensitive for detecting minority alleles than Sanger sequencing. Moreover, because microscopy detects only high fungal loads, the selection of microscopy-positive samples may miss genotypes associated with low loads.

  12. Quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 isoforms in human liver microsomes by the combination of proteomics and chemical probe-based assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xidong; Hu, Lianghai; Ge, Guangbo; Yang, Bo; Ning, Jing; Sun, Shixin; Yang, Ling; Pors, Klaus; Gu, Jingkai

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is one of the most important drug-metabolizing enzyme families, which participates in the biotransformation of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. Quantitative analysis of CYP expression levels is important when studying the efficacy of new drug molecules and assessing drug-drug interactions in drug development. At present, chemical probe-based assay is the most widely used approach for the evaluation of CYP activity although there are cross-reactions between the isoforms with high sequence homologies. Therefore, quantification of each isozyme is highly desired in regard to meeting the ever-increasing requirements for carrying out pharmacokinetics and personalized medicine in the academic, pharmaceutical, and clinical setting. Herein, an absolute quantification method was employed for the analysis of the seven isoforms CYP1A2, 2B6, 3A4, 3A5, 2C9, 2C19, and 2E1 using a proteome-derived approach in combination with stable isotope dilution assay. The average absolute amount measured from twelve human liver microsomes samples were 39.3, 4.3, 54.0, 4.6, 10.3, 3.0, and 9.3 (pmol/mg protein) for 1A2, 2B6, 3A4, 3A5, 2C9, 2C19, and 2E1, respectively. Importantly, the expression level of CYP3A4 showed high correlation (r = 0.943, p < 0.0001) with the functional activity, which was measured using bufalin-a highly selective chemical probe we have developed. The combination of MRM identification and analysis of the functional activity, as in the case of CYP3A4, provides a protocol which can be extended to other functional enzyme studies with wide application in pharmaceutical research.

  13. Predicting in vivo cardiovascular properties of β-blockers from cellular assays: a quantitative comparison of cellular and cardiovascular pharmacological responses

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Kemp, Philip; March, Julie; Fretwell, Laurice; Hill, Stephen J.; Gardiner, Sheila M.

    2011-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptor antagonists differ in their degree of partial agonism. In vitro assays have provided information on ligand affinity, selectivity, and intrinsic efficacy. However, the extent to which these properties are manifest in vivo is less clear. Conscious freely moving rats, instrumented for measurement of heart rate (β1; HR) and hindquarters vascular conductance (β2; HVC) were used to measure receptor selectivity and ligand efficacy in vivo. CGP 20712A caused a dose-dependent decrease in basal HR (P<0.05, ANOVA) at 5 doses between 6.7 and 670 μg/kg (i.v.) and shifted the dose-response curve for isoprenaline to higher agonist concentrations without altering HVC responses. In contrast, at doses of 67 μg/kg (i.v.) and above, ICI 118551 substantially reduced the HVC response to isoprenaline without affecting HR responses. ZD 7114, xamoterol, and bucindolol significantly increased basal HR (ΔHR: +122±12, +129±11, and +59±11 beats/min, respectively; n=6), whereas other β-blockers caused significant reductions (all at 2 mg/kg i.v.). The agonist effects of xamoterol and ZD 7114 were equivalent to that of the highest dose of isoprenaline. Bucindolol, however, significantly antagonized the response to the highest doses isoprenaline. An excellent correlation was obtained between in vivo and in vitro measures of β1-adrenoceptor efficacy (R2=0.93; P<0.0001).—Baker, J. G., Kemp, P., March, J., Fretwell, L., Hill, S. J., Gardiner, S. M. Predicting in vivo cardiovascular properties of β-blockers from cellular assays: a quantitative comparison of cellular and cardiovascular pharmacological responses. PMID:21865315

  14. Disruption of TgPHIL1 Alters Specific Parameters of Toxoplasma gondii Motility Measured in a Quantitative, Three-Dimensional Live Motility Assay

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Rould, Mark A.; Konradt, Christoph; Hunter, Christopher A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    T. gondii uses substrate-dependent gliding motility to invade cells of its hosts, egress from these cells at the end of its lytic cycle and disseminate through the host organism during infection. The ability of the parasite to move is therefore critical for its virulence. T. gondii engages in three distinct types of gliding motility on coated two-dimensional surfaces: twirling, circular gliding and helical gliding. We show here that motility in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based environment is strikingly different, in that all parasites move in irregular corkscrew-like trajectories. Methods developed for quantitative analysis of motility parameters along the smoothed trajectories demonstrate a complex but periodic pattern of motility with mean and maximum velocities of 0.58±0.07 µm/s and 2.01±0.17 µm/s, respectively. To test how a change in the parasite's crescent shape might affect trajectory parameters, we compared the motility of Δphil1 parasites, which are shorter and wider than wild type, to the corresponding parental and complemented lines. Although comparable percentages of parasites were moving for all three lines, the Δphil1 mutant exhibited significantly decreased trajectory lengths and mean and maximum velocities compared to the parental parasite line. These effects were either partially or fully restored upon complementation of the Δphil1 mutant. These results show that alterations in morphology may have a significant impact on T. gondii motility in an extracellular matrix-like environment, provide a possible explanation for the decreased fitness of Δphil1 parasites in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of the quantitative three-dimensional assay for studying parasite motility. PMID:24489670

  15. Evaluation of viral-lysate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for detecting human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) infections using human sera standardized by quantitative western blotting.

    PubMed

    Hardy, C T; Damrow, T A; Villareal, D B; Kenny, G E

    1992-06-01

    The first generation of proprietary reagents for detecting antibodies to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used as antigen partially purified virus from cell culture lysates. These tests, which are still in use, may vary in their antibody measurement capabilities if different proportions of the viral polypeptides are present in the viral lysate mixtures. We determined the quantities of antibodies in the serum of persons infected with HIV-1 by dilution analysis using 3 ELISA kits: Abbott [A], Du Pont [D], Genetic Systems [G]. The proportionate antibody titres of each serum to p24gag and gp160env/120env were established by quantitative Western blotting. Serum antibody titres were high, frequently over 1:10,000, a result observed both by ELISA and Western blot. For Kit D, sera with high proportions of antibody to p24gag produced antibody titration curves with steep slopes whereas shallower slopes were found in sera with high proportions of antibody to gp160env. In contrast, Kit A gave steeper slopes with sera enriched for gp160env antibodies. Kit G gave results with slopes intermediate between Kits A and D. Serum antibody titres differed between kits depending upon the proportion and concentration of antibodies in a given serum to gp160env and p24gag. The findings that both the concentration and proportion of antibodies to specific viral polypeptides in human sera markedly affect the signal intensity produced by proprietary ELISAs suggest the need for several control sera which reflect the diversity of human serum responses. Standardization of human reference sera by quantitative Western blotting will assist in evaluation and quality control of ELISA tests.

  16. Development of a combined immunomagnetic separation and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for sensitive detection of infectious rotavirus in water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan; Gu, April Z; Zeng, Si-yu; Li, Dan; He, Miao; Shi, Han-chang

    2011-03-01

    A quantitative and rapid detection method for rotavirus in water samples was developed using immunomagnetic separation combined with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IMS-RT-qPCR). Magnetic beads coated with antibodies against representative group A rotavirus were used to capture and purify intact rotavirus particles in both artificial and real environmental water sample matrix. Compared to extracting RNA using commercial kits and RT-qPCR assay, the developed IMS-RT-qPCR method increased the detection sensitivity by about one order of magnitude when applied in clean water, with a detection limit of 3.16 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50))/mL within 5h. This method was compatible with various commonly used virus eluants, including beef extract (BE), beef extract with 0.05M glycine (BEG) and urea arginine phosphate buffer (UAPB). The recovery efficiencies from various eluants using IMS-RT-qPCR are higher than that using direct RT-qPCR method, demonstrating the effectiveness of the IMS step for eliminating inhibitors in the eluant matrix. This method was also successfully applied to purify and detect rotavirus particles seeded in 10(3)-fold concentrated wastewater influent samples. It seemed to reduce the interference from complex sample background and increase the qPCR product reliability comparing to RT-qPCR method without the IMS step. The results indicated that IMS-RT-qPCR is a rapid, sensitive and reliable tool for detecting rotaviruses in complex water environments. PMID:21256895

  17. Binary classification of a large collection of environmental chemicals from estrogen receptor assays by quantitative structure-activity relationship and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Rotroff, Daniel M; Judson, Richard S

    2013-12-23

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals subject to regulatory decisions for endocrine disrupting potential. The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ∼8200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large data set to develop in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using machine learning (ML) methods and a novel approach to manage the imbalanced data distribution. Training compounds from the ToxCast project were categorized as active or inactive (binding or nonbinding) classes based on a composite ER Interaction Score derived from a collection of 13 ER in vitro assays. A total of 1537 chemicals from ToxCast were used to derive and optimize the binary classification models while 5073 additional chemicals from the Tox21 project, evaluated in 2 of the 13 in vitro assays, were used to externally validate the model performance. In order to handle the imbalanced distribution of active and inactive chemicals, we developed a cluster-selection strategy to minimize information loss and increase predictive performance and compared this strategy to three currently popular techniques: cost-sensitive learning, oversampling of the minority class, and undersampling of the majority class. QSAR classification models were built to relate the molecular structures of chemicals to their ER activities using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), classification and regression trees (CART), and support vector machines (SVM) with 51 molecular descriptors from QikProp and 4328 bits of structural fingerprints as explanatory variables. A random forest (RF) feature selection method was employed to extract the structural features most relevant to the ER activity. The best model was obtained using SVM in combination with a subset of descriptors identified from a large set via the RF algorithm, which recognized the active and

  18. Binary classification of a large collection of environmental chemicals from estrogen receptor assays by quantitative structure-activity relationship and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Rotroff, Daniel M; Judson, Richard S

    2013-12-23

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals subject to regulatory decisions for endocrine disrupting potential. The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ∼8200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large data set to develop in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using machine learning (ML) methods and a novel approach to manage the imbalanced data distribution. Training compounds from the ToxCast project were categorized as active or inactive (binding or nonbinding) classes based on a composite ER Interaction Score derived from a collection of 13 ER in vitro assays. A total of 1537 chemicals from ToxCast were used to derive and optimize the binary classification models while 5073 additional chemicals from the Tox21 project, evaluated in 2 of the 13 in vitro assays, were used to externally validate the model performance. In order to handle the imbalanced distribution of active and inactive chemicals, we developed a cluster-selection strategy to minimize information loss and increase predictive performance and compared this strategy to three currently popular techniques: cost-sensitive learning, oversampling of the minority class, and undersampling of the majority class. QSAR classification models were built to relate the molecular structures of chemicals to their ER activities using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), classification and regression trees (CART), and support vector machines (SVM) with 51 molecular descriptors from QikProp and 4328 bits of structural fingerprints as explanatory variables. A random forest (RF) feature selection method was employed to extract the structural features most relevant to the ER activity. The best model was obtained using SVM in combination with a subset of descriptors identified from a large set via the RF algorithm, which recognized the active and

  19. A Quick Assay for the Quantitation of Fumonisin B1 and B2 in Maize Samples by Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vega, Victor A

    2016-05-01

    A quick and effective extraction of fumonisin B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2) in corn samples is described. The samples were extracted with an 80% acetonitrile-water solution, followed by a second extraction using an 80% methanol-water solution. The extract was then subjected to an immunoaffinity column for cleanup. Quantitation was then obtained by LC/MS. LC/MS parameters were optimized resulting in a 3 min run time. Corn certified reference materials (CRMs) at three different levels were analyzed. For the lowest level, a corn CRM sample containing 0.6 ppm of FB1 and 0.1 ppm of FB2 was analyzed. For the midlevel, analysis of a corn CRM sample containing 1.2 ppm FB1 and 0.3 ppm FB2 was conducted. A sample containing 3.6 ppm FB1 and 0.8 ppm FB2 was also analyzed. All recoveries were calculated using an external standard curve. Recoveries from all CRM samples ranged from 70 to 110%. Confirmation for both analytes in the sample extracts at each level was accomplished by comparing MS/MS spectra of the samples against those of the standards. This method provides a rapid, specific, robust, and easily controlled assay for the analysis of fumonisin in corn samples. PMID:27297840

  20. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR-based assay, improved by Southern hybridization technique, for polarity-specific influenza virus RNAs in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Uchide, Noboru; Ohyama, Kunio; Bessho, Toshio; Yamakawa, Toshio

    2002-10-01

    Complementary (c) DNAs against viral (v) RNA of negative polarity and complementary and/or messenger (c/m) RNA of positive polarity for influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) were synthesized from total cellular RNA extracted from influenza virus- and mock-infected cells using polarity-specific primers, respectively. HA vRNA and c/mRNA were amplified readily by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from influenza virus-infected cells during a virus productive period; however, non-specific PCR product was prone to amplification from mock-infected cells and cells at once after virus infection. Southern blots of the PCR products were hybridized with biotinylated DNA probe, which enabled the generation of specific signals to HA vRNA and c/mRNA. Mock-infected cells produced no signals. Furthermore, titration analyses revealed linear relationships between amount of target RNAs and generated signals. Accordingly, Southern hybridization made possible the quantitation of specific PCR products for HA vRNA and c/mRNA in cell culture and proved the lack of HA RNAs in mock-infected cells in the absence of virus. The RT-PCR based assay combined with Southern hybridization methodology was useful with respect for investigating the processes of replication and transcription of viral genes in cell culture before and during the virus productive period.

  1. Quantitative characterization of chitosan in the skin by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and ninhydrin assay: application in transdermal sciences.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, A; Wong, T W

    2016-07-01

    The chitosan has been used as the primary excipient in transdermal particulate dosage form design. Its distribution pattern across the epidermis and dermis is not easily accessible through chemical assay and limited to radiolabelled molecules via quantitative autoradiography. This study explored Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy imaging technique with built-in microscope as the means to examine chitosan molecular distribution over epidermis and dermis with the aid of histology operation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy skin imaging was conducted using chitosan of varying molecular weights, deacetylation degrees, particle sizes and zeta potentials, obtained via microwave ligation of polymer chains at solution state. Both skin permeation and retention characteristics of chitosan increased with the use of smaller chitosan molecules with reduced acetyl content and size, and increased positive charge density. The ratio of epidermal to dermal chitosan content decreased with the use of these chitosan molecules as their accumulation in dermis (3.90% to 18.22%) was raised to a greater extent than epidermis (0.62% to 1.92%). A larger dermal chitosan accumulation nonetheless did not promote the transdermal polymer passage more than the epidermal chitosan. A small increase in epidermal chitosan content apparently could fluidize the stratum corneum and was more essential to dictate molecular permeation into dermis and systemic circulation. The histology technique aided Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy imaging approach introduces a new dimension to the mechanistic aspect of chitosan in transdermal delivery. PMID:26695532

  2. Pharmacological profile of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) splice variant translation using a novel drug screening assay: a "quantitative code".

    PubMed

    Vaghi, Valentina; Polacchini, Alessio; Baj, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Vera L M; Vicario, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity. BDNF is a major pharmaceutical target in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological modulation of this neurotrophin is challenging because BDNF is generated by multiple, alternatively spliced transcripts with different 5'- and 3'UTRs. Each BDNF mRNA variant is transcribed independently, but translation regulation is unknown. To evaluate the translatability of BDNF transcripts, we developed an in vitro luciferase assay in human neuroblastoma cells. In unstimulated cells, each BDNF 5'- and 3'UTR determined a different basal translation level of the luciferase reporter gene. However, constructs with either a 5'UTR or a 3'UTR alone showed poor translation modulation by BDNF, KCl, dihydroxyphenylglycine, AMPA, NMDA, dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Constructs consisting of the luciferase reporter gene flanked by the 5'UTR of one of the most abundant BDNF transcripts in the brain (exons 1, 2c, 4, and 6) and the long 3'UTR responded selectively to stimulation with the different receptor agonists, and only transcripts 2c and 6 were increased by the antidepressants desipramine and mirtazapine. We propose that BDNF mRNA variants represent "a quantitative code" for regulated expression of the protein. Thus, to discriminate the efficacy of drugs in stimulating BDNF synthesis, it is appropriate to use variant-specific in vitro screening tests.

  3. Development and validation of a SYBR Green real-time PCR assay for rapid and quantitative detection of goose interferons and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-10-01

    Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) based on SYBR-Green I binding is a quick, reliable, and easy method for analyzing small amounts of mRNA. Viral pathogens are recognized at the time of infection by pattern recognition receptors; thus, the inflammatory cytokines (IL1β, IL6, and IL18) and antiviral cytokines (IFNα, IFNγ) are secreted by innate immune cells and induced to respond to the pathogens. The objective of this study was to develop an effective and sensitive RT-qPCR assay for the rapid and accurate quantification of goose cytokines: IFNα, IFNγ, IL1β, IL6, and IL18. Subsequently, the established methods were employed to detect the immune response in agonist-stimulated goose spleen cells in vitro. These data indicated that the established RT-qPCR is a reliable method for determining relative gene expression. The results revealed that Imiquimod led to the significant upregulation of goose IFNα (P < 0.01), IFNγ (P < 0.01), IL1β (P < 0.01), IL6 (P < 0.01), and IL18 (P < 0.05). The established methods are important for scientific research and clinical applications, which require rapid and accurate results in a short period of time. The technique can potentially be used in the further research of goose molecular immunology, which will help us understand the interactions between hosts and pathogens.

  4. Effects of Holding Time, Storage, and the Preservation of Samples on Sample Integrity for the Detection of Fecal Indicator Bacteria by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)-based assays.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to answer questions related to storage of samples to be analyzed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based assays for fecal indicator bacteria. The project was divided into two parts. The first part was to determine if filters th...

  5. Development and accuracy of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for detection and quantification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) heat labile and heat stable toxin genes in travelers' diarrhea samples.

    PubMed

    Youmans, Bonnie P; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Petrosino, Joseph F; DuPont, Herbert L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the leading bacterial pathogen of travelers' diarrhea, is routinely detected by an established DNA hybridization protocol that is neither sensitive nor quantitative. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays that detect the ETEC toxin genes eltA, sta1, and sta2 in clinical stool samples were developed and tested using donor stool inoculated with known quantities of ETEC bacteria. The sensitivity of the qPCR assays is 89%, compared with 22% for the DNA hybridization assay, and the limits of detection are 10,000-fold lower than the DNA hybridization assays performed in parallel. Ninety-three clinical stool samples, previously characterized by DNA hybridization, were tested using the new ETEC qPCR assays. Discordant toxin profiles were observed for 22 samples, notably, four samples originally typed as ETEC negative were ETEC positive. The qPCR assays are unique in their sensitivity and ability to quantify the three toxin genes in clinical stool samples.

  6. TRI12 based quantitative real-time PCR assays reveal the distribution of trichothecene genotypes of F. graminearum and F. culmorum isolates in Danish small grain cereals.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, L K; Jensen, J D; Rodríguez, A; Jørgensen, L N; Justesen, A F

    2012-07-16

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays, based on polymorphisms in the TRI12 gene of the trichothecene pathway, were developed to identify and quantify the trichothecene genotypes producing 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3ADON), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15ADON) or nivalenol (NIV) in the Fusarium graminearum species complex, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium cerealis and Fusarium pseudograminearum. These assays were applied on a total of 378 field samples of cereal grain of wheat, barley, triticale, rye and oats collected from 2003 to 2007 to study the trichothecene genotype composition in Danish cereals. The three genotypes, 3ADON, 15ADON and NIV were found in all five cereal species, great annual variation in the occurrence of the trichothecene genotypes was evident with considerable variation between the samples. 3ADON was the dominant genotype in barley, triticale, rye and oats while 15ADON was most dominant in wheat. The NIV genotype was found at low levels in most samples. Study of genotype composition within the Danish F. graminearum and F. culmorum population was based on principal component analysis (PCA). PCA revealed that the dominating genotype of F. graminearum in wheat is 15ADON. For barley, the PCA analysis indicated that the F. graminearum population consisted of all three genotypes, and in triticale, the F. graminearum population consisted mainly of 15ADON genotype. F. culmorum/F. cerealis showed correlation to the NIV genotype in wheat and triticale but not in barley. F. culmorum/F. cerealis also showed some correlation to 3ADON especially in wheat and triticale. Selected wheat and barley samples from 1957 to 2000 showed low amounts of F. graminearum and F. culmorum in general but with a dominance of the 3ADON genotype. 15ADON was not detected in these samples, except for very low amounts in the sample representing the years from 1997 to 2000. Detection of low amounts of the 15ADON genotype in these historical samples and the relatively high amounts of 15ADON

  7. Development and validation of a quantitative real-time polymerase chain assay for universal detection of the White Spot Syndrome Virus in marine crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), the sole member of the family Whispoviridae, is the etiological agent that causes severe mortality events in wild and farmed shrimp globally. Given its adverse effects, the WSSV has been included in the list of notifiable diseases of the Office of International Epizootic (OIE) since 1997. To date there are no known therapeutic treatments available against this lethal virus, and a surveillance program in brood-stock and larvae, based on appropriate diagnostic tests, has been strongly recommended. However, some currently used procedures intended for diagnosis of WSSV may be particularly susceptible to generate spurious results harmfully impacting the shrimp farming industry. Methods In this study, a sensitive one-step SYBR green-based real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection and quantitation of WSSV was developed. The method was tested against several WSSV infected crustacean species and on samples that were previously diagnosed as being positive for WSSV from different geographical locations. Results A universal primer set for targeting the WSSV VP28 gene was designed. This method demonstrated its specificity and sensitivity for detection of WSSV, with detection limits of 12 copies per sample, comparable with the results obtained by other protocols. Furthermore, the primers designed in the present study were shown to exclusively amplify the targeted WSSV VP28 fragment, and successfully detected the virus in different samples regardless of their geographical origin. In addition, the presence of WSSV in several species of crustaceans, including both naturally and experimentally infected, were successfully detected by this method. Conclusion The designed qPCR assay here is highly specific and displayed high sensitivity. Furthermore, this assay is universal as it allows the detection of WSSV from different geographic locations and in several crustacean species that may serve as potential vectors. Clearly, in many low

  8. Quantitative RT-PCR assay of HER2 mRNA expression in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangjung; Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Ahn, Sungwoo; Lee, Dongsup; Cho, Yoonjung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Jung, Dongju; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-01-01

    Detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2, also known as erbB2) expression is a preparatory process to decide a treatment strategy for breast cancer patients. 20-30% of breast cancer patients have HER2 overexpression, and they usually show poor recovery rate. For detection of HER2 expression, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods are conventionally used. Although these methods are accurate and reliable, their time-consuming process and high cost need a concise method with high sensitivity and accuracy. As a complementary method to the current IHC/FISH standard techniques, PCR-based methods have been developed. Here we employed a quantitative PCR method to detect HER2 expression in one hundred ninety nine formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer tissue samples from the patients treated over two years at the Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Republic of Korea. Relative expression of HER2 mRNA in the FFPE samples was analyzed using a quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) method and the obtained HER2 expression levels were compared with those from IHC/FISH methods. Our results show that the RT-qPCR method was highly concordant with IHC/FISH methods for detecting HER2 expression. Overall sensitivity and specificity of the BrightGen HER2 RT-qDx assay kit (Syantra, Calgary, Canada), which is a kit we used for RT-qPCR analyses, were 93.0% and 89.8% (P < 0.0001), respectively. The diagnostic cut-off value of HER2 RT-qDx for the clinical samples was determined by likelihood ratio, among which the highest likelihood ratio of relative HER2 mRNA levels was over 105.5 (AUC = 0.9466) with the highest sensitivity and specificity. Our study indicates that quantification of HER2 mRNA expression with the RT-qPCR could be an alternative method of conventional IHC/FISH methods.

  9. Establishment of real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for transcriptional analysis of duck enteritis virus UL55 gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR) has become the benchmark for detection and quantification of target gene expression level and been utilized increasingly in detection of viral load and therapy monitoring. The dynamic transcription variation of duck enteritis virus UL55 gene during the life cycle of duck enteritis virus in infected cells has not been reported yet. Results The newly identified duck enteritis virus UL55 gene was amplified and cloned into pMD18-T vector after digestion to generate a recombinant plasmid pMD18-T/UL55 for the establishment of qRT-PCR as standard DNA. The results of agarose gel electrophoresis and melting curve analysis demonstrated the primers we designed for qRT-PCR were specific and available. We used β-actin as a reference gene for normalization and established two standard curves based on pMD18-T/UL55 and pMD18-T/β-actin successfully. Based on that, the transcriptional analysis of DEV UL55 gene was performed, and the result suggested the expression of UL55 mRNA was at a low level from 0 to 8 h post-infection(p.i.), then accumulated quickly since 12 h p.i. and peaked at 36 h p.i., it can be detected till 60 h p.i.. Nucleic acid inhibition test was carried out for analyzing a temporal regulation condition of DEV UL55 gene, result revealed that it was sensitive to ganciclovir. Synthesis procedures of DEV UL55 gene can be inhibited by ganciclovir. Conclusions The method we established in this paper can provide quantitative values reflecting the amounts of measured mRNA in samples. It's available for detection and quantification, also can be used in DEV diagnosis. The DEV UL55 gene was produced most abundantly during the late phase of replication in DEV-infected cells and the transcription of it depended on the synthesized DNA. DEV UL55 gene is a γ2 gene which occurs last and have a strict requirement for viral DNA synthesis. PMID:21631934

  10. Quantitative relationship between anticapsular antibody measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or radioimmunoassay and protection of mice against challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 4.

    PubMed Central

    Musher, D M; Johnson, B; Watson, D A

    1990-01-01

    We have recently shown that a substantial proportion of antibody to pneumococcal polysaccharide as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or radioimmunoassay is removed by adsorption with pneumococcal cell wall polysaccharide (CWPS). The present study was undertaken to validate the hypothesis that only serotype-specific antibody that remains after adsorption with CWPS provides protection against pneumococcal infection. Serum samples were obtained from human subjects before and after they had been vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Antibody to Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 4 was measured by ELISA without adsorption or after adsorption of serum with CWPS. Groups of mice were injected with graded doses of serum and then challenged intraperitoneally with 10, 100, or 1,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. pneumoniae serotype 4. Without adsorption, prevaccination sera from five healthy adults appeared to contain up to 33 micrograms of antibody to S. pneumoniae serotype 4 antigen per ml; adsorption with CWPS removed all detectable antibody, and pretreating mice with up to 0.1 ml of these sera (less than or equal to 3.3 micrograms of antibody) failed to protect them against challenge with 100 LD50. In contrast, postvaccination sera contained 2.9 to 30 micrograms of antibody per ml that was not removed by adsorption. Diluting sera to administer desired amounts of serotype-specific immunoglobulin G showed a significant relationship between protection and antibody remaining after adsorption (P less than 0.05 by linear regression analysis); 150 ng was uniformly protective against 1,000 LD50, and 50 ng was protective against 100 LD50. These studies have, for the first time, quantitated the amount of serotype-specific antibody that protects mice against challenge with S. pneumoniae type 4. In light of these observations, it is necessary to reassess current concepts regarding the presence of antipneumococcal antibody in the unvaccinated

  11. Development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) gonadotropin ß subunit mRNAs to support endocrine disruptor research.

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Kahl, Michael D.; Korte, Joseph J.; Greene, Katie J.; Blake, Lindsey S.; Linnum, Ann; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-03-01

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are one of the most widely-used small fish models for regulatory ecotoxicology testing and research related to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, we isolated and sequenced cDNAs for fathead minnow follicle-stimulating hormone-like and luteinizing hormone-like β (FSHβ and LHβ) and glycoprotein α (GPα) subunits. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for measuring gonadotropin (GtH) β subunit transcripts were developed and used to examine “baseline” transcript levels over a range of age classes and reproductive states encompassed in EDC testing. In females, FSHβ and LHβ transcripts were greater in 4-5 month old than in younger fish and were significantly correlated with one another across all age classes examined. In males, FSHβ transcripts were greatest in 2-3 month old fish and were inversely correlated with various measures of testis development including, gonadal-somatic index (GSI), and histological stage. Overall, the pattern of GtHβ expression over age classes associated with gonad development was similar to that reported for other asynchronous-spawning fish. Despite significant changes in female GSI, gonad stage, and plasma vitellogenin within 24 h of spawning, GtHβ transcript levels in fish that had spawned within the preceding 24 h were not significantly different from those in fish that were 2-3 days post-spawn and expected to spawn within the next 24 h based on spawning history. Results of this study provide insights related to the role of GtHs in fathead minnow reproductive development and function. Additionally they provide useful “baseline” data needed to design and interpret effective experiments for studying direct and indirect effects of EDCs on GtH subunit mRNA expression, which will facilitate a greater understanding of integrated system-wide responses of the fathead minnow brain-pituitary-gonadal axis to stressors including EDCs.

  12. /sup 125/I-Fibrin deposition in contact sensitivity reactions in the mouse. Sensitivity of the assay for quantitating reactions after active or passive sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Mekori, Y.A.; Dvorak, H.F.; Galli, S.J.

    1986-03-15

    The clotting associated with delayed hypersensitivity (DH) responses in the mouse by sensitizing the animals to the contactant oxazolone (Ox), and then administering /sup 125/I-guinea pig fibrinogen i.v. 10 to 30 min before antigen challenge 5 days later. Early (4 to 8 hr) contact sensitivity (CS) responses in immunized mice were barely detectable by three conventional measures of CS, but the total /sup 125/I-cpm in ears challenged with hapten was 3.6 to 4.5 x that in control ears challenged with vehicle alone; moreover, the amount of urea-insoluble cpm (cross-linked /sup 125/I-fibrin-associated cpm) in the reactions to Ox was 6.5-fold to 8.2-fold that present in the control reactions. In 24 hr reactions that were near peak intensity by measurements of ear swelling, ear weight ratios, and ratios of /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine-labeled leukocyte infiltration, the cpm in antigen-challenged ears exceeded that in control ears by 13-fold to 53-fold. In addition, antigen-challenged ears contained 27 to 300 x the urea-insoluble cpm present in control ears. /sup 125/I-Fibrin deposition was not a specific characteristic of CS reactions, because a small amount of urea-insoluble reactivity was also detected in some reactions to Ox in native mice. Nevertheless, the assay was exquisitely sensitive and readily detected quantitative differences between the immunologically specific and nonspecific reactions at very early intervals after challenge or with suboptimal doses of antigen.

  13. Identification of novel anti-hepatitis C virus agents by a quantitative high throughput screen in a cell-based infection assay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zongyi; Hu, Xin; He, Shanshan; Yim, Hyung Joon; Xiao, Jingbo; Swaroop, Manju; Tanega, Cordelle; Zhang, Ya-qin; Yi, Guanghui; Kao, C Cheng; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Liang, T Jake

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a major health threat to the world. The recent development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV has markedly improved the response rate of HCV and reduced the side effects in comparison to the interferon-based therapy. Despite this therapeutic advance, there is still a need to develop new inhibitors that target different stages of the HCV life cycle because of various limitations of the current regimens. In this study, we performed a quantitative high throughput screening of the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) of ∼350,000 chemicals for novel HCV inhibitors using our previously developed cell-based HCV infection assay. Following confirmation and structural clustering analysis, we narrowed down to 158 compounds from the initial ∼3000 molecules that showed inhibitory activity for further structural and functional analyses. We were able to assign the majority of these compounds to specific stage(s) in the HCV life cycle. Three of them are direct inhibitors of NS3/4A protease. Most of the compounds appear to act on novel targets in HCV life cycle. Four compounds with novel structure and excellent drug-like properties, three targeting HCV entry and one targeting HCV assembly/secretion, were advanced for further development as lead hits. These compounds represent diverse chemotypes that are potential lead compounds for further optimization and may offer promising candidates for the development of novel therapeutics against HCV infection. In addition, they represent novel molecular probes to explore the complex interactions between HCV and the cells. PMID:26515788

  14. Evaluation of a purification procedure for the muscarinic receptor for the purpose of quantitative receptor assays of anticholinergics. Part A: The membrane-bound receptor.

    PubMed

    Smisterová, J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1995-11-01

    The presented purification procedure for the muscarinic receptor from calf striatum includes the extraction of lipids with hexane in the first step and the removal of 39% of non-receptor proteins with 2 M NaCl in the second step. The simplicity of such an approach to the purification of the receptor warrants its use in the routine practice for quantitative purposes. The high affinity binding of tertiary 3H-dexetimide (3H-DEX) and quaternary 3H-N-methylscopolamine (3H-NMS) is preserved after the removal of irrelevant lipids and proteins from the P2-pellet. The overall yield of receptors--80%, when labelled with 3H-NMS, was satisfactory. Moreover, the final product, the NaCl-pellet, exerts a higher density of 3H-NMS binding sites per mg proteins by a factor of about 1.7. The overall yield of receptors and purification factor were lower, when measured with 3H-DEX. The total yield of 3H-DEX binding sites amounted to about 40% and the receptor density per mg protein decreased by a factor of 0.85. We did not succeed in the improvement of the ratio specific/non-specific binding, neither for 3H-DEX nor for 3H-NMS for the purified receptor preparations. The use of 3H-NMS is preferable to 3H-DEX in plasma sample assays because of a negligible effect of plasma on ligand binding when compared with 3H-DEX. PMID:8570569

  15. Real-Time Quantitative Broad-Range PCR Assay for Detection of the 16S rRNA Gene Followed by Sequencing for Species Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zucol, Franziska; Ammann, Roland A.; Berger, Christoph; Aebi, Christoph; Altwegg, Martin; Niggli, Felix K.; Nadal, David

    2006-01-01

    Here we determined the analytical sensitivities of broad-range real-time PCR-based assays employing one of three different genomic DNA extraction protocols in combination with one of three different primer pairs targeting the 16S rRNA gene to detect a panel of 22 bacterial species. DNA extraction protocol III, using lysozyme, lysostaphin, and proteinase K, followed by PCR with the primer pair Bak11W/Bak2, giving amplicons of 796 bp in length, showed the best overall sensitivity, detecting DNA of 82% of the strains investigated at concentrations of ≤102 CFU in water per reaction. DNA extraction protocols I and II, using less enzyme treatment, combined with other primer pairs giving shorter amplicons of 466 bp and 342 or 346 bp, respectively, were slightly more sensitive for the detection of gram-negative but less sensitive for the detection of gram-positive bacteria. The obstacle of detecting background DNA in blood samples spiked with bacteria was circumvented by introducing a broad-range hybridization probe, and this preserved the minimal detection limits observed in samples devoid of blood. Finally, sequencing of the amplicons generated using the primer pair Bak11W/Bak2 allowed species identification of the detected bacterial DNA. Thus, broad-spectrum PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene in the quantitative real-time format can achieve an analytical sensitivity of 1 to 10 CFU per reaction in water, avoid detection of background DNA with the introduction of a broad-range probe, and generate amplicons that allow species identification of the detected bacterial DNA by sequencing. These prerequisites are important for its application to blood-containing patient samples. PMID:16891488

  16. Development of a high-throughput β-Gal-based neutralization assay for quantitation of herpes simplex virus-neutralizing antibodies in human samples.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Amy; Cooney, Michael; Blevins, Tamara P; Morrison, Lynda A; Larson, Shane; Skoberne, Mojca; Belshe, Robert B; Flechtner, Jessica B; Long, Deborah

    2016-07-19

    Measurement of neutralizing antibodies against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is important for evaluation of candidate vaccines. The established plaque-reduction neutralization assay is time consuming, labor intensive, and difficult to validate and transfer. Here, we describe the characterization of a HSV-neutralization assay based on the expression of a reporter gene, β-galactosidase (β-Gal). Using previously constructed HSV-β-Gal recombinant viruses, HSV-2/Gal and HSV-1/tk12, we developed a colorimetric β-Gal-based neutralization assay that is sensitive and highly reproducible, and performed in less than 48h. HSV-1 and HSV-2 neutralizing titers measured by the β-Gal-based neutralization assay were equivalent to those obtained by a plaque reduction neutralization assay. Intra- and inter-assay precision studies demonstrated that the β-Gal-based assay was repeatable and yielded low and acceptable variation. In addition, comparison of HSV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers measured in two independent laboratories by two unique β-Gal-based assays showed a highly significant correlation (r=0.9499, p<0.0001) between the two assays. The new assay will serve as an important tool both for preclinical and clinical trials of new HSV vaccines.

  17. Bioluminescence Methods for Assaying Kinases in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Format Applied to Yes1 Tyrosine Kinase, Glucokinase, and PI5P4Kα Lipid Kinase.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Auld, Douglas S; Inglese, James

    2016-01-01

    Assays in which the detection of a biological phenomenon is coupled to the production of bioluminescence by luciferase have gained widespread use. As firefly luciferases (FLuc) and kinases share a common substrate (ATP), coupling of a kinase to FLuc allows for the amount of ATP remaining following a kinase reaction to be assessed by quantitating the amount of luminescence produced. Alternatively, the amount of ADP produced by the kinase reaction can be coupled to FLuc through a two-step process. This chapter describes the bioluminescent assays that were developed for three classes of kinases (lipid, protein, and metabolic kinases) and miniaturized to 1536-well format, enabling their use for quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) of small-molecule libraries.

  18. Development of real-time PCR assays for the quantitative detection of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, comparison of TaqMan probes, and molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Jebbink, Jiska; Bai, Xin; Rogers, Beverly Barton; Dawson, D Brian; Scheuermann, Richard H; Domiati-Saad, Rana

    2003-02-01

    Human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) can cause serious complications in immunocompromised patients. Rapid diagnosis of EBV and CMV infection is critical in the management of the disease so that anti-viral therapy can be started early. Here we describe the development of real-time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and molecular beacons and compare the performance of both assays with a well-established, validated, gel-based PCR method for the quantification of EBV and CMV in patients' samples. The TaqMan and molecular beacon assays were linear between 10 to 10(7) viral genomes/reaction. Both assays generated calibration curves with strong correlation and low intra-assay and interassay variation. Results of EBV and CMV viral load determination inpatient samples obtained by the gel-based and real-time PCR were very similar. The real-time PCR assays showed increases in viral load before clinical measures of viral disease and decreases in viral load during anti-viral therapy in two of six pediatric patients. The data indicate that these TaqMan and molecular beacon approaches are accurate, rapid, and reliable assays for the diagnosis and monitoring of EBV and CMV infections in patients.

  19. Development of a quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Piasentin Alessio, Elsa; Astegiano, Sara; Gasparini, Giorgio; Cavallo, Rossana

    2012-03-01

    Evidence demonstrating that human rhinovirus (HRV) disease is not exclusively limited to the upper airways and may cause lower respiratory complications, together with the frequency of HRV infections and the increasing number of immunocompromised patients underline the need for rapid and accurate diagnosis of HRV infections. In this study, we developed the first quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes. We described a simple method to accurately quantify RNA target by computing the time to positivity (TTP) values for HRV RNA. Quantification capacity was assessed by plotting these TTP values against the starting number of target molecules. By using this simple method, we have significantly increased the diagnostic accuracy, precision, and trueness of real-time NASBA assay. Specificity of the method was verified in both in silico and experimental studies. Moreover, for assessment of clinical reactivity of the assay, NASBA has been validated on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Our quantitative NASBA assay was found to be very specific, accurate, and precise with high repeatability and reproducibility.

  20. Binding assays for the quantitative detection of P. brevis polyether neurotoxins in biological samples and antibodies as therapeutic aids for polyether marine intoxication. Annual report, 1 December 1987-30 November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, D.G.

    1988-12-15

    The polyether lipid-soluble toxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) can be detected using two separate types of specific binding reaction. Using tritiated PbTx-3 as a specific probe for binding to voltage-dependent sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes or to specific polyclonal antibodies, binding equilibria and displacement by unlabeled brevetoxins were compared. Labeled toxin can be displaced in a competitive manner by any of the other 5 naturally-occurring toxins; the quantitative displacement ability of each appears to reflect individual potency in fish bioassay. A comparison of ED50 in Radioimmunoassay and ED50 in synaptosome binding assay indicates that the former assay is useful for detection of toxins which possess the structural backbone of PbTx-3, the immunizing hapten. Thus, the two assays have quantitative applicability; the sodium channel with respect to potency and the antibodies with respect to structure. Microtiter plate assays utilizing each specific brevetoxin binding component and enzyme-linked toxin hapten have been successful and indicate a general applicability of colorimetric prototypes. There, is however, considerable manipulation required to decrease non-specific binding of the hydrophobic toxin-enzyme complex to the plates. Preliminary studies aimed at producing monoclonal antibodies have been explored using brevetoxins linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin.

  1. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  2. Development of SYBR Green and TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR assays for hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) infecting Penaeus monodon in India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Reena; Paria, Anutosh; Mankame, Smruti; Makesh, M; Chaudhari, Aparna; Rajendran, K V

    2015-12-01

    Hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) infects Penaeus monodon and causes mortality in the larval stages. Further, it has been implicated in the growth retardation in cultured P. monodon. Though different geographical isolates of HPV show large sequence variations, a sensitive PCR assay specific to Indian isolate has not yet been reported. Here, we developed a sensitive SYBR Green-based and TaqMan real-time PCR for the detection and quantification of the virus. A 441-bp PCR amplicon was cloned in pTZ57 R/T vector and the plasmid copy number was estimated. A 10-fold serial dilution of the plasmid DNA from 1 × 10(9) copies to 1 copy was prepared and used as the standard. The primers were tested initially using the standard on a conventional PCR format to determine the linearity of detection. The standards were further tested on real-time PCR format using SYBR Green and TaqMan chemistry and standard curves were generated based on the Ct values from three well replicates for each dilution. The assays were found to be sensitive, specific and reproducible with a wide dynamic range (1 × 10(9) to 10 copies) with coefficient of regression (R(2)) > 0.99, calculated average slope -3.196 for SYBR Green assay whereas, for TaqMan assay it was >0.99 and -3.367, respectively. The intra- and inter-assay variance of the Ct values ranged from 0.26% to 0.94% and 0.12% to 0.81%, respectively, for SYBR Green assay, and the inter-assay variance of the Ct values for TaqMan assay ranged from 0.07% to 1.93%. The specificity of the assays was proved by testing other DNA viruses of shrimp such as WSSV, IHHNV and MBV. Standardized assays were further tested to detect and quantify HPV in the post-larvae of P. monodon. The result was further compared with conventional PCR to test the reproducibility of the test. The assay was also used to screen Litopeneaus vannamei, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and Scylla serrata for HPV.

  3. Development of a novel HAC-based “gain of signal” quantitative assay for measuring chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Sheung; Lee, Nicholas C. O.; Goncharov, Nikolay V.; Kumeiko, Vadim; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C.; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that chromosome instability (CIN) common to cancer cells can be used as a target for cancer therapy. At present the rate of chromosome mis-segregation is quantified by laborious techniques such as coupling clonal cell analysis with karyotyping or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, a novel assay was developed based on the loss of a non-essential human artificial chromosome (HAC) carrying a constitutively expressed EGFP transgene (“loss of signal” assay). Using this system, anticancer drugs can be easily ranked on by their effect on HAC loss. However, it is problematic to covert this “loss of signal” assay into a high-throughput screen to identify drugs and mutations that increase CIN levels. To address this point, we re-designed the HAC-based