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Sample records for assembled lumbar interbody

  1. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Alan

    2002-04-01

    Indication and technique of TLIF procedure are described. TLIF provides for anterior column support and posterior tension band. It is a unilateral approach to the spine, and there is no need to expose or manipulate the dura. It provides the benefits of a 360 degrees fusion without performing an anterior approach. It restores the normal anatomy of the motion segment and maintains normal lumbar lordosis. Patients are mobilized quickly and resume activities early.

  2. Mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Ricks, Christian; Tempel, Zachary; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-07-01

    In deformity surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion provides excellent biomechanical support, creates a broad surface area for arthrodesis, and induces lordosis in the lower lumbar spine. Preoperative MRI, plain radiographs, and, when available, CT scan should be carefully assessed for sacral slope as it relates to pubic symphysis, position of the great vessels (especially at L4/5), disc space height, or contraindication to an anterior approach. This video demonstrates the steps in an anterior surgical procedure with minimal open exposure. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/r3bC4_vu1hQ .

  3. [Mechanical studies of lumbar interbody fusion implants].

    PubMed

    Bader, R J; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Mittelmeier, W; Bertagnoli, R; Gradinger, R

    2002-05-01

    In addition to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages composed of metal or plastic are being used increasingly as spacers for interbody fusion of spinal segments. The goal of this study was the mechanical testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) fusion cages used for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. With a special testing device according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, the mechanical properties of the implants were determined under four different loading conditions. The implants (UNION cages, Medtronic Sofamor Danek) provide sufficient axial compression, shear, and torsional strength of the implant body. Ultimate axial compression load of the fins is less than the physiological compression loads at the lumbar spine. Therefore by means of an appropriate surgical technique parallel grooves have to be reamed into the endplates of the vertebral bodies according to the fin geometry. Thereby axial compression forces affect the implants body and the fins are protected from damaging loading. Using a supplementary anterior or posterior instrumentation, in vivo failure of the fins as a result of physiological shear and torsional spinal loads is unlikely. Due to specific complications related to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages made of metal or carbon fiber reinforced plastic are an important alternative implant in interbody fusion.

  4. Radiographic Results of Minimally Invasive (MIS) Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LIF) Compared with Conventional Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Kwan; Kim, Sung Min

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the radiographic results of minimally invasive (MIS) anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Twelve and nineteen patients who underwent MIS-ALIF, MIS-TLIF, respectively, from 2006 to 2008 were analyzed with a minimum 24-months' follow-up. Additionally, 18 patients treated with single level open TLIF surgery in 2007 were evaluated as a comparative group. X-rays and CT images were evaluated preoperatively, postoperatively, and at the final follow-up. Fusion and subsidence rates were determined, and radiographic parameters, including lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), fused segment angle (FSA), sacral slope angle (SSA), disc height (DH), and foraminal height (FH), were analyzed. These parameters were also compared between the open and MIS-TLIF groups. In the MIS interbody fusion group, statistically significant increases were observed in LLA, FSA, and DH and FH between preoperative and final values. The changes in LLA, FSA, and DH were significantly increased in the MIS-ALIF group compared with the MIS-TLIF group, but SSA and FH were not significantly different. No significant differences were seen between open and MIS-TLIF except for DH. The interbody subsidence and fusion rates of the MIS groups were 12.0±4% and 96%, respectively. Radiographic results of MIS interbody fusion surgery are as favorable as those with conventional surgery regarding fusion, restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and lumbar lordosis. MIS-ALIF is more effective than MIS-TLIF for intervertebral disc height restoration and lumbar lordosis.

  5. Radiographic Results of Minimally Invasive (MIS) Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LIF) Compared with Conventional Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the radiographic results of minimally invasive (MIS) anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods Twelve and nineteen patients who underwent MIS-ALIF, MIS-TLIF, respectively, from 2006 to 2008 were analyzed with a minimum 24-months' follow-up. Additionally, 18 patients treated with single level open TLIF surgery in 2007 were evaluated as a comparative group. X-rays and CT images were evaluated preoperatively, postoperatively, and at the final follow-up. Fusion and subsidence rates were determined, and radiographic parameters, including lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), fused segment angle (FSA), sacral slope angle (SSA), disc height (DH), and foraminal height (FH), were analyzed. These parameters were also compared between the open and MIS-TLIF groups. Results In the MIS interbody fusion group, statistically significant increases were observed in LLA, FSA, and DH and FH between preoperative and final values. The changes in LLA, FSA, and DH were significantly increased in the MIS-ALIF group compared with the MIS-TLIF group, but SSA and FH were not significantly different. No significant differences were seen between open and MIS-TLIF except for DH. The interbody subsidence and fusion rates of the MIS groups were 12.0±4% and 96%, respectively. Conclusion Radiographic results of MIS interbody fusion surgery are as favorable as those with conventional surgery regarding fusion, restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and lumbar lordosis. MIS-ALIF is more effective than MIS-TLIF for intervertebral disc height restoration and lumbar lordosis. PMID:24757461

  6. Ureter Injury as a Complication of Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Park, Choon Keun

    2017-06-01

    Oblique lumbar interbody fusion is a commonly used surgical method of achieving lumbar interbody fusion. There have been some reports about complications of oblique lumbar interbody fusion at the L2-L3 level. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reports about ureter injury during oblique lumbar interbody fusion. We report a case of ureter injury during oblique lumbar interbody fusion to share our experience. A 78-year-old male patient presented with a history of lower back pain and neurogenic intermittent claudication. He was diagnosed with spinal stenosis at L2-L3, L4-L5 level and spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 level. Symptoms were not improved after several months of medical treatments. Then, oblique lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L2-L3, L4-L5 level. During the surgery, anesthesiologist noticed hematuria. A retrourethrogram was performed immediately by urologist, and ureter injury was found. Ureteroureterostomy and double-J catheter insertion were performed. The patient was discharged 2 weeks after surgery without urologic or neurologic complications. At 2 months after surgery, an intravenous pyelogram was performed, which showed an intact ureter. Our study shows that a low threshold of suspicion of ureter injury and careful manipulation of retroperitoneal fat can be helpful to prevent ureter injury during oblique lumbar interbody fusion at the upper level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiexpandable cage for minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Jeffrey D; Zucherman, James F; Kucharzyk, Donald W; Poelstra, Kornelis A; Miller, Larry E; Kunwar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The increasing adoption of minimally invasive techniques for spine surgery in recent years has led to significant advancements in instrumentation for lumbar interbody fusion. Percutaneous pedicle screw fixation is now a mature technology, but the role of expandable cages is still evolving. The capability to deliver a multiexpandable interbody cage with a large footprint through a narrow surgical cannula represents a significant advancement in spinal surgery technology. The purpose of this report is to describe a multiexpandable lumbar interbody fusion cage, including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, preclinical testing, and early clinical experience. Results to date suggest that the multiexpandable cage allows a less invasive approach to posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery by minimizing iatrogenic risks associated with static or vertically expanding interbody prostheses while providing immediate vertebral height restoration, restoration of anatomic alignment, and excellent early-term clinical results. PMID:27729817

  8. Minimally invasive percutaneous posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Larry T; Palmer, Sylvain; Laich, Daniel T; Fessler, Richard G

    2002-11-01

    The wide exposure required for a standard posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can cause unnecessary trauma to the lumbar musculoligamentous complex. By combining existing microendoscopic, percutaneous instrumentation and interbody technologies, a novel, minimally invasive, percutaneous PLIF technique was developed to minimize such iatrogenic tissue injury (MIP-PLIF). The MIP-PLIF technique was validated in three cadaveric torsos with six motion segments decompressed and fused. Preoperative variables measured from imaging included interpedicular distance, pedicular height and width, interspinous distance, lordosis, intervertebral height, Cobb angle, and foraminal height and volume. Using the METRx and MD spinal access systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN), bilateral laminotomies were performed using a hybrid of microsurgical and microendoscopic techniques. The intervertebral disc spaces were then distracted and prepared with the Tangent (Medtronic Sofamor Danek) interbody instruments. Either a 10 or 12 by 22 mm interbody graft was then placed. Using the Sextant (Medtronic Sofamor Danek) system, percutaneous pedicle screw-rod fixation of the motion segment was completed. We then applied MIP-PLIF in three patients. For segments with preoperative intervertebral/foraminal height loss, MIP-PLIF was effective in restoring both heights in all cases. The amount of improvement (9.7 to 38% disc height increase; 7.7 to 29.9% foraminal height increase) varied directly with the size of the graft used and the original degree of disc and foraminal height loss. Segmental lordosis improved by 29% on average. Graft and screw placement was accurate in the cadavers, except for a single Grade 1 screw violation of one pedicle. The average operative time was 3.5 hours per level. In our three clinical cases, the MIP-PLIF procedure required a mean of 5.4 hours, estimated blood loss was 185 ml, and inpatient stay was 2.8 days, with no intravenous narcotic use after 2 days in

  9. Instrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Adult Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Hsiao; Wang, Chen-Ti

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether using artificial cages increases fusion rates compared with use of bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. We hypothesized artificial cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion would provide better clinical and radiographic outcomes than bone chips alone. We assumed solid fusion would provide good clinical outcomes. We clinically and radiographically followed 34 patients with spondylolisthesis having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with mixed autogenous and allogeneic bone chips alone and 42 patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of artificial cages packed with morselized bone graft. Patients with the artificial cage had better functional improvement in the Oswestry disability index than those with bone chips alone, whereas pain score, patient satisfaction, and fusion rate were similar in the two groups. Postoperative disc height ratio, slip ratio, and segmental lordosis all decreased at final followup in the patients with bone chips alone but remained unchanged in the artificial cage group. The functional outcome correlated with radiographic fusion status. We conclude artificial cages provide better functional outcomes and radiographic improvement than bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis, although both techniques achieved comparable fusion rates. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18846411

  10. Surgical results of lumbar interbody fusion using calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Motohiro; Mure, Hideo; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar interbody fusion using artificial fusion cages filled with calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were retrospectively reviewed. Between 2002 and 2011, 25 patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion at Tokushima University Hospital, and 22 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 5 patients received autologous local bone grafts and 17 received CPC. Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was used for clinical outcome assessments. Lumbar radiography and computed tomography (CT) were performed at 12, 24 months and last follow-up period to assess bony fusion. The mean JOA score of all patients improved from 9.3 before surgery to 21.0 at 24 months after surgery. Fusion had occurred in 5 of 5 patients in the local bone graft group and in 16 of 17 patients in CPC group at 24 months postoperatively. No surgically related complication was occurred in both groups. CPC is a useful and safe graft material for lumbar interbody fusion.

  11. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion: two-year results with a modular interbody device.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith Lynn; Yeoman, Chevas; Chung, Woosik M; Chappuis, James L; Freedman, Brett

    2014-10-01

    Retrospective case series. To present radiographic outcomes following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) utilizing a modular interbody device. Though multiple anterior lumbar interbody techniques have proven successful in promoting bony fusion, postoperative subsidence remains a frequently reported phenomenon. Forty-three consecutive patients underwent ALIF with (n=30) or without (n=11) supplemental instrumentation. Two patients underwent ALIF to treat failed posterior instrumented fusion. The primary outcome measure was presence of fusion as assessed by computed tomography. Secondary outcome measures were lordosis, intervertebral lordotic angle (ILA), disc height, subsidence, Bridwell fusion grade, technical complications and pain score. Interobserver reliability of radiographic outcome measures was calculated. Forty-three patients underwent ALIF of 73 motion segments. ILA and disc height increased over baseline, and this persisted through final follow-up (p<0.01). Solid anterior interbody fusion was present in 71 of 73 motion segments (97%). The amount of new bone formation in the interbody space increased over serial imaging. Subsidence >4 mm occurred in 12% of patients. There were eight surgical complications (19%): one major (reoperation for nonunion/progressive subsidence) and seven minor (five subsidence, two malposition). The use of a modular interbody device for ALIF resulted in a high rate of radiographic fusion and a low rate of subsidence. The large endplate and modular design of the device may contribute to a low rate of subsidence as well as maintenance of ILA and lordosis. Previously reported quantitative radiographic outcome measures were found to be more reliable than qualitative or categorical measures.

  12. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with expandable versus static interbody devices: radiographic assessment of sagittal segmental and pelvic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Khalifeh, Jawad M; Chatrath, Ajay; Yarbrough, Chester K; Ray, Wilson Z

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has been adopted as an alternative technique to hasten recovery and minimize postoperative morbidity. Advances in instrumentation technologies and operative techniques have evolved to maximize patient outcomes as well as radiographic results. The development of expandable interbody devices allows a surgeon to perform MIS-TLIF with minimal tissue disruption. However, sagittal segmental and pelvic radiographic outcomes after MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices are not well characterized. The object of this study is to evaluate the radiographic sagittal lumbar segmental and pelvic parameter outcomes of MIS-TLIF performed using an expandable interbody device. METHODS A retrospective review of MIS-TLIFs performed between 2014 and 2016 at a high-volume center was performed. Radiographic measurements were performed on lateral radiographs before and after MIS-TLIF with static or expandable interbody devices. Radiographic measurements included disc height, foraminal height, fused disc angle, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and pelvic tilt. Mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis were calculated for each radiograph. RESULTS A total of 48 MIS-TLIFs were performed, predominantly at the L4-5 level, in 44 patients. MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device led to a greater and more sustained increase in disc height when compared with static interbody devices. Foraminal height increased after MIS-TLIF with expandable but not with static interbody devices. MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices increased index-level segmental lordosis more than with static interbody devices. The increase in segmental lordosis was sustained in the patients with expandable interbody devices but not in patients with static interbody devices. For patients with a collapsed disc space, MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device provided superior and longer-lasting increases in

  13. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  14. Lumbar facet cyst resolution following anterior interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Massey, Gene M; Caputo, Adam M; Michael, Keith W; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2013-12-01

    Facet cysts are a relatively common source of neural compression in the lumbar spine. Open decompression and fusion are frequently used to treat the stenosis and instability associated with this pathology. Recently, anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has increased in popularity for the treatment of lumbar degenerative conditions. ALIF may achieve indirect decompression of the neural elements with less surgical morbidity than conventional open approaches. To date, there are no published reports describing the use of indirect decompression or interbody fusion for the treatment of facet cysts. We report a patient who developed an L4-L5 facet cyst secondary to degenerative changes and spondylolisthesis. ALIF with posterior instrumentation was used to address his condition. Six months after surgery, the patient had complete resolution of his symptoms. MRI revealed complete resolution of the facet cyst. This patient provides previously unreported evidence that interbody fusion alone may result in facet cyst resolution. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate if interbody fusion can consistently relieve the symptoms associated with facet cysts without the use of direct decompression.

  15. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Two-Year Results with a Modular Interbody Device

    PubMed Central

    Yeoman, Chevas; Chung, Woosik M.; Chappuis, James L; Freedman, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To present radiographic outcomes following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) utilizing a modular interbody device. Overview of Literature Though multiple anterior lumbar interbody techniques have proven successful in promoting bony fusion, postoperative subsidence remains a frequently reported phenomenon. Methods Forty-three consecutive patients underwent ALIF with (n=30) or without (n=11) supplemental instrumentation. Two patients underwent ALIF to treat failed posterior instrumented fusion. The primary outcome measure was presence of fusion as assessed by computed tomography. Secondary outcome measures were lordosis, intervertebral lordotic angle (ILA), disc height, subsidence, Bridwell fusion grade, technical complications and pain score. Interobserver reliability of radiographic outcome measures was calculated. Results Forty-three patients underwent ALIF of 73 motion segments. ILA and disc height increased over baseline, and this persisted through final follow-up (p<0.01). Solid anterior interbody fusion was present in 71 of 73 motion segments (97%). The amount of new bone formation in the interbody space increased over serial imaging. Subsidence >4 mm occurred in 12% of patients. There were eight surgical complications (19%): one major (reoperation for nonunion/progressive subsidence) and seven minor (five subsidence, two malposition). Conclusions The use of a modular interbody device for ALIF resulted in a high rate of radiographic fusion and a low rate of subsidence. The large endplate and modular design of the device may contribute to a low rate of subsidence as well as maintenance of ILA and lordosis. Previously reported quantitative radiographic outcome measures were found to be more reliable than qualitative or categorical measures. PMID:25346811

  16. Subsidence of metal interbody cage after posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Ajiro, Yasumitsu; Umezawa, Natsuki

    2009-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion is considered to be an excellent fusion procedure to stabilize anterior support, correct alignment in the sagittal and coronal plane, and achieve foraminal decompression by lifting the disk height. The metal interbody cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion is thought to be useful to prevent collapse of the graft bone and to correct and maintain disk height; however, some studies have noted a gradual decrease of disk height due to cage subsidence. Therefore, to investigate the significance of cage subsidence, 86 disk levels radiographically confirmed to have good union in 66 patients with posterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with pedicle screw fixation and a single metal cage for degenerative lumbar disease were retrospectively evaluated. The follow-up period ranged from 3 years to 10 years 3 months, with a mean of 7 years 9 months. Cage subsidence often showed a gradual increase over time. At final follow-up, subsidence averaged 4.0 mm on the cranial surface and 2.7 mm on the caudal surface. Although the average increase of disk height was 3.2 mm immediately postoperatively, the final disk height decreased by 4.2 mm on average from that time. The degree of cage subsidence and decrease of disk height were not correlated with the final clinical results. Subsidence was not correlated with bone mineral density in the vertebral body, body weight, or site of the insertion. On the other hand, the wedge shape of the cage and the thickness of the resected endplate had a significant influence on cage subsidence.

  17. Review of early clinical results and complications associated with oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF).

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Maharaj, Monish; Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-09-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion represents an effective surgical intervention for patients with lumbar degenerative diseases, spondylolisthesis, disc herniation, pseudoarthrosis and spinal deformities. Traditionally, conventional open anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion techniques have been employed with excellent results, but each with their own advantages and caveats. Most recently, the antero-oblique trajectory has been introduced, providing yet another corridor to access the lumbar spine. Termed the oblique lumbar interbody fusion, this approach accesses the spine between the anterior vessels and psoas muscles, avoiding both sets of structures to allow efficient clearance of the disc space and application of a large interbody device to afford distraction for foraminal decompression and endplate preparation for rapid and thorough fusion. This review aims to summarize the early clinical results and complications of this new technique and discusses potential future directions of research.

  18. Morphological analysis of interbody fusion following posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cages using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Kwang; Kim, Myeong Jong; Roh, Sung Woo; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using cages in conjunction with pedicle screw fixation is considered the gold standard for surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disorders due to its biomechanical stability and high fusion rate. However, research regarding patterns of fusion in the interbody space during the early postoperative period is lacking.Sixty consecutive patients were recruited from May 2013 to June 2015. All patients underwent PLIF using 2 titanium cages filled with local bone chips from decompressed lamina and facet bone in conjunction with pedicle screw fixation. Computed tomography scans were obtained 3 to 6 months following surgery in order to evaluate the partial fusion state. Computed tomography (CT) classification of fusion morphology was divided into 8 groups and then into compartments according to fusion space, and the rate of fusion for each was calculated. Further follow-up was conducted to confirm fusion state and assess outcomes.The most frequent pattern of interbody fusion was bilateral intra-cage fusion with unilateral lateral bridging of extra-cage areas (N = 36, 43.4%); the least frequent was interspace bridging of the 2 cages alone (N = 0, 0%). The fusion rate for the intra-cage area (Compartment 1) reached 100%. However, the fusion in the lateral space outside of cages (Compartment 2) was not satisfactory, though reasonable (72.3%). All patients were confirmed as achieving adequate fusion at the final follow-up, with improved clinical outcomes.Widening of the contact area between the vertebral body and cages is recommended to promote increased interbody fusion during the early postoperative period.

  19. Morphological analysis of interbody fusion following posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cages using computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong Kwang; Kim, Myeong Jong; Roh, Sung Woo; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using cages in conjunction with pedicle screw fixation is considered the gold standard for surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disorders due to its biomechanical stability and high fusion rate. However, research regarding patterns of fusion in the interbody space during the early postoperative period is lacking. Sixty consecutive patients were recruited from May 2013 to June 2015. All patients underwent PLIF using 2 titanium cages filled with local bone chips from decompressed lamina and facet bone in conjunction with pedicle screw fixation. Computed tomography scans were obtained 3 to 6 months following surgery in order to evaluate the partial fusion state. Computed tomography (CT) classification of fusion morphology was divided into 8 groups and then into compartments according to fusion space, and the rate of fusion for each was calculated. Further follow-up was conducted to confirm fusion state and assess outcomes. The most frequent pattern of interbody fusion was bilateral intra-cage fusion with unilateral lateral bridging of extra-cage areas (N = 36, 43.4%); the least frequent was interspace bridging of the 2 cages alone (N = 0, 0%). The fusion rate for the intra-cage area (Compartment 1) reached 100%. However, the fusion in the lateral space outside of cages (Compartment 2) was not satisfactory, though reasonable (72.3%). All patients were confirmed as achieving adequate fusion at the final follow-up, with improved clinical outcomes. Widening of the contact area between the vertebral body and cages is recommended to promote increased interbody fusion during the early postoperative period. PMID:28834885

  20. Instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody fusion device (Cage) in degenerative disc disease (DDD): 3 years outcome.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Hossain, M A; Sakeb, N; Khan, S I; Zaman, N

    2013-10-01

    This prospective interventional study carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and a private hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period from October 2003 to September 2011. Surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) should aim to re-expand the interbody space and stabilize until fusion is complete. The present study conducted to find out the efficacy of using interbody fusion device (Cage) to achieve interbody space re-expansion and fusion in surgical management of DDD. We have performed the interventional study on 53 patients, 42 female and 11 male, with age between 40 to 67 years. All the patients were followed up for 36 to 60 months (average 48 months). Forty seven patients were with spondylolisthesis and 06 with desiccated disc. All subjects were evaluated with regard to immediate and long term complications, radiological fusion and interbody space re-expansion and maintenance. The clinical outcome (pain and disability) was scored by standard pre and postoperative questionnaires. Intrusion, extrusion and migration of the interbody fusion cage were also assessed. Forty seven patients were considered to have satisfactory outcome in at least 36 months follow up. Pseudoarthrosis developed in 04 cases and 06 patients developed complications. In this series posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody cage and instrumentation in DDD showed significant fusion rate and maintenance of interbody space. Satisfactory outcome observed in 88.68% cases.

  1. [Posterior interbody fusion versus improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in segmental spinal fixation for aged spondylolisthesis with lumbar spinal canal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Wu, Ji-bin; Zhao, Meng; Dai, Wei-xiang; Wu, De-hui; Wang, Zhao-hong; Feng, Jie; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Qing-hua; Tian, Ji-wei

    2012-03-06

    To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterior lumbar fixation and posterior interbody fusion or improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for Meyerding grade II/III spondylolisthesis so as to address the suitability of a dynamic stabilization. A total of 28 consecutive patients underwent posterior lumbar fixation and posterior interbody fusion or improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for Meyerding grade II/III spondylolisthesis. Among them, 13 patients underwent posterior interface fusion (PLIF) and pedicle screw fixation. And improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ITLIF) and placement of the same system were performed in 15 patients. Their clinical, economic, functional, and radiographic data were recorded both pre- and postoperatively. The average changes of economic and functional scores on the Prolo scale were 1.36 and 1.48 respectively. In patients with posterior interbody fusion; the average preoperative vertebral slippage was 46.9% (range: 25 - 75%) versus 14.6% (range: 15 - 25%) postoperatively. In patients with ITLIF, the average changes in economic and functional scores were 1.75 and 1.63 respectively. And the average preoperative vertebral slippage was 45.2% (range: 28 - 78%) compared with 26.3% (range: 14 - 28%) postoperatively. When two fusion techniques were compared, an overall superior reliability and resistance of systems was associated with the ITLIF procedure. But their clinical outcomes did not differ greatly (P > 0.05). The application of a segmental pedicle screw fixation is both feasible and efficacious.

  2. Biomechanical Characteristics of an Integrated Lumbar Interbody Fusion Device

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I.; Vastardis, Georgios; Zelenakova, Julia; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M.; Waldorff, Erik I.; Zindrick, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that an Integrated Lumbar Interbody Fusion Device (PILLAR SA, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX) will function biomechanically similar to a traditional anterior interbody spacer (PILLAR AL, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX) plus posterior instrumentation (FIREBIRD, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX). Purpose of this study was to determine if an Integrated Interbody Fusion Device (PILLAR SA) can stabilize single motion segments as well as an anterior interbody spacer (PILLAR AL) + pedicle screw construct (FIREBIRD). Methods Eight cadaveric lumbar spines (age: 43.9±4.3 years) were used. Each specimen's range of motion was tested in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) under intact condition, after L4-L5 PILLAR SA with intervertebral screws and after L4-L5 360° fusion (PILLAR AL + Pedicle Screws and rods (FIREBIRD). Each specimen was tested in flexion (8Nm) and extension (6Nm) without preload (0 N) and under 400N of preload, in lateral bending (±6 Nm) and axial rotation (±5 Nm) without preload. Results Integrated fusion using the PILLAR SA device demonstrated statistically significant reductions in range of motion of the L4-L5 motion segment as compared to the intact condition for each test direction. PILLAR SA reduced ROM from 8.9±1.9 to 2.9±1.1° in FE with 400N follower preload (67.4%), 8.0±1.7 to 2.5±1.1° in LB, and 2.2±1.2 to 0.7±0.3° in AR. A comparison between the PILLAR SA integrated fusion device versus 360° fusion construct with spacer and bilateral pedicle screws was statistically significant in FE and LB. The 360° fusion yielded motion of 1.0±0.5° in FE, 1.0±0.8° in LB (p0.05). Conclusions The PILLAR SA resulted in motions of less than 3° in all modes of motion and was not as motion restricting as the traditional 360° using bilateral pedicle screws. The residual segmental motions compare very favorably with published biomechanical studies of other interbody integrated fusion devices. PMID:25694931

  3. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion via a unilateral approach.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun Chul; Yi, Seong; Kim, Keung Nyun; Kim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Do Heum

    2006-06-30

    This study sought to determine the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), via a unilateral approach, in selected patients who presented with unilateral leg pain and segmental instability of the lumbar spine. Patients with a single level of a herniated disc disease in the lumbar spine, unilateral leg pain, chronic disabling lower back pain (LBP), and a failed conservative treatment, were considered for the procedure. A total of 41 patients underwent a single-level PLIF using two PEEK (Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone) cages filled with iliac bone, via a unilateral approach. The patients comprised 21 women and 20 men with a mean age of 41 years (range: 22 to 63 years). Two cages were inserted using a unilateral medial facetectomy and a partial hemilaminectomy. At follow-up, the outcomes were assessed using the Prolo Scale. The success of the fusion was determined by dynamic lumbar radiography and/or computerized tomography scanning. All the patients safely underwent surgery without severe complications. During a mean follow-up period of 26 months, 1 patient underwent percutaneous pedicle screw fixation due to persistent LBP. A posterior displacement of the cage was found in one patient. At the last follow up, 90% of the patients demonstrated satisfactory results. An osseous fusion was present in 85% of the patients. A PLIF, via a unilateral approach, enables a solid union with satisfactory clinical results. This preserves part of the posterior elements of the lumbar spine in selected patients with single level instability and unilateral leg pain.

  4. Factors influencing segmental lumbar lordosis after lateral transpsoas interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C; Sharma, Amit K; Meredith, Dennis S; Metitiri, Ochuko; Sama, Andrew A; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P

    2012-05-01

    Although contributions to sagittal alignment have been characterized for anterior, posterior and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, sagittal alignment after lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) has not yet been characterized. This study examined the ability of LTIF to restore lumbar lordosis and identified factors associated with change in sagittal alignment. Twenty-nine patients and 67 levels were studied. Segmental lordosis, anterior-posterior cage position, and cage obliquity were measured on preoperative and postoperative radiographs and CT scans. Change in sagittal alignment was analyzed with respect to demographic information and measures of cage position and obliquity to identify factors associated with segmental alignment change. Mean lordosis increased 3.7° at instrumented segments, increasing from 4.1° preoperatively to 7.8° postoperatively. Although increases at each level were significant, there were no significant differences between levels. Lordosis increase was inversely-associated with preoperative lordosis; levels with the least preoperative lordosis gained the most lordosis. Cage obliquity and height were not significantly associated with lordosis change. Anterior cage placement resulted in the largest lordosis gain (+7.4°/level) while posterior placement was prokyphotic (-1.2°/level). There were no significant associations with age, sex or body mass index. Anteroposterior cage placement is an important intraoperative determinant of postoperative alignment; anterior placement results in greater lordosis while middle/posterior placement has a minimal effect on sagittal alignment. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Lumbar interbody fusion: techniques, indications and comparison of interbody fusion options including PLIF, TLIF, MI-TLIF, OLIF/ATP, LLIF and ALIF

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Malham, Greg; Seex, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine is common in the ageing population, and is one of the most frequent causes of disability. Lumbar spondylosis may result in mechanical back pain, radicular and claudicant symptoms, reduced mobility and poor quality of life. Surgical interbody fusion of degenerative levels is an effective treatment option to stabilize the painful motion segment, and may provide indirect decompression of the neural elements, restore lordosis and correct deformity. The surgical options for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine include: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF), oblique lumbar interbody fusion/anterior to psoas (OLIF/ATP), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The indications may include: discogenic/facetogenic low back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis, lumbar degenerative spinal deformity including symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. In general, traditional posterior approaches are frequently used with acceptable fusion rates and low complication rates, however they are limited by thecal sac and nerve root retraction, along with iatrogenic injury to the paraspinal musculature and disruption of the posterior tension band. Minimally invasive (MIS) posterior approaches have evolved in an attempt to reduce approach related complications. Anterior approaches avoid the spinal canal, cauda equina and nerve roots, however have issues with approach related abdominal and vascular complications. In addition, lateral and OLIF techniques have potential risks to the lumbar plexus and psoas muscle. The present study aims firstly to comprehensively review the available literature and evidence for different lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) techniques. Secondly, we propose a set of recommendations and guidelines

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of lateral lumbar interbody fusion with secondary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Reis, Marco T; Reyes, Phillip M; Bse; Altun, Idris; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Singh, Vaneet; Chang, Steve W; Kelly, Brian P; Crawford, Neil R

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) has emerged as a popular method for lumbar fusion. In this study the authors aimed to quantify the biomechanical stability of an interbody implant inserted using the LLIF approach with and without various supplemental fixation methods, including an interspinous plate (IP). METHODS Seven human cadaveric L2-5 specimens were tested intact and in 6 instrumented conditions. The interbody implant was intended to be used with supplemental fixation. In this study, however, the interbody was also tested without supplemental fixation for a relative comparison of these conditions. The instrumented conditions were as follows: 1) interbody implant without supplemental fixation (LLIF construct); and interbody implant with supplemental fixation performed using 2) unilateral pedicle screws (UPS) and rod (LLIF + UPS construct); 3) bilateral pedicle screws (BPS) and rods (LLIF + BPS construct); 4) lateral screws and lateral plate (LP) (LLIF + LP construct); 5) interbody LP and IP (LLIF + LP + IP construct); and 6) IP (LLIF + IP construct). Nondestructive, nonconstraining torque (7.5 Nm maximum) induced flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, whereas 3D specimen range of motion (ROM) was determined optoelectronically. RESULTS The LLIF construct reduced ROM by 67% in flexion, 52% in extension, 51% in lateral bending, and 44% in axial rotation relative to intact specimens (p < 0.001). Adding BPS to the LLIF construct caused ROM to decrease by 91% in flexion, 82% in extension and lateral bending, and 74% in axial rotation compared with intact specimens (p < 0.001), providing the greatest stability among the constructs. Adding UPS to the LLIF construct imparted approximately one-half the stability provided by LLIF + BPS constructs, demonstrating significantly smaller ROM than the LLIF construct in all directions (flexion, p = 0.037; extension, p < 0.001; lateral bending, p = 0.012) except axial rotation (p = 0

  7. Interbody Spacer Material Properties and Design Conformity for Reducing Subsidence During Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chatham, Lillian S; Patel, Vikas V; Yakacki, Christopher M; Dana Carpenter, R

    2017-05-01

    There is a need to better understand the effects of intervertebral spacer material and design on the stress distribution in vertebral bodies and endplates to help reduce complications such as subsidence and improve outcomes following lumbar interbody fusion. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of spacer material on the stress and strain in the lumbar spine after interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation. A standard spacer was also compared with a custom-fit spacer, which conformed to the vertebral endplates, to determine if a custom fit would reduce stress on the endplates. A finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5 motion segment was developed from computed tomography (CT) images of a cadaveric lumbar spine. An interbody spacer, pedicle screws, and posterior rods were incorporated into the image-based model. The model was loaded in axial compression, and strain and stress were determined in the vertebra, spacer, and rods. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), titanium, poly(para-phenylene) (PPP), and porous PPP (70% by volume) were used as the spacer material to quantify the effects on stress and strain in the system. Experimental testing of a cadaveric specimen was used to validate the model's results. There were no large differences in stress levels (<3%) at the bone-spacer interfaces and the rods when PEEK was used instead of titanium. Use of the porous PPP spacer produced an 8-15% decrease of stress at the bone-spacer interfaces and posterior rods. The custom-shaped spacer significantly decreased (>37%) the stress at the bone-spacer interfaces for all materials tested. A 28% decrease in stress was found in the posterior rods with the custom spacer. Of all the spacer materials tested with the custom spacer design, 70% porous PPP resulted in the lowest stress at the bone-spacer interfaces. The results show the potential for more compliant materials to reduce stress on the vertebral endplates postsurgery. The custom spacer provided a

  8. Transdural retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage: Technical case report.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Hasan Aqdas; Shah, Ashish; Kakarla, Udaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe a novel method to retrieve a herniated lumbar interbody cage. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly popular method of spinal fixation and fusion. Unexpected retropulsion of an interbody is a rare event that can result in intractable pain or motor compromise necessitating surgical retrieval of the interbody. Both anterior and posterior approaches to removing migrated cages may be associated with significant surgical morbidity and mortality. A 60-year-old woman underwent an L4-S1 TLIF coupled with pedicle screw fixation at a previous hospital 5 years prior to admission. She noted sudden-onset bilateral lower extremity weakness and right-sided foot drop. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographs were notable for purely centrally herniated interbody. A posterior, midline transdural approach was used to retrieve the interbody. Situated in between nerve rootlets to the ventral canal, this virgin corridor allowed us to easily visualize and protect neurological structures while safely retrieving the interbody. The patient experienced an immediate improvement in symptoms and was discharged on postoperative day 3. At 12-month follow-up, she had no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and had returned to normal activities of daily living. While the risk of CSF leak may be higher with a transdural approach, we maintain that avoiding unnecessary retraction of the nerve roots may outweigh this risk. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a transdural approach for the retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage.

  9. Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion via a Unilateral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun Chul; Yi, Seong; Kim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Do Heum

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to determine the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), via a unilateral approach, in selected patients who presented with unilateral leg pain and segmental instability of the lumbar spine. Patients with a single level of a herniated disc disease in the lumbar spine, unilateral leg pain, chronic disabling lower back pain (LBP), and a failed conservative treatment, were considered for the procedure. A total of 41 patients underwent a single-level PLIF using two PEEK™ (Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone) cages filled with iliac bone, via a unilateral approach. The patients comprised 21 women and 20 men with a mean age of 41 years (range: 22 to 63 years). Two cages were inserted using a unilateral medial facetectomy and a partial hemilaminectomy. At follow-up, the outcomes were assessed using the Prolo Scale. The success of the fusion was determined by dynamic lumbar radiography and/or computerized tomography scanning. All the patients safely underwent surgery without severe complications. During a mean follow-up period of 26 months, 1 patient underwent percutaneous pedicle screw fixation due to persistent LBP. A posterior displacement of the cage was found in one patient. At the last follow up, 90% of the patients demonstrated satisfactory results. An osseous fusion was present in 85% of the patients. A PLIF, via a unilateral approach, enables a solid union with satisfactory clinical results. This preserves part of the posterior elements of the lumbar spine in selected patients with single level instability and unilateral leg pain. PMID:16807980

  10. Analysis of Internet Information on Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Belayneh, Rebekah; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-07-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a surgical technique that is being increasingly used. The authors' objective was to examine information on the Internet pertaining to the LLIF technique. An analysis was conducted of publicly accessible websites pertaining to LLIF. The following search engines were used: Google (www.google.com), Bing (www.bing.com), and Yahoo (www.yahoo.com). DuckDuckGo (www.duckduckgo.com) was an additional search engine used due to its emphasis on generating accurate and consistent results while protecting searchers' privacy and reducing advertisements. The top 35 websites providing information on LLIF from the 4 search engines were identified. A total of 140 websites were evaluated. Each web-site was categorized based on authorship (academic, private, medical industry, insurance company, other) and content of information. Using the search term lateral lumbar interbody fusion, 174,000 Google results, 112,000 Yahoo results, and 112,000 Bing results were obtained. DuckDuckGo does not display the number of results found for a search. From the top 140 websites collected from each website, 78 unique websites were identified. Websites were authored by a private medical group in 46.2% of the cases, an academic medical group in 26.9% of the cases, and the biomedical industry in 5.1% of the cases. Sixty-eight percent of websites reported indications, and 24.4% reported contraindications. Benefits of LLIF were reported by 69.2% of websites. Thirty-six percent of websites reported complications of LLIF. Overall, the quality of information regarding LLIF on the Internet is poor. Spine surgeons and spine societies can assist in improving the quality of the information on the Internet regarding LLIF. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e701-e707.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion versus Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Three-Level Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guoxin; Wu, Xinbo; Yu, Shunzhi; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to directly compare the clinical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in three-level lumbar spinal stenosis. This retrospective study involved a total of 60 patients with three-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent MIS-TLIF or PLIF from January 2010 to February 2012. Back and leg visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scale were used to assess the pain, disability, and health status before surgery and postoperatively. In addition, the operating time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay were also recorded. There were no significant differences in back VAS, leg VAS, ODI, SF-36, fusion condition, and complications at 12-month follow-up between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, significantly less blood loss and shorter hospital stay were observed in MIS-TLIF group (P < 0.05). Moreover, patients undergoing MIS-TLIF had significantly lower back VAS than those in PLIF group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF might be a prior option because of noninferior efficacy as well as merits of less blood loss and quicker recovery in treating three-level lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:27747244

  12. Mini-Open Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Combined with Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Corrective Surgery for Adult Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Lee, Jun-Young; Yum, Tae-Hoon; Shin, Seong-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Purpose To introduce the techniques and present the surgical outcomes of mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) at the most caudal segments of the spine combined with lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for the correction of adult spinal deformity Overview of Literature Although LLIF is increasingly used to correct adult spinal deformity, the correction of sagittal plane deformity with LLIF alone is reportedly suboptimal. Methods Thirty-two consecutive patients with adult spinal deformity underwent LLIF combined with mini-open ALIF at the L5–S1 or L4–S1 levels followed by 2-stage posterior fixation. ALIF was performed for a mean 1.3 levels and LLIF for a mean 2.7 levels. Then, percutaneous fixation was performed in 11 patients (percutaneous group), open correction with facetectomy with or without laminectomy in 16 (open group), and additional pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) in 5 (PSO group). Spinopelvic parameters were compared preoperatively and postoperatively. Hospitalization data and clinical outcomes were recorded. Results No major medical complications developed, and clinical outcomes improved postoperatively in all groups. The mean postoperative segmental lordosis was greater after ALIF (17.5°±5.5°) than after LLIF (8.1°±5.3°, p <0.001). Four patients (12.5%) had lumbar lordosis with a pelvic incidence of ±9° preoperatively, whereas this outcome was achieved postoperatively in 30 patients (93.8%). The total increase in lumbar lordosis was 14.7° in the percutaneous group, 35.3° in the open group, and 57.0° in the PSO group. The ranges of potential lumbar lordosis increase were estimated as 4°–25°, 23°–42°, and 45°–65°, respectively. Conclusions Mini-open ALIF combined with LLIF followed by posterior fixation may be a feasible technique for achieving optimal sagittal balance and reducing the necessity of more extensive surgery. PMID:27994777

  13. A Biomechanical Comparison of Shape Design and Positioning of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Cages.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Behn, Anthony; Ravi, Shashank; Cheng, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Cadaveric biomechanical analysis. The aim of this study was to compare three interbody cage shapes and their position within the interbody space with regards to construct stability for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Twenty L2-L3 and L4-L5 lumbar motion segments from fresh cadavers were potted in polymethyl methacrylate and subjected to testing with a materials testing machine before and after unilateral facetectomy, diskectomy, and interbody cage insertion. The three cage types were kidney-shaped, articulated, and straight bullet-shaped. Each cage type was placed in a common anatomic area within the interbody space before testing: kidney, center; kidney, anterior; articulated, center; articulated, anterior; bullet, center; bullet, lateral. Load-deformation curves were generated for axial compression, flexion, extension, right bending, left bending, right torsion, and left torsion. Finally, load to failure was tested. For all applied loads, there was a statistically significant decrease in the slope of the load-displacement curves for instrumented specimens compared with the intact state (p < 0.05) with the exception of right axial torsion (p = 0.062). Among all instrumented groups, there was no statistically significant difference in stiffness for any of the loading conditions or load to failure. Our results failed to show a clearly superior cage shape design or location within the interbody space for use in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

  14. A Biomechanical Comparison of Shape Design and Positioning of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Cages

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Garet C.; Behn, Anthony; Ravi, Shashank; Cheng, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Cadaveric biomechanical analysis. Objective  The aim of this study was to compare three interbody cage shapes and their position within the interbody space with regards to construct stability for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Methods  Twenty L2–L3 and L4–L5 lumbar motion segments from fresh cadavers were potted in polymethyl methacrylate and subjected to testing with a materials testing machine before and after unilateral facetectomy, diskectomy, and interbody cage insertion. The three cage types were kidney-shaped, articulated, and straight bullet-shaped. Each cage type was placed in a common anatomic area within the interbody space before testing: kidney, center; kidney, anterior; articulated, center; articulated, anterior; bullet, center; bullet, lateral. Load-deformation curves were generated for axial compression, flexion, extension, right bending, left bending, right torsion, and left torsion. Finally, load to failure was tested. Results  For all applied loads, there was a statistically significant decrease in the slope of the load-displacement curves for instrumented specimens compared with the intact state (p < 0.05) with the exception of right axial torsion (p = 0.062). Among all instrumented groups, there was no statistically significant difference in stiffness for any of the loading conditions or load to failure. Conclusions  Our results failed to show a clearly superior cage shape design or location within the interbody space for use in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:27433426

  15. Minimally invasive versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio, Alan T.; Roeca, Cassandra M.; Nelson, E. Lee; Mason, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Background Available clinical data are insufficient for comparing minimally invasive (MI) and open approaches for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). To date, a paucity of literature exists directly comparing minimally invasive (MI) and open approaches for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The purpose of this study was to directly compare safety and effectiveness for these two surgical approaches. Materials and Methods Open or minimally invasive TLIF was performed in 63 and 76 patients, respectively. All consecutive minimally invasive TLIF cases were matched with a comparable cohort of open TLIF cases using three variables: diagnosis, number of spinal levels, and history of previous lumbar surgery. Patients were treated for painful degenerative disc disease with or without disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, and/or stenosis at one or two spinal levels. Clinical outcome (self-report measures, e.g., visual analog scale (VAS), patient satisfaction, and MacNab's criteria), operative data (operative time, estimated blood loss), length of hospitalization, and complications were assessed. Average follow-up for patients was 37.5 months. Results: The mean change in VAS scores postoperatively was greater (5.2 vs. 4.1) in theopen TLIF patient group (P = 0.3). MacNab's criteria score was excellent/good in 67% and 70% (P = 0.8) of patients in open and minimally invasive TLIF groups, respectively. The overall patient satisfaction was 72.1% and 64.5% (P = 0.4) in open and minimally invasive TLIF groups, respectively. The total mean operative time was 214.9 min for open and 222.5 min for minimally invasive TLIF procedures (P = 0.5). The mean estimated blood loss for minimally invasive TLIF (163.0 ml) was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than the open approach (366.8 ml). The mean duration of hospitalization in the minimally invasive TLIF (3 days) was significantly shorter (P = 0.02) than the open group (4.2 days). The total rate of neurological deficit was

  16. Lymphocele formation after anterior lumbar interbody fusion at L4-5. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pee, Yong Hun; Kim, Ki Joon; Choi, Young-Geun; Jeon, Sang Hyeop; Park, Jong Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2007-11-01

    In this report, the authors present the case of patient with a lymphocele in the retroperitoneal area following anterior lumbar interbody fusion at L4-5. A lymphocele is a rare complication of spinal operations, especially lower lumbar spinal surgeries. The authors discuss this complicating factor and describe its features and treatments.

  17. Transforaminal Endoscopic Decompression for Displaced End Plate Fracture After Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ralf; Telfeian, Albert E; Krzok, Guntram; Iprenburg, Menno

    2017-10-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive approach to anterior spinal column fusion, deformity correction, and indirect decompression of the lumbar spine. A rarely reported possible complication of the procedure is end plate fracture, which has the potential for nerve root compression. Here we present a case of end plate fracture and nerve compression after stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion, its diagnosis, and its subsequent successful treatment with transforaminal endoscopic spine surgery. The case highlights the possible role for minimally invasive endoscopic surgery as a rescue procedure after fusion complication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Mini Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Ehab M.; Elmorsy, Haitham M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mini-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (Mini-TLIF) and other minimally invasive approaches introduced for the purpose of treating lumbar degenerative disc disease and instability are achieving high success and safety rates as the conventional approaches. Moreover, it has less soft tissue damage, minimal blood loss, and less hospital stay. Methods A prospective study was conducted from 2012 to 2014 on 28 patients who were subjected to Mini-open TLIF combined with transpedicular screw fixation for spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease. Two paramedian approaches were done, 4 cm for each, to insert the pedicular screws, along with inserting unilateral TLIF cage with autologous bone graft. Decompression was done either unilateral or bilateral according to the patient side of radiculopathy. Sixteen patients (57.2%) were diagnosed with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 7 patients (25%) were diagnosed with isthmic type spondylolisthesis, and 5 patients (17.8%) were diagnosed with degenerative disc disease, 2 of them(7.1%) had previous operations at the same level. Twenty patients (71.4%) were operated at the L4/5 level, and 8 patients (28.6%) at the L5/S1 level. Results All patients were able to ambulate the next day of surgery. The mean estimated blood loss was 251.79mL. The average hospital stay was 4.14 days. The average follow-up was 9 months. The mean visual analog scale was 1.86 at discharge, 1.68 after 3 months, and 1.38 after 6 months. After 6 months of the operation, MacNab's criteria were good in 23 patients and excellent in 5 patients. We had one case with transient weakness, 2 cases of screw malposition without clinical manifestations, and one case of infection. Conclusion Mini-TLIF approach is an efficient and safe approach for treating instability and degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. The clinical outcome is encouraging and it may be an operation of choice for lumbar spinal fusion in selected patients. PMID:28127376

  19. Minimally-invasive technique for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Burak M; Yoo, Kevin; Rodriguez, Gerardo; Taylor, William R

    2005-11-01

    Minimal access surgical techniques have been described for diskectomy and laminectomy procedures performed through tubular exposures. Tubular exposures, however, restrain visibility to a fixed diameter and require co-axial instrument manipulation. An independent blade retractor system has been developed to overcome the obstacles of working through a tube. Decompression and circumferential fusion can be accomplished through this minimal access exposure via a combination of laminectomy and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) coupled with minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation. Herein, we describe a minimally-invasive technique for TLIF exposure. Illustrations, intraoperative photographs, and fluoroscopic images supplement this technique. We found that the described minimally-invasive system provides comparable exposure to the traditional-open techniques with the benefits of minimally-invasive techniques. Additionally, it does not have the added constraints of a tubular system. We were able to perform TLIFs without any additional complications. Minimal access decompression and TLIF can be performed safely and effectively using this minimally-invasive system. Besides the retractor system, no additional specialized instruments are required. An operative microscope is not required, in fact, all our cases were performed using operative loupes. The light attachment provides superb visbility without the discomfort of having to wear a headlight. Thus far we have found no added risks or complications using this system. We are currently working on long-term analysis and follow-up to further evaluate this system's efficacy.

  20. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the management of spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Devkota, P; Shrestha, S K; Krishnakumar, R; Renjithkumar, J

    2011-03-01

    The ideal surgical treatment of spondylolisthesis still remains controversial. There are several methods of treatment and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is one of them. We analyze the results of spondylolisthesis treated by PLIF in term of radiological union, improvement of pre-operative symptoms like back pain, radiating pain and return to normal activities including that of employment, by the review of the medical records. Total of 72 patients, 20 male and 52 female and the age ranges from 15 to 68 years with the mean age being 44.38 years were included in the study. Thirty (41.66%) patients had isthmic spondylolisthesis, 26 (36.12%) had congenital spondylolisthesis, and 16 (22.22%) cases had degenerative spondylolisthesis. There were 38 (52.77%) cases of grade I, 14 (19.44%) cases of grade II and 20 (27.77%) cases of grade III according to the grading criteria of Meyerding. According to the evaluation criteria used by Stauffer and Coventry, 59 patients (81.94%) got good results, eight patients (11.11%) belonged to the fair group and five cases (6.94%) had the poor results. This study showed that PLIF is one of the effective and reliable techniques for the management of spondylolisthesis.

  1. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Unilateral Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Wang; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Wu, Hua-Rong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Suo; Xu, Wei-Kun; Fan, Hui-Long; Cai, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Jian-Qing

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation using a tubular retractor in the management of degenerative lumbar disease. A retrospective analysis was conducted to analyze the clinical outcome of 58 degenerative lumbar disease patients who were treated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation during December 2012 to January 2015. The spine was unilaterally approached through a 3.0-cm skin incision centered on the disc space, located 2.5 cm lateral to the midline, and the multifidus muscles and longissimus dorsi were stripped off. After transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the MacNab score were applied to evaluate clinical effects. The operation time, peri-operative bleeding, postoperative time in bed, hospitalization costs, and the change in the intervertebral height were analyzed. Radiological fusion based on the Bridwell grading system was also assessed at the last follow-up. The quality of life of the patients before and after the operation was assessed using the short form-36 scale (SF-36). Fifty-eight operations were successfully performed, and no nerve root injury or dural tear occurred. The average operation time was 138 ± 33 min, intraoperative blood loss was 126 ± 50 mL, the duration from surgery to getting out of bed was 46 ± 8 h, and hospitalization cost was 1.6 ± 0.2 ten thousand yuan. All of the 58 patients were followed up for 7-31 months, with an average of 14.6 months. The postoperative VAS scores and ODI score were significantly improved compared with preoperative data (P < 0.05). The evaluation of the MacNab score was excellent in 41 patients, good

  2. Modified Mini-open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Pakzaban, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To describe a modified technique for mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) that improves visualization for decompression, fusion, and freehand pedicle screw insertion. Accuracy of freehand pedicle screw placement with this technique was assessed. Summary of Background Data. Mini-open TLIF is a minimally invasive technique that allows limited visualization of the bone and neural anatomy via an expandable tubular retractor inserted through the Wiltse plane. No significant modification that of this technique has been described in detail. Methods. In this study, 92 consecutive patients underwent one-level modified mini-open TLIF (MOTLIF). MOTLIF modifications consisted of (i) transmuscular dissection through the multifidus muscle rather than intermuscular dissection in the Wiltse plane; (ii) microsurgical detachment of multifidus from the facet rather than muscle dilation; (iii) en bloc total facetectomy (unilateral or bilateral, as needed for decompression); (iv) facet autograft used for interbody fusion; and (v) solid pedicle screws placed bilaterally by a freehand technique under direct vision. Results. The mean age was 53 years. Mean follow-up was 35 months (minimum 2 yrs). By 6 months, mean Visual Analog Scale for back and leg pain had improved from 51 to 19 and from 58 to 17, respectively, and mean Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) improved from 53 to 16. These improvements persisted at 2 years. Solid fusion, defined by computed tomography at 1 year, was achieved in 88.1%, whereas satisfactory fusion was achieved in 95.2% of patients. Pedicle screws were accurately placed in 335 of 336 imaged pedicles (pedicle breach grades: 91.1% grade 1; 8.6% grade 2; and 0.3% grade 3). Mean fluoroscopy time was 29.3 seconds. Conclusion. MOTLIF is a safe and effective minimally invasive technique with a high fusion rate. It allows accurate pedicle screw placement by a freehand technique. By eliminating bi

  3. Subsidence following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF): a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Giang, Gloria; Maharaj, Monish M.; Phan, Steven; Mobbs, Ralph J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a widely used surgical technique for disorders of the lumbar spine. One potential complication is the subsidence of disc height in the post-operative period. Few studies have reported the rate of subsidence in ALIF surgery prospectively. We prospectively evaluated the rate of subsidence in adult patients undergoing ALIF. Methods Results were obtained by reviewing scans of 147 patients. Disc heights were measured on radiographic scans taken pre-operatively in addition to post-operatively immediately, at 6 weeks and at 18 months. The anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights were measured. Subsidence was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm loss of height. Results A total of 15 patients (10.2%) had subsidence, with 7 being male. Each case was of delayed cage subsidence (DCS) >6 weeks postoperatively. The mean subsidence was 4.7 mm (range, 2.4–7.8). Mean anterior disc height was 8.6±0.4 mm preoperatively, which improved to 15.1±0.5 mm at latest follow-up. Mean posterior disc height was 4.7±0.2 mm preoperatively, which improved to 8.7±0.4 mm at latest follow-up. The mean lumbar lordosis (LL) angle was 42.5°±10.8° and the mean local disc angle (LDA) was 6.7°±4.0°. The 91.2% (n=114/125) of patients with appropriate radiological follow-up demonstrated fusion by latest follow-up. There was no correlation between subsidence rate with patient reported outcomes [Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 12 Item survey (SF-12)] and fusion rates. There was a significant negative correlation between LL and extent of subsidence (Pearson correlation =−0.754, P=0.012). Conclusions In conclusion, we found that the subsidence rate at follow-up was generally low following standalone ALIF for this patient series. Patient clinical outcomes and bony fusion rates were not significantly influenced by subsidence. PMID:28744497

  4. Subsidence following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF): a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin; Giang, Gloria; Maharaj, Monish M; Phan, Steven; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-06-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a widely used surgical technique for disorders of the lumbar spine. One potential complication is the subsidence of disc height in the post-operative period. Few studies have reported the rate of subsidence in ALIF surgery prospectively. We prospectively evaluated the rate of subsidence in adult patients undergoing ALIF. Results were obtained by reviewing scans of 147 patients. Disc heights were measured on radiographic scans taken pre-operatively in addition to post-operatively immediately, at 6 weeks and at 18 months. The anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights were measured. Subsidence was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm loss of height. A total of 15 patients (10.2%) had subsidence, with 7 being male. Each case was of delayed cage subsidence (DCS) >6 weeks postoperatively. The mean subsidence was 4.7 mm (range, 2.4-7.8). Mean anterior disc height was 8.6±0.4 mm preoperatively, which improved to 15.1±0.5 mm at latest follow-up. Mean posterior disc height was 4.7±0.2 mm preoperatively, which improved to 8.7±0.4 mm at latest follow-up. The mean lumbar lordosis (LL) angle was 42.5°±10.8° and the mean local disc angle (LDA) was 6.7°±4.0°. The 91.2% (n=114/125) of patients with appropriate radiological follow-up demonstrated fusion by latest follow-up. There was no correlation between subsidence rate with patient reported outcomes [Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 12 Item survey (SF-12)] and fusion rates. There was a significant negative correlation between LL and extent of subsidence (Pearson correlation =-0.754, P=0.012). In conclusion, we found that the subsidence rate at follow-up was generally low following standalone ALIF for this patient series. Patient clinical outcomes and bony fusion rates were not significantly influenced by subsidence.

  5. A Biomechanical Stability Study of Extraforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion on the Cadaveric Lumbar Spine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song; Yan, Meijun; Han, Yingchao; Xia, Dongdong; Sun, Guixin; Li, Lijun; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an effective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease. However, this fusion technique requires resection of inferior facet joint to provide access for superior facet joint resection, which results in reduced lumbar spinal stability and unnecessary trauma. We have previously developed extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) that can avoid back muscle injury with direct nerve root decompression. This study aims to show that ELIF enhances lumbar spinal stability in comparison to TLIF by comparing lumbar spinal stability of L4–L5 range of motion (ROM) on 12 cadaveric spine specimens after performing TLIF or ELIF. Methods 12 cadaveric spine specimens were randomly divided and treated in accordance with the different internal fixations, including ELIF with a unilateral pedicle screw (ELIF+UPS), TLIF with a unilateral pedicle screw (TLIF+UPS), TLIF with a bilateral pedicle screw (TLIF+BPS), ELIF with a unilateral pedicle screw and translaminar facet screw (ELIF+UPS+TLFS) and ELIF with a bilateral pedicle screw (ELIF+BPS). The treatment groups were exposed to a 400-N load and 6 N·m movement force to calculate the angular displacement of L4-L5 during anterior flexion, posterior extension, lateral flexion and rotation operation conditions. Results The ROM in ELIF+UPS group was smaller than that of TLIF+UPS group under all operating conditions, with the significant differences in left lateral flexion and right rotation by 36.15% and 25.97% respectively. The ROM in ELIF+UPS group was higher than that in TLIF+BPS group. The ROM in the ELIF+UPS+TLFS group was much smaller than that in the ELIF+UPS group, but was not significantly different than that in the TLIF+BPS group. Conclusions Despite that TLIF+BPS has great stability, which can be comparable by that of ELIF+UPS. Additionally, ELIF stability can be further improved by using translaminar facet screws without causing more tissue damage to patient. PMID

  6. Ventral Dural Injury After Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, JaeChil; Kim, Jin-Sung; Jo, Hyunjin

    2017-02-01

    Oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) through the oblique corridor between the aorta and anterior border of psoas muscle is favored among spinal surgeons who employ minimally invasive techniques. We report a case of ventral dural tear after OLIF that was associated with the inaccurate trajectory direction of endplate preparation. This is the first report to our knowledge of ventral dural tear associated with OLIF. A 72-year-old woman presented with right leg pain and numbness. X-rays showed degenerative spondylolisthesis and loss of disc height at L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed right-sided paracentral disc herniation at the L3-L4 level and foraminal disc herniation at L4-L5. The initial surgical plan was OLIF of L3-L4 and L4-L5 after percutaneous screw fixation without laminectomy. With the patient in the lateral position, discectomy and endplate preparation were done successfully at the L3-L4 level, and the same procedure was done at the L4-L5 level for OLIF. A sharp Cobbs elevator for endplate preparation triggered a ventral dural defect at the L4-L5 level. We changed the patient's position to attempt dural repair. The ventral dural defect could not be repaired because it was too large. After the herniated rootlets were repositioned, TachoComb was patched over the defect site. Postoperatively, the patient has no definite neurologic deficits. When a surgeon performs OLIF, ventral dural injury should be avoided during the procedure of endplate preparation and contralateral annular release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuguang; Sun, Junying; Tang, Genlin

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47-72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column spinal stability. Attention was given to ensure the correct pre-operative fenestration, complete decompression and the prevention of adhesions. After an average follow-up of 26.4 months, the one year post-operative X-ray radiographs suggested that the successful fusion rate was 88.1%, and this was 100% in the two-year post-operative radiographs. Moreover, the functional recovery rate was 97.9%. Bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion is an ideal surgical method for the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The surgical method retains the spinal posterior column and middle column and results in full decompression and reliable fusion by a limited yet effective surgical approach.

  8. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47–72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column spinal stability. Attention was given to ensure the correct pre-operative fenestration, complete decompression and the prevention of adhesions. After an average follow-up of 26.4 months, the one year post-operative X-ray radiographs suggested that the successful fusion rate was 88.1%, and this was 100% in the two-year post-operative radiographs. Moreover, the functional recovery rate was 97.9%. Bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion is an ideal surgical method for the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The surgical method retains the spinal posterior column and middle column and results in full decompression and reliable fusion by a limited yet effective surgical approach. PMID:23407794

  9. Radiological and functional outcome after anterior lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Christensen, F B; Karlsmose, B; Hansen, E S; Bünger, C E

    1996-01-01

    Outcome after anterior spinal fusion has mainly been studied radiologically and reported fusion rates vary greatly. The aim of this study was to investigate radiological and long-term clinical outcome. The study comprised 120 consecutive patients, operated on during the period 1979-1987, with single-or two-level anterior interbody spinal fusion due to disc degeneration or isthmic spondylolisthesis with lumbar instability. In 64 patients a supplemental facet joint fusion was performed. Clinical outcome was evaluated 5-13 years after surgery using the patient-administered Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ). Radiological outcome was determined on the basis of radiographs taken at a 2-year follow-up assessed by independent observers. The radiological follow-up rate was 98%. Complete fusion was found in 52%, questionable fusion in 24%, and definitive pseudoarthrosis in 24% of patients. Radiological results were poor in patients who had undergone previous spinal surgery (P < 0.05) and in those with two-level fusion (P < 0.05). The DPQ reply rate was 80%. Sixty-six patients claimed improvement in all functional groups. Patients with complete or questionable union had significantly better results than did those with non-union (P < 0.01). Poorer functional outcome was found in patients who had undergone previous spinal surgery (P < 0.01) or fusion at the L4/L5 level (P < 0.05), in those who had responded poorly to the preoperative test brace (P < 0.05), and in those above 45 years old at the time of surgery (P < 0.05). Radiological and functional outcome did not vary according to whether patients were treated postoperatively with a plaster jacket or with facet screw fixation. The study demonstrated a functional success rate of approximately 66% following anterior lumbar spinal fusion after a mean follow-up of 8 years. There was a clear tendency for poorer prognosis for patients who had undergone previous spinal surgery, those aged above 45 years, those operated at the L4/L5

  10. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion: a systematic review of complication rates.

    PubMed

    Hijji, Fady Y; Narain, Ankur S; Bohl, Daniel D; Ahn, Junyoung; Long, William W; DiBattista, Jacob V; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Singh, Kern

    2017-10-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a frequently used technique for the treatment of lumbar pathology. Despite its overall success, LLIF has been associated with a unique set of complications. However, there has been inconsistent evidence regarding the complication rate of this approach. To perform a systematic review analyzing the rates of medical and surgical complications associated with LLIF. Systematic review. 6,819 patients who underwent LLIF reported in clinical studies through June 2016. Frequency of complications within cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, urologic, gastrointestinal, transient neurologic, persistent neurologic, and spine (MSK) categories. This systematic review was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies that identified rates of any complication following LLIF procedures were obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases. Articles were excluded if they did not report complications, presented mixed complication data from other procedures, or were characterized as single case reports, reviews, or case series containing less than 10 patients. The primary outcome was frequency of complications within cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, urologic, gastrointestinal, transient neurologic, persistent neurologic, and MSK categories. All rates of complications were based on the sample sizes of studies that mentioned the respective complications. The authors report no conflicts of interest directly or indirectly related to this work, and have not received any funds in support of this work. A total of 2,232 articles were identified. Following screening of title, abstract, and full-text availability, 63 articles were included in the review. A total of 6,819 patients had 11,325 levels fused. The rate of complications for the categories included were as follows: wound (1.38%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.00%-1.85%), cardiac (1.86%; CI=1.33%-2.52%), vascular (0.81%; CI=0

  11. Interobserver and Intraobserver Reliability in the Radiologic Assessment of Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kroeze, Robert J; Graat, Harm C A; Pluymakers, Winand J; Marting, Louis N; van Dijk, Martijn; van Dijke, Cees F; Vd Klis, Anton H; Verberne, Steven J; de Gruyter, Albert J; Temmerman, Olivier P P

    2017-07-01

    Retrospective cohort study comparing intraobserver and interobserver reliability of 3 different radiologic fusion classifications following uninstrumented single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion. The objective of the study was to compare the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of 3 different radiologic spinal fusion scoring systems. Knowledge regarding radiologic spinal fusion is crucial when studying patients that were treated with lumbar interbody fusion. The scoring system should be reliable and reproducible. Various radiologic classification systems coexist, but the reliability of these systems has thus far not been compared in a single consecutive group of patients. The aim of the present study was the identification of the most valid scoring system in the assessment of interbody fusion. We studied a retrospective consecutive cohort of 50 patients who underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure by a single surgeon using a stand-alone cage performed between 1993 and 2002. Plain anterior-posterior, lateral radiographs, and flexion-extension radiographs were made during follow-up visits and were used for analysis. The interbody fusion was scored on these radiographic images using the 3 classification systems (Brantigan, Burkus, and the Radiographic Score) by 2 experienced musculoskeletal radiologists and 2 senior orthopedic spinal surgeons all of whom were blinded to clinical data and outcome. Of the 3 classifications included in the current study, the Burkus classification had a moderate interobserver agreement and a substantial to perfect intraobserver agreement. The other classifications (Bratingan and the Radiographic Score) showed only fair interobserver agreement and moderate to substantial agreement among all observers. No significant differences in reliability between orthopedic surgeons and radiologists were found for all 3 classifications. The Burkus classification system was classified as most reliable in this, but showed only

  12. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Discogenic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianqiang; Fang, Xiutong; Zhong, Weiye; Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The treatment of degenerative discogenic pain is controversial, and anterior lumbar fusion for the treatment of degenerative discogenic low back pain has also been a controversial topic for over a generation. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the outcome of different anterior lumbar fusion levels for degenerative discogenic low back pain. In this study, we performed a clinical outcome subgroup analysis. The outcomes of 84 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS) results, and complication rate were recorded separately. Medical indications were degenerative disc disease (73.8%), postdiscectomy disc disease (16.1%), and disc herniation (9.5%). Patients with severe spondylolysis or disc degeneration, with more than 3 or multilevel lesions, were excluded. The mean operative time was 124.5 ± 10.9 min (range 51–248 min), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 242.1 ± 27.7 mL (range 50–2700 mL), the mean hospital stay was 3.9 ± 1.1 days (range 3–6 days), the mean preoperative VAS score was 7.5 ± 1.4, and the mean preoperative ODI score was 60.0 ± 5.7. At the 1-year follow-up, the mean postoperative VAS score was 3.3 ± 1.3 and the mean postoperative ODI score was 13.6 ± 3.4 (P < 0.05). L4–L5 disc fusion led to better clinical results than 2-level L4–L5/L5–S1 disc fusion. Additionally, the 2-level fusion of L4–L5/L5–S1 had better clinical results than the L5–S1 disc fusion at both the 1 and 2-year postoperative follow-ups regarding the VAS score and the ODI score. The rate of complications was more frequent in the 2-level L4–L5/L5–S1 group (27.3%) (group C) than in the L4–L5 group (9.1%) (group A) and the L5–S1 group (12.5%) (group B). There was no difference between the L4–L5 group (9.1%) and the L

  13. Effect of steerable cage placement during minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion on lumbar lordosis.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Timothy E; Viljoen, Stephanus V; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2014-03-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) is commonly used for the treatment of a variety of degenerative spine disorders. Recently, steerable interbody cages have been developed which potentially allow for greater restoration of lumbar lordosis. Here we describe a technique and radiographic results following minimally invasive placement of steerable cages through a bilateral approach. A retrospective review was conducted of the charts and radiographs of 15 consecutive patients who underwent 19 levels of bilateral MIS-TLIF with the placement of steerable cages. These were compared to 10 patients who underwent 16 levels of unilateral MIS-TLIF with the placement of bullet cages. The average age, body mass index, distribution of the levels operated and follow-up were similar in both groups. The average height of the steerable cage placed was 10.9 mm compared to 8.5mm for bullet cages. The preoperative focal Cobb's angle per level was similar between both groups with a mean of -5.3 degrees for the steerable cage group and -4.8 degrees for the bullet cage group. There was a significant improvement in postoperative Cobb's angle after placement of a steerable cage with a mean of -13.7 (p<0.01) and this persisted at the last follow-up with -13 degrees (p<0.01). There was no significant change in Cobb's angle after bullet cage placement with -5.7 degrees postoperatively and a return to the baseline preoperative Cobb's angle of -4.8 at the last follow-up. Steerable cage placement for MIS-TLIF improves focal lordosis compared to bullet cage placement.

  14. Extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion: Do the cons outweigh the pros?

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Major factors prompted the development of minimally invasive (MIS) extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive Inc., San Diego, CA, USE) for the thoracic/lumbar spine. These include providing interbody stabilization and indirect neural decompression while avoiding major visceral/vessel injury as seen with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), and to avert trauma to paraspinal muscles/facet joints found with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), and posterior-lateral fusion techniques (PLF). Although anticipated pros of MIS XLIF included reduced blood loss, operative time, and length of stay (LOS), they also included, higher fusion, and lower infection rates. Unanticipated cons, however, included increased morbidity/mortality rates. Methods: We assessed the pros and cons (e.g., risks, complications, comparable value/superiority/inferiority, morbidity/mortality) of MIS XLIF vs. ALIF, TLIF, PLIF, and PLF. Results: Pros of XLIF included various biomechanical and technical surgical advantages, along with multiple cons vs. ALIF, TLIF, PLIF, and PLF. For example, XLIF correlated with a considerably higher frequency of major neurological deficits vs. other constructs; plexus injuries 13.28%, sensory deficits 0–75% (permanent in 62.5%), motor deficits 0.7–33.6%, and anterior thigh pain 12.5–25%. XLIF also disproportionately contributed to other major morbidity/mortality; sympathectomy, major vascular injuries (some life-ending others life-threatening), bowel perforations, and seromas. Furthermore, multiple studies documented no superiority, and the potential inferiority of XLIF vs. ALIF, TLIF, PLIF, and PLF. Conclusion: Reviewing the pros of XLIF (e.g. radiographic, technical, biomechanical) vs. the cons (inferiority, increased morbidity/mortality) vs. ALIF, TLIF, PLIF, and PLF, we question whether XLIF should remain part of the lumbar spinal surgical armamentarium. PMID:27843688

  15. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Shan, Jian-Lin; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Li, Fang; Guan, Kai; Sun, Tian-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Results The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM) of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05), while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05). The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups. Conclusions Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD. PMID:26824851

  16. Biomechanical analysis of lateral interbody fusion strategies for adjacent segment degeneration in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Melodie F; Robinson, Samuel T; Maldonado, Ruben C; Rawlinson, Jeremy; Liu, John; Acosta, Frank L

    2017-07-01

    Surgical treatment of symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) typically involves extension of previous instrumentation to include the newly affected level(s). Disruption of the incision site can present challenges and increases the risk of complication. Lateral-based interbody fusion techniques may provide a viable surgical alternative that avoids these risks. This study is the first to analyze the biomechanical effect of adding a lateral-based construct to an existing fusion. The study aimed to determine whether a minimally invasive lateral interbody device, with and without supplemental instrumentation, can effectively stabilize the rostral segment adjacent to a two-level fusion when compared with a traditional posterior revision approach. This is a cadaveric biomechanical study of lateral-based interbody strategies as add-on techniques to an existing fusion for the treatment of ASD. Twelve lumbosacral specimens were non-destructively loaded in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion. Sequentially, the tested conditions were intact, two-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) (L3-L5), followed by lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedures at L2-L3 including interbody alone, a supplemental lateral plate, a supplemental spinous process plate, and then either cortical screw or pedicle screw fixation. A three-level TLIF was the final instrumented condition. In all conditions, three-dimensional kinematics were tracked and range of motion (ROM) was calculated for comparisons. Institutional funds (<$50,000) in support of this work were provided by Medtronic Spine. The addition of a lateral interbody device superadjacent to a two-level fusion significantly reduced motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (p<.05). Supplementing with a lateral plate further reduced ROM during lateral bending and torsion, whereas a spinous process plate further reduced ROM during flexion and extension. The addition of posterior cortical screws provided the

  17. Comparison of open and minimally invasive techniques for posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion after open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Yu, Anthony L; Gruskay, Jordan A; Delasotta, Lawrence A; Radcliff, Kristen E; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Anderson, D Greg; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2013-05-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for spinal fusion have theoretical advantages for the reduction of iatrogenic injury. Although this topic has been investigated previously for posterior-only interbody surgery, such as transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, similar studies have not evaluated these techniques after anteroposterior spinal fusion, a study design that can more accurately determine the effect of pedicle screw placement and decompression via a minimally invasive technique without the confounding effect of simultaneous interbody cage placement. To compare process measures that provide insight into the morbidity of surgery, such as surgical time and the length of postoperative hospital stay between open and minimally invasive anteroposterior lumbar fusion; and to compare the complications during the intraoperative and early postoperative period between open and minimally invasive anteroposterior lumbar fusion. Retrospective case-control study. One hundred sixty-two patients. Estimated blood loss, length of surgery, intraoperative fluoroscopy time, length of postoperative hospital stay, malpositioned instrumentation on postoperative imaging, and postoperative complications, including pulmonary embolus and surgical site infection. Patients who underwent open anterior lumbar interbody fusion followed by either traditional open posterior fusion (Open group) or minimally invasive posterior fusion (minimally invasive surgery [MIS] group) were matched by the number of surgical levels. A chart review was performed to document the intraoperative and postoperative process measures and associated complications in the two groups. Secondary analyses were performed to compare the subgroups of patients, who did and did not undergo a posterior decompression at the time of posterior instrumentation to determine the effect of decompression. Baseline characteristics were similar between the Open and MIS groups. Estimated blood loss and postoperative transfusion rate were

  18. Computational comparison of three posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques by using porous titanium interbody cages with 50% porosity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Heng; Chung, Chi-Jen; Wang, Chih-Wei; Peng, Yao-Te; Chang, Chih-Han; Chen, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Yen-Nien; Li, Chun-Ting

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the biomechanical response of porous cages and lumbar spine segments immediately after surgery and after bone fusion, in addition to the long-term effects of various posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques, by using the finite element method. Lumbar L3-L4 models based on three PLIF techniques (a single cage at the center of the intervertebral space, a single cage half-anterior to the intervertebral space, and two cages bilateral to the intervertebral space) with and without bone ingrowth were used to determine the biomechanical response of porous cages and lumbar segments instrumented with porous titanium cages (cage porosity=50%, pore diameter=1mm). The results indicated that bone fusion enhanced the stability of the lumbar segments with porous cages without any posterior instrumentation and reduced the peak von Mises stress in the cortical bones and porous cages. Two cages placed bilateral to the intervertebral space achieved the highest structural stability in the lumbar segment and lowest von Mises stress in the cages under both bone fusion conditions. Under identical loading (2-Nm), the range of motion in the single cage at the center of the intervertebral space with bone fusion decreased by 11% (from 1.18° to 1.05°) during flexion and by 66.5% (from 4.46° to 1.5°) during extension in the single cage half-anterior to the intervertebral space with bone fusion compared with no-fusion models. Thus, two porous titanium cages with 50% porosity can achieve high stability of a lumbar segment with PLIF. If only one cage is available, placing the cage half-anterior to the intervertebral space is recommended for managing degenerated lumbar segments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Ossification of the Yellow Ligament in the Lumbar Spine: First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tetsuya; Funayama, Toru; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Keita; Miura, Kousei; Nagashima, Katsuya; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    When ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) occurs in the lumbar spine and extends to the lateral wall of the spinal canal, facetectomy is required to remove all of the ossified lesion and achieve decompression. Subsequent posterior fixation with interbody fusion will then be necessary to prevent postoperative progression of the ossification and intervertebral instability. The technique of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) has recently been introduced. Using this procedure, surgeons can avoid excess blood loss from the extradural venous plexus and detachment of the ossified lesion and the ventral dura mater is avoidable. We present a 55-year-old male patient with OYL at L3/4 and anterior spondylolisthesis of L4 vertebra, with concomitant ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, who presented with a severe gait disturbance. He underwent a 2-stage operation without complications: LLIF for L3/4 and L4/5 was performed at the initial surgery, and posterior decompression fixation using pedicle screws from L3 to L5 was performed at the second surgery. His postoperative progress was favorable, and his interbody fusion was deemed successful. Here, we present the first reported case of LLIF for OYL of the lumbar spine. This procedure can be a good option for OYL of the lumbar spine. PMID:28352485

  20. Biomechanical comparison of anterior lumbar interbody fusion: stand-alone interbody cage versus interbody cage with pedicle screw fixation -- a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Chul; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yeong Hyeon; Lee, Sung Jae; Park, Chun-Kun

    2013-07-26

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) followed by pedicle screw fixation (PSF) is used to restore the height of the intervertebral disc and provide stability. Recently, stand-alone interbody cage with anterior fixation has been introduced, which eliminates the need for posterior surgery. We compared the biomechanics of the stand-alone interbody cage to that of the interbody cage with additional PSF in ALIF. A three-dimensional, non-linear finite element model (FEM) of the L2-5 segment was modified to simulate ALIF in L3-4. The models were tested under the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) destabilized spine, (3) with the interbody cage alone (type 1), (4) with the stand-alone cage with anterior fixation (SynFix-LR®; type 2), and (5) with type 1 in addition to PSF (type 3). Range of motion (ROM) and the stiffness of the operated level, ROM of the adjacent segments, load sharing distribution, facet load, and vertebral body stress were quantified with external loading. The implanted models had decreased ROM and increased stiffness compared to those of the destabilized spine. The type 2 had differences in ROM limitation of 8%, 10%, 4%, and 6% in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending, respectively, compared to those of type 3. Type 2 had decreased ROM of the upper and lower adjacent segments by 3-11% and 3-6%, respectively, compared to those of type 3. The greatest reduction in facet load at the operated level was observed in type 3 (71%), followed by type 2 (31%) and type 1 (23%). An increase in facet load at the adjacent level was highest in type 3, followed by type 2 and type 1. The distribution of load sharing in type 2 (anterior:posterior, 95:5) was similar to that of the intact spine (89:11), while type 3 migrated posterior (75:25) to the normal. Type 2 reduced about 15% of the stress on the lower vertebral endplate compared to that in type 1. The stress of type 2 increased two-fold compared to the stress of type 3, especially in

  1. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature.

  2. Comparison between Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Conventional Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: An Updated Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lei; Wu, Wen-Jian; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: The previous studies agree that minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has better function outcomes, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stay, when compared to open-TLIF. However, there are no significance differences on operative time, complication, and reoperation rate between the two procedures. This could be from less relative literatures and lower grade evidence. The further meta-analysis is needed with more and higher grade evidences to compare the above two TLIF procedures. Methods: Prospective and retrospective studies that compared open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF were identified by searching the Medline, Embase, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP database (the literature search comprised Medical Subject Heading terms and key words or Emtree term). The retrieval time ranged from the date when the database was founded to January 2015. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the clinical outcomes and perioperative data. Results: Twenty-four studies (n = 1967 patients) were included in this review (n = 951, open-TLIF, n = 1016, MIS-TLIF). MIS-TLIF was associated with a significant decrease in the visual analog score (VAS)-back pain score (WMD = −0.44; P = 0.001), Oswestry Disabilities Index (WMD = −1.57; P = 0.005), early ambulation (WMD = −1.77; P = 0.0001), less blood loss (WMD = −265.59; P < 0.00001), and a shorter hospital stay (WMD = −1.89; P < 0.0001). However, there were no significant differences in the fusion rate (RR = 0.99; P = 0.34), VAS-leg pain (WMD = −0.10; P = 0.26), complication rate (RR = 0.84; P = 0.35), operation time (WMD = −5.23; P = 0.82), or reoperation rate (RR = 0.73; P = 0.32). Conclusions: MIS-TLIF resulted in a similar fusion rate with better functional outcome, less blood loss, shorter ambulation, and hospital stay; furthermore, it did not increase the complication or

  3. Change of Lumbar Ligamentum Flavum after Indirect Decompression Using Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the ligamentum flavum thickness and remodeling of the spinal canal after anterior fusion during a 10-year follow-up. Overview of Literature Extreme lateral interbody fusion provides minimally invasive treatment of the lumbar spine; this anterior fusion without direct posterior decompression, so-called indirect decompression, can achieve pain relief. Anterior fusion may restore disc height, stretch the flexure of the ligamentum flavum, and increase the spinal canal diameter. However, changes in the ligamentum flavum thickness and remodeling of the spinal canal after anterior fusion during a long follow-up have not yet been reported. Methods We evaluated 10 patients with L4 spondylolisthesis who underwent stand-alone anterior interbody fusion using the iliac crest bone. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 10 years after surgery. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the dural sac and the ligamentum flavum at L1–2 to L5–S1 was calculated using a Picture Archiving and Communication System. Results Spinal fusion with correction loss (average, 4.75 mm anterior slip) was achieved in all patients 10 years postsurgery. The average CSAs of the dural sac and the ligamentum flavum at L1–2 to L5–S1 were 150 mm2 and 78 mm2, respectively. The average CSA of the ligamentum flavum at L4–5 (30 mm2) (fusion level) was significantly less than that at L1–2 to L3–4 or L5–S1. Although patients had an average anterior slip of 4.75 mm, the average CSA of the dural sac at L4–5 was significantly larger than at the other levels. Conclusions Spinal stability induced a lumbar ligamentum flavum change and a sustained remodeling of the spinal canal, which may explain the long-term pain relief after indirect decompression fusion surgery. PMID:28243378

  4. Large volume inside the cage leading incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual back pain after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Wakao, Norimitsu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare intervertebral bone fusion and clinical outcomes in L4-5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using the same posterior instrumentation with four combinations of one of three types of interbody cage with one of two bone grafts, iliac and local or only local. In 67 patients who underwent L4-5 PLIF, 19 patients had the Brantigan cage and iliac and local bone graft, 18 with the TELAMON C cage and iliac and local bone graft, 16 with the TELAMON C cage and local bone graft (TL), and 14 with the OIC PEEK cage and local bone graft. Clinical assessments were based on Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and on the visual analogue scale (VAS). The bone fusion assessments were based on radiography and CT scans according to the Brantigan, Steffee, and Fraser criteria. More than 2 years after surgery, these assessments were made. In the results, the fusion outcome for the group receiving TL was significantly less than those for the other three groups. In TL, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the inside volume of the cage of ≥2.0 mL was the only significant factor for incomplete fusion. Moreover, the VAS (low back pain) score was significantly higher for TL than for the other three groups. In conclusions, we believe that the large volume inside the cage (≥2.0 mL) with local bone graft may lead incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual postsurgical low back pain after PLIF.

  5. Utility of postoperative radiographs after anterior lumbar interbody fusion with or without posterior instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew K; Osler, Polina; Wood, Kirkham B

    2013-11-01

    Retrospective clinical and radiographical review. To evaluate the utility of plain radiographical surveillance after anterior lumbar interbody fusion and determine to what extent radiographical findings affect postoperative decision making. Postoperative radiographical surveillance is a ubiquitous practice among spine surgeons, which lacks evidence and has received growing attention in an environment of increasing health care cost and receding resources. Lumbar interbody fusions are being performed with increasing frequency from numerous approaches; nonetheless, there are no evidence-based guidelines for postoperative radiographical evaluation of patients after these procedures. One hundred forty-six consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with or without short segment posterior fusion from 2008 to 2011 were reviewed. Exclusion criteria were less than 6 months of follow-up, prior surgery, hybrid constructs with disc arthroplasty, and concurrent posterior fusion of greater than 3 levels. Three hundred fifty-nine radiographical series and 330 clinic notes of the included 67 patients were reviewed. Radiographs were evaluated for abnormalities and clinic notes reviewed for any changes in clinical management by multiple reviewers. Interobserver reliability, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. There was no single instance of a change in treatment course based on radiographical findings alone in any of the 330 clinic visits of the 67 included patients during an average 15.8-month postoperative follow-up period. Thirty-four of the 67 patients (51%) had some change in their management on the basis of their clinical symptoms and/or examination. Interobserver agreement for change in management was 0.96 (κ = 0.918). Sensitivity (6%), specificity (97%), positive predictive value (67%), and negative predictive value (50%) were calculated. Routine postoperative radiographical surveillance has minimal

  6. Failure of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer implant used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Zeeshan; Jarzem, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure owing to the high prevalence of degenerative spinal disorders. During such procedures, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages are frequently utilized to fill the void created between adjacent vertebral bodies, to provide mechanical stability, and to carry graft material. Failure of such implants can lead to significant morbidity. We discuss the possible causes leading to the failure of a CFRP cage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Review of a 49-year-old woman who underwent revision anterior lumbar interbody fusion 2 years after posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The patient developed pseudarthrosis at the two previously fused levels with failure of the posterior instrumentation. Revision surgery reveled failure with fragmentation of the CFRP cage at the L5-S1 level. CFRP implants can break if mechanical instability or nonunion occurs in the spinal segments, thus emphasizing the need for optimizing medical management and meticulous surgical technique in achieving stability.

  7. Failure of a Carbon Fiber–Reinforced Polymer Implant Used for Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Zeeshan; Jarzem, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure owing to the high prevalence of degenerative spinal disorders. During such procedures, carbon fiber–reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages are frequently utilized to fill the void created between adjacent vertebral bodies, to provide mechanical stability, and to carry graft material. Failure of such implants can lead to significant morbidity. We discuss the possible causes leading to the failure of a CFRP cage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Review of a 49-year-old woman who underwent revision anterior lumbar interbody fusion 2 years after posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4–L5 and L5–S1. The patient developed pseudarthrosis at the two previously fused levels with failure of the posterior instrumentation. Revision surgery reveled failure with fragmentation of the CFRP cage at the L5–S1 level. CFRP implants can break if mechanical instability or nonunion occurs in the spinal segments, thus emphasizing the need for optimizing medical management and meticulous surgical technique in achieving stability. PMID:24436878

  8. The cost-effectiveness of interbody fusions versus posterolateral fusions in 137 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B; Witham, Timothy F; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    Reimbursements for interbody fusions have declined recently because of their questionable cost-effectiveness. A Markov model was adopted to compare the cost-effectiveness of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (/TLIF) versus noninterbody fusion and posterolateral fusion (PLF) in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Decision model analysis based on retrospective data from a single institutional series. One hundred thirty-seven patients underwent first-time instrumented lumbar fusions for degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis. Quality of life adjustments and expenditures were assigned to each short-term complication (durotomy, surgical site infection, and medical complication) and long-term outcome (bowel/bladder dysfunction and paraplegia, neurologic deficit, and chronic back pain). Patients were divided into a PLF cohort and a PLF plus PLIF/TLIF cohort. Anterior techniques and multilevel interbody fusions were excluded. Each short-term complication and long-term outcome was assigned a numerical quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), based on time trade-off values in the Beaver Dam Health Outcomes Study. The cost data for short-term complications were calculated from charges accrued by the institution's finance sector, and the cost data for long-term outcomes were estimated from the literature. The difference in cost of PLF plus PLIF/TLIF from the cost of PLF alone divided by the difference in QALY equals the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER). We do not report any study funding sources or any study-specific appraisal of potential conflict of interest-associated biases in this article. Of 137 first-time lumbar fusions for spondylolisthesis, 83 patients underwent PLF and 54 underwent PLIF/TLIF. The average time to reoperation was 3.5 years. The mean QALY over 3.5 years was 2.81 in the PLF cohort versus 2.66 in the PLIFo/TLIF cohort (p=.110). The mean 3.5-year costs of $54,827.05 after index interbody fusion were

  9. Results of lumbar spondylodeses using different bone grafting materials after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

    PubMed

    vonderHoeh, Nicolas Heinz; Voelker, Anna; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2017-05-25

    Can a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HA) and autologous bone from decompression sites produce similar results when used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)? In the current literature, autologous iliac crest bone grafts (ICBGs) have been reported the gold standard for this procedure. Indeed, to date, no clinical data have confirmed that a mixture of equal volumes of HA and local autologous bone produce similar results in term of fusion as the same volume of autologous ICBG alone. Study design/setting This study was approved by the local ethics committee and completed in a prospective, randomized, single-blinded manner. The results of lumbar fusion using TLIF and different bone grafting materials were compared. Patient sample The patient sample included patients with spinal lumbar degenerative disease. Outcome measures The clinical outcome was determined using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The radiological outcomes and fusion rates were determined with radiographs evaluated using the McAfee criteria and computed tomography (CT) data evaluated by the Williams criteria. Three blinded investigators (one radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons) assessed the data. The secondary variables included donor site morbidity. Methods The patients were admitted to our department for orthopedic surgery with degenerative lumbar pathologies (L2-S1) that required stabilization in one or two segments using a TLIF procedure. The patients were 18-80 years old. Only those patients who had degenerative lumbar pathologies and agreed to be educated about the study were included. The patients were divided into the following two randomized groups: group A: TLIF procedure using autologous ICBGs alone; and group B: TLIF procedure using local bone from decompression site mixed with hydroxyapatite. Each group received equal graft volumes. The mixture in group B consisted of equal volumes of local autograft (5 cc) and synthetic

  10. Segmental and global lordosis changes with two-level axial lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Melgar, Miguel A; Tobler, William D; Ernst, Robert J; Raley, Thomas J; Anand, Neel; Miller, Larry E; Nasca, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of lumbar lordosis has been reported after lumbar interbody fusion surgery and may portend poor clinical and radiographic outcome. The objective of this research was to measure changes in segmental and global lumbar lordosis in patients treated with presacral axial L4-S1 interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation and to determine if these changes influenced patient outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective, multi-center review of prospectively collected data in 58 consecutive patients with disabling lumbar pain and radiculopathy unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment who underwent L4-S1 interbody fusion with the AxiaLIF two-level system (Baxano Surgical, Raleigh NC). Main outcomes included back pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Odom's outcome criteria, and fusion status using flexion and extension radiographs and computed tomography scans. Segmental (L4-S1) and global (L1-S1) lumbar lordosis measurements were made using standing lateral radiographs. All patients were followed for at least 24 months (mean: 29 months, range 24-56 months). Results There was no bowel injury, vascular injury, deep infection, neurologic complication or implant failure. Mean back pain severity improved from 7.8±1.7 at baseline to 3.3±2.6 at 2 years (p < 0.001). Mean ODI scores improved from 60±15% at baseline to 34±27% at 2 years (p < 0.001). At final follow-up, 83% of patients were rated as good or excellent using Odom's criteria. Interbody fusion was observed in 111 (96%) of 116 treated interspaces. Maintenance of lordosis, defined as a change in Cobb angle ≤ 5°, was identified in 84% of patients at L4-S1 and 81% of patients at L1-S1. Patients with loss or gain in segmental or global lordosis experienced similar 2-year outcomes versus those with less than a 5° change. Conclusions/Clinical Relevance Two-level axial interbody fusion supplemented with posterior fixation does not alter segmental or global lordosis in most patients. Patients with

  11. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages in minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Le, Tien V; Baaj, Ali A; Dakwar, Elias; Burkett, Clinton J; Murray, Gisela; Smith, Donald A; Uribe, Juan S

    2012-06-15

    A retrospective review. The objective is to evaluate subsidence related to minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion by reviewing our experience with this procedure. Polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages of different lengths, widths, and heights filled with various allograft types are commonly used as spacers in lumbar fusions. Subsidence is a potential complication. To date, there are no published reports specifically addressing subsidence, because it relates to a series of patients undergoing minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion. An institutional review board-approved, retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted. One hundred forty consecutive patients who underwent this procedure between L1 and L5 during a 2-year period were included. All patients had T scores of -2.5 or more. Postoperative radiographs during routine follow-ups were reviewed for subsidence, defined as any violation of the vertebral end plate. Radiographical subsidence occurred in 14.3% (20 of 140), whereas clinical subsidence occurred in 2.1%. Subsidence occurred in 8.8% (21 of 238) of levels fused. Construct length had a significant positive correlation with increasing subsidence rates. Subsidence rates decreased progressively with lower levels in the lumbar spine, but had a higher than expected rate at L4-L5. Subsidence rates of 14.1% (19 of 135) and 1.9% (2 of 103) were associated with 18-and 22-mm-wide cages, respectively. No significant trends were observed with cage lengths. Supplemental lateral plates had a higher rate of subsidence than bilateral pedicle screws. Subsidence occurred at the superior end plate 70% of the time. The use of wider intervertebral cages leads to a significantly lower rate of subsidence, but a longer cage does not necessarily offer a similar advantage. Wide cages are protective against subsidence, and the widest cages should be used whenever feasible for interbody

  12. Computerized tomography evaluation of a resorbable implant after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kuklo, Timothy R; Rosner, Michael K; Polly, David W

    2004-03-15

    Synthetic bioabsorbable implants have recently been introduced in spinal surgery; consequently, the indications, applications, and results are still evolving. The authors used absorbable interbody spacers (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) packed with recombinant bone morphogenetic protein (Infuse; Medtronic Sofamor Danek) for single- and multiple-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedures over a period of 18 months. This is a consecutive case series in which postoperative computerized tomography (CT) scanning was used to assess fusion status. There were 22 patients (17 men, five women; 39 fusion levels) whose mean age was 41.6 years (range 23-70 years) and in whom the mean follow-up duration was 12.4 months (range 6-18 months). Bridging bone was noted as early as the 3-month postoperative CT scan when obtained; solid arthrodesis was routinely noted between 6 and 12 months in 38 (97.4%) of 39 fusion levels. In patients who underwent repeated CT scanning, the fusion mass appeared to increase with time, whereas the disc space height remained stable. Although the results are early (mean 12-month follow-up duration), there was only one noted asymptomatic delayed union/nonunion at L5-S1 in a two-level TLIF with associated screw breakage. There were no infections or complications related to the cages. The bioabsorbable cages appear to be a viable alternative to metal interbody spacers, and may be ideally suited to spinal interbody applications because of their progressive load-bearing properties.

  13. Restoration of lordosis and disk height after single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Radcliff, Kristen E; Patel, Amar A; Anderson, D Greg; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Hilibrand, Alan S; Albert, Todd J

    2012-02-01

    To study radiographic and clinical outcomes after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in order to determine the impact of TLIF on lumbar lordosis, intervertebral height and improvement in clinical outcome measures. Forty-five patients who had undergone a single-level TLIF procedure for a single-level degenerative condition were retrospectively reviewed and their clinical histories, degree of pre- and post-operative lumbar lordosis, intervertebral height, and cage position recorded. Clinical assessment included use of modified Odom's criteria and a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain. At 21 months, the patients had gained an average of 3.6° of lumbar lordosis and 4.5 mm disc height. Change in disc height was significantly associated with an anterior cage position while lumbar lordosis was unaffected by cage position. A spondylolisthesis subgroup demonstrated 31% reduction in the magnitude of anterior slip. Less lordosis was associated with worse back and leg pain as assessed by VAS and greater disk heights were associated with higher Odom's criteria scores. Patients with persistent leg pain at final follow-up had less lumbar lordosis and intervertebral height than patients without leg pain. Intervertebral height and lumbar lordosis reconstruction are important for achieving good surgical results; guidance regarding the likely changes in lumbar lordosis and disk height after TLIF is provided by our findings. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Characteristics and Efficacy of a New 3-Dimensional Printed Mesh Structure Titanium Alloy Spacer for Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung-Soo; Lee, Kyung-Joon; Kwon, Yoo-Beom; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2017-08-17

    This study evaluated the characteristics of a newly developed 3-dimensional printed mesh structure titanium spacer and its efficacy for posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with this spacer was performed at 53 segments (40 patients; mean age, 64 years; range, 51-73 years). Data were collected prospectively. Radiographic characteristics were analyzed with changes in interbody height, instability of the segments, formation of bone bridges around the implants, and pseudarthrosis, as determined by dynamic radiographs and postoperative computed tomography scans. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the visual analog scale for the low back and extremities, the Oswestry Disability Index, and the 36-Item Short Form Survey. Radiographically, preoperative anterior and posterior interbody height was significantly increased immediately postoperatively (P<.05), and this increase was maintained until the last follow-up. No segmental motion of 3° or greater was noted at the last follow-up. Sagittal computed tomography images showed complete anterior bone bridges for 94.3% of cases and complete posterior bone bridges for 86.7% of cases. Coronal computed tomography images showed bilateral complete bone bridges for 94.3% of cases and unilateral bone bridges for 5.7% of cases without incomplete bilateral bone bridges. No pseudarthrosis or revision, particularly including posterior lumbar interbody fusion at L5-S1, was noted. Compared with preoperative values, the visual analog scale score for the low back and extremities, the Oswestry Disability Index, and the 36-Item Short Form Survey score showed significant improvement at the last follow-up (P<.05). Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with a newly developed 3-dimensional printed mesh structure titanium spacer showed satisfactory radiographic and clinical results, with no cases of pseudarthrosis or revision, including posterior lumbar interbody fusion at L5-S1. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx

  15. Minimally Invasive Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Spinal Endoscope Assistance: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Choi, Won Suh; Park, Choon-Keun; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the surgical methodology and effectiveness of minimally invasive oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) assisted by spinal endoscopy, which can treat disk herniation from the central to contralateral foramen. OLIF showed indirect decompression effects on reduction of spondylolisthesis and a foraminal widening effect on disk height restoration. In this study, the indirect decompression effect of OLIF was augmented by direct endoscopic decompression and spinal endoscopy for removal of herniated disk materials. Twelve patients with confirmed degenerative lumbar stenosis, herniated lumbar disks, and degenerative spondylolisthesis were treated using OLIF with spinal endoscopic discectomy. Direct ventral decompression was achieved by removal of herniated disk materials. The symptoms of all patients improved postoperatively. OLIF with spinal endoscopic discectomy can achieve neural decompression without additional posterior decompression and can be used as an alternative treatment in selected cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of a narrow-surface cage in full endoscopic minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    He, Er-Xing; Guo, Jing; Ling, Qin-Jie; Yin, Zhi-Xun; Wang, Ying; Li, Ming

    2017-06-01

    Spinal endoscopy has been widely applied in lumbar discectomy and decompression. However, endoscopic lumbar interbody fusion still remains a technical challenge due to the limited space within the working trocar for cage implantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of using a narrow-surface fusion cage in full endoscopic minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. From Jun 2013 to Dec 2014, a total of 42 patients (23 males, 19 females) underwent full endoscopic MIS-TLIF at our hospital was recruited. An 8-mm-wide narrow-surface fusion cage was selected for all cases. Perioperative parameters and complications were recorded. Comparisons on visual analog scale (VAS) and oswestry disability index (ODI) scores before and after surgery were performed. At the last follow-up, Nakai grading system was applied to assess patients' satisfaction; meanwhile, interbody fusion was evaluated by computed tomography. Mean operation time was 233.1 ± 69.5 min, and mean blood loss during surgery was 221.8 ± 98.5 ml. Two patients (4.8%) developed neurological complications. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 24 to 36 months (mean 27.6 ± 3.8 months). VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved 3 months after surgery and at the final follow-up, respectively (P < 0.05). Outcome of surgery was graded as excellent for 32 patients, good for 8 patients, and acceptable for 2 patients, corresponding to a success rate ("good" and "excellent") of 95.2%. Thirty-nine of the 42 patients demonstrated solid interbody fusion at the last follow-up, indicating a fusion rate of 92.9%. Application of a narrow-surface fusion cage in full endoscopic MIS-TLIF for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease is feasible and effective. The clinical outcome and fusion success of this procedure were acceptable and promising. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd

  17. Roseomonas spinal epidural abscess complicating instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Bantouna, Vasiliki; Lianoudakis, Efstratios; Stavrakakis, Ioannis; Scoulica, Efstathia

    2013-07-01

    The first case of a spinal epidural abscess caused by Roseomonas mucosa following instrumented posterior lumbar fusion is presented. Although rare, because of its highly resistant profile, Roseomonas species should be included in the differential diagnosis of epidural abscesses in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts.

  18. Non-neurological major complications of extreme lateral and related lumbar interbody fusion techniques

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Complications exclusive of new neurological deficits/injuries that follow extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) and related lateral lumbar interbody techniques should be better recognized to determine the safety of these procedures. Unfortunately, a review of the XLIF literature did not accurately reflect the frequency of these “other complications” as few US surgeons publish such adverse events that may lead to medicolegal suits. Methods: Major complications occurring with XLIF included sympathectomy, major vascular injuries, bowel perforations, sterile seromas, and instrumentation failures. Results: The frequency of sympathectomy was 4% for XLIF vs. 15% for anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). There were three major vascular injuries for XLIF; one fatal intraoperative event, one life-threatening retroperitoneal hematoma, and one iatrogenic lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm that was successfully embolized. Two bowel perforations were reported, whereas a third was a “direct communication.” One patient developed a sterile recurrent seroma due to vancomycin powder utilized for an XLIF. One study cited malpositioning of an XLIF cage resulting in a lateral L3–L4 extrusion, whereas the second series looked at the 45% risk of cage-overhang when XLIF devices were placed in the anterior one-third of the vertebral body. Conclusion: Excluding new neurological deficits, XLIF techniques resulted in multiple other major complications. However, these small numbers likely reflect just the tip of the iceberg (e.g., 10%) and the remaining 90% may never be known as many US-based spine surgeons fail to publish such adverse events as they are discoverable in a court of law and may lead to medicolegal suits. PMID:27843680

  19. Biomechanical analysis of cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Fantigrossi, Alfonso; Galbusera, Fabio; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Sassi, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Interbody fusions using intervertebral cages have become increasingly common in spinal surgery. Computational simulations were conducted in order to compare different cage designs in terms of their biomechanical interaction with the spinal structures. Differences in cage design and surgical technique may significantly affect the biomechanics of the fused spine segment, but little knowledge is available on this topic. In the present study, four 3D finite element models were developed, reproducing the human L4-L5 spinal unit in intact condition and after implantation of three different cage models. The intact model consisted of two vertebral bodies and relevant laminae, facet joints, main ligaments and disc. The instrumented models reproduced the post-operative conditions resulting after implant of the different cages. The three considered devices were hollow threaded titanium cages, the BAK (Zimmer Centerpulse, Warsaw, IN, USA), the Interfix and the Interfix Fly (both by Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA). Simulations were run imposing various loading conditions, under a constant compressive preload. A great increase in the stiffness induced on the spinal segment by all cages was observed in all the considered loading cases. Stress distributions on the bony surface were evaluated and discussed. The differences observed between the biomechanics of the instrumented models were associated with the geometrical and surgical features of the devices.

  20. Retrograde ejaculation after anterior lumbar interbody fusion: transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal exposure.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Rick C; Kenneth Burkus, J; LeHuec, Jean-Charles

    2003-05-15

    In this multicenter, prospective, 2-year study, 146 male patients underwent a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with a tapered threaded titanium fusion device. All the patients were advised before surgery of the risk for retrograde ejaculation. After surgery, any case of retrograde ejaculation was recorded as an adverse event, and the patient was observed up for the remainder of the study. To determine the incidence of retrograde ejaculation in male patients treated for single-level degenerative lumbar disc disease at L4-L5 or L5-S1 with a stand-alone anterior interbody fusion using tapered, threaded titanium fusion cages. The incidence of retrograde ejaculation in men after anterior lumbosacral spinal surgery has been reported to range from 0.42% to 5.9%. Various risk factors that increase the chance of retrograde ejaculation have been proposed. In this prospective study, 146 male patients underwent an open surgical exposure of the lumbosacral junction and a single-level interbody fusion at either L4-L5 or L5-S1. Assessment of a patient's clinical outcome was based on written questionnaires at 6 weeks and then 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Patients were questioned about adverse events at each of these assessments, and any case of retrograde ejaculation was recorded and followed. Retrograde ejaculation developed in 6 of the 146 men after open anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery. Two cases (1.7%; 2/116) involved patients who underwent a retroperitoneal surgical exposure. Four cases (13.3%; 4/30) involved patients who had a transperitoneal surgical exposure. This difference is statistically significant according to Fisher's exact test (P = 0.017). At 12 months after surgery, 2 patients had resolution of their symptoms: 1 in the retroperitoneal approach group and 1 in the transperitoneal group. At the final 2-year follow-up, no changes in symptoms were reported. One patient in the retroperitoneal approach group (0.86%) and three patients in

  1. [Interbody arthrodesis of the lumbar vertebrae using retroperitoneal videoendoscopy. A preliminary study of 38 cases].

    PubMed

    Husson, J L; Le Huec, J C; Polard, J L; Trébuchet, G; Lesprit, E; Bossis, J M

    1998-11-01

    To report a series of 38 patients presenting retroperitoneoscopic inter-body fusion of the lumbar spine from L2 to L5, performed between 1995 and 1998. This series included 25 women and 13 men aged from 16 to 74 years (mean age: 48.5 years). Surgery was performed in 32 patients for primary degenerative or post-operative instability of the lumbar spine, in five patients for painful sequels of burst fracture, and in one patient for sequels of disc infection. The main complaint was lumbar pain but a real sciatic pain was present in nine patients and was not a contraindication for this surgery. Standard X-rays were performed for each patient, and MRI performed in 30 patients confirmed the diagnosis and was also useful in determining vascular abnormalities. A cast immobilisation of the lumbar spine was done as a preoperative test in every patient. Forty-two levels were fused: 31 with a cage filled with cancellus bone and screwed between the end plates, and 11 with cancellus bone alone or in association with bone substitute, such as beta TCP. Post-operative complications included only a transient paresthesia of the thigh in two cases and a chyloretroperitoneum spontaneously resolutive. After 2.3 months of plaster immobilisation with a follow-up of 11.4 months, patient satisfaction rate was 84.5%, with 68.5% reporting no further back pain. The improvement was estimated by Prolo score. Fusion was considered effective by X-ray examination in all patients with an increase in the intervertebral space of 35% and a recovery of the local lordosis of 15%. Retroperitoneoscopic surgery is an elegant and secure method for lumbar interbody fusion of L2 to L5 with very few postoperative complications.

  2. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lytic spondylolisthesis: restoration of sagittal balance using insert-and-rotate interbody spacers.

    PubMed

    Sears, William

    2005-01-01

    The role of surgical correction of sagittal plane deformity in cases of lytic spondylolisthesis remains controversial. While some early evidence is emerging of the possible short- and long-term benefits of restoring spinal balance, many surgeons have been concerned about the associated risks. The insert-and-rotate posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) technique, first described by Jaslow in 1946, may enable surgeons to safely and effectively correct sagittal balance through a single posterior approach. To determine whether the focal kyphosis and subluxation associated with a lytic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis can be safely and effectively corrected using a single-stage posterior distraction/reduction technique and insert-and-rotate interbody fusion spacers. A prospective, single cohort, observational study of the clinical outcomes and retrospective radiological review, in a series of 18 consecutive patients with lytic spondylolisthesis Grades I to IV, operated between September 2000 and December 2002. Mean age of 50.2 years (range, 15.5 to 77.8 years). Principal indication for surgery was relief of radicular pain secondary to foraminal stenosis in 16 of 18 patients, and back pain was the principal symptom in 2 patients. Mean preoperative slip was 30.2% (range, 9% to 78%). Mean preoperative focal lordosis was 10.6 degrees (range, -12 to 33 degrees). Minimum 12-month follow-up was available on all patients except one, who died of unrelated causes after his 6-month visit. Patients completed Visual Analogue Pain Score (VAS), Low Back Outcome Score (LBOS), Short Form (SF)-12 and patient satisfaction questionnaires. Pre- and postoperative measurements of the percentage slip and lumbar lordosis of the involved segments were available on 13 patients. SURGICAL METHODS: Decompressive laminectomy was followed by reduction of the spondylolisthesis with the aid of intervertebral disc space spreaders and supplementary pedicle screw instrumentation. The vertebral bodies were

  3. A Change in Lumbar Sagittal Alignment After Single-level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Normal Sagittal Balance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Seung Heon; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2017-08-01

    Retrospective analysis. The object is to assess the correlation between whole lumbar lordosis (LL) and the segmental angle (SA) after single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The restoration of the SA at lower lumbar spine is meaningful, considering it contributes approximately 60% of LL, and revision surgery due to flat back or adjacent segment pathology was necessary decades after the initial surgery. However, little is known about the change of whole lumbar curvature after single-level lower lumbar fusion surgery, especially for balanced spine. We included 41 consecutive patients (M:F=9:32; mean age, 59.8±9.3 y) with a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery for low-grade degenerative spinal spondylolisthesis, with C7 plumb line of <5 cm and ≥2-year follow-up period. The operated levels were L4-L5 in 34 patients and L5-S1 in 7 patients. Whole LL, SA, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope were compared. According to the Macnab criteria, a favorable outcome (excellent, 21; good, 15) was achieved in 36/41 (88%; excellent, 21; good, 15) patients. LL and SA were significantly changed from -50.8±9.9 to -54.6±11.1 degrees and -15.6±6.1 to -18.7±5.1 degrees (P<0.01), and a positive correlation (r=0.43, P=0.01) was observed between LL and SA at postoperative month 24. The changes to the pelvic tilt and sacral slope were not significant. Whole lumbar sagittal alignment was influenced by single SA. Therefore, obtaining adequate segmental lordosis is desirable considering the effect on the whole spine for a long time.

  4. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion using traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Several biomechanical studies have demonstrated the favorable mechanical properties of the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw. However, no reports have examined surgical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with CBT screw fixation for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) compared with those after PLIF using traditional pedicle screw (PS) fixation. The purposes of this study were thus to elucidate surgical outcomes after PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS and to compare these results with those after PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS (CBT group; mean followup 35 months). A historical control group consisted of 82 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with traditional PS fixation (PS group; mean follow-up 40 months). Clinical status was assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale score. Fusion status was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT. The need for additional surgery and surgery-related complications was also evaluated. RESULTS The mean JOA score improved significantly from 13.7 points before surgery to 23.3 points at the latest follow-up in the CBT group (mean recovery rate 64.4%), compared with 14.4 points preoperatively to 22.7 points at final follow-up in the PS group (mean recovery rate 55.8%; p < 0.05). Solid spinal fusion was achieved in 84 patients from the CBT group (88.4%) and in 79 patients from the PS group (96.3%, p > 0.05). Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease developed in 3 patients from the CBT group (3.2%) compared with 9 patients from the PS group (11.0%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS provided comparable improvement of clinical symptoms with PLIF using traditional PS fixation. However, the successful fusion rate tended to be lower in the CBT group than in the PS group, although the difference was not statistically significant between the 2 groups.

  5. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P.; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Elowitz, Eric; Härtl, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p < 0.001), VAS buttock (4.66 versus 1.97, p = 0.002), VAS leg (4.55 versus 1.96, p < 0.001), and ODI (21.7 versus 12.1, p < 0.001) scores. There was a significant increase in the average disk height (6.49 versus 8.18 mm, p = 0.037) and foraminal height (15.6 versus 18.53 mm, p = 0.0001), and a significant reduction in the listhesis (5.13 versus 3.15 mm, p = 0.005). The subsidence of 0.66 mm (7.4%) observed at the latest follow-up was not significant (p = 0.35). Conclusions Midterm results indicate that expandable PEEK spacers can effectively and durably restore disk and foraminal height and improve

  6. Comparison of complication rates of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and lateral lumbar interbody fusion: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) are 2 currently popular techniques for lumbar arthrodesis. The authors compare the total risk of each procedure, along with other important complication outcomes. METHODS This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies (up to May 2015) that reported complications of either MI-TLIF or LLIF were identified from a search in the PubMed database. The primary outcome was overall risk of complication per patient. Secondary outcomes included risks of sensory deficits, temporary neurological deficit, permanent neurological deficit, intraoperative complications, medical complications, wound complications, hardware failure, subsidence, and reoperation. RESULTS Fifty-four studies were included for analysis of MI-TLIF, and 42 studies were included for analysis of LLIF. Overall, there were 9714 patients (5454 in the MI-TLIF group and 4260 in the LLIF group) with 13,230 levels fused (6040 in the MI-TLIF group and 7190 in the LLIF group). A total of 1045 complications in the MI-TLIF group and 1339 complications in the LLIF group were reported. The total complication rate per patient was 19.2% in the MI-TLIF group and 31.4% in the LLIF group (p < 0.0001). The rate of sensory deficits and temporary neurological deficits, and permanent neurological deficits was 20.16%, 2.22%, and 1.01% for MI-TLIF versus 27.08%, 9.40%, and 2.46% for LLIF, respectively (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.002, respectively). Rates of intraoperative and wound complications were 3.57% and 1.63% for MI-TLIF compared with 1.93% and 0.80% for LLIF, respectively (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.034, respectively). No significant differences were noted for medical complications or reoperation. CONCLUSIONS While there was a higher overall complication rate with LLIF, MI-TLIF and LLIF both have

  7. Comparison of outcomes between minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and traditional posterior lumbar intervertebral fusion in obese patients with lumbar disk prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Peng; An, Ji-Long; Sun, Ya-Peng; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the curative effect between minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) and the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in obese patients with lumbar disk prolapse. Patients and methods In this study, 72 patients who underwent lumbar disk prolapse therapy in the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University between March 2011 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed and were divided into two groups, MIS-TLIF group (n=35) and PLIF group (n=37), according to different surgical procedures. Several clinical parameters were compared between these two groups. Results Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, less postoperative drainage and shorter postoperative time in bed; moreover, patients in the MIS-TLIF group had lower levels of serum creatine kinase on 1, 3 and 5 postoperative days. At the 3- and 6-month follow-up, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores of low back pain of patients in the MIS-TLIF group were significantly reduced and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores were increased, whereas the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion Obese patients can achieve good efficacy with MIS-TLIF or PLIF treatment, but MIS-TLIF surgery showed longer operative time, fewer traumas and bleeding volume, less incidence of short-term pain, low complication rate and faster postoperative recovery. PMID:28176906

  8. Circumferential Fusion: A Comparative Analysis Between Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Posterior Pedicle Screw Fixation and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for L5-S1 Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Tye, Erik Y; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Alonso, Andrea S; Xiao, Roy; Steinmetz, Michael P; Mroz, Thomas E; Savage, Jason W

    2017-08-15

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screws (ALIFPS) offer significantly higher radiographic fusion rates than other fusion techniques for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). As it stands, there is a relative paucity of comparative data of the two techniques. To define the clinical, radiographic, and financial differences between TLIF and ALIFPS for L5-S1 IS. A retrospective cohort study conducted at a single-tertiary care center. 66 patients who underwent either TLIF or ALIPFS for L5-S1 IS at a single-tertiary care center between 2009-2014. Self-reported health status measures, including the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Radiographic parameters including pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, segmental lordosis, total lordosis, degree of slip, disc height, and L1-Axis S1 Distance (LASD). Cost measures included in-hospital charges, hospital length of stay (LOS), and post-admission costs out to 1 year. Quality of life (QoL) outcome scores, radiographic data, and financial data were collected with a minimum of 1-year follow up. Clinical results were investigated using the Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and EuroQol-5 Dimension Health State (EQ-5D). Radiographic measurements included lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, height of disc, L-1 axis S-1 distance (LASD), and the degree of slip. Cost data were generated based on patient-level resource utilization. Comparative data were presented as median with interquartile range (IQR). Continuous variables were compared using either independent student t-tests assuming unequal variance or Whitney-Mann U tests for parametric and non-parametric variables, respectively. The minimally clinical important difference (MCID) used for each questionnaire was as follows: PDQ (26), PHQ-9 (5), and EQ-5D

  9. Evaluation of ABM/P-15 versus autogenous bone in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Blake P.; Lindley, Emily M.; Turner, A. Simon; Seim III, Howard B.; Benedict, James; Burger, Evalina L.

    2010-01-01

    A prospective, randomized study was performed in an ovine model to compare the efficacy of an anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix combined with a synthetic 15 amino acid residue (ABM/P-15) in facilitating lumbar interbody fusion when compared with autogenous bone harvested from the iliac crest. P-15 is a biomimetic to the cell-binding site of Type-I collagen for bone-forming cells. When combined with ABM, it creates the necessary scaffold to initiate cell invasion, binding, and subsequent osteogenesis. In this study, six adult ewes underwent anterior-lateral interbody fusion at L3/L4 and L4/L5 using PEEK interbody rings filled with autogenous bone at one level and ABM/P-15 at the other level and no additional instrumentation. Clinical CT scans were obtained at 3 and 6 months; micro-CT scans and histomorphometry analyses were performed after euthanization at 6 months. Clinical CT scan analysis showed that all autograft and ABM/P-15 treated levels had radiographically fused outside of the rings at the 3-month study time point. Although the clinical CT scans of the autograft treatment group showed significantly better fusion within the PEEK rings than ABM/P-15 at 3 months, micro-CT scans, clinical CT scans, and histomorphometric analyses showed there were no statistical differences between the two treatment groups at 6 months. Thus, ABM/P-15 was as successful as autogenous bone graft in producing lumbar spinal fusion in an ovine model, and it should be further evaluated in clinical studies. PMID:20694847

  10. Evaluation of ABM/P-15 versus autogenous bone in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Blake P; Lindley, Emily M; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Benedict, James; Burger, Evalina L; Patel, Vikas V

    2010-12-01

    A prospective, randomized study was performed in an ovine model to compare the efficacy of an anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix combined with a synthetic 15 amino acid residue (ABM/P-15) in facilitating lumbar interbody fusion when compared with autogenous bone harvested from the iliac crest. P-15 is a biomimetic to the cell-binding site of Type-I collagen for bone-forming cells. When combined with ABM, it creates the necessary scaffold to initiate cell invasion, binding, and subsequent osteogenesis. In this study, six adult ewes underwent anterior-lateral interbody fusion at L3/L4 and L4/L5 using PEEK interbody rings filled with autogenous bone at one level and ABM/P-15 at the other level and no additional instrumentation. Clinical CT scans were obtained at 3 and 6 months; micro-CT scans and histomorphometry analyses were performed after euthanization at 6 months. Clinical CT scan analysis showed that all autograft and ABM/P-15 treated levels had radiographically fused outside of the rings at the 3-month study time point. Although the clinical CT scans of the autograft treatment group showed significantly better fusion within the PEEK rings than ABM/P-15 at 3 months, micro-CT scans, clinical CT scans, and histomorphometric analyses showed there were no statistical differences between the two treatment groups at 6 months. Thus, ABM/P-15 was as successful as autogenous bone graft in producing lumbar spinal fusion in an ovine model, and it should be further evaluated in clinical studies.

  11. Clinical and radiological outcomes of spinal endoscopic discectomy-assisted oblique lumbar interbody fusion: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Direct neural decompression cannot be achieved by performing lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). To overcome the indirect decompressive effect of LLIF, additional endoscopic discectomy with oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) has been attempted. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent OLIF with additional endoscopic discectomy. METHODS Spinal endoscopic discectomy-assisted OLIF was attempted to remove herniated disc material. Only patients with a follow-up time that exceeded 12 months were enrolled. Clinical parameters examined were the Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale scores of back and leg pain. Postoperative MRI was also performed. RESULTS Fourteen patients were enrolled. Central and foraminal disc herniations were evident in 8 and 6 patients, respectively. Concomitant central or foraminal herniated discs were removed completely after additional endoscopic discectomy, and disc removal was confirmed by postoperative MRI. Mean preoperative visual analog scale scores and Oswestry Disability Index scores improved postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS OLIF with additional endoscopic discectomy results in successful direct neural decompression without posterior decompressive procedures. Endoscopic assistance might overcome the limitations of LLIF.

  12. Neurological complications using a novel retractor system for direct lateral minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Sedra, Fady; Lee, Robert; Dominguez, Ignacio; Wilson, Lester

    2016-09-01

    We describe our experience using the RAVINE retractor (K2M, Leesburg, VA, USA) to gain access to the lateral aspect of the lumbar spine through a retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative neurological adverse events, utilising the mentioned retractor system, were recorded and analysed. We included 140 patients who underwent minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (MI-LLIF) for degenerative spinal conditions between 2011 and 2015 at two major spinal centres. A total of 228 levels were treated, 35% one level, 40% two level, 20% three level and 5% 4 level surgeries. The L4/5 level was instrumented in 28% of cases. 12/140 patients had postoperative neurological complications. Immediately after surgery, 5% of patients (7/140) had transient symptoms in the thigh ranging from sensory loss, pain and paraesthesia, all of which recovered within 12weeks following surgery. There were five cases of femoral nerve palsy (3.6% - two ipsilateral and three contralateral), all of which recovered completely with no residual sensory or motor deficit within 6months. MI-LLIF done with help of the described retractor system has proved a safe and efficient way to achieve interbody fusion with minimal complications, mainly nerve related, that recovered quickly. Judicious use of the technique to access the L4/5 level is advised.

  13. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  14. Beta-tricalcium phosphate as a substitute for autograft in interbody fusion cages in the canine lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Takashiro; Kubo, Yoshichika; Iwata, Hiroo; Taki, Waro

    2002-10-01

    An interbody fusion cage has been introduced for cervical anterior interbody fusion. Autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies. Thus, donor site-related complications can still occur. In this study a synthetic ceramic, beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), was examined as a substitute for autograft bone in a canine lumbar spine model. In 12 dogs L-1 to L-4 vertebrae were exposed via a posterolateral approach, and discectomy and placement of interbody fusion cages were performed at two intervertebral disc spaces. One cage was filled with autograft (Group A) and the other with TCP (Group B). The lumbar spine was excised at 16 weeks postsurgery, and biomechanical, microradiographic, and histological examinations were performed. Both the microradiographic and histological examinations revealed that fusion occurred in five (41.7%) of 12 operations performed in Group A and in six (50%) of 12 operations performed in Group B. The mean percentage of trabecular bone area in the cages was 54.6% in Group A and 53.8% in Group B. There were no significant intergroup differences in functional unit stiffness. Good histological and biomechanical results were obtained for TCP-filled interbody fusion cages. The results were comparable with those obtained using autograft-filled cages, suggesting that there is no need to harvest iliac bone or to use allo- or xenografts to increase the interlocking strength between the cage and vertebral bone to achieve anterior cervical interbody fusion.

  15. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  16. Fusion rate following extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Berjano, Pedro; Langella, Francesco; Damilano, Marco; Pejrona, Matteo; Buric, Josip; Ismael, Maryem; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Lamartina, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar fusion has been found to be a clinically effective procedure in adult patients. The lateral transpsoas approach allows for direct visualization of the intervertebral space, significant support of the vertebral anterior column, while avoiding the complications associated with the posterior procedures. The aim of this study is to determine the fusion rate of inter body fusion using computed tomography in patients treated by extreme lateral intersomatic fusion (XLIF) technique. All patients intervened by XLIF procedure between 2009 and 2013 by a single operating team at a single institution were recruited for this study. A clinical evaluation and a CT scan of the involved spinal segments were then performed with at least 1-year follow-up following the standard clinical practice in the center. A total of 77 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 53 were available for review with a mean follow-up of 34.5 (12-62) months. A total of 68 (87.1 %) of the 78 operated levels were considered as completely fused, 8 (10.2 %) were considered as stable, probably fused, and 2 (2.6 %) of the operated levels were diagnosed as pseudarthrosis. When stratified by type of graft material complete fusion was obtained in 75 % of patients in which autograft was used to fill the cages, compared to 89 % of patients in which calcium triphosphate was used, and 83 % of patients in which Attrax™ was used. Reports of XLIF fusion rate in the literature vary from 85 to 93 % at 1-year follow-up. Fusion rate in our series corroborates data from previous publications. The results of this series confirm that anterior inter body fusion by means of XLIF approach is a technique that achieves high fusion rate and satisfactory clinical outcomes.

  17. Comparison of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Monosegmental Vacuum Phenomenon within an Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki-Chan; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Dae-Hyun; Youn, Ji-Hong; Lee, Woon-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc. Overview of Literature The vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc is a serious form of degenerative disease that destabilizes the intervertebral body. Outcomes of PLIF and PLF in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon are unclear. Methods Monosegmental instrumented PLIF and PLF was performed on 84 degenerative lumbar disease patients with monosegmental vacuum phenomenon (PLIF, n=38; PLF, n=46). Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Clinical outcomes of leg and back pain were assessed using visual analogue scales for leg pain (LVAS) and back pain (BVAS), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The radiographic outcome was the estimated bony union rate. Results LVAS, BVAS, and ODI improved in both groups. There was no significant difference in the degree of these improvements between PLIF and PLF patients (p>0.05). Radiological union rate was 91.1% in PLIF group and 89.4% in PLF group at postoperative 24 months (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences in clinical results and union rates were found between PLIF and PLF patients. Selection of the operation technique will reflect the surgeon's preferences and patient condition. PMID:26949464

  18. A randomized double-blind prospective study of the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic fields for interbody lumbar fusions

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, V. )

    1990-07-01

    A randomized double-blind prospective study of pulsed electromagnetic fields for lumbar interbody fusions was performed on 195 subjects. There were 98 subjects in the active group and 97 subjects in the placebo group. A brace containing equipment to induce an electromagnetic field was applied to patients undergoing interbody fusion in the active group, and a sham brace was used in the control group. In the active group there was a 92% success rate, while the control group had a 65% success rate (P greater than 0.005). The effectiveness of bone graft stimulation with the device is thus established.

  19. Minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation and lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Xu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhang, Bi; Lin, Qiuyan; He, Mingchang

    2013-08-01

    Minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases has won the support of many surgeons. However, few data are available regarding clinical research on unilateral pedicle screw fixation associated with minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of lumbar spinal diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes in a selected series of patients with lumbar degenerative diseases treated with minimally invasive unilateral vs classic bilateral pedicle screw fixation and lumbar interbody fusion. Patients in the unilateral group (n=43) underwent minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation with the Quadrant system (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee). The bilateral group (n=42) underwent bilateral instrumentation via the classic approach. Visual analog scale pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index scores, fusion rate, operative time, blood loss, and complications were analyzed. Mean operative time was 75 minutes in the unilateral group and 95 minutes in the bilateral group. Mean blood loss was 220 mL in the unilateral group and 450 mL in the bilateral group. Mean postoperative visual analog scale pain score was 3.10±0.16 in the unilateral group and 3.30±1.10 in the bilateral group. Mean postoperative Oswestry Disability Index score was 15.67±2.3 in the unilateral group and 14.93±2.6 in the bilateral group. Successful fusion was achieved in 92.34% of patients in the unilateral group and 93.56% of patients in the bilateral group. Minimally invasive unilateral pedicle screw fixation is an effective and reliable option for the surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. It causes less blood loss, requires less operative time, and has a fusion rate comparable with that of conventional bilateral fixation. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Evaluation of a PEEK titanium composite interbody spacer in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model: a biomechanical, micro-computed tomography, and histologic analyses.

    PubMed

    McGilvray, Kirk C; Waldorff, Erik I; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Zhang, Nianli; Linovitz, Raymond J; Ryaby, James T; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2017-07-24

    The most commonly used materials used for interbody cages are titanium metal and polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Both of these materials have demonstrated good biocompatibility. A major disadvantage associated with solid titanium cages is their radiopacity, limiting post-operative monitoring of spinal fusion via standard imaging modalities. However, PEEK is radiolucent, allowing for temporal assessment of the fusion mass by clinicians. On the other hand, PEEK is hydrophobic, which can limit bony in-growth. While both PEEK and titanium have demonstrated clinical success in obtaining a solid spinal fusion, innovations are being developed in order to improve fusion rates and create stronger constructs using hybrid additive manufacturing approaches by incorporating both materials into a single interbody device. The purpose of this study was to examine the interbody fusion characteristic of a PEEK - titanium composite (PTC) cage for use in lumbar fusion. Thirty-four mature female sheep underwent two level (L2 - L3 and L4-L5) interbody fusion using either a PEEK or PTC cage (one of each per animal). Animals were sacrificed at 0, 8, 12 and 18-weeks post-surgery. Post-sacrifice, each surgically treated functional spinal unit underwent non-destructive kinematic testing, micro-CT scanning and histomorphometric analyses. Relative to the standard PEEK cages, the PTC constructs demonstrated significant reductions in ranges of motion and a significant increase in stiffness. These biomechanical findings were reinforced by the presence of significantly more bone at the fusion site as well as in-growth into the porous endplates. Overall, the results indicate that PTC interbody devices could potentially lead to a more robust intervertebral fusion relative to a standard PEEK device in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Matched Comparison of Fusion Rates between Hydroxyapatite Demineralized Bone Matrix and Autograft in Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Nam; Shin, Dong Ah; Yi, Seong; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the fusion rate of a hydroxyapatite demineralized bone matrix (DBM) with post-laminectomy acquired autograft in lumbar interbody fusion surgery and to evaluate the correlation between fusion rate and clinical outcome. Methods From January 2013 to April 2014, 98 patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion surgery with hydroxyapatite DBM (HA-DBM group) in our institute. Of those patients, 65 received complete CT scans for 12 months postoperatively in order to evaluate fusion status. For comparison with autograft, we selected another 65 patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion surgery with post-laminectomy acquired autograft (Autograft group) during the same period. Both fusion material groups were matched in terms of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and bone mineral density (BMD). To evaluate the clinical outcomes, we analyzed the results of visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results We reviewed the CT scans of 149 fusion levels in 130 patients (HA-DBM group, 75 levels/65 patients; Autograft group, 74 levels/65 patients). Age, sex, BMI, and BMD were not significantly different between the groups (p=0.528, p=0.848, p=0.527, and p=0.610, respectively). The HA-DBM group showed 39 of 75 fused levels (52%), and the Autograft group showed 46 of 74 fused levels (62.2%). This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.21). In the HA-DBM group, older age and low BMD were significantly associated with non-fusion (61.24 vs. 66.68, p=0.027; -1.63 vs. -2.29, p=0.015, respectively). VAS and ODI showed significant improvement after surgery when fusion was successfully achieved in both groups (p=0.004, p=0.002, HA-DBM group; p=0.012, p=0.03, Autograft group). Conclusion The fusion rates of the hydroxyapatite DBM and Autograft groups were not significantly different. In addition, clinical outcomes were similar between the groups. However, older age and low BMD are risk factors that might

  2. Long-term follow-up of minimal-access and open posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Nicholas K; Ferch, Richard D; Ghahreman, Ali; Bogduk, Nikolai

    2013-03-01

    Although posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is regarded as an effective treatment for spondylolisthesis, few studies have reported comprehensive, long-term outcome data, and none has investigated the incidence of deterioration of outcomes. To determine and compare the success rates and long-term stability of outcomes of open PLIF and minimal-access PLIF in the treatment of radicular pain and back pain in patients with spondylolisthesis. Forty-three patients were followed for a minimum of 3 years. They completed a Short-Form Health Survey and visual analog scores for back pain and leg pain and underwent lumbar spine radiography. Outcomes were compared with baseline data and 12-month data. Surgery succeeded in reducing listhesis and increasing disc height, but had little effect on lumbar lordosis or the angulation of the segment treated. At 12 months after surgery, listhesis was reduced, disc height was increased, leg pain was reduced or eliminated, and physical functioning restored. Back pain was less often relieved. These outcomes were largely maintained over the ensuing 2 years. Only 5% to 10% of patients reported deterioration in their relief of pain. Depending on the definition adopted for success, the long-term success rate of PLIF may be as high as 70%. For the relief of leg pain, the success rates of open PLIF (70%) and minimal-access PLIF (67%) for spondylolisthesis are high and durable in the long-term. PLIF is less often successful in relieving back pain, but the outcomes are maintained. The outcomes of open PLIF and minimal-access PLIF were statistically indistinguishable. MCIC, minimally clinically important changeMPLIF, minimal-access posterior lumbar interbody fusionOPLIF, open-access posterior lumbar interbody fusionPLIF, posterior lumbar interbody fusionSF-36, Short-Form Health Survey.

  3. Radiographic changes in patients with pseudarthrosis after posterior lumbar interbody arthrodesis using carbon interbody cages: a prospective five-year study.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Tokumi; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Satake, Kotaro; Ito, Zenya; Yoshida, Go; Sakai, Yoshihito; Imagama, Shiro; Kawakami, Noriaki

    2014-05-21

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate longitudinal radiographic changes at up to five years in patients with pseudarthrosis after posterior lumbar interbody arthrodesis using carbon interbody cages. From 2003 to 2006, prospective longitudinal radiographic and CT (computed tomography) scan evaluations were made at up to five years after posterior lumbar interbody arthrodesis using carbon interbody cages at one or two levels in 153 consecutive patients. At the one-year evaluation, seventeen patients with early pseudarthrosis at nineteen levels were selected as subjects on the basis of one or more of the following characteristics: complete absence of osseous bridging between the upper and lower vertebrae, angular motion of ≥5°, and/or radiolucent zones surrounding the implant. Angular motion, continuity of osseous bridging, grafted bone quantity, and radiolucent zones around the pedicle screws and cages were observed annually until five years. The mean angular motion of five levels that exhibited ≥5° of motion at one year began to decrease significantly thereafter (p = 0.046), and no level showed movement of ≥5° at five years. The mean grade of the radiolucent zones around the screws on CT showed significant improvements at two years (p = 0.039) and three years (p < 0.01). The radiolucent zones around the screws disappeared at twelve of sixteen levels by five years, and the radiolucent zones around the cages disappeared in eleven of seventeen levels by five years. Of eighteen levels with early pseudarthrosis, seven (39%) were assessed as successfully fused at three years and twelve (67%) at five years. Four (80%) of five patients with a radiolucent zone of >1 mm around the entire cage on CT at one year showed continuing pseudarthrosis at five years, whereas only two (15%) of thirteen patients without this finding did (crude relative risk = 5.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 20.02). A radiolucent zone of >1 mm around the entire cage on CT at one

  4. Mini posterior lumbar interbody fusion with presacral screw stabilization in early lumbosacral instability

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Arjun; Kini, Abhishek R; Chacko, A; Sunil, Upadhyaya; Vinod, K; Geover, Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical options for the management of early lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability vary from open lumbar interbody fusion with transpedicular fixation to a variety of minimal access fusion and fixation procedures. We have used a combination of micro discectomy and axial lumbosacral interbody fusion with presacral screw fixation to treat symptomatic patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis or lumbosacral degenerative disc disease, which needed surgical stabilization. This study describes the above technique along with analysis of results. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with symptomatic lumbosacral (L5-S1) instability and degenerative lumbosacral disc disease were treated by micro discectomy and interbody fusion using presacral screw stabilization. Patients with history of bowel, bladder dysfunction and local anorectal diseases were excluded from this study. Postoperatively all patients were evaluated neurologically and radiologically for screw position, fusion and stability. Oswestry disability index was used to evaluate results. Results: We had nine females and three males with a mean age of 47.33 years (range 26–68 years). Postoperative assessment revealed three patients to have screw placed in anterior 1/4th of the 1st sacral body, in rest nine the screws were placed in the posterior 3/4th of sacral body. At 2 years followup, eight patients (67%) showed evidence of bridging trabeculae at bone graft site and none of the patients showed evidence of instability or implant failure. Conclusion: Presacral screw fixation along with micro discectomy is an effective procedure to manage early symptomatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability. PMID:26015626

  5. Endoscopic Foraminal Decompression Preceding Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion To Decrease The Incidence Of Post Operative Dysaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Katzell, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion has become a well established method to diminish axial back pain as well as radiculopathy in patients with degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and instability. The concept of indirect decompression of the neural foramen and spinal canal while performing fusion became popular in the mid 1990’s with description of ALIF techniques. Morphometric analysis confirmed the extent of decompression of posterior elements with interbody height restoration. In an attempt to diminish potential complications associated with anterior or posterior approaches to the spine for interbody fusion, and with the hope of accomplishing fusion in a less invasive manner, lateral lumbar interbody fusion has become quite popular. This transpsoas approach to the disc space has been associated with a high incidence of neurologic complications. Even though this is the first technique to routinely recommend EMG monitoring to increase safety in the approach, neurologic injuries still occur. A newer oblique lateral lumbar interbody (OLLIF) approach has recently been described to lessen the incidence of neurologic injury. This technique also advocates use of EMG testing to lessen neurologic trauma. In spite of this precaution, neurologic insult has not been eliminated. In fact, even in patients whose electrical stimulation thresholds suggested a safe entry space into the disc, transient dysaesthesia continues to occur in 20-25 percent of cases. Purpose This pilot study reflects data and observations of a subset of patients treated with endoscopic foraminotomy preceding oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF) to assess specifically potential improvements in dysaesthesia rates. Methods A select subset of patients undergoing OLLIF failed to meet electrodiagnostic criteria for safe disc access through Kambin’s triangle. These patients underwent an endoscopic foraminotomy and exiting nerve decompression prior to discectomy, endplate preparation and cage

  6. Arthrodesis Rate and Patient Reported Outcomes After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Utilizing a Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Coated PEEK Interbody Implant: A Retrospective, Observational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Sophea R.; Staples, Miranda; Liang, Kevin; Raiszadeh, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Background Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is utilized in symptomatic spinal disc destabilization due to degenerative lumbar disc disease, isthmic and degenerative spondylolisthesis, internal disc disruption, or pseudarthrosis after non-operative treatments fail. The addition of a plasma-sprayed titanium coating (PTC) to polyether ether ketone spacers (PEEK) may reduce the rate of implant subsidence or non-union secondary to poor osseous-integration of non-coated PEEK or metal interbody systems. Methods A retrospective, non-randomized, single-center chart review, evaluated the post-surgical follow-up data of patients receiving a PTC PEEK implant during single or multi-level ALIF procedures to determine the clinical efficacy and rate of arthrodesis after utilization of a coated spacer. Standard roentgenographs or computed tomography were used to identify successful arthrodesis following the ALIF procedure and longitudinal clinical improvements were determined by scores on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for low back and leg pain. Results Forty-four subjects (48% male, mean=53 years) were included in this chart review. Follow-up radiology demonstrated radiographic union with bridging bone formation across the interbody space for 42/44 (96%) individuals with solid arthrodesis occurring at an average of 7.3 ± 2.3 months. Subjects demonstrated significant improvement in VAS low back pain (4.5 ± 2.4 point improvement, p=0.0001) and VAS leg pain (4.1 ± 3.3 point improvement, p=0.0001). While there was a significant reduction in the improvement of VAS low back pain of Worker's Compensation claimants as compared to other patients (3.9 ± 2.4 vs. 5.3 ± 2.1), there was no difference in VAS low back pain or leg pain when the data was stratified by gender, age, tobacco use, comorbidities, prior surgery, fusion construct length, use of supplemental posterior instrumentation, BMI, or diagnosis. Conclusions This study provides support that the addition of a PTC coating

  7. [Short-term effectiveness of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 intervertebral cage for lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lower lumbar degenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Song, Yueming; Kong, Qingquan; Gong, Quan; Pei, Fuxing; Tu, Chongqi

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the short-term effectiveness of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 (n-HA/PA66) intervertebral cage for lumbar interbody fusion in the patients with lower lumbar degenerative diseases. Between January and October 2011, 20 patients with lower lumbar degenerative diseases underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with n-HA/PA66 intervertebral cage. There were 8 males and 12 females, aged 22-80 years (mean, 51 years). The disease duration was 1 to 24 months (mean, 4 months). L4,5 fusion was performed in 8 cases, L5, S1 fusion in 9 cases, and L4-S1 fusion in 3 cases. Among 20 cases, 3 were diagnosed as having recurrent lumbar disc protrusion, 5 as having lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 9 as having lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, and 3 as having lumbar spinal stenosis. The intervertebral height and lordosis were measured on X-ray film to assess the surgical correction and postoperative sustain while osseous fusion was observed on 3-dimensional CT. The Oswestry disability index (ODI) and short-form 36 health survey scale (SF-36) scores were obtained to assess the status of clinical recovery. All patients had incision healing by first intention. The pain and numb were relieved in varying degrees after operation. No cerebrospinal leakage, nerve root injury, or wound infection was occurred. All patients were followed up 6-9 months (mean, 7 months). No cage displacement or collapse was found. The intervertebral height and lordosis of single fusion segment were significantly improved at 3 days and 3, 6 months after operation when compared with those at preoperation (P < 0.01); there was no significant difference among each time point after operation (P > 0.05). The fusion rate was 74% at 3 months after operation and 96% at 6 months after operation, with an average of 4 months (range, 3-9 months) for interbody fusion. The ODI and SF-36 scores were significantly improved at 3 days and 6 months after operation when compared with the scores at

  8. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone cage after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Chung, Hung-Tae; Cho, Jae-Lim; Kim, Dong-Jun; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of cage subsidence after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) conducted using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, and to identify associated risk factors. Although various rates of cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion have been reported, few studies have addressed subsidence rate after MITLIF using PEEK cage. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone MITLIF using a PEEK cage with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included in this study. Cage subsidence was defined to have occurred when a cage was observed to sink into an adjacent vertebral body by ≥2 mm on the postoperative or serial follow-up lateral radiographs. The demographic variables considered to affect cage subsidence were the following: age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, diagnosis, number of fusion segment, and the quality/quantity of back muscle, and the cage-related variables considered were: level of fusion, intervertebral angle, cage size, cage position, and postoperative distraction of disc height. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore relations between these variables and cage subsidence. : For the 122 cages inserted, the rate of cage subsidence was 14.8% (18 cages), and cage subsidence occurred within 7.2±8.5 (1-25) months of surgery. The odds ratios for factors found to significantly increase the risk of cage subsidence were; 1.950 (95% confidence interval, 1.002-4.224) for L5-S1 level, and 1.018 (95% confidence interval, 1.000-1.066) for anterior cage position. The rate of PEEK cage subsidence after MITLIF was relatively low. End-plate manipulation and cage insertion during MITLIF were not influenced by a small operation window.

  9. The Multiple Benefits of Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery: Results Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela R.; Witek-Janusek, Linda; Nockels, Russ P.; Peterson, Jonna; Mathews, Herb L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) offers equivalent postoperative fusion rates compared to posterior lumbar fusion (PLF) and minimizes the amount of iatrogenic injury to the spinal muscles. The objective of this study was to examine the difference in pain perception, stress, mood disturbance, quality of life, and immunological indices throughout the perioperative course among patients undergoing TLIF and PLF. A prospective, nonrandomized descriptive design was used to evaluate these measures among patients undergoing TLIF (n = 17) or PLF (n = 18) at 1 week prior to surgery (T1), the day of surgery (T2), 24 hours postoperatively (T3), and 6 weeks postoperatively (T4). Among TLIF patients, pain, stress, fatigue, and mood disturbance were significantly decreased at the 6-week follow-up visit (T4) compared to patients who underwent PLF. The TLIF group also demonstrated significantly higher levels (near baseline) of CD8 cells atT4 than the PLF group. Interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the TLIF group as well, which may be an indicator of ongoing nerve regeneration and healing. Knowledge concerning the effect of pain and the psychological experience on immunity among individuals undergoing spinal fusion can help nurses tailor interventions to improve outcomes, regardless of the approach used. PMID:18330408

  10. Automated Pressure-Controlled Discography in Patients Undergoing Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Discogenic Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Kyu; Shin, Dong Ah; Kim, Hyoung Ihl; Yi, Seong; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum

    2017-01-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To compare the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with or without automated pressure-controlled discography (APCD) before the procedure. Patients (n = 36) who underwent ALIF for lumbar discogenic back pain between 2008 and 2013 and were followed for more than 6 months were enrolled in this study. APCD was performed to identify discogenic back pain. Preoperative x-rays, computed tomography images, and magnetic resonance images were obtained. The intervertebral disc height, type of Modic change, grade of disc degeneration, and fusion rate were determined. Additionally, the presence or absence of high-intensity zone and vacuum disc were checked preoperatively. Clinical evaluation was performed by visual analog scale (0 = no pain, 10 = worst pain imaginable), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey before surgery and every 6 months postoperatively. The average patient age was 53.3 years (range, 31-73 years). The mean follow-up durations were 19.7 months. Seventeen patients (the APCD-ALIF group) underwent ALIF after APCD, and 19 patients underwent ALIF without APCD. The APCD-ALIF group had significantly improved clinical outcomes compared with the control group (visual analog scale score 1.8 ± 1.6 vs. 3.3 ± 2.4; P = 0.039: ODI score 6.7 ± 6.3 vs. 12.1 ± 6.8; P = 0.019). The surgical improvement rate was significantly associated with ODI score (P = 0.005). The results of this study confirm that APCD aids surgical outcomes of ALIF in patients with suspected lumbar discogenic pain. We recommend performing APCD before ALIF to confirm lumbar discogenic pain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Risk Factors and Management of Incidental Durotomy in Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Enders, Frederik; Ackemann, Amelie; Müller, Simon; Kiening, Karl; Orakcioglu, Berk

    2017-08-28

    This is a retrospective study analysis. In this retrospective study we evaluated risk factors for incidental durotomy and its impact on the postoperative course. Lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) is increasingly applied for the treatment of degenerative instability. A known complication is incidental durotomy. A cohort of 541 patients who underwent primary LIF surgery between 2005 and 2015 was analyzed. Previous lumbar surgery, age, surgeon's experience, intraoperative use of a microscope, and the number of operated levels were assessed and the risk for incidental durotomy was estimated using the Log-likelihood test and Wald test, respectively. The association of incidental durotomy and outcome parameters was analyzed using the quantile regression model. In 77 (14.2%) patients intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula was observed. Previous lumbar surgery (P<0.001), number of operated levels (P=0.03), and surgeon's experience (P=0.01) were significantly associated with incidental durotomy. Incidental durotomy was significantly associated with a prolonged bed rest (P<0.001), hospital stay (P=0.041), and an increased use of postoperative antibiotics (P<0.001). Eleven of 77 patients with incidental durotomy (14.3%) developed postoperative CSF fistula of whom 10 (91%) needed revision surgery for dural repair. We could identify important risk factors for incidental durotomy in LIF surgery. In patients who had undergone previous lumbar surgery and those with multilevel disease particular precaution is required. Furthermore, we were able to verify the morbidity associated with CSF fistula as shown by increased immobilization and follow-up surgeries for postoperative CSF fistula which emphasizes the importance to develop strategies to minimize the risk for incidental durotomy.

  12. Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Low-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified significant risk factors for symptomatic ASP. We retrospectively studied records of 40 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Japan. The patients were followed for ≥ 4 years. Patients' medical records were retrospectively examined for evidence of symptomatic ASP. Age at time of surgery, sex, fusion level, whole lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, preexisting laminar inclination angle, and facet tropism at the cranial fusion segment were analyzed to identify risk factors for symptomatic ASP. Four patients (ASP group) developed symptomatic ASP at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion. There were no significant differences in age, sex, fusion level, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, or facet tropism at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion between the ASP and the non-ASP groups. In contrast, laminar inclination angle at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was significantly higher in the ASP group than in the non-ASP group. Four patients (10%) developed symptomatic ASP after PLIF with transpedicular fixation for adult low-grade IS. Preexisting laminar horizontalization at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was a significant risk factor for symptomatic ASP. PMID:24436872

  13. Miniopen Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Unilateral Fixation: A Comparison between Ipsilateral and Contralateral Reherniation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fubing; Jiang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors between ipsilateral and contralateral reherniation and to compare the effectiveness of miniopen transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with unilateral fixation for each group. From November 2007 to December 2014, clinical and radiographic data of each group (ipsilateral or contralateral reherniation) were collected and compared. Functional assessment (Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA)) and radiographic evaluation (fusion status, disc height, lumbar lordosis (LL), and functional spine unit (FSU) angle) were applied to compare surgical effect for each group preoperatively and at final followup. MacNab questionnaire was applied to further evaluate the satisfactory rate after the discectomy and fusion. No difference except pain-free interval was found between ipsilateral and contralateral groups. There was a significant difference in operative time between two groups. No differences were found in clinical and radiographic data for assessment of surgical effect between two groups. The satisfactory rate was decreasing in both groups with time passing after discectomy. Difference in pain-free interval may be a distinction for ipsilateral and contralateral reherniation. Miniopen TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation can be a recommendable way for single level reherniation regardless of ipsilateral or contralateral reherniation. PMID:27885358

  14. Risk of sympathectomy after anterior and lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedures.

    PubMed

    Hrabalek, Lumir; Sternbersky, Jan; Adamus, Milan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify retrospectively, lumbar sympathectomy (SE) using thermography (TG) and to evaluate clinically, the severity of post-sympathectomy (post-SE) dysfunction after anterior and lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedures (ALIF, XLIF). Twenty eight patients with suspected SE were referred for TG to both legs. They completed our questionnaire on severity of difficulties after SE. We evaluated the ability of physical examinations to reveal the SE in contrast to TG and compared the symptoms (warmer leg and inhibited leg sweating) of SE with questionnaire responses as subjective measure and TG as objective measure. SE was diagnosed in 0.5% after ALIF at L5/S1, in 15% after ALIF at Th12-L5 and in 4% after XLIF at T12-L5. SE severely reduced the quality of life in two cases. The ability to distinguish differences in leg temperature by palpation after SE was found in 32%. All physical examinations together were insufficient for reliably disclosing SE. Subjective symptoms of SE were often false positive and proven SE by TG was often a clinically false negative. This is the first study to examine post-SE dysfunction objectivelya using TG after ALIF and XLIF, and the first to evaluate clinically, the severity of the post-SE syndrome. Before surgery we cannot foresee potentially poor SE results. For this reason, injury to the sympathetic chain during surgery must be avoided. The advantage of TG for identifying SE is its non-invasiveness and reliability.

  15. Comparison of Outcomes of Anterior, Posterior, and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery at a Single Lumbar Level with Degenerative Spinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yi, Seong; Ha, Yoon; Shin, Dong Ah; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keun Su

    2017-05-01

    The fusion rate in spinal surgery may vary in relation to the technique, and it remains unknown which surgical technique provides the best fusion rate and surgical outcome. We aimed to compare radiologic and surgical results between 3 surgical techniques used for lumbar interbody fusion. Participants included 77 patients diagnosed with degenerative spinal stenosis including spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to surgical technique: anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF, n = 26), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF, n = 21), and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF, n = 30). Various radiologic parameters were measured, including fusion rates. Significant changes after surgery were observed in the ALIF group for the percentage of vertebral body slippage, anterior disk height, posterior disk height, and segmental range of movement (ROM). The fusion rate on computed tomography (CT) scan at the final follow-up was 69.2% in the ALIF group, 72.7% in the TLIF group, and 64.3% in the PLIF group. The cage subsidence rate 2 years after surgery was 15.4% in the ALIF group, 38.1% in the TLIF group, and 10% in the PLIF group. ALIF was associated with better restoration of segmental lordosis. The fusion rate on CT scan and with segmental ROM did not differ between the 3 groups. TLIF was associated with a better postoperative visual analog scale. PLIF showed the lowest cage subsidence rate. Therefore, it is difficult to know which surgical technique is better among the 3 groups because each surgical method has its own advantages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Correlation Between Cage Subsidence, Bone Mineral Density, and Clinical Results in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyu Won; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Do-Yoon; Shim, Hee Jong

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected radiographic and clinical data. This study aims to investigate the relationship between cage subsidence and bone mineral density (BMD), and to reveal the clinical implications of cage subsidence. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become one of the standard treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. However, cage subsidence might result in recurrent foraminal stenosis and deteriorate the clinical results. Furthermore, numbers of osteoporosis patients who underwent PLIF are increasing. Therefore, the information on the correlations between cage subsidence, BMD, and clinical results will be of great significance. A total 139 segments was included in this retrospective study. We examined functional rating index (Visual Analogue Scale for pain, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-36 score) preoperatively, and investigated their changes after postoperative 1 year. Correlation between cage subsidence and clinical scores was investigated. Plain anteroposterior and lateral radiograph were taken preoperatively and postoperatively and during follow-up. Preoperative BMD and subsidence measured by postoperative 1 year 3-dimensional computed tomography were achieved and their correlation was assessed. All postoperative clinical scores improved significantly compared with preoperative ones (pain Visual Analogue Scale: 7.34-2.89, Oswestry Disability Index: 25.34-15.86, Short Form-36: 26.45-16.46, all P<0.001). BMD showed significant weak correlation with subsidence (r=-0.285, P<0.001). Severe osteoporotic segments (T score <-3.0) had more risk to develop severe subsidence (>3 mm) compared with the segments in which T score were higher than -3.0 (P=0.012), and its odds ratio was 8.44. Subsidence had no significant correlation with all clinical scores. This study revealed that cage subsidence is relevant to BMD. However, it was demonstrated that subsidence is not related to the clinical deterioration. Therefore

  17. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

    2003-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed using a posterior approach did not cause the same increase in spinal stiffness seen with pedicle screw instrumentation, and we concluded that cages should not be used posteriorly without other forms of fixation. On the other hand, placement of two cages using a posterior approach does have the disadvantage of risk to the bilateral nerve roots. We therefore performed a prospective study to determine whether PLIF can be accomplished by utilizing a single diagonal fusion cage with the application of supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation. Twenty-seven patients underwent a PLIF using one single fusion cage (BAK, Sulzer Spine-Tech, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted posterolaterally and oriented anteromedially on the symptomatic side with unilateral facetectomy and at the same level supplemental fixation with a transpedicular screw/rod system. The internal fixation systems included 12 SOCON spinal systems (Aesculap AG, Germany) and 15 TSRH spinal systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, USA). The inclusion criteria were grade 1 to 2 lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and recurrent lumbar disc herniations with instability. Patients had at least 1 year of low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica and a severely restricted functional ability in individuals aged 28-55 years. Patients with more than grade 2 spondylolisthesis or adjacent-level degeneration were excluded from the study. Patients were clinically assessed prior to surgery by an independent assessor; they were then reassessed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24

  18. Retrograde ejaculation after anterior lumbar interbody fusion using rhBMP-2: a cohort controlled study.

    PubMed

    Carragee, Eugene J; Mitsunaga, Kyle A; Hurwitz, Eric L; Scuderi, Gaetano J

    2011-06-01

    The commercially available growth factor recombinant bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) used in spinal fusion has been associated with numerous adverse reactions, including inflammatory reactions in soft tissue, heterotopic bone formation, radiculitis, osteolysis, and cage or graft subsidence. The original Food and Drug Administration Summary of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) reported 12 retrograde ejaculation (RE) events (8%) in the rhBMP-2 groups compared with (1.4%) in the control group. It had been debated whether this finding was related to rhBMP-2 use. To compare the incidence of RE after ALIF in patients with and without rhBMP-2 use. Retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered outcomes data on consecutive subjects having ALIF with and without rhBMP-2 use. Male patients with lumbar spondylosis or spondylolisthesis having ALIF of the lowest one or two lumbar levels with and without rhBMP-2. Report of RE as a new finding after ALIF. From the comprehensive outcome database at a high-volume university practice, male subjects having ALIF for one- (L5/S1) or two-level (L4/L5, L5/S1) lumbar fusion were identified. Retrograde ejaculation events were recorded and comparative incidence compared. The two groups were comparable for age and additional procedures performed. There were 69 L5/S1 ALIFs performed with rhBMP-2 and 174 ALIFs performed without rhBMP-2 during the study period. Of those, 24 and 64 were two-level ALIFs performed with and without rhBMP-2, respectively. There were five RE events (7.2%) reported in the rhBMP-2 group and 1 (0.6%) in the control group. Comparing single-level L5/S1 ALIF, there was a 6.7% and 0% rate of RE in the rhBMP-2 versus control groups, respectively. At 1 year after surgery, three of six affected subjects reported resolution of the RE. This study confirms previous reports of a higher rate of RE in ALIF procedures using rhBMP-2. This may be an important consideration in subjects concerned with sterility after surgery

  19. Extraforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at the L5-S1 Level: Technical Considerations and Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Kurzbuch, Arthur Robert; Kaech, Denis; Baranowski, Pawel; Baranowska, Alicja; Recoules-Arche, Didier

    2017-09-01

    Background Extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) surgery is a muscle-sparing approach that allows the treatment of various degenerative spinal diseases. It is technical challenging to perform the ELIF approach at the L5-S1 level because the sacral ala obstructs the view of the intervertebral disk space. Methods We reported earlier on the ELIF technique in which the intervertebral disk is targeted at an angle of 45 degrees relative to the midline. In this article we describe the technical process we developed to overcome the anatomic relation between the sacral ala and the intervertebral disk space L5-S1 that hinders the ELIF approach at this level. We then report in a retrospective analysis on the short-term clinical and radiologic outcome of 100 consecutive patients with degenerative L5-S1 pathologies who underwent ELIF surgery. Results The L5-S1 ELIF approach could be realized in all patients. The short-term clinical outcome was evaluated 5 months after surgery: 92% of the patients were satisfied with their postoperative result; 8% had a poor result. Overall, 17% of the patients presented light radicular or low back pain not influencing their daily activity, and 82% of the patients working before surgery returned to work 3 to 7 months after surgery. The radiologic outcome was documented by computed tomography at 5 months after surgery and showed fusion in 99% of the patients. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging performed in 5 patients at 6 months after surgery revealed the integrity of the paraspinal muscles. Conclusions ELIF surgery at the L5-S1 level is technically feasible for various degenerative spinal diseases. Analysis of the clinical and radiologic data in a consecutive retrospective cohort of patients who underwent this surgical procedure showed a good short-term clinical outcome and fusion rate. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Standardized evaluation of long-term results after anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, M; Griss, P; Haake, M; Kienapfel, H; Billion, M

    1996-01-01

    A total of 113 patients, excluding those with tumor, spondylitis, and idiopathic scoliosis, underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with autologous iliac crest graft between 1984 and 1991 at our department. The proportion of these who were failed back patients was higher than that reported in the literature. Evaluation of functional outcome was feasible in 80 patients, utilizing Oswestry and Marburg scores, which were closely intercorrelated. The overall results yielded an improvement in the Oswestry score of 35.7 percentage points. A subset of 52 patients who were evaluated twice, showed the same results at an average of 6.6 years as they did at 2.3 years following surgery. Functional results showed a weak correlation with postoperative height loss of the intervertebral space. Influencing factors for the functional result were: postoperative compensation claim, age, and obesity. Of the professional people involved, 19.4% did not return to any occupation. Patients satisfied with the result had significantly greater functional improvement. Younger patients with additional dorsal distraction prior to ALIF for reduction of severe spondylolisthesis fared better than patients with ALIF alone. The rate of complications was low and did not contribute to the postoperative functional result. On the basis of these results further prospective studies have been designed and are currently underway.

  1. A Radiological Comparison of Anterior Fusion Rates in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, M. J. H.; Ng, L.; Vermeersch, G.; Chan, D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim To compare anterior fusion in standalone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using cage and screw constructs and anterior cage–alone constructs with posterior pedicle screw supplementation but without posterior fusion. Methods Eighty-five patients underwent single- or two-level ALIF procedure for degenerative disk disease or lytic spondylolisthesis (SPL). Posterior instrumentation was performed without posterior fusion in all cases of lytic SPL and when the anterior cage used did not have anterior screw through cage fixation. Results Seventy (82%) patients had adequate radiological follow-up at a mean of 19 months. Forty patients had anterior surgery alone (24 single level and 16 two levels) and 30 had front-back surgery (15 single level and 15 two levels). Anterior locked pseudarthrosis was only seen in the anterior surgery–alone group when using the STALIF cage (Surgicraft, Worcestershire, UK) (37 patients). This occurred in five of the single-level surgeries (5/22) and nine of the two-level surgeries (9/15). Fusion was achieved in 100% of the front-back group and only 65% (26/40) of the anterior surgery–alone group. Conclusion Posterior pedicle screw supplementation without posterolateral fusion improves the fusion rate of ALIF when using anterior cage and screw constructs. We would recommend supplementary posterior fixation especially in cases where more than one level is being operated. PMID:24353968

  2. Does prone repositioning before posterior fixation produce greater lordosis in lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF)?

    PubMed

    Yson, Sharon C; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Santos, Edward R G; Luna, Jeffrey T P; Polly, David W

    2014-10-01

    Retrospective comparative radiographic review. To determine if lateral to prone repositioning before posterior fixation confers additional operative level lordosis in lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedures. In a review of 56 consecutive patients who underwent LLIF, there was no statistically significant change in segmental lordosis from lateral to prone once a cage is in place. The greatest lordosis increase was observed after cage insertion. We reviewed 56 consecutive patients who underwent LLIF in the lateral position followed by posterior fixation in the prone position. Eighty-eight levels were fused. Disk space angle was measured on intraoperative C-arm images, and change in operative level segmental lordosis brought about by each of the following was determined: (1) cage insertion, (2) prone repositioning, and (3) posterior instrumentation. Paired t test was used to determine significance (α=0.05). Mean lordosis improvement brought about by cage insertion was 2.6 degrees (P=0.00005). There was a 0.1 degree mean lordosis change brought about by lateral to prone positioning (P=0.47). Mean lordosis improvement brought about by posterior fixation, including rod compression, was 1.0 degree (P=0.03). In LLIF procedures, the largest increase in operative level segmental lordosis is brought about by cage insertion. Further lordosis may be gained by placing posterior fixation, including compressive maneuvers. Prone repositioning after cage placement does not produce any incremental lordosis change. Therefore, posterior fixation may be performed in the lateral position without compromising operative level sagittal alignment.

  3. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  4. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex.

  5. Total 3D Airo® Navigation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xiaofeng; Berlin, Connor; Moriguchi, Yu; Zhang, Qiwei; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A new generation of iCT scanner, Airo®, has been introduced. The purpose of this study is to describe how Airo facilitates minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Method. We used the latest generation of portable iCT in all cases without the assistance of K-wires. We recorded the operation time, number of scans, and pedicle screw accuracy. Results. From January 2015 to December 2015, 33 consecutive patients consisting of 17 men and 16 women underwent single-level or two-level MIS-TLIF operations in our institution. The ages ranged from 23 years to 86 years (mean, 66.6 years). We treated all the cases in MIS fashion. In four cases, a tubular laminectomy at L1/2 was performed at the same time. The average operation time was 192.8 minutes and average time of placement per screw was 2.6 minutes. No additional fluoroscopy was used. Our screw accuracy rate was 98.6%. No complications were encountered. Conclusions. Airo iCT MIS-TLIF can be used for initial planning of the skin incision, precise screw, and cage placement, without the need for fluoroscopy. “Total navigation” (complete intraoperative 3D navigation without fluoroscopy) can be achieved by combining Airo navigation with navigated guide tubes for screw placement. PMID:27529069

  6. Total 3D Airo® Navigation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiaofeng; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Berlin, Connor; Jada, Ajit; Moriguchi, Yu; Zhang, Qiwei; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A new generation of iCT scanner, Airo®, has been introduced. The purpose of this study is to describe how Airo facilitates minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Method. We used the latest generation of portable iCT in all cases without the assistance of K-wires. We recorded the operation time, number of scans, and pedicle screw accuracy. Results. From January 2015 to December 2015, 33 consecutive patients consisting of 17 men and 16 women underwent single-level or two-level MIS-TLIF operations in our institution. The ages ranged from 23 years to 86 years (mean, 66.6 years). We treated all the cases in MIS fashion. In four cases, a tubular laminectomy at L1/2 was performed at the same time. The average operation time was 192.8 minutes and average time of placement per screw was 2.6 minutes. No additional fluoroscopy was used. Our screw accuracy rate was 98.6%. No complications were encountered. Conclusions. Airo iCT MIS-TLIF can be used for initial planning of the skin incision, precise screw, and cage placement, without the need for fluoroscopy. "Total navigation" (complete intraoperative 3D navigation without fluoroscopy) can be achieved by combining Airo navigation with navigated guide tubes for screw placement.

  7. Minimally Invasive Scoliosis Surgery with Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Surgeon Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hamid; Miller, Lynn; Abbasi, Ali; Orandi, Vali; Khaghany, Kamran

    2017-06-25

    Degenerative deformities of the spine have traditionally been treated with extensive open surgeries. However, these open procedures are associated with a high degree of surgical morbidity. In this study, we explore whether clinical improvement in patients with spinal deformities can be achieved using a new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) called oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF). OLLIF is a MIS single surgeon procedure in which the disc is approached through Kambin's triangle. OLLIF can achieve correction of spinal deformities through careful cage placement. The purpose of this study is to establish the safety and efficacy of using OLLIF to correct spinal deformities and to collect early outcome data. Collected data includes perioperative outcomes, patient reported outcomes, and radiographic outcomes. This study is a retrospective review of 37 OLLIF surgeries in 36 patients with symptomatic degenerative spinal deformity. Collected perioperative data included surgery time, blood loss, and hospital stay. Follow-up was conducted at least 150 days post surgery. We recorded complications and patient reported outcomes such as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and pain scale. Imaging was conducted pre- and post-surgery. Fusion rates and changes in Cobb angle were also measured. A total of 37 surgeries that treated 100 vertebral levels were performed. For two and three level procedures, respectively, the mean blood loss was 83 and 178 ml, the average surgery time was 74 and 158 minutes and the average hospital stay was 2.6 and 3.3 days. The patients ambulated within 24 hours in all but two cases. The patients reported pain improvements on the ten-point pain scale from 8.3 to 3.7 (p<0.001) and on the ODI from 53% to 32%. Cobb angles decreased from 16° to 9.3° (p<0.001), amounting to 2.5° of correction per level of surgery. Detailed imaging was reviewed by independent radiologists for 24 cases and 100% interbody fusion was achieved along with 71% right

  8. Minimally Invasive Scoliosis Surgery with Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Surgeon Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Hamid; Miller, Lynn; Orandi, Vali; Khaghany, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Background Degenerative deformities of the spine have traditionally been treated with extensive open surgeries. However, these open procedures are associated with a high degree of surgical morbidity. In this study, we explore whether clinical improvement in patients with spinal deformities can be achieved using a new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) called oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF). OLLIF is a MIS single surgeon procedure in which the disc is approached through Kambin’s triangle. OLLIF can achieve correction of spinal deformities through careful cage placement. Purpose The purpose of this study is to establish the safety and efficacy of using OLLIF to correct spinal deformities and to collect early outcome data. Collected data includes perioperative outcomes, patient reported outcomes, and radiographic outcomes. Study design/setting This study is a retrospective review of 37 OLLIF surgeries in 36 patients with symptomatic degenerative spinal deformity. Collected perioperative data included surgery time, blood loss, and hospital stay. Follow-up was conducted at least 150 days post surgery. We recorded complications and patient reported outcomes such as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and pain scale. Imaging was conducted pre- and post-surgery. Fusion rates and changes in Cobb angle were also measured. Results A total of 37 surgeries that treated 100 vertebral levels were performed. For two and three level procedures, respectively, the mean blood loss was 83 and 178 ml, the average surgery time was 74 and 158 minutes and the average hospital stay was 2.6 and 3.3 days. The patients ambulated within 24 hours in all but two cases. The patients reported pain improvements on the ten-point pain scale from 8.3 to 3.7 (p<0.001) and on the ODI from 53% to 32%. Cobb angles decreased from 16° to 9.3° (p<0.001), amounting to 2.5° of correction per level of surgery. Detailed imaging was reviewed by independent radiologists for 24 cases and 100

  9. Minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult degenerative scoliosis with 1 or 2 dislocated levels.

    PubMed

    Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Ratte, Louis; Poignard, Alexandre; Auregan, Jean-Charles; Queinnec, Steffen; Hernigou, Philippe; Allain, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    Frequent complications of posterolateral instrumented fusion have been reported after treatment of degenerative scoliosis in elderly patients. Considering that in some cases, most of the symptomatology of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) is a consequence of the segmental instability at the dislocated level, the use of minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) to manage symptoms can be advocated to reduce surgical morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of 1- or 2-level minimally invasive ALIFs in ADS patients with 1- or 2-level dislocations. A total of 47 patients (average age 64 years; range 43-80 years) with 1- or 2-level ALIF performed for ADS (64 levels) in a single institution were included in the study. An independent spine surgeon retrospectively reviewed all the patients' medical records and radiographs to assess operative data and surgery-related complications. Clinical outcome was reported using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analog scale (VAS) for lumbar and leg pain. Intraoperative data and complications were collected. Fusion and risk for adjacent-level degeneration were assessed. The mean follow-up duration was 3 years (range 1-10 years). ODI, and back and leg pain VAS scores were significantly improved at last follow-up. A majority of patients (74%) had a statistically significant improvement in their ODI score of more than 20 points at latest follow-up and 1 had a worsening of his disability. The mean operating time was 166 minutes (range 70-355 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 410 ml (range 50-1700 ml). Six (5 major and 1 minor) surgical complications (12.7% of patients) and 13 (2 major and 11 minor) medical complications (27.7% of patients) occurred without death or wound infection. Fusion was achieved in 46 of 47 patients. Surgery resulted in a slight but significant decrease of the Cobb angle, and improved the pelvic parameters and lumbar lordosis, but had no

  10. How does back muscle strength change after posterior lumbar interbody fusion?

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Won-Hah; Shin, Won-Ju; Seo, Yong-Gon

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE There is a lack of evidence of how back muscle strength changes after lumbar fusion surgery and how exercise influences these changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in back muscle strength after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to measure the effects of a postoperative exercise program on muscle strength and physical and mental health outcomes. METHODS This prospective study enrolled 59 women (mean age 58 years) who underwent PLIF at 1 or 2 spinal levels. To assess the effects of a supervised lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE), the authors allocated the patients to an LSE (n = 26) or a control (n = 33) group. The patients in the LSE group performed the LSEs between 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Back extensor strength, visual analog scale (VAS) scores in back pain, and physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores on the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey were determined for the both groups. RESULTS Mean strength of the back muscles tended to slightly decrease by 7.5% from preoperatively to 3 months after PLIF (p = 0.145), but it significantly increased thereafter and was sustained until the last follow-up (38.1%, p < 0.001). The mean back muscle strength was similar in the LSE and control groups preoperatively, but it increased significantly more in the LSE group (64.2%) than in the control group (21.7%) at the last follow-up 12 months after PLIF (p = 0.012). At the last follow-up, decreases in back pain VAS scores were more significant among LSE group patients, who had a pain reduction on average of 58.2%, than among control group patients (reduction of 26.1%) (p = 0.013). The patients in the LSE group also had greater improvement in both PCS (39.9% improvement) and MCS (20.7% improvement) scores than the patients in the control group (improvement of 18.0% and 1.1%, p = 0.042 and p = 0.035, respectively). CONCLUSIONS After PLIF, strength in back muscles decreased until 3 months postoperatively but

  11. High neurological complication rates for extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion and related techniques: A review of safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    There are frequent reports of lumbosacral plexus and other neurological injuries occurring with extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIF) and other related lateral lumbar techniques. This review focuses on the new neurological deficits (e.g. lumbosacral plexus, root injuries) that occur following minimally invasive surgery (MIS) XLIF and other related lateral lumbar techniques. A review of multiple articles revealed the following ranges of new postoperative neurological complications for XLIF procedures: plexus injuries 13.28%; sensory deficits 0-75% (permanent in 62.5%); motor deficits 0.7-33.6%; anterior thigh pain 12.5-25%. Of interest, in a study by Lykissas et al., the frequency of long-term neural injury following lateral lumber interbody fusion (LLIF) with BMP-2 (72 patients) was much higher than for LLIF performed with autograft/allograft (72 patients). The addition of bone morphogenetic protein led to persistent sensory deficits in 29 vs. 20 without BMP; persistent motor deficits in 35 with vs. 17 without BMP; and persistent anterior thigh/groin pain in 8 with vs. 0 without BMP. They should also have noted the unacceptably high incidence of neural injury occurring with LLIF alone without BMP. This review highlights the high risk of neural injury (up to 75% for sensory, 33.6% for motor, and an overall plexus injury rate of 13.28%) utilizing the XLIF and other similar lateral lumbar approaches. With such extensive neurological injuries, is the XLIF really safe, and should it still be performed?

  12. [Comparison of clinical efficacies of single segment transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with cage versus autogenous morselized bone for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a prospective randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Peisheng; Liu, Xiaozhen; Qiao, Xuejing; Du, Wennan; Luo, Dawei; Zheng, Xiujun

    2014-09-23

    To compare the clinical efficacies of single segment transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with cage versus autogenous morselized bone for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. A total of 87 patients undergoing single segment TLIF were randomly divided into 2 groups. A cage was implanted into intervertebral space in group A patients while autogenous morselized bone in group B patients. Operative duration, blood loss, length of stay and cost of hospitalization of two groups were recorded. They were followed up at 1 week, 12, 24 months post-operation. Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS) fusion rates, intervertebral space and foramen height restoration, lumbar lordosis and postoperative complications were compared between two groups. No significant inter-group difference existed in operative duration, blood loss or length of stay. However, the average hospitalization cost in group A were 18% higher than that of group B (P < 0.05). Both groups achieved excellent clinical outcomes within 2 years. ODI, VAS score improvement rates and postoperative complication rates were not statistically different. Lumbar fusion rate was 86.7% in group A versus 85.7% in group B after 2 years. And there was no significant difference (P > 0.05). The heights of intervertebral space and foramen in group A achieved a better recovery than those of group B. Both groups had similar improvements of lumbar lordosis. For degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, usage of interbody cage is more effective in terms of recovery of intervertebral space and foraminal height compared with usage of bone graft. However it brings no better clinical efficacy while the usage of autogenous morselized bone is more cost-effective. Two grafting methods yield similar overall clinical outcomes.

  13. Extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Surgical technique, outcomes and complications after a minimum of one year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, I; Luque, R; Noriega, M; Rey, J; Alia, J; Marco-Martínez, F

    «Minimally invasive» techniques have been recently been developed in order to achieve good clinical results with a low incidence of complications. The extralateral interbody fusion or direct transpsoas is a minimally invasive anterior arthrodesis. A total of 97 patients with 138 segments received surgery between May 2012 and May 2015. The follow-up was from 12-44 months. The mean age was 68 years (41-86). The most common cause of intervention was the adjacent segment (30%), deformity (22%), and lumbar disc disease (21%). The interbody cage was implanted as: Single (stand-alone) in 33%, and additional fixation was used in the others: Screws, percutaneous unilateral (11%), bilateral (27%), or with a lateral plate (62%). The mean stay was 3.2 days (2-6). The score on a lumbar visual analogue scale decreased from 9 to 4.1, and dropped to 3 after one year. The improvement in disc height was from 8.4mm to 13.8mm, and a larger increase in the foramen diameter from 10.5 to 13.1mm, which were statistically significant. The early major complications recorded were, three motor femoral nerve injuries and retroperitoneal haematoma (4%), and the early minor were: two fractures (2%). As major late complications there was an abdominal hernia, a mobilization of 10mm and three radiculopathy (5%), and as minor late, three fracture, two mobilisations greater than 10mm, four mobilisations of less than 10mm, and one mobilisation of a screw plate (10%). The extralateral interbody fusion technique is a safe and reliable when performing a lumbar fusion by an alternative minimally invasive route.

  14. Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion (OLLIF): Technical Notes and Early Results of a Single Surgeon Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background context: Lower back pain is one of the most prevalent and expensive health conditions in the Western world. The standard treatment, interbody fusion, is an invasive procedure that requires the stripping of muscles and soft tissue, leading to surgical morbidity. Current minimally invasive (MI) spinal fusions are technically demanding and suffer from technical limitations. Purpose: Oblique lumbar lateral interbody fusion (OLLIF) is a new technique for fusion of the lumbar spine that overcomes these complications. Outcome measures include patient demographics, reported outcomes, and surgical outcomes. Study design/Setting: Kambin's Triangle can easily be located as a silent window with an electrophysiological probe. Discectomy is performed through a single access portal with a 10 mm diameter. After a discectomy, the disc space is packed with beta-tricalcium phosphate soaked in autologous bone marrow, aspirated, and the cage is inserted. Finally, a minimally invasive posterior fixation is performed. Methods: OLLIF’s major innovation is to approach the disc through Kambin’s Triangle, aided by bilateral fluoroscopy. Results: We present data from 69 consecutive OLLIF surgeries on 128 levels with a control group of 55 consecutive open transformational lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs) on 125 levels. For a single level OLLIF, the mean surgery time is 69 minutes (min) and blood loss is 29 ml. Surgery time was approximately twice as fast as open TLIF (mean: 135 min) and blood loss is reduced by over 80% compared to TLIF (mean: 355 ml). Conclusions: OLLIF is a minimally invasive fusion that significantly reduces surgery times compared to open surgery. OLLIF overcomes the difficulties of traditional open fusions, making it a safe and technically less demanding surgery than open or minimally invasive TLIF.  PMID:26623206

  15. The Effect of the Retroperitoneal Transpsoas Minimally Invasive Lateral Interbody Fusion on Segmental and Regional Lumbar Lordosis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tien V.; Vivas, Andrew C.; Dakwar, Elias; Baaj, Ali A.; Uribe, Juan S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS LIF) in the lumbar spine can correct coronal Cobb angles, but the effect on sagittal plane correction is unclear. Methods. A retrospective review of thirty-five patients with lumbar degenerative disease who underwent MIS LIF without supplemental posterior instrumentation was undertaken to study the radiographic effect on the restoration of segmental and regional lumbar lordosis using the Cobb angles on pre- and postoperative radiographs. Mean disc height changes were also measured. Results. The mean follow-up period was 13.3 months. Fifty total levels were fused with a mean of 1.42 levels fused per patient. Mean segmental Cobb angle increased from 11.10° to 13.61° (P < 0.001) or 22.6%. L2-3 had the greatest proportional increase in segmental lordosis. Mean regional Cobb angle increased from 52.47° to 53.45° (P = 0.392). Mean disc height increased from 6.50 mm to 10.04 mm (P < 0.001) or 54.5%. Conclusions. The MIS LIF improves segmental lordosis and disc height in the lumbar spine but not regional lumbar lordosis. Anterior longitudinal ligament sectioning and/or the addition of a more lordotic implant may be necessary in cases where significant increases in regional lumbar lordosis are desired. PMID:22919332

  16. The effect of the retroperitoneal transpsoas minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion on segmental and regional lumbar lordosis.

    PubMed

    Le, Tien V; Vivas, Andrew C; Dakwar, Elias; Baaj, Ali A; Uribe, Juan S

    2012-01-01

    The minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS LIF) in the lumbar spine can correct coronal Cobb angles, but the effect on sagittal plane correction is unclear. A retrospective review of thirty-five patients with lumbar degenerative disease who underwent MIS LIF without supplemental posterior instrumentation was undertaken to study the radiographic effect on the restoration of segmental and regional lumbar lordosis using the Cobb angles on pre- and postoperative radiographs. Mean disc height changes were also measured. The mean follow-up period was 13.3 months. Fifty total levels were fused with a mean of 1.42 levels fused per patient. Mean segmental Cobb angle increased from 11.10° to 13.61° (P < 0.001) or 22.6%. L2-3 had the greatest proportional increase in segmental lordosis. Mean regional Cobb angle increased from 52.47° to 53.45° (P = 0.392). Mean disc height increased from 6.50 mm to 10.04 mm (P < 0.001) or 54.5%. The MIS LIF improves segmental lordosis and disc height in the lumbar spine but not regional lumbar lordosis. Anterior longitudinal ligament sectioning and/or the addition of a more lordotic implant may be necessary in cases where significant increases in regional lumbar lordosis are desired.

  17. Clinical efficacy of lumbar interbody fusion using a channel system combined with ozone therapy for the treatment of central-type L3-L4 lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Sun, Hong; Qin, Shuzhen

    2017-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion via the intervertebral foramen combined with ozone (O3) therapy for the treatment of L3-L4 central-type lumbar disc herniation was explored. We recruited patients with sciatica who attended our hospital between July 2013 and October 2015 and underwent lumbar X-ray (anteroposterior and lateral view), lumbar flexion-extension radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging after admission. Seventy-four patients with central-type lumbar disc herniation but no other complications were randomly selected and divided into the observation and control groups. The observation group comprised 37 patients treated with lumbar fusion using a channel system combined with O3 therapy, whereas the control group comprised 37 patients treated with lumbar fusion alone. The effects of the two therapies were evaluated using visual analog scale, Japanese Orthopaedic Association, and MacNab scores. There was no significant difference in scores between the two groups before surgery (P>0.05). The scores of the observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those before surgery and those of the control group (P<0.05). One patient in the observation group experienced no obvious improvement in symptoms after surgery, and two patients in the control group experienced postoperative recurrence; these three patients subsequently underwent laminectomy combined with planted bone fusion and internal fixation. There was no significant difference in total efficacy rates between the two groups (P>0.05). Lumbar fusion using a channel system combined with O3 therapy for the treatment of L3-L4 central-type lumbar disc herniation is safe and effective. It has the advantages of reduced trauma, fewer complications, and rapid pain relief, and it promotes the recovery of lumbar function. Strict mastery of the surgical indications is key to the success of the procedure; however, it is worth expanding its use in

  18. Overpowering posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody cages followed by posterior revision: a preliminary feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Abhijeet; Wigner, Nathan; Saville, Philip; Arlet, Vincent

    2017-09-29

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this study was to evaluate whether sagittal plane correction can be obtained from the front by overpowering previous posterior instrumentation and/or fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages in patients undergoing revision surgery for degenerative spinal conditions and/or spinal deformities. METHODS The authors report their experience with the application of hyperlordotic cages at 36 lumbar levels for ALIFs in a series of 20 patients who underwent revision spinal surgery at a single institution. Included patients underwent staged front-back procedures: ALIFs with hyperlordotic cages (12°, 20°, and 30°) followed by removal of posterior instrumentation and reinstrumentation from the back. Patients were divided into the following 2 groups depending on the extent of posterior instrumentation and fusion during the second stage: long constructs (≥ 6 levels with extension into thoracic spine and/or pelvis) and short constructs (< 6 levels). Preoperative and postoperative standing radiographs were evaluated to measure segmental lordosis (SL) along with standard sagittal parameters. Radiographic signs of pseudarthrosis at previously fused levels were also sought in all patients. RESULTS The average patient age was 54 years (range 30-66 years). The mean follow-up was 11.5 months (range 5-26 months). The mean SL achieved with 12°, 20°, and 30° cages was 13.1°, 19°, and 22.4°, respectively. The increase in postoperative SL at the respective surgically treated levels for 12°, 20°, and 30° cages that were used to overpower posterior instrumentation/fusion averaged 6.1° (p < 0.05), 12.5° (p < 0.05), and 17.7° (p < 0.05), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in SL correction at levels in patients who had pseudarthrosis (n = 18) versus those who did not (n = 18). The mean overall lumbar lordosis increased from 44.3° to 59.8° (p < 0.05). In the long-construct group, the mean

  19. Surgical Management of Minimally Invasive Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Stand-Alone Interbody Cage for L4-5 Degenerative Disorders: Clinical and Radiographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hironaka, Yasuo; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment for degenerative spinal disorders is controversial, although lumbar fusion is considered an acceptable option for disabling lower back pain. Patients underwent instrumented minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF) using a retroperitoneal approach except for requiring multilevel fusions, severe spinal canal stenosis, high-grade spondylolisthesis, and a adjacent segments disorders. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records and radiographs of 142 patients who received mini-ALIF for L4-5 degenerative lumbar disorders between 1998 and 2010. We compared preoperative and postoperative clinical data and radiographic measurements, including the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back and leg pain, disc height (DH), whole lumbar lordosis (WL), and vertebral wedge angle (WA). The mean follow-up period was 76 months. The solid fusion rate was 90.1% (128/142 patients). The average length of hospital stay was 6.9 days (range, 3–21 days). The mean blood loss was 63.7 ml (range, 10–456 ml). The mean operation time was 155.5 min (range, 96–280 min). The postoperative JOA and VAS scores for back and leg pain were improved compared with the preoperative scores. Radiological analysis showed significant postoperative improvements in DH, WL, and WA, and the functional and radiographical outcomes improved significantly after 2 years. The 2.8% complication rate included cases of wound infection, liquorrhea, vertebral body fractures, and a misplaced cage that required revision. Mini-ALIF was found to be associated with improved clinical results and radiographic findings for L4-5 disorders. A retroperitoneal approach might therefore be a valuable treatment option. PMID:24140782

  20. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF) in degenerative lumbar disorders: a randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Høy, Kristian; Bünger, Cody; Niederman, Bent; Helmig, Peter; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Li, Haisheng; Andersen, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze outcome, with respect to functional disability, pain, fusion rate, and complications of patients treated with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in compared to instrumented poserolateral fusion (PLF) alone, in low back pain. Spinal fusion has become a major procedure worldwide. However, conflicting results exist. Theoretical circumferential fusion could improve functional outcome. However, the theoretical advantages lack scientific documentation. Prospective randomized clinical study with a 2-year follow-up period. From November 2003 to November 2008 100 patients with severe low back pain and radicular pain were randomly selected for either posterolateral lumbar fusion [titanium TSRH (Medtronic)] or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion [titanium TSRH (Medtronic)] with anterior intervertebral support by tantalum cage (Implex/Zimmer). The primary outcome scores were obtained using Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), Oswestry disability Index, SF-36, and low back pain Rating Scale. All measures assessed the endpoints at 2-year follow-up after surgery. The overall follow-up rate was 94 %. Sex ratio was 40/58. 51 patients had TLIF, 47 PLF. Mean age 49(TLIF)/45(PLF). No statistic difference in outcome between groups could be detected concerning daily activity, work leisure, anxiety/depression or social interest. We found no statistic difference concerning back pain or leg pain. In both the TLIF and the PLF groups the patients had significant improvement in functional outcome, back pain, and leg pain compared to preoperatively. Operation time and blood loss in the TLIF group were significantly higher than in the PLF group (p < 0.001). No statistic difference in fusion rates was detected. Transforaminal interbody fusion did not improve functional outcome in patients compared to posterolateral fusion. Both groups improved significantly in all categories compared to preoperatively. Operation time and blood loss were

  1. Reduction in adjacent-segment degeneration after multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion with proximal DIAM implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Tai-Been; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Han-Jung

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Multilevel long-segment lumbar fusion poses a high risk for future development of adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD). Creating a dynamic transition zone with an interspinous process device (IPD) proximal to the fusion has recently been applied as a method to reduce the occurrence of ASD. The authors report their experience with the Device for Intervertebral Assisted Motion (DIAM) implanted proximal to multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in reducing the development of proximal ASD. METHODS This retrospective study reviewed 91 cases involving patients who underwent 2-level (L4-S1), 3-level (L3-S1), or 4-level (L2-S1) PLIF. In Group A (42 cases), the patients received PLIF only, while in Group B (49 cases), an interspinous process device, a DIAM implant, was put at the adjacent level proximal to the PLIF construct. Bone resection at the uppermost segment of the PLIF was equally limited in the 2 groups, with preservation of the upper portion of the spinous process/lamina and the attached supraspinous ligament. Outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for low-back pain and leg pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for functional impairment. Anteroposterior and lateral flexion/extension radiographs were used to evaluate the fusion status, presence and patterns of ASD, and mobility of the DIAM-implanted segment. RESULTS Solid interbody fusion without implant failure was observed in all cases. Radiographic ASD occurred in 20 (48%) of Group A cases and 3 (6%) of Group B cases (p < 0.001). Among the patients in whom ASD was identified, 9 in Group A and 3 in Group B were symptomatic; of these patients, 3 in Group A and 1 in Group B underwent a second surgery for severe symptomatic ASD. At 24 months after surgery, Group A patients fared worse than Group B, showing higher mean VAS and ODI scores due to symptoms related to ASD. At the final follow-up evaluations, as reoperations had been performed to treat symptomatic ASD in some

  2. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Integrated Screw Cages: Intrinsic Load Generation, Subsidence, and Torsional Stability.

    PubMed

    Assem, Yusuf; Pelletier, Matthew H; Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-05-01

    To perform a repeatable idealized in vitro model to evaluate the effects of key design features and integrated screw fixation on unloaded surface engagement, subsidence, and torsional stability. We evaluated four different stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages with two, three, and four screw designs. Polyurethane (saw-bone) foam blocks were used to simulate the vertebral bone. Fuji Film was used to measure the contact footprint, average pressure, and load generated by fixating the cages with screws. Subsidence was tested by axially loading the constructs at 10 N/s to 400 N and torsional load was applied +/-1 Nm for 10 cycles to assess stability. Outcome measures included total subsidence and maximal torsional angle range. Cages 1, 2, and 4 were symmetrical and produced similar results in terms of contact footprint, average pressure, and load. The addition of integrated screws into the cage-bone block construct demonstrated a clear trend towards decreased subsidence. Cage 2 with surface titanium angled ridges and a keel produced the greatest subsidence with and without screws, significantly more than all other cages ( P < 0.05). Angular rotation was not significantly affected by the addition of screws ( P < 0.066). A statistically significant correlation existed between subsidence and reduced angular rotation across all cage constructs ( P = 0.018). Each stand-alone cage featured unique surface characteristics, which resulted in differing cage-foam interface engagement, influencing the subsidence and torsional angle. Increased subsidence significantly reduced the torsional angle across all cage constructs. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus instrumented posterolateral fusion in Grade I/II spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pooswamy, Shanmugasundaram; Muralidharagopalan, Niranjanan Raghavn; Subbaiah, Sivasubramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Spondylolisthesis refers to slippage of one vertebra over the other, which may be caused by a variety of reasons such as degenerative, trauma, and isthmic. Surgical management forms the mainstay of treatment to prevent further slip and worsening. However, there is no consensus regarding the best surgical option to treat these patients. This study compares TLIF and instrumented PLF in patients with Grade I and II spondylolisthesis and analysis the outcome with respect to functional outcome, pain, fusion rate, adequacy of medial facetectomy for decompression, and complications. Materials and Methods: Forty patients operated for spondylolisthesis by instrumented posterolateral or transforaminal fusion between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 were included in this retrospective study. They were followed up for 3 years. Twenty one cases were of instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) and 19 cases were of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The patients were asked to fill up the Oswestry disability index (ODI), Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), and low back pain rating scale (LBPRS) preoperatively, at 1-month postoperatively, and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months postoperatively. Radiological parameters were assessed using radiographs. Results: No significant differences were found in DPQ, LBPRS, or ODI scores preoperative, 1-month postoperative, and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months followup. No significant difference was found between the two groups in blood loss. The only significant difference between the two groups was in the operative time, in which the instrumented PLF group had a mean of 50 min lesser than the TLIF group (P = 0.02). Conclusions: TLIF and instrumented PLF are equally efficacious options in the treatment of Grade I and II spondylolisthesis, except lytic type. PMID:28400657

  4. Learning curve of a complex surgical technique: minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kong Hwee; Yeo, William; Soeharno, Henry; Yue, Wai Mun

    2014-10-01

    Prospective cohort study. This study aimed to evaluate the learning curve of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). Very few studies have evaluated the learning curve of this technically demanding surgery. We intend to evaluate the learning curve of MIS TLIF with a larger sample size and assess surgical competence based not only on operative time but with perioperative variables, clinical and radiologic outcomes, incidence of complications, and patient satisfaction. From 2005 to 2009, the first 90 single-level MIS TLIF, which utilized a consistent technique and spinal instrumentation, performed by a single surgeon at our tertiary institution were studied. Variables studied included operative time, perioperative variables, clinical (Visual Analogue Scores for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, North American Spine Society Scores for neurogenic symptoms) and radiologic outcomes, incidence of complications and patient rating of expectation met, and the overall result of surgery. The asymptote of the surgeon's learning curve for MIS TLIF was achieved at the 44th case. Comparing the early group of 44 patients to the latter 46, the demographics were similar. For operative parameters, only 3 variables showed differences between the 2 groups: mean operative duration, fluoroscopy duration, and usage of patient-controlled analgesia. At the final follow-up, for clinical outcome parameters, the 2 groups were different in 3 parameters: VAS scores for back, leg pain, and neurogenic symptom scores. For radiologic outcome, both groups showed similar good fusion rates. For complications, none of the MIS TLIF cases were converted to open TLIF intraoperatively. In the early group, there were 3 complications: 1 incidental durotomy and 2 asymptomatic cage migrations; and in the latter group, there was 1 asymptomatic cage migration. In our study, technical proficiency in MIS TLIF was achieved after 44 surgeries, and the latter patients benefited

  5. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus instrumented posterolateral fusion in Grade I/II spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Pooswamy, Shanmugasundaram; Muralidharagopalan, Niranjanan Raghavn; Subbaiah, Sivasubramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis refers to slippage of one vertebra over the other, which may be caused by a variety of reasons such as degenerative, trauma, and isthmic. Surgical management forms the mainstay of treatment to prevent further slip and worsening. However, there is no consensus regarding the best surgical option to treat these patients. This study compares TLIF and instrumented PLF in patients with Grade I and II spondylolisthesis and analysis the outcome with respect to functional outcome, pain, fusion rate, adequacy of medial facetectomy for decompression, and complications. Forty patients operated for spondylolisthesis by instrumented posterolateral or transforaminal fusion between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 were included in this retrospective study. They were followed up for 3 years. Twenty one cases were of instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) and 19 cases were of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The patients were asked to fill up the Oswestry disability index (ODI), Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), and low back pain rating scale (LBPRS) preoperatively, at 1-month postoperatively, and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months postoperatively. Radiological parameters were assessed using radiographs. No significant differences were found in DPQ, LBPRS, or ODI scores preoperative, 1-month postoperative, and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months followup. No significant difference was found between the two groups in blood loss. The only significant difference between the two groups was in the operative time, in which the instrumented PLF group had a mean of 50 min lesser than the TLIF group (P = 0.02). TLIF and instrumented PLF are equally efficacious options in the treatment of Grade I and II spondylolisthesis, except lytic type.

  6. Minimally Invasive Extraforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Revision Surgery: A Technique through Kambin's Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Gue; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of minimally invasive extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) for revision surgery. Methods From January 2011 to December 2012, 12 patients who underwent minimally invasive ELIF through the Kambin's triangle for revision surgery were included in this study. All patients underwent the surgical procedure in the following sequence: (1) epidural anesthesia, (2) exposing the Kambin's triangle toward the lateral part of the dura (partial resection of the superior articular process), (3) bilateral cage insertion for reinforcement of stabilization and fusion, and (4) percutaneous transpedicular screwing. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS), and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Imaging and clinical findings including surgical techniques, clinical outcomes, and related complications were depicted and analyzed. Results The mean age of the patients (5 men, 7 women) was 60.7±13.4 years, and the mean follow-up period was 27.1±4.9 months. The mean VAS (back and leg) score improved significantly at final follow-up. The mean ODI score decreased as follows: preoperative, 76.78±6.08; 3 months after the surgery, 37.74±6.67; and at final follow-up, 29.91±2.98. Two patients presented with transient nerve root irritation, but there were no cases of incidental dural tear or serious infection. No significant neurological deterioration or major complication was noted in any of the patients. Conclusion Minimally invasive ELIF for revision surgery is an effective surgical option with a low complication rate. PMID:26834815

  7. Hybrid Biosynthetic Autograft Extender for Use in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Safety and Clinical Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Chedid, Mokbel K; Tundo, Kelly M; Block, Jon E; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft is the preferred option for spinal fusion, but the morbidity associated with bone harvest and the need for graft augmentation in more demanding cases necessitates combining local bone with bone substitutes. The purpose of this study was to document the clinical effectiveness and safety of a novel hybrid biosynthetic scaffold material consisting of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 75:25) combined by lyophilization with unmodified high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (10-12% wt:wt) as an extender for a broad range of spinal fusion procedures. We retrospectively evaluated all patients undergoing single- and multi-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion at an academic medical center over a 3-year period. A total of 108 patients underwent 109 procedures (245 individual vertebral levels). Patient-related outcomes included pain measured on a Visual Analog Scale. Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks, 3-6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Radiographic fusion or progression of fusion was documented in 221 of 236 index levels (93.6%) at a mean (±SD) time to fusion of 10.2+4.1 months. Single and multi-level fusions were not associated with significantly different success rates. Mean pain scores (+SD) for all patients improved from 6.8+2.5 at baseline to 3.6+2.9 at approximately 12 months. Improvements in VAS were greatest in patients undergoing one- or two-level fusion, with patients undergoing multi-level fusion demonstrating lesser but still statistically significant improvements. Overall, stable fusion was observed in 64.8% of vertebral levels; partial fusion was demonstrated in 28.8% of vertebral levels. Only 15 of 236 levels (6.4%) were non-fused at final follow-up.

  8. Open and Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Comparison of Intermediate Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hee, Hwan Tak

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To compare clinical and radiological outcomes of open vs. minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Overview of Literature MI-TLIF promises smaller incisions and less soft tissue dissection resulting in lower morbidity and faster recovery; however, it is technically challenging. Methods Twenty-five patients with MI-TLIF were compared with 25 matched open TLIF controls. A minimum 2 year follow-up and a statistical analysis of perioperative and long-term outcomes were performed. Potential complications were recorded. Results The mean ages for the open and MI-TLIF cases were 44.4 years (range, 19-69 years) and 43.6 years (range, 20-69 years), respectively. The male:female ratio was 13:12 for both groups. Average follow-up was 26.9 months for the MI-TLIF group and 29.3 months for the open group. Operative duration was significantly longer in the MI-TLIF group than that in the open group (p<0.05). No differences in estimated blood loss, duration to ambulation, or length of stay were found. Significant improvements in the Oswestry disability index and EQ-5D functional scores were observed at 6-, 12-, and 24-months in both groups, but no significant difference was detected between the groups. Fusion rates were comparable. Cage sizes were significantly smaller in the MI-TLIF group at the L5/S1 level (p<0.05). One patient had residual spinal stenosis at the MI-TLIF level, and one patient who underwent two-level MI-TLIF developed a deep vein thrombosis resulting in a pulmonary embolism. Conclusions MI-TLIF and open TLIF had comparable long-term benefits. Due to technical constraints, patients should be advised on the longer operative time and potential undersizing of cages at the L5S1 level. PMID:25901228

  9. Preservation or Restoration of Segmental and Regional Spinal Lordosis Using Minimally Invasive Interbody Fusion Techniques in Degenerative Lumbar Conditions: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juan S; Myhre, Sue Lynn; Youssef, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    A literature review. The purpose of this study was to review lumbar segmental and regional alignment changes following treatment with a variety of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) interbody fusion procedures for short-segment, degenerative conditions. An increasing number of lumbar fusions are being performed with minimally invasive exposures, despite a perception that minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion procedures are unable to affect segmental and regional lordosis. Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 23 articles were identified that reported alignment following minimally invasive lumbar fusion for degenerative (nondeformity) lumbar spinal conditions to examine aggregate changes in postoperative alignment. Of the 23 studies identified, 28 study cohorts were included in the analysis. Procedural cohorts included MIS ALIF (two), extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) (16), and MIS posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P/TLIF) (11). Across 19 study cohorts and 720 patients, weighted average of lumbar lordosis preoperatively for all procedures was 43.5° (range 28.4°-52.5°) and increased 3.4° (9%) (range -2° to 7.4°) postoperatively (P < 0.001). Segmental lordosis increased, on average, by 4° from a weighted average of 8.3° preoperatively (range -0.8° to 15.8°) to 11.2° at postoperative time points (range -0.2° to 22.8°) (P < 0.001) in 1182 patient from 24 study cohorts. Simple linear regression revealed a significant relationship between preoperative lumbar lordosis and change in lumbar lordosis (r = 0.413; P = 0.003), wherein lower preoperative lumbar lordosis predicted a greater increase in postoperative lumbar lordosis. Significant gains in both weighted average lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis were seen following MIS interbody fusion. None of the segmental lordosis cohorts and only two of the 19 lumbar lordosis cohorts showed decreases in lordosis postoperatively. These results suggest that

  10. Effect of one- or two-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion on global sagittal balance.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Hwan; Joo, Youn-Suk; Lim, Cheongsu; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Choon Sung

    2017-06-02

    Sagittal imbalance is associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with degenerative lumbar disease. However, there is no consensus on the impact of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) on local and global sagittal balance. To reveal the effect of one- or two-level PLIF on global sagittal balance. A retrospective case-control study. This study included 88 patients who underwent a one- or two-level PLIF for spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Clinical and radiological parameters were measured pre- and postoperatively. All patients were followed up for >2 years. Clinical outcomes included a visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D). Radiological parameters were measured using whole-spine standing lateral radiographs. Fusion, loosening, subsidence rates, and adverse events were also evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to their preoperative C7-S1 sagittal vertical axis (SVA): Group N: SVA≤5 cm vs Group I: SVA>5 cm; they were also divided according to postoperative changes in C7-S1 SVA. Clinical and radiological outcomes were compared between the groups. All clinical outcomes and radiological parameters improved postoperatively. C7-S1 SVA improved (-1.6 cm) after L3-L5 fusion, but it was compromised (+3.6 cm) after L4-S1 fusion (p=.001). Preoperative demographic and clinical data showed no difference except in the anxiety or depression domain of EQ-5D. No differences were found in postoperative clinical outcomes. Lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, and thoracic kyphosis slightly improved in Group N, whereas C7-S1 SVA decreased from 9.5 cm to 3.8 cm (p<.001) in Group I. Furthermore, all sagittal parameters improved in Group I. On comparing the postoperative changes in C7-S1 SVA, we found that the decreasing trend in the postoperative C7-S1 SVA was related to a larger preoperative C7-S1 SVA (p=.030) and a more proximal level fusion (L3-L5 vs L4-S1, p=.033). Global sagittal

  11. Vertebral Body Hounsfield Units are Associated With Cage Subsidence After Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jie; Li, Kang; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Jie

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between Hounsfield units (HU) measurement and cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with unilateral fixation becomes a popular treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. Cage subsidence is a potentially devastating complication after lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral fixation. Recently, a new technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU values from computed tomography has been proposed. Bone quality is believed to be one of the important factors that cause cage subsidence after TLIF. Cage subsidence after single-level (L4/5) TLIF with unilateral fixation was prospectively documented at a single institution between 2013 and 2014. Patients with cage subsidence were matched 1:1 to a control cohort without cage subsidence on the basis of age and sex. HU values were measured from the preoperative computed tomography. All patients received computed tomographic scans at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Sagittal images were evaluated for evidence of cage subsidence. Eighteen patients with cage subsidence were well matched 1:1 to a cohort without cage subsidence and had complete imaging data. The global lumbar HU values were significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence than in the controls (112.4±10.08 vs. 140.2±10.17; P=0.0015). Similarly, a regional assessment of HU across the fusion levels was significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence (113.4±10.47 vs. 127.9±8.13; P=0.0075). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic cure were 0.715 and 0.636 for global and regional assessment, respectively. The best cut-offs for global and regional assessment were 132 (sensitivity: 83.3%; specificity: 61.1%) and 122 (sensitivity: 72.2%; specificity: 55.6%), respectively. Lower preoperative HU values is associated with cage subsidence after TLIF with unilateral fixation. HU measurement may be used as a predictor of cage subsidence after

  12. Clinical analysis of preoperative risk factors for the incidence of deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingchao; Li, Wenyi; Pei, Yueying; Shen, Yong; Li, Jia

    2016-06-13

    The purpose of this study aimed to assess preoperative risk factors for the incidence of deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The diagnosis of preoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. To examine the preoperative risk factors for DVT admitted for PLIF, comparative analysis of the DVT-positive and DVT-negative groups was done. DVT was detected in 9.4 % (269/2861) patients, including 17 proximal DVT patients (6.3 %) and 252 the distal DVT patients (93.7 %). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, the age, preoperative D-dimer, and history of rheumatoid arthritis were significant risk factors relative to the onset of DVT after posterior lumbar surgery. According to the result of our study, age, positive preoperative plasma D-dimer level, and rheumatoid arthritis had the influential impact on the incidence of DVT admitted for PLIF.

  13. Preliminary Results of Bioactive Amniotic Suspension with Allograft for Achieving One and Two-Level Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Eubulus J.; Utter, Philip A.; Cavanaugh, David A.; Frank, Kelly A.; Moody, Devan; McManus, Brian; Stone, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone graft material for lumbar fusion was historically autologous bone graft (ABG). In recent years alternatives such as allograft, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), ceramics, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) have gained favor, although the complications of these are not fully understood. Bioactive amniotic suspension (BAS) with allograft is a new class of material derived from human amniotic tissue. Methods Eligible patients receiving a one or two level lumbar interbody fusion with Nucel, a BAS with allograft, were contacted and scheduled for a mininmim 12 month follow-up visit. Patients were evaluated for fusion using CT's and plain radiographs. Clincal outcomes, including ODI, VAS back and leg were collected, as well as comorbidities including BMI, smoking status, diabetes and previous lumbar surgery. Results One-level patients (N=38) were 71.1% female with mean age of 58.4 ± 12.7 and mean BMI of 30.6 ± 6.08. Two-level patients (N=34) were 58.8% female with mean age of 49.3 ±10.9 and mean BMI of 30.1 ± 5.82. Kinematic fusion was achieved in 97.4% of one-level patients and 100% of two-level patients. Baseline comorbidities were present in 89.5% of one-level patients and 88.2% of two-level patients. No adverse events related to BAS were reported in this study. Conclusion Fusion status is evaluated with many different biologics and varying methods in the literature. BAS with allograft in this study demonstrated high fusion rates with no complications within a largely comorbid population. Although a small population, BAS with allograft results were encouraging for one and two-level lumbar interbody fusion in this study. Further prospective studies should be conducted to investigate safety and efficacy in a larger population. PMID:27162714

  14. BMP-2-induced Neuroforaminal Bone Growth in the Setting of a Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Singh, Kern

    2015-06-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has become a popular alternative to traditional methods of lumbar decompression and fusion. When compared with the open technique, the minimally invasive approach can result in decreased pain and blood loss as well as a shorter length of hospitalization. However, the narrower working channel through the tubular retractor increases the difficulty of decortication and bone grafting. Therefore, recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMP-2) is often utilized (although this is off-label) to create a more favorable interbody fusion environment. Recently, the use of rhBMP-2 has been associated with excessive bone growth in an MIS-TLIF. If this bone growth compresses the neighboring neural structures, patients may present with either new or recurrent radicular pain. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging can demonstrate heterotopic bone growth extending from the disk space into either the ipsilateral neuroforamen or lateral recess, which may result in the compression of the exiting or traversing root, respectively. The purpose of this article and the accompanying video is to demonstrate a technique for defining and resecting rhBMP-2-induced heterotopic bone growth following a previous MIS-TLIF.

  15. Porous biodegradable lumbar interbody fusion cage design and fabrication using integrated global-local topology optimization with laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heesuk; Hollister, Scott J; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable cages have received increasing attention for their use in spinal procedures involving interbody fusion to resolve complications associated with the use of nondegradable cages, such as stress shielding and long-term foreign body reaction. However, the relatively weak initial material strength compared to permanent materials and subsequent reduction due to degradation may be problematic. To design a porous biodegradable interbody fusion cage for a preclinical large animal study that can withstand physiological loads while possessing sufficient interconnected porosity for bony bridging and fusion, we developed a multiscale topology optimization technique. Topology optimization at the macroscopic scale provides optimal structural layout that ensures mechanical strength, while optimally designed microstructures, which replace the macroscopic material layout, ensure maximum permeability. Optimally designed cages were fabricated using solid, freeform fabrication of poly(ε-caprolactone) mixed with hydroxyapatite. Compression tests revealed that the yield strength of optimized fusion cages was two times that of typical human lumbar spine loads. Computational analysis further confirmed the mechanical integrity within the human lumbar spine, although the pore structure locally underwent higher stress than yield stress. This optimization technique may be utilized to balance the complex requirements of load-bearing, stress shielding, and interconnected porosity when using biodegradable materials for fusion cages.

  16. Radiographic results of single level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in degenerative lumbar spine disease: focusing on changes of segmental lordosis in fusion segment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Bum; Jeon, Taek-Soo; Heo, Youn-Moo; Lee, Woo-Suk; Yi, Jin-Woong; Kim, Tae-Kyun; Hwang, Cheol-Mog

    2009-12-01

    To assess the radiographic results in patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), particularly the changes in segmental lordosis in the fusion segment, whole lumbar lordosis and disc height. Twenty six cases of single-level TLIF in degenerative lumbar diseases were analyzed. The changes in segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and disc height were evaluated before surgery, after surgery and at the final follow-up. The segmental lordosis increased significantly after surgery but decreased at the final follow-up. Compared to the preoperative values, the segmental lordosis did not change significantly at the final follow-up. Whole lumbar lordosis at the final follow-up was significantly higher than the preoperative values. The disc height was significantly higher in after surgery than before surgery (p = 0.000) and the disc height alter surgery and at the final follow-up was similar. When performing TLIF, careful surgical techniques and attention are needed to restore and maintain the segmental lordosis at the fusion level.

  17. The effect of anterior longitudinal ligament resection on lordosis correction during minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion: Biomechanical and radiographic feasibility of an integrated spacer/plate interbody reconstruction device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choll; Harris, Jonathan A; Muzumdar, Aditya; Khalil, Saif; Sclafani, Joseph A; Raiszadeh, Kamshad; Bucklen, Brandon S

    2017-03-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is powerful for correcting degenerative conditions, yet sagittal correction remains limited by anterior longitudinal ligament tethering. Although lordosis has been restored via ligament release, biomechanical consequences remain unknown. Investigators examined radiographic and biomechanical of ligament release for restoration of lumbar lordosis. Six fresh-frozen human cadaveric spines (L3-S1) were tested: (Miller et al., 1988) intact; (Battie et al., 1995) 8mm spacer with intact anterior longitudinal ligament; (Cho et al., 2013) 8mm spacer without intact ligament following ligament resection; (Galbusera et al., 2013) 13mm lateral lumbar interbody fusion; (Goldstein et al., 2001) integrated 13mm spacer. Focal lordosis and range of motion were assessed by applying pure moments in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Cadaveric radiographs showed significant improvement in lordosis correction following ligament resection (P<0.05). The 8mm spacer with ligament construct provided greatest stability relative to intact (P>0.05) but did little to restore lordosis. Ligament release significantly destabilized the spine relative to intact in all modes and 8mm with ligament in lateral bending and axial rotation (P<0.05). Integrated lateral lumbar interbody fusion following ligament resection did not significantly differ from intact or from 8mm with ligament in all testing modes (P>0.05). Lordosis corrected by lateral lumbar interbody fusion can be improved by anterior longitudinal ligament resection, but significant construct instability and potential implant migration/dislodgment may result. This study shows that an added integrated lateral fixation system can significantly improve construct stability. Long-term multicenter studies are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar degenerative disease: short-term and medium-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Bin; Rong, Li-Min; Chen, Rui-Qiang; Dong, Jian-Wen; Xie, Pei-Gen; Zhang, Liang-Ming; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate short-term and medium-term outcomes of microendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) and open TLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods: In this prospective, randomized control study, 50 cases received microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF (MIS group), while another well-matched 50 cases accepted open TLIF (open group). Parameters between both groups, including surgical duration, intraoperative blood loss and radiologic exposure, postoperative analgesic usage and ambulatory time, visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg, functional scores, self-evaluation of surgical outcome (modified MacNab criteria), interbody fusion rate, adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) rate, as well as complication incidence were compared at 1 month and 24 months postoperatively. Results: Intraoperative blood loss and postoperative analgesic usage were significantly reduced in MIS group (P<0.05). Patients undergoing microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF were able to ambulate earlier postoperatively than those receiving open TLIF (P<0.05). However, it showed prolonged surgical duration and enhanced radiologic exposure in MIS group (P<0.05). At 1 month postoperatively, MIS group was associated with more improvement of VAS and functional scores compared with open group (P<0.05). While at 24 months postoperatively, both groups revealed similar VAS and functional scores (P>0.05). Excellent and perfect scale rating by modified MacNab criteria, interbody fusion rate, ASD rate and complication incidence between both groups were nearly the same (P>0.05). Conclusions: Microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF owns advantages of less iatrogenic injury, decreased blood loss, reduced analgesic usage and earlier rehabilitation, while it has drawbacks of more surgical duration and radiologic exposure. It is superior than open TLIF in terms of short-term clinical outcomes and has similar medium-term clinical outcomes. PMID:26885072

  19. Sagittal balance and spinopelvic parameters after lateral lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative scoliosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Yaser M K; Larson, A Noelle; Dekutoski, Mark B; Cui, Quanqi; Sebastian, Arjun S; Armitage, Bryan M; Nassr, Ahmad

    2014-02-01

    Retrospective matched-cohort analysis. To evaluate the change in radiographical parameters in patients undergoing interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation compared with posterior spine fusion (PSF) alone for degenerative scoliosis. Little is known about the effect of lateral interbody fusion (LIF) on sagittal plane correction in the setting of degenerative scoliosis. We performed a retrospective study to investigate these changes compared with PSF. Between 1997 and 2011, 33 patients had LIF at 181 levels between T8 and L5 vertebrae for the treatment of degenerative scoliosis (mean; 5 ± 2 levels). Of those, 23 patients had additional anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) at 37 levels between L4 and S1 vertebrae (mean; 1.6 ± 0.5 levels). A 1:1 matched control of patients who underwent PSF was performed. Patients were matched by age, sex, and diagnosis. Clinical and radiographical data were collected and compared between the matched cohorts. Lumbar lordosis (LL) was significantly restored in the LIF ± ALIF compared with PSF cohort (44° ± 14° vs. 36° ± 15°, P = 0.02). The segmental LL over the 102 LIF levels significantly improved from 12°± 10° to 21°± 13° postoperatively (P < 0.0001). However, the change over the 37 ALIF levels was not significant (from 30° ± 15° to 29° ± 9°, P = 0.8). Sagittal plane alignment was improved in the LIF ± ALIF compared with PSF cohort and trended toward but did not reach significance (3.8 ± 3.2 cm vs. 6.2 ± 5.7 cm, P = 0.09). Sacral slope was significantly higher in the LIF ± ALIF compared with PSF cohort (33° ± 11° vs. 28° ± 10°, P = 0.03). Pelvic tilt was lower in the LIF ± ALIF compared with PSF cohort and trended toward but did not reach significance (22° ± 10° vs. 26° ± 10°, P = 0.08). LL and sacral slope had mildly but statistically improved in the interbody fusion cohort compared with PSF cohort. Sagittal alignment and pelvic tilt trended toward but did not reach statistical

  20. Allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) combined with an osteoconductive scaffold to promote lumbar interbody spine fusion in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Donna L; Fredericks, Douglas C; Dryer, Randall F; Bae, Hyun W

    2016-03-01

    Advances in immunomagnetic cell sorting have enabled isolation and purification of pleuripotent stem cells from marrow aspirates and have expanded stem cell therapies to include allogeneic sources. This study aimed to determine the safety and efficacy of allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) combined with an osteoconductive scaffold in lumbar interbody spinal fusion using an ovine model. Thirty-two skeletally mature ewes underwent a single-level interbody fusion procedure using a Polyetheretherketone fusion cage supplemented with either iliac crest autograft (AG) or an osteconductive scaffold (Mastergraft Matrix, Medtronic, Memphis, TN, USA) with 2.5×10(6) MPCs, 6.25×10(6) MPCs, or 12.5×10(6) MPCs. Plain radiographs and computed tomography scans were scored for bridging bone at multiple points during healing and at necropsy. The biomechanical competency of fusion was scored by manual palpation and quantified using functional radiographs at necropsy. Postnecropsy histopathology and histomorphometric analysis assessed the local response to MPC treatment and quantified the volume and connectivity of newly formed bridging bone. Safety was assessed by serum biochemistry, hematology, and organ histopathology. Mesenchymal precursor cell treatment caused no adverse systemic or local tissue responses. All analyses indicated MPCs combined with an osteoconductive scaffold achieved similar or better fusion success as AG treatment after 16 weeks, and increasing the MPC dose did not enhance fusion. Manual palpation of the fusion site indicated more than 75% of MPC-treated and 65% of AG-treated animals achieved rigid fusion, which was corroborated with functional radiography. Computed tomography fusion scores indicated all animals in the MPC- and AG-treatment groups were fused at 16 weeks, yet X-ray scores indicated only 67% of the AG-treated animals were fused. Histomorphometry analyses showed equivalent outcomes for fusion connectivity and bony fusion area for

  1. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral pedicle screw fixation: comparison between primary and revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moo Sung; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery with a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is an important minimally invasive fusion technique for the lumbar spine. Lumbar spine reoperation is challenging and is thought to have greater complication risks. The purpose of this study was to compare MIS TLIF with unilateral screw fixation perioperative results between primary and revision surgeries. This was a prospective study that included 46 patients who underwent MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw. The patients were divided into two groups, primary and revision MIS TLIF, to compare perioperative results and complications. The two groups were similar in age, sex, and level of operation, and were not significantly different in the length of follow-up or clinical results. Although dural tears were more common with the revision group (primary 1; revision 4), operation time, blood loss, total perioperative complication, and fusion rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Both groups showed substantial improvements in VAS and ODI scores one year after surgical treatment. Revision MIS TLIF performed by an experienced surgeon does not necessarily increase the risk of perioperative complication compared with primary surgery. MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation is a valuable option for revision lumbar surgery.

  2. [The posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cages (PLIF) and transpedicular stabilization].

    PubMed

    Diedrich, O; Kraft, C N; Perlick, L; Schmitt, O

    2001-01-01

    The development of intervertebral cages has significantly innovated the original technique of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In this study we present the results of patients treated for degenerative or postoperative segmental spinal instabilities by PLIF with cages and pedicular stabilisation (360 degrees-instrumentation). Between 1992 and 1999 we implanted either CFRP-, PEEK- or Titanium-cages in 86 patients. 78 patients were adequately followed up over a period of at least 12 months (average 2,6 years). 5 patients were stabilised over 2 segments, so that ultimately 83 fused segments were evaluated.15% of all patients had an excellent, 51% a good, 28% a moderate and 5% an insufficient clinical result. Degenerative instabilities had a better outcome with 73% good or excellent clinical results, compared to postoperative instabilities (56%). Based on stringent radiographic fusion criteria we found true bony fusion in 52% of all segments after 12 months, 63% after 24 months, 72% after 36 months, and 78% after 48 months. In 21 segments cage packing was performed with autologous spongiosa, while in 62 segments a combination of cortical bone and spongiosa obtained from osseous structures at the operation-site were used as packing material. At the 24 month radiographic control we found a slightly higher fusion rate for those segments treated with autologous spongiosa obtained from the iliac crest. Neither for cages nor for pedicular screws was implant failure or material fatigue found. Serious entero-, pulmo-, cardio- or urological complications were not observed. Nonetheless the necessity for operative revision was 9%. A postoperative semiquantitative evaluation of segments neighbouring the fused vertebra revealed in 28% an increase in degenerative changes. Particularly after 360 degrees-instrumentation, interpretation of the fusion-status should be based on structural and not on functional criteria. The modification of PLIF with cages compared to the use of

  3. Particular Features of Surgical Site Infection in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hak; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Go We

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous reports have observed differences only in infection rates between posterolateral fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). There have been no reports that describe the particular features of surgical site infection (SSI) in PLIF. In this study, we endeavor to identify the distinguishing characteristics and risk factors of SSI in PLIF. Methods Our study undertook a review of a case series of an institute. Patients who had undergone PLIF consecutively in the author's hospital were reviewed. Two proactive procedures were introduced during the study period. One was irrigation of the autolocal bone, and the other was the intradiscal space irrigation with a nozzle. Infection rate and risk factors were analyzed. For subgroup analysis, the elapsed time to a diagnosis (ETD), clinical manifestations, hematologic findings, and causative bacteria were examined in patients with SSI. Results In a total of 1,831 cases, there were 30 cases of SSI (1.6%). Long operation time was an independent risk factor (p = 0.008), and local bone irrigation was an independent protective factor (p = 0.001). Two cases of referred SSI were included in the subgroup analysis. There were 6/32 (19%) superficial incisional infections (SII), 6/32 (19%) deep incisional infections (DII), and 20/32 (62%) organ/space infections (O/SI). The difference of incidence among three groups was significant (p = 0.002).The most common bacteria encountered were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis followed by methicillin-resistant S. aureus in incisional infections, and no growth followed by S. epidermidis in O/SI. ETD was 8.5 ± 2.3 days in SII, 8.7 ± 2.3 days in DII and 164.5 ± 131.1 days in O/SI (p = 0.013). Conclusions The rate of SSI in PLIF was 1.6%, with the most common type being O/SI. The causative bacteria of O/SI was of lower virulence than in the incisional infection, and thus diagnosis was delayed due to its latent and insidious feature. Contamination of auto

  4. Bone Morphogenic Protein Is a Viable Adjunct for Fusion in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M Mashfiqul Arafin; Sta.Ana, Ana Rosario P.; Yeo, William

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Comparison of prospectively collected data of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) with and without recombinant human bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP). Purpose To compare the clinical, radiological outcome and complications of patients undergoing MIS-TLIF with and without BMP. Overview of Literature BMP is an effective fusion enhancer with potential complications. Direct comparison of MIS-TLIF with and without BMP is limited to retrospective studies with short follow-up. Methods From June 2005 to February 2011, consecutive cases of MIS-TLIF performed by a single surgeon were included. North American Spine Society (NASS) score, Oswestry disability index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and visual analogue score (VAS) were assessed preoperatively and at 6 and 24 months postoperatively. Fusion rates and complications were noted. Results The 252 cases comprised 104 non-BMP and 148 BMP cases. The BMP group was significantly older (mean age, 60.2 vs. 53.9; p<0.01). Preoperative scores were similar. Immediate postoperative morphine usage was significantly lower in the BMP group (12.4 mg vs. 20.1 mg, p<0.01). At 6 months, the BMP group had lower VAS back and leg pain scores (p<0.01). At 2 years, the BMP group had better leg pain scores (p<0.01), ODI (15.4 vs. 20.3, p=0.04) and NASS scores (8.8 vs. 15.8, p<0.01). Both groups showed significant clinical improvement compared to their preoperative levels. The BMP group attained a significantly higher rate of fusion at 6 months follow-up (88.4% vs. 76.8%, p=0.016) with no difference at 2 years. The non-BMP and BMP group had 12 (11.5%) and 9 (6.1%) complications and 5 (4.8%) and 2 (1.4%) reoperations, respectively. Conclusions The use of BMP to augment fusion in MIS-TLIF is an acceptable alternative that has potential benefits of less pain in early and intermediate postoperative follow-up. PMID:27994786

  5. Evaluation of a novel tool for bone graft delivery in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Jeffrey B; Kleiner, Hannah M; Grimberg, E John; Throlson, Stefanie J

    2016-01-01

    Study design Disk material removed (DMR) during L4-5 and L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (T-LIF) surgery was compared to the corresponding bone graft (BG) volumes inserted at the time of fusion. A novel BG delivery tool (BGDT) was used to apply the BG. In order to establish the percentage of DMR during T-LIF, it was compared to DMR during anterior diskectomy (AD). This study was performed prospectively. Summary of background data Minimal information is available as to the volume of DMR during a T-LIF procedure, and the relationship between DMR and BG delivered is unknown. BG insertion has been empiric and technically challenging. Since the volume of BG applied to the prepared disk space likely impacts the probability of arthrodesis, an investigation is justified. Methods A total of 65 patients with pathology at L4-5 and/or L5-S1 necessitating fusion were treated with a minimally invasive T-LIF procedure. DMR was volumetrically measured during disk space preparation. BG material consisting of local autograft, BG extender, and bone marrow aspirate were mixed to form a slurry. BG slurry was injected into the disk space using a novel BGDT and measured volumetrically. An additional 29 patients who were treated with L5-S1 AD were compared to L5-S1 T-LIF DMR to determine the percent of T-LIF DMR relative to AD. Results DMR volumes averaged 3.6±2.2 mL. This represented 34% of the disk space relative to AD. The amount of BG delivered to the disk spaces was 9.3±3.2 mL, which is 2.6±2.2 times the amount of DMR. The BGDT allowed uncomplicated filling of the disk space in <1 minute. Conclusion The volume of DMR during T-LIF allows for a predictable volume of BG delivery. The BGDT allowed complete filling of the entire prepared disk space. The T-LIF diskectomy debrides 34% of the disk relative to AD. PMID:27274320

  6. A Retrospective Analysis of Complications Associated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Hindoyan, Kevork; Tilan, Justin; Buser, Zorica; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective review. The aim of our study was to quantify the frequency of complications associated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) use in anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The orthopedic subset of the Medicare database (PearlDiver) was queried for this retrospective cohort study using International Statistical Classification of Diseases 9 (ICD-9) and Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes for ALIF procedures with and without rhBMP-2 between 2005 and 2010. Frequencies of complications and reoperations were then identified within 1 year from the index procedure. Complications included reoperations, pulmonary embolus, deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, nerve-related complications, incision and drainage procedures, wound, sepsis, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, respiratory, heterotopic ossification, retrograde ejaculation, radiculopathy, and other medical complications. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the statistical significance. We identified a total of 41 865 patients who had an ALIF procedure. A total of 14 384 patients received rhBMP-2 while 27 481 did not. Overall, 6016 (41.8%) complications within 1 year from surgery were noted within the group who received rhBMP-2 and 12 950 (47.1%) complications within 1 year from surgery were recorded in those who did not receive rhBMP-2 (OR = 0.81, CI = 0.77-0.84). Overall, exposure to rhBMP-2 was associated with significantly decreased odds of complications with exception to reoperation rates (0.9% rhBMP-2 vs 1.0% no rhBMP-2; OR = 0.88, CI = 0.71-1.09) and radiculopathy (4.4% rhBMP-2 vs 4.3% no rhBMP-2; OR = 1.02, CI = 0.93-1.13). The use of rhBMP-2 in patients undergoing ALIF procedure was associated with a significantly decreased rate of complications. Further studies are needed to elucidate a true incidence of complication.

  7. A Retrospective Analysis of Complications Associated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hindoyan, Kevork; Tilan, Justin; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective review. Objective: The aim of our study was to quantify the frequency of complications associated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) use in anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Methods: The orthopedic subset of the Medicare database (PearlDiver) was queried for this retrospective cohort study using International Statistical Classification of Diseases 9 (ICD-9) and Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes for ALIF procedures with and without rhBMP-2 between 2005 and 2010. Frequencies of complications and reoperations were then identified within 1 year from the index procedure. Complications included reoperations, pulmonary embolus, deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, nerve-related complications, incision and drainage procedures, wound, sepsis, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, respiratory, heterotopic ossification, retrograde ejaculation, radiculopathy, and other medical complications. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the statistical significance. Results: We identified a total of 41 865 patients who had an ALIF procedure. A total of 14 384 patients received rhBMP-2 while 27 481 did not. Overall, 6016 (41.8%) complications within 1 year from surgery were noted within the group who received rhBMP-2 and 12 950 (47.1%) complications within 1 year from surgery were recorded in those who did not receive rhBMP-2 (OR = 0.81, CI = 0.77-0.84). Overall, exposure to rhBMP-2 was associated with significantly decreased odds of complications with exception to reoperation rates (0.9% rhBMP-2 vs 1.0% no rhBMP-2; OR = 0.88, CI = 0.71-1.09) and radiculopathy (4.4% rhBMP-2 vs 4.3% no rhBMP-2; OR = 1.02, CI = 0.93-1.13). Conclusions: The use of rhBMP-2 in patients undergoing ALIF procedure was associated with a significantly decreased rate of complications. Further studies are needed to elucidate a true incidence of complication. PMID:28507884

  8. [A feasibility research of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) using hybrid internal fixation for recurrent lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Mao, Ke-ya; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Song-hua; Zhang, Yong-gang; Liu, Bao-wei; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Cui, Geng; Zhang, Xue-song; Li, Peng; Mao, Ke-zheng

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) using hybrid internal fixation of pedicle screws and a translaminar facet screw for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. From January 2010 to December 2011, 16 recurrent lumbar disc herniation patients, 10 male and 6 female patients with an average age of 45 years (35-68 years) were treated with unilateral incision MIS-TLIF through working channel. After decompression, interbody fusion and fixation using unilateral pedicle screws, a translaminar facet screw was inserted from the same incision through spinous process and laminar to the other side facet joint. The results of perioperative parameters, radiographic images and clinical outcomes were assessed. The repeated measure analysis of variance was applied in the scores of visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disablity index (ODI). All patients MIS-TLIF were accomplished under working channel including decompression, interbody fusion and hybrid fixation without any neural complication. The average operative time was (148 ± 75) minutes, the average operative blood loss was (186 ± 226) ml, the average postoperative ambulation time was (32 ± 15) hours, and the average hospitalization time was (6 ± 4) days. The average length of incision was (29 ± 4) mm, and the average length of translaminar facets screw was (52 ± 6) mm. The mean follow-up was 16.5 months with a range of 12-24 months. The postoperative X-ray and CT images showed good position of the hybrid internal fixation, and all facets screws penetrate through facets joint. The significant improvement could be found in back pain VAS, leg pain VAS and ODI scores between preoperative 1 day and postoperative follow-up at all time-points (back pain VAS:F = 52.845, P = 0.000;leg pain VAS:F = 113.480, P = 0.000;ODI:F = 36.665, P = 0.000). Recurrent lumbar disc herniation could be treated with MIS-TLIF using hybrid fixation through unilateral incision, and the

  9. High neurological complication rates for extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion and related techniques: A review of safety concerns

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are frequent reports of lumbosacral plexus and other neurological injuries occurring with extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIF) and other related lateral lumbar techniques. Methods: This review focuses on the new neurological deficits (e.g. lumbosacral plexus, root injuries) that occur following minimally invasive surgery (MIS) XLIF and other related lateral lumbar techniques. Results: A review of multiple articles revealed the following ranges of new postoperative neurological complications for XLIF procedures: plexus injuries 13.28%; sensory deficits 0–75% (permanent in 62.5%); motor deficits 0.7–33.6%; anterior thigh pain 12.5–25%. Of interest, in a study by Lykissas et al., the frequency of long-term neural injury following lateral lumber interbody fusion (LLIF) with BMP-2 (72 patients) was much higher than for LLIF performed with autograft/allograft (72 patients). The addition of bone morphogenetic protein led to persistent sensory deficits in 29 vs. 20 without BMP; persistent motor deficits in 35 with vs. 17 without BMP; and persistent anterior thigh/groin pain in 8 with vs. 0 without BMP. They should also have noted the unacceptably high incidence of neural injury occurring with LLIF alone without BMP. Conclusion: This review highlights the high risk of neural injury (up to 75% for sensory, 33.6% for motor, and an overall plexus injury rate of 13.28%) utilizing the XLIF and other similar lateral lumbar approaches. With such extensive neurological injuries, is the XLIF really safe, and should it still be performed? PMID:27843679

  10. Anatomy of the psoas muscle and lumbar plexus with respect to the surgical approach for lateral transpsoas interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Bogner, Eric A; Herzog, Richard J; Huang, Russel C

    2011-04-01

    Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is a minimally invasive technique that permits interbody fusion utilizing cages placed via a direct lateral retroperitoneal approach. We sought to describe the locations of relevant neurovascular structures based on MRI with respect to this novel surgical approach. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive lumbosacral spine MRI scans in 43 skeletally mature adults. MRI scans were independently reviewed by two readers to identify the location of the psoas muscle, lumbar plexus, femoral nerve, inferior vena cava and right iliac vein. Structures potentially at risk for injury were identified by: a distance from the anterior aspect of the adjacent vertebral bodies of <20 mm, representing the minimum retraction necessary for cage placement, and extension of vascular structures posterior to the anterior vertebral body, requiring anterior retraction. The percentage of patients with neurovascular structures at risk for left-sided approaches was 2.3% at L1-2, 7.0% at L2-3, 4.7% at L3-4 and 20.9% at L4-5. For right-sided approaches, this rose to 7.0% at L1-2, 7.0% at L2-3, 9.3% at L3-4 and 44.2% at L4-5, largely because of the relatively posterior right-sided vasculature. A relationship between the position of psoas muscle and lumbar plexus is described which allows use of the psoas position as a proxy for lumbar plexus position to identify patients who may be at risk, particularly at the L4-5 level. Further study will establish the clinical relevance of these measurements and the ability of neurovascular structures to be retracted without significant injury.

  11. Comparative Study of the Difference of Perioperative Complication and Radiologic Results: MIS-DLIF (Minimally Invasive Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion) Versus MIS-OLIF (Minimally Invasive Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion).

    PubMed

    Jin, Jie; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Seong, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Sung; Cho, Hyun-Jin

    2017-01-04

    Retrospective observatory analysis. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of perioperative complication, difference of cage location, and sagittal alignment between minimally invasive oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-OLIF) and MIS-direct lateral lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) in the cases of single-level surgery at L4-L5. MIS-DLIF using tubular retractor has been used for the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases; however, blunt transpsoas dissection poses a risk of injury to the lumbar plexus. As an alternative, MIS-OLIF uses a window between the prevertebral venous structures and psoas muscle. A total of 43 consecutive patients who underwent MIS-DLIF or MIS-OLIF for various L4/L5 level pathologies between November 2011 and April 2014 by a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. A complication classification based on the relation to surgical procedure and effect duration was used. Perioperative complications until 3-month postoperatively were reviewed for the patients. Radiologic results including the cage location and sagittal alignment were also assessed with plain radiography. There were no significant statistical differences in perioperative parameters and early clinical outcome between 2 groups. Overall, there were 13 (59.1%) approach-related complications in the DLIF group and 3 (14.3%) in the OLIF group. In the DLIF group, 3 (45.6%) were classified as persistent, however, there was no persistent complication in the OLIF group. In the OLIF group, cage is located mostly in the middle 1/3 of vertebral body, significantly increasing posterior disk space height and foraminal height compared with the DLIF group. Global and segmental lumbar lordosis was greater in the DLIF group due to anterior cage position without statistical significance. In our report of L4/L5 level diseases, the OLIF technique may decrease approach-related perioperative morbidities by eliminating the risk of unwanted muscle and nerve manipulations. Using

  12. Allogeneic morphogenetic protein vs. recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in lumbar interbody fusion procedures: a radiographic and economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jeffrey S; Yeung, Christopher A; Field, Justin S; McClellan, R Trigg

    2013-12-28

    Since the introduction of rhBMP-2 (Infuse) in 2002, surgeons have had an alternative substitute to autograft and its related donor site morbidity. Recently, the prevalence of reported adverse events and complications related to the use of rhBMP-2 has raised many ethical and legal concerns for surgeons. Additionally, the cost and decreasing reimbursement landscape of rhBMP-2 use have required identification of a viable alternative. Osteo allogeneic morphogenetic protein (OsteoAMP) is a commercially available allograft-derived growth factor rich in osteoinductive, angiogenic, and mitogenic proteins. This study compares the radiographic fusion outcomes between rhBMP-2 and OsteoAMP allogeneic morphogenetic protein in lumbar interbody fusion spine procedures. Three hundred twenty-one (321) patients from three centers underwent a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedure and were assessed by an independent radiologist for fusion and radiographically evident complications. The independent radiologist was blinded to the intervention, product, and surgeon information. Two hundred and twenty-six (226) patients received OsteoAMP with autologous local bone, while ninety-five (95) patients received Infuse with autologous local bone. Patients underwent radiographs (x-ray and/or CT) at standard postoperative follow-up intervals of approximately 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Fusion was defined as radiographic evidence of bridging across endplates, or bridging from endplates to interspace disc plugs. Osteobiologic surgical supply costs were also analyzed to ascertain cost differences between OsteoAMP and rhBMP-2. OsteoAMP produced higher rates of fusion at 6, 12, and 18 months (p ≤ 0.01). The time required for OsteoAMP to achieve fusion was approximately 40% less than rhBMP-2 with approximately 70% fewer complications. Osteobiologic supply costs were 80.5% lower for OsteoAMP patients (73.7% lower per level) than for rh

  13. Do Trunk Muscles Affect the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Rate?: Correlation of Trunk Muscle Cross Sectional Area and Fusion Rates after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Stand-Alone Cage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man Kyu; Park, Bong Jin; Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although trunk muscles in the lumbar spine preserve spinal stability and motility, little is known about the relationship between trunk muscles and spinal fusion rate. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the correlation between trunk muscles cross sectional area (MCSA) and fusion rate after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using stand-alone cages. Methods A total of 89 adult patients with degenerative lumbar disease who were performed PLIF using stand-alone cages at L4–5 were included in this study. The cross-sectional area of the psoas major (PS), erector spinae (ES), and multifidus (MF) muscles were quantitatively evaluated by preoperative lumbar magnetic resonance imaging at the L3–4, L4–5, and L5–S1 segments, and bone union was evaluated by dynamic lumbar X-rays. Results Of the 89 patients, 68 had bone union and 21 did not. The MCSAs at all segments in both groups were significantly different (p<0.05) for the PS muscle, those at L3–4 and L4–5 segments between groups were significantly different (p=0.048, 0.021) for the ES and MF muscles. In the multivariate analysis, differences in the PS MCSA at the L4–5 and L5–S1 segments remained significant (p=0.048, 0.043 and odds ratio=1.098, 1.169). In comparison analysis between male and female patients, most MCSAs of male patients were larger than female's. Fusion rates of male patients (80.7%) were higher than female's (68.8%), too. Conclusion For PLIF surgery, PS muscle function appears to be an important factor for bone union and preventing back muscle injury is essential for better fusion rate. PMID:27226860

  14. Choice of Approach Does Not Affect Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes: A Comparative Cohort of Patients Having Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Patients Having Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion at 24 Months

    PubMed Central

    Malham, Gregory M.; Parker, Rhiannon M.; Blecher, Carl M.; Chow, Fiona Y.; Seex, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected registry data. Objective  This study aimed to compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes between comparative cohorts of patients having anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and patients having lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Methods  Ninety consecutive patients were treated by a single surgeon with either ALIF (n = 50) or LLIF (n = 40). Inclusion criteria were patients age 45 to 70 years with degenerative disk disease or grade 1 to 2 spondylolisthesis and single-level pathology from L1 to S1. Patient-reported outcome measures included pain (visual analog scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), and quality of life (Short Form 36 physical component score [PCS] and mental component scores [MCS]). Assessment of fusion and measurement of lordosis and posterior disk height were performed on computed tomography scans. Results  At 24 months, patients having ALIF had significant improvements in back (64%) and leg (65%) pain and ODI (60%), PCS (44%), and MCS (26%; p < 0.05) scores. Patients having LLIF had significant improvements in back (56%) and leg (57%) pain and ODI (52%), PCS (48%), and MCS (12%; p < 0.05) scores. Fourteen complications occurred in the ALIF group, and in the LLIF group, there were 17 complications (p > 0.05). The fusion rate was 100% for ALIF and 95% for LLIF (p = 0.1948). ALIF added ∼6 degrees of lordosis and 3 mm of height, primarily measured at L5–S1, and LLIF added ∼3 degrees of lordosis and 2 mm of height between L1 to L5. Mean follow-up was 34.1 months. Conclusions  In comparative cohorts of patients having ALIF and patients having LLIF at 24 months postoperatively, there were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, complication rates, or fusion rates. PMID:27433432

  15. Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Results of Mean 46-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Erken, H. Yener

    2017-01-01

    Background. Spinal fusion has been shown to be the preferred surgical option to reduce pain, recover function, and increase quality of life in the treatment of a variety of lumbar spinal disorders. The main goal of the present study is to report our clinical experience and results of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar interbody fusion (PELIF) applications using the expandable spacer in a single institution. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of 18 patients with >12-month follow-up who had been operated on PELIF using expandable spacer from 2001 to 2007. Their clinical and radiological data were collected and analyzed. Results. The mean follow-up period was 46 months. The mean DH before the surgery was 8.3 mm which improved to 11.4 mm at the early postoperative period and regressed to 9.3 mm at the last follow-up visit. The VAS-B, VAS-L, and ODI scores at the last follow-up showed a 54%, 72%, and 69% improvement from the preoperative period, respectively. Conclusions. The presented PELIF technique with the expandable spacer seems to be a promising surgical technique for the treatment of a variety of lumbar spinal disorders. Conversely, radiological results including disc space subsidence make the stand-alone application of the expandable spacer debatable. PMID:28337448

  16. Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Results of Mean 46-Month Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Erken, H Yener; Bae, Junseok

    2017-01-01

    Background. Spinal fusion has been shown to be the preferred surgical option to reduce pain, recover function, and increase quality of life in the treatment of a variety of lumbar spinal disorders. The main goal of the present study is to report our clinical experience and results of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar interbody fusion (PELIF) applications using the expandable spacer in a single institution. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of 18 patients with >12-month follow-up who had been operated on PELIF using expandable spacer from 2001 to 2007. Their clinical and radiological data were collected and analyzed. Results. The mean follow-up period was 46 months. The mean DH before the surgery was 8.3 mm which improved to 11.4 mm at the early postoperative period and regressed to 9.3 mm at the last follow-up visit. The VAS-B, VAS-L, and ODI scores at the last follow-up showed a 54%, 72%, and 69% improvement from the preoperative period, respectively. Conclusions. The presented PELIF technique with the expandable spacer seems to be a promising surgical technique for the treatment of a variety of lumbar spinal disorders. Conversely, radiological results including disc space subsidence make the stand-alone application of the expandable spacer debatable.

  17. Preserving Posterior Complex Can Prevent Adjacent Segment Disease following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgeries: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Peng; Du, Cheng-Fei; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Xuan-Wei; Wu, Gui; Li, Zhe-Cheng; Ye, Jin-Duo; Lin, Jian-Hua; Wang, Li Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of the lumbar posterior complex on the adjacent segments after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgeries. Methods A finite element model of the L1–S1 segment was modified to simulate PLIF with total laminectomy (PLIF-LAM) and PLIF with hemilaminectomy (PLIF-HEMI) procedures. The models were subjected to a 400N follower load with a 7.5-N.m moment of flexion, extension, torsion, and lateral bending. The range of motion (ROM), intradiscal pressure (IDP), and ligament force were compared. Results In Flexion, the ROM, IDP and ligament force of posterior longitudinal ligament, intertransverse ligament, and capsular ligament remarkably increased at the proximal adjacent segment in the PLIF-LAM model, and slightly increased in the PLIF-HEMI model. There was almost no difference for the ROM, IDP and ligament force at L5-S1 level between the two PLIF models although the ligament forces of ligamenta flava remarkably increased compared with the intact lumbar spine (INT) model. For the other loading conditions, these two models almost showed no difference in ROM, IDP and ligament force on the adjacent discs. Conclusions Preserved posterior complex acts as the posterior tension band during PLIF surgery and results in less ROM, IDP and ligament forces on the proximal adjacent segment in flexion. Preserving the posterior complex during decompression can be effective on preventing adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following PLIF surgeries. PMID:27870867

  18. Fully endoscopic lumbar interbody fusion using a percutaneous unilateral biportal endoscopic technique: technical note and preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Son, Sang Kyu; Eum, Jin Hwa; Park, Choon Keun

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive spine surgery can minimize damage to normal anatomical structures. Recently, fully endoscopic spine surgeries have been attempted for lumbar fusion surgery. In this study, the authors performed a percutaneous unilateral biportal endoscopic (UBE) technique as a minimally invasive surgery for lumbar fusion. The purpose of this study is to present the UBE technique of fully endoscopic lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) and to analyze the clinical results. METHODS Patients who were to undergo single-level fusion surgery from L3-4 to L5-S1 were enrolled. Two channels (endoscopic portal and working portal) were used for endoscopic lumbar fusion surgery. All patients underwent follow-up for more than 12 months. Demographic characteristics, diagnosis, operative time, and estimated blood loss were evaluated. MRI was performed on postoperative Day 2. Clinical evaluations (visual analog scale [VAS] for the leg and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] scores) were performed preoperatively and during the follow-up period. RESULTS A total of 69 patients (24 men and 45 women) were enrolled in this study. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months. Postoperative MRI revealed optimal direct neural decompression after fully endoscopic fusion surgery. VAS and ODI scores significantly improved after the surgery. There was no postoperative neurological deterioration. CONCLUSIONS Fully endoscopic LIF using the UBE technique may represent an alternative minimally invasive LIF surgery for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. Long-term follow-up and larger clinical studies are needed to validate the clinical and radiological results of this surgery.

  19. A Multi-center Clinical Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Expandable Stand-alone Cage (Tyche® Cage) for Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Wook; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Oh, Seong Hoon; Roh, Sung Woo; Rim, Dae Cheol; Kim, Tae Sung

    2007-01-01

    Objective This multi-center clinical study was designed to determine the long-term results of patients who received a one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion with expandable cage (Tyche® cage) for degenerative spinal diseases during the same period in each hospital. Methods Fifty-seven patients with low back pain who had a one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion using a newly designed expandable cage were enrolled in this study at five centers from June 2003 to December 2004 and followed up for 24 months. Pain improvement was checked with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and their disability was evaluated with the Oswestry Disability Index. Radiographs were obtained before and after surgery. At the final follow-up, dynamic stability, quality of bone fusion, interveretebral disc height, and lumbar lordosis were assessed. In some cases, a lumbar computed tomography scan was also obtained. Results The mean VAS score of back pain was improved from 6.44 points preoperatively to 0.44 at the final visit and the score of sciatica was reduced from 4.84 to 0.26. Also, the Oswestry Disability Index was improved from 32.62 points preoperatively to 18.25 at the final visit. The fusion rate was 92.5%. Intervertebral disc height, recorded as 9.94±2.69 mm before surgery was increased to 12.23±3.31 mm at postoperative 1 month and was stabilized at 11.43±2.23 mm on final visit. The segmental angle of lordosis was changed significantly from 3.54±3.70° before surgery to 6.37±3.97° by 24 months postoperative, and total lumbar lordosis was 20.37±11.30° preoperatively and 24.71±11.70° at 24 months postoperative. Conclusion There have been no special complications regarding the expandable cage during the follow-up period and the results of this study demonstrates a high fusion rate and clinical success. PMID:19096552

  20. Preparing the lumbar intervertebral disk space for interbody procedures: a comparison between the traditional method and a new automated method.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Brett A; Rhee, John M; Jackson, Keith L

    2012-02-01

    Cadaveric laboratory study. To quantify and compare automated disk-space preparation with traditional methods. Removal of nucleus pulposus to prepare a disk space for interbody fusion is performed with various techniques. Our aim was to determine the safety and effectiveness of an automated technique in comparison to traditional methods and gauge its expected clinical application. This study was conducted in 2 phases. In the phase 1 safety trial, ''maximal'' force was applied to an automated shaver against cadaveric annulus and endplates until flexion of the shaft caused the blades to bind. This simulated the risk of creating an incidental cortical or annular defect. In phase 2, 27 cadaveric lumbar disk spaces were randomized to traditional or automated preparation techniques through a standard transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion approach. Traditional method comprised the use of paddle shavers, pituitary rongeurs, and curettes. Automated technique involved insertion of an 8-mm paddle shaver, followed by straight and angled hand pieces to remove nucleus pulposus and endplate cartilage. Unintended cortical and annular breaches, preparation time, instrument insertions, percentage area of exposed endplate underlying the nucleus pulposus, and percentage volume of nuclear space cleared were measured and compared. In phase 1, ''maximal'' force applied for 10 seconds produced no full-thickness annular or cortical defects. In phase 2, automated technique produced fewer endplate cortical defects (3 vs. 7) and full-thickness annular breaches (0 vs. 1), required fewer instrument insertions (29 vs. 6; P<0.001), exposed more endplate (65% vs. 52%; P=0.037), and removed more nucleus pulposus volume (83% vs. 59%; P=0.01). Automated shaving decreased instrument insertions and prepared the disk space more effectively, with fewer cortical or annular defects. This technique holds promise for improved outcomes in spinal fusion surgery.

  1. [EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON POLY-AMINO ACID/NANO-HYDROXYAPATITE/CALCIUM SULFATE CAGE FOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION IN GOATS].

    PubMed

    Xue, Youdi; Song, Yueming; Liu, Limin; Ren, Chunpeng; Zhou, Zhongjie; Zhou, Chunguang

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of poly-amino acid/nano-hydroxyapatite/calcium sulfate (PHC) Cage in lumbar interbody fusion of the goat. Eighteen mature female goats (weighing 29-33 kg) were divided into 3 groups randomly: PHC Cage group (group A), titanium Cage group (group B), and ilium group (group C). A left extraperitoneal approach was used to establish the animal model of discectomy and interbody fusion with Cage or ilium. The general situation was observed for 24 weeks after operation. X-ray films were taken to measure disc space height (DSH) before operation and at 4, 12, and 24 weeks after operation. CT three dimensional reconstuction was performed at 24 weeks after operation to evaluate the interbody fusion according to modified Brantigan grading. The specimens of L3,4 were harvested for mechanical test, histological, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation at 24 weeks after operation. All goats survived to the end of experiment. DSH at 4 weeks after operation increased when compared with preoperative one in each group, and then decreased; DSH was significantly lower at 12 and 24 weeks after operation than preoperative one in group C (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in DSH among 3 groups at preoperation and 4 weeks after operation (P > 0.05); at 12 and 24 weeks after operation, DSH of groups A and B was significantly higher than that of group C (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between groups A and B (P > 0.05). CT three dimensional reconstuction showed that bony fusion was obtained in all goats of groups A and C, and in 3 goats of group B; according to modified Brantigan grading, the scores of groups A and C were significantlly higher than that of group B (P < 0.05), but no significant difference between groups A and C (P > 0.05). The biomechanical test showed that there was no significant difference in range of motion between group A and group B (P > 0.05), which were significantly lower than that of group C (P < 0

  2. A perioperative cost analysis comparing single-level minimally invasive and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kern; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J; Oglesby, Mathew; Pelton, Miguel A; Andersson, Gunnar B; Isayeva, Darya; Jegier, Briana J; Phillips, Frank M

    2014-08-01

    Emerging literature suggests superior clinical short- and long-term outcomes of MIS (minimally invasive surgery) TLIFs (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion) versus open fusions. Few studies to date have analyzed the cost differences between the two techniques and their relationship to acute clinical outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences in hospitalization costs and payments for patients treated with primary single-level MIS versus open TLIF. The impact of clinical outcomes and their contribution to financial differences was explored as well. This study was a nonrandomized, nonblinded prospective review. Sixty-six consecutive patients undergoing a single-level TLIF (open/MIS) were analyzed (33 open, 33 MIS). Patients in either cohort (MIS/open) were matched based on race, sex, age, smoking status, medical comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity index), payer, and diagnosis. Every patient in the study had a diagnosis of either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis and stenosis. Operative time (minutes), length of stay (LOS, days), estimated blood loss (EBL, mL), anesthesia time (minutes), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and hospital cost/payment amount were assessed. The MIS and open TLIF groups were compared based on clinical outcomes measures and hospital cost/payment data using SPSS version 20.0 for statistical analysis. The two groups were compared using bivariate chi-squared analysis. Mann-Whitney tests were used for non-normal distributed data. Effect size estimate was calculated with the Cohen d statistic and the r statistic with a 95% confidence interval. Average surgical time was shorter for the MIS than the open TLIF group (115.8 minutes vs. 186.0 minutes respectively; p=.001). Length of stay was also reduced for the MIS versus the open group (2.3 days vs. 2.9 days, respectively; p=.018). Average anesthesia time and EBL were also lower in the MIS group (p<.001). VAS scores decreased for both groups, although these

  3. Viscoelastic Disc Arthroplasty Provides Superior Back and Leg Pain Relief in Patients with Lumbar Disc Degeneration Compared to Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Rischke, Burkhard; Zimmers, Kari B; Smith, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed spinal diseases. The symptoms these disorders cause are anticipated to increase as the population in Western countries ages. Compare back and leg pain alleviation in patients with LDD and a viscoelastic disc prosthesis documented in the SWISSspine registry versus patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion documented in the Spine Tango registry. Prospectively collected clinical and outcome data in two independent spine registries. Outcome Measures were back and leg pain relief on 0 to 10 numerical rating scales. The analysis included a single surgeon series of 48 patients with viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR) from the SWISSspine registry which were compared to 131 patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) from the Spine Tango registry. Two linear multivariate regression models were built to assess the associations of patient characteristics with back and leg pain relief. The following covariates were included in the models: patient age and sex, disc herniation as additional diagnosis, number of treated segments, level of treated segment, treatment type (VTDR, ALIF), preoperative back and leg pain levels and follow-up interval. Both models showed VTDR to be associated with significantly higher back (2.76 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.78 - 3.73; p < 0.001) and leg pain (2.12 points; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.13; p < 0.001) relief than ALIF. Other influential factors for higher back pain relief were female sex compared with male sex (1.03 additional points; 95% CI 0.27 to 1.78; p = 0.008), monosegmental surgery compared with bisegmental surgery (1.02 additional points; 95% CI 0.21 to 1.83; p = 0.014), and higher back pain at baseline (0.87 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative back pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.03; p < 0.001). Other influential factors for leg pain relief were monosegmental surgery (0.93 additional points; 95% CI 0.10 to 1.77; p = 0.029) and

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of a spherical lumbar interbody device at varying levels of subsidence

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Steven A.; Isaza, Jorge E.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ulf Fernström implanted stainless steel ball bearings following discectomy, or for painful disc disease, and termed this procedure disc arthroplasty. Today, spherical interbody spacers are clinically available, but there is a paucity of associated biomechanical testing. The primary objective of the current study was to evaluate the biomechanics of a spherical interbody implant. It was hypothesized that implantation of a spherical interbody implant, with combined subsidence into the vertebral bodies, would result in similar ranges of motion (RoM) and facet contact forces (FCFs) when compared with an intact condition. A secondary objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) versus a cobalt chrome (CoCr) implant on vertebral body strains. We hypothesized that the material selection would have a negligible effect on vertebral body strains since both materials have elastic moduli substantially greater than the annulus. Methods A finite element model of L3-L4 was created and validated by use of ROM, disc pressure, and bony strain from previously published data. Virtual implantation of a spherical interbody device was performed with 0, 2, and 4 mm of subsidence. The model was exercised in compression, flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. The ROM, vertebral body effective (von Mises) strain, and FCFs were reported. Results Implantation of a PEEK implant resulted in slightly lower strain maxima when compared with a CoCr implant. For both materials, the peak strain experienced by the underlying bone was reduced with increasing subsidence. All levels of subsidence resulted in ROM and FCFs similar to the intact model. Conclusions The results suggest that a simple spherical implant design is able to maintain segmental ROM and provide minimal differences in FCFs. Large areas of von Mises strain maxima were generated in the bone adjacent to the implant regardless of whether the implant was PEEK or Co

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of a spherical lumbar interbody device at varying levels of subsidence.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Steven A; Isaza, Jorge E; Kurtz, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Ulf Fernström implanted stainless steel ball bearings following discectomy, or for painful disc disease, and termed this procedure disc arthroplasty. Today, spherical interbody spacers are clinically available, but there is a paucity of associated biomechanical testing. The primary objective of the current study was to evaluate the biomechanics of a spherical interbody implant. It was hypothesized that implantation of a spherical interbody implant, with combined subsidence into the vertebral bodies, would result in similar ranges of motion (RoM) and facet contact forces (FCFs) when compared with an intact condition. A secondary objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) versus a cobalt chrome (CoCr) implant on vertebral body strains. We hypothesized that the material selection would have a negligible effect on vertebral body strains since both materials have elastic moduli substantially greater than the annulus. A finite element model of L3-L4 was created and validated by use of ROM, disc pressure, and bony strain from previously published data. Virtual implantation of a spherical interbody device was performed with 0, 2, and 4 mm of subsidence. The model was exercised in compression, flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. The ROM, vertebral body effective (von Mises) strain, and FCFs were reported. Implantation of a PEEK implant resulted in slightly lower strain maxima when compared with a CoCr implant. For both materials, the peak strain experienced by the underlying bone was reduced with increasing subsidence. All levels of subsidence resulted in ROM and FCFs similar to the intact model. The results suggest that a simple spherical implant design is able to maintain segmental ROM and provide minimal differences in FCFs. Large areas of von Mises strain maxima were generated in the bone adjacent to the implant regardless of whether the implant was PEEK or CoCr.

  6. Transforaminal lumbar interbody graft placement using an articulating delivery arm facilitates increased segmental lordosis with superior anterior and midline graft placement.

    PubMed

    Shau, David N; Parker, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Zuckerman, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-05-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is a frequently performed method of lumbar arthrodesis in patients failing medical management of back and leg pain. Accurate placement of the interbody graft and restoration of lordosis has been shown to be crucial when performing lumbar fusion procedures. We performed a single-surgeon, prospective, randomized study to determine whether a novel articulating versus traditional straight graft delivery arm system allows for superior graft placement and increased lordosis for single-level TLIF. Thirty consecutive patients undergoing single-level TLIF were included and prospectively randomized to one of the 2 groups (articulated vs. straight delivery arm system). Three radiographic characteristics were evaluated at 6-week follow-up: (1) degree of segmental lumbar lordosis at the fused level; (2) the percent anterior location of the interbody graft in disk space; and (3) the distance (mm) off midline of the interbody graft placement. Randomization yielded 16 patients in the articulated delivery arm cohort and 14 in the straight delivery arm cohort. The articulating delivery arm system yielded an average of 14.7-degree segmental lordosis at fused level, 35% anterior location, and 3.6 mm off midline. The straight delivery arm system yielded an average of 10.7-degree segmental lordosis at fused level, 46% anterior location, and 7.0 mm off midline. All 3 comparisons were statistically significant (P<0.05). The study suggests that an articulating delivery arm system facilitates superior anterior and midline TLIF graft placement allowing for increased segmental lordosis compared with a traditional straight delivery arm system.

  7. Flexibility and fatigue evaluation of oblique as compared with anterior lumbar interbody cages with integrated endplate fixation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Andrew L; Camisa, William J; Buttermann, Glenn R; Malcolm, James R

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify the in vitro range of motion (ROM) of oblique as compared with anterior lumbar interbody devices, pullout resistance, and subsidence in fatigue. Anterior and oblique cages with integrated plate fixation (IPF) were tested using lumbar motion segments. Flexibility tests were conducted on the intact segments, cage, cage + IPF, and cage + IPF + pedicle screws (6 anterior, 7 oblique). Pullout tests were then performed on the cage + IPF. Fatigue testing was conducted on the cage + IPF specimens for 30,000 cycles. No ROM differences were observed in any test group between anterior and oblique cage constructs. The greatest reduction in ROM was with supplemental pedicle screw fixation. Peak pullout forces were 637 ± 192 N and 651 ± 127 N for the anterior and oblique implants, respectively. The median cage subsidence was 0.8 mm and 1.4 mm for the anterior and oblique cages, respectively. Anterior and oblique cages similarly reduced ROM in flexibility testing, and the integrated fixation prevented device displacement. Subsidence was minimal during fatigue testing, most of which occurred in the first 2500 cycles.

  8. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L5-S1 through a Unilateral Approach: Technical Feasibility and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Suh; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Seong, Ji-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Minimally invasive spinal transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) at L5-S1 is technically more demanding than it is at other levels because of the anatomical and biomechanical traits. Objective. To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIS-TLIF for treatment of single-level spinal stenosis low-grade isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis at L5-S1. Methods. Radiological data and electronic medical records of patients who underwent MIS-TLIF between May 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. Fusion rate, cage position, disc height (DH), disc angle (DA), disc slope angle, segmental lordotic angle (SLA), lumbar lordotic angle (LLA), and pelvic parameters were assessed. For functional assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and patient satisfaction rate (PSR) were utilized. Results. A total of 21 levels in 21 patients were studied. DH, DA, SLA, and LLA had increased from their preoperative measures at the final follow-up. Fusion rate was 86.7% (18/21) at 12 months' follow-up. The most common cage position was anteromedial (15/21). The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain mean ODI scores improved significantly at the final follow-up. PSR was 88%. Cage subsidence was observed in 33.3% (7/21). Conclusions. The clinical and radiologic outcomes after MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 in patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis are generally favorable. PMID:27433472

  9. Incidence of vascular complications during lateral lumbar interbody fusion: an examination of the mini-open access technique.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Fantini, Gary A; Walker, Brendon R; Aichmair, Alexander; Hughes, Alexander P

    2015-04-01

    This article examines the incidence and management of vascular injury during Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LLIF). The details of the mini-open access technique are presented. A total of 900 patients who underwent a LLIF at an average 1.94 levels (range: 1-5 levels) by one of six fellowship trained surgeons on 1,754 levels from 2006 to 2013 were identified. The incidence of intraoperative vascular injury was retrospectively determined from the Operative Records. The management of vascular injury was evaluated. The mini-open access adapted by our institution for LLIF is described. The incidence of major vascular complication in our series was 1/900. The incidence of minor vascular injury was 4/900. The overall incidence of vascular injury was calculated to be 0.056 % per case and 0.029 % per level. All minor vascular injuries were identified to be segmental vessel lacerations, which were readily ligated under direct visualization without further extension of the incision with no clinical sequelae. The laceration of the abdominal aorta, the major vascular complication of this series, was emergently repaired through an exploratory laparotomy. None of the patients suffered long-term sequelae from their intraoperative vascular injuries. The mini-open lateral access technique for LLIF provides for minimal risk of vascular injury to the lumbar spine. In the rare event of minor vascular injury, the mini-open access approach allows for immediate visualization, confirmation and repair of the vessel with no long-term sequelae.

  10. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  11. Minimally invasive versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis: comparative effectiveness and cost-utility analysis.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Shau, David N; Zuckerman, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; Cheng, Joseph S; McGirt, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) for lumbar spondylolisthesis allows for the surgical treatment of back/leg pain while minimizing tissue injury and accelerating the patient's recovery. Although previous results have shown shorter hospital stays and decreased intraoperative blood loss for MIS versus open TLIF, short- and long-term outcomes have been similar. Therefore, we performed comparative effectiveness and cost-utility analysis for MIS versus open TLIF. A total of 100 patients (50 MIS, 50 open) undergoing TLIF for lumbar spondylolisthesis were prospectively studied. Back-related medical resource use, missed work, and quality-adjusted life years were assessed. Cost of in-patient care, direct cost (2-year resource use × unit costs based on Medicare national allowable payment amounts), and indirect cost (work-day losses × self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate) were recorded, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated. Length of hospitalization and time to return to work were less for MIS versus open TLIF (P = 0.006 and P = 0.03, respectively). MIS versus open TLIF demonstrated similar improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed. MIS versus open TLIF was associated with a reduction in mean hospital cost of $1758, indirect cost of $8474, and total 2-year societal cost of $9295 (P = 0.03) but similar 2-year direct health care cost and quality-adjusted life years gained. MIS TLIF resulted in reduced operative blood loss, hospital stay and 2-year cost, and accelerated return to work. Surgical morbidity, hospital readmission, and short- and long-term clinical effectiveness were similar between MIS and open TLIF. MIS TLIF may represent a valuable and cost-saving advancement from a societal and hospital perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Interspinous Fastener Provides Comparable Clinical Outcome and Fusion Rate to Pedicle Screws.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Min; Yu, Xing-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Duo; Song, Ruo-Xian; Yu, Li-Li; Yu, Xiu-Chun

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility and validity of interspinous fastener (ISF) for lumbar degenerative diseases. From October 2013 to March 2014, a total of 46 patients suffering from lumbar degenerative diseases underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) randomly augmented by ISF or pedicle screws. The clinical outcome was primarily measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score. The minimal clinical important difference (MCID) was defined as an eight-point decrease in ODI. The second clinical outcome measurement was Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score. Interbody fusion rates were evaluated by lumbar plain radiograph and computed tomography (CT) scan. Complications were also compared between groups. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS version 13.0. Sample size calculation was performed before the study. The type I error α was set at 0.05 and the type II error β at 0.1. Based on these assumptions and adding 10% for possible drop-outs, sample size calculations indicated that a total of 46 patients were required for the study. Parametric data was compared by independent t-test and categorical variables were compared using χ(2) -tests or Fisher exact tests depending on the sample size. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significantly statistically different. Fleiss kappa coefficients were calculated for intra-observer and inter-observer reliability. A total of 43 patients completed the follow-up, with 22 cases in the ISF group and 21 patients in the pedicle screws group, respectively. Less intraoperative blood loss and shorter operation time were observed in the ISF group. The mean ODI significantly declined in both groups, with the ISF group's decreasing from preoperative 43.3 ± 8.2 to 21.4 ± 3.5 at 24-month follow-up and the pedicle screws group's decreasing from preoperative 42.9 ± 7.9 to 22.5 ±3.8 at 24-month follow-up, respectively. The ODI changes between groups had no statistical difference (P > 0.05). Of the 43

  13. Interbody Fusion in Low Grade Lumbar Spondylolsithesis: Clinical Outcome Does Not Correalte with Slip Reduction and Neural Foraminal Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Atanu; McConnell, Jeffrey R.; Jha, Deepak K.; Chakraburtty, Tapas

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective nonrandomized study. Purpose To find a possible correlation between clinical outcome and extent of lumbar spondylolisthesis reduction. Overview of Literature There is no consensus in the literature concerning whether a beneficial effect of reduction on outcome can be expected following reduction and surgical fusion for low grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods Forty six patients with a mean age of 37.5 years (age, 17–48 years) with isthmic spondylolisthesis underwent interbody fusion with cages with posterior instrumentation (TLIF). Clinical outcome was measured using visual analogue score (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Foraminal dimensions and disc heights were measured in standard digital radiographs. These were analyzed at baseline and 1 year after surgery and changes were compared. Radiographic fusion was judged with computed tomography scans at 1 year. Results Ninety percent of the patients had good or very good clinical results with fusion and instrumentation. Baseline and one-year postoperative mean VAS score was 6.33 (range, 5–8) and 0.76 (range, 0–3), respectively (p=0.004). Baseline and one-year postoperative, mean ODI score was 48 (range, 32–62) and 10 (range, 6–16), respectively (p<0.001). A mean spondylolisthesis slip of 32.1% was reduced to 6.7% at 1 year. Average anterior disc height, posterior disc height, vertical foraminal dimension), and foraminal) diameter improved from 9.8 to 11.7 mm (p=0.005), 4.5 to 5.8 mm (p=0.004), 11.3 to 12.6 mm (p=0.002), and 18.6 to 20.0 mm (p<0.001), respectively. The fusion rate was 75% with TLIF. There is no significant correlation between the improvements of ODI scores and the extent of slip reduction. Conclusions Neural decompression and interbody fusion can significantly improve pain and disability but the clinical outcome does not correlate with radiological improvement in the neural foraminal dimension. PMID:27114773

  14. Is the use of minimally invasive fusion technologies associated with improved outcomes after elective interbody lumbar fusion? Analysis of a nationwide prospective patient-reported outcomes registry.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Mummaneni, Praveen; Knightly, John; Pfortmiller, Deborah; Foley, Kevin; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-07-01

    Over the last decade, clinical investigators and biomedical industry groups have used significant resources to develop advanced technologies that enable less invasive spine fusions. These minimally invasive surgery (MIS) technologies often require increased expenditures by hospitals and payers. Although several small single center studies have suggested MIS technologies decrease surgical morbidity and reduce hospital stay, evidence documenting benefit from a patient perspective remains limited. Furthermore, MIS outcomes have yet to be evaluated from the perspective of multiple practice types representing the broad spectrum of US spine surgery. This study aimed to examine a population of patients who underwent one- or two-level interbody lumbar fusion diagnosed with lumbar stenosis or Grade 1 spondylolisthesis in an observational, prospective national registry for the purposes of determining how MIS and traditional open technologies affect postsurgical and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). This study used observational analysis of prospectively collected data. The sample consisted of cases from the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD). Numeric rating scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, EuroQol-5D, return to work, and perioperative morbidity were the outcome measures. The N(2)QOD is a prospective PROs registry enrolling patients undergoing elective spine surgery from 60 hospitals in 27 US states via representative sampling. We analyzed the N(2)QOD aggregate dataset (2010-2014) to identify one- and two-level lumbar interbody fusion procedures performed for lumbar stenosis or Grade 1 spondylolisthesis with 12 months' follow-up where surgical instrumentation and implant types were clearly identified. Perioperative and 1-year outcomes were compared between cases performed with MIS enabling technologies versus traditional open technologies before and after propensity matching. There were 467 (24%) patients who underwent

  15. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Discogenic Low Back Pain: Evaluation of L4-S1 Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianqiang; Fang, Xiutong; Zhong, Weiye; Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of degenerative discogenic pain is controversial, and anterior lumbar fusion for the treatment of degenerative discogenic low back pain has also been a controversial topic for over a generation.The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the outcome of different anterior lumbar fusion levels for degenerative discogenic low back pain.In this study, we performed a clinical outcome subgroup analysis. The outcomes of 84 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS) results, and complication rate were recorded separately.Medical indications were degenerative disc disease (73.8%), postdiscectomy disc disease (16.1%), and disc herniation (9.5%). Patients with severe spondylolysis or disc degeneration, with more than 3 or multilevel lesions, were excluded.The mean operative time was 124.5 ± 10.9 min (range 51-248 min), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 242.1 ± 27.7 mL (range 50-2700 mL), the mean hospital stay was 3.9 ± 1.1 days (range 3-6 days), the mean preoperative VAS score was 7.5 ± 1.4, and the mean preoperative ODI score was 60.0 ± 5.7. At the 1-year follow-up, the mean postoperative VAS score was 3.3 ± 1.3 and the mean postoperative ODI score was 13.6 ± 3.4 (P < 0.05). L4-L5 disc fusion led to better clinical results than 2-level L4-L5/L5-S1 disc fusion. Additionally, the 2-level fusion of L4-L5/L5-S1 had better clinical results than the L5-S1 disc fusion at both the 1 and 2-year postoperative follow-ups regarding the VAS score and the ODI score. The rate of complications was more frequent in the 2-level L4-L5/L5-S1 group (27.3%) (group C) than in the L4-L5 group (9.1%) (group A) and the L5-S1 group (12.5%) (group B). There was no difference between the L4-L5 group (9.1%) and the L5-S1 group (12.5%). A venous tear

  16. Can cantilever transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (C-TLIF) maintain segmental lordosis for degenerative spondylolisthesis on a long-term basis?

    PubMed

    Kida, Kazunobu; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Kumon, Masashi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Kawazoe, Tateo; Tani, Toshikazu

    2014-03-01

    To determine if cantilever transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (C-TLIF) using the crescent-shaped titanium interbody spacer (IBS) favors acquisition of segmental and lumbar lordosis even for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) on a long-term basis. We analyzed 23 consecutive patients who underwent C-TLIF with pedicle screw instrumentations fixed with compression for a single-level DS. Measurements on the lateral radiographs taken preoperatively, 2 weeks postoperatively and at final follow-up included disc angle (DA), segmental angle (SA), lumbar lordosis (LL), disc height (%DH) and slip rate (%slip). There was a good functional recovery with 100 % fusion rate at the mean follow-up of 62 months. Segmental lordosis (DA and SA) and %DH initially increased, but subsequently decreased with the subsidence of the interbody spacer, resulting in a significant increase (p = 0.046) only in SA from 13.2° ± 5.5° preoperatively to 14.7° ± 6.4° at the final follow-up. Changes of LL and %slip were more consistent without correction loss finally showing an increase of LL by 3.6° (p = 0.005) and a slip reduction by 6.7 % (p < 0.001). Despite the inherent limitation of placing the IBS against the anterior endplate of the upper vertebra in the presence of DS, the C-TLIF helped significantly restore segmental as well as lumbar lordosis on a long-term basis, which would be of benefit in preventing hypolordosis-induced back pain and the adjacent level disc disease.

  17. The Efficacy of Vitamin C on Postoperative Outcomes after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Woo; Yang, Han Seok; Yeom, Jin S; Ahn, Myun-Whan

    2017-09-01

    Vitamin C has critical features relavant to postoperative pain management and functional improvement; however, no study has yet evaluated the effectiveness of vitamin C on improving the surgical outcomes for spine pathologies. Thus, this study aimed to explore the impact of vitamin C on postoperative outcomes after single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for lumbar spinal stenosis in prospectively randomized design. We conducted a 1-year prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the impact of vitamin C on the postoperative outcomes after PLIF surgery. A total of 123 eligible patients were randomly assigned to either group A (62 patients with vitamin C) or group B (61 patients with placebo). Patient follow-up was continued for at least 1 year after surgery. The primary outcome measure was pain intensity in the lower back using a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures were: (1) the clinical outcome assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); (2) the fusion rate assessed using dynamic radiographs and computed tomography scans; and (3) complications. Pain intensity in the lower back was significantly improved in both groups compared with preoperative pain intensity, but no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups over the follow-up period. The ODI score of group A at the third postoperative month was significantly higher than the score of group B. After the sixth postoperative month, the ODI score of group A was slightly higher than the score of group B; however, this difference was not significant. The fusion rates at 1 year after surgery and the complication rates were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Postoperative pain intensity, the primary outcome measure, was not significantly different at 1 year after surgery between the 2 groups. However, vitamin C may be associated with improving functional status after PLIF surgery, especially during the first 3

  18. Influence of obesity on complications, clinical outcome and subsidence following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF): prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Rogers, Priya; Rao, Prashanth J; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-08-09

    The complications associated with obesity have been well described for posterior lumbar spinal surgery. However, the influence of obesity on anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is not well established. We aimed to compare complication risks, functional outcomes and subsidence rates in normal, overweight and obese patients who underwent ALIF. 137 consecutive patients undergoing ALIF surgery from 2012-2014 were prospectively followed. Patients were categorized into 3 groups according to their body mass index (BMI). Patients were evaluated preoperative and postoperatively. Outcome measures included Short Form-12 (SF-12), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), surgical complications, and subsidence. There was no significant difference between the BMI groups in terms of baseline age, proportion of males, levels operated, smoking status, diabetes status, anterior, posterior or average disc height. There was no difference in operative duration, blood loss, or hospital stay. At 12-months follow-up, no difference was found in terms of total complications, change in SF-12 mental or physical component scores, or ODI scores. Average disc height was significant lower for the obese group (11.3mm) compared to the normal (14.4mm) group. Fusion rate was also significantly lower for obese patients (60%) compared to normal (88.2%) and overweight patients (76%)(P=0.014). Delayed subsidence rates were also similar between normal and overweight patients. There were no difference in functional outcomes or complications in patients with elevated BMI compared to normal patients. Fusion rates were lower for obese patients. Obesity should not be considered a contraindication to surgery in patients with appropriate indication to undergo ALIF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Short-Term Results of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Pedicle Screw with Cortical Bone Trajectory Compared with Conventional Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Purpose To evaluate clinical and radiological results of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) performed with cortical bone trajectory (CBT) pedicle screw insertion with those of TLIF using 'conventional' or percutaneous pedicle screw insertion. Overview of Literature CBT is a new trajectory for pedicle screw insertion in the lumbar spine; clinical and radiological results of TLIF using pedicle screws inserted with CBT are unclear. Methods In total, 26 patients (11 males, 15 females) were enrolled in this retrospective study and divided into three groups: TLIF with pedicle screw insertion by conventional minimally invasive methods via the Wiltse approach (M-TLIF, n=10), TLIF with percutaneous pedicle screw insertion (P-TLIF, n=6), and TLIF with pedicle screw insertion with CBT (CBT-TLIF, n=10). Surgical results and preand postoperative radiological findings were evaluated and compared. Results Intraoperative blood loss was significantly less with CBT-TLIF (p=0.03) than with M-TLIF. Postoperative lordotic angles did not differ significantly among the three groups. Complete fusions were obtained in 10 of 12 levels (83%) with M-TLIF, in seven levels (100%) with P-TLIF, and in 10 of 11 levels (91%) with CBT-TLIF. On postoperative computed tomography, correct positioning was seen in 84.1% of M-TLIF screws, 88.5% of P-TLIF screws, and 90% of CBT-TLIF screws. Conclusions CBT-TLIF resulted in less blood loss and a shorter operative duration than M-TLIF or P-TLIF. Postoperative rates of bone union, maintenance of lordotic angles, and accuracy of pedicle screw positions were similar among the three groups. PMID:26097661

  20. A novel synthetic material for spinal fusion: a prospective clinical trial of porous bioactive titanium metal for lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Neo, Masashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Doi, Kenji; Ito, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the efficacy and safety of porous bioactive titanium metal for use in a spinal fusion device, based on a prospective human clinical trial. A high-strength spinal interbody fusion device was manufactured from porous titanium metal. A bioactive surface was produced by simple chemical and thermal treatment. Five patients with unstable lumbar spine disease were treated surgically using this device in a clinical trial approved by our Ethics Review Committee and the University Hospital Medical Information Network. Clinical and radiological results were reported at the minimum follow-up period of 1 year. The optimal mechanical strength and interconnected structure of the porous titanium metal were adjusted for the device. The whole surface of porous titanium metal was treated uniformly and its bioactive ability was confirmed before clinical use. Successful bony union was achieved in all cases within 6 months without the need for autologous iliac crest bone grafting. Two specific findings including an anchoring effect and gap filling were evident radiologically. All clinical parameters improved significantly after the operation and no adverse effects were encountered during the follow-up period. Although a larger and longer-term follow-up clinical study is mandatory to reach any firm conclusions, the study results show that this porous bioactive titanium metal is promising material for a spinal fusion device.

  1. Screw Placement Accuracy for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Study on 3-D Neuronavigation-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge; James, Andrew R.; Alimi, Marjan; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Geannette, Christian; Härtl, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 3-D navigation for pedicle screw placement accuracy in minimally invasive transverse lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Methods A retrospective review of 52 patients who had MIS-TLIF assisted with 3D navigation is presented. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scales (VAS), and MacNab scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed using X-rays and thin-slice computed tomography. Result The mean age was 56.5 years, and 172 screws were implanted with 16 pedicle breaches (91.0% accuracy rate). Radiographic fusion rate at a mean follow-up of 15.6 months was 87.23%. No revision surgeries were required. The mean improvement in the VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, and ODI at 11.3 months follow-up was 4.3, 4.5, and 26.8 points, respectively. At last follow-up the mean postoperative disc height gain was 4.92 mm and the mean postoperative disc angle gain was 2.79 degrees. At L5–S1 level, there was a significant correlation between a greater disc space height gain and a lower VAS leg score. Conclusion Our data support that application of 3-D navigation in MIS-TLIF is associated with a high level of accuracy in the pedicle screw placement. PMID:24353961

  2. The Negligible Influence of Chronic Obesity on Hospitalization, Clinical Status, and Complications in Elective Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kombos, Theodoros; Bode, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a common surgical treatment for degenerative spinal instability, but many surgeons consider obesity a contraindication for elective spinal fusion. The aim of this study was to analyze whether obesity has any influence on hospitalization parameters, change in clinical status, or complications. Methods. In this prospective study, regression analysis was used to analyze the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on operating time, postoperative care, hospitalization time, type of postdischarge care, change in paresis or sensory deficits, pain level, wound complications, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and implant complications. Results. Operating time increased only 2.5 minutes for each increase of BMI by 1. The probability of having a wound complication increased statistically with rising BMI. Nonetheless, BMI accounted for very little of the variation in the data, meaning that other factors or random chances play a much larger role. Conclusions. Obesity has to be considered a risk factor for wound complications in patients undergoing elective PLIF for degenerative instability. However, BMI showed no significant influence on other kinds of peri- or postoperative complications, nor clinical outcomes. So obesity cannot be considered a contraindication for elective PLIF. PMID:27478866

  3. The Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage: A New Concept in Lumbar Interbody Fusion—A Prospective, Noncomparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kok, D.; Donk, R. D.; Wapstra, F. H.; Veldhuizen, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design/Objective. A single-centre, prospective, non-comparative study of 25 patients to evaluate the performance and safety of the Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage (MAC) in Lumbar Interbody Fusion. Summary of Background Data. Interbody fusion cages in general are designed to withstand high axial loads and in the meantime to allow ingrowth of new bone for bony fusion. In many cages the contact area with the endplate is rather large leaving a relatively small contact area for the bone graft with the adjacent host bone. MAC is constructed from the memory metal Nitinol and builds on the concept of sufficient axial support in combination with a large contact area of the graft facilitating bony ingrowth and ease in minimal access implantation due to its high deformability. Methods. Twenty five subjects with a primary diagnosis of disabling back and radicular leg pain from a single level degenerative lumbar disc underwent an interbody fusion using MAC and pedicle screws. Clinical performance was evaluated prospectively over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. The interbody fusion status was assessed using conventional radiographs and CT scan. Safety of the device was studied by registration of intra- and post-operative adverse effects. Results. Clinical performance improved significantly (P < .0018), CT scan confirmed solid fusion in all 25 patients at two year follow-up. In two patients migration of the cage occurred, which was resolved uneventfully by placing a larger size at the subsequent revision. Conclusions. We conclude that the Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage (MAC) resulted in 100% solid fusions in 2 years and proved to be safe, although two patients required revision surgery in order to achieve solid fusion. PMID:22567409

  4. Posterior corrective surgery with a multilevel transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and a rod rotation maneuver for patients with degenerative lumbar kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Akira; Namikawa, Takashi; Kato, Minori; Ozaki, Tomonori; Hori, Yusuke; Hidaka, Noriaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical results of posterior corrective surgery using a multilevel transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with a rod rotation (RR) and to evaluate the segmental corrective effect of a TLIF using CT imaging. The medical records of 15 consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar kyphoscoliosis (DLKS) who had undergone posterior spinal corrective surgery using a multilevel TLIF with an RR technique and who had a minimum follow-up of 2 years were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographic parameters were evaluated using plain radiographs, and segmental correction was evaluated using CT imaging. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the Scoliosis Research Society Patient Questionnaire-22 (SRS-22) and the SF-36. The mean follow-up period was 46.7 months, and the mean age at the time of surgery was 60.7 years. The mean total SRS-22 score was 2.9 before surgery and significantly improved to 4.0 at the latest follow-up. The physical functioning, role functioning (physical), and social functioning subcategories of the SF-36 were generally improved at the latest follow-up, although the changes in these scores were not statistically significant. The bodily pain, vitality, and mental health subcategories were significantly improved at the latest follow-up (p < 0.05). Three complications occurred in 3 patients (20%). The Cobb angle of the lumbar curve was reduced to 20.3° after surgery. The overall correction rate was 66.4%. The pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis (preoperative/postoperative = 31.5°/4.3°), pelvic tilt (29.2°/18.9°), and sagittal vertical axis (78.3/27.6 mm) were improved after surgery and remained so throughout the follow-up. Computed tomography image analysis suggested that a 1-level TLIF can result in 10.9° of scoliosis correction and 6.8° of lordosis. Posterior corrective surgery using a multilevel TLIF with an RR on patients with DLKS can provide effective correction in the coronal plane but allows only

  5. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of L4 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Shugo; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Tateiwa, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Hisatoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter analysis of two groups of patients surgically treated for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis is widely performed. However, few reports have compared the outcome of PLF to that of PLIF for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Methods Patients with L4 unstable spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade II or more, slip of >10° or >4 mm upon maximum flexion and extension bending, and posterior opening of >5 degree upon flexion bending were studied. Patients were treated from January 2008 to January 2010. Patients who underwent PLF (n=12) and PLIF (n=19) were followed-up for >2 years. Radiographic findings and clinical outcomes evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were compared between the two groups. Radiographic evaluation included slip angle, translation, slip angle and translation during maximum flexion and extension bending, intervertebral disc height, lumbar lordotic angle, and fusion rate. Results JOA scores of the PLF group before surgery and at final follow-up were 12.3±4.8 and 24.1±3.7, respectively; those of the PLIF group were 14.7±4.8 and 24.2±7.8, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. Correction of slip estimated from postoperative slip angle, translation, and maintenance of intervertebral disc height in the PLIF group was significantly (p<0.05) better than those in the PLF group. However, there was no significant difference in lumbar lordotic angle, slip angle and translation angle upon maximum flexion, or extension bending. Fusion rates of the PLIF and PLF groups had no significant difference. Conclusions The L4–L5 level posterior instrumented fusion for unstable spondylolisthesis using both PLF and PLIF

  6. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Rigid Interspinous Process Fixation: A Learning Curve Analysis of a Surgeon Team's First 74 Cases.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Patrick; Welch, Arthur; Tharpe, Jason; Moore, Camille; Ferry, Chris

    2017-05-30

    Studies have shown that a significant learning curve may be associated with adopting minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BPSF). Accordingly, several hybrid TLIF techniques have been proposed as surrogates to the accepted BPSF technique, asserting that less/fewer fixation(s) or less disruptive fixation may decrease the learning curve while still maintaining the minimally disruptive benefits. TLIF with interspinous process fixation (ISPF) is one such surrogate procedure. However, despite perceived ease of adaptability given the favorable proximity of the spinous processes, no evidence exists demonstrating whether or not the technique may possess its own inherent learning curve. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intraoperative learning curve for one- and two-level TLIF + ISPF may exist for a single lead surgeon. Seventy-four consecutive patients who received one- or two-Level TLIF with rigid ISPF by a single lead surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. It was the first TLIF + ISPF case series for the lead surgeon. Intraoperative blood loss (EBL), hospitalization length-of-stay (LOS), fluoroscopy time, and postoperative complications were collected. EBL, LOS, and fluoroscopy time were modeled as a function of case number using multiple linear regression methods. A change point was included in each model to allow the trajectory of the outcomes to change during the duration of the case series. These change points were determined using profile likelihood methods. Models were fit using the maximum likelihood estimates for the change points. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and the number of treated levels were included as covariates. EBL, LOS, and fluoroscopy time did not significantly differ by age, sex, or BMI (p ≥ 0.12). Only EBL differed significantly by the number of levels (p = 0.026). The case number was not a significant predictor of EBL, LOS, or fluoroscopy time (p ≥ 0

  7. Denervation and atrophy of paraspinal muscles after open lumbar interbody fusion is associated with clinical outcome--electromyographic and CT-volumetric investigation of 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Waschke, Albrecht; Hartmann, Christin; Walter, Jan; Dünisch, Pedro; Wahnschaff, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Different studies have shown that atrophy of paraspinal muscles arises after open dorsal lumbar fusion, and the reasons for this atrophy are still not yet fully clarified. This prospective study investigates the extent of atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles after open lumbar interbody fusion, its possible causes, and their association with clinical outcome measures. Thirty consecutive patients were prospectively included (13 male, 17 female, median age 60.5 years, range 33-80 years). Mono or bisegmental, posterior lumbar interbody fusion and instrumentation was performed applying a conventional, open lumbar midline approach. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Needle electromyography of paraspinal muscles was performed preoperatively, at 6 and 12 months. Serum values of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and myoglobin were determined preoperatively, at day 2 after surgery and at discharge. Paraspinal muscle volume was determined by volumetric analysis of thin-slice computed tomography scans preoperatively and 1 year after surgery. There was a significant increase of electromyographic denervation activity (p =0.024) and reduced recruitment of motor units (p = 0.001) after 1 year. Laboratory studies showed a significant increase of CK (p < 0.001) and myoglobin (p < 0.001) serum levels at day 2 after surgery. The paraspinal muscle volume decreased from 67.8 to 60.4 % (p < 0.001) after 1 year. Correlation analyses revealed a significant negative correlation between denervation and muscle volume (K = -0.219, p = 0.002). Paraspinal muscle volume is significantly correlated with physical outcome (K = 0.169, p = 0.020), mental outcome (K = 0.214, p = 0.003), and pain (K = 0.382, p < 0.001) after 1 year. Atrophy of paraspinal muscles after open, posterior lumbar interbody fusion seems to be associated with denervation, as well as direct muscle trauma during surgery. While muscle

  8. Biomechanical effect of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and axial interbody threaded rod on range of motion and S1 screw loading in a destabilized L5-S1 spondylolisthesis model.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Gary D; Hart, David; Ferrara, Lisa A; Freeman, Andrew L; Avidano, Eugene E

    2014-01-15

    A cadaveric lumbosacral spondylolytic spondylolisthesis model was used to evaluate the biomechanical function of 2 different interbody spacers. To analyze and compare the reduction in pedicle screw strain and spine range of motion (ROM) between transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and an axial interbody threaded rod (AxialITR) in a destabilized L5-S1 spondylolisthesis model. Symptomatic spondylolytic spondylolisthesis is often treated with posterior instrumented fusion augmented by a variety of different interbody devices. Interbody spacers rely primarily on posterior instrumentation to stabilize the spine during fusion, but there may be advantages to the more rigid support offered by an anterior threaded rod. Pure-moment flexibility testing was performed on L3-S1 cadaveric specimens in 4 conditions: (1) Intact, (2) L5-S1 pedicle screws (PS) + L5-S1 disc destabilization (DDS), (3) TLIF at L5-S1 + PS + DDS, and (4) AxialITR at L5-S1 + PS + DDS. Specimens were destabilized by performing a complete denucleation at L5-S1 and sectioning two-thirds of the annulus' width from anterior to posterior. The S1 PSs were instrumented with strain gauges to measure screw-bending moments and ROM was quantified with a noncontact camera system. S1 screw strains were highest with PS but were significantly reduced by 73% in flexion and 31% in extension with TLIF (P ≤ 0.004). AxialITR significantly reduced strain by 78% in flexion and 81% in extension (P ≤ 0.001). ROM was smallest with AxialITR in each test direction at 1.7 ± 1.8° in flexion-extension, 1.6 ± 0.9° in lateral bending and 1.3 ± 0.8° in torsion. This study demonstrated that ROM and S1 screw-bending moments were reduced with the use of AxialITR and TLIF. Although the TLIF and AxialITR both reduced strains and motion, the AxialITR provided a significant reduction in extension strain when compared with TLIF. N/A.

  9. Is dibotermin alfa a cost-effective substitute for autologous iliac crest bone graft in single level lumbar interbody spine fusion?

    PubMed

    Svedbom, Axel; Paech, Daniel; Leonard, Catherine; Donnell, David; Song, Fujian; Boszcyk, Bronek; Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Lloyd, Andrew; Borgman, Benny

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dibotermin alfa compared with autologous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) for patients undergoing single level lumbar interbody spinal fusion in a UK hospital setting. An individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of six randomized controlled clinical trials and two single arm trials compared dibotermin alfa on an absorbable collagen implantation matrix (ACIM) (n = 456) and ICBG (n = 244) on resource use, re-operation rates, and SF-6D (Short form 6-dimension) health utility (total N = 700). Failure-related second surgery, operating time, post-operative hospital stay, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) derived from the IPD meta-analysis were included as inputs in an economic evaluation undertaken to assess the cost-effectiveness of dibotermin alfa/ACIM versus ICBG for patients undergoing single level lumbar interbody spinal fusion. A four year time horizon and the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS) and Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective was adopted in the base case, with sensitivity analyses performed to gauge parameter uncertainty. In the base case analysis, patients treated using dibotermin alfa/ACIM (12 mg pack) accrued 0.055 incremental QALYs at an incremental cost of £ 737, compared with patients treated with ICBG. This resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £ 13,523, indicating that at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £ 20,000, dibotermin alfa/ACIM is a cost-effective intervention relative to ICBG from the NHS and PSS perspective. In a UK hospital setting, dibotermin alfa/ACIM is a cost-effective substitute for ICBG for patients who require lumbar interbody arthrodesis.

  10. The role of single-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with titanium mesh cages and short-segment instrumentation in thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiongjie; Liu, Hongzhe; Wang, Guoping; Pang, Xiaoyang; Luo, Chengke; Zeng, Hao; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to retrospectively analyze the clinical efficacy and feasibility of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis treated by single-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with titanium mesh cages (TMC), and combined short-segment instrumentation. Fifteen patients with no more than two vertebral bodies involving thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis were collected from January 2006 to January 2010, performed by single-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with TMC and posterior short-segment fixation. The clinical efficacy was evaluated based on the data of the 10-point Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), neurological status, kyphosis angle, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein, which were collected at a certain time. The average duration of surgery was 135 minutes. All the patients were followed up for a period ranging from 18 to 48 months (mean 28.9±6.44 months). The VAS score was improved from 8.47±1.13 (range 7-10) before surgery to 2.1±1.7 (range 0-2) after surgery. Correction of segmental kyphotic deformity was 24.2±6.59°. Neither the postoperative change of the position of titanium mesh cage nor any posterior instrumentation failure was recorded. The situation of 13 patients with incomplete neurologic lesions before surgery was improved after surgery. Patients with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis can be successfully treated by posterior debridement, interbody fusion with TMC combining short-segment instrumentation. The presence of the TMC anteriorly at the site of tubercular spondylitis has no negative influence on the course of infection healing, and additionally they stabilize the affected segment maintaining sufficient sagittal profile.

  11. Progression of Coronal Cobb Angle After Short-Segment Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam; Yi, Seong; Shin, Dong Ah; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum; Ha, Yoon

    2016-05-01

    The progression of scoliosis after fusion surgery is a poor prognostic factor of long-term outcomes in patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis (DLS). In this study we aimed to investigate changes in coronal alignment and identify risk factors related to progression of scoliosis after fusion. There were 540 patients with symptomatic DLS treated by short-segment lumbar fusion surgery. Among them, 50 patients had coronal Cobb angles >10° at the final follow-up. Sixteen patients had increases >5° (progression group), and 34 patients had increases <5° (nonprogression group). Radiologic parameters that may affect the progression of scoliosis were compared. The mean progression of the Cobb angle was 7.92° in the progression group and 1.25° in the nonprogression group. The progression group had significantly longer follow-up periods and a lower preoperative Cobb angle. The apical vertebra (AV) of the major curve was more frequently thoracic in the progression group. Progression of the Cobb angle was correlated with the follow-up period, preoperative Cobb angle, and location of the AV. Multivariate regression analysis showed that progression of the Cobb angle was significantly associated with a lower preoperative Cobb angle, and both facet degeneration of the upper instrumented vertebra at the fusion site and vertebral spur formation on the concave side also appeared to be associated with progression of the Cobb angle. The global magnitude of progression of the Cobb angle after short-segment lumbar fusion surgery in patients with DLS is similar to the natural curve progression of adult degenerative scoliosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical Analysis of a Newly Developed Shape Memory Alloy Hook in a Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Results Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p<0.05). The USMAH slightly reduced the ROM in extension, right lateral bending and axial rotation (p>0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4–5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:25474112

  13. Biomechanical analysis of a newly developed shape memory alloy hook in a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p<0.05). The USMAH slightly reduced the ROM in extension, right lateral bending and axial rotation (p>0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4-5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration.

  14. Fixation Strength of Caudal Pedicle Screws after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Modified Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Method

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical case series. Purpose In the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure in our institute, the cephalad screw trajectory follows a mediolateral and caudocephalad directed path according to the original cortical bone trajectory (CBT) method. However, the starting point of the caudal screw is at the medial border of the pedicle on an articular surface of the superior articular process, and the trajectory takes a mediolateral path parallel to the cephalad endplate. The incidence of caudal screw loosening after PLIF with this modified CBT screw method was investigated, and significant risk factors for caudal screw loosening were evaluated. Overview of Literature A biomechanical study of this modified caudal screw trajectory using the finite element method reported about a 20% increase in uniaxial yield pullout load compared with the traditional trajectory. However, there has been no clinical study concerning the fixation strength of this modified caudal screw trajectory. Methods The subjects were 193 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF with modified CBT screw fixation. Caudal screw loosening was checked in computed tomography at 6 months after surgery, and screw loosening was defined as a radiolucency of 1 mm or more at the bone-screw interface. Results The incidence of caudal screw loosening after lumbosacral PLIF (46.2%) was significantly higher than that after floating PLIF (6.0%). No significant differences in sex, brand of the instruments, and diameter and length of the caudal screw were evident between patients with and without caudal screw loosening. Patients with caudal screw loosening were significantly older at the time of surgery than patients without caudal screw loosening. Conclusions Fixation strength of the caudal screw after floating PLIF with this modified CBT screw technique was sufficiently acceptable. Fixation strength after the lumbosacral procedure was not. PMID:27559442

  15. Elderly Patients Achieving Clinical and Radiological Outcomes Comparable with Those of Younger Patients Following Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Nikhil N, Joshi; Lim, Joel Wei-An; Yeo, William; Yue, Wai-Mun

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective analysis of prospective database. To compare 2-year clinical and radiological outcomes after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) among "middle-age" (50-64.99 years), "young-old" (65-74.99 years), and "old-old" (>75 years) patients. Owing to higher perioperative morbidity and mortality rates, elderly patients with degenerative lumbar conditions are occasionally denied surgical care, even after conservative treatment failure. MIS-TLIF advantages include reduced blood loss, reduced analgesia requirements, early mobilization, and shorter hospital stays. Between 2007 and 2012, 22 patients (age >75 years) treated with 1-2 level MIS-TLIF were matched with "young-old" and "middle-age" patients (22 each) based on race, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, spinal level, number of spinal levels operated upon, and bone graft type. Clinical outcomes included the Oswestry disability index (ODI), neurogenic symptom score (NSS), 36-item short form health survey (SF-36), and visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain. Radiological assessment included plain radiographs and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and plain radiographs at 1, 3, 6, and 24 months postoperatively. Fusion grade, loosening, cage migration, and adjacent segment degeneration were assessed. The groups had similar fluoroscopy time, operation duration, and postoperative analgesia type used. "Old-old" patients took longer to ambulate (1.6 days) and had longer hospital stays (6 days). All patients showed significant improvement in clinical outcome scores at all time-points compared with the preoperative status. "Middle-age" patients showed better ODI and SF-36 physical function scores than "old-old" patients preoperatively and 2 years post surgery. NSS, VAS (back and leg), and SF-36 mental function scores were similar between groups preoperatively and at every time-point postoperatively. Minimal clinical important differences (63.6%-95.5% at 2 years) were

  16. The use of RhBMP-2 in single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a clinical and radiographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Makda, Junaid; Hong, Joseph; Patel, Ravi; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Anderson, David G.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Albert, Todd J.

    2009-01-01

    The “off label” use of rhBMP-2 in the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure has become increasingly popular. Although several studies have demonstrated the successful use of rhBMP-2 for this indication, uncertainties remain regarding its safety and efficacy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of the single-level TLIF procedure using rhBMP-2. Patients who underwent a single-level TLIF between January 2004 and May 2006 with rhBMP-2 were identified. A retrospective evaluation of these patients included operative report(s), pre- and postoperative medical records, and dynamic and static lumbar radiographs. Patient-reported clinical outcome measures were obtained from a telephone questionnaire and included a modification of the Odom’s criteria, a patient satisfaction score, and back and leg pain numeric rating scale scores. Forty-eight patients met the study criteria and were available for follow-up (avg. radiographic and clinical follow-up of 19.4 and 27.4 months, respectively). Radiographic fusion was achieved in 95.8% of patients. Good to excellent results were achieved in 71% of patients. On most recent clinical follow-up, 83% of patients reported improvement in their symptoms and 84% reported satisfaction with their surgery. Twenty-nine patients (60.4%) reported that they still had some back pain, with an average back pain numeric rating score of 2.8. Twenty patients (41.7%) reported that they still had some leg pain, with an average leg pain numeric rating score was 2.4. Thirteen patients (27.1%) had one or more complications, including transient postoperative radiculitis (8/48), vertebral osteolysis (3/48), nonunion (2/48), and symptomatic ectopic bone formation (1/48). The use of rhBMP-2 in the TLIF procedure produces a high rate of fusion, symptomatic improvement and patient satisfaction. Although its use eliminates the risk of harvesting autograft, rhBMP-2 is associated with other

  17. Survivorship and clinical outcomes after multi-level anterior lumbar reconstruction with stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion or hybrid construct.

    PubMed

    Chen, Benjamin; Akpolat, Yusuf T; Williams, Paul; Bergey, Darren; Cheng, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    In multilevel disc disease, there is still uncertainty regarding whether multiple total disc replacement is more effective and safer than fusion. Our objective was to measure and compare the clinical outcome of multilevel hybrid constructs with stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using a retrospective analysis. Sixty-four patients with chronic low back pain determined to be from two or three-level degenerative disc disease were included. Thirty-three patients were treated with hybrid fusion and 31 with ALIF. Several parameters were retrospectively reviewed, including blood loss, operation time, hospital stay, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and survivorship without the need for revision surgery. Telephone follow-ups were conducted to ascertain survivorship, clinical outcomes (VAS, ODI) and patient satisfaction. Operation time was longer in the hybrid group (p=0.021). The hybrid group showed a significant improvement in VAS and ODI with 52.2% and 50.0% improvement versus 28.3% and 25.5% in the ALIF group (p<0.05). At the telephone follow-up for patient satisfaction, 95.7% (n=22) of the hybrid group were satisfied and 95.2% (n=21) of the ALIF group were satisfied. Seventy-four percent (n=17) in the hybrid group and 85.7% (n=18) in the ALIF group would choose to do the initial surgery again. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed 80.5% survivorship for hybrids and 75.9% for ALIF at 5years. With our clinical outcomes in VAS and ODI scores, these results, when taken together, indicate that hybrid fusion is a valid and viable alternative to ALIF fusion, with at least equal if not better clinical outcomes in terms of survivorship, back pain, and disability scores. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Patients 80 Years of Age and Older with Lumbar Degenerative Disease: Minimum 2 Years' Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Matsumura, Akira; Konishi, Sadahiko; Kato, Minori; Namikawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective To compare clinical outcomes, radiographic evaluations including bony union rate and incidence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVFxs), and perioperative complications following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) between patients ≥80 years of age and those <80 years. Methods Ninety-six patients ≥70 years old who underwent PLIF were reviewed. We divided the patients into the two age groups, ≥80 group (n = 19) and <80 group (n = 77), and compared the clinical outcomes using Japanese Orthopaedics Association (JOA) scores and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). We also evaluated bony union and the incidence of OVFxs in the both groups. Results The JOA score improved 47.6% in the ≥80 group and 49.1% in the <80 group. There were no significant differences between the two groups. Only the bodily pain component of the SF-36 improved significantly in the ≥80 group, and seven of eight components (exception was general health) improved significantly in the <80 group. Bony union rate was significantly superior in the <80 group (94.8%) compared with that of the ≥80 group (73.7%, p = 0.013). OVFx prevalence and incidence were not significantly different between the two groups, although postoperative OVFx worsened the JOA score improvement in the ≥80 group (38.8%, p = 0.02). Conclusions The present study indicated that surgical outcomes of PLIF in patients ≥80 years were comparable to those < 80 years. However, bony union rate was significantly lower and postoperative OVFx worsened the clinical outcomes in patients ≥80 years. PMID:27781186

  19. Anterior lumbar interbody surgery for spondylosis results from a classically-trained neurosurgeon.

    PubMed

    Chatha, Gurkirat; Foo, Stacy W L; Lind, Christopher R P; Budgeon, Charley; Bannan, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Anterior lumbar surgery for degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a relatively novel technique that can prevent damage to posterior osseous, muscular and ligamentous spinal elements. This study reports the outcomes and complications in 286 patients who underwent fusion - with artificial disc implants or combined fusion and artificial disc implants - by a single-operator neurosurgeon, with up to 24 months of follow-up. The visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 (SF36) and prospective log of adverse events were used to assess the clinical outcome. Radiographic assessments of implant position and bony fusion were analysed. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also recorded. Irrespective of pre-surgical symptoms (back pain alone or back and leg pain combined), workers' compensation status and type of surgical implant, clinically significant improvements in VAS, ODI and SF36 were primarily observed at 3 and/or 6 month follow-up, and improvements were maintained at 24 months after surgery. A 94% fusion rate was obtained; the overall complication was 9.8% which included 3.5% with vascular complications. The anterior lumbar approach can be used for treating DDD for both back pain and back and leg pain with low complication rates. With appropriate training, single-operator neurosurgeons can safely perform these surgeries.

  20. Beta-tricalcium phosphate combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a substitute for autograft, used for packing interbody fusion cages in the canine lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Takashiro; Kubo, Yoshichika; Iwata, Hiroo; Taki, Waro

    2004-05-01

    Beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) was examined as a substitute for autograft for packing into interbody fusion cages in the canine lumbar spine model. Discectomy and interbody cage fusion were performed at three disc spaces in eight dogs. Examination of microradiographs and histological sections of the lumbar spine at 16 weeks postsurgery revealed three fusions in the autograft cages (Group A), three in the beta-TCP cages (Group B), and five in the beta-TCP-BMP-2 cages (Group C). The mean percentage of trabecular bone area in the cages was 51.9% in Group A, 48.8% in Group B, and 65.6% in Group C. Mean percentage of trabecular bone formation and mechanical stiffness were highest in the cages filled with beta-TCP and BMP-2. Combination of BMP to beta-TCP may act as an osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone graft substitute in clinical spine surgery.

  1. The Lumbar I/F Cage for posterior lumbar interbody fusion with the variable screw placement system: 10-year results of a Food and Drug Administration clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Brantigan, John W; Neidre, Arvo; Toohey, John S

    2004-01-01

    The Lumbar I/F Cage is a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) device designed to separate the mechanical and device functions of interbody fusion. A Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) clinical study of the CFRP cage was conducted during an enrollment period from 1991 to 1993. Based on the 2-year results of this study, the cage was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in February 1999. Since then, the Lumbar I/F Cage device has become widely used in the United States. This study was designed to determine the long-term results of patients who received this device during the 1991-1993 enrollments. Investigators from the original study were asked to evaluate their original patients according to FDA-reviewed case report forms. Although many of the centers were unable to provide significant follow-up, two centers that enrolled almost half of the original study group provided reports on a high percentage of their original patients. This paper reviews the results in those patients. Inclusion criteria included patients with degenerative disc disease who had at least one failed lumbar discectomy or decompression procedure at one or more levels. Clinical success was defined by a modified Prolo score evaluating pain, function, medication usage and economic status. Fusion success, determined by evaluation of plain radiographs, was defined by continuous bone bridging the fusion area with no lucencies. Flexion-extension X-rays were done on patients who had previous removal of pedicle screw implants. Any motion on flexion-extension films indicated pseudarthrosis. All patients were contacted at their last known address. Internet search services were used to locate additional patients. Thirty-three of 43 eligible patients (77%) were evaluated, including 31 patients who reported for examination and X-ray and 2 additional patients by telephone survey and written questionnaire. Clinical success was achieved in 32 of 37 patients (86.5%) at 24 months and in 29 of

  2. Learning curve and clinical outcomes of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: our experience in 86 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Jang, Hae-Dong; Shin, Byung-Joon

    2012-08-15

    Consecutive case series with prospective data collection. To define and analyze the learning curve for minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Minimally invasive TLIF using a unilateral approach has recently been gaining popularity because of its potential for minimizing soft-tissue damage and reducing recovery time. However, a steep learning curve has been described for surgeons first performing this technique. Eighty-six consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar diseases who were treated by TLIF were included in the study. Surgeries were performed using a tubular retractor, and a cage was inserted using a unilateral transforaminal approach by a single surgeon. The corresponding segments were fixed with percutaneous pedicle screws. Eighty-three patients were followed up for more than 1 year, and the average follow-up period was 25 months. Single-level TLIF was performed in 60 cases, single-level TLIF plus adjacent-level decompression was performed in 13 cases, and double-level TLIF was performed in 13 cases. Corrected operative time per level, operative blood loss, postoperative blood drainage, total blood loss, and ambulation recovery time were measured. Transfusion rates and complication incidence were also identified. Clinical results were assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and a visual analogue scale (VAS). The learning curve was assessed using a logarithmic curve-fit regression analysis. In the single-level TLIF group (n = 60), 22 patients were defined as the "early" group (among the first 30 cases of the series), and the subsequent 38 cases were defined as the "late" group for comparison. Corrected operative time gradually decreased as the series progressed, and an asymptote was reached after about 30 cases. ODI significantly decreased from an average of 24 at the preoperative stage to 10 at the final follow-up. Average VAS scores for lower back pain and radiating pain also significantly decreased from an average

  3. Effects of Lordotic Angle of a Cage on Sagittal Alignment and Clinical Outcome in One Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Dong-Oh; Lee, Jae Hyup; Shim, Hee Jong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the differences in the radiological and clinical results depending on the lordotic angles of the cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). We reviewed 185 segments which underwent PLIF using two different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. The segmental lordosis and total lumbar lordosis of the 4° and 8° cage groups were compared preoperatively, as well as on the first postoperative day, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. Clinical assessment was performed using the ODI and the VAS of low back pain. The pre- and immediate postoperative segmental lordosis angles were 12.9° and 12.6° in the 4° group and 12° and 12.0° in the 8° group. Both groups exhibited no significant different segmental lordosis angle and total lumbar lordosis over period and time. However, the total lumbar lordosis significantly increased from six months postoperatively compared with the immediate postoperative day in the 8° group. The ODI and the VAS in both groups had no differences. Cages with different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° showed insignificant results clinically and radiologically in short-level PLIF surgery. Clinical improvements and sagittal alignment recovery were significantly observed in both groups. PMID:25685795

  4. An analysis of the differences in the acute hospitalization charges following minimally invasive versus open posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael Y; Cummock, Matthew D; Yu, Yong; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2010-06-01

    Minimally invasive spine (MIS) procedures are increasingly being recognized as equivalent to open procedures with regard to clinical and radiographic outcomes. These techniques are also believed to result in less pain and disability in the immediate postoperative period. There are, however, little data to assess whether these procedures produce their intended result and even fewer objective data to demonstrate that they are cost effective when compared with open surgery. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of hospital charges for 1- and 2-level MIS and open posterior interbody fusion for lumbar spondylotic disease, disc degeneration, and spondylolisthesis treated at a single academic medical center. Patients presenting with bilateral neurological symptoms were treated with open surgery, and those with unilateral symptoms were treated with MIS. Overall hospital charges and surgical episode-related charges, length of stay (LOS), and discharge status were obtained from the hospital finance department and adjusted for multi-/single-level surgeries. During a 14-month period, 74 patients (mean age 55 years) were treated. The series included 59 single-level operations (75% MIS and 25% open), and 15 2-level surgeries (53% MIS and 47% open). The demographic profile, including age and Charlson Comorbidity Index, were similar between the 4 groups. The mean LOS for patients undergoing single-level surgery was 3.9 and 4.8 days in the MIS and open cases, respectively (p = 0.017). For those undergoing 2-level surgery, the mean LOS was 5.1 for MIS versus 7.1 for open surgery (p = 0.259). With respect to hospital charges, single-level MIS procedures were associated with an average of $70,159 compared with $78,444 for open surgery (p = 0.027). For 2-level surgery, mean charges totalled $87,454 for MIS versus $108,843 for open surgery (p = 0.071). For single-level surgeries, 5 and 20% of patients undergoing MIS and open surgery, respectively, were discharged to inpatient

  5. Systematic Review of Thigh Symptoms after Lateral Transpsoas Interbody Fusion for Adult Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gammal, Isaac D.; Bendo, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is a minimally invasive technique for achieving lumbar spinal fusion. While it has many advantages over open techniques it carries with it a distinct set of risks, most commonly post-operative ipsilateral thigh pain, weakness and sensory disturbances. It is vital for both the surgeon and patient to understand the risks for and outcomes of injury associated with this procedure. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the incidence, risks, and long-term clinical outcomes of post-operative thigh symptoms in patients treated with LTIF. Methods We conducted a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Collaboration Library, using keywords and MeSH terms, for English-language literature published through September 2014, as well as reference lists from key articles. Studies were then manually filtered to retrieve articles that met inclusion criteria. We were interested in studies that reported postoperative lower extremity symptoms after LTIF, such as pain, weakness and changes in sensation. The strength of evidence was determined based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE). Results A total of 392 articles were initially retrieved, with 24 ultimately meeting criteria for inclusion. The incidence of any post-operative thigh symptom varied, ranging as high as 60.7%, with 9.3% of patients experiencing a motor deficit related to direct nerve injury. Several studies reported cases of persistent symptoms at 6 months follow up. Additionally, inclusion of the L4-5 disc space and a longer duration of surgery were both identified as risks for developing postoperative thigh symptoms. Conclusion The risk of postoperative thigh symptoms after LTIF is high. Thigh pain, paresthesias and weakness were the most commonly reported symptoms. While most patients’ symptoms resolved by 6 months follow up

  6. [One-segment interbody lumbar arthrodesis using impacted cages: posterior unilateral approach versus posterior bilateral approach].

    PubMed

    Commarmond, J

    2001-04-01

    We assessed the relative advantages of unilateral versus bilateral posterior approaches for lumbar spine fusion. Eighty-three patients who underwent lumbar spine fusion via a bilateral posterior approach and who had reached more than two years follow-up were compared with 80 patients who had undergone the same procedure via a unilateral posterior approach, including 54 with a follow-up greater than one year and 24 greater than two years. Most cases were L4-L5 fusions for degenerative spondylolisthesis or recurrent discal herniation with instability. Two composite carbon cages were filled with autologous cancellous bone. The key to the unilateral approach was the comfortable exposure of the disc by lamino-arthectomy; the osteosynthesis could then be performed unilaterally if only one gutter was opened. We measured bleeding and operative time to quantify surgical difficulty. At one year we assessed disc height, lordosis, frontal balance, and fusion of the operated disk. At two years, we assessed lombalgia and sciatalgia [scored from 4 (none) to 0 (intolerable)], subjective outcome, and recovery of former activity level. Mean blood loss and operative time were 360 ml and 162 min for the 83 classical procedures and 216 ml and 118 min for the 80 unilateral procedures. There were ten dural wounds with the bilateral approach and one dural wound and one transient radicular deficit with the unilateral approach. At one year, 81 of the 83 unilateral cases had reached fusion (2 nonunions). There was a mean 2 degrees gain in discal lordosis despite three cases of impaction due to osteoporosis. For the unilateral procedures, all 54 reached fusion at one year with a mean 2.5 degrees gain in lordosis, also with 3 impactions. With intersomatic distraction, balanced disc height in the frontal plane was obtained in all cases where the initial narrowing was not excessive. There were no cases of posterior displacement. There was a degradation of the supra-adjacent segment in three of

  7. Comparison of biochemical response between the minimally invasive and standard open posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Linzer, Petr; Filip, Michal; Jurek, Patrik; Šálek, Tomáš; Gajdoš, Miroslav; Jarkovský, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The mini-invasive open posterior lumbar fusion procedure (mini PLIF) procedure is an alternative to standard open procedure (open PLIF) and is intended to reduce surgery-related trauma. The measuring of suitable biochemical factors enables objective comparison of the invasiveness of spinal surgery procedures. Prospectively collected data on myoglobin, creatine kinase, interleukin-6, C-reactive protein levels and intensity of low back pain and radicular pain in one-level mini PLIF and open PLIF procedures were analysed. The mini PLIF and the open PLIF groups included 27 and 23 patients, respectively. The collection of blood samples and clinical data were performed preoperatively and on postoperative days 1, 3 and 7. The non-paired t-test was used for statistical evaluation. We did not found any statistically significant differences of myoglobin and creatine kinase levels between the groups. In the open PLIF group the IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in the mini PLIF group on postoperative day 3. CRP levels showed significant lower stress response in favour of the mini PLIF group on postoperative days 3 and 7. Levels of post-op low back pain on day 3 were significantly lower in mini PLIF group. Also intensity of radicular pain on day 1 and 3 were lower also mini PLIF group. The extent of myonecrosis was comparable in both techniques. The analysis of the IL-6 and CRP levels showed significantly lower systemic inflammatory response in mini PLIF technique. The mini PLIF technique provides transiently lower postoperative pain levels. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeled cost-effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion compared with posterolateral fusion for spondylolisthesis using N(2)QOD data.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Ghogawala, Zoher; Mummaneni, Praveen V; McGirt, Matthew J; Asher, Anthony L

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has become the most commonly used fusion technique for lumbar degenerative disorders. This suggests an expectation of better clinical outcomes with this technique, but this has not been validated consistently. How surgical variables and choice of health utility measures drive the cost-effectiveness of TLIF relative to posterolateral fusion (PSF) has not been established. The authors used health utility values derived from Short Form-6D (SF-6D) and EQ-5D and different cost-effectiveness thresholds to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of TLIF compared with PSF. METHODS From the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD), 101 patients with spondylolisthesis who underwent PSF were propensity matched to patients who underwent TLIF. Health-related quality of life measures and perioperative parameters were compared. Because health utility values derived from the SF-6D and EQ-5D questionnaires have been shown to vary in patients with low-back pain, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were derived from both measures. On the basis of these matched cases, a sensitivity analysis for the relative cost per QALY of TLIF versus PSF was performed in a series of cost-assumption models. RESULTS Operative time, blood loss, hospital stay, and 30-day and 90-day readmission rates were similar for the TLIF and PSF groups. Both TLIF and PSF significantly improved back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, and EQ-5D and SF-6D scores at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. At 12 months postoperatively, patients who had undergone TLIF had greater improvements in mean ODI scores (30.4 vs 21.1, p = 0.001) and mean SF-6D scores (0.16 vs 0.11, p = 0.001) but similar improvements in mean EQ-5D scores (0.25 vs 0.22, p = 0.415) as patients treated with PSF. At a cost per QALY threshold of $100,000 and using SF-6D-based QALYs, the authors found that TLIF would be cost-prohibitive compared with PSF at a

  9. Hospital charges associated with "never events": comparison of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and lumbar laminectomy to total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Contag, Alec G; Rastegar, Farbod; Waagmeester, Garrett; Anderson, Paul A; Arthur, Melanie; Hart, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Beginning in 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS) determined that certain hospital-acquired adverse events such as surgical site infection (SSI) following spine surgery should never occur. The following year, they expanded the ruling to include deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following total joint arthroplasty. Due to their ruling that "never events" are not the payers' responsibility, CMS insists that the costs of managing these complications be borne by hospitals and health care providers, rather than billings to health care payers for additional care required in their management. Data comparing the expected costs of such adverse events in patients undergoing spine and orthopedic surgery have not previously been reported. METHODS The California State Inpatient Database (CA-SID) from 2008 to 2009 was used for the analysis. All patients with primary procedure codes indicating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), lumbar laminectomy (LL), total knee replacement (TKR), and total hip replacement (THR) were analyzed. Patients with diagnostic and/or treatment codes for DVT, PE, and SSI were separated from patients without these complication codes. Patients with more than 1 primary procedure code or more than 1 complication code were excluded. Median charges for treatment from primary surgery through 3 months postoperatively were calculated. RESULTS The incidence of the examined adverse events was lowest for ACDF (0.6% DVT, 0.1% PE, and 0.03% SSI) and highest for TKA (1.3% DVT, 0.3% PE, 0.6% SSI). Median inpatient charges for uncomplicated LL was $51,817, compared with $73,432 for ACDF, $143,601 for PLIF, $74,459 for THR, and $70,116 for TKR. Charges for patients with DVT ranged from $108,387 for TKR (1.5 times greater than index) to $313,536 for ACDF (4.3 times greater than index). Charges for patients with PE ranged from $127,958 for TKR (1.8 times greater than

  10. [Effects of robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and traditional open surgery in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Cui, G Y; Tian, W; He, D; Xing, Y G; Liu, B; Yuan, Q; Wang, Y Q; Sun, Y Q

    2017-07-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effects of robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and traditional open TLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods: A total of 41 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis accepted surgical treatment in Department of Spinal Surgery of Beijing Jishuitan Hospital From July 2015 to April 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 16 cases accepted robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF and 25 accepted traditional open TLIF. The operation time, X-ray radiation exposure time, perioperative bleeding, drainage volume, time of hospitalization, time for pain relief, time for ambulatory recovery, visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and complications were compared. T test and χ(2) were used to analyze data. Results: There were no significant difference in gender, age, numbers, degrees, pre-operative VAS and ODI in spondylolisthesis (all P>0.05). Compared with traditional open TLIF group, the robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF group had less perioperative bleeding ((187.5±18.4) ml vs. (332.1±23.5) ml), less drainage volume ((103.1±15.6) ml vs. (261.3±19.8) ml), shorter hospitalization ((7.8±1.9) days vs. (10.0±1.6) days), shorter time for pain relief ((2.8±1.0) days vs. (5.2±1.1) days), shorter time for ambulatory recovery ((1.7±0.9) days vs. (2.9±1.3) days) and less VAS of the third day postoperatively (2.2±0.9 vs. 4.2±2.4) (t=2.762-16.738, all P<0.05), but need more operation time ((151.3±12.3) minutes vs. (102.2±7.1) minutes) and more X-ray radiation exposure ((26.1±3.3) seconds vs. (5.5±2.1) seconds) (t=6.125, 15.168, both P<0.01). In both groups ODI was significantly lower in final follow-up than that of the pre-operation (t=12.215, 14.036, P<0.01). Intervertebral disc height of the final follow-up in both groups were significantly larger than that of the preoperation (robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF group: (11.8 ± 2.8) mm vs

  11. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis: minimum 3 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun Seok; Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Jin-Sung; Jung, Byungjoo; Choi, Gun

    2010-12-01

    Although favorable clinical outcomes have been reported for instrumented lumbar interbody fusion (LIF), adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) has been reported as a long-term complication after LIF. To investigate ASD after instrumented LIF performed at a single level and only for the homogeneous disease of adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. A total of 128 patients who had undergone LIF for the treatment of adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis involving the lower lumbar spine at our institution between February 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively reviewed by chart review and telephone survey. Of them, 103 patients with a minimum of a 36-month follow-up period were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 48.5 years. The average follow-up period was 59 months. Clinical and radiological data related to segmental lordosis (SL), whole lumbar lordosis, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, and L1 axis S1 distance were analyzed to identify significant risk factors for ASD. The overall incidence of ASD was 10.6% (11/103). The incidences of radiographic and symptomatic ASD were 8.7% (9/103) and 1.9% (2/103), respectively. All patients improved clinically and functionally during the follow-up period. Postoperative SL, preoperative SL, whole lumbar lordosis, and L1 axis S1 distance were significant risk factors for ASD. Only SL was a significant risk factor for both the preoperative and postoperative states. ASD may occur at a relatively lower incidence in adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis compared with other degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. SL is significantly correlated with ASD, whereas mechanical alterations caused by LIF are less likely to affect the adjacent segment. Restoration of normal SL is important for preventing ASD, and long-term follow-up is necessary.

  12. CT navigated lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion techniques are heavily reliant on fluoroscopy for retractor docking and graft placement, which expose both the patient and surgeon to high doses of radiation. Use of image-guided technologies with CT-based images, however, can eliminate this radiation exposure for the surgeon. We describe the surgical technique of performing lateral lumbar interbody fusion using CT navigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vertebral osteolysis originating from subchondral cyst end plate defects in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using rhBMP-2. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Sarah; Nottmeier, Eric W

    2010-07-01

    Vertebral osteolysis has been reported as a complication of off-label recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). It has been postulated that end plate violation during disc space preparation, rhBMP-2 overdosing, or a combination thereof can contribute to the development of vertebral osteolysis when rhBMP-2 is used in the lumbar interspace. To present two cases of vertebral osteolysis that occurred after TLIF in which rhBMP-2 was used. In each case, the osteolysis originated from subchondral cysts that were present on preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans. Case report. Two patients underwent instrumented TLIF using INFUSE (Medtronic, Inc., Littleton, MA, USA) on an absorbable collagen sponge carrier. In each patient, approximately 4 mg of rhBMP-2 was placed anteriorly in the disc space with 0.1 mg of rhBMP-2 being placed inside a polyetheretherketone interbody cage. Morcellized allograft bone mixed with demineralized bone matrix was also placed in the disc space and cage. The remaining rhBMP-2 was placed posterolaterally on the contralateral side. Each patient presented with worsening back pain approximately 3 to 4 months postoperatively and CT scans revealed osteolysis affecting the L4 and L5 vertebral bodies. The osteolysis appeared to originate from preoperative vertebral defects caused by subchondral cysts. One patient underwent removal of the interbody cage at the L4-L5 level and revision of the fusion with iliac crest autograft. At 15-month follow-up, he had no complaints of back pain, and CT scanning revealed solid fusion across the L4-L5 disc space. The other patient was offered revision of his fusion but declined any further surgery. At 2-year follow-up, that patient had persistent back pain but still declined any further surgery. A CT scan revealed unchanged osteolysis at the L4 and L5 levels. It has been proposed that rhBMP-2-induced vertebral osteolysis occurring in TLIF

  14. A new extensile anterolateral retroperitoneal approach for lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to S1: a prospective series with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Sean; Butler, Joseph S; Benton, Adam; Malhotra, Karan; Selvadurai, Susanne; Agu, Obiekezie

    2016-06-01

    A variety of surgical approaches have been used for cage insertion in lumbar interbody fusion surgery. The direct anterior approach requires mobilization of the great vessels to access the intervertebral disc spaces cranial to L5/S1. With the lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach, it is difficult to access the L4/L5 intervertebral disc space due to the lumbar plexus and iliac crest, and L5/S1 is inaccessible. We describe a new anterolateral retroperitoneal approach, which is safe and reproducible to access the disc spaces from L1 to S1 inclusive, obviating the need for a separate direct anterior approach to access L5/S1. This paper had the following objectives: first, to report a reproducible novel single-incision, muscle-splitting, anterolateral pre-psoas surgical approach to the lumbar spine from L1 to S1; second, to highlight the technical challenges of this approach and highlight approach-related complications; and third, to evaluate clinical outcomes using this surgical technique in a prospective series of L1 to S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) performed as part of a 360-degree fusion for adult spinal deformity correction. This report used a prospective cohort study. A prospective series of patients (n=64) having ALIF using porous tantalum cages as part of a two-stage complex spinal reconstruction from L1 to S1 were studied. Data collected included blood loss, operative time, incision size, technical challenges, perioperative complications, and secondary procedures. Clinical outcome measures used included visual analogue scale (VAS) Back Pain, VAS Leg Pain, EuroQoL-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), EQ-5D VAS, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22). Pre- and postoperative radiographic parameters and clinical outcome measures were assessed. Mean follow-up time was 1.8 years. Mean blood loss was 68±9.6 mL. The mean VAS Back Pain score improved from 7.5±1.25 preoperatively to 2.5±1.7 at 3 months (p=.02), 1.2±0.5 at 6

  15. Evaluation of Coflex interspinous stabilization following decompression compared with decompression and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease: A minimum 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Su, Qing-Jun; Liu, Tie; Yang, Jin-Cai; Kang, Nan; Guan, Li; Hai, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have compared the clinical and radiological outcomes between Coflex interspinous stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative lumbar disease. We compared the at least 5-year clinical and radiological outcomes of Coflex stabilization and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighty-seven consecutive patients with lumbar degenerative disease were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-two patients underwent decompression and Coflex interspinous stabilization (Coflex group), 45 patients underwent decompression and PLIF (PLIF group). Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated. Coflex subjects experienced less blood loss, shorter hospital stays and shorter operative time than PLIF (all p<0.001). Both groups demonstrated significant improvement in Oswestry Disability Index and visual analogue scale back and leg pain at each follow-up time point. The Coflex group had significantly better clinical outcomes during early follow-up. At final follow-up, the superior and inferior adjacent segments motion had no significant change in the Coflex group, while the superior adjacent segment motion increased significantly in the PLIF group. At final follow-up, the operative level motion was significantly decreased in both groups, but was greater in the Coflex group. The reoperation rate for adjacent segment disease was higher in the PLIF group, but this did not achieve statistical significance (11.1% vs. 4.8%, p=0.277). Both groups provided sustainable improved clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease through at least 5-year follow-up. The Coflex group had significantly better early efficacy than the PLIF group. Coflex interspinous implantation after decompression is safe and effective for lumbar degenerative disease.

  16. Lumbar disc arthroplasty with Maverick disc versus stand-alone interbody fusion: a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter investigational device exemption trial.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Burkus, J Kenneth; Dryer, Randall F; Peloza, John H

    2011-12-01

    Randomized, controlled, multicenter, investigational device exemption trial. To investigate the safety and effectiveness of the first two-piece, metal-on-metal lumbar disc prosthesis for treating patients with single-level degenerative disc disease. For patients with degenerative disc disease unresponsive to conservative measures, lumbar disc arthroplasty provides an alternative to fusion designed to relieve persistent discogenic pain and maintain motion. After 2:1 randomization, 577 patients were treated in either the investigational group (405), receiving lumbar disc arthroplasty, or the control group (172), receiving anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Patients were evaluated preoperatively, at surgery/discharge, and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The primary study endpoint was overall success, a composite measure of safety and effectiveness as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration and defined in the protocol. Both treatment groups demonstrated significant improvements compared with preoperative status. The investigational group had statistically superior outcomes (P < 0.05) at all postoperative evaluations in Oswestry Disability Index, back pain, and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores as well as patient satisfaction. Investigational patients had longer surgical times (P < 0.001) and greater blood loss (P < 0.001) than did control patients; however, hospitalization stays were similar for both groups. Investigational patients had fewer implant or implant/surgical procedure-related adverse events (P < 0.001). Return-to-work intervals were reduced for investigational patients. Disc height and segmental angular motion were maintained throughout the study in the investigational group. In the investigational group, overall success superiority was found when compared to the control group as defined by the Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption protocol. The investigational group consistently demonstrated

  17. Clinical and radiological outcome of anterior–posterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for symptomatic disc degeneration: a retrospective comparative study of 133 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, James D.; Safriel, Yair; Gilbert, Thomas J.; Mehbod, Amir A.; Denis, Francis; Transfeldt, Ensor E.; Wroblewski, Jill M.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant data are available for direct anterior/posterior spine fusion (APF) and some for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), but only few studies from one institution compares the two techniques. One-hundred and thirty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed, 68 having APF and 65 having TLIF. All patients had symptomatic disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Only those with one or two-level surgeries were included. Clinical chart and radiologic reviews were done, fusion solidity assessed, and functional outcomes determined by pre- and postoperative SF-36 and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and a satisfaction questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 24 months. The mean operating room time and hospital length of stay were less in the TLIF group. The blood loss was slightly less in the TLIF group (409 vs. 480 cc.). Intra-operative complications were higher in the APF group, mostly due to vein lacerations in the anterior retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative complications were higher in the TLIF group due to graft material extruding against the nerve root or wound drainage. The pseudarthrosis rate was statistically equal (APF 17.6% and TLIF 23.1%) and was higher than most published reports. Significant improvements were noted in both groups for the SF-36 questionnaires. The mean ODI scores at follow-up were 33.5 for the APF and 39.5 for the TLIF group. The patient satisfaction rate was equal for the two groups. PMID:19125304

  18. Fusion and subsidence rate of stand alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion using PEEK cage with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Behrbalk, Eyal; Uri, Ofir; Parks, Ruth M; Musson, Rachel; Soh, Reuben Chee Cheong; Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian

    2013-12-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is an established treatment for structural instability associated with symptomatic disk degeneration (SDD). Stand-alone ALIF offers many advantages, however, it may increase the risk of non-union. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) may enhance fusion rate but is associated with postoperative complication. The optimal dose of BMP-2 remains unclear. This study assessed the fusion and subsidence rates of stand-alone ALIF using the SynFix-LR interbody cage with 6 ml/level of BMP-2. Thirty-two ALIF procedures were performed by a single surgeon in 25 patients. Twenty-five procedures were performed for SDD without spondylolisthesis (SDD group) and seven procedures were performed for SDD with grade-I olisthesis (SDD-olisthesis group). Patients were followed-up for a mean of 17 ± 6 months. Solid fusion was achieved in 29 cases (90.6 %) within 6 months postoperatively. Five cases of implant subsidence were observed (16 %). Four of these occurred in the SDD-olisthesis group and one occurred in the SDD group (57 % vs. 4 % respectively; p = 0.004). Three cases of subsidence failed to fuse and required revision. The body mass index of patients with olisthesis who developed subsidence was higher than those who did not develop subsidence (29 ± 2.6 vs. 22 ± 6.5 respectively; p = 0.04). No BMP-2 related complications occurred. The overall fusion rate of stand-alone ALIF using the SynFix-LR system with BMP-2 was 90.6 %, comparable with other published series. No BMP-2 related complication occurred at a dose of 6 mg/level. Degenerative spondylolisthesis and obesity seemed to increase the rate of implant subsidence, and thus we believe that adding posterior fusion for these cases should be considered.

  19. Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) Versus Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) Implants for Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, William; McLain, Robert F.; Rufo-Smith, Candace; Gurd, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative disc disease is common and debilitating for many patients. If conservative extensive care fails, anterior lumbar interbody fusion has proven to be an alternative form of surgical management. The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage(SAC) was introduced as a method to obtain stability and fusion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) is comparable in safety and efficacy to the Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) device. Methods As part of a prospective, randomized, controlled FDA trial, 73 patients underwent anterior interbody fusion using either the SAC(56%) or the BAK device (44%). Results Background characteristics were similar between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the SAC and BAK groups in mean operative time or mean blood loss during surgery. Adverse event rates did not differ between the groups. Assessment of plain radiographs could not confirm solid fusion in 63% of control and 71% of study patients. Functional scores from Owestry and SF-36 improved in both groups by the two-year follow-up. There were no significant differences between the SAC and BAK patients with respect to outcome. Conclusions Both the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage and the BAK Cage provided satisfactory improvement in function and pain relief, despite less than expected radiographic fusion rates. The apparent incongruency between fusion rates and functional outcomes suggests that either radiographs underestimate the true incidence of fusion, or that patients are obtaining good pain relief and improved function despite a lower rate of fusion than previously reported. This was a Level III study. PMID:25694930

  20. Quality-of-Life Outcomes With Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Based on Long-Term Analysis of 304 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Namath S.; White, G. Zachary; Begun, Evan M.; Collins, Robert A.; Fahim, Daniel K.; Hiremath, Girish K.; Adbi, Fadumo M.; Yacob, Sammy A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. This was a prospective clinical study that took place in an outpatient spine clinic. Objective. To demonstrate the short-/long-term outcomes from a large cohort of patients undergoing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF). Summary of Background Data. Long-term prospective outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive spinal fusion for debilitating back pain has not been well studied. Methods. Presenting diagnosis was determined from clinical findings and radiographical (radiograph, magnetic resonance image, computed tomographic scan) evaluations preoperatively. Patients were assessed with outcome measures preoperatively, and postoperatively at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, and annually 2 to 7 years (mean follow-up: 47 mo) final follow-up. The rate of postoperative complications and reoperations at the initial level of MITLIF and adjacent level(s) were followed. Fusion rates were assessed blinded and independently by radiograph. Results. Visual analogue scale scores decreased significantly from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.5 at mean 47-month follow-up. Oswestry Disability Index scores declined from 43.1 preoperatively to 28.2 at mean 47-month follow-up. Short-Form 36 mental component scores increased from 43.8 preoperatively to 49.7 at 47-month follow-up. Short-Form 36 physical component scores increased from 30.6 preoperatively to 39.6 at 47-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Conclusion. This prospectively collected outcomes study shows long-term statistically significant clinical outcomes improvement after MITLIF in patients with clinically symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with or without stenosis. MITLIF resulted in a high rate of spinal fusion and very low rate of interbody fusion failure and/or adjacent segment disease requiring reoperation while reducing postoperative complications. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:24150437

  1. Unilateral Versus Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Monocentric Study of 215 Patients With a Minimum of 4-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fubing; Feng, Zhenzhou; Zhou, Xiaogang; Liang, Yun; Jiang, Chun; Li, Xilei; Li, Zheng; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Dong, Jian

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective clinical study. This study sought to retrospectively compare the mid-term to long-term outcomes between unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) and bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) augmented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in lumbar degenerative diseases. Recently, UPS fixation has been applied in TLIF, for its satisfactory clinical outcome, less implants and less invasiveness. However, only short-term outcome has been reported, the mid-term to long-term outcome has not been well characterized. From June 2007 to February 2011, 215 of 348 consecutive patients suffering from lumbar degenerative diseases were operated in our hospital and accomplished a minimum of 4-year follow-up. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to the operative techniques: UPS group (n=109), and bilateral pedicle screw group (n=106). Operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, hospital bill, fusion status, and complications were recorded and analyzed statistically. Visual analog scale, Oswestry disability index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores were used to assess the preoperative and postoperative pain and functional outcome. The mean follow-up duration was 52.2 months. A significant decrease occurred in operative time, blood loss, and hospital bill in unilateral group, compared with bilateral group (P<0.05). The average postoperative visual analog scale, Oswestry disability index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores improved significantly in each group than the preoperative counterparts (P<0.05); however, there were no significant difference between groups at any follow-up time point (P>0.05). No statistically difference was detected regarding fusion rate and complication rate between the 2 groups (P>0.05), except the cage migration rate (P<0.05). UPS fixation could achieve satisfactory clinical outcome similar to bilateral fixation in TLIF at a mid-term to long-term follow-up. To avoid cage migration, bullet-shaped cages should not

  2. Lumbar-sacral fusion by a combined approach using interbody PEEK cage and posterior pedicle-screw fixation: clinical and radiological results from a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Boissiere, L; Perrin, G; Rigal, J; Michel, F; Barrey, C

    2013-12-01

    This prospective series evaluated the clinical and radiological results of a circumferential lumbar fusion achieved by a combined approach in one stage (anterior then posterior) using interbody PEEK cages and posterior pedicle-screw fixation. The combined approach in one stage is a safe and efficient technique with few complications to achieve a fusion with a satisfying clinical and radiological outcome. Thirty-nine consecutive patients were prospectively included, with a one-year clinical and radiological minimum follow-up, from December 2008 to July 2011. All patients suffering from degenerative disc disease or low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis requiring L5S1, L4L5 or L4S1 spinal fusions were included. Clinical outcome was assessed using VAS, ODI and Rolland-Morris scores. Radiological outcome was assessed by analyzing PI, PT, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, disc height, C7/CSFD ratio on full spine radiographies and the quality of bone fusion on a CT scan at 1-year follow-up. Blood loss, surgery time and adverse events were also recorded. Twenty-nine patients (74%) were operated for a lumbar degenerative disc disease and 10 patients (26%) for an isthmic spondylolisthesis. Mean age was 46 (± 10.1) years old. Clinical outcome were satisfactory. VAS, ODI and Rolland-Morris scores substantially improved. Mean follow-up was 22.5 months (± 8.7). Mean surgery time was 227 min (± 41.4) for complete surgical procedure time. Mean blood loss was 308 mL (± 179.2) for total surgery. Fusion was assessed in all cases. Disc height and segmental lordosis significantly improved in postoperative. The segmental lordosis at operated level(s) increased by 8.5° (± 5) regardless of the level, and by 11.6° (± 6) for L5-S1. The combined procedure meets the requested criteria for a lumbar fusion in terms of clinical and functional results, fusion rates, and restoration of segmental lordosis. It cumulates the advantages of the anterior and posterior approach performed alone

  3. Demineralized Bone Matrix (DBM) as a Bone Void Filler in Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Pilot Study of Simultaneous DBM and Autologous Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Haebin; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Won-Hyung; Jin, Sung-Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective Solid bone fusion is an essential process in spinal stabilization surgery. Recently, as several minimally invasive spinal surgeries have developed, a need of artificial bone substitutes such as demineralized bone matrix (DBM), has arisen. We investigated the in vivo bone growth rate of DBM as a bone void filler compared to a local autologous bone grafts. Methods From April 2014 to August 2015, 20 patients with a one or two-level spinal stenosis were included. A posterior lumbar interbody fusion using two cages and pedicle screw fixation was performed for every patient, and each cage was packed with autologous local bone and DBM. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) of leg pain and back pain and the Korean Oswestry Disability Index (K-ODI). Clinical outcome parameters and range of motion (ROM) of the operated level were collected preoperatively and at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Computed tomography was performed 1 year after fusion surgery and bone growth of the autologous bone grafts and DBM were analyzed by ImageJ software. Results Eighteen patients completed 1 year of follow-up, including 10 men and 8 women, and the mean age was 56.4 (32–71). The operated level ranged from L3/4 to L5/S1. Eleven patients had single level and 7 patients had two-level repairs. The mean back pain NRS improved from 4.61 to 2.78 (p=0.003) and the leg pain NRS improved from 6.89 to 2.39 (p<0.001). The mean K-ODI score also improved from 27.33 to 13.83 (p<0.001). The ROM decreased below 2.0 degrees at the 3-month assessment, and remained less than 2 degrees through the 1 year postoperative assessment. Every local autologous bone graft and DBM packed cage showed bone bridge formation. On the quantitative analysis of bone growth, the autologous bone grafts showed significantly higher bone growth compared to DBM on both coronal and sagittal images (p<0.001 and p=0.028, respectively). Osteoporotic patients showed less bone

  4. Surgical Data and Early Postoperative Outcomes after Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Data-Monitored Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Paulo; Buzek, David; Franke, Jörg; Senker, Wolfgang; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Manson, Neil; Rosenberg, Wout; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Scheufler, Kai-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD). Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study. Objective: To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD. Materials and Methods: In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (≥30 MILIF surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients’ short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective) including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), health status (EQ-5D) and Patient satisfaction. Results: At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83%) and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%). For one-level (and two-level) procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182) min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154) sec, and blood-loss 164 (233) mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2), leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9), and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%), and a significantly (P < 0.0001) improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9) 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported. Conclusions: For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to

  5. Lower Lumbar Segmental Arteries Can Intersect Over the Intervertebral Disc in the Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion Approach With a Risk for Arterial Injury: Radiological Analysis of Lumbar Segmental Arteries by Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Abe, Koki; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takane; Kubota, Go; Eguchi, Yawara; Terakado, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-02-01

    A retrospective radiological study on vascular anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical and radiological features of lumbar segmental arteries with respect to the surgical field of the oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) approach by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). OLIF surgery restores disc height and enables indirect decompression of narrowed spinal canals through an oblique lateral approach to the spine, by using a specially designed retractor. In a minimal surgical field, injuring segmental arteries can cause massive hemorrhage. We reviewed 272 lumbar MRIs. In the sagittal images, the intersection of one-third of the anterior and median lines of the intervertebral disc (IVD) was considered the center of the virtually installed OLIF retractor. The cephalad/caudal distances from the center and branch angles of segmental arteries to the longitudinal axes of the aorta were measured to determine whether the segmental arteries run into the surgical area. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The branch angles of segmental arteries were significantly acute (≤90°) in L1-L3 arteries and significantly blunt (>90°) in L4 and L5 arteries. The average distance to the center of the caudal adjacent IVD was significantly larger, and there were generally low possibilities for the existence of segmental arteries below half of the vertebral height, where the surgeons can install fixation pins with ease and safety. Among the lumbar segmental arteries, L5 showed specific characteristics with significant deviation, a four times (4.1% vs. L1-L3 segmental arteries) higher adjacency rate, and a two-fifth (38.6% vs. 100%) lower existence rate. Segmental arteries can be involved in the surgical field of OLIF especially in the lower lumbar spine level of L4 and L5 arteries, which can directly run across IVDs. L5 segmental arteries can also be iliolumbar arteries that have an abnormal trajectory by nature. 4.

  6. Total Disc Arthroplasty and Anterior Interbody Fusion in the Lumbar Spine Have Relatively Few Differences in Readmission and Short-term Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Blake N; Wilson, Alexander T; Ondeck, Nathaniel T; Bovonratwet, Patawut; McLynn, Ryan P; Cui, Jonathan J; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2017-07-18

    Retrospective matched cohort study of prospectively collected data. To compare rates of adverse events and readmission between lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. TDA and ALIF may be considered for similar degenerative indications. However, there have been few large-cohort comparison studies of short-term clinical outcomes for these procedures. The 2011-2015 NSQIP databases were retrospectively queried to identify patients who underwent elective stand-alone ALIF and TDA. After propensity matching, the association of procedure type with adverse events and readmission was determined using McNemar's test. Operative time and postoperative length of stay were compared using multivariate linear regression. Risk factors for adverse events were determined using multivariate Poisson regression. In total, 1,801 ALIF and 255 TDA patients were identified. After matching with propensity scores, there were no significant differences in the rates of any adverse event, serious adverse events, individual adverse events or readmission other than blood transfusion, which occurred more frequently in the ALIF cohort (3.92% versus 0.39%, p = 0.007). Operative time was not significantly different between the two cohorts, but postoperative length of stay was significantly longer for ALIF cases (+0.28 days, p < 0.001). When evaluating ten preoperative variables as potential risk factors for adverse events and readmission after TDA and ALIF, the majority of results were similar. The only identified differences in perioperative outcomes between TDA and ALIF were a 3.53% higher incidence of blood transfusion and 0.28-day longer length of stay for the ALIF group. These results suggest overall similar short-term general-health outcomes between the two groups, and that the choice between the two procedures, for the appropriately selected patient

  7. Clinical outcomes of minimally invasive versus open approach for one-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at the 3- to 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vela, Javier; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Joven, Eduardo; Muñoz-Marín, Javier; Herrera, Antonio; Velilla, José

    2013-12-01

    Supporters of minimally invasive approaches for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) have reported short-term advantages associated with a reduced soft tissue trauma. Nevertheless, mid- and long-term outcomes and specifically those involving physical activities have not been adequately studied. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of mini-open versus classic open surgery for one-level TLIF, with an individualized evaluation of the variables used for the clinical assessment. A prospective cohort study was conducted of 41 individuals with degenerative disc disease who underwent a one-level TLIF from January 2007 to June 2008. Patients were randomized into two groups depending on the type of surgery performed: classic open (CL-TLIF) group and mini-open approach (MO-TLIF) group. The visual analog scale (VAS), North American Spine Society (NASS) Low Back Pain Outcome instrument, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) were used for clinical assessment in a minimum 3-year follow-up (36-54 months). Patients of the MO-TLIF group presented lower rates of lumbar (p = 0.194) and sciatic pain (p = 0.427) and performed better in daily life activities, especially in those requiring mild efforts: lifting slight weights (p = 0.081), standing (p = 0.097), carrying groceries (p = 0.033), walking (p = 0.069) and dressing (p = 0.074). Nevertheless, the global scores of the clinical questionnaires showed no statistical differences between the CL-TLIF and the MO-TLIF groups. Despite an improved functional status of MO-TLIF patients in the short term, the clinical outcomes of mini-open TLIF at the 3- to 4-year follow-up showed no clinically relevant differences to those obtained with open TLIF.

  8. An Outcome and Cost Analysis Comparing Single-Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Intraoperative Fluoroscopy versus Computed Tomography-Guided Navigation.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ryan; McDevitt, Joseph L; Abecassis, Zachary A; Smith, Zachary A; Koski, Tyler R; Fessler, Richard G; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has undergone significant evolution since its conception as a fusion technique to treat lumbar spondylosis. Minimally invasive TLIF is commonly performed using intraoperative two-dimensional fluoroscopic x-rays. However, intraoperative computed tomography (CT)-based navigation during minimally invasive TLIF is gaining popularity for improvements in visualizing anatomy and reducing intraoperative radiation to surgeons and operating room staff. This is the first study to compare clinical outcomes and cost between these 2 imaging techniques during minimally invasive TILF. For comparison, 28 patients who underwent single-level minimally invasive TLIF using fluoroscopy were matched to 28 patients undergoing single-level minimally invasive TLIF using CT navigation based on race, sex, age, smoking status, payer type, and medical comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity Index). The minimum follow-up time was 6 months. The 2 groups were compared in regard to clinical outcomes and hospital reimbursement from the payer perspective. Average surgery time, anesthesia time, and hospital length of stay were similar for both groups, but average estimated blood loss was lower in the fluoroscopy group compared with the CT navigation group (154 mL vs. 262 mL; P = 0.016). Oswestry Disability Index, back visual analog scale, and leg visual analog scale scores similarly improved in both groups (P > 0.05) at 6-month follow-up. Cost analysis showed that average hospital payments were similar in the fluoroscopy versus the CT navigation groups ($32,347 vs. $32,656; P = 0.925) as well as payments for the operating room (P = 0.868). Single minimally invasive TLIF performed with fluoroscopy versus CT navigation showed similar clinical outcomes and cost at 6 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF): a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Yipeng; Li, Zhengyao; Yu, Bin; Li, Ye

    2014-11-06

    A few studies focused on unilateral or bilateral pedicle screw (PS) fixation of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) to treat lumbar degenerative diseases have been published. There is still debate over whether one method is superior to another. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) was performed to compare the efficacy of the two methods. We searched the established electronic literature databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for RCTs comparing the unilateral with bilateral pedicle screw fixation of MIS-TLIF. Pooled mean differences (MD) and odds ratios (OR) and with 95% CIs were calculated for the outcomes. Three RCTs were identified and analyzed. The results showed that there is no significant difference between the two methods in terms of postoperative VAS-BP score (WMD = -0.09; 95% CI: -0.69 to 0.51; P =0.78), ODI (WMD, -0.09; 95% CI -5.85 to 5.67; P =0.98), fusion rate (OR = 2.99; 95% CI 0.55 to 16.38; P = 0.21) or complication rate (OR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.49 to 5.37; P =0.43). Unilateral pedicle screw fixation was associated with less blood loss (WMD = -87.83; 95% CI: -160.70 to -14.96; P =0.02). The existing evidence indicate that no superiority exists between the two fixation methods of MIS-TLIF in terms of functional outcome, fusion rate and complication rate, in spite of that unilateral pedicle screw fixation can achieve less blood loss than bilateral fixation.

  10. Minimum 10-Year Follow-up Study of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Progressive Pattern of the Adjacent Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Taketoshi; Hori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aims of the current study are to evaluate the minimum 10-year follow-up clinical results of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature ALIF has been widely used as a treatment regimen in the management of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Still much controversy exists regarding the factors that affect the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods The author performed a retrospective review of 20 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis treated with ALIF (follow-up, 16.4 years). The clinical results were assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for low back pain, vertebral slip and disc height index on the radiographs. Results The mean preoperative JOA score was 7.1 ± 1.8 points (15-point-method). At 1 year, 5 years, and 10 years or more after surgery, the JOA scores were assessed as 12.4 ± 2.2 points, 12.7 ± 2.6 points, 12.0 ± 2.5 points, respectively (excluding the data of reoperated cases). The adjacent disc degeneration developed in all cases during the long-term follow-up. The progressive pattern of disc degeneration was divided into three types. Initially, disc degeneration occurred due to disc space narrowing. After that, the intervertebral discs showed segmental instability with translation at the upper level. But the lower discs showed osteophyte formation, and occasionally lead to the collapse or spontaneous union. Conclusions The clinical results of the long-term follow-up data after ALIF became worse due to the adjacent disc degeneration. The progressive pattern of disc degeneration was different according to the adjacent levels. PMID:22708014

  11. A Comparative Radiographic Analysis of Fusion Rate between L4-5 and L5-S1 in a Single Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Hyun; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Ki-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate radiographic fusion rates at L4-5 and L5-S1 after single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and evaluate the relationship between fusion rates and preoperative disc slope angle (DSA), lumbar lordosis (LL), segmental angle (SA), and pelvic parameters. We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent single level PLIF at L4-5 or L5-S1 during May 2003-December 2012 at our institution. 73 patients were finally enrolled. Fusion was assessed by use of the Brantigan-Steffee classification, less than 2mm translation and less than 5° motion on the flexion-extension lateral radiographs. We analyzed the radiographic fusion rates, risk factors, and relationship of fusion rates with DSA, LL, SA, and pelvic parameters. There were 59 patients (80.8%) in the L4-5 group and 14 (19.2%) in L5-S1 (average follow-up, 34 months). The radiographic fusion rates were 89.8% in the L4-5 group (53/59) and 42.9% in L5-S1 (6/14) (p<0.001).The preoperative DSA was significantly lesser in the L4-5 group than in the L5-S1 group (13.1±8.1° vs. 27.2±6.7°, p<0.001). The LL, SA, and pelvic parameters were not related with radiographic fusion rates in both groups. Risk factors for non-union were not identified between the two groups except for the surgery level (p<0.001). The radiographic fusion rate at L5-S1 was less than half that at L4-5 after single level PLIF. This may be due to the anatomical and biomechanical differences between the two levels. More vigorous effort to achieve successful fusion at L5-S1 should be considered.

  12. Septic hematogenous lumbar spondylodiscitis in elderly patients with multiple risk factors: efficacy of posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with iliac crest bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Mater, Eckhardt; Schön, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The conservative and operative treatment strategies of hematogenous spondylodiscitis in septic patients with multiple risk factors are controversial. The present series demonstrates the outcome of 18 elderly patients (median age, 72 years) with septic hematogenous spondylodiscitis and intraspinal abscess treated with microsurgical decompression and debridement of the infective tissue, followed by posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with iliac crest bone graft in one or two lumbar segments. The majority of the patients were unsuccessfully treated with intravenous antibiotics prior to the operation. Antibiotic therapy was continued for more than 6 weeks postoperatively. Morbidity and early mortality amounted to 50 and 17%, respectively. Three patients died in the hospital from internal complications after an initial postoperative improvement of the inflammatory clinical signs and laboratory parameters. Fifteen patients recovered from the spinal infection. Three of them died several months after discharge (cerebral hemorrhage, malignancy and unknown cause). Twelve patients had excellent or good outcomes during the follow-up period of at least 1 year. The series shows that operative decompression and eradication of the intraspinal and intervertebral infective tissue with fusion and stabilization via a posterior approach is possible in septic patients with multiple risk factors and leads to good results in those patients, who survive the initial severe stage of the septic disease. However, the morbidity and mortality suggest that this surgical treatment is not the therapy of first choice in high-risk septic patients, but may be considered in patients when conservative management has failed. PMID:20495933

  13. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Percutaneous Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbosacral Spine Degenerative Diseases. A retrospective database of 40 consecutive treated cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Millimaggi, Daniele Francesco; DI Norcia, Valerio; Luzzi, Sabino; Alfiero, Tommaso; Galzio, Renato Juan; Ricci, Alessandro

    2017-04-12

    To report our results about minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation, in patients with degenerative lumbosacral spine disease. To describe the indications, surgical technique and results of a consecutive series of 40 patients undergone MI-TLIF. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, published data suggest tremendous potential advantages of this technique. Forty patients with radiological findings of degenerative lumbosacral spine disease were undergone MI-TLIF between July 2012 and January 2015. Clinical outcomes were assessed by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Health Survey Scoring (SF36) before surgery and at first year follow-up. Furthermore, the following parameters were retrospectively reviewed: age, sex, working activity, body mass index (BMI), type of degenerative disease, number of levels of fusion, operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay. Average operative time was of 230 minutes, mean estimated blood loss 170 mL, average length of hospital stay 5 days. The ODI improved from a score of 59, preoperatively, to post-operative score of 20 at first year follow-up. Average SF36 score increased from 36 to 54 (Physical Health) and from 29 to 50 (Mental Health) at first year outcome evaluation. MI-TLIF with bilateral pedicle screw fixation is an excellent choice for selected patients suffering from symptomatic degenerative lumbosacral spine disease, especially secondary to recurrent disk herniations.

  14. Is Stand-Alone Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion a Safe and Efficacious Treatment for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis of L5-S1?

    PubMed

    Viglione, Luke L; Chamoli, Uphar; Diwan, Ashish D

    2017-09-01

    A systematic review. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (sa-ALIF) for the treatment of symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1 by assessing the level of available clinical and radiographic evidence. A systematic review utilizing Medline, Embase, and Scopus online databases was undertaken. Clinical, radiographic, and adverse outcome data were extracted for the relevant isthmic spondylolisthesis cases with the intention of undertaking a meta-analysis. The database search between January 1980 and December 2015 yielded 23 articles that concerned sa-ALIF for isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1. Only in 9 of the 23 articles data could be extracted specific to sa-ALIF for isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1. There was considerable inconsistency in the standards for reporting outcomes of the surgery due to which meta-analysis could not be undertaken, and hence each article was reviewed. There was insufficient evidence to support the safety and efficacy of sa-ALIF for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1. Although sa-ALIF is widely documented in the literature, there was insufficient evidence to support its use in treating this specific pathology. The unique pathological and anatomical situation that isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5-S1 presents must be recognized and its treatment with sa-ALIF should be well thought out.

  15. Posterolateral instrumented fusion with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis: A randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Etemadifar, Mohammad Reza; Hadi, Abdollah; Masouleh, Mehran Feizi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spondylolisthesis is a common cause of surgery in patients with lower back pain. Although posterolateral fusion and pedicle screw fixation are a relatively common treatment method for the treatment of spondylolisthesis, controversy exists about the necessity of adding interbody fusion to posterolateral fusion. The aim of our study was to assess the functional disability, pain, and complications in patients with spondylolisthesis treated by posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF) with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: From February 2007 to February 2011, 50 adult patients with spondylolisthesis were randomly assigned to be treated with PLF or PLF+TLIF techniques (25 patients in each group) by a single surgeon. Back pain, leg pain, and disability were assessed before treatment and until 2 years after surgical treatment using visual analog scale (VAS) and oswestry disability index (ODI). Patients were also evaluated for postoperative complications such as infection, neurological complications, and instrument failure. Results: All patients completed the 24 months of follow-up. Twenty patients were females and 30 were males. Average age of the patients was 53 ± 11 years for the PLF group and 51 ± 13 for the PLF + TLIF group. Back pain, leg pain, and disability score were significantly improved postoperatively compared to preoperative scores (P < 0.001). At 3 months of follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS score for back pain and leg pain in both groups; however, after 6 months and 1 year and 2 years follow-up, the reported scores for back pain and leg pain were significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group (P < 0.05). The ODI score was also significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group at 1 year and 2 years of follow-up (P < 0.05). One screw breakage and one superficial infection occurred in the PLF+TLIF group, which had no statistical significance (P = 0

  16. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Rigid Interspinous Process Fixation: A Learning Curve Analysis of a Surgeon Team’s First 74 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Patrick; Welch, Arthur; Tharpe, Jason; Moore, Camille

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that a significant learning curve may be associated with adopting minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BPSF). Accordingly, several hybrid TLIF techniques have been proposed as surrogates to the accepted BPSF technique, asserting that less/fewer fixation(s) or less disruptive fixation may decrease the learning curve while still maintaining the minimally disruptive benefits. TLIF with interspinous process fixation (ISPF) is one such surrogate procedure. However, despite perceived ease of adaptability given the favorable proximity of the spinous processes, no evidence exists demonstrating whether or not the technique may possess its own inherent learning curve. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intraoperative learning curve for one- and two-level TLIF + ISPF may exist for a single lead surgeon. Methods Seventy-four consecutive patients who received one- or two-Level TLIF with rigid ISPF by a single lead surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. It was the first TLIF + ISPF case series for the lead surgeon. Intraoperative blood loss (EBL), hospitalization length-of-stay (LOS), fluoroscopy time, and postoperative complications were collected. EBL, LOS, and fluoroscopy time were modeled as a function of case number using multiple linear regression methods. A change point was included in each model to allow the trajectory of the outcomes to change during the duration of the case series. These change points were determined using profile likelihood methods. Models were fit using the maximum likelihood estimates for the change points. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and the number of treated levels were included as covariates. Results EBL, LOS, and fluoroscopy time did not significantly differ by age, sex, or BMI (p ≥ 0.12). Only EBL differed significantly by the number of levels (p = 0.026). The case number was not a significant predictor of EBL, LOS

  17. The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled

  18. Biomechanical comparison of a two-level Maverick disc replacement with a hybrid one-level disc replacement and one-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Serkan; Rivera, Yamil; Wu, Chunhui; Mehbod, Amir A; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2009-10-01

    Multilevel lumbar disc disease (MLDD) is a common finding in many patients. Surgical solutions for MLDD include fusion or disc replacement. The hybrid model, combining fusion and disc replacement, is a potential alternative for patients who require surgical intervention at both L5-S1 and L4-L5. The indications for this hybrid model could be posterior element insufficiency, severe facet pathology, calcified ligamentum flavum, and subarticular disease confirming spinal stenosis at L5-S1 level, or previous fusion surgery at L5-S1 and new symptomatic pathology at L4-L5. Biomechanical data of the hybrid model with the Maverick disc and anterior fusion are not available in the literature. To compare the biomechanical properties of a two-level Maverick disc replacement at L4-L5, L5-S1, and a hybrid model consisting of an L4-L5 Maverick disc replacement with an L5-S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion using multidirectional flexibility test. An in vitro human cadaveric biomechanical study. Six fresh human cadaveric lumbar specimens (L4-S1) were subjected to unconstrained load in axial torsion (AT), lateral bending (LB), flexion (F), extension (E), and flexion-extension (FE) using multidirectional flexibility test. Four surgical treatments-intact, one-level Maverick at L5-S1, two-level Maverick between L4 and S1, and the hybrid model (anterior fusion at L5-S1 and Maverick at L4-L5) were tested in sequential order. The range of motion of each treatment was calculated. The Maverick disc replacement slightly reduced intact motion in AT and LB at both levels. The total FE motion was similar to the intact motion. However, the E motion is significantly increased (approximately 50% higher) and F motion is significantly decreased (30%-50% lower). The anterior fusion using a cage and anterior plate significantly reduced spinal motion compared with the condition (p<.05). No significant differences were found between two-level Maverick disc prosthesis and the hybrid model in terms of

  19. Dynamic stabilization for L4-5 spondylolisthesis: comparison with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with more than 2 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Cheng, Henrich; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the past decade, dynamic stabilization has been an emerging option of surgical treatment for lumbar spondylosis. However, the application of this dynamic construct for mild spondylolisthesis and its clinical outcomes remain uncertain. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the management of single-level spondylolisthesis at L4-5. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive patients with Meyerding Grade I spondylolisthesis at L4-5 who were managed with surgery. Patients were divided into 2 groups: DDS and MI-TLIF. The DDS group was composed of patients who underwent standard laminectomy and the DDS system. The MI-TLIF group was composed of patients who underwent MI-TLIF. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by visual analog scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at each time point of evaluation. Evaluations included radiographs and CT scans for every patient for 2 years after surgery. RESULTS A total of 86 patients with L4-5 spondylolisthesis completed the follow-up of more than 2 years and were included in the analysis (follow-up rate of 94.5%). There were 64 patients in the DDS group and 22 patients in the MI-TLIF group, and the overall mean follow-up was 32.7 months. Between the 2 groups, there were no differences in demographic data (e.g., age, sex, and body mass index) or preoperative clinical evaluations (e.g., visual analog scale back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores). The mean estimated blood loss of the MI-TLIF group was lower, whereas the operation time was longer compared with the DDS group (both p < 0.001). For both groups, clinical outcomes were significantly improved at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery compared with preoperative clinical status. Moreover, there were no differences between the 2

  20. Cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis associated low-back and leg pain over two years.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Adogwa, Owoicho; Bydon, Ali; Cheng, Joseph; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for lumbar spondylolisthesis allows for surgical treatment of back and leg pain while theoretically minimizing tissue injury and accelerating overall recovery. Although the authors of previous studies have demonstrated shorter length of hospital stay and reduced blood loss with MIS versus open-TLIF, short- and long-term outcomes have been similar. No studies to date have evaluated the comprehensive health care costs associated with TLIF procedures or assessed the cost-utility of MIS- versus open-TLIF. As such, we set out to assess previously unstudied end points of health care cost and cost-utility associated with MIS- versus open-TLIF. Thirty patients undergoing MIS-TLIF (n=15) or open-TLIF (n=15) for grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis associated back and leg pain were prospectively studied. Total back-related medical resource use, missed work, and health-state values (quality-adjusted life years [QALYs], calculated from EQ-5D with U.S. valuation) were assessed after two-year follow-up. Two-year resource use was multiplied by unit costs on the basis of Medicare national allowable payment amounts (direct cost) and work-day losses were multiplied by the self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate (indirect cost). Difference in mean total cost per QALY gained for MIS- versus open-TLIF was assessed as incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: COSTmis-COSTopen/QALYmis-QALYopen). MIS versus open-TLIF cohorts were similar at baseline. By two years postoperatively, patients undergoing MIS- versus open-TLIF reported similar mean QALYs gained (0.50 vs. 0.41, P=0.17). Mean total two-year cost of MIS- and open-TLIF was $35,996 and $44,727, respectively. The $8,731 two-year cost savings of MIS- versus open-TLIF did not reach statistical significance (P=0.18) for this sample size. Although our limited sample size prevented statistical significance, MIS- versus open-TLIF was associated with reduced costs over

  1. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing radiographic and clinical outcomes between stand-alone lateral interbody lumbar fusion with either silicate calcium phosphate or rh-BMP2.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Amaral, Rodrigo

    2013-11-01

    Iliac crest autograft has traditionally been considered the gold standard for lumbar spine fusion, though it is not without drawbacks related to harvesting site pain and other complications. Bone graft alternatives, such as recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rh-BMP2), are now widely used but also have unique risk profiles and substantially increase costs. The purpose of the current study was to compare the efficacy of rh-BMP2 and synthetic silicate calcium phosphate (SiCaP) as bone graft substitutes on fusion rates and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing single-level lumbar stand-alone extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF). A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical, and radiographic study was performed at a single institution. Thirty patients with L4-L5 degenerative disc disease (DDD) were enrolled. Patients were randomized into one of two groups, 15 underwent lumbar single-level stand-alone XLIF using SiCaP, and 15 using rh-BMP2. Clinical and radiographic results were compared between the study groups. Pain (visual analogue scale) and disability (Oswestry disability index) were assessed preoperatively and at postoperative weeks 1 and 6 and postoperative months 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36. Radiographic evaluations were performed at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Neurological examinations and adverse events were recorded at each visit. No intraoperative complications were observed in either treatment group, and clinical outcomes were similarly improved between bone graft substitutes from baseline to 36 months postoperative. Complications were transient hip flexion weakness (13%), insufficient indirect decompression (7%), subsidence (17%), excessive bone formation (4%), and adjacent segment disease (14%). Complication rates between the groups were similar, though with slightly more instances of subsidence in the SiCaP group and higher rates of excessive bone formation and adjacent segment disease in the rh-BMP2 group. Rates of fusion at different time

  2. Impaired bone mineral density as a predictor of graft subsidence following minimally invasive transpsoas lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Zachary J; Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    The LLIF procedure is a useful stand-alone and adjunct surgical approach for many spinal conditions. One complication of LLIF is subsidence of the interbody graft into the vertebral bodies, resulting in severe pain, impaired arthrodesis and potentially fracture of the body. Low bone density, as measured by T score on DEXA scanning, has also been postulated to increase the risk of subsidence. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed on all patients who underwent LLIF at this institution consisting of 712 levels in 335 patients. Patients with subsidence following LLIF were recorded. We utilized the T score obtained from the femoral neck DEXA scans, which is used to determine overall fracture risk. The T score of patients with subsidence was compared to those without subsidence. 20 of 57 (35 %) patients without subsidence had a DEXA T score between -1.0 and -2.4 consistent osteopenia, one patient (1.8 %) exhibited a T score less than -2.5, consistent with osteoporosis. 13 patients of 23 (57 %) with subsidence exhibited a T score between -1.0 and -2.4, consistent with osteopenia, five (22 %) exhibited a T score of -2.5 or less, consistent with osteoporosis. The mean DEXA T score in patients with subsidence was -1.65 (SD 1.04) compared to -0.45 (SD 0.97) in patients without subsidence (p < 0.01). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for patients with a T score of -1.0 or less was 80.1 %. Patients with DEXA T scores less than -1.0 who undergo stand-alone LLIF are at a much higher risk of developing graft subsidence. Further, they are at an increased risk of requiring additional surgery. In patients with poor bone quality, consideration could be made to supplement the LLIF cage with posterior instrumentation.

  3. Applying the Mini-Open Anterolateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Self-Anchored Stand-Alone Polyetheretherketone Cage in Lumbar Revision Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lei; Chen, Yuqiao; Li, Lei; Lü, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    The author retrospectively studied twenty-two patients who underwent revision lumbar surgeries using ALLIF with a self-anchored stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. The operation time, blood loss, and perioperative complications were evaluated. Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores and visual analog scale (VAS) scores of leg and back pain were analyzed preoperatively and at each time point of postoperative follow-up. Radiological evaluation including fusion, disc height, foraminal height, and subsidence was assessed. The results showed that the ALLIF with a self-anchored stand-alone PEEK cage is safe and effective in revision lumbar surgery with minor surgical trauma, low access-related complication rates, and satisfactory clinical and radiological results. PMID:27885355

  4. The accuracy of 3D image navigation with a cutaneously fixed dynamic reference frame in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ji Young; Chan, Chee Keong; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Ho-Yeon

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to preoperative image-based 3D navigation systems, which require surgeon-dependent registration, an intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (cb-CT) image-based 3D navigation system allows automatic registration during the acquisition of 3D images intraoperatively. Thus, the need for spinal exposure for point matching is obviated, making a cb-CT image-based navigation system ideal for use in minimally invasive spinal procedures. Conventionally, the dynamic reference frame (DRF) is mounted to an adjacent spinous process or iliac bone through a separate incision. However, the close proximity of the DRF to the surgical area may result in its interfering with the surgical procedure or causing streak artifacts on the navigation images. Cutaneous placement of the DRF overlying the sacral hiatus is one possible solution to these problems, but such a placement does not provide a solid bony fixation point and is distant from the surgical area, both of which factors may hinder the accuracy of the navigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a novel idea for DRF placement in a series of mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedures performed with intraoperative cb-CT image-based 3D navigation. From June 2009 to December 2009, 20 patients underwent mini-open TLIF for a total 82 pedicle screws placed in the lumbar spine with cutaneous placement of the DRF overlying the sacral hiatus. The pedicle screws were inserted under navigational guidance using cb-CT data acquired intraoperatively with a Medtronic O-arm. Screw positions were subsequently checked with a final intraoperative cb-CT scan. Nineteen patients underwent single-level fusion (8 at L4-5, 6 at L5-S1, 4 at L3-4, and 1 at L2-3) and one patient underwent two-level fusion (from L3-5). There were 4 (4.9%) pedicle perforations greater than 2 mm out of the 82 pedicle screw insertions in the 20 patients. Two of these breached screws were repositioned and

  5. Retrograde ejaculation after anterior lumbar interbody fusion with and without bone morphogenetic protein-2 augmentation: a 10-year cohort controlled study.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Smith, Micah W; Hurwitz, Eric L; Mitsunaga, Kyle A; Kessler, Robert; Carragee, Eugene J

    2012-10-01

    Retrograde ejaculation (RE) is a complication of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) techniques. Most commonly, this results from mechanical or inflammatory injury to the superior hypogastric plexus near the aortic bifurcation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) has been used in spinal fusions and has been associated with inflammatory and neuroinflammatory adverse reactions, which may contribute to RE development after anterior lumbar surgery. While controlling for anterior approach technique, we compared the incidence of RE with and without rhBMP-2 exposure, in large, matched cohorts of patients after ALIF. Retrospective analysis of 10 years of prospectively gathered outcomes data on consecutive-patient cohorts having the same anterior exposure technique for ALIF with and without rhBMP-2 use. All male patients without baseline sexual incapacity and having ALIF for lumbar spondylosis or spondylolisthesis of the lowest one or two lumbar levels with and without rhBMP-2, from 2002 through 2011. Diagnosis of RE as a new finding after ALIF compared against BMP-2 exposure, comorbid conditions, and other urological complications after ALIF surgery. From the comprehensive surgical database at a high volume, university practice, male subjects having ALIF at one (L5/S1) or two levels (L4/5, L5/S1) from 2002 to 2011 were identified. Baseline comorbid factors, postoperative urinary catheter/retention events, and RE events were recorded and comparative incidence compared. There were four consecutive-patient cohorts identified: one before rhBMP-2 use was adopted (n=174), two cohorts in which BMP-2 use was routine (n=88 and n=151), and one final cohort after BMP-2 use was discontinued from routine use (n=59). The cohorts with and without BMP-2 exposure were closely comparable for age, approach, levels of surgery, comorbid factors affecting RE. Of 239 patients with ALIF and exposure to BMP-2, RE was diagnosed in 15 subjects (6.3%), compared with an RE diagnosis rate of two

  6. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion With and Without an "Access Surgeon": A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Xu, Joshua; Scherman, Daniel B; Rao, Prashanth J; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2017-05-15

    A systematic review and meta-analysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcomes of anterior lumber interbody fusion (ALIF) with and without an "access surgeon." Anterior approaches for spine operations have become increasingly popular but may often involve unfamiliar anatomy and territory for spine surgeons, potentially placing the patient at risk to a greater proportion of approach-related complications. Thus, many spine surgeons require or prefer the assistance of an "access surgeon" to perform the exposure. However, there has been much debate about the necessity of an "access surgeon." A systematic search of six databases from inception to April 2016 was performed by two independent reviewers. Meta-analysis was used to pool overall rates, and compare the outcomes of ALIF with an access surgeon and without. A total of 58 (8028 patients) studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall intraoperative complications were similar with and without an "access surgeon." The overall pooled rate of arterial injuries [no access 0.44% vs. access 1.16%, odds ratio (OR) 2.67, P < 0.001], retrograde ejaculation (0.41% vs. 0.96%, OR 2.34, P = 0.005), and ileus (1.93% vs. 2.26%, OR 2.45, P < 0.001) was higher with an "access surgeon." However, the overall pooled rates of peritoneal injury (0.44% vs. 0.16%, OR 0.36, P = 0.034) and neurological injury (0.99% vs. 0.11%, OR 0.11, P < 0.001) were lower with an "access surgeon." Total postoperative complications (5.95% vs. 4.08%, OR 0.67, P < 0.001) were lower with an "access surgeon" along with prosthesis complications (1.59% vs. 0.89%, OR 0.56, P < 0.001) and reoperation rates (2.28% vs. 1.31%, OR 0.57, P < 0.001). Compared with no access surgeon, the use of an access surgeon was associated with similar intraoperative complication rates, higher arterial injuries, retrograde ejaculation, ileus, and lower prosthesis complications, reoperation rates, and postoperative complications

  7. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance.

    PubMed

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, Fh; Veldhuizen, Ag

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal's inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra-operative and during the followup. Interbody fusion status was

  8. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, FH; Veldhuizen, AG

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Summary of Background Data: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal’s inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Methods: Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra

  9. The Asfora Bullet Cage System Shows Comparable Fusion Rate Success Versus Control Cage in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jeremy P; Miller, Ashley L; Thompson, Paul A; Asfora, Wilson T

    2016-04-01

    Low back pain and degeneration of the intervertebral disc are an integrated malady that affects millions of Americans. Cage devices used in association with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) have been shown to be an effective approach in the treatment of a number of lower spine disorders attributed to degenerative disc disease (DDD). This study was undertaken as part of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study and compares the effectiveness of the Asfora Bullet Cage System (ABCS) to successfully fuse vertebra at one or two levels between L2 and S1 in patients with DDD to an FDA approved comparison device, the Medtronic-Sofamor Danek Inter Fix Threaded Fusion Device (MSDIFD). A total of 257 randomized participants were implanted with either the ABCS device (n = 132) or the MSDIFD device (n = 125) through an open posterior approach using autogenous local bone graft without the use of pedicle screws. Patients were evaluated prior to surgery and at the 24 month (24-M) visit for fusion status, deep tendon reflex status, sensory function, motor function, straight leg raise status, pain, disability, and device safety. Radiological evaluation and statistical analysis were performed by independent professionals. Evaluation of device success was performed at 24-M visit. From the original group of 257 patients, 59 were lost to follow-up. Primary measures of success at the 24-M visit involved pain and function, fusion, neurological status, and device-related adverse events measures. Pain and function improved in both (MSDIFD: 75.7 percent; ABCS: 82.6 percent). Fusion success with all radiographic points at 24-M visits was 79.4 percent MSDIFD and 88.2 percent ABCS. Neurological improvement was seen in both (MSDIFD: 77.0 percent; ABCS: 87.8 percent). One device-related grade 1 adverse event was reported in the MSDIFD group. Disc height preservation was equivalent for single level fusions (MSDIFD: 16.1 percent; ABCS: 20

  10. Biomechanical advantages of robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation in posterior lumbar interbody fusion compared with freehand technique in a prospective randomized controlled trial-perspective for patient-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Park, Sung-Cheol; Kwon, Oh-Hyo; Son, Juhyun; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    There have been conflicting results on the surgical outcome of lumbar fusion surgery using two different techniques: robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation and conventional freehand technique. In addition, there have been no studies about the biomechanical issues between both techniques. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical properties in terms of stress at adjacent segments using robot-assisted pedicle screw insertion technique (robot-assisted, minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion, Rom-PLIF) and freehand technique (conventional, freehand, open approach, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, Cop-PLIF) for instrumented lumbar fusion surgery. This is an additional post-hoc analysis for patient-specific finite element (FE) model. The sample is composed of patients with degenerative lumbar disease. Intradiscal pressure and facet contact force are the outcome measures. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo an instrumented PLIF procedure using a Rom-PLIF (37 patients) or a Cop-PLIF (41), respectively. Five patients in each group were selected using a simple random sampling method after operation, and 10 preoperative and postoperative lumbar spines were modeled from preoperative high-resolution computed tomography of 10 patients using the same method for a validated lumbar spine model. Under four pure moments of 7.5 Nm, the changes in intradiscal pressure and facet joint contact force at the proximal adjacent segment following fusion surgery were analyzed and compared with preoperative states. The representativeness of random samples was verified. Both groups showed significant increases in postoperative intradiscal pressure at the proximal adjacent segment under four moments, compared with the preoperative state. The Cop-PLIF models demonstrated significantly higher percent increments of intradiscal pressure at proximal adjacent segments under extension, lateral bending, and torsion moments than the Rom-PLIF models (p=.032, p=.008, and p

  11. Comparison of ALIF vs. XLIF for L4/5 interbody fusion: pros, cons, and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, Shanu

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lumbar fusion for the treatment of various degenerative lumbar spine diseases has increased dramatically over the last twenty years. Many lumbar fusion techniques have been developed and popularized, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) initially introduced in the 1930’s, has become a common and widely accepted technique for lumbar fusions over the last decade offering several advantages over standard posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). More recently, the lateral trans-psoas approach termed extreme, direct or lateral lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF, DLIF, LLIF) is gaining widespread popularity. The aim of this paper is to compare the approaches, advantages and disadvantages of ALIF and XLIF for L4/5 interbody fusion based on relevant literature. PMID:27683688

  12. Comparative analysis of perioperative surgical site infection after minimally invasive versus open posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: analysis of hospital billing and discharge data from 5170 patients.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Lerner, Jason; Engelhart, Luella; Knight, Tyler; Wang, Michael Y

    2011-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after lumbar fusion results in significant patient morbidity and associated medical resource utilization. Minimally invasive (MI) techniques for posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P/TLIF) were introduced with the goals of smaller wounds, less tissue trauma, reduced blood loss, and quicker postoperative recovery, while maintaining comparable surgical results. Studies with sufficient power to directly compare the incidence of SSI following MI versus open P/TLIF procedures have been lacking. Furthermore, the direct medical cost associated with the treatment of SSI following the P/TLIF procedure is poorly understood and has not been adequately assessed. Thus, the aim in the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative SSI in patients undergoing MI versus open P/TLIF and the direct hospital cost associated with the diagnosis and management of SSI after P/TLIF as reported in a large administrative database. The authors retrospectively reviewed hospital discharge and billing records from the Premier Perspective Database for 2003 to 2009 to identify patients undergoing 1- or 2-level MI or open P/TLIF for lumbar spondylotic disease, disc degeneration, or spondylolisthesis. The ICD-9-CM procedure codes were used to identify patients undergoing P/TLIF and those experiencing SSI. Infection-related costs were obtained from the total costs incurred by the hospital for SSI-related care provided during inpatient or hospital outpatient encounters. Five thousand one hundred seventy patients undergoing P/TLIF were identified. Demographic profiles, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index, were similar between MI and open cohorts. Overall, 292 patients (5.6%) experienced an SSI with a mean direct cost of $15,817 per SSI. For 1-level MI versus open P/TLIF, the incidence of SSI (38 [4.5%] vs 77 [4.8%], p = 0.77) and the mean SSI-associated cost per P/TLIF ($684 vs $724, p = 0.680) were similar. For 2-level MI versus open P

  13. Associated lumbar scoliosis does not affect outcomes in patients undergoing focal minimally invasive surgery-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) for neurogenic symptoms-a minimum 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kae Sian; Bassi, Anupreet; Yeo, William; Yue, Wai Mun

    2017-01-01

    There is no current literature comparing outcomes of patients with and without lumbar scoliosis having neurologic symptoms undergoing minimally invasive surgery-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MISTLIF) technique. This study aimed to determine whether associated lumbar scoliosis will result in different clinical, radiological, and operative outcomes in patients undergoing focal MISTLIF for neurogenic symptoms, without specific correction of the scoliosis. A retrospective case comparison study from prospectively collected hospital registry data was carried out. Two hundred and thirty eligible patients were evaluated and divided into two groups: Scoliosis Group (SG; n=57) with Cobb angle >10 degrees on anterioposterior (AP) plain lumbar spine radiographs and Non-Scoliosis Group (NSG; n=173) consisting of the remaining patients. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index, the North American Spine Society (NASS) Neurogenic Symptom Score, the NASS Satisfaction with Surgery Rating, the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Numerical Pain Rating Scale for back and leg pain. Radiological findings included Cobb angle, fusion, implant failure or loosening, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Both groups were compared for demographics, perioperative parameters, complications, clinical, and radiological outcomes. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) for measurement of Cobb angle was calculated on all cases of both groups by two authors. Patients were evaluated preoperatively, at 6 months, and 2 years after surgery. The average follow-up was 2.88±1.47 years in the SG and 2.71±1.34 years in the NSG (p=.444). Differences in mean age (SG: 62.9±10.9 years and NSG: 57.6±13.1 years), estimated related risk of death (SG: 3.05±2.13 and NSG: 2.41±1.74), and gender (female=SG: 87.7% and NSG: 64.2%) were statistically significant (p<.05), whereas race distribution, body mass index |(BMI), spinal levels operated, number of levels

  14. Long-Term Outcomes of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Stand-Alone Ray Threaded Cage for Degenerative Disk Disease: A 20-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Belen G.; Noriega, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To analyze outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) stand-alone cages. Overview of Literature PLIF for degenerative disk disease using stand-alone cages has lost its popularity owing to implant-related complications and pseudoarthrosis. Methods We analyzed the records of 45 patients (18 women, 27 men), operated between January 1994 and December 1996, with a mean follow-up of 18 years 3 months (20 years 3 months–22 years 3 months). Clinical outcomes were measured using visual analogue score (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), Odom's criteria, and radiological measurements of fusion rate, Cobb angle, and implant-related complications conducted at the preoperative evaluation, hospital discharge, 12-month follow-up, and final follow-up. Results Preoperative mean VAS (back) was 6.9 and VAS (radicular) was 7.2, with mean improvements (p <0.05) of 2.9 and 3.1, respectively, at the final follow-up. Median preoperative ODI was 64.5, with a mean improvement to 34 and 42 at the 12-month and final follow-ups, respectively (p <0.05). Odom's criteria at the 12-month follow-up were excellent in 11.2% patients, good in 57.7%, fair in 31.1%, and poor in none of the patients; at the final follow-up, no patient was classified as excellent, 71.1% as good, 22.2% as fair, and 6.7% as poor (p <0.05). Pseudoarthrosis was observed in five patients (11.1%), of whom, three (6.6%) required re-operation. Preoperative disk height was 9.23 mm, which increased to 13.33 mm in the immediate postoperative evaluation and was maintained at 10.0 mm at the final follow-up (p <0.05). The preoperative mean L1–S1 Cobb angle was 34.7°, which changed to 44.7° in the immediate postoperative evaluation and dropped to 39.7° at the final follow-up (p <0.005). Conclusions PLIF stand-alone cages were associated with good clinical outcomes. Although the fusion rate was excellent, maintenance of disk heights and a lordotic alignment were not achieved

  15. 2013 Young Investigator Award winner: how safe is lateral lumbar interbody fusion for the surgeon? A prospective in vivo radiation exposure study.

    PubMed

    Taher, Fadi; Hughes, Alexander P; Sama, Andrew A; Zeldin, Roseann; Schneider, Robert; Holodny, Edward I; Lebl, Darren R; Fantini, Gary A; Nguyen, Joseph; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2013-07-15

    Prospective in vivo radiation exposure study. To assess surgeon exposure to ionizing radiation in the setting of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Minimally invasive spine surgery relies heavily on image guidance. Rapid popularization of minimally invasive spine surgery procedures, such as LLIF, is appropriately accompanied by concern regarding occupational radiation exposure related to intraoperative fluoroscopy. Optically stimulated luminescence technology dosimeters were used to record radiation exposure prospectively at 5 anatomic locations during 18 LLIF procedures: (1) eye, (2) thyroid, (3) chest, (4) axilla, and (5) gluteal region. Additionally, a ring dosimeter was worn during 13 of the LLIF cases. Average fluoroscopy time was 88.7 ± 36.8 seconds and skin dose to the patient was 25.2 ± 21.1 mGy. The chest dosimeter protected by lead recorded the lowest readings per procedure (0.44 ± 0.49 mrem). The gluteal dosimeter recorded an average exposure of 2.31 ± 4.50 mrem and the dosimeter at the axilla recorded an average of 4.20 ± 7.76 mrem per procedure. Exposure to the thyroid and eye were 2.19 ± 2.07 mrem and 2.64 ± 2.76 mrem, respectively. With the exception of the gluteal region, dosimeter readings from all unprotected areas were significantly higher than those from the chest dosimeter (P < 0.0125). In the course of 13 procedures, 190 mrem of exposure to the hand was recorded by the ring dosimeters. More than 2700 LLIF procedures may be performed annually before occupational limits are exceeded. Prolonged exposure to "low-level" radiation as an occupational risk remains a concern for medical personnel. Radiation exposures to unprotected, radiosensitive locations, such as the axilla or eye, are worrisome. However, following radiation safety guidelines, 2700 LLIF procedures can be performed per year before exceeding occupational dose limits. Adherence to radiation safety guidelines is necessary to avoid sequelae related to an invisible but

  16. New rod-plate anterior instrumentation for thoracolumbar/lumbar scoliosis: biomechanical evaluation compared with dual-rod and single-rod with structural interbody support.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Johnston, Charles E; Pierce, William A; Ashman, Richard B; Bronson, Dwight G; Haideri, Nessie F

    2006-12-01

    A new rod-plate anterior implant was designed to provide plate fixation at the cephalad and caudal-end segments of a 5-level anterior spine construct. Biomechanical testing was performed on calf spines instrumented with 5-segment anterior scoliosis constructs. OBJECTIVES.: To analyze the initial and post-fatigue biomechanical performance of the new implant, and compare it to an anterior dual-rod construct and a single-rod construct with interbody cages. Using single-rod anterior instrumentation for thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis, an unacceptable incidence of loss of correction, segmental kyphosis, and pseudarthrosis has been reported. Inadequate construct stiffness due to early postoperative bone-screw interface failure, especially at cephalad and caudal-end vertebrae, has been implicated as the cause of these complications. Thirty calf spines were instrumented over 5 segments with: (1) single-rod augmented with rod-plate implants, (2) dual-rod construct, and (3) single-rod with titanium mesh cages. Stiffness in flexion-extension and lateral bending modes was determined initially and post-cyclical loading by measuring segmental range of motion (ROM). Post-fatigue screw pullout tests were also performed. In lateral bending, the caudal-end segmental ROM for rod-plate construct was 54% less than single-rod with cages construct (P < 0.05), with no difference between rod-plate and dual-rod constructs. In flexion-extension, the rod-plate construct showed 45% to 91% (initial test) and 84% to 90% (post-fatigue) less ROM than the single-rod with cages construct (P < 0.001). Again, there was no difference between rod-plate and dual-rod constructs at the cephalad and caudal-end segments. Post-fatigue screw pullout strengths of the rod-plate construct were significantly greater than those of the dual-rod and single-rod with cages constructs (P < 0.05). The rod-plate construct was significantly stiffer and provided greater stability of bone-screw interface than the single

  17. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumented posterolateral fusion in adult spondylolisthesis: description and association of clinico-surgical variables with prognosis in a series of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Moreta, Juan A.; Hernandez-Vicente, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background We present our experience in the treatment of patients with isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis, by means of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF), and we compare them with those published in the literature. We analyse whether there exists any statistical association between the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the disease and our surgical technique, with the complications and the clinical-radiological prognosis of the cases. Method We designed a prospective study. A total of 36 cases were operated. The patients included were 14 men and 22 women, with an average age of 57.17±27.32 years. Our technique consists of PLIF+IPLF, using local bone for the fusion. The clinical results were evaluated with the Visual Analogical Scale (VAS) and the Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. The radiological evaluation followed the Bratingan (PLIF) and Lenke (IPLF) methodology. A total of 42 variables were statistically analysed by means of SPSS18. We used the Paired Student's T-test, logistic regression and Pearson's Chi-square-test. Results The spondylolisthesis was isthmic in 15 cases and degenerative in 21 cases. The postoperative evaluations had excellent or good results in 94.5% (n = 34), with a statistically significant improvement in the back pain and sciatica (p < 0.01). The rate of circumferential fusion reached was approximately 92%. We had 13.88% of transitory morbility and 0% of mortality associated with our technique. A greater age, degree of listhesis or length of illness before the intervention, weakly correlated with worse clinical results (p< -0.2). In our series, the logistical regression showed that the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the lesion and our surgical technique were not associated with greater postoperative complications. Conclusion Although a higher level of training is necessary, we believe that the described

  18. A novel indication for a method in the treatment of lumbar tuberculosis through minimally invasive extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) in combination with percutaneous pedicle screws fixation in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiyou; Xu, Yichun; Chen, Ruiqiang; Dong, Jianwen; Liu, Bin; Rong, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To describe a novel indication for a method through minimally invasive extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) in combination with percutaneous pedicle screwsfixation in the treatment of lumbar tuberculosis (TB) in an elderly patient, and its clinical efficacy and feasibility. Lumbar TB is a destructive form of TB. Antituberculous treatment should be started as early as possible. In some circumstances, however, surgical debridement with or without stabilization of the spine appears to be beneficial and may be recommended. Surgeries through the approach of anterior or posterior are still challenging and often involve some complications. Patient concerns: The case is a 68-year-old female who was misdiagnosed as simple vertebral compression fracture and underwent L1 and L2 percutaneous vertebroplasty in another hospital 7 years ago. He complained of lumbosacral pain for 1 month this time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) showed intervertebral space in L1/2 was seriously damaged like TB. Diagnoses: Lumbar tuberculosis Interventions: Antitubercular drugs, mini-invasive debridement with XLIF in combination with percutaneous pedicle screwsfixation was performed. This patient was followed up for 12 months. Outcomes: No obvious complication occurred during the operation and the wound healed well. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI: 56 vs 22) and visual analog scale (VAS: 4 vs 0) score significantly decreased atfinal follow-up of 12 months. Obvious recovery of kyphosis angle was found postoperatively (post: 14.8° vs pre: 33.5°). No recurrent infection occurred at the last follow-up. Lessons: Mini-invasive surgery by debridement through XLIF and percutaneous pedicle screwsfixation may be an effective and innovative treatment method for lumbar TB in the elderly. PMID:27902591

  19. Percutaneous Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (pTLIF) with a Posterolateral Approach for the Treatment of Degenerative Disk Disease: Feasibility and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interbody fusion by open discectomy is the usual treatment for degenerative disk disease but requires a relatively long recovery period. The transforaminal posterolateral approach is a well-known standard in endoscopic spine surgery that allows direct access to the disk with progressive tissue dilation. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of percutaneous transforaminal interbody fusion (pTLIF) with percutaneous insertion of an expandable or a standard rigid interbody implant for patients with degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis and for revision surgery with the endoscopic posterolateral approach. Methods Between 2009 and 2014, the pTLIF procedure was performed in 30 patients. Ten patients underwent insertion of a rigid implant (group A) and the remaining 20 underwent insertion of an expandable titanium interbody implant as the initial procedure (n = 10) (group B) or after failed back surgery (n = 10) (group C). Patient outcomes were scored with visual analogic scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Macnab criteria. Results The mean follow-up period was 38 (17) (range 11 to 67) months. The outcome was excellent in 18, good in 10 and fair in 2. No poor results and no major complications were reported. No significant (p<0.05) differences in VAS and ODI scores according to the study group were found. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was 26 hours (20 to 68 hours). Postoperative values for VAS and ODI scores improved significantly (p<0.05) compared to preoperative data in all study groups. Conclusions These preliminary results have shown the feasibility and efficacy of the pTLIF procedure using a percutaneous posterolateral approach for the treatment of degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis up to grade 2 and in revision surgery. No significant differences in outcome were observed between an expandable and a rigid cage. Median postoperative time until hospital

  20. Fusion rate and clinical outcome in anterior lumbar interbody fusion with beta-tricalcium phosphate and bone marrow aspirate as a bone graft substitute. A prospective clinical study in fifty patients.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Ricarda; Putzer, David; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian; Thaler, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Bone graft substitutes have been successfully used in posterolateral lumbar fusion, anterior cervical fusion and animal studies. This study has been conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) procedure. In a prospective clinical study, ALIF cages were prefilled with β-TCP and additionally fixated with posterior pedicle screw. Computed tomography (CT) and X-rays were performed one year after surgery. Fusion was assessed and functional status was evaluated before and one year after surgery. X-ray evaluation showed a definite fusion in 85.48 % of treated levels. CT assessment showed anterior and posterior intersegemental bone bridging in 77.78 % of treated levels. The X-ray fusion rate presented is comparable with those published for ALIF procedures with bone graft. Fusion rates β-TCP are similar to autologous bone. ALIF with β-TCP and additional posterior fixation is a safe and effective procedure.

  1. Less invasive corrective surgery using oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) including L5-S1 fusion for severe lumbar kyphoscoliosis due to L4 compression fracture in a patient with Parkinson's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Hiromasa; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Ohtori, Seiji; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Toyone, Tomoaki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Inoue, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Orita, Sumihisa

    2015-04-07

    Corrective surgery for kyphoscoliosis patients tend to be highly invasive due to osteotomy. The present case introduce less invasive corrective surgery using anterior oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) technique. An 80-year-old Japanese man with a history of Parkinson's disease presented to our hospital because of severe kyphoscoliosis and gait disturbance. Considering the postsurgical complications due to osteotomy, we performed an anterior-posterior combined corrective fusion surgery: OLIF of Lumbar (L) 2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) followed by L5-Sacral (S) 1 anterior lumbar fusion via the OLIF approach using an anterior intervertebral cage, and posterior L3-4 and L4-5 facetectomy and posterior fusion using percutaneous pedicle screws from Thoracic (T) 10 to S1 with a T-9 hook system. The surgery was performed in a less invasive manner with no osteotomy, and it improved the sagittal alignments with moderate restoration, which improved the patient's posture and gait disturbance. The patient showed transient muscle weakness of proximal lower extremity contralateral side to the surgical site, which fully recovered by physical rehabilitation 3 months after the surgery. The surgical corrective procedure using the minimally invasive OLIF method including L5-S1 fusion showed a great advantage in treating degenerative kyphoscoliosis in a Parkinson's disease patient in its less-invasive approac.

  2. Fusion performance of low-dose recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 and bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells in biodegradable scaffolds: a comparative study in a large animal model of anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Abbah, Sunny A; Lam, Christopher X F; Ramruttun, Amit K; Goh, James C H; Wong, Hee-Kit

    2011-10-01

    A large animal study comparing interbody fusion of a bioresorbable scaffold loaded with either low-dose recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) or bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (BMSCs). To compare the quality of fusion resulting from implantation of medical grade poly (ε-caprolactone)-20% tricalcium phosphate (mPCL/TCP) scaffolds and two different bone growth stimulating agents. Nondegradable cages have been used for interbody fusion with good results. However, the overall advantage of lifelong implantation of a nondegradable device remains a subject of ongoing debate. The use of bioresorbable scaffolds might offer superior alternatives. In this study, we evaluated the quality of fusion obtained with two potential bone graft substitutes. Eleven Yorkshire pigs underwent a bisegmental (L2/L3; L4/L5) anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) in four groups, namely: (1) mPCL/TCP + 0.6 mg rhBMP-2; (2) mPCL/TCP + BMSCs; (3) mPCL/TCP (negative control); and (4) autologous bone grafts (positive control). RESULTS. The mean radiographic scores at 9 months were 3.0, 1.7, 1.0, and 1.8 for groups 1 to 4, respectively. The bone volume fraction of group 1 was two-folds higher than group 2. Histology, micro-computed tomographic scanning and biomechanical evaluation demonstrated solid and comparable fusion between groups 1 and 4. However, group 2 showed inferior quality of fusion when compared with groups 1 and 4 while group 3 showed no fusion even at 9 months. In addition, there was no evidence of implant rejection, chronic inflammation or any other complications. mPCL/TCP scaffolds loaded with low-dose rhBMP-2 is comparable to autograft bone as a bone graft substitute in this large animal ALIF model. Although BMSCs lagged behind autograft bone and rhBMP-2, evidence of bone ingrowth in this group warrants further investigation. Our results suggest that mPCL/TCP scaffolds loaded with rhBMP-2 or BMSCs may be a viable alternative to conventional cages

  3. Comparison of fusion rate and clinical results between CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 bioactive glass ceramics spacer with titanium cages in posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Kong, Chang-Bae; Yang, Jae Jun; Shim, Hee-Jong; Koo, Ki-Hyoung; Kim, Jeehyoung; Lee, Choon-Ki; Chang, Bong-Soon

    2016-11-01

    The CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics spacer generates chemical bonding to adjacent bones with high mechanical stability to produce a union with the end plate, and ultimately stability. The authors aimed to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics with a titanium cage that is widely used for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery in the clinical field. This is a prospective, stratified randomized, multicenter, single-blinded, comparator-controlled non-inferiority trial. The present study was conducted in four hospitals and enrolled a total of 86 patients between 30 and 80 years of age who required one-level PLIF due to severe spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or huge disc herniation. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), and pain visual analog scale (VAS) were assessed before surgery and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The spinal fusion rate was assessed at 6 and 12 months after surgery. The spinal fusion rate and the area of fusion, subsidence of each CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics and titanium cage, and the extent of osteolysis were evaluated using a dynamic plain radiography and a three-dimensional computed tomography at 12 months after surgery. The present study was supported by BioAlpha, and some authors (JHL, C-KL, and B-SC) have stock ownership (<10,000 US dollars). From the plain radiography results, the 6-month fusion rates for the bioactive glass ceramics group and the titanium group were 89.7% and 91.4%, respectively. In addition, the 12-month fusion rates based on CT scan were 89.7% and 91.2%, respectively, showing no significant difference. However, the bone fusion area directly attached to the end plate of either bioactive glass ceramics or the titanium cage was significantly higher in the bioactive glass ceramics group than in the titanium group. The ODI, SF-36, back pain, and lower limb pain in both groups significantly improved after surgery, with no

  4. Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

    2014-03-01

    The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

  5. First clinical results of minimally invasive vector lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-VLIF) in spondylodiscitis and concomitant osteoporosis: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Bernhard; Jiang, Hongzhen; Ruess, Daniel; Reinshagen, Clemens; Molcanyi, Marek; Zivcak, Jozef; Tong, Huaiyu; Schackert, Gabriele

    2016-12-27

    First description of MIS-VLIF, a minimally invasive lumbar stabilization, to evaluate its safety and feasibility in patients suffering from weak bony conditions (lumbar spondylodiscitis and/or osteoporosis). After informed consent, 12 patients suffering from lumbar spondylodiscitis underwent single level MIS-VLIF. Eight of them had a manifest osteoporosis, either. Pre- and postoperative clinical status was documented using numeric rating scale (NRS) for leg and back pain. In all cases, the optimal height for the cage was preoperatively determined using software-based range of motion and sagittal balance analysis. CT scans were obtained to evaluate correct placement of the construct and to verify fusion after 6 months. Since 2013, 12 patients with lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent MIS-VLIF. Mean surgery time was 169 ± 28 min and average blood loss was less than 400 ml. Postoperative CT scans showed correct placement of the implants. Eleven patients showed considerable postoperative improvement in clinical scores. In one patient, we observed screw loosening. After documented bony fusion in the CT scan, the fixation system was removed in two cases to achieve lower material load. The load-bearing trajectories (vectors) of MIS-VLIF are different from those of conventional coaxial pedicle screw implantation. The dorsally converging construct combines the heads of the dorsoventral pedicle screws with laminar pedicle screws following cortical bone structures within a small approach. In case of lumbar spondylodiscitis and/or osteoporosis, MIS-VLIF relies on cortical bony structures for all screw vectors and the construct does not depend on conventional coaxial pedicle screws in the presence of inflamed, weak, cancellous or osteoporotic bone. MIS-VLIF allows full 360° lumbar fusion including cage implantation via a small, unilateral dorsal midline approach.

  6. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Comparison Study Based on Endplate Subsidence and Cystic Change in Individuals Above and Below the Age of 65.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guang-Xun; Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Jo, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Hyeong-Jin; Covarrubias-Rosas, Claudia Angelica; Jin, Chengzhen; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2017-06-29

    To compare the outcomes between patients older and younger than 65 who underwent single-level minimally invasive transforaminal interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) surgery. This study is a retrospective analysis of 76 patients who underwent MI-TLIF between April 2012 and June 2016. Group A consisted of 35 patients (< 65 years) while Group B consisted of 41 patients (≥ 65 years). Intraoperative data were recorded. The evaluation of clinical outcomes was based on the Visual Analog Scale for back and leg pain and the Oswestry Disability Index. Radiological outcomes including cage subsidence, endplate cyst formation, and fusion rate were assessed. The mean age of the study subjects was 65.3 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 18.98 months. Group B had a higher rate of comorbidities when compared to Group A 90.24% vs. 57.14%, respectively (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications between the groups: Group A with 14.29% and Group B with 17.07%. Clinical outcomes significantly improved in both groups postoperatively (P < 0.05). Although bony fusion in Group A was slightly higher than that in Group B, the fusion rate was not statistically different according to age. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of cage subsidence or positive cyst sign between the groups. MI-TLIF presented similar safeness and acceptable outcomes and complication rate in both groups. Cyst formation may be aggravated by cage subsidence, as cage subsidence was a useful potential predictor of cyst formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Single-Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Provides Sustained Improvements in Clinical and Radiological Outcomes up to 5 Years Postoperatively in Patients with Neurogenic Symptoms Secondary to Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Dhoke, Priyesh; Tay, Kae-Sian; Yeo, William; Yue, Wai-Mun

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective review of prospective registry data. To determine 5-year clinical and radiological outcomes of single-level instrumented minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in patients with neurogenic symptoms secondary to spondylolisthesis. MIS-TLIF and open approaches have been shown to yield comparable outcomes. This is the first study to assess MIS-TLIF outcomes using the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) criterion. The outcomes of 56 patients treated by a single surgeon, including the Oswestry disability index (ODI), neurogenic symptom score, short-form 36 questionnaire (SF-36), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for back pain (BP), and leg pain (LP), were collected prospectively for up to 5 years postoperatively. Radiological outcomes included adjacent segment degeneration, fusion, cage subsidence, and screw loosening rates. Our patients were predominantly female (71.4%) and had a mean age of 53.7±11.3 years and mean body mass index of 25.7±3.7 kg/m(2). The mean operative time, blood loss, time to ambulation, and hospitalization were 167±49 minutes, 126±107 mL, 1.2±0.4 days, and 2.8±1.1 days, respectively. The mean fluoroscopic time was 58.4±33 seconds, and the mean postoperative intravenous morphine dose was 8±2 mg. Regarding outcomes, postoperative scores improved relative to preoperative scores, and this was sustained across various time points for up to 5 years (p<0.001). Improvements in ODI, SF-36, VAS-BP, and VAS-LP all met the MCID criterion. Notably, 5.4% of our patients developed clinically significant adjacent segment disease during follow-up, and 7 minor complications were reported. Single-level instrumented MIS-TLIF is suitable for patients with neurogenic symptoms secondary to lumbar spondylolisthesis and is associated with an acceptable complication rate. Both clinical and radiological outcomes were sustained up to 5 years postoperatively, with many patients achieving an MCID.

  8. Single-Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Provides Sustained Improvements in Clinical and Radiological Outcomes up to 5 Years Postoperatively in Patients with Neurogenic Symptoms Secondary to Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Dhoke, Priyesh; Tay, Kae-Sian; Yeo, William

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of prospective registry data. Purpose To determine 5-year clinical and radiological outcomes of single-level instrumented minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in patients with neurogenic symptoms secondary to spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature MIS-TLIF and open approaches have been shown to yield comparable outcomes. This is the first study to assess MIS-TLIF outcomes using the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) criterion. Methods The outcomes of 56 patients treated by a single surgeon, including the Oswestry disability index (ODI), neurogenic symptom score, short-form 36 questionnaire (SF-36), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for back pain (BP), and leg pain (LP), were collected prospectively for up to 5 years postoperatively. Radiological outcomes included adjacent segment degeneration, fusion, cage subsidence, and screw loosening rates. Results Our patients were predominantly female (71.4%) and had a mean age of 53.7±11.3 years and mean body mass index of 25.7±3.7 kg/m2. The mean operative time, blood loss, time to ambulation, and hospitalization were 167±49 minutes, 126±107 mL, 1.2±0.4 days, and 2.8±1.1 days, respectively. The mean fluoroscopic time was 58.4±33 seconds, and the mean postoperative intravenous morphine dose was 8±2 mg. Regarding outcomes, postoperative scores improved relative to preoperative scores, and this was sustained across various time points for up to 5 years (p<0.001). Improvements in ODI, SF-36, VAS-BP, and VAS-LP all met the MCID criterion. Notably, 5.4% of our patients developed clinically significant adjacent segment disease during follow-up, and 7 minor complications were reported. Conclusions Single-level instrumented MIS-TLIF is suitable for patients with neurogenic symptoms secondary to lumbar spondylolisthesis and is associated with an acceptable complication rate. Both clinical and radiological outcomes were sustained up to 5 years

  9. Effects of Lumbar Spine Assemblies and Body-Borne Equipment Mass on Anthropomorphic Test Device Responses During Drop Tests.

    PubMed

    Aggromito, Daniel; Jaffrey, Mark; Chhor, Allen; Chen, Bernard; Yan, Wenyi

    2017-10-01

    When simulating or conducting land mine blast tests on armored vehicles to assess potential occupant injury, the preference is to use the Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD). In land blast events, neither the effect of body-borne equipment (BBE) on the ATD response nor the dynamic response index (DRI) is well understood. An experimental study was carried out using a drop tower test rig, with a rigid seat mounted on a carriage table undergoing average accelerations of 161 g and 232 g over 3 ms. A key aspect of the work looked at the various lumbar spine assemblies available for a Hybrid III ATD. These can result in different load cell orientations for the ATD which in turn can affect the load measurement in the vertical and horizontal planes. Thirty-two tests were carried out using two BBE mass conditions and three variations of ATDs. The latter were the Hybrid III with the curved (conventional) spine, the Hybrid III with the pedestrian (straight) spine, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Hybrid III which also has a straight spine. The results showed that the straight lumbar spine assemblies produced similar ATD responses in drop tower tests using a rigid seat. In contrast, the curved lumbar spine assembly generated a lower pelvis acceleration and a higher lumbar load than the straight lumbar spine assemblies. The maximum relative displacement of the lumbar spine occurred after the peak loading event, suggesting that the DRI is not suitable for assessing injury when the impact duration is short and an ATD is seated on a rigid seat on a drop tower. The peak vertical lumbar loads did not change with increasing BBE mass because the equipment mass effects did not become a factor during the peak loading event.

  10. Lordosis restoration after Smith-Petersen osteotomies and interbody strut placement: a radiographic study in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Wiater, Brett; Bransford, Richard J; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens R

    2010-12-01

    Six human lumbar cadaveric specimens evaluated after sequential steps in restoration of lumbar lordosis. To determine the effect of Smith-Petersen osteotomies (SPO) with concurrent interbody strut placement on lordosis in the lumbar spine. The importance of restoration of lumbar lordosis is well recognized. SPO have been suggested to yield roughly 10° of lordosis per level, whereas pedicle subtraction osteotomies have been shown to result in over 30° of lordosis restoration. Though the pedicle subtraction osteotomy can achieve greater degrees of lordosis, there is considerable surgical morbidity associated. We hypothesize that SPO with an interbody strut placed within the disc space will result significantly greater lordosis than SPO alone. Lateral radiographs of 6 human lumbar specimens were obtained after 3 interventions as follows: (1) lumbar spine without osteotomy in maximal extension, (2) after SPO at L2, L3, and L4 and held in maximal extension with pedicle screw fixation, and (3) after SPO at L2, L3, and L4 with interbody cage placement in L2-L3, L3-L4, and L4-L5 held in maximal extension with pedicle screw fixation. The mean lordosis in the intact specimens was 7.03° (standard deviation [SD], 2.21°). The mean lordosis after SPO was 11.05° (SD, 1.05°). The mean lordosis after SPO and interbody strut placement was 15.72° (SD, 3.19°). The difference in lordosis in the osteotomized specimens with and without interbody strut was significantly (P < 0.01). The addition of an interbody strut to a lumbar level after SPO may result in as much as 15° of lumbar lordosis, significantly greater than that of SPO alone.

  11. A comparison of radiographic and clinical outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion performed with either a cellular bone allograft containing multipotent adult progenitor cells or recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel Dongwhan; Kim, John Yongmin

    2017-08-25

    Both the map3 Cellular Allogeneic Bone Graft® and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2, Infuse®) were developed to provide an alternative to iliac crest autograft, thus eliminating the morbidity associated with its harvest. The recent literature concerning adverse events associated with the use of rhBMP-2, however, highlights the need for a safe and effective alternative. The multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) found in map3 allograft may provide this alternative. The purpose of this study is to report 1-year outcomes of patients treated via anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using either map3 Cellular Allogeneic Bone Graft or rhBMP-2 for bony fusion. This was a retrospective evaluation of 41 patients treated via ALIF with either map3 or rhBMP-2 in a polyetheretherketone cage with posterior stabilization at 1, 2, or 3 consecutive levels (L3-S1). Patients were equally divided between treatment groups. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scores (VAS) for pain were documented as part of the standard of care. An independent radiologist assessed bridging of bone, disc height, and lordosis. Primary outcome measures included radiographic analysis of fusion by plain film and CTs. Secondary clinical outcomes included visual analogue scale for neck and arm pain and low back disability index scores. The overall fusion rate was 91%, with no significant difference between groups. Improvements in ODI and VAS were observed among all patients (p < 0.001), with no significant difference between groups for ODI (p = 0.966) or VAS (p = 0.251). There was no significant difference in terms of changes to disc height and lordosis between groups (p < 0.05). The rhBMP-2 group had increased post-operative complications when compared to the map3 group, but the low numbers precluded statistical analysis. Improvements in radiographic and clinical findings were observed in both treatment groups one-year postoperatively. Map3 allograft

  12. Instrumented Minimally Invasive spinal-Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (MIS-TLIF); Minimum 5-years Follow-up With Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Sung; Jung, Byungjoo; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-09-28

    STUDY DESIGN:: A retrospective study. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of the long-term results of instrumented MIS-TLIF in unstable, single level, low-grade, isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) or degenerative spondylosis (DS) including degenerative spondylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis with central stenosis, degenerative disc disease, and recurrent disc herniation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: MIS-TLIF is a common surgical procedure to treat lumbar spondylolisthesis. However, there are no studies that have documented the long-term results of MIS-TLIF. METHODS:: Forty-four patients who had undergone instrumented MIS-TLIF between July 2003 and January 2005, were retrospectively reviewed. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), patient satisfaction rate (PSR), and the patient's return-to-work status were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Radiological follow-up were carried out in patients to check for adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The plain radiographs, CT and MRI were used in all patients in last follow-up period. RESULTS:: The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain decreased from 5.8 and 7 to 3.5 and 3.7 respectively in the DS group (n=19) and from 6.8 and 6.9 to 1.8 and 2.0 respectively in the IS group (n=25) (P<0.001). The mean ODI scores improved from 61.7% to 21.5% in the DS group and from 53.9% to 16% in the IS group (P<0.001). PSR was 80% and 81% in the DS and IS groups, respectively. Evidence of fusion was observed radiologically in 24 (96%) and 19 (100%) of the patients in the IS and the DS group respectively, giving an overall fusion rate of 97.7% (43/44). The final ASD rate, observed using radiography, was 68.4% (13/19) in the DS, and 40% (10/25) in the IS group. However, 15.8% (3/19) in the DS and 4% (1/25) in the IS group had symptoms associated with ASD. CONCLUSIONS:: The long-term clinical and radiologic outcomes after instrumented MIS-TLIF in patients with unstable single

  13. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System: expandable, standalone interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Emstad, Erik; del Monaco, Diana Cardenas; Fielding, Louis C; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral fusion cages have been in clinical use since the 1990s. Cages offer the benefits of bone graft containment, restored intervertebral and foraminal height, and a more repeatable, stable procedure compared to interbody fusion with graft material alone. Due to concerns regarding postoperative stability, loss of lordosis, and subsidence or migration of the implant, interbody cages are commonly used with supplemental fixation such as pedicle screw systems or anterior plates. While providing additional stability, supplemental fixation techniques increase operative time, exposure, cost, and morbidity. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System (VariLift® system) has been developed as a standalone solution to provide the benefits of intervertebral fusion cages without the requirement of supplemental fixation. The VariLift® system, FDA-cleared for standalone use in both the cervical and lumbar spine, is implanted in a minimal profile and then expanded in situ to provide segmental stability, restored lordosis, and a large graft chamber. Preclinical testing and analyses have found that the VariLift® System is durable, and reduces stresses that may contribute to subsidence and migration of other standalone interbody cages. Fifteen years of clinical development with the VariLift® system have demonstrated positive clinical outcomes, continued patient maintenance of segmental stability and lordosis, and no evidence of implant migration. The purpose of this report is to describe the VariLift® system, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The VariLift® System represents an improved surgical option for a stable interbody fusion without requiring supplemental fixation. PMID:26060414

  14. Interbody device endplate engagement effects on motion segment biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Buttermann, Glenn R; Beaubien, Brian P; Freeman, Andrew L; Stoll, James E; Chappuis, James L

    2009-07-01

    Stand-alone nonbiologic interbody fusion devices for the lumbar spine have been used for interbody fusion since the early 1990s. However, most devices lack the stability found in clinically successful circumferential fusion constructs. Stability results from cage geometry and device/vertebral endplate interface integrity. To date, there has not been a published comparative biomechanical study specifically evaluating the effects of endplate engagement of interbody devices. Lumbar motion segments implanted with three different interbody devices were tested biomechanically to compare the effects of endplate engagement on motion segment rigidity. The degree of additional effect of supplemental posterior and anterior fixation was also investigated. A cadaveric study of interbody fusion devices with varying degrees of endplate interdigitation. Implanted motion segment range of motion (ROM), neutral zone (NZ), stiffness, and disc height. Eighteen human L23 and L45 motion segments were distributed into three interbody groups (n=6 each) receiving a polymeric (polyetheretherketone) interbody spacer with small ridges; a modular interbody device with endplate spikes (InFix, Abbott Spine, Austin, TX, USA); or dual tapered threaded interbody cages (LT [Lordotic tapered] cage; Medtronic, Memphis, TN, USA). Specimens were tested intact using a 7.5-Nm flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion flexibility protocol. Testing was repeated after implantation of the interbody device, anterior plate fixation, and posterior interpedicular fixation. Radiographic measurements determined changes in disc height and intervertebral lordosis. ROM and NZ were calculated and compared using analysis of variance. The interbody cages with endplate spikes or threads provided a statistically greater increase in disc height versus the polymer spacer (p=.01). Relative to intact, all stand-alone devices significantly reduced ROM in lateral bending by a mean 37% to 61% (p< or =.001). The cages

  15. Surgical anatomy of the minimally invasive lateral lumbar approach.

    PubMed

    Bina, Robert W; Zoccali, Carmine; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-03-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion approach (LLIF), which encompasses the extreme lateral interbody fusion or direct lateral interbody fusion techniques, has gained popularity as an alternative to traditional posterior approaches. With rapidly expanding applications, this minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach is now utilized in basic degenerative pathologies as well as complex lumbar degenerative deformities and tumors. Given the intimate relationship of the psoas muscle, and hence the lumbar plexus, to this MIS approach, several authors have examined the surgical anatomy of this approach. Understanding this regional neural anatomy is imperative given the potential for serious injuries to both the motor and sensory nerves of the lumbar plexus. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss all published studies detailing the surgical anatomy of the lateral lumbar approach with respect to the MIS LLIF techniques. This is a timely review given the rapidly growing number of surgeons utilizing this technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dissection of left iliac artery during anterior lumbar interspace fusion: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Uwe M; Davies, Mark G; El Sayed, Hosam

    2015-04-01

    Vascular injury is an uncommon complication of spine surgery. Among the different approaches, anterior lumbar interbody fusion has increased potential for vascular injuries, since the great vessels and their branches overly the disc spaces to be operated on, and retraction of these vessels is necessary to gain adequate surgical exposure. The reported incidence for anterior lumbar interbody fusion-associated vascular injuries ranges from 0% to 18.1%, with venous laceration as the most common type. We report a case of anterior lumbar interbody fusion-associated left common iliac artery dissection leading to delayed acute limb ischemia developing in early post-operative period.

  17. Radiographic and clinical evaluation of cage subsidence after stand-alone lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2013-07-01

    Indirect decompression of the neural structures through interbody distraction and fusion in the lumbar spine is feasible, but cage subsidence may limit maintenance of the initial decompression. The influence of interbody cage size on subsidence and symptoms in minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion is heretofore unreported. The authors report the rate of cage subsidence after lateral interbody fusion, examine the clinical effects, and present a subsidence classification scale. The study was performed as an institutional review board-approved prospective, nonrandomized, comparative, single-center radiographic and clinical evaluation. Stand-alone short-segment (1- or 2-level) lateral lumbar interbody fusion was investigated with 12 months of postoperative follow-up. Two groups were compared. Forty-six patients underwent treatment at 61 lumbar levels with standard interbody cages (18 mm anterior/posterior dimension), and 28 patients underwent treatment at 37 lumbar levels with wide cages (22 mm). Standing lateral radiographs were used to measure segmental lumbar lordosis, disc height, and rate of subsidence. Subsidence was classified using the following scale: Grade 0, 0%-24% loss of postoperative disc height; Grade I, 25%-49%; Grade II, 50%-74%; and Grade III, 75%-100%. Fusion status was assessed on CT scanning, and pain and disability were assessed using the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Complications and reoperations were recorded. Pain and disability improved similarly in both groups. While significant gains in segmental lumbar lordosis and disc height were observed overall, the standard group experienced less improvement due to the higher rate of interbody graft subsidence. A difference in the rate of subsidence between the groups was evident at 6 weeks (p = 0.027), 3 months (p = 0.042), and 12 months (p = 0.047). At 12 months, 70% in the standard group and 89% in the wide group had Grade 0 or I subsidence, and 30% in the standard group

  18. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Gallizzi, Michael A; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T; Isaacs, Robert E; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this study meets criteria for an IRB waiver.

  19. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. Results The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. Clinical Relevance LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this

  20. Interobserver agreement using computed tomography to assess radiographic fusion criteria with a unique titanium interbody device.

    PubMed

    Slosar, Paul J; Kaiser, Jay; Marrero, Luis; Sacco, Damon

    2015-02-01

    The accuracy of using computed tomography (CT) to assess interbody fusion in patients with titanium implants has been questioned in the past. Radiologists have reported difficulty assessing fusion bone quality because of metal artifact and small graft windows. A new titanium interbody implant with a large footprint and a wide graft aperture has been developed. We conducted a study to determine the interobserver reliability of using CT to assess radiographic fusion variables with the new titanium interbody device. Patients underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the same titanium interbody implant. Reconstructed CT images were obtained randomly at 6, 9, or 12 months. Two independent radiologists reviewed the scans. Interobserver reliability was calculated using the κ statistic. Fifty-six spinal fusion levels (33 patients) were analyzed. The radiologists agreed on 345 of the 392 fusion data points reviewed (κ = .88). Agreement for solid fusion formation was 0.77. This interbody device demonstrated minimal artifact and minimal subsidence, and trabecular bone was easily identified throughout the implant in the vast majority of cases reviewed. High interobserver agreement was noted across all radiographic variables assessed.

  1. Biomechanical evaluation of CIBOR spine interbody fusion device.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alexander C M; Harrer, Seth W; Heggeness, Michael H; Wooley, Paul H

    2017-07-01

    The CIBOR PEEK spinal interbody fusion device is an anterior lumbar interbody fusion construct with a hollow center designed to accommodate an osteoinductive carbon foam insert to promote bony ingrowth to induce fusion where rigid stabilization is needed. Three different sizes of the device were investigated. Part-I: implants were tested under axial compression and rotation using polyurethane foam blocks. Part-II: simulated 2-legged stance using cadaveric specimen using the L5-S1 lumbar spine segment. Part-III: a survey feedback form was used to investigate two orthopedic surgeons concern regarding the implant. In Part-I, the subsidence hysteresis under axial compression loading was found to be statistical significant difference between these three implant sizes. It was noted that the implants had migration as rotation applied, and the amount of subsidence was a factor of the axial compression loads applied. In Part-II, a minor subsidence and carbon foam debris were observed when compared to each implant size. Poor contact surface of the implant with the end plates of the L5 or S1 vertebrae from the anterior view under maximum loads was observed; however, the implant seemed to be stable. Each surgeon has their own subjective opinion about the CIBOR implant. Two out of the three different sizes of the device (medium and large sizes) provided appropriate rigid stabilization at the physiological loads. Neither orthopedic surgeon was 100% satisfied with overall performance of the implant, but felt potential improvement could be made. This study indicates an option for operative treatment of spine interbody fusion, as the CIBOR spine interbody fusion device has a hollow center. This hollow center is designed to accommodate a carbon foam insert to promote bony ingrowth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1157-1168, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Posterolateral Fusion Versus Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ryan C; Mobbs, Ralph J; Lu, Victor M; Xu, Joshua; Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Current surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) involves decompression of the spinal canal followed by fusion with or without interbody. The additional functional and operative benefits derived from interbody inclusion has yet to be thoroughly established with a number of recent studies producing conflicting results. Thus, we aim to compare the functional and operative outcomes after fusion against interbody fusion in the treatment of DS. This systematic review of the literature comparing posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) outcomes in the treatment of DS was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Electronic searches of 6 databases yielded 386 articles from database inception to July 2016, which were screening against established criteria for inclusion into this study. A total of 6 studies, satisfied criteria and reported outcomes for 721 patients. Fusion alone was performed in 458 (63.5%) patients and interbody fusion was performed in 263 (36.5%) patients. Functional outcomes Oswestry Disability Index (P = .29) and visual analog scale (P = .13) were not statistically different between the 2 approaches. Furthermore, there was no significant inferiority between fusion alone and with interbody in terms of the operative outcomes of blood loss (P = .38), reoperation rate (P = .66), hospital stay (P = .96), complication rate (P = .78), or fusion rate (P = .15). There was no statistically significant difference in functional and operative outcomes following fusion alone versus with interbody. Additional subgroup analysis of intrinsic DS features in future large, prospective, randomized controlled trials will improve the validity of these findings.

  3. Effects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Interbody Fusion Surgery in an Osteoporotic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Ho, Natalie Yi-Ju; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that afflicts millions of people around the world, and a variety of spinal integrity issues, such as degenerative spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis, are frequently concomitant with osteoporosis and are sometimes treated with spinal interbody fusion surgery. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strontium ranelate (SrR) treatment of osteoporosis in improving bone strength, promoting bone remodeling, and reducing the risk of fractures, but its effects on interbody fusion surgery have not been adequately investigated. SrR-treated rats subjected to interbody fusion surgery exhibited significantly higher lumbar vertebral bone mineral density after 12 weeks of treatment than rats subjected to the same surgery but not treated with SrR. Furthermore, histological and radiographic assessments showed that a greater amount of newly formed bone tissue was present and that better fusion union occurred in the SrR-treated rats than in the untreated rats. Taken together, these results show significant differences in bone mineral density, PINP level, histological score, SrR content and mechanical testing, which demonstrate a relatively moderate effect of SrR treatment on bone strength and remodeling in the specific context of recovery after an interbody fusion surgery, and suggest the potential of SrR treatment as an effective adjunct to spinal interbody fusion surgery for human patients. PMID:28052066

  4. Indirect foraminal decompression after lateral transpsoas interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Sharma, Amit K; Huang, Russel C; Meredith, Dennis S; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P; Sama, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) permits anterior column lumbar interbody fusion via a direct lateral approach. The authors sought to answer 3 questions. First, what is the effect of LTIF on lumbar foraminal area? Second, how does interbody cage placement affect intervertebral height? And third, how does the change in foraminal area and cage position correlate with changes in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) scores? Included patients underwent LTIF with or without posterior instrumentation and received preoperative and postoperative CT scans. Disc heights, neural foraminal area between adjacent-level pedicles, and anteroposterior cage position were measured from sagittal CT images. Preoperative and postoperative ODI and SF-12 scores were matched with the change in foraminal area from the clinically most severely affected side for analysis of the relationship between outcomes instruments and change in foraminal area. Average foraminal area increased by 36.2 mm(2), or 35% of the preoperative area (p < 0.01), without statistically significant differences by side, level, or anteroposterior cage position. Preoperative anterior and posterior disc heights measured 6.2 mm and 3.7 mm, respectively, compared with postoperative measurements of 9.8 mm (p < 0.01) and 6.3 mm (p < 0.01), respectively, without significant differences by level or cage position. Despite significant overall improvement in ODI and SF-12 scores, there was no correlation with foraminal area increase. Average foraminal area increased approximately 35% after cage placement without variation based on cage position. While ODI and SF-12 scores increased significantly, there was no significant association with cage position or foraminal area change, likely attributable to the multifactorial nature of preoperative pain.

  5. Simultaneous Lateral Interbody Fusion and Posterior Percutaneous Instrumentation: Early Experience and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Drazin, Doniel; Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar fusion surgery involving lateral lumbar interbody graft insertion with posterior instrumentation is traditionally performed in two stages requiring repositioning. We describe a novel technique to complete the circumferential procedure simultaneously without patient repositioning. Twenty patients diagnosed with worsening back pain with/without radiculopathy who failed exhaustive conservative management were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with both procedures simultaneously from a single lateral approach and 10 control patients with lateral lumbar interbody fusion followed by repositioning and posterior percutaneous instrumentation were analyzed. Pars fractures, mobile grade 2 spondylolisthesis, and severe one-level degenerative disk disease were matched between the two groups. In the simultaneous group, avoiding repositioning leads to lower mean operative times: 130 minutes (versus control 190 minutes; p = 0.009) and lower intraoperative blood loss: 108 mL (versus 93 mL; NS). Nonrepositioned patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.1 days (versus 3.8 days; NS). There was one complication in the control group requiring screw revision. Lateral interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior instrumentation are both readily accomplished in a single lateral decubitus position. In select patients with adequately sized pedicles, performing simultaneous procedures decreases operative time over sequential repositioning. Patient outcomes were excellent in the simultaneous group and comparable to procedures done sequentially. PMID:26649303

  6. Positional effects of transforaminal interbody spacer placement at the L5-S1 intervertebral disc space: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Richard A; Lavelle, William F; J Bianco, Aaron; Taormina, Jennifer L; Ordway, Nathaniel R

    2014-12-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly used alternative fusion method over anterior and posterior lumbar interbody fusions. There are conflicting results on the optimal positioning of interbody devices. No study has addressed the lumbosacral segment, L5-S1, where the lordotic configuration presents unique challenges. To determine if there are biomechanical and/or anatomical advantages related to the positioning of an interbody device at L5-S1, either anterior or posterior to the neutral axis. An in vitro biomechanical study using human cadaveric lumbar specimens. Lumbar specimens were biomechanically tested using pure moments with and without compressive axial loading. Testing was performed in intact and after TLIF with the implant posterior (TLIF-post) and anterior (TLIF-ant) to neutral axis. Segmental range of motion (ROM) and stiffness were analyzed at the L5-S1 surgical level and the adjacent L4-L5 level. Neuroforaminal height measurements of L5-S1 were analyzed in neutral and end range positions. Compared with the intact condition, ROM decreased more than 75% at L5-S1 and stiffness increased up to 270% with TLIF. There was no significant difference between anterior or posterior placement for ROM and stiffness. There was a change in L5-S1 neuroforaminal height based on the placement, with posterior placement showing a significant increase compared with anterior placement. There were no relative changes in neuroforaminal height under loading after TLIF. Compressive load did not affect the magnitudes or resulting significance of outcome measures at L5-S1 after either TLIFs. An interbody spacer with the addition of posterior instrumentation significantly enhances the mechanical stability of L5-S1 regardless of interbody position. There were noticeable increases in terms of construct stability and stiffness after both TLIF-ant and TLIF-post in comparison with the intact condition. A posteriorly placed interbody implant did result in the

  7. Midline Lumbar Fusion with Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Masaki; KURAISHI, Keita; UMEDA, Yasuyuki; SANO, Takanori; TSUJI, Masanori; SUZUKI, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    A novel cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique provides an alternative fixation technique for lumbar spine. Trajectory of CBT screw creates a caudo-cephalad path in sagittal plane and a medio-lateral path in axial plane, and engages cortical bone in the pedicle. The theoretical advantage is that it provides enhanced screw grip and interface strength. Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) is composed of posterior mid-line approach, microsurgical laminectomy, and CBT screw fixation. We adopted the MIDLF technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Advantages of this technique include that decompression and fusion are available in the same field, and it minimizes approach-related damages. To determine whether MIDLF with CBT screw is as effective as traditional approach and it is minimum invasive technique, we studied the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIDLF. Our results indicate that MIDLF is effective and minimum invasive technique. Evidence of effectiveness of MIDLF is that patients had good recovery score, and that CBT screw technique was safety in clinical and stable in radiological. MIDLF with CBT screw provides the surgeon with additional options for fixation. This technique is most likely to be useful for treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in combination with midline decompression and insertion of an interbody graft, such as the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques. PMID:25169139

  8. Comparison Study between Conventional Sequence and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) in the Diagnosis of Postoperative Complications in Patients Receiving Lumbar Inter-Body Fusion and Pedicle Screw Fixation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sol Bee; Kwon, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) sequence is one of the metal artifact reduction techniques of anatomical structure, but there has been no report about evaluation of post-operative complications. The purpose of this article is to compare the anatomical visibility between fast spin echo (FSE) and FSE-SEMAC and to evaluate the additional value of FSE-SEMAC in diagnostic confidence of the complications. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 54 patients who received lumbar spinal surgery and MR images including FSE-SEMAC. For the semi-quantitative evaluation, the visibility of anatomical structures (neural foramen, bone-inter-body cage interface, central canal, nerve root in epidural space, back muscle, and bone-pedicle screw interface) was evaluated. For qualitative evaluation, we evaluated FSE and FSE with FSE-SEMAC independently, and recorded the diagnostic confidence level of post-operative complications. Generalized estimating equation regression analysis was used for statistical analysis, and a weighted kappa was used for inter-observer agreement. Results Scores of 6 imaging findings with FSE-SEMAC were significantly higher than that of FSE (P-value < .0001). Inter-observer agreements show good reliability (weighted kappa = 0.45–0.75). Both reviewers deemed 37 (reviewer 1) or 19 more (reviewer 2) post-operative complications with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC, compared to FSE only. Except for central canal stenosis (P-value = .2408), diagnostic confidence level for other post-operative complications were significantly higher with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC (P-value = .0000) than FSE. Conclusions FSE-SEMAC significantly reduces image distortion, compared to FSE sequence in 3.0-T MR. Also, diagnostic confidence for post-operative complications was higher when FSE with additional FSE-SEMAC compared to FSE only. PMID:27711137

  9. An Innovative Use of Cortoss Bone Cement to Stabilize a Nonunion after Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-01-01

    A 65-year-old male originally had surgery for spondylolisthesis at L5-S1 in 2008 and then went on to have an L4-5 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with pedicle screw fixation from L4 to S1 and interbody graft in 2010. Despite having two surgical procedures, he continued with intractable back pain and was told he had a failed lumbar fusion. When he was evaluated with a computerized tomography (CT) scan from April 2015, it demonstrated an erosive nonunion of the L4-5 interbody fusion without incorporation of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. In an attempt to perform a minimally invasive stabilization of the L4-5 nonunion, he underwent a percutaneous lateral foraminal approach with an injection of Cortoss® cement (Stryker®, Malvern, PA) into the L4-5 interspace and around the graft. The objective was to stabilize the nonunion, resulting in intermediate relief of pain. PMID:28229033

  10. An Innovative Use of Cortoss Bone Cement to Stabilize a Nonunion after Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-01-20

    A 65-year-old male originally had surgery for spondylolisthesis at L5-S1 in 2008 and then went on to have an L4-5 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with pedicle screw fixation from L4 to S1 and interbody graft in 2010. Despite having two surgical procedures, he continued with intractable back pain and was told he had a failed lumbar fusion. When he was evaluated with a computerized tomography (CT) scan from April 2015, it demonstrated an erosive nonunion of the L4-5 interbody fusion without incorporation of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. In an attempt to perform a minimally invasive stabilization of the L4-5 nonunion, he underwent a percutaneous lateral foraminal approach with an injection of Cortoss® cement (Stryker®, Malvern, PA) into the L4-5 interspace and around the graft. The objective was to stabilize the nonunion, resulting in intermediate relief of pain.

  11. PEEK-Halo effect in interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Hogan, Jarred A; Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-02-01

    Recent developments have seen poly[aryl-ether-ether-ketone] (PEEK) being increasingly used in vertebral body fusion. More novel approaches to improve PEEK have included the introduction of titanium-PEEK (Ti-PEEK) composites and coatings. This paper aims to describe a potential complication of PEEK based implants relating to poorer integration with the surrounding bone, producing a "PEEK-Halo" effect which is not seen in Ti-PEEK composite implants. We present images from two patients undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The first patient underwent an L5/S1 ALIF using a PEEK implant whilst the second patient underwent L4/L5 ALIF using a Ti-PEEK composite implant. Evidence of osseointegration was sought using CT imaging and confirmed using histological preparations of a sheep tibia model. The PEEK-Halo effect is demonstrated by a halo effect between the PEEK implant and the bone graft on CT imaging. This phenomenon is secondary to poor osseointegration of PEEK implants. The PEEK-Halo effect was not demonstrated in the second patient who received a Ti-PEEK composite graft. Histological analysis of graft/bone interface surfaces in PEEK versus Ti-PEEK implants in a sheep model further confirmed poorer osseointegration of the PEEK implant. In conclusion, the PEEK-Halo effect is seen secondary to minimal osseointegration of PEEK at the adjacent vertebral endplate following a PEEK implant insertion. This effect is not seen with Ti-PEEK implants, and may support the role of titanium in improving the bone-implant interface of PEEK substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lumbar lordosis restoration following single-level instrumented fusion comparing 4 commonly used techniques.

    PubMed

    Dimar, John R; Glassman, Steven D; Vemuri, Venu M; Esterberg, Justin L; Howard, Jennifer M; Carreon, Leah Y

    2011-11-09

    A major sequelae of lumbar fusion is acceleration of adjacent-level degeneration due to decreased lumbar lordosis. We evaluated the effectiveness of 4 common fusion techniques in restoring lordosis: instrumented posterolateral fusion, translumbar interbody fusion, anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, and anterior interbody fusion with lordotic threaded (LT) cages (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee). Radiographs were measured preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Parameters measured included anterior and posterior disk space height, lumbar lordosis from L3 to S1, and surgical level lordosis.No significant difference in demographics existed among the 4 groups. All preoperative parameters were similar among the 4 groups. Lumbar lordosis at final follow-up showed no difference between the anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, translumbar interbody fusion, and LT cage groups, although the posterolateral fusion group showed a significant loss of lordosis (-10°) (P<.001). Immediately postoperatively and at follow-up, the LT cage group had a significantly greater amount of lordosis and showed maintenance of anterior and posterior disk space height postoperatively compared with the other groups. Instrumented posterolateral fusion produces a greater loss of lordosis compared with anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, translumbar interbody fusion, and LT cages. Maintenance of lordosis and anterior and posterior disk space height is significantly better with anterior interbody fusion with LT cages. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Transthoracic discectomy without interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Krauss, William E; Edwards, Diane A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2005-05-01

    Transthoracic discectomy is an established surgical procedure for the treatment of thoracic disk disease. Most authors advocate interbody fusion after transthoracic discectomy. The purpose of this study was to determine if there were any adverse consequences in foregoing interbody fusion after transthoracic discectomy. Eighteen consecutive patients underwent transthoracic discectomy without fusion between 1996 and 2002 at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN). There were 11 women and 7 men with the mean age of 54 years (range, 28-84 years). Surgical indications were radiculopathy in 1 patient and myelopathy in 17. Follow-up data were obtained from the clinic visits and telephone surveys. We used the available pre- and postoperative radiographs for 16 patients at the last follow-up to establish the incidence of postoperative kyphosis and/or scoliosis at the operated level. Mean duration of the radiographic follow-up was 22 +/- 24 (SD) months. None of the patients reported the onset of a new axial spine pain postoperatively. No patient developed segmental kyphosis or scoliosis at the operated level during the follow-up period. Fifteen of 18 (83%) patients had significant improvement in their neurological symptoms and signs. Two patients remained unchanged. An 83-year-old patient had a slight worsening of her gait after surgery. Specifically, the only 3 nonambulatory patients regained ambulation after discectomy. There were 4 complications: 1 wound infection, 1 pleural effusion requiring pleurodesis, 1 cerebrospinal fluid leak, and 1 case of disabling intercostal neuralgia. These results indicate that interbody fusion may not be necessary for selected patients undergoing transthoracic discectomy. Further long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the development of late spinal instability and resultant deformity after this procedure.

  14. Long-Term Objective Physical Activity Measurements using a Wireless Accelerometer Following Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Interbody Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a case of a patient who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (mi-TLIF) with objective physical activity measurements performed preoperatively and postoperatively at up to 12-months using wireless accelerometer technology. In the first postoperative month following surgery, the patient had reduced mobility, taking 2,397 steps over a distance of 1.8 km per day. However, the number of steps taken and distance travelled per day had returned to baseline levels by the second postoperative month. At one-year follow-up, the patient averaged 5,095 steps per day in the month over a distance of 3.8 km; this was a 60% improvement in both steps taken and distance travelled compared to the preoperative status. The use of wireless accelerometers is feasible in obtaining objective physical activity measurements before and after lumbar interbody fusion and may be applicable to other related spinal surgeries as well.

  15. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  16. Feasibility of the runt cow for in vivo testing of a spinal interbody prosthesis with preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Buttermann, Glenn R; Mendenhall, H Vincent

    2012-04-01

    The optimal lumbar spinal disc prosthesis has yet to be developed. Failures of clinical device studies may be minimized by appropriate large animal preclinical studies. The lumbar spine of the mature "runt" cow, Corrientes breed, has been shown to have a number of desirable characteristics to the human. This study assessed the feasibility of the "runt" cow for in vivo testing of human-sized lumbar interbody implants and the ability to perform common analyses of explants. Eight cows (four experimental and four controls) were compared. The experimental animals had transosseous implantation of the disc prosthesis at L4-L5, and their spines were harvested at four or six months. They were evaluated for the ease of surgical access and healing, motion segment mobility, ability to remove the implant nondestructively, and microradiography and histomorphology. All animals had successful implantation. All explantations were performed without alteration to the devices. All animals had surgical healing and intended device motion, and histology found device stability by demonstrating bone ingrowth into the device's porous plates. There was a significant 46% increase in the amount of trabecular bone adjacent to the implants. The mature runt cow allows for implantation of human-sized interbody and intrabody spinal prostheses. This animal model allowed for macro- and histological analysis of the implant and surrounding tissues. In vivo stability was demonstrated for the disc prosthesis while also allowing for evaluation of intended mobility. Additionally, this is the first study to suggest increased bone density supporting an interbody prosthesis.

  17. Bioresorbable polylactide interbody implants in an ovine anterior cervical discectomy and fusion model: three-year results.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kevin A; Toth, Jeffrey M; Crawford, Neil R; Seim, Howard B; Shi, Lewis L; Harris, Mitchel B; Turner, A Simon

    2008-04-01

    In vivo study of anterior discectomy and fusion using a bioresorbable 70:30 poly(l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) interbody implant in an ovine model. To evaluate the efficacy of the polylactide implant to function as an interbody fusion device, and to assess the tissue reaction to the material during the resorption process. The use of polylactide as a cervical interbody implant has several potential advantages when compared with traditional materials. Having an elastic modulus very similar to bone minimizes the potential for stress shielding, and as the material resorbs additional loading is transferred to the developing fusion mass. Although preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the suitability of polylactide implants for lumbar interbody fusion, detailed information on cervical anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with polylactide devices is desirable. Single level ACDF was performed in 8 skeletally mature ewes. Bioresorbable 70:30 poly (l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) interbody implants packed with autograft were used with single-level metallic plates. Radiographs were made every 3 months up to 1 year, and yearly thereafter. The animals were killed at 6 months (3 animals), 12 months (3 animals), and 36 months (2 animals). In addition to the serial plain radiographs, the specimens were evaluated by nondestructive biomechanical testing and undecalcified histologic analysis. The bioresorbable polylactide implants were effective in achieving interbody fusion. The 6-month animals appeared fused radiographically and biomechanically, whereas histologic sections demonstrated partial fusion (in 3 of 3 animals). Radiographic fusion was confirmed histologically and biomechanically at 12 months (3 of 3 animals) and 36 months (2 of 2 animals). A mild chronic inflammatory response to the resorbing polylactide implant was observed at both 6 months and 12 months. At 36 months, the operative levels were solidly fused and the implants were completely resorbed. No

  18. Minimally Invasive Direct Lateral Interbody Fusion (MIS-DLIF): Proof of Concept and Perioperative Results.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hamid; Abbasi, Ali

    2017-01-14

    Minimally invasive direct lateral interbody fusion (MIS-DLIF) is a novel approach for fusions of the lumbar spine. In this proof of concept study, we describe the surgical technique and report our experience and the perioperative outcomes of the first nine patients who underwent this procedure. In this study we establish the safety and efficacy of this approach. MIS-DLIF was performed on 15 spinal levels in nine patients who failed to respond to conservative therapy for the treatment of a re-herniated disk, spondylolisthesis, or other severe disk disease of the lumbar spine. We recorded surgery time, blood loss, fluoroscopy time, patient-reported pain, and complications. Throughout the MIS-DLIF procedure, the surgeon is aided by biplanar fluoroscopic imaging to place an interbody graft or cage into the disc space through the interpleural space. A discectomy is performed in the same minimally invasive fashion. The procedure is usually completed with posterior pedicle screw fixation. MIS-DLIF took 44/85 minutes, on average, for 1/2 levels, with 54/112 ml of blood loss, and 0.3/1.7 days of hospital stay. Four of nine patients did not require overnight hospitalization and were discharged two to four hours after surgery. We did not encounter any clinically significant complications. At more than ninety days post surgery, the patients reported a statistically significant reduction of 4.5 points on a 10-point sliding pain scale. MIS-DLIF with pedicle screw fixation is a safe and clinically effective procedure for fusions of the lumbar spine. The procedure overcomes many of the limitations of the current minimally invasive approaches to the lumbar spine and is technically straightforward. MIS-DLIF has the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs relative to the current standard of care and therefore warrants further investigation. We are currently expanding this study to a larger cohort and documenting long-term outcome data.

  19. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. A Novel Nonpedicular Screw-Based Fixation in Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The authors present the clinical results obtained in patients who underwent interspinous fusion device (IFD) implantation following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of this study is investigating the feasibility of IFD with PLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods. Between September 2013 and November 2014, 39 patients underwent PLIF and subsequent IFD (Romeo®2 PAD, Spineart, Geneva, Switzerland) implantation. Medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to collect relevant data such as blood loss, operative time, and length of hospital stay. Radiographs and clinical outcome were evaluated 6 weeks and 12 months after surgery. Results. All 39 patients were followed up for more than one year. There were no major complications such as dura tear, nerve injuries, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or deep infection. Both interbody and interspinous fusion could be observed on radiographs one year after surgery. However, there were 5 patients having early retropulsion of interbody fusion devices. Conclusion. The interspinous fusion device appears to achieve posterior fixation and facilitate lumbar fusion in selected patients. However, further study is mandatory for proposing a novel anatomic and radiological scoring system to identify patients suitable for this treatment modality and prevent postoperative complications. PMID:28164125

  1. Multilevel extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) and osteotomies for 3-dimensional severe deformity: 25 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Paul C; Shucosky, Erin; Chotikul, Liana; Salari, Ben; Chen, Lun; Jerrems, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of 25 patients with severe lumbar nerve root compression undergoing multilevel anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation for deformity. The objective is to analyze the outcomes and clinical results from anterior interbody fusions performed through a lateral approach and compare these with traditional surgical procedures. A consecutive series of 25 patients (78 extreme lateral interbody fusion [XLIF] levels) was identified to illustrate the primary advantages of XLIF in correcting the most extreme of the 3-dimensional deformities that fulfilled the following criteria: (1) a minimum of 40° of scoliosis; (2) 2 or more levels of translation, anterior spondylolisthesis, and lateral subluxation (subluxation in 2 planes), causing symptomatic neurogenic claudication and severe spinal stenosis; and (3) lumbar hypokyphosis or flat-back syndrome. In addition, the majority had trunks that were out of balance (central sacral vertical line ≥2 cm from vertical plumb line) or had sagittal imbalance, defined by a distance between the sagittal vertical line and S1 of greater than 3 cm. There were 25 patients who had severe enough deformities fulfilling these criteria that required supplementation of the lateral XLIF with posterior osteotomies and pedicle screw instrumentation. In our database, with a mean follow-up of 24 months, 85% of patients showed evidence of solid arthrodesis and no subsidence on computed tomography and flexion/extension radiographs. The complication rate remained low, with a perioperative rate of 2.4% and postoperative rate of 12.2%. The lateral listhesis and anterior spondylolisthetic subluxation were anatomically reduced with minimally invasive XLIF. The main finding in these 25 cases was our isolation of the major indication for supplemental posterior surgery: truncal decompensation in patients who are out of balance by 2 cm or more, in whom posterior spinal osteotomies and segmental

  2. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Malham, Gregory M; Parker, Rhiannon M

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation.

  3. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhiannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. Methods This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Results: Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. Conclusions LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation. PMID:27683683

  4. Histologic evaluation of the efficacy of rhBMP-2 compared with autograft bone in sheep spinal anterior interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Harvinder S; Toth, Jeffrey M; Diwan, Ashish D; Seim, H B; Kanim, Linda E A; Kabo, J Michael; Turner, A Simon

    2002-03-15

    The sheep anterior lumbar spinal fusion model was used to study the efficacy of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-collagen composite in comparison with autograft to enhance spinal interbody fusion. Comparisons were drawn from temporal radiographic and end-point biomechanical and histologic data. To analyze histologically the ability of rhBMP-2 to achieve complete arthrodesis between vertebral bodies. Studies using rhBMP for enhancement of anterior interbody fusion have used numerous endpoints. However, systematic histologic evaluation of the fusion has not been conducted. Twelve sheep underwent single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion performed with a cylindrical fenestrated titanium interbody fusion device (INTER FIX, Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Inc., Memphis, TN). The device was filled either with rhBMP-2-collagen (n = 6) or autogenous iliac crest bone graft (n = 6). Radiologic evaluation was carried out at 2-month intervals, and all sheep were killed 6 months after surgery. Nondestructive biomechanical testing for stiffness to flexion, extension, and lateral bending moments, un-decalcified histology, and qualitative and quantitative histologic evaluation were performed. Radiographs revealed a bony bridge anterior to the cage in five of six rhBMP-2-treated animals, whereas it was present only in one of five in the autogenous bone graft group. Segments treated with rhBMP-2 were 20% stiffer in flexion than autograft-treated segments at 6 months. Six of six in the rhBMP-2 group and two of six in the autograft group showed complete fusion. There was a significantly higher rate of bony continuity observed at the fenestrations of the rhBMP-2 group. Three times more number of cage fenestrations in the rhBMP-2 group demonstrated "all-bone" when compared with the autograft group (P < 0.001). Further, the scar tissue in and around the autograft-treated cages was 16-fold more (P < 0.01) than that seen for rhBMP-2-treated cages. The study

  5. Concomitant Lumbar Stenosis and Aortic Pseudoaneurysm: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Christoph; Niemeier, Thomas E; Neway, William E

    2016-01-01

    Aortic pseudoaneurysm can create a constellation of symptoms that can mimic lumbar back pain. There are rare but well-documented reports of aortic pathology (aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, and chronic contained aneurysm ruptures) eroding into the vertebral column causing neural compression. We report a case of a rapidly progressive aortic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with pre-existing lumbar spine pathology which had the potential for catastrophic intraoperative bleeding during a minimally invasive surgery (MIS) using the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) technique. Postoperatively, the patient’s radicular pain resolved but her back pain remained. Further workup identified the pseudoaneurysm and the patient subsequently underwent open vascular repair. In this report, we highlight a lesser known mimicker of lumbar back pain. PMID:27882269

  6. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  7. Titanium vs. polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody fusion: Meta-analysis and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Scott; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Torner, James C; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal interbody fusion is a standard and accepted method for spinal fusion. Interbody fusion devices include titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with distinct biomechanical properties. Titanium and PEEK cages have been evaluated in the cervical and lumbar spine, with conflicting results in bony fusion and subsidence. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we reviewed the available literature evaluating Ti and PEEK cages to assess subsidence and fusion rates. Six studies were included in the analysis, 3 of which were class IV evidence, 2 were class III, and 1 was class II. A total of 410 patients (Ti-228, PEEK-182) and 587 levels (Ti-327, PEEK-260) were studied. Pooled mean age was 50.8years in the Ti group, and 53.1years in the PEEK group. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 4 studies (395 levels) and transforaminal interbody fusion in 2 studies (192 levels). No statistically significant difference was found between groups with fusion (OR 1.16, 95% C.I 0.59-2.89, p=0.686, I(2)=49.7%) but there was a statistically significant the rate of subsidence with titanium (OR 3.59, 95% C.I 1.28-10.07, p=0.015, I(2)=56.9%) at last follow-up. Titanium and PEEK cages are associated with a similar rate of fusion, but there is an increased rate of subsidence with titanium cage. Future prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate these cages using surgical and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Endoscopic foraminotomy for recurrent lumbar radiculopathy after TLIF: Technical report

    PubMed Central

    Telfeian, Albert E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is a well-accepted fusion technique that uses unilateral facet removal as an oblique corridor for inserting an interbody spacer. This manuscript focused on five cases of endoscopic foraminotomy for patients presenting with recurrent radiculopathy after TLIF procedures. Methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, charts from five patients with lumbar radiculopathy and instrumented TLIF procedures who underwent subsequent endoscopic procedures between 2011 and 2013 were reviewed. Results: The average pain relief 1 year postoperatively was reported to be 63.8%, good results as defined by MacNab. The average preoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score was 9.5, indicated in our questionnaire as severe and constant pain. The average 1 year postoperative VAS score was 3.5, indicated in our questionnaire as mild and intermittent pain. Conclusion: Transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy could be used as a safe, yet, minimally invasive and innovative technique for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of previous instrumented lumbar fusion. IRB approval: Lifespan: IRB Study # 600415 PMID:25949850

  9. Risk Assessment of Lumbar Segmental Artery Injury During Lateral Transpsoas Approach in the Patients With Lumbar Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Yamashita, Kazuta; Abe, Mitsunobu; Higashino, Kosaku; Ngamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective study using 27 contrast-enhanced multi-planar computed tomography scans of subjects with lumbar scoliosis. To assess the risk of injury of lumbar segmental arteries during transpsoas approach in patients with lumbar scoliosis. Although lumbar interbody fusion using big intervertebral cage through transpsoas approach has a big advantage to correct coronal and sagittal deformity in patients with spinal deformity, the risk for injury of lumbar segmental artery is always concerned. The abdominal-contrast enhanced multi-planar computed tomography scans of 27 subjects with lumbar scoliosis with over 15° of Cobb angle were retrospectively reviewed. The coronal views through the posterior one third of the intervertebral discs were reviewed. The cranio-caudal intervals of the adjacent segmental arteries at each intervertebral level were measured. The recommended working space for the lateral transpsoas approach using extreme lateral interbody fusion retractor is 24 mm in the cranio-caudal direction. The cutoff value for an intersegmental Cobb angle that would estimate a cranio-caudal interval of less than 24 mm was determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. The average interval between the cranio-caudal lumbar segmental arteries on the concave side was significantly shorter than that on the convex side (29.9 vs. 33.6 mm, P < 0.05). The differences in the intervals between the convex and concave sides were correlated with the corresponding intersegmental Cobb angle (r = 0.65, P < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that cutoff value for the best prediction of an interval less than 24 mm was 14.5°, with a specificity of 94.3% and sensitivity of 71.4%. This study demonstrated that female patients with lumbar scoliosis with an intersegmental Cobb angle higher than 14.5° would be at high risk for potential injury to the lumbar artery during a transpsoas approach for extreme lateral interbody

  10. Lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion in a patient with achondroplastic dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Staub, Blake N; Holman, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    The authors present the first reported use of the lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach for interbody arthrodesis in a patient with achondroplastic dwarfism. The inherent anatomical abnormalities of the spine present in achondroplastic dwarfism predispose these patients to an increased incidence of spinal deformity as well as neurogenic claudication and potential radicular symptoms. The risks associated with prolonged general anesthesia and intolerance of significant blood loss in these patients makes them ideal candidates for minimally invasive spinal surgery. The patient in this case was a 51-year-old man with achondroplastic dwarfism who had a history of progressive claudication and radicular pain despite previous extensive lumbar laminectomies. The lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach was used for placement of interbody cages at L1/2, L2/3, L3/4, and L4/5, followed by posterior decompression and pedicle screw instrumentation. The patient tolerated the procedure well with no complications. Postoperatively his claudicatory and radicular symptoms resolved and a CT scan revealed solid arthrodesis with no periimplant lucencies.

  11. Posterolateral versus posterior interbody fusion in isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-05-20

    Spondylolisthesis is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by subluxation of a vertebral body over another in the sagittal plane. Its most common form is isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). This study aims to compare clinical outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with posterior instrumentation in the treatment of IS. We performed a randomized prospective study in which 80 patients out of a total of 85 patients with IS were randomly allocated to one of two groups: PLF with posterior instrumentation (group I) or PLIF with posterior instrumentation (group II). Posterior decompression was performed in the patients. The Oswestry low back pain disability (OLBP) scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) and pain, respectively. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate fusion rate and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare categorical data. Fusion in group II was significantly better than in group I (p=0.012). Improvement in low back pain was statistically more significant in group I (p=0.001). The incidence of neurogenic claudication was significantly lower in group I than in group II (p=0.004). In group I, there was no significant correlation between slip Meyerding grade and disc space height, radicular pain, and low back pain. There was no significant difference in post-operative complications at 1-year follow-up. Our data showed that PLF with posterior instrumentation provides better clinical outcomes and more improvement in low back pain compared to PLIF with posterior instrumentation despite the low fusion rate.

  12. Extreme lateral interbody fusion for the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Adam M; Michael, Keith W; Chapman, Todd M; Jennings, Jason M; Hubbard, Elizabeth W; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2013-11-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) is a minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracolumbar spine. Though the procedure is rapidly increasing in popularity, limited data is available regarding its use in deformity surgery. We aimed to evaluate radiographic correction using XLIF in adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Thirty consecutive patients were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Plain radiographs were obtained on all patients preoperatively, postoperatively, and at most recent follow-up. Plain radiographic measurements of coronal Cobb angle, apical vertebral translation, segmental lordosis, global lordosis, disc height, neuroforaminal height and neuroforaminal width were made at each time point. CT scans were obtained for all patients 1 year after surgery to evaluate for fusion. There was significant improvement in multiple radiographic parameters from preoperative to postoperative. Cobb angle corrected 72.3%, apical vertebral translation corrected 59.7%, neuroforaminal height increased 80.3%, neuroforaminal width increased 7.4%, and disc height increased 116.7%. Segmental lordosis at L4-L5 increased 14.1% and global lordosis increased 11.5%. There was no significant loss of correction from postoperative to most recent follow-up. There was an 11.8% pseudoarthrosis rate at levels treated with XLIF. Complications included lateral incisional hernia (n=1), rupture of anterior longitudinal ligament (n=2), wound breakdown (n=2), cardiac instability (n=1), pedicle fracture (n=1), and nonunion requiring revision (n=1). XLIF significantly improves coronal plane deformity in patients with adult degenerative scoliosis. XLIF has the ability to correct sagittal plane deformity, although it is most effective at lower lumbar levels.

  13. Lumbar foraminal stenosis, the hidden stenosis including at L5/S1.

    PubMed

    Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhide; Eguchi, Yawara; Kubota, Go; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In patients with lower back and leg pain, lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS) is one of the most important pathologies, especially for predominant radicular symptoms. LFS pathology can develop as a result of progressing spinal degeneration and is characterized by exacerbation with foraminal narrowing caused by lumbar extension (Kemp's sign). However, there is a lack of critical clinical findings for LFS pathology. Therefore, patients with robust and persistent leg pain, which is exacerbated by lumbar extension, should be suspected of LFS. Radiological diagnosis is performed using multiple radiological modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, including plain examination and novel protocols such as diffusion tensor imaging, as well as dynamic X-ray, and computed tomography. Electrophysiological testing can also aid diagnosis. Treatment options include both conservative and surgical approaches. Conservative treatment includes medication, rehabilitation, and spinal nerve block. Surgery should be considered when the pathology is refractory to conservative treatment and requires direct decompression of the exiting nerve root, including the dorsal root ganglia. In cases with decreased intervertebral height and/or instability, fusion surgery should also be considered. Recent advancements in minimally invasive lumbar lateral interbody fusion procedures enable effective and less invasive foraminal enlargement compared with traditional fusion surgeries such as transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. The lumbosacral junction can cause L5 radiculopathy with greater incidence than other lumbar levels as a result of anatomical and epidemiological factors, which should be better addressed when treating clinical lower back pain.

  14. Minimally Invasive Direct Lateral Interbody Fusion (MIS-DLIF): Proof of Concept and Perioperative Results

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive direct lateral interbody fusion (MIS-DLIF) is a novel approach for fusions of the lumbar spine. In this proof of concept study, we describe the surgical technique and report our experience and the perioperative outcomes of the first nine patients who underwent this procedure. Study design/setting In this study we establish the safety and efficacy of this approach. MIS-DLIF was performed on 15 spinal levels in nine patients who failed to respond to conservative therapy for the treatment of a re-herniated disk, spondylolisthesis, or other severe disk disease of the lumbar spine. We recorded surgery time, blood loss, fluoroscopy time, patient-reported pain, and complications. Methods Throughout the MIS-DLIF procedure, the surgeon is aided by biplanar fluoroscopic imaging to place an interbody graft or cage into the disc space through the interpleural space. A discectomy is performed in the same minimally invasive fashion. The procedure is usually completed with posterior pedicle screw fixation. Results MIS-DLIF took 44/85 minutes, on average, for 1/2 levels, with 54/112 ml of blood loss, and 0.3/1.7 days of hospital stay. Four of nine patients did not require overnight hospitalization and were discharged two to four hours after surgery. We did not encounter any clinically significant complications. At more than ninety days post surgery, the patients reported a statistically significant reduction of 4.5 points on a 10-point sliding pain scale. Conclusions MIS-DLIF with pedicle screw fixation is a safe and clinically effective procedure for fusions of the lumbar spine. The procedure overcomes many of the limitations of the current minimally invasive approaches to the lumbar spine and is technically straightforward. MIS-DLIF has the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs relative to the current standard of care and therefore warrants further investigation. We are currently expanding this study to a larger cohort and

  15. Establishing benchmarks for the volume-outcome relationship for common lumbar spine surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Sturgeon, Daniel J; Burns, Camden B; Hunt, Tyler J; Bono, Christopher M

    2017-09-05

    The importance of surgeon volume as a quality measure has been defined for a number of surgical specialties. Meaningful procedural volume benchmarks have not been established, however, particularly with respect to lumbar spine surgery. To establish surgeon volume benchmarks for the performance of four common lumbar spine surgical procedures (discectomy, decompression, lumbar interbody fusion, lumbar posterolateral fusion). Retrospective review of data in the Florida Statewide Inpatient Dataset (2011-2014). Patients who underwent one of the four lumbar spine surgical procedures under study. The development of a complication or hospital readmission within 90-days of the surgical procedure. For each specific procedure, individual surgeon volume was separately plotted against the number of complications and readmissions in a spline analysis that adjusted for co-variates. Spline cut points were used to create a categorical variable of procedure volume for each individual procedure. Log-binomial regression analysis was then separately performed using the categorical volume-outcome metric for each individual procedure and for the outcomes of 90-day complications and 90-day readmissions. In all, 187,185 spine surgical procedures met inclusion criteria, performed by 5,514 different surgeons at 178 hospitals. Spline analysis determined that the procedure volume cut-point was 25 for decompressions, 40 for discectomy, 43 for interbody fusion and 35 for posterolateral fusions. For surgeons who failed to meet the volume metric, there was a 63% increase in the risk of complications following decompressions, a 56% increase in the risk of complications following discectomy, a 15% increase in the risk of complications following lumbar interbody fusions and a 47% increase in the risk of complications following posterolateral fusions. Findings were similar for readmission measures. The results of this work allow us to identify meaningful volume-based benchmarks for the performance of

  16. Degenerative spondylolisthesis: contemporary review of the role of interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph F; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Yong; Razi, Afshin

    2017-02-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a common presentation, yet the best surgical treatment continues to be a matter of debate. Interbody fusion is one of a number of options, but its exact role remains ill defined. The aim of this study was to provide a contemporary review of the literature to help determine the role, if any, of interbody fusion in the surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. A systematic review of the literature since 2005 was performed. Details on study size, patient age, surgical treatments, levels of slip, patient reported outcome measures, radiographic outcomes, complications and selected utility measures were recorded. Studies that compared a cohort treated with interbody fusion and at least one other surgical intervention for comparison were included for review. Only studies examining the effect in degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. Two authors independently reviewed the manuscripts and extracted key data. Thirteen studies were included in the final analysis. A total of 565 underwent interbody fusion and 761 underwent other procedures including decompression alone, interspinous stabilisation and posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation. Most studies were graded Level III evidence. Heterogeneous reporting of outcomes prevented formal statistical analysis. However, in general, studies reviewed concluded no significant clinical or radiographic difference in outcome between interbody fusion and other treatments. Two small studies suggested interbody fusion is a better option in cases of definite instability. Interbody fusion only provided outcomes as good as instrumented posterolateral fusion. However, most studies were Level III, and hence, we remain limited in defining the exact role of interbody fusion-cases with clear instability appear to be most appropriate. Future work should use agreed-upon common outcome measures and definitions.

  17. Lordosis restoration after anterior longitudinal ligament release and placement of lateral hyperlordotic interbody cages during the minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach: a radiographic study in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juan S; Smith, Donald A; Dakwar, Elias; Baaj, Ali A; Mundis, Gregory M; Turner, Alexander W L; Cornwall, G Bryan; Akbarnia, Behrooz A

    2012-11-01

    In the surgical treatment of spinal deformities, the importance of restoring lumbar lordosis is well recognized. Smith-Petersen osteotomies (SPOs) yield approximately 10° of lordosis per level, whereas pedicle subtraction osteotomies result in as much as 30° increased lumbar lordosis. Recently, selective release of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) and placement of lordotic interbody grafts using the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach (XLIF) has been performed as an attempt to increase lumbar lordosis while avoiding the morbidity of osteotomy. The objective of the present study was to measure the effect of the selective release of the ALL and varying degrees of lordotic implants placed using the XLIF approach on segmental lumbar lordosis in cadaveric specimens between L-1 and L-5. Nine adult fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were placed in the lateral decubitus position. Lateral radiographs were obtained at baseline and after 4 interventions at each level as follows: 1) placement of a standard 10° lordotic cage, 2) ALL release and placement of a 10° lordotic cage, 3) ALL release and placement of a 20° lordotic cage, and 4) ALL release and placement of a 30° lordotic cage. All four cages were implanted sequentially at each interbody level between L-1 and L-5. Before and after each intervention, segmental lumbar lordosis was measured in all specimens at each interbody level between L-1 and L-5 using the Cobb method on lateral radiography. The mean baseline segmental lordotic angles at L1-2, L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 were -3.8°, 3.8°, 7.8°, and 22.6°, respectively. The mean lumbar lordosis was 29.4°. Compared with baseline, the mean postimplantation increase in segmental lordosis in all levels combined was 0.9° in Intervention 1 (10° cage without ALL release); 4.1° in Intervention 2 (ALL release with 10° cage); 9.5° in Intervention 3 (ALL release with 20° cage); and 11.6° in Intervention 4 (ALL release with 30° cage

  18. Biomechanical analysis of biodegradable interbody fusion cages augmented With poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid).

    PubMed

    Kandziora, Frank; Pflugmacher, R; Kleemann, R; Duda, Georg; Wise, Donald L; Trantolo, Debra J; Lewandrowski, Kai-Uwe

    2002-08-01

    Three different types of biodegradable poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) cages with and without augmentation of a biodegradable poly(propylene glycol-cofumaric acid) scaffold were compared with autograft and metallic cages of the same design and size by determining the stiffness and failure load of the L4-L5 motion segment of cadaveric human spines. To determine how these devices limit the range of motion in the lumbar spine compared with a metallic cage. If biomechanically equivalent, biodegradable spinal fusion systems ultimately could reduce local stress shielding and diminish the incidence of clinical complications, including device-related osteopenia, implant loosening, and breakage. Previous studies in dogs and humans have demonstrated vertebral body osteopenia as a result of instrumented spine fusions. To the authors' knowledge, neither an in vitro nor an in vivo biomechanical analysis of a biodegradable interbody fusion system has been performed. Forty-eight L4-L5 motion segments were isolated from 22 male and 26 female human donors with an average age of 49.6 +/- 2.7 years (range 36-55 years). Cages of similar dimensions and design, including a threaded, hollow, porous titanium BAK cage and three different BIO cages (BIO cage 1, pure polymer; BIO cage 2, polymer plus hydroxyapatite buffer; BIO cage 3, polymer plus nano-sized hydroxyapatite), produced from the same poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) polymer were tested in a comparative analysis to intact motion segment, interbody implantation of autograft, and a BIO cage augmented with an expandable biodegradable foam-scaffold fashioned from poly(propylene glycol-cofumaric acid). All cages were able to increase stiffness and failure load of the unstable motion segment significantly (P < 0.01). In comparison with the bone graft, the BAK cage (P < 0.01) and BIO cages 1 and 3 (P < 0.05) were able to increase stiffness and failure load. There was no significant difference between BIO cage 2 and the bone graft

  19. Lateral interbody fusion combined with open posterior surgery for adult spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Strom, Russell G; Bae, Junseok; Mizutani, Jun; Valone, Frank; Ames, Christopher P; Deviren, Vedat

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) with percutaneous screw fixation can treat adult spinal deformity (ASD) in the coronal plane, but sagittal correction is limited. The authors combined LIF with open posterior (OP) surgery using facet osteotomies and a rod-cantilever technique to enhance lumbar lordosis (LL). It is unclear how this hybrid strategy compares to OP surgery alone. The goal of this study was to evaluate the combination of LIF and OP surgery (LIF+OP) for ASD. METHODS All thoracolumbar ASD cases from 2009 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients with < 6 months follow-up, prior fusion, severe sagittal imbalance (sagittal vertical axis > 200 mm or pelvic incidence-LL > 40°), and those undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion were excluded. Deformity correction, complications, and outcomes were compared between LIF+OP and OP-only surgery patients. RESULTS LIF+OP (n = 32) and OP-only patients (n = 60) had similar baseline features and posterior fusion levels. On average, 3.8 LIFs were performed. Patients who underwent LIF+OP had less blood loss (1129 vs 1833 ml, p = 0.016) and lower durotomy rates (0% vs 23%, p = 0.002). Patients in the LIF+OP group required less ICU care (0.7 vs 2.8 days, p < 0.001) and inpatient rehabilitation (63% vs 87%, p = 0.015). The incidence of new leg pain, numbness, or weakness was similar between groups (28% vs 22%, p = 0.609). All leg symptoms resolved within 6 months, except in 1 OP-only patient. Follow-up duration was similar (28 vs 25 months, p = 0.462). LIF+OP patients had significantly less pseudarthrosis (6% vs 27%, p = 0.026) and greater improvement in visual analog scale back pain (mean decrease 4.0 vs 1.9, p = 0.046) and Oswestry Disability Index (mean decrease 21 vs 12, p = 0.035) scores. Lumbar coronal correction was greater with LIF+OP surgery (mean [± SD] 22° ± 13° vs 14° ± 13°, p = 0.010). LL restoration was 22° ± 13°, intermediately between OP-only with facet osteotomies (11° ± 7°, p < 0.001) and

  20. Lumbar lordosis.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar lordosis is a key postural component that has interested both clinicians and researchers for many years. Despite its wide use in assessing postural abnormalities, there remain many unanswered questions regarding lumbar lordosis measurements. Therefore, in this article we reviewed different factors associated with the lordosis angle based on existing literature and determined normal values of lordosis. We reviewed more than 120 articles that measure and describe the different factors associated with the lumbar lordosis angle. Because of a variety of factors influencing the evaluation of lumbar lordosis such as how to position the patient and the number of vertebrae included in the calculation, we recommend establishing a uniform method of evaluating the lordosis angle. Based on our review, it seems that the optimal position for radiologic measurement of lordosis is standing with arms supported while shoulders are flexed at a 30° angle. There is evidence that many factors, such as age, gender, body mass index, ethnicity, and sport, may affect the lordosis angle, making it difficult to determine uniform normal values. Normal lordosis should be determined based on the specific characteristics of each individual; we therefore presented normal lordosis values for different groups/populations. There is also evidence that the lumbar lordosis angle is positively and significantly associated with spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis. However, no association has been found with other spinal degenerative features. Inconclusive evidence exists for association between lordosis and low back pain. Additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations. The optimal lordotic range remains unknown and may be related to a variety of individual factors such as weight, activity, muscular strength, and flexibility of the spine and lower extremities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Congenital hypoplasia of the lumbar pedicle with spondylolisthesis: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Sheng; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Hyung Chang; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Park, Sang-Joon; Chen, Jian-Han

    2017-04-01

    Congenital hypoplasia of the spinal pedicle is a rare condition. Previously reported cases were treated conservatively or with posterior instrumented fusion. However, the absence or hypoplasia of the lumbar pedicle may increase the difficulty of pedicle screw fixation and fusion. Herein, the authors describe 2 cases of rare adult congenital hypoplasia of the right lumbar pedicles associated with spondylolisthesis. The patients underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with a stand-alone cage as well as percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. This method was used to avoid the difficulties associated with pedicle screw fixation and to attain solid fusion. Both patients achieved satisfactory outcomes after a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. This method may be an alternative for patients with congenital hypoplasia of the lumbar spinal pedicle.

  2. Outcomes of Posterolateral Fusion with and without Instrumentation and of Interbody Fusion for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Endler, Peter; Ekman, Per; Möller, Hans; Gerdhem, Paul

    2017-05-03

    Various methods for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis are available. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, and interbody fusion. The Swedish Spine Register was used to identify 765 patients who had been operated on for isthmic spondylolisthesis and had at least preoperative and 2-year outcome data; 586 of them had longer follow-up (a mean of 6.9 years). The outcome measures were a global assessment of leg and back pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) Questionnaire, the Short Form-36 (SF-36), a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, and satisfaction with treatment. Data on additional lumbar spine surgery was searched for in the register, with the mean duration of follow-up for this variable being 10.6 years after the index procedure. Statistical analyses were performed with analysis of covariance or competing-risks proportional hazards regression, adjusted for baseline differences in the studied variables, smoking, employment status, and level of fusion. Posterolateral fusion without instrumentation was performed in 102 patients; posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, in 452; and interbody fusion, in 211. At 1 year, improvement was reported in the global assessment for back pain by 54% of the patients who had posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, 68% of those treated with posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, and 70% of those treated with interbody fusion (p = 0.009). The VAS for back pain and reported satisfaction with treatment showed similar patterns (p = 0.003 and p = 0.017, respectively), whereas other outcomes did not differ among the treatment groups at 1 year. At 2 years, the global assessment for back pain indicated improvement in 57% of the patients who had undergone posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, 70% of those who had posterolateral fusion with instrumentation

  3. 100 Consecutive Cases of Degenerative Lumbar Conditions Using a Non-Threaded Locking Screw System With a 90-Degree Locking Cap

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bryan W.; Tortolani, P. Justin; Fedder, Ira L.; Sefter, John C.; Davis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background This prospective study analyzes the perioperative outcomes and long-term fusion success of 100 consecutive lumbar degenerative cases. The cases were managed using a non-threaded locking screw system, in conjunction with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages, for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. These 100 cases were compared to another prospective study treating patients with the same inclusion and exclusion criteria using conventional plate-based pedicle screw spinal instrumentation augmented with carbon fiber interbody cages. Methods A total of 167 operative levels were treated in 100 patients (51 single-level, 39 two-level and 10 three-level cases). Eleven cases were revisions and 67 patients received interbody fusion cages. Patients had an average of 22.8 ± 4.0 months followup. Results: There was one instrumentation failure but no significant subsidence at the interbody fusion level. The disc space height was restored as part of the surgical procedure at the interbody cage levels: from 7.5 ± 2.3 mm preoperative to 9.0 ± 2.1 mm postoperative. There were 2 cases of pseudarthrosis (2 / 100 = 2%). The average operative time for 1-level cases was 111 ± 25 minutes; for 2-level cases it was 132.4 ± 21.8 minutes; and for 3-level cases it was 162.6 ± 33 minutes. Blood loss averaged 800 ± 473 cc for 1-level cases, 1055 ± 408 cc for 2 levels, and 1155 ± 714 cc for 3 levels. The length of stay was similar between the 3 groups (4.4 ± 1.2 days for single-level cases, 4.7 ± 1.1 for 2 levels, and 5.0 ± 1.1 for 3 levels; P > .05). There were 3 incidental durotomies, and 4 other patients developed infections postoperatively that required reoperation. Conclusion The disc and foraminal heights can be restored and maintained with a unilateral cage and pedicle screw construct. Unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using a PEEK cage combined with a non-threaded locking pedicle screw and rod system results in similar fusion rates to

  4. Utility of multilevel lateral interbody fusion of the thoracolumbar coronal curve apex in adult deformity surgery in combination with open posterior instrumentation and L5-S1 interbody fusion: a case-matched evaluation of 32 patients.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Alexander A; Mundis, Gregory M; Nguyen, Stacie; Okonkwo, David O; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Fessler, Richard; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank; Diebo, Bassel G; Burton, Douglas; Hart, Robert; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of supplementing long thoracolumbar posterior instrumented fusion (posterior spinal fusion, PSF) with lateral interbody fusion (LIF) of the lumbar/thoracolumbar coronal curve apex in adult spinal deformity (ASD). METHODS Two multicenter databases were evaluated. Adults who had undergone multilevel LIF of the coronal curve apex in addition to PSF with L5-S1 interbody fusion (LS+Apex group) were matched by number of posterior levels fused with patients who had undergone PSF with L5-S1 interbody fusion without LIF (LS-Only group). All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Percutaneous PSF and 3-column osteotomy (3CO) were excluded. Demographics, perioperative details, radiographic spinal deformity measurements, and HRQoL data were analyzed. RESULTS Thirty-two patients were matched (LS+Apex: 16; LS: 16) (6 men, 26 women; mean age 63 ± 10 years). Overall, the average values for measures of deformity were as follows: Cobb angle > 40°, sagittal vertical axis (SVA) > 6 cm, pelvic tilt (PT) > 25°, and mismatch between pelvic incidence (PI) and lumbar lordosis (LL) > 15°. There were no significant intergroup differences in preoperative radiographic parameters, although patients in the LS+Apex group had greater Cobb angles and less LL. Patients in the LS+Apex group had significantly more anterior levels fused (4.6 vs 1), longer operative times (859 vs 379 minutes), and longer length of stay (12 vs 7.5 days) (all p < 0.01). For patients in the LS+Apex group, Cobb angle, pelvic tilt (PT), lumbar lordosis (LL), PI-LL (lumbopelvic mismatch), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for back and leg pain improved significantly (p < 0.05). For patients in the LS-Only group, there were significant improvements in Cobb angle, ODI score, and VAS scores for back and leg pain. The LS+Apex group had better correction of Cobb angles (56% vs 33%, p = 0.02), SVA (43% vs 5%, p = 0

  5. Navigation-assisted fluoroscopy in minimally invasive direct lateral interbody fusion: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jonathan E.; Regev, Gilad J.; Garfin, Steven R.; Kim, Choll W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is dependent on intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging for visualization, which significantly increases exposure to radiation. Navigation-assisted fluoroscopy (NAV) can potentially decrease radiation exposure and improve the operating room environment by reducing the need for real-time fluoroscopy. The direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) procedure is a technique for MIS intervertebral lumbar and thoracic interbody fusions. This study assesses the use of navigation for the DLIF procedure in comparison to standard fluoroscopy (FLUORO), as well as the accuracy of the NAV MIS DLIF procedure. Methods Three fresh whole-body cadavers underwent multiple DLIF procedures at the T10-L5 levels via either NAV or FLUORO. Radiation exposure and surgical times were recorded and compared between groups. An additional cadaver was used to evaluate the accuracy of the NAV system for the DLIF procedure by measuring the deviation error as the surgeon worked further from the anterior superior iliac spine tracker. Results Approach, discectomy, and total fluoroscopy times for FLUORO were longer than NAV (P < .05). In contrast, the setup time was longer in NAV (P = .005). Cage insertion and total operating times were similar for both. Radiation exposure to the surgeon for NAV was significantly less than FLUORO (P < .05). Accuracy of the NAV system was within 1 mm for L2-5. Conclusion Navigation for the DLIF procedure is feasible. Accuracy for this procedure over the most common levels (L2-5) is likely sufficient for safe clinical application. Although initial setup times were longer with NAV, simultaneous anteroposterior and lateral imaging with the NAV system resulted in overall surgery times similar to FLUORO. Navigation minimizes fluoroscopic radiation exposure. Clinical significance Navigation for the DLIF procedure is accurate and decreases radiation exposure without increasing the overall surgical time. PMID:25802659

  6. Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) with plate fixation and unilateral pedicle screws: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Sharma, Amit K; Huang, Russel C

    2011-08-01

    Retrospective cohort study. We present the radiographic and clinical outcomes of 13 patients who underwent lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) stabilized by unilateral pedicle screw instrumentation and anterior instrumentation. LTIF is a surgical technique that permits anterior column lumbar interbody fusion via a direct lateral transpsoas approach. Because of the inherent stability of the implants used and the minimal disruption of stabilizing ligaments associated with LTIF, this technique may allow use of less invasive adjunctive fixation methods including unilateral pedicle screw fixation. Information from medical records included patient demographics, medical comorbidities, clinical assessment, surgical time, blood loss, implant information, and complications. Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-12, and visual analog pain scale scores were obtained. Postoperative imaging allowed assessment of fusion, subsidence, and alignment. Estimated blood loss averaged 225 mL and operative time averaged 261 minutes. No patients received a transfusion. Average length of hospital stay was 4.6 days. Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-12, and visual analog pain scores demonstrated significant improvement. All patients with available 1 year postoperative imaging demonstrated solid fusion with average cranial and caudal subsidence of 1.8 and 0.8 mm, respectively. Two patients developed postoperative nondisplaced vertebral fractures through the anterior fixation screw tracts. Three patients developed transient postoperative hip flexion weakness and one also developed transient hypoesthesia in the anterior thigh, likely approach related. We report a series of patients treated with unilateral pedicle screw fixation with LTIF. Although the patient cohort is small, validated outcomes instruments were used and fusion was assessed by computed tomography scan in most cases. The data suggest that unilateral pedicle screw fixation may be adequate to achieve high fusion rates

  7. Retrograde ejaculation after anterior lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Emily M; McBeth, Zachary L; Henry, Sarah E; Cooley, Robert; Burger, Evalina L; Cain, Christopher M J; Patel, Vikas V

    2012-09-15

    A retrospective cohort study. To compare the incidence of retrograde ejaculation (RE) after anterior lumbar spine surgery with disc replacement versus fusion with the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP). Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has become a popular choice for treating a number of pathologies, largely because it preserves the posterior paravertebral muscles and ligaments. Despite these advantages, the anterior approach is also associated with various complications, one of which is RE. A recent study has questioned whether the risk of RE is increased by the use of BMP in ALIF procedures rather than by the approach alone. We conducted a retrospective review of all male patients who received ALIF using BMP or artificial disc replacement (ADR) on at least the L5-S1 level between 2004 and 2011. Medical records were evaluated for the occurrence of RE, and patients were contacted via the phone to obtain current information. The incidence of RE was then compared between the 2 anterior lumbar surgery procedures. Of the 95 cases of anterior surgery including L5-S1, 54 patients underwent ALIF with BMP (56.8%) and 41 patients were treated with ADR (43.2%). Postoperative RE occurred in 4 of the 54 ALIF patients (7.4%) and in 4 of the 41 ADR patients (9.8%). The incidence of RE was not significantly different between groups (P = 0.7226). At latest follow-up, 1 ALIF and 1 ADR patient reported resolution of the RE. This study found that RE occurred at a similar rate in patients treated with ADR and ALIF with BMP. The overall rate of RE after retroperitoneal anterior lumbar surgery was higher than expected, which underscores the importance of counseling patients about this risk and specifically questioning patients about the symptoms of RE at postoperative visits.

  8. [Surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis with multi-segment lumbar spinal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaping; Tang, Xun; Xu, Yongqing; Zhou, Tianhua; Shi, Jian; Cui, Yi; Xiang, Qili; Cai, Zhijun; Zhao, Qingkai; Yang, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Caihua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the surgical indications, decompression and fusion method, and fusion level selection of degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and multi-segment lumbar spinal stenosis. Between April 2000 and November 2011, 46 cases of DLS and multi-segment lumbar spinal stenosis were treated with multi-level decompression by fenestration and crept enlargement plus internal fixation by interbody and posterior-lateral bone graft fusion (5 segments or above). Of 46 cases, 25 were male and 21 were female, with a mean age of 70.2 years (range, 65-81 years) and with a mean disease duration of 6.4 years (range, 4 years and 6 months to 13 years). X-ray films showed that the lumbar Cobb angle was (26.7 ± 10.0) degrees, and the lumbar lordotic angle was (20.3 ± 8.8)degrees. The lumbar CT and MRI images showed three-segment stenosis in 24 cases, four-segment stenosis in 17 cases, and five-segment stenosis in 5 cases. A total of 165 stenosed segments included 12 L1,2, 34 L2,3, 43 L3,4, 45 L4,5, and 31 L5 and S1. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score (29 points) were employed to evaluate effectiveness. Thirteen patients had leakage of cerebrospinal fluid during operation, and no infection was found after corresponding treatment; pulmonary infection and urinary system infection occurred in 4 and 2 patients respectively, who relieved after received antibiotic therapy; 8 patients with poor wound healing received dressing change, adequate drainage, debridement and suture. No death, paralysis, central nervous system infection, or other complication was observed in these patients. Forty-six cases were followed up 12-72 months (mean, 36.2 months). Lumbago and backache and intermittent claudication of lower extremity were obviously improved. During follow-up, no screw incising, loosening and broken screws, or pseudarthrosis was noted under X-ray film and CT scanning. At last follow-up, the lumbar Cobb angle was

  9. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term.

  10. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  11. Correction of severe spinopelvic mismatch: decreased blood loss with lateral hyperlordotic interbody grafts as compared with pedicle subtraction osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Jean-Christophe; Yanamadala, Vijay; Buchlak, Quinlan D; Sethi, Rajiv K

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) provides extensive correction in patients with fixed sagittal plane imbalance but is associated with high estimated blood loss (EBL). Anterior column realignment (ACR) with lateral graft placement and sectioning of the anterior longitudinal ligament allows restoration of lumbar lordosis (LL). The authors compare peri- and postoperative measures in 2 groups of patients undergoing correction of a sagittal plane imbalance, either through PSO or the use of lateral lumbar fusion and ACR with hyperlordotic (20°-30°) interbody cages, with stabilization through standard posterior instrumentation in all cases. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective chart review of cases involving a lumbar PSO or lateral lumbar interbody fusion and ACR (LLIF-ACR) between 2010 and 2015 at the authors' institution. Patients who had a PSO in the setting of a preexisting fusion that spanned more than 4 levels were excluded. Demographic characteristics, spinopelvic parameters, EBL, operative time, and LOS were analyzed and compared between patients treated with PSO and those treated with LLIF-ACR. RESULTS The PSO group included 14 patients and the LLIF-ACR group included 13 patients. The mean follow-up was 13 months in the LLIF-ACR group and 26 months in the PSO group. The mean EBL was significantly lower in the LLIF-ACR group, measuring approximately 50% of the mean EBL in the PSO group (1466 vs 2910 ml, p < 0.01). Total LL correction was equivalent between the 2 groups (35° in the PSO group, 31° in the LLIF-ACR group, p > 0.05), as was the preoperative PI-LL mismatch (33° in each group, p > 0.05) and the postoperative PI-LL mismatch (< 1° in each group, p = 0.05). The fusion rate as assessed by the need for reoperation due to pseudarthrosis was lower in the LLIF-ACR group but not significantly so (3 revisions in the PSO group due to pseudarthrosis vs 0 in the LLIF-ACR group, p > 0.5). The total operative time and LOS were not

  12. Lumbar foraminal stenosis causes leg pain at rest.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Katsutaka; Aota, Yoichi; Higashi, Takayuki; Ishida, Ko; Nimura, Takanori; Konno, Tomoyuki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Lumbar intra-spinal canal stenosis is characterized by leg pain that intensifies during walking and intermittent claudication, while leg pain at rest is a characteristic neurological symptom of lumbar disc herniation. Until now, a correlation between leg pain at rest and symptomatic foraminal stenosis has not been reported. This is a prospective and comparative study of unilateral leg pain from L5 nerve root compression due to spinal canal stenosis to determine clinical characteristics of lumbar foraminal stenosis. Clinical and neurological findings were compared among 38 patients receiving L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for L5-S1 foraminal stenosis (FS group) and 60 patients receiving L4-5 decompression or/and fusion for L4-5 intra-spinal canal stenosis (CS group). The only significant difference between the FS and CS groups in demographic clinical data was leg pain at rest. The prevalence of leg pain was significantly higher in the FS group compared to the CS group (76 vs. 35%). The visual analogue scale for leg pain at rest was also significantly higher in the FS group than in the CS group (6.6 ± 3.1 vs. 1.3 ± 1.9). Leg pain at rest is characteristic of L5-S1 foraminal stenosis.

  13. Tophaceous gout causing lumbar stenosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huigen; Sheng, Jianming; Dai, Jiaping; Hu, Xuqi

    2017-08-01

    Gout in the spine is very rare. The clinical symptoms of the spinal gout are various and lack of specificity. The authors report a case of spinal gout causing lumbar stenosis. We never find such wide-invasive spinal gouty lesion in the published studies. A 68-year-old male had low back pain radiating to bilateral lower limbs, accompanying with intermittent claudication that lasted for 3 months and aggravated 5 days ago. Spinal gout, lumbar stenosis. The patient underwent L2-L4 laminectomy, L2/3 L3/4 an d L4/5 discectomy and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Dual-energy computed tomography detected extensive tophaceous deposits in L1/2 L2/3 L3/4 and L4/5 lumbar discs as well as the posterior column, especially L2-L3 and L4-L5 facet joints. During the surgery, we found a mass of chalky white material at the posterior column of L3 to L5 vertebral bodies, which also involved the intervertebral discs. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of spinal gout. Although spinal gout is thought to be rare, the diagnosis should be considered if the patient had severe back pain and a history of gout. Dual-energy computed tomography is highly recommended for these patients.

  14. Deep vein thrombosis due to migrated graft bone after posterior lumbosacral interbody fusion. Case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Hisashi; Sato, Shigenobu; Nakagawa, Izumi; Hyakumachi, Takahiko; Yanagibashi, Yasushi; Nitta, Fumihito; Masuda, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    The authors report the case of an 83-year-old woman with refractory sciatica attributable to isthmic spondylolisthesis at L-5. Her symptoms were successfully improved after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) at L5-S1; however, notable swelling in her left leg suddenly developed 2 days postoperatively. Anterior migration of a fragment of bone graft was demonstrated on computed tomography scanning, and there was obvious occlusion of the left common iliac vein (CIV) on magnetic resonance venography. Ultrasonography revealed a thrombus in the left CIV at the site of compression. To prevent a pulmonary embolism during manipulation of the affected vein, an inferior vena cava filter was placed just before excision of the migrated bone fragment. The swelling in the patient's leg subsided quickly after the surgery, and she was treated with heparin and warfarin to prevent recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Six months after the second surgery, complete restoration of blood flow to the left CIV and no recurrence of DVT were demonstrated on magnetic resonance venography. Especially in elderly patients with degenerative disc disease, excessive curettage and impaction of disc materials during the PLIF procedure may cause migration of bone graft fragments. Surgeons should be aware of the possible vascular complications of PLIF.

  15. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount that...

  16. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount that...

  17. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount that...

  18. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount that...

  19. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount that...

  20. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis: A retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-07-01

    The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery.In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared.The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively.PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period, and financial

  1. Preoperative evaluation of left common iliac vein in oblique lateral interbody fusion at L5-S1.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nam-Su; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Han-Dong; Kweon, Heon-Ju

    2017-06-22

    Oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) L5-S1 is essentially to perform an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) in the lateral position. Because the surgical procedures are performed "obliquely" over the left common iliac vein (LCIV), ensuring that the vein is protected which is particularly important. We aimed to evaluate the configuration of LCIV and its risk of mobilization during anterior approach at L5-S1 segment. This study involved 65 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar fusion (ALIF, n = 39; OLIF, n = 26) at the L5-S1 segment. Three independent examiners evaluated the configuration of the LCIV at the L5-S1 disc on axial magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine. The LCIV was categorized into three types according to the difficulty of mobilization: type I (no requirement for mobilization; LCIV runs laterally for more than two-thirds of the length of the left side of the L5-S1 disc), type II (easy mobilization; LCIV obstructs the L5-S1 disc space, but the perivascular adipose tissue is present under the LCIV), and type III (potentially difficult mobilization; no perivascular adipose tissue under the LCIV). The patient records were reviewed for vascular complications. There were 21 men and 44 women in this study, with a mean age of 63.4 years (range 19-83 years). Type I LCIV configuration was found in 32 (49.2%) patients, type II in 18 (27.7%), and type III in 15 (23.1%). There were 7 (10.8%) patients with LCIV injury (type I, n = 0; type II, n = 2; type III, n = 5) (P = 0.003). Intraobserver reliability for the LCIV classification ranged from substantial to excellent, and interobserver reliability ranged from moderate to excellent. Preoperative evaluation for anterior approach to the L5-S1 segment should take account of the LCIV position, as well as the difficulty of its mobilization. The type III LCIV configuration showed a high rate of vascular injury.

  2. Analysis of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Use in the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingqiang; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Buser, Zorica; Park, Jong-Beom; Brodke, Darrel S.; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Youssef, Jim A.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Yoon, S. Tim

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database review. Objective To identify trends of the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS). Methods PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar fusion for LDS between 2005 and 2011. The distribution of bone morphogenetic protein use rate (BR) in various surgical procedures was recorded. Patient numbers, reoperation numbers, BR, and per year BR (PYBR) were stratified by geographic region, gender, and age. Results There were 11,335 fusion surgeries, with 3,461 cases using rhBMP-2. Even though PYRB increased between 2005 and 2008, there was a significant decrease in 2010 for each procedure: 404 (34.5%) for posterior interbody fusion, 1,282 (34.3%) for posterolateral plus posterior interbody fusion (PLPIF), 1,477 (29.2%) for posterolateral fusion, and 335 (22.4%) for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. In patients using rhBMP-2, the reoperation rate was significantly lower than in patients not using rhBMP-2 (0.69% versus 1.07%, p < 0.0001). Male patients had higher PYBR compared with female patients in 2008 and 2009 (p < 0.05). The West region and PLPIF had the highest BR and PYBR. Conclusions Our data shows that the revision rates were significantly lower in patients treated with rhBMP-2 compared with patients not treated with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, rhBMP-2 use in LDS varied by year, region, gender, and type of fusion technique. In the West region, the posterior approach and patients 65 to 69 years of age had the highest rate of rhBMP-2 use. PMID:27853658

  3. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Unilateral Facetectomy and Interbody Fusion Using Expandable Cages for Lumbosacral Foraminal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hoon; Bae, Chae Wan; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Rhim, Seung Chul; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Objective Surgical treatment of lumbosacral foraminal stenosis requires an understanding of the anatomy of the lumbosacral area in individual patients. Unilateral facetectomy has been used to completely decompress entrapment of the L5 nerve root, followed in some patients by posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with stand-alone cages. Methods We assessed 34 patients with lumbosacral foraminal stenosis who were treated with unilateral facetectomy and PLIF using stand-alone cages in our center from January 2004 to September 2007. All the patients underwent follow-up X-rays, including a dynamic view, at 3, 6, 12, 24 months, and computed tomography (CT) at 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were analyzed with the mean numeric rating scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Odom's criteria. Radiological outcomes were assessed with change of disc height, defined as the average of anterior, middle, and posterior height in plain X-rays. In addition, lumbosacral fusion was also assessed with dynamic X-ray and CT. Results Mean NRS score, which was 9.29 prior to surgery, was 1.5 at 18 months after surgery. The decrease in NRS was statistically significant. Excellent and good groups with regard to Odom's criteria were 31 cases (91%) and three cases (9%) were fair. Pre-operative mean ODI of 28.4 decreased to 14.2 at post-operative 24 months. In 30 patients, a bone bridge on CT scan was identified. The change in disc height was 8.11 mm, 10.02 mm and 9.63 mm preoperatively, immediate postoperatively and at 24 months after surgery, respectively. Conclusion In the treatment of lumbosacral foraminal stenosis, unilateral facetectomy and interbody fusion using expandable stand-alone cages may be considered as one treatment option to maintain post-operative alignment and to obtain satisfactory clinical outcomes. PMID:21430975

  4. Reliability and accuracy of fine-cut computed tomography scans to determine the status of anterior interbody fusions with metallic cages.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Schwender, James D; Subach, Brian R; Gornet, Matthew F; Ohno, Shuichiro

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scan has been shown to be more accurate than radiographs in evaluating anterior interbody fusion but may still over-read the extent of fusion. To assess the reliability and accuracy of fine-cut CT scans with reconstructions in evaluating anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with metallic cages using surgical exploration as the reference standard. Accuracy of a diagnostic test referenced to the gold standard. A total of 49 patients and 69 surgical levels. Evaluation of fine-cut CT scans for evidence of fusion with subsequent surgical exploration as the reference standard. Forty-nine patients who underwent ALIF with metallic cages over 69 levels, who had a fine-cut CT scan before revision were included. Five spine surgeons unaware of the findings on surgical exploration evaluated pre-revision CT scans, classified these as fused or not; and determined the presence of a "sentinel sign" and a "posterior sentinel sign." Kappa coefficients for interobserver reliability, sensitivity, and specificity to detect fusion were determined. There were 26 males and 23 females with a mean age of 43 years. There were 27 smokers. Average time from index to revision surgery was 22 months. Interobserver kappa for classification as fused or not was 0.25 with 70% to 97% sensitivity and 28% to 85% specificity. The interobserver kappa for the sentinel sign was 0.34 with 13% to 33% sensitivity and 77% to 92% specificity. The interobserver kappa for the posterior sentinel sign was 0.23 with 33% to 87% sensitivity and 56% to 90% specificity. Raters generally overstated fusion with low specificities across raters and low consensus specificity. Overall accuracy of the posterior sentinel sign (74%) was higher than the sentinel sign (61%). The low kappa value indicates fair reliability. In patients with metallic interbody devices, surgeons should be cautious about interpreting the findings on fine-cut CT scans whether using a general assessment of the fusion, the

  5. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones.

  6. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  7. Biomechanical and clinical study of single posterior oblique cage POLIF in the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Zagra, Antonino; Scaramuzzo, Laura; Galbusera, Fabio; Minoia, Leone; Archetti, Marino; Giudici, Fabrizio

    2015-11-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability and the clinical efficacy of a lumbar interbody fusion obtained by single oblique cage implanted by a posterior approach. Through the realization of three finite element models (FEMs), the biomechanics of POLIF was compared to PLIF and TLIF. Ninety-four patients underwent interbody fusion by POLIF with instrumented posterolateral fusion. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated at regular intervals for at least 6 months. The FEMs showed no statistically significant differences in stability in compression and flexion-extension. Mean preoperative VAS score was 7.1, decreased to 2.1 at follow-up. Mean preoperative SF-12 value was 34.5 %, increased to 75.4 % at follow-up. All patients showed a good fusion rate and no hardware failure. POLIF associated to instrumented posterolateral fusion is a viable and safe surgical technique, which ensures a biomechanical stability similar to other surgical techniques.

  8. Lumbar ADR: a triumph of technology over reason?

    PubMed

    Madonia-Barr, Jennifer R

    2007-08-01

    The many unanswered questions surrounding ADR beget the question of whether patients would ultimately be better managed with lumbar fusion surgery or even no surgery at all. Lumbar fusion technology has made advances in recent years with the advent of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and the use of bone morphogenetic proteins. With a TLIF procedure, spine surgeons are able to obtain a 360-degree fusion through a single posterior incision with more predictable long-term results, especially when patients have confounding issues. Although early clinical results show ADR to be a promising alternative to current surgical options, long-term results are needed to adequately assess the procedure's efficacy. There will always be a demand for new technology. Cost, quality, and access are performance benchmarks for hospital survival in the current health care industry. Today's health care environment forces surgeons to be fiscally responsible while still providing the best quality care possible. Therefore, the cost of ADR compared to a traditional pedicle screw instrumentation (about $12,000 per segment vs $3,500 per segment) must be taken into consideration. Is the additional cost of ADR justified when studies so far fail to show a statistically significant difference in long-term outcomes? How do we justify the added cost when conventional lumbar fusion, the gold standard for intractable cases, has more predictable outcomes? Ultimately, ADR may be a more promising alternative to spinal fusion for patients with multilevel DDD (ie, a three-segment lumbar disk replacement) because it can spare disk decompensation of the adjacent segments.

  9. Technical description of oblique lateral interbody fusion at L1-L5 (OLIF25) and at L5-S1 (OLIF51) and evaluation of complication and fusion rates.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kamal R M; Billys, James B; Hynes, Richard A

    2017-04-01

    The oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) procedure is aimed at mitigating some of the challenges seen with traditional anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and transpsoas lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF), and allows for interbody fusion at L1-S1. The study aimed to describe the OLIF technique and assess the complication and fusion rates. This is a retrospective cohort study. The sample is composed of 137 patients who underwent OLIF procedure. The outcome measures were adverse events within 6 months of surgery: infection, symptomatic pseudarthrosis, hardware failure, vascular injury, perioperative blood transfusion, ureteral injury, bowel injury, renal injury, prolonged postoperative ileus (more than 3 days), incisional hernia, pseudohernia, reoperation, neurologic deficits (weakness, numbness, paresthesia), hip flexion pain, retrograde ejaculation, sympathectomy affecting lower extremities, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and cerebrovascular accident. The outcome measures also include fusion and subsidence rates based on computed tomography (CT) done at 6 months postoperatively. Retrospective chart review of 150 consecutive patients was performed to examine the complications associated with OLIF at L1-L5 (OLIF25), OLIF at L5-S1 (OLIF51), and OLIF at L1-L5 combined with OLIF at L5-S1 (OLIF25+OLIF51). Only patients who had at least 6 months of postoperative follow-up, including CT scan at 6 months after surgery, were included. Independent radiology review of CT data was performed to assess fusion and subsidence rates at 6 months. A total of 137 patients underwent fusion at 340 levels. An overall complication rate of 11.7% was seen. The most common complications were subsidence (4.4%), postoperative ileus (2.9%), and vascular injury (2.9%). Ileus and vascular injuries were only seen in cases including OLIF51. No patient suffered neurologic injury. No cases of ureteral injury, sympathectomy affecting the lower

  10. Extreme lateral interbody fusion relieves symptoms of spinal stenosis and low-grade spondylolisthesis by indirect decompression in complex patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Farwana, Mohammad; Lam, Khai S

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis and low-grade spondylolisthesis produce symptoms of neural compression that can be treated with extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF) via indirect decompression. This study aimed to investigate whether the restoration of disc dimensions would relieve symptoms of radiculopathy, claudication and back pain. In this retrospective study, patients undergoing XLIF surgery for relief of radicular symptoms or degenerative disc disease were included. Radiologically proven changes were used to assess the modes of degeneration. Objective measures such as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for back and legs and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used. Complications were collated post-operatively from clinical notes and outpatient appointments. Twenty-three consecutive patients were included, of whom 91% had spinal stenosis. The cohort presented with multiple comorbidities and 35% of the cohort had undergone previous lumbar surgery. There was a 61% improvement of coronal Cobb angle and an 11% correction of the lordosis sustained 1year after surgery. Clinical outcomes at 1year showed 39%, 50% and 60% improvements in the ODI, back and leg VAS scores respectively. 48% of patients had reduced sensation related to lumbosacral plexus manipulation and one retroperitoneal haematoma was conservatively managed. Minimally invasive spinal (MIS) XLIF resulted in effective restoration of disc dimensions via indirect decompression, providing good relief of clinical symptoms evidenced by significant improvement in clinical outcome scores. XLIF corrected scoliosis and improved lumbar lordosis significantly. Several plexopathies did not hinder long-term recovery. XLIF is highly suited to treating complex patients with multiple comorbidities and degenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Early experience with endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Lynn B; Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2016-02-01

    Approximately half a million spinal fusion procedures are performed annually in the US. It is estimated that up to one-third of arthrodesis constructs require revision surgeries. In this study the authors present endoscopic treatment strategies targeting 3 types of complications following arthrodesis surgery: 1) adjacent-level foraminal stenosis; 2) foraminal stenosis at an arthrodesis segment; and 3) stenosis caused by a displaced interbody cage. A retrospective chart review of 11 patients with a mean age of 68 ± 15 years was performed (continuous variables are shown as the mean ± SEM). All patients had a history of lumbar arthrodesis surgery and suffered from unilateral radiculopathy. Endoscopic revision surgeries were done as outpatient procedures, and there were no intraoperative or perioperative complications. The cohort included 3 patients with foraminal stenosis at the level of previous arthrodesis. They presented with unilateral radicular leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS] score: 7.3 ± 2.1) and were severely disabled, as evidenced by an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of 46 ± 4.9. Transforaminal endoscopic foraminotomies were performed, and at a mean follow-up time of 9.0 ± 2.5 months VAS was reduced by an average of 6.3. The cohort also includes 7 patients suffering unilateral radiculopathy due to adjacent-level foraminal stenosis. Preoperative VAS for leg pain of the symptomatic side was 6.0 ± 1.6, VAS for back pain was 5.2 ± 1.7, and ODI was 40 ± 6.33. Endoscopic decompression led to reduction of the ipsilateral leg VAS score by an average of 5, resulting in leg pain of 1 ± 0.5 at an average of 8 months of follow-up. The severity of back pain remained stable (VAS 4.2 ± 1.4). Two of these patients required revision surgery for recurrent symptoms. Finally, this study includes 1 patient who presented with weakness and pain due to retropulsion of an L5/S1 interbody spacer. The patient underwent an endoscopic interlaminar approach with partial

  12. Effects of preoperative simulation on minimally invasive Hybrid Lumbar Interbody Fusion (MIS-HLIF).

    PubMed

    Rieger, Bernhard; Jiang, Hongzhen; Reinshagen, Clemens; Molcanyi, Marek; Zivcak, Jozef; Grönemeyer, Dietrich; Bosche, Bert; Schackert, Gabriele; Ruess, Daniel

    2017-07-10

    The main focus of this study was to evaluate how preoperative simulation affects the surgical workflow, radiation exposure and outcome of MIS-HLIF. 132 patients who underwent single level MIS-HLIF were enrolled in a cohort study design. Dose area product was analyzed in addition to surgical data. Once preoperative simulation was established, 66 cases (SIM cohort) were compared with 66 patients who had previously undergone MIS-HLIF without preoperative simulation (NO-SIM cohort). Dose area product was reduced considerably in the SIM cohort (320 cGy·cm(2) NO-SIM cohort: 470 cGy·cm(2); p<0.01). Surgical time was shorter for the SIM cohort (155 minutes; NO-SIM cohort: 182 minutes; p<0.05). SIM cohort had a better outcome in numeric rating scale (NRS) back at 6 months follow-up when compared to NO-SIM cohort (p<0.05). Preoperative simulation reduced radiation exposure and resulted in less back pain at the 6 months follow-up time point. Preoperative simulation provided guidance in determining the correct cage height. Outcome controls enabled the surgeon to improve the procedure and the software algorithm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein in Spinal Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Colom-Beauchamp, Eduardo; Beaton-Comulada, David; Rodriguez, Julio A; Pérez-López, José C; Montañez-Huertas, José; Escobar-Medina, Enrique; Massanet-Vollrath, José

    2017-09-01

    Since its introduction and FDA approval, rhBMP-2 has been adopted by spine surgeons as a substitute for ICBG in numerous spinal fusion techniques. As broad clinical use increased, reports on potential complications associated with rhBMP-2 also increased. We provide our experience with TLIF using rhBMP-2 or ICBG in an entirely Hispanic population. This was a 2-year retrospective study of 67 patients, with 26 in the rhBMP-2 group and 41 in the ICBG group, who underwent TLIF. Pertinent information was obtained through review of the medical records documenting complications, intraoperative times, and EBL, among other things. There were 28 post-operative complications with 15 (53.6%) in the ICBG group and 13 (46.4%) in the rhBMP-2 group. The average EBL was 572.3 mL (SD: 411.8) in the ICBG group and 397.9 mL (SD: 312.2) in the rhBMP-2 group. The average intraoperative time was 243.1 minutes (SD: 79.5) in the ICBG group and 226.5 minutes (SD: 64.7) in the rhBMP-2 group. Fifty-two patients underwent open TLIF and 15 patients underwent MI TLIF. The average EBL was 571.2 mL (SD: 375.3) in the open TLIF group and 228.3 mL (SD: 299.3) in the MI-TLIF group. The average intraoperative time was 241.0 minutes (SD: 76.0) for patients in the open TLIF group and 218.8 minutes (SD: 65.0) for those in the MI-TLIF group. There were no new cancer events at any of the 2-year follow-up visits. Our results suggest that the safety profile of rhBMP-2 may be inferior to that of ICBG, rejecting the possibility of ICBG being replaced by rhBMP-2 as the gold standard for spinal fusion.

  14. A Clinical Investigation of Contralateral Neurological Symptom after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yapeng; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze treatment outcomes and morbidity of contralateral neurological symptom in patients after TLIF surgery and to explore its possible causes. Material/Methods A retrospective study was conducted involving a total of 476 patients who underwent TILF from 2009 to 2012 in our hospital. These cases were divided into a symptomatic group (Group S) and a non-symptomatic group. The differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery were compared between Group S and a random sample of 40 cases of non-symptomatic group patients (group N). In addition, according to whether the patient underwent second surgery, Group S patients were further divided into a transient neurologic symptoms group (Group T) and an operations exploration group (Group O). The time of symptom appearance, duration, and symptomatic severity (JOA VAS score) were compared between Group T and O. Results Among the 476 patients, 18 had postoperative contralateral neurological symptoms; thus, the morbidity was 3.7815%. The indicators in Group S were lower than in Group N in the differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery (p<0.05). Five patients (Group O) in Group S had second surgery because of invalid conservative treatment. The surgical exploration rate was 1.0504%. Compared with Group T, the symptoms of Group O patients appeared earlier, persisted longer, and were more serious (p<0.05). Conclusions Contralateral neurological symptom is a potential complication after TLIF, and its causes are diverse. Surgical explorations should be conducted early for those patients with the complication who present with obvious nerve damage. PMID:26109143

  15. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A single-center clinical and radiological follow-up study of 20 patients.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, Enrico; Molliqaj, Granit; Schaller, Karl; Gautschi, Oliver Pascal

    2017-02-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is an alternative to standard posterior approaches for achieving fusion in the lumbar spine. It allows exposure of the lateral aspect of the lumbar disc through a lateral approach with the possibility to insert a wide footprint interbody cage as a stand-alone procedure or associated with a uni- or bilateral percutaneous fixation. This is a retrospective series of 20 consecutive patients operated with a XLIF procedure from 2014 to 2015. N=10 women and N=10 men with a mean age of 67.5years (range 37.9-81.2) were included in the study. N=18 patients have been operated at one level, while N=2 patients underwent a double-level XLIF. The index levels were: L2-L3 in 2, L3-L4 in 7, L4-L5 in 9 and L3-L5 in 2 patients, respectively. The mean clinico-radiological follow-up was 9.8months (range 2.5-16.6). The clinical outcome was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Euro-Qol (EQ)-5D, visual analogue scale (VAS) and EQ-5D index scores. Preoperative, postoperative and follow-up sagittal balance was assessed by EOS full spine X-ray. Furthermore, presence or absence of fusion was assessed by thin cuts CT scan at the end of the follow-up. The analysis highlighted a clear clinical improvement for the study collective. The mean ODI improved from 41.6 preoperatively to 23.5 at the last follow-up (p<0.0036). EQ-5D VAS and EQ-5D index improved from 45.5 to 71.8 (p<0.0001) and from 0.454 to 0.693 (p<0.0002), respectively. Analysis of the sagittal balance revealed an increase of the total lumbar lordosis, however not in a statistically significant manner (p=0.164). Furthermore, an increase of 55.7% in mean disc height (from 7.0mm to 10.9mm) has been observed (p<0.0001). Surprisingly, the right foramen height was increased in a statistically significant manner compared to the left one, but both of them increased in absolute values. However, foraminal area on both sides did not significantly increase. The mean canal area was 115.7mm(2

  16. Retroperitoneal hematoma after using the extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) approach: Presentation of a case and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Peiró-García, A; Domínguez-Esteban, I; Alía-Benítez, J

    2016-01-01

    The transpsoas approach, also known as extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF), to the lumbar spine is a novel minimally invasive technique with positive clinical outcomes and a low complication rate. There is a low risk of bleeding, due to this approach causing less soft tissue disruption than traditional spine surgery, but segmental arteries and great vessels can be damaged. Retroperitoneal haematoma is a major complication, with few cases reported. This is the first case reported in a Stand-alone XLIF and also the first case reported with haemorrhagic shock. Non-specific symptoms such tachycardia, hypotension, and anaemia are the most prevalent in this complication. With this case, our aim is to describe serious complications related to XLIF.

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes in hybrid constructs for multi-level lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Alan; Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph

    2016-12-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the effect of hybrid constructs which involve a total disc arthroplasty (TDA) with stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) versus non-hybrid constructs including multi-level TDA, multi-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with posterior transpedicular fixation or multi-level stand-alone ALIF as a surgical intervention for degenerative disc disease (DDD) in the lumbar spine. Primary outcomes analysed included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for back pain. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar was undertaken by two separate reviewers and a meta-analysis of the outcomes was performed. Three studies met our search criteria. When comparing hybrid constructs to multi-level TDA or lumbar fusion (LF) improvements in back pain were found with a VAS back pain score reduction of 1.38 (P<0.00001) postoperatively and a VAS back pain score reduction of 0.99 points (P=0.0006) at 2-years follow-up. Results so far slightly favour clinically significant improved VAS back pain score outcomes postoperatively and at 2-years follow-up for hybrid constructs in multi-level lumbar DDD of the spine when compared with non-hybrid multi-level LF or TDA. It cannot however be concluded that a hybrid construct is superior to multi-level LF or TDA based on this meta-analysis. The results highlight the need for further prospective studies to delineate best practice in the management of degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine.

  18. Elimination of Subsidence with 26-mm-Wide Cages in Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gernot; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Gandevia, Lena; Hussain, Ibrahim; Nakhla, Jonathan; Zubkov, Micaella; Härtl, Roger

    2017-08-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (ELIF) has gained popularity as a minimally invasive technique for indirect decompression. However, graft subsidence potentially threatens long-term success of ELIF. This study evaluated whether 26-mm-wide cages can eliminate subsidence and subsequent loss of decompression in ELIF. Patients undergoing ELIF surgery using a 26-mm-wide cage were analyzed retrospectively. Patient demographics and perioperative data for radiographic and clinical outcomes were recorded. Radiographic parameters included regional sagittal lumbar lordosis and foraminal and disc height. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale. Subsidence of 26-mm-wide cages was compared with previous outcomes of patients undergoing ELIF using 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. There were 21 patients and 28 spinal segments analyzed. Radiographic outcome measures such as disc and foraminal height revealed significant improvement at follow-up compared with before surgery (P = 0.001). Postoperative to last follow-up cage subsidence translated into 0.34 mm ± 0.26 and -0.55 mm ± 0.64 in disc and foraminal height loss, respectively. Patients with 26-mm-wide cages experienced less subsidence by means of disc (26 mm vs. 18 mm and 22 mm, P ≤ 0.05) and foraminal height (26 mm vs. 18 mm, P = 0.005; 26 mm vs. 22 mm, P = 0.208) loss compared with patients receiving 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. The 26-mm-wide cages almost eliminated cage subsidence in ELIF. Compared with 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages, 26-mm-wide cages significantly reduced cage subsidence in ELIF at midterm follow-up. A 26-mm-wide cage should be used in ELIF to achieve sustained indirect decompression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Selection of suitable procedure in the treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis based upon imaging studies].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yue; Xu, Yong-yi; Wang, Shou-guo; Ji, Feng; Fei, Hao-dong; Ge, Yun-ru; Zhao, Qing-hua; Tian, Ji-wei

    2013-01-29

    To compare the clinical efficacies of two different procedures in the treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis. From August 2008 to August 2011, 28 patients of lumbar degenerative scoliosis were divided into one group (n = 14) undergoing modified transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) instrumented surgery and another group (n = 14) undergoing posterolateral fusion (PLF) instrumented surgery. There were 12 males and 16 females with a mean age of 66.2 years (range: 54-79). The operative durations and bleeding volumes of two groups were recorded. The post-operative efficacy was evaluated with VAS (visual analogue scale) for low back pain, ODI (Oswestry disability index), Cobb' angle and lumbar lordosis angle on plain film. The mean follow-up period was 25.9 months. The operative duration was 192.0 ± 44.7 min in modified TLIF group versus 163.0 ± 39.0 min in PLF group. The bleeding volume was 718.0 ± 197.2 ml in modified TLIF group versus 546.0 ± 226.6 ml in PLF group. All operated lumbar intervertebral achieved bony fusion in modified TLIF group by the last follow-up. Two cases had no bony fusion and there was one case of pseudarthrosis in PLF group. Significant differences existed between two groups in pre-operative and post-operative values of VAS, ODI, Cobb' s angle and lumbar lordosis angle (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between two groups in the values of pre-operative and post-operative VAS and lumbar lordosis angle (P < 0.05) but not in the values of pre-operative and post-operative ODI and Cobb' s angle (P > 0.05). As an alternative, safe and effective procedure, modified TLIF instrumented is superior to PLF instrumented in the treatment of lumbar degenerative scoliosis.

  20. [Comparison of three types of lumbar total disc arthroplasty. Four-year minimum follow-up].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Bran-García, M; Rosales-Olivarez, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Sánchez-Bringas, M G; Juárez-Jiménez, H G; Santillán-Montelongo, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A

    2012-01-01

    Total lumbar disc replacement was developed to avoid the drawbacks of arthrodesis. This procedure should be done cautiously due to the various already known complications. The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical and radiographic results after single-level lumbar arthroplasty with the Prodisc-L, Maverick and Charité prostheses at our service. A retrospective study was performed comparing the clinical and radiographic results of three groups of patients who underwent total lumbar disc arthroplasty from January 2000 to December 2007. Twenty-one lumbar prosthetic surgeries were performed. The Prodisc device was used in 13 patients, the Maverick in 4, and the Charité in 4. After the application of the Stauffer-Coventry scale, 16 patients reported excellent results and 5 good results. The mean preoperative interbody height was 7.9 mm and the mean postoperative height was 12.91 mm. The mean differential angle in the dynamic films was 5.47 degrees preoperatively and 4.61 postoperatively; the mean angle in neutral position was 13.38 preoperatively and 19.61 postoperatively. This study showed that the clinical result was good in all three groups. Mobility was better maintained with the Charité prosthesis compared to the Prodisc and Maverick devices. The three prostheses are appropriate for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disease.

  1. Outcomes of Demineralized Bone Matrix Enriched with Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate in Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, Mark A.; Hamamoto, Jason T.; Plotkin, Benjamin; Daubs, Michael D.; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple studies have demonstrated that a significant amount of variability exists in various demineralized bone matrix (DBM) formulations, which casts doubts on its reliability in consistently promoting fusion. Bone marrow aspirate (BMA) is a cellular based graft that contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and growth factors can confer osteogenic and osteoinductive potential to DBM. The goal of this study was to describe the outcome of DBM enriched with concentrated BMA in patients undergoing combined lumbar interbody and posterolateral fusion. Methods Eighty patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up were evaluated. Fusion and rates of complication were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed based on the modified Odom’s criteria. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effects of independent variables on fusion outcome. Results The overall rate of solid fusion (i.e patients with both solid posterolateral and interbody fusion) was 81.3% (65/80). Specifically, the radiographic evidence of solid posterolateral and interbody fusions were 81.3% (65/80) and 92.5% (74/80), respectively. Seven (8.75%) patients developed hardware-related complications, 2 (2.5%) patients developed a postoperative infection and 2 (2.5%) patients developed clinical pseudarthrosis. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores of 3 and 4 were associated with non-solid unions (CCI-3, p = 0.048; CCI-4, p = 0.03). Excellent or good outcomes were achieved in 58 (72.5%) patients. Conclusions Patients undergoing lumbar fusion using an enriched bone graft containing concentrated BMA added to DBM can achieve successful fusion with relatively low complications and good functional outcomes. Despite these findings, more studies with higher level of evidence are needed to better understand the efficacy of this promising graft option. PMID:27909656

  2. Outcomes of Demineralized Bone Matrix Enriched with Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate in Lumbar Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, Remi M; Eckardt, Mark A; Hamamoto, Jason T; Plotkin, Benjamin; Daubs, Michael D; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that a significant amount of variability exists in various demineralized bone matrix (DBM) formulations, which casts doubts on its reliability in consistently promoting fusion. Bone marrow aspirate (BMA) is a cellular based graft that contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and growth factors can confer osteogenic and osteoinductive potential to DBM. The goal of this study was to describe the outcome of DBM enriched with concentrated BMA in patients undergoing combined lumbar interbody and posterolateral fusion. Eighty patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up were evaluated. Fusion and rates of complication were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed based on the modified Odom's criteria. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effects of independent variables on fusion outcome. The overall rate of solid fusion (i.e patients with both solid posterolateral and interbody fusion) was 81.3% (65/80). Specifically, the radiographic evidence of solid posterolateral and interbody fusions were 81.3% (65/80) and 92.5% (74/80), respectively. Seven (8.75%) patients developed hardware-related complications, 2 (2.5%) patients developed a postoperative infection and 2 (2.5%) patients developed clinical pseudarthrosis. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores of 3 and 4 were associated with non-solid unions (CCI-3, p = 0.048; CCI-4, p = 0.03). Excellent or good outcomes were achieved in 58 (72.5%) patients. Patients undergoing lumbar fusion using an enriched bone graft containing concentrated BMA added to DBM can achieve successful fusion with relatively low complications and good functional outcomes. Despite these findings, more studies with higher level of evidence are needed to better understand the efficacy of this promising graft option.

  3. A new bone surrogate model for testing interbody device subsidence.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony G; Aiyangar, Ameet K; Anderson, Paul A; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2011-07-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study investigating interbody device subsidence measures in synthetic vertebrae, polyurethane foam blocks, and human cadaveric vertebrae. To compare subsidence measures of bone surrogates with human vertebrae for interbody devices varying in size/placement. Bone surrogates are alternatives when human cadaveric vertebrae are unavailable. Synthetic vertebrae modeling cortices, endplates, and cancellous bone have been developed as an alternative to polyurethane foam blocks for testing interbody device subsidence. Indentors placed on the endplates of synthetic vertebrae, foam blocks, and human vertebrae were subjected to uniaxial compression. Subsidence, measured with custom-made extensometers, was evaluated for an indentor seated either centrally or peripherally on the endplate. Failure force and indentation stiffness were determined from force-displacement curves. Subsidence measures in human vertebrae varied with indentor placement: failure forces were higher and indentors subsided less with peripheral placement. Subsidence measures in foam blocks were insensitive to indentor size/placement; they were similar to human vertebrae for centrally placed but not for peripherally placed indentors. Although subsidence measures in synthetic vertebrae were sensitive to indentor size/placement, failure force and indentation stiffness were overestimated, and subsidence underestimated, for both centrally placed and peripherally placed indentors. The synthetic endplate correctly represented the human endplate geometry, and thus, failure force, stiffness, and subsidence in synthetic vertebrae were sensitive to indentor size/placement. However, the endplate was overly strong and thus synthetic vertebrae did not accurately model indentor subsidence in human cadaveric vertebrae. Foam blocks captured subsidence measures more accurately than synthetic vertebrae for centrally placed indentors, but because of their uniform density were not sufficiently robust to

  4. Anterior Interbody Grafting and Instrumentation for Advanced Spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Kwan; Jo, Dae Jean; Lee, Tae One

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the surgical outcomes of ventral interbody grafting and anterior or posterior spinal instrumentation for the treatment of advanced spondylodiscitis in patients who had failed medical management. Methods A total of 28 patients were evaluated for associated medical illness, detected pathogen, level of involved spine, and perioperative complications. Radiological evaluation including the rate of bony union, segmental Cobb angle, graft- and instrumentation-related complications, and clinical outcomes by mean Frankel scale and VAS score were performed. Results There are 14 pyogenic spondylodiscitis, 6 postoperative spondylodiscitis, and 8 tuberculous spondylodiscitis. There were 21 males and 7 females. Mean age was 51 years, with a range from 18 to 77. Mean follow-up period was 10.9 months. Associated medical illnesses were 6 diabetes, 3 pulmonary tuberculosis, and 4 chronic liver diseases. Staphylococcus was the most common pathogen isolated (25%), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was found in 18% of the patients. Operative approaches, either anterior or posterior spinal instrumentation, were done simultaneously or delayed after anterior aggressive debridement, neural decompression, and structural interbody bone grafting. All patients with neurological deficits improved after operation, except only one who died from aggravation as military tuberculosis. Mean Frankel scale was changed from 3.78±0.78 preoperatively to 4.78±0.35 at final follow up and mean VAS score was improved from 7.43±0.54 to 2.07±1.12. Solid bone fusion was obtained in all patients except only one patient who died. There was no need for prolongation of duration of antibiotics and no evidence of secondary infection owing to spinal instrumentations. Conclusion According to these results, debridement and anterior column reconstruction with ventral interbody grafting and instrumentation is effective and safe in patients who had failed medical management and neurological deficits

  5. Clinical and Radiological Comparison of Semirigid (WavefleX) and Rigid System for the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Keun; Lim, Hyunkeun; Oh, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Spinal fusion operation is an effective treatment in the spinal pathology, but it could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumented and adjacent segments. This retrospective study compared the radiological and clinical outcomes of patients undergoing lumbar fusion with semirigid rods versus rigid rods system. Methods Using transpedicular fixation and posterior lumbar interbody fusion at the level of L4/L5, 20 patients were treated with semirigid rods (WavefleX, SR group), and 20 patients with rigid rods (titanium, RR group). Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated, including visual analog score for lower back pain and leg pain, Prolo functional and economic scores, statues of implanted instruments, fusion rate, and complications during 24-month follow-up. Results Clinical scores were significantly improved until postoperative 24-month follow-up as compared with preoperative scores in both groups (p<0.05), with similar levels of improvement observed at the same time points postoperatively between the 2 groups. Prolo economic scores were significantly improved in SR group compared to RR until 12 months, but this improvement became similar after 18 months. The overall fusion rate was 94.1% until the 24-month follow-up for both groups. No significant complication was observed in both groups. Conclusion The results of the present study indicate that semirigid rods system with posterior lumbar interbody fusion showed similar clinical and radiological result with rigid rods system until 2 years after instrumentation. The WavefleX rods system, as a semirigid rods with unique characteristics, may be an effective alternative treatment for patients in lumbar fusion. PMID:27437014

  6. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... at and just below the waist. A herniated lumbar disc can press on the nerves in the spine and may cause pain, numbness, ... point injections do not help heal a herniated lumbar ... on and irritating the nerves, causing symptoms of pain and weakness. The most ...

  7. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. This narrowing is called “stenosis.” As the lumbar spinal canal narrows, the nerves that go through it are squeezed. This squeezing ... chest). It’s thought that these positions “open” the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, ...

  8. Percutaneous pedicle screw and rod fixation with TLIF in a series of 14 patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Niesche, Marco; Juratli, Tareq A; Sitoci, Kerim-Hakan; Neidel, Julia; Daubner, Dirk; Schackert, Gabriele; Leimert, Mario

    2014-09-01

    To determine if minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using the Medtronic Sextant system is a reliable surgical treatment option in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation, compared with the traditional open procedure. Clinical and radiographic data were retrospectively collected from a total of 33 patients who underwent single level lumbar fusion between 2007 and 2010. 14 underwent minimally invasive TLIF using the Sextant system, and the other 19 patients underwent the open procedure. All patients suffered from at least first recurrent lumbar disc herniation, and additionally from disc degeneration associated with erosive chondrosis Modic grade I-II due to previous surgical, non-instrumental interventions. Median operation time in the minimally invasive group was 140 min (95-190); average X-ray exposure time: 2.35 min (1.5-3.5); median postoperative resting time in hospital: 5 days (3-7). Postoperative pain relief and mobility improvement were documented with the visual analogue scale (6.9-3.0) and the Oswestry Disability Index (6.8-2.4). All patients benefited from surgery at follow up. These data were on many terms significantly superior compared with data of patients in the open surgery group. Percutaneous minimally invasive TLIF technique with the Medtronic Sextant system is a gentle, tissue protecting and safe alternative procedure for lumbar fusion in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation and erosive chondrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Theoretical model of a piezoelectric composite spinal fusion interbody implant.

    PubMed

    Tobaben, Nicholas E; Domann, John P; Arnold, Paul M; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Failure rates of spinal fusion are high in smokers and diabetics. The authors are investigating the development of a piezoelectric composite biomaterial and interbody device design that could generate clinically relevant levels of electrical stimulation to help improve the rate of fusion for these patients. A lumped parameter model of the piezoelectric composite implant was developed based on a model that has been utilized to successfully predict power generation for piezoceramics. Seven variables (fiber material, matrix material, fiber volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio, implant cross-sectional area, implant thickness, and electrical load resistance) were parametrically analyzed to determine their effects on power generation within reasonable implant constraints. Influences of implant geometry and fiber aspect ratio were independent of material parameters. For a cyclic force of constant magnitude, implant thickness was directly and cross-sectional area inversely proportional to power generation potential. Fiber aspect ratios above 30 yielded maximum power generation potential while volume fractions above 15% showed superior performance. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using composite piezoelectric biomaterials in medical implants to generate therapeutic levels of direct current electrical stimulation. The piezoelectric spinal fusion interbody implant shows promise for helping increase success rates of spinal fusion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Trends in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pannell, William C; Savin, David D; Scott, Trevor P; Wang, Jeffrey C; Daubs, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There is a lack of agreement among spine surgeons as to the best surgical treatment modality for many degenerative lumbar diseases. Although there are many studies examining trends in spinal surgery, specific studies reporting the variations in surgical treatment in the United States for these diseases are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze trends in lumbar spinal fusion methods for common lumbar pathologies in the United States. National insurance database review: 2004-2009. Data is taken from United Healthcare and represents more than 25 million patients. No outcomes were measured in this study. Using a private insurance database, we identified patients who underwent one of five types of instrumented single-level lumbar spinal fusion for the 10 most common primary diagnoses. Surgery rates were reviewed from 2004 to 2009 and were stratified according to patient age, patient gender, and region in the United States. Poisson regression analysis was performed to determine regional and demographic differences in treatment modality. The authors received no funds in support of this work. A total of 23,986 patients met our search criteria. Of the five fusion types, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with posterolateral fusion (PLF) was the most common (45%), followed by PLF (19%), anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF, 16%), PLIF (10%), and ALIF with PLF (9%). There was a significant increase in PLIF with PLF (p<.0001), PLIF (p<.0001), PLF (p=.012), ALIF (p<.0001), and ALIF with PLF (p<.0001) from 2004 to 2009. After controlling for gender, there were significant differences between regions for all fusion types (p<.0001). The likelihood of a posterior fusion increased with age. Anterior fusions were more common in the 30- to 49-year-old age range than in patents older than 50. For patients in age groups older than 30, there was an increased number who underwent a circumferential fusion or an ALIF (p<.022). Fusion types were significantly different

  11. Structural and mechanical evaluations of a topology optimized titanium interbody fusion cage fabricated by selective laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ying; Wirtz, Tobias; LaMarca, Frank; Hollister, Scott J

    2007-11-01

    A topology optimized lumbar interbody fusion cage was made of Ti-Al6-V4 alloy by the rapid prototyping process of selective laser melting (SLM) to reproduce designed microstructure features. Radiographic characterizations and the mechanical properties were investigated to determine how the structural characteristics of the fabricated cage were reproduced from design characteristics using micro-computed tomography scanning. The mechanical modulus of the designed cage was also measured to compare with tantalum, a widely used porous metal. The designed microstructures can be clearly seen in the micrographs of the micro-CT and scanning electron microscopy examinations, showing the SLM process can reproduce intricate microscopic features from the original designs. No imaging artifacts from micro-CT were found. The average compressive modulus of the tested caged was 2.97+/-0.90 GPa, which is comparable with the reported porous tantalum modulus of 3 GPa and falls between that of cortical bone (15 GPa) and trabecular bone (0.1-0.5 GPa). The new porous Ti-6Al-4V optimal-structure cage fabricated by SLM process gave consistent mechanical properties without artifactual distortion in the imaging modalities and thus it can be a promising alternative as a porous implant for spine fusion.

  12. Mid-term Clinical Outcomes of Stand-alone Posterior Interbody Fusion with Rectangular Cages: A 4-year-minimum Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung Rae; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun Sang

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine minimum 4 years of clinical outcomes including fusion rate, revision rate and complications of patients who underwent placement of rectangular stand-alone cages. Methods Thirty-three cases of degenerative spine that had been followed for at least 4-years were reviewed retrospectively. Cages were inserted at L4-L5 level or L5-S1 in 27 or in 6 cases respectively. Visual analogue scale (VAS), Odom's criteria, fusion rate, intervertebral disc height and lumbar lordosis were determined pre- and post-operatively on standing x-rays. Amount of intra- and postoperative blood loss, total volume transfused, duration of surgery and perioperative complications were also evaluated. Results The mean VAS score of back pain and sciatica were improved from 8.0 and 7.0 points to 3.4 and 2.4 during 1 years follow-up visit and the scores was raised gradually. Also, during the follow-up, 94% of patients showed excellent or good outcomes by the Odom's criteria. Intervertebral disc height was increased from 8.2±1.4mm to 9.2±1.9mm at the first year of follow-up, however, found to be decreased and stabilized to 8.3±1.8mm after 2 years. The fus