Science.gov

Sample records for assess body temperature

  1. Assessment of body temperature measurement options.

    PubMed

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    Assessment of body temperature is important for decisions in nursing care, medical diagnosis, treatment and the need of laboratory tests. The definition of normal body temperature as 37°C was established in the middle of the 19th century. Since then the technical design and the accuracy of thermometers has been much improved. Knowledge of physical influence on the individual body temperature, such as thermoregulation and hormones, are still not taken into consideration in body temperature assessment. It is time for a change; the unadjusted mode should be used, without adjusting to another site and the same site of measurement should be used as far as possible. Peripheral sites, such as the axillary and the forehead site, are not recommended as an assessment of core body temperature in adults. Frail elderly individuals might have a low normal body temperature and therefore be at risk of being assessed as non-febrile. As the ear site is close to the hypothalamus and quickly responds to changes in the set point temperature, it is a preferable and recommendable site for measurement of body temperature.

  2. Assessment of body composition by air-displacement plethysmography: influence of body temperature and moisture.

    PubMed

    Fields, David A; Higgins, Paul B; Hunter, Gary R

    2004-04-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the effect of body temperature and moisture on body fat (%fat), volume and density by air-displacement plethysmography (BOD POD). METHODS: %fat, body volume and density by the BOD POD before (BOD PODBH) and immediately following hydrostatic weighing (BOD PODFH) were performed in 32 healthy females (age (yr) 33 +/- 11, weight (kg) 64 +/- 14, height (cm) 167 +/- 7). Body temperature and moisture were measured prior to BOD PODBH and prior to BOD PODFH with body moisture defined as the difference in body weight (kg) between the BOD PODBH and BOD PODFH measurements. RESULTS: BOD PODFH %fat (27.1%) and body volume (61.5 L) were significantly lower (P body density (1.0379 g/cm3) significantly higher (P body volume (61.7 L), and body density (1.0341 g/cm3). A significant increase in body temperature (~0.6 degrees C; P body moisture (0.08 kg; P Body surface area was positively associated with the difference in %fat independent of changes in body temperature and moisture, r = 0.30, P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate for the first time that increases in body heat and moisture result in an underestimation of body fat when using the BOD POD, however, the precise mechanism remains unidentified.

  3. Assessment of the use of temperature-sensitive microchips to determine core body temperature in goats.

    PubMed

    Torrao, N A; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L C R; Fick, L G

    2011-03-26

    Body temperature was measured at five different body sites (retroperitoneum, groin, semimembranosus muscle, flank and shoulder) using temperature-sensitive microchips implanted in five female goats, and compared with the core body and rectal temperatures. Body temperature was measured while the goats were kept in different ambient temperatures, with and without radiant heat, as well as during a fever induced experimentally by injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Bland-Altman limit of agreement analysis was used to compare the temperature measurements at the different body sites during the different interventions. Temperatures measured by the microchip implanted in the retroperitoneum showed the closest agreement (mean 0.2 °C lower) with core and rectal temperatures during all interventions, whereas temperatures measured by the microchips implanted in the groin, muscle, flank and shoulder differed from core body temperature by up to 3.5 °C during the various interventions.

  4. Assessment of body composition by air-displacement plethysmography: influence of body temperature and moisture

    PubMed Central

    Fields, David A; Higgins, Paul B; Hunter, Gary R

    2004-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of body temperature and moisture on body fat (%fat), volume and density by air-displacement plethysmography (BOD POD). Methods %fat, body volume and density by the BOD POD before (BOD PODBH) and immediately following hydrostatic weighing (BOD PODFH) were performed in 32 healthy females (age (yr) 33 ± 11, weight (kg) 64 ± 14, height (cm) 167 ± 7). Body temperature and moisture were measured prior to BOD PODBH and prior to BOD PODFH with body moisture defined as the difference in body weight (kg) between the BOD PODBH and BOD PODFH measurements. Results BOD PODFH %fat (27.1%) and body volume (61.5 L) were significantly lower (P ≤ 0.001) and body density (1.0379 g/cm3) significantly higher (P ≤ 0.001) than BOD PODBH %fat (28.9%), body volume (61.7 L), and body density (1.0341 g/cm3). A significant increase in body temperature (~0.6°C; P ≤ 0.001) and body moisture (0.08 kg; P ≤ 0.01) were observed between BOD PODBH and BOD PODFH. Body surface area was positively associated with the difference in %fat independent of changes in body temperature and moisture, r = 0.30, P < 0.05. Conclusion These data demonstrate for the first time that increases in body heat and moisture result in an underestimation of body fat when using the BOD POD, however, the precise mechanism remains unidentified. PMID:15059287

  5. Validity of devices that assess body temperature during outdoor exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Casa, Douglas J; Becker, Shannon M; Ganio, Matthew S; Brown, Christopher M; Yeargin, Susan W; Roti, Melissa W; Siegler, Jason; Blowers, Julie A; Glaviano, Neal R; Huggins, Robert A; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2007-01-01

    Rectal temperature is recommended by the National Athletic Trainers' Association as the criterion standard for recognizing exertional heat stroke, but other body sites commonly are used to measure temperature. Few authors have assessed the validity of the thermometers that measure body temperature at these sites in athletic settings. To assess the validity of commonly used temperature devices at various body sites during outdoor exercise in the heat. Observational field study. Outdoor athletic facilities. Fifteen men and 10 women (age = 26.5 +/- 5.3 years, height = 174.3 +/- 11.1 cm, mass = 72.73 +/- 15.95 kg, body fat = 16.2 +/- 5.5%). We simultaneously tested inexpensive and expensive devices orally and in the axillary region, along with measures of aural, gastrointestinal, forehead, temporal, and rectal temperatures. Temporal temperature was measured according to the instruction manual and a modified method observed in medical tents at local road races. We also measured forehead temperatures directly on the athletic field (other measures occurred in a covered pavilion) where solar radiation was greater. Rectal temperature was the criterion standard used to assess the validity of all other devices. Subjects' temperatures were measured before exercise, every 60 minutes during 180 minutes of exercise, and every 20 minutes for 60 minutes of postexercise recovery. Temperature devices were considered invalid if the mean bias (average difference between rectal temperature and device temperature) was greater than +/-0.27 degrees C (+/-0.5 degrees F). Temperature from each device at each site and time point. Mean bias for the following temperatures was greater than the allowed limit of +/-0.27 degrees C (+/-0.5 degrees F): temperature obtained via expensive oral device (-1.20 degrees C [-2.17 degrees F]), inexpensive oral device (-1.67 degrees C [-3.00 degrees F]), expensive axillary device (-2.58 degrees C [-4.65 degrees F]), inexpensive axillary device (-2.07 degrees C

  6. Validity of Devices That Assess Body Temperature During Outdoor Exercise in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J; Becker, Shannon M; Ganio, Matthew S; Brown, Christopher M; Yeargin, Susan W; Roti, Melissa W; Siegler, Jason; Blowers, Julie A; Glaviano, Neal R; Huggins, Robert A; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rectal temperature is recommended by the National Athletic Trainers' Association as the criterion standard for recognizing exertional heat stroke, but other body sites commonly are used to measure temperature. Few authors have assessed the validity of the thermometers that measure body temperature at these sites in athletic settings. Objective: To assess the validity of commonly used temperature devices at various body sites during outdoor exercise in the heat. Design: Observational field study. Setting: Outdoor athletic facilities. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen men and 10 women (age = 26.5 ± 5.3 years, height = 174.3 ± 11.1 cm, mass = 72.73 ± 15.95 kg, body fat = 16.2 ± 5.5%). Intervention(s): We simultaneously tested inexpensive and expensive devices orally and in the axillary region, along with measures of aural, gastrointestinal, forehead, temporal, and rectal temperatures. Temporal temperature was measured according to the instruction manual and a modified method observed in medical tents at local road races. We also measured forehead temperatures directly on the athletic field (other measures occurred in a covered pavilion) where solar radiation was greater. Rectal temperature was the criterion standard used to assess the validity of all other devices. Subjects' temperatures were measured before exercise, every 60 minutes during 180 minutes of exercise, and every 20 minutes for 60 minutes of postexercise recovery. Temperature devices were considered invalid if the mean bias (average difference between rectal temperature and device temperature) was greater than ±0.27°C (±0.5°F). Main Outcome Measure(s): Temperature from each device at each site and time point. Results: Mean bias for the following temperatures was greater than the allowed limit of ±0.27°C (±0.5°F): temperature obtained via expensive oral device (−1.20°C [−2.17°F]), inexpensive oral device (−1.67°C [−3.00°F]), expensive axillary device (−2.58°C [−4

  7. Dedicated tool to assess the impact of a rhetorical task on human body temperature.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert; Wilczyński, Sławomir; Martowska, Katarzyna; Gołuch, Dominik; Wrocławska-Warchala, Emilia

    2017-10-01

    Functional infrared thermal imaging is a method widely used in medicine, including analysis of the mechanisms related to the effect of emotions on physiological processes. The article shows how the body temperature may change during stress associated with performing a rhetorical task and proposes new parameters useful for dynamic thermal imaging measurements MATERIALS AND METHODS: 29 healthy male subjects were examined. They were given a rhetorical task that induced stress. Analysis and processing of collected body temperature data in a spatial resolution of 256×512pixels and a temperature resolution of 0.1°C enabled to show the dynamics of temperature changes. This analysis was preceded by dedicated image analysis and processing methods RESULTS: The presented dedicated algorithm for image analysis and processing allows for fully automated, reproducible and quantitative assessment of temperature changes and time constants in a sequence of thermal images of the patient. When performing the rhetorical task, the temperature rose by 0.47±0.19°C in 72.41% of the subjects, including 20.69% in whom the temperature decreased by 0.49±0.14°C after 237±141s. For 20.69% of the subjects only a drop in temperature was registered. For the remaining 6.89% of the cases, no temperature changes were registered CONCLUSIONS: The performance of the rhetorical task by the subjects causes body temperature changes. The ambiguous temperature response to the given stress factor indicates the complex mechanisms responsible for regulating stressful situations. Stress associated with the examination itself induces body temperature changes. These changes should always be taken into account in the analysis of infrared data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Measuring body temperature.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Louise; Higgins, Dan

    Body temperature is one of the four main vital signs that must be monitored to ensure safe and effective care. Temperature measurement is recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence a part of the initial assessment in acute illness in adults (NICE, 2007) and by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines for post-operative management in adults (SIGN, 2004). Despite applying in all healthcare environments, wide variations exist on the methods and techniques used to measure body temperature. It is essential to use the most appropriate technique to ensure that temperature is measured accurately. Inaccurate results may influence diagnosis and treatment, lead to a failure to identify patient deterioration and compromise patient safety. This article explains the importance of temperature regulation and compares methods of its measurement.

  9. Validity and Reliability of Devices That Assess Body Temperature During Indoor Exercise in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Ganio, Matthew S; Brown, Christopher M; Casa, Douglas J; Becker, Shannon M; Yeargin, Susan W; McDermott, Brendon P; Boots, Lindsay M; Boyd, Paul W; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2009-01-01

    Context: When assessing exercise hyperthermia outdoors, the validity of certain commonly used body temperature measuring devices has been questioned. A controlled laboratory environment is generally less influenced by environmental factors (eg, ambient temperature, solar radiation, wind) than an outdoor setting. The validity of these temperature measuring devices in a controlled environment may be more acceptable. Objective: To assess the validity and reliability of commonly used temperature devices compared with rectal temperature in individuals exercising in a controlled, high environmental temperature indoor setting and then resting in a cool environment. Design: Time series study. Setting: Laboratory environmental chamber (temperature  =  36.4 ± 1.2°C [97.5 ± 2.16°F], relative humidity  =  52%) and cool laboratory (temperature  =  approximately 23.3°C [74.0°F], relative humidity  =  40%). Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen males and 10 females. Intervention(s): Rectal, gastrointestinal, forehead, oral, aural, temporal, and axillary temperatures were measured with commonly used temperature devices. Temperature was measured before and 20 minutes after entering the environmental chamber, every 30 minutes during a 90-minute treadmill walk in the heat, and every 20 minutes during a 60-minute rest in mild conditions. Device validity and reliability were assessed with various statistical measures to compare the measurements using each device with rectal temperature. A device was considered invalid if the mean bias (average difference between rectal and device temperatures) was more than ±0.27°C (±0.50°F). Main Outcome Measure(s): Measured temperature from each device (mean and across time). Results: The following devices provided invalid estimates of rectal temperature: forehead sticker (0.29°C [0.52°F]), oral temperature using an inexpensive device (−1.13°C [−2.03°F]), temporal temperature measured according to the instruction

  10. Validity and reliability of devices that assess body temperature during indoor exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Ganio, Matthew S; Brown, Christopher M; Casa, Douglas J; Becker, Shannon M; Yeargin, Susan W; McDermott, Brendon P; Boots, Lindsay M; Boyd, Paul W; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2009-01-01

    When assessing exercise hyperthermia outdoors, the validity of certain commonly used body temperature measuring devices has been questioned. A controlled laboratory environment is generally less influenced by environmental factors (eg, ambient temperature, solar radiation, wind) than an outdoor setting. The validity of these temperature measuring devices in a controlled environment may be more acceptable. To assess the validity and reliability of commonly used temperature devices compared with rectal temperature in individuals exercising in a controlled, high environmental temperature indoor setting and then resting in a cool environment. Time series study. Laboratory environmental chamber (temperature = 36.4 +/- 1.2 degrees C [97.5 +/- 2.16 degrees F], relative humidity = 52%) and cool laboratory (temperature = approximately 23.3 degrees C [74.0 degrees F], relative humidity = 40%). Fifteen males and 10 females. Rectal, gastrointestinal, forehead, oral, aural, temporal, and axillary temperatures were measured with commonly used temperature devices. Temperature was measured before and 20 minutes after entering the environmental chamber, every 30 minutes during a 90-minute treadmill walk in the heat, and every 20 minutes during a 60-minute rest in mild conditions. Device validity and reliability were assessed with various statistical measures to compare the measurements using each device with rectal temperature. A device was considered invalid if the mean bias (average difference between rectal and device temperatures) was more than +/-0.27 degrees C (+/-0.50 degrees F). Measured temperature from each device (mean and across time). The following devices provided invalid estimates of rectal temperature: forehead sticker (0.29 degrees C [0.52 degrees F]), oral temperature using an inexpensive device (-1.13 degrees C [-2.03 degrees F]), temporal temperature measured according to the instruction manual (-0.87 degrees C [-1.56 degrees F]), temporal temperature using a

  11. Time for a change to assess and evaluate body temperature in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    2009-08-01

    The definition of normal body temperature as 37 degrees C still is considered the norm worldwide, but in practice there is a widespread confusion of the evaluation of body temperature, especially in elderly individuals. In this paper, we discuss the relevance of normal body temperature as 37 degrees C and consequences in clinical practice. Our conclusion is that body temperature should be evaluated in relation to the individual variability and that the best approach is to use the same site, and an unadjusted mode without adjustments to other sites. If the baseline value is not known, it is important to notice that frail elderly individuals are at risk of a low body temperature. In addition, what should be regarded as fever is closely related to what is considered as normal body temperature. That is, as normal body temperature shows individual variations, it is reasonable that the same should hold true for the febrile range.

  12. Portable Body Temperature Conditioner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-18

    also have decreased thermoregulation due to blood loss. Normal core body temperature is defined as 37oC and core body temperature below 35oC and above...environmental exposure during transport and decreased ability of thermoregulation due to blood loss. Normal core body temperature is defined at 37oC and...require efficient and reliable equipment for the thermoregulation of either injured or ill patients. However, effective methods for warming/cooling

  13. Portable Body Temperature Conditioner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    thermoregulation due to blood loss. Normal core body temperature is defined as 37 o C and core body temperature below 35 o C and above 40 o C is defined as...environmental exposure during transport and decreased ability of thermoregulation due to blood loss. Normal core body temperature is defined at 37 o...medical installations require efficient and reliable equipment for the thermoregulation of either injured or ill patients. However, effective methods for

  14. Disorders of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Camilo R

    2014-01-01

    The human body generates heat capable of raising body temperature by approximately 1°C per hour. Normally, this heat is dissipated by means of a thermoregulatory system. Disorders resulting from abnormally high or low body temperature result in neurologic dysfunction and pose a threat to life. In response to thermal stress, maintenance of normal body temperature is primarily maintained by convection and evaporation. Hyperthermia results from abnormal temperature regulation, leading to extremely elevated body temperature while fever results from a normal thermoregulatory mechanism operating at a higher set point. The former leads to specific clinical syndromes with inability of the thermoregulatory mechanism to maintain a constant body temperature. Heat related illness encompasses heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, in order of severity. In addition, drugs can induce hyperthermia and produce one of several specific clinical syndromes. Hypothermia is the reduction of body temperature to levels below 35°C from environmental exposure, metabolic disorders, or therapeutic intervention. Management of disorders of body temperature should be carried out decisively and expeditiously, in order to avoid secondary neurologic injury. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the `modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a `Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  16. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the 'modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a 'Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  17. Tympanic ear thermometer assessment of body temperature among patients with cognitive disturbances. An acceptable and ethically desirable alternative?

    PubMed

    Aadal, Lena; Fog, Lisbet; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    2016-12-01

    Investigation of a possible relation between body temperature measurements by the current generation of tympanic ear and rectal thermometers. In Denmark, a national guideline recommends the rectal measurement. Subsequently, the rectal thermometers and tympanic ear devices are the most frequently used and first choice in Danish hospital wards. Cognitive changes constitute challenges with cooperating in rectal temperature assessments. With regard to diagnosing, ethics, safety and the patients' dignity, the tympanic ear thermometer might comprise a desirable alternative to rectal noninvasive measurement of body temperature during in-hospital-based neurorehabilitation. A prospective, descriptive cohort study. Consecutive inclusion of 27 patients. Linear regression models were used to analyse 284 simultaneous temperature measurements. Ethical approval for this study was granted by the Danish Data Protection Agency, and the study was completed in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration 2008. About 284 simultaneous rectal and ear temperature measurements on 27 patients were analysed. The patient-wise variability of measured temperatures was significantly higher for the ear measurements. Patient-wise linear regressions for the 25 patients with at least three pairs of simultaneous ear and rectal temperature measurements showed large interpatient variability of the association. A linear relationship between the rectal body temperature assessment and the temperature assessment employing the tympanic thermometer is weak. Both measuring methods reflect variance in temperature, but ear measurements showed larger variation. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Assessing the reliability of thermography to infer internal body temperatures of lizards.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Frederico M; Carretero, Miguel A; Silva, Francisco; Sannolo, Marco

    2016-12-01

    For many years lizard thermal ecology studies have relied on the use of contact thermometry to obtain internal body temperature (Tb) of the animals. However, with progressing technology, an interest grew in using new, less invasive methods, such as InfraRed (IR) pyrometry and thermography, to infer Tb of reptiles. Nonetheless few studies have tested the reliability of these new tools. The present study tested the use of IR cameras as a non-invasive tool to infer Tb of lizards, using three differently body-sized lacertid species (Podarcis virescens, Lacerta schreiberi and Timon lepidus). Given the occurrence of regional heterothermy, we pairwise compared thermography readings of six body parts (snout, eye, head, dorsal, hind limb, tail base) to cloacal temperature (measured by a thermometer-associated thermocouple probe) commonly employed to measure Tb in field and lab studies. The results showed moderate to strong correlations (R(2)=0.84-0.99) between all body parts and cloacal temperature. However, despite the readings on the tail base showed the strongest correlation in all three species, it was the eye where the absolute values and pattern of temperature change most consistently followed the cloacal measurements. Hence, we concluded that the eye would be the body location whose IR camera readings more closely approximate that of the animal's internal environment. Alternatively, other body parts can be used, provided that a careful calibration is carried out. We provide guidelines for future research using thermography to infer Tb of lizards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Portable Body Temperature Conditioner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    environmental exposure during transport. These patients also have decreased thermoregulation due to blood loss. Normal core body temperature is defined...patients become hypothermic after severe injury due to environmental exposure during transport and decreased ability of thermoregulation due to blood loss...device. CONCLUSIONS: Defense medical installations require efficient and reliable equipment for the thermoregulation of either injured or ill

  20. Assessment of the effects of changes in body temperature on cardiac electrophysiology in anaesthetised guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kågström, Jens; Laumola, Eva-Lena; Poijes, Niklas; Johansson, Maria; Ericson, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    Anaesthetised guinea pigs are commonly used within Safety Pharmacology to evaluate drug effects on cardiac electrophysiology. However, anesthesia compromises the ability to thermoregulate, which can be further challenged when more invasive surgery is required. As anaesthetised animals are often used when screening for cardiotoxicity, thereby influencing go/no-go decisions, we wanted to quantify the impact of small temperature changes on the recorded electrophysiological parameters. Male guinea pigs were anaesthetised by pentobarbital, placed on a pre-heated table and a rectal thermistor inserted for monitoring of body temperature. After intubation animals were vagotomised and β-blocked, and lead II ECG needle electrodes attached. Following thoracotomy an atrial pacing electrode was attached and a suction MAP electrode positioned on the ventricular epicardium. In control animals temperature was kept constant (38.1±0.1°C) over the duration of the experiment. Animals in one group were slowly warmed to 41.9°C by a heating plate and a heating lamp, and in another group slowly cooled to 34.4°C by turning off all heating equipment. MAP duration at 90% repolarisation (MAPD90), AV conduction, ECG and body temperature were recorded during cardiac pacing every 5min up to 50min. No time-dependent changes were seen in the control group. In contrast, a linear correlation was found between changes in body temperature and MAPD90, AV conduction, QTc and QRS intervals. For each degree temperature fell below 38°C MAPD90 was prolonged by 6.1ms, and for each degree above 38°C MAPD90 was shortened by 5.3ms. Corresponding changes were seen for QTc interval and AV conduction time, while effects on the QRS interval were smaller. The data highlights the importance of carefully controlling body temperature when performing electrophysiological recordings in laboratory animals. A change by a single degree can affect electrophysiological parameters by 5-10%, thus increasing the risk for

  1. Hemoglobin senses body temperature.

    PubMed

    Artmann, G M; Digel, Ilya; Zerlin, K F; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch; Linder, Pt; Porst, D; Kayser, P; Stadler, A M; Dikta, G; Temiz Artmann, A

    2009-06-01

    When aspirating human red blood cells (RBCs) into 1.3 mum pipettes (DeltaP = -2.3 kPa), a transition from blocking the pipette below a critical temperature T(c) = 36.3 +/- 0.3 degrees C to passing it above the T(c) occurred (micropipette passage transition). With a 1.1 mum pipette no passage was seen which enabled RBC volume measurements also above T(c). With increasing temperature RBCs lost volume significantly faster below than above a T(c) = 36.4 +/- 0.7 (volume transition). Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) measurements of RBCs in autologous plasma (25 degrees C < or = T < or = 39.5 degrees C) showed a T (c) at 37.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C above which the COP rapidly decreased (COP transition). In NMR T(1)-relaxation time measurements, the T(1) of RBCs in autologous plasma changed from a linear (r = 0.99) increment below T(c) = 37 +/- 1 degrees C at a rate of 0.023 s/K into zero slope above T(c) (RBC T(1) transition). An amorphous hemoglobin-water gel formed in the spherical trail, the residual partial sphere of the aspirated RBC. At T(c), a sudden fluidization of the gel occurs. All changes mentioned above happen at a distinct T(c) close to body temperature. The T(c) is moved +0.8 degrees C to higher temperatures when a D(2)O buffer is used. We suggest a mechanism similar to a "glass transition" or a "colloidal phase transition". At T(c), the stabilizing Hb bound water molecules reach a threshold number enabling a partial Hb unfolding. Thus, Hb senses body temperature which must be inscribed in the primary structure of hemoglobin and possibly other proteins.

  2. Determination of regional brain temperature using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess brain-body temperature differences in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Hiltunen, Yrjö; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2007-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) was used to determine brain temperature in healthy volunteers. Partially water-suppressed (1)H MRS data sets were acquired at 3T from four different gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) volumes. Brain temperatures were determined from the chemical-shift difference between the CH(3) of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) at 2.01 ppm and water. Brain temperatures in (1)H MRS voxels of 2 x 2 x 2 cm(3) showed no substantial heterogeneity. The volume-averaged temperature from single-voxel spectroscopy was compared with body temperatures obtained from the oral cavity, tympanum, and temporal artery regions. The mean brain parenchyma temperature was 0.5 degrees C cooler than readings obtained from three extra-brain sites (P < 0.01). (1)H MRS imaging (MRSI) data were acquired from a slice encompassing the single-voxel volumes to assess the ability of spectroscopic imaging to determine regional brain temperature within the imaging slice. Brain temperature away from the center of the brain determined by MRSI differed from that obtained by single-voxel MRS in the same brain region, possibly due to a poor line width (LW) in MRSI. The data are discussed in the light of proposed brain-body temperature gradients and the use of (1)H MRSI to monitor brain temperature in pathologies, such as brain trauma.

  3. Assessment of axillary temperature for the evaluation of normal body temperature of healthy young adults at rest in a thermoneutral environment.

    PubMed

    Marui, Shuri; Misawa, Ayaka; Tanaka, Yuki; Nagashima, Kei

    2017-02-22

    The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate whether recently introduced methods of measuring axillary temperature are reliable, (2) examine if individuals know their baseline body temperature based on an actual measurement, and (3) assess the factors affecting axillary temperature and reevaluate the meaning of the axillary temperature. Subjects were healthy young men and women (n = 76 and n = 65, respectively). Three measurements were obtained: (1) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a predictive mode requiring 10 s (T ax-10 s), (2) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a standard mode requiring 10 min (T ax-10 min), and (3) tympanic membrane temperature continuously measured by infrared thermometry (T ty). The subjects answered questions about eating and exercise habits, sleep and menstrual cycles, and thermoregulation and reported what they believed their regular body temperature to be (T reg). T reg, T ax-10 s, T ax-10 min, and T ty were 36.2 ± 0.4, 36.4 ± 0.5, 36.5 ± 0.4, and 36.8 ± 0.3 °C (mean ± SD), respectively. There were correlations between T ty and T ax-10 min, T ty and T ax-10 s, and T ax-10 min and T ax-10 s (r = .62, r = .46, and r = .59, respectively, P < .001), but not between T reg and T ax-10 s (r = .11, P = .20). A lower T ax-10 s was associated with smaller body mass indices and irregular menstrual cycles. Modern devices for measuring axillary temperature may have changed the range of body temperature that is recognized as normal. Core body temperature variations estimated by tympanic measurements were smaller than those estimated by axillary measurements. This variation of axillary temperature may be due to changes in the measurement methods introduced by modern devices and techniques. However, axillary temperature values correlated well with those of tympanic measurements, suggesting that the technique may reliably report an individual's state

  4. Dinosaur Fossils Predict Body Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew P; Charnov, Eric L

    2006-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest mystery surrounding dinosaurs concerns whether they were endotherms, ectotherms, or some unique intermediate form. Here we present a model that yields estimates of dinosaur body temperature based on ontogenetic growth trajectories obtained from fossil bones. The model predicts that dinosaur body temperatures increased with body mass from approximately 25 °C at 12 kg to approximately 41 °C at 13,000 kg. The model also successfully predicts observed increases in body temperature with body mass for extant crocodiles. These results provide direct evidence that dinosaurs were reptiles that exhibited inertial homeothermy. PMID:16817695

  5. Central control of body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.

    2016-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the behavioral and autonomic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response and behavioral states and in response to declining energy homeostasis. This review summarizes the central nervous system circuit mechanisms controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction regulating heat loss and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these thermoeffectors is regulated by parallel but distinct efferent pathways within the central nervous system that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The model for the neural circuit mechanism underlying central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation, for elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation, and for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to modulating body temperature and energy homeostasis. PMID:27239289

  6. Core body temperature in obesity.

    PubMed

    Heikens, Marc J; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Savastano, David M; Chen, Kong Y; Skarulis, Monica C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-05-01

    A lower core body temperature set point has been suggested to be a factor that could potentially predispose humans to develop obesity. We tested the hypothesis that obese individuals have lower core temperatures than those in normal-weight individuals. In study 1, nonobese [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) <30] and obese (BMI ≥30) adults swallowed wireless core temperature-sensing capsules, and we measured core temperatures continuously for 24 h. In study 2, normal-weight (BMI of 18-25) and obese subjects swallowed temperature-sensing capsules to measure core temperatures continuously for ≥48 h and kept activity logs. We constructed daily, 24-h core temperature profiles for analysis. Mean (±SE) daily core body temperature did not differ significantly between the 35 nonobese and 46 obese subjects (36.92 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.89 ± 0.03°C; P = 0.44). Core temperature 24-h profiles did not differ significantly between 11 normal-weight and 19 obese subjects (P = 0.274). Women had a mean core body temperature ≈0.23°C greater than that of men (36.99 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.76 ± 0.03°C; P < 0.0001). Obesity is not generally associated with a reduced core body temperature. It may be necessary to study individuals with function-altering mutations in core temperature-regulating genes to determine whether differences in the core body temperature set point affect the regulation of human body weight. These trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428987 and NCT00266500.

  7. Portable Body Temperature Conditioner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    20 ° C , 10 ° C , and 5 ° C while heating performance was evaluated with bath temperatures of 42 ° C and 40 ° C . Voltage was maintained constant for each...Temperature (20° C ) 26June12 C7 15 5 25.2 5.2 0.016 4.18 131.0 329.8 2.5 Bath Temperature (10° C ) 27June12 C4 6.5 3.5 25.2 4.0 0.016 4.19 100.8 231.4 2.3 Bath...Temperature ( 5 ° C ) 27June12 C8 3.5 1.5 25.2 3.8 0.016 4.20 95.8 99.4 1.0 Bath Temperature (42° C ) 27June12 H1 45.0 3.0 25.2 4.9 0.016 4.18 123.5 197.7

  8. Technical note: Assessment of milk temperature measured by automatic milking systems as an indicator of body temperature and fever in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pohl, A; Heuwieser, W; Burfeind, O

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether milk temperature (MT) measured by automatic milking system (AMS) is a reliable indicator of body temperature of dairy cows and whether cows with fever could be detected. Data loggers (Minilog 8, Vemco Ltd., Halifax, NS, Canada) measuring body temperature were inserted for 7 ± 1 d into the vaginal cavity of 31 dairy cows and programmed to take 1 reading/min. Milk temperature was recorded at each milking event by the AMS, and values from the vaginal loggers were paired with the corresponding MT. The correlation (r) between vaginal temperature (VT) and MT was 0.52. Vaginal temperature was higher (39.1 ± 0.4°C) than MT (38.6 ± 0.7°C) with a mean difference of 0.5 ± 0.6°C. The ability of MT to identify cows with fever was assessed using 2 approaches. In the first approach, VT could indicate fever at any time of the day, whereas MT could display fever only during the milking events of a given day. Different definitions of fever based on thresholds of VT and duration exceeding these thresholds were constructed. Different thresholds of MT were tested to distinguish between cows with and without fever. The combination of 39.0°C as a threshold for MT and 39.5°C for at least 2h/d as a threshold for VT resulted in the highest combination of sensitivity (0.65) and specificity (0.65). In the second approach, we evaluated whether MT could identify cows with fever at a given milking event. A threshold of MT >38.7°C delivered the best combination of sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.66) when fever was defined as VT ≥39.5°C. Therefore, MT measured by AMS can be indicative of fever in dairy cows to a limited extent. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Circadian variations in body temperature during dialysis.

    PubMed

    Usvyat, Len A; Kotanko, Peter; van der Sande, Frank M; Kooman, Jeroen P; Carter, Mary; Leunissen, Karel M L; Levin, Nathan W

    2012-03-01

    Thermal changes during dialysis strongly influence intra-dialytic hemodynamics. The mechanisms behind the increase in body temperature during hemodialysis (HD) are still not completely understood. The objective of this retrospective observational cohort study is to assess the effect of circadian variation on body temperature changes during HD by comparing results in patients treated on different treatment shifts. Data from the Renal Research Institute, New York, clinical database encompassing patients treated in six states in the USA were used. Data from January and August 2008 were used for analysis. Body temperature changes during HD were categorized by dialysis shifts. Patients with morning shifts (n = 1064), afternoon shifts (n = 730) and evening shifts (n = 210) were compared. Pre-dialysis body temperatures were significantly different among the different shifts [morning, 36.41 (95% confidence interval: 36.39-36.43°C), afternoon, 36.47 (36.45-36.49°C), evening, 36.67 (36.64-36.70°C), P < 0.001]. In August, but not in January, intra-dialytic increases in body temperature were significantly different between patients treated during morning [0.07 (0.058-0.082°C)], afternoon [0.03 (0.016-0.044°C)] and evening shifts [-0.01 (-0.032 to 0.012°C); P < 0.001 analysis of variance], although in January, treatment shift was a significant predictor of the intra-dialytic increase in body temperature. The intra-dialytic change in body temperature was related not only to the pre-dialysis body temperature (r(2) = 0.31; P < 0.001) but also to microbiological dialysate quality, treatment time and dialysate temperature. The intra-dialytic change in blood pressure (BP) was significantly related to changes in intra-dialytic body temperature irrespective of the study month. Both pre-dialytic body temperature as well as changes in body temperature are significantly related to the timing of the dialysis shifts, in phase with the circadian body temperature rhythm. Due to the

  10. Estimation Method of Body Temperature from Upper Arm Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Arata; Ryu, Kazuteru; Kanai, Nobuyuki

    This paper proposes a method for estimation of a body temperature by using a relation between the upper arm temperature and the atmospheric temperature. Conventional method has measured by armpit or oral, because the body temperature from the body surface is influenced by the atmospheric temperature. However, there is a correlation between the body surface temperature and the atmospheric temperature. By using this correlation, the body temperature can estimated from the body surface temperature. Proposed method enables to measure body temperature by the temperature sensor that is embedded in the blood pressure monitor cuff. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and body temperature can be realized. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through the actual body temperature experiment. The proposed method might contribute to reduce the medical staff's workloads in the home medical care, and more.

  11. [Measurement and management of body temperature].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Hironobu; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Body temperature regulation is at the basis of life maintenance and for humans to maintain the central body temperature within the range of 37 +/- 0.2 degrees Celsius. In the case of anesthesia, a patient would have a high possibility of lower body temperature and also could have more complications with low body temperature. In addition, it would generate more complications and extend a period of hospitalization. For that reason, anesthetists must pay full attention to body temperature management during surgery. Measurement for central body temperature is necessary as a monitor for body temperature measurement and the measurement for nasopharyngeal temperature, tympanic temperature, and lung artery temperature is effective for this purpose. Therapeutic hypothermia for brain injury is receiving attention recently as a preventive method for brain disorder and the method is utilized in hospital facilities. In future, it is expected to attain the most suitable treatment method by clinical studies on low body temperature.

  12. Body temperature and fever in a free-living bird.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape

    2010-05-01

    Fever is an adaptive physiological response that animals use to fight infections by microorganisms. Although used routinely by veterinary and medical doctors for assessment of health status, there are hardly any studies of fever in free-living animals. Body temperature in a sample of more than 500 adult barn swallows Hirundo rustica varied considerably, but was consistent among capture events. Body temperature increased during the day, and reached a minimum in the middle of the breeding season. A normal quantile plot revealed that 4.5% of adults constituted a separate population that had fever. There were only marginal effects of handling on body temperature. Body temperature increased by 2.6 standard deviations following injection with LPS, showing that body temperature indeed increased with an immune challenge. Body temperature was negatively related to abundance of feather mites, but was not related to abundance of other ectoparasites or size of the uropygial gland. Barn swallows with high body temperatures also had large body mass and showed weak stress responses as reflected by their tonic immobility. Barn swallows in large colonies had lower body temperatures than solitary or less colonial individuals. Body temperature was not related to arrival date, timing of breeding, annual fecundity or adult survival. However, individuals that were easier to catch had higher body temperatures. These findings suggest that body temperature is a consistent physiological parameter of individuals, a small fraction of individuals has fever, and that febrile individuals have specific parasite loads, body mass, social environment and ability to escape capture.

  13. Body temperature variability (Part 2): masking influences of body temperature variability and a review of body temperature variability in disease.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gregory S

    2007-03-01

    This is the second of a two-part review on body temperature variability. Part 1 discussed historical and modern findings on average body temperatures. It also discussed endogenous sources of temperature variability, including variations caused by site of measurement; circadian, menstrual, and annual biological rhythms; fitness; and aging. Part 2 reviews the effects of exogenous masking agents - external factors in the environment, diet, or lifestyle that can be a significant source of body temperature variability. Body temperature variability findings in disease states are also reviewed.

  14. The relationship between body and ambient temperature and corneal temperature.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Line; Johnson, Leif; Arvidsson, Henrik; Larsen, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature. The relation between corneal temperature and ambient temperature was examined in 11 human volunteers. Furthermore, corneal temperature was measured using a thermal camera during elevation of body core temperature in three human volunteers and four rats. A linear relationship between corneal temperature and body temperature was found in the rat. For humans there was an initial linear increase in corneal temperature with increasing body temperature, but corneal temperature seemed to plateau at 36.5°C to 37.0°C despite a continued increase of body core temperature. A linear relationship between ambient and corneal temperature was found in humans but with a less steep slope than that between corneal and body core temperature. Corneal temperature is estimated to reach the maximum of 36.5°C to 37.0°C at ambient temperatures between 32.0°C and 34.5°C. If there is a causal relationship between elevated eye temperature, cataract, and presbyopia, the incidence of these eye diseases is predicted to increase with global warming. Importantly, the strong association between corneal temperature and body core temperature indicates that frequent infections could also be considered a risk factor for age-related lens disorders.

  15. QT interval correction for drug-induced changes in body temperature during integrated cardiovascular safety assessment in regulatory toxicology studies in dogs: A case study.

    PubMed

    El Amrani, Abdel-Ilah; El Amrani-Callens, Francine; Loriot, Stéphane; Singh, Pramila; Forster, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular safety assessment requires accurate evaluation of QT interval, which depends on the length of the cardiac cycle and also on core body temperature (BT). Increases in QT interval duration have been shown to be associated with decreases in BT in dogs. An example of altered QT interval duration associated with changes in body temperature observed during a 4-week regulatory toxicology study in dogs is presented. Four groups of Beagle dogs received the vehicle or test item once on Day 1, followed by a 4-week observation period. Electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters were continuously recorded on Days 1 and 26 by jacketed external telemetry (JET). Core body temperature (BT) was measured with a conventional rectal thermometer at appropriate time-points during the Day 1 recording period. Decreased BT was observed approximately 2h after treatment on Day 1, along with increased QT interval duration corrected according to the Van de Water formula (QTcV), but the effect was no longer observed after correction for changes in BT [QTcVcT=QTcV-14(37.5-BT)] according to the Van der Linde formula. No significant changes in QTcV were reported at the end of the observation period, on Day 26. The present study demonstrates that core body (rectal) temperature can easily be monitored at appropriate time-points during JET recording in regulatory toxicology studies in dogs, in order to correct QT interval duration values for treatment-related changes in BT. The successful application of the Van der Linde formula to correct QTc prolongation for changes in BT was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Body temperature regulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Sigal, Ronald J; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness.

  17. Body temperature regulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Glen P.; Sigal, Ronald J.; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  18. Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth P Jr; Hull, Joseph T.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Body temperature has been reported to influence human performance. Performance is reported to be better when body temperature is high/near its circadian peak and worse when body temperature is low/near its circadian minimum. We assessed whether this relationship between performance and body temperature reflects the regulation of both the internal biological timekeeping system and/or the influence of body temperature on performance independent of circadian phase. Fourteen subjects participated in a forced desynchrony protocol allowing assessment of the relationship between body temperature and performance while controlling for circadian phase and hours awake. Most neurobehavioral measures varied as a function of internal biological time and duration of wakefulness. A number of performance measures were better when body temperature was elevated, including working memory, subjective alertness, visual attention, and the slowest 10% of reaction times. These findings demonstrate that an increased body temperature, associated with and independent of internal biological time, is correlated with improved performance and alertness. These results support the hypothesis that body temperature modulates neurobehavioral function in humans.

  19. Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth P Jr; Hull, Joseph T.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Body temperature has been reported to influence human performance. Performance is reported to be better when body temperature is high/near its circadian peak and worse when body temperature is low/near its circadian minimum. We assessed whether this relationship between performance and body temperature reflects the regulation of both the internal biological timekeeping system and/or the influence of body temperature on performance independent of circadian phase. Fourteen subjects participated in a forced desynchrony protocol allowing assessment of the relationship between body temperature and performance while controlling for circadian phase and hours awake. Most neurobehavioral measures varied as a function of internal biological time and duration of wakefulness. A number of performance measures were better when body temperature was elevated, including working memory, subjective alertness, visual attention, and the slowest 10% of reaction times. These findings demonstrate that an increased body temperature, associated with and independent of internal biological time, is correlated with improved performance and alertness. These results support the hypothesis that body temperature modulates neurobehavioral function in humans.

  20. Body Temperature Regulation in Hot Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Molokwu, Mary Ngozi; Olsson, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Organisms in hot environments will not be able to passively dissipate metabolically generated heat. Instead, they have to revert to evaporative cooling, a process that is energetically expensive and promotes excessive water loss. To alleviate these costs, birds in captivity let their body temperature increase, thereby entering a state of hyperthermia. Here we explore the use of hyperthermia in wild birds captured during the hot and dry season in central Nigeria. We found pronounced hyperthermia in several species with the highest body temperatures close to predicted lethal levels. Furthermore, birds let their body temperature increase in direct relation to ambient temperatures, increasing body temperature by 0.22°C for each degree of increased ambient temperature. Thus to offset the costs of thermoregulation in ambient temperatures above the upper critical temperature, birds are willing to let their body temperatures increase by up to 5°C above normal temperatures. This flexibility in body temperature may be an important mechanism for birds to adjust to predicted increasing ambient temperatures in the future. PMID:27548758

  1. Body Temperature Regulation in Hot Environments.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Molokwu, Mary Ngozi; Olsson, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Organisms in hot environments will not be able to passively dissipate metabolically generated heat. Instead, they have to revert to evaporative cooling, a process that is energetically expensive and promotes excessive water loss. To alleviate these costs, birds in captivity let their body temperature increase, thereby entering a state of hyperthermia. Here we explore the use of hyperthermia in wild birds captured during the hot and dry season in central Nigeria. We found pronounced hyperthermia in several species with the highest body temperatures close to predicted lethal levels. Furthermore, birds let their body temperature increase in direct relation to ambient temperatures, increasing body temperature by 0.22°C for each degree of increased ambient temperature. Thus to offset the costs of thermoregulation in ambient temperatures above the upper critical temperature, birds are willing to let their body temperatures increase by up to 5°C above normal temperatures. This flexibility in body temperature may be an important mechanism for birds to adjust to predicted increasing ambient temperatures in the future.

  2. Astronaut James Lovell checks body temperature with oral temperature probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 7 pilot Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr. has temperature check with oral temperature probe attached to his space suit during final preflight preparations for the Gemini 7 space mission. The temperature probe allows doctors to monitor astronauts body temperature at any time during the mission.

  3. Astronaut James Lovell checks body temperature with oral temperature probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 7 pilot Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr. has temperature check with oral temperature probe attached to his space suit during final preflight preparations for the Gemini 7 space mission. The temperature probe allows doctors to monitor astronauts body temperature at any time during the mission.

  4. Core body temperature in obesity123

    PubMed Central

    Heikens, Marc J; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Savastano, David M; Chen, Kong Y; Skarulis, Monica C

    2011-01-01

    Background: A lower core body temperature set point has been suggested to be a factor that could potentially predispose humans to develop obesity. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that obese individuals have lower core temperatures than those in normal-weight individuals. Design: In study 1, nonobese [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) <30] and obese (BMI ≥30) adults swallowed wireless core temperature–sensing capsules, and we measured core temperatures continuously for 24 h. In study 2, normal-weight (BMI of 18–25) and obese subjects swallowed temperature-sensing capsules to measure core temperatures continuously for ≥48 h and kept activity logs. We constructed daily, 24-h core temperature profiles for analysis. Results: Mean (±SE) daily core body temperature did not differ significantly between the 35 nonobese and 46 obese subjects (36.92 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.89 ± 0.03°C; P = 0.44). Core temperature 24-h profiles did not differ significantly between 11 normal-weight and 19 obese subjects (P = 0.274). Women had a mean core body temperature ≈0.23°C greater than that of men (36.99 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.76 ± 0.03°C; P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Obesity is not generally associated with a reduced core body temperature. It may be necessary to study individuals with function-altering mutations in core temperature–regulating genes to determine whether differences in the core body temperature set point affect the regulation of human body weight. These trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428987 and NCT00266500. PMID:21367952

  5. How the body controls brain temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingming; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2007-01-01

    Normal brain functioning largely depends on maintaining brain temperature. However, the mechanisms protecting brain against a cooler environment are poorly understood. Reported herein is the first detailed measurement of the brain-temperature profile. It is found to be exponential, defined by a characteristic temperature shielding length, with cooler peripheral areas and a warmer brain core approaching body temperature. Direct cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements with microspheres show that the characteristic temperature shielding length is inversely proportional to the square root of CBF in excellent agreement with a theoretical model. This “temperature shielding effect” quantifies the means by which CBF prevents “extracranial cold” from penetrating deep brain structures. The effect is crucial for research and clinical applications; the relationship between brain, body, and extracranial temperatures can now be quantitatively predicted. PMID:16840581

  6. A nonintrusive temperature measuring system for estimating deep body temperature in bed.

    PubMed

    Sim, S Y; Lee, W K; Baek, H J; Park, K S

    2012-01-01

    Deep body temperature is an important indicator that reflects human being's overall physiological states. Existing deep body temperature monitoring systems are too invasive to apply to awake patients for a long time. Therefore, we proposed a nonintrusive deep body temperature measuring system. To estimate deep body temperature nonintrusively, a dual-heat-flux probe and double-sensor probes were embedded in a neck pillow. When a patient uses the neck pillow to rest, the deep body temperature can be assessed using one of the thermometer probes embedded in the neck pillow. We could estimate deep body temperature in 3 different sleep positions. Also, to reduce the initial response time of dual-heat-flux thermometer which measures body temperature in supine position, we employed the curve-fitting method to one subject. And thereby, we could obtain the deep body temperature in a minute. This result shows the possibility that the system can be used as practical temperature monitoring system with appropriate curve-fitting model. In the next study, we would try to establish a general fitting model that can be applied to all of the subjects. In addition, we are planning to extract meaningful health information such as sleep structure analysis from deep body temperature data which are acquired from this system.

  7. Temperature alters food web body-size structure.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; DeLong, John P

    2014-08-01

    The increased temperature associated with climate change may have important effects on body size and predator-prey interactions. The consequences of these effects for food web structure are unclear because the relationships between temperature and aspects of food web structure such as predator-prey body-size relationships are unknown. Here, we use the largest reported dataset for marine predator-prey interactions to assess how temperature affects predator-prey body-size relationships among different habitats ranging from the tropics to the poles. We found that prey size selection depends on predator body size, temperature and the interaction between the two. Our results indicate that (i) predator-prey body-size ratios decrease with predator size at below-average temperatures and increase with predator size at above-average temperatures, and (ii) that the effect of temperature on predator-prey body-size structure will be stronger at small and large body sizes and relatively weak at intermediate sizes. This systematic interaction may help to simplify forecasting the potentially complex consequences of warming on interaction strengths and food web stability.

  8. Does the body temperature change in older people?

    PubMed

    Güneş, Ulkü Yapucu; Zaybak, Ayten

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mean body temperatures in older people using mercury-in-glass thermometer. Older people are unable to regulate their body temperatures to the same degree as young adults because their responses to changes in body temperature are altered. Several published reports suggest that body temperature decreases with advancing age and has a greater variability in older populations. The aim of this study was to determine the mean body temperatures in older people. Non-experimental. Axillary body temperatures were taken in 133 older subjects in a nursing home for older people using mercury-in-glass thermometer. Temperatures were measured at 8 a.m., 2 p.m., and 6 p.m., over three consecutive days. Each subject had all three measurements taken on the same day. The mean age of the subjects was 77.2, SD 7.3. In the 133 older subjects, the mean axillary temperatures ranged from 35.1 to 36.4 degrees C (95.3-97.6 degrees F). The mean temperatures for those aged 65-74 was higher than in those aged 75-84 (p < 0.001) and those aged 85 and older (p < 0.001) at 6 p.m. but not at 8 a.m. or 2 p.m. We concluded that older people have mean axillary body temperatures lower than the reference point of 36.5 degrees C (97.7 degrees F). When assessing body temperature, it is important to take the age of the patient into consideration. Also, the reference point of 36.5 degrees C is inappropriate in older people, especially when diagnosing a febrile illness.

  9. An evaluation of body temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Ilsley, A H; Rutten, A J; Runciman, W B

    1983-02-01

    The accuracy of routine body temperature measurements, the suitability of various sites for such measurements, and the performance and practicality of various temperature measuring devices were studied. Oral and axillary temperature measurements made by the nursing staff were within 1 degree C of a reference value (within 0.5 degree C in 67%). Both sites were suitable for routine ward temperature measurement. Mercury-in-glass thermometers are recommended for routine ward use. Electronic and disposable chemical thermometers cost more but the latter are suitable in uncooperative patients and children. Forehead skin temperature measurements using liquid crystal plastic discs were unreliable. Pulmonary artery and rectal temperature measurements were satisfactory in operating theatre and intensive care unit; however, electronic thermometers should be subjected to routine checks. The bladder temperature measuring device proved unsuitable for clinical use. When oesophagus, nasopharynx and tympanum sites are used careful placement is necessary to minimise trauma and obtain reliable measurements.

  10. The circadian rhythm of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on the circadian rhythm of body temperature. It starts with a description of the typical pattern of oscillation under standard laboratory conditions, with consideration being given to intra- and interspecies differences. It then addresses the influence of environmental factors (principally ambient temperature and food availability) and biological factors (including locomotor activity, maturation and aging, body size, and reproductive state). A discussion of the interplay of rhythmicity and homeostasis (including both regulatory and heat-exchange processes) is followed by concluding remarks.

  11. Heat Capacity, Body Temperature, and Hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Even when air and water are at the same temperature, water will "feel" distinctly colder to us. This difference is due to the much higher heat capacity of water than of air. Offered here is an interesting life science application of water's high heat capacity and its serious implications for the maintenance of body temperature and the prevention of hypothermia in warm-blooded animals.

  12. Increase in body temperature during migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Ordás, Carlos M; Cuadrado, María L; Rodríguez-Cambrón, Ana B; Casas-Limón, Javier; del Prado, Náyade; Porta-Etessam, Jesús

    2013-08-01

    Intermittent fever has been occasionally related to migraine, either as a migraine equivalent or as a migraine accompaniment. We present a case of recurrent increase in body temperature consistently associated with migraine headaches. A 15-year-old girl reported a 3-year lasting history of migraine without aura, with a feeling of warmth occurring in each episode. Ancillary tests did not show any evidence of secondary headaches or any systemic disease. A 2-month headache diary was obtained, with daily records of headache intensity (0, no headache; 1, mild pain; 2, moderate pain; 3, severe pain) and simultaneous measurements of axillary temperature. Both parameters were registered in the evening, at 6:00 pm every day. The distribution of headache intensity and body temperature as well as the relationship between both variables over time were analyzed with nonparametric tests. The number of days without pain was 28 (45.2%); a mild headache was present on 13 days (21%), a moderate headache on 15 days (24.2%), and a severe headache on 6 days (9.7%). Headache days were associated with higher body temperature than headache-free days (median values: 37.3°C vs 36.6°C; Mann-Whitney U-test, P < 0.001). Moreover, a positive correlation was found between headache intensity and body temperature (Spearman's rho coefficient: 0.83, P < 0.001). Recurrent increase in body temperature may be another manifestation of the complex clinical spectrum of migraine. This symptom is probably related to hypothalamic involvement. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Structural transition temperature of hemoglobins correlates with species' body temperature.

    PubMed

    Zerlin, Kay Frank Thorsten; Kasischke, Nicole; Digel, Ilya; Maggakis-Kelemen, Christina; Temiz Artmann, Aysegül; Porst, Dariusz; Kayser, Peter; Linder, Peter; Artmann, Gerhard Michael

    2007-12-01

    Human red blood cells (RBCs) exhibit sudden changes in their biophysical properties at body temperature (T (B)). RBCs were seen to undergo a spontaneous transition from blockage to passage at T (C) = 36.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C, when the temperature dependency of RBC-passages through 1.3 mum narrow micropipettes was observed. Moreover, concentrated hemoglobin solutions (45 g/dl) showed a viscosity breakdown between 36 and 37 degrees C. With human hemoglobin, a structural transition was observed at T (B) as circular dichroism (CD) experiments revealed. This leads to the assumption that a species' body temperature occupies a unique position on the temperature scale and may even be imprinted in the structure of certain proteins. In this study, it was investigated whether hemoglobins of species with a T (B) different from those of human show temperature transitions and whether those were also linked to the species' T (B). The main conclusion was drawn from dynamic light scattering (DLS) and CD experiments. It was observed that such structural temperature transitions did occur in hemoglobins from all studied species and were correlated linearly (slope 0.81, r = 0.95) with the species' body temperature. We presumed that alpha-helices of hemoglobin were able to unfold more readily around T (B). alpha-helical unfolding would initiate molecular aggregation causing RBC passage and viscosity breakdown as mentioned above. Thus, structural molecular changes of hemoglobin could determine biophysical effects visible on a macroscopic scale. It is hypothesized that the species' body temperature was imprinted into the structure of hemoglobins.

  14. [Body temperature measurement in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Chadelat, I; Lenoir, G

    2005-08-01

    The use of rectal mercury thermometer has long been the standard method for measurement of body temperature. The restriction of mercury use since 1996 has led to development of other devices. The liquid crystal strip thermometer held against the forehead has a low sensitivity. The single-use chemical thermometer measures oral temperature. Its accuracy must be evaluated. Infrared ear thermometers are routinely used because it is convenient and fast to use. However, numerous studies have shown that it does not show sufficient correlation with rectal temperature, leading to the risk to miss cases of true fever. Rectal temperature remains the gold standard in case of fever. Rectal temperature measurement with an electronic device is well correlated with the glass mercury standard. Galistan thermometer accuracy must be evaluated because of sterilization of the whole device, which is not the case for the electronic thermometer. A pediatric study is necessary to evaluate the performance of this device in comparison with the electronic thermometer.

  15. Adiposity and human regional body temperature.

    PubMed

    Savastano, David M; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Brady, Sheila M; Reynolds, James C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2009-11-01

    Human obesity is associated with increased heat production; however, subcutaneous adipose tissue provides an insulating layer that impedes heat loss. To maintain normothermia, therefore, obese individuals must increase their heat dissipation. The objective was to test the hypothesis that temperature in a heat-dissipating region of the hand is elevated in obese adults. Obese [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) > or = 30] and normal-weight (NW; body mass index = 18-25) adults were studied under thermoneutral conditions at rest. Core body temperature was measured by using ingested telemetric capsules. The temperatures of the third fingernail bed of the right hand and of abdominal skin from an area 1.5 cm inferior to the umbilicus were determined by using infrared thermography. Abdominal skin temperatures were also measured via adhesive thermistors that were placed over a prominent skin-surface blood vessel and over an adjacent nonvessel location. The groups were compared by analysis of covariance with age, sex, race, and room temperature as covariates. Core temperature did not differ significantly between the 23 obese and 13 NW participants (P = 0.74). However, infrared thermography-measured fingernail-bed temperature was significantly higher in obese subjects than in NW subjects (33.9 +/- 0.7 degrees C compared with 28.6 +/- 0.9 degrees C; P < 0.001). Conversely, infrared thermography-measured abdominal skin temperature was significantly lower in obese subjects than in NW subjects (31.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C compared with 32.8 +/- 0.3 degrees C; P = 0.02). Nonvessel abdominal skin temperatures measured by thermistors were also lower in obese subjects (P = 0.04). Greater subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese adults may provide a significant insulating layer that blunts abdominal heat transfer. Augmented heat release from the hands may offset heat retention in areas of the body with greater adiposity, thereby helping to maintain normothermia in obesity. This trial was

  16. Adiposity and human regional body temperature123

    PubMed Central

    Savastano, David M; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Brady, Sheila M; Reynolds, James C

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human obesity is associated with increased heat production; however, subcutaneous adipose tissue provides an insulating layer that impedes heat loss. To maintain normothermia, therefore, obese individuals must increase their heat dissipation. Objective: The objective was to test the hypothesis that temperature in a heat-dissipating region of the hand is elevated in obese adults. Design: Obese [body mass index (in kg/m2) ≥ 30] and normal-weight (NW; body mass index = 18–25) adults were studied under thermoneutral conditions at rest. Core body temperature was measured by using ingested telemetric capsules. The temperatures of the third fingernail bed of the right hand and of abdominal skin from an area 1.5 cm inferior to the umbilicus were determined by using infrared thermography. Abdominal skin temperatures were also measured via adhesive thermistors that were placed over a prominent skin-surface blood vessel and over an adjacent nonvessel location. The groups were compared by analysis of covariance with age, sex, race, and room temperature as covariates. Results: Core temperature did not differ significantly between the 23 obese and 13 NW participants (P = 0.74). However, infrared thermography–measured fingernail-bed temperature was significantly higher in obese subjects than in NW subjects (33.9 ± 0.7°C compared with 28.6 ± 0.9°C; P < 0.001). Conversely, infrared thermography–measured abdominal skin temperature was significantly lower in obese subjects than in NW subjects (31.8 ± 0.2°C compared with 32.8 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.02). Nonvessel abdominal skin temperatures measured by thermistors were also lower in obese subjects (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Greater subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese adults may provide a significant insulating layer that blunts abdominal heat transfer. Augmented heat release from the hands may offset heat retention in areas of the body with greater adiposity, thereby helping to maintain normothermia in

  17. Peripheral ankle cooling and core body temperature.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Riann M; Garrison, J Craig; Leonard, Jamie L; Edwards, Jeffrey E; Weltman, Arthur; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of the human body to cold is perceived as a stressor and results in a sympathetic response geared at maintaining core temperature. Application of ice to the periphery may lead to a decrease in core temperature, which may counteract the therapeutic effects of cryotherapy. To determine if core temperature is lowered by the application of an ice bag to the ankle joint complex. A within-subjects, repeated-measures design. The University of Virginia General Clinical Research Center. Twenty-three healthy adults aged 19 to 39 years. Subjects were admitted to the hospital on 2 separate occasions. During one admission, subjects had a 20-minute ice treatment applied to their ankles; in the other admission, a bag of marbles was applied. Temperature measurements were recorded at 6 time intervals: baseline (before ice application), immediately after ice application, 10 and 20 minutes after ice application, and 10 and 20 minutes after ice removal. We measured core temperature and ankle and soleus muscle surface temperatures. A mixed-effects model analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to determine if differences existed in core temperature and ankle and soleus surface temperatures between conditions (cryotherapy and control) and over time. Core temperature did not change after ice application or ice removal (P > 0.05). The average core temperatures during the cryotherapy and control conditions were 36.72 degrees C +/- 0.42 degrees C and 36.45 degrees C +/- 1.23 degrees C, respectively. A 20-minute cryotherapy treatment applied to the ankle did not alter core temperature.

  18. [Circadian rhythms in body temperature and sleep].

    PubMed

    Honma, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-01

    A 24 hour variation of core body temperature in humans is primarily regulated by the endogenous circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. And the expression of circadian rhythm is modified by the thermoregulatory mechanism controlling heat production and heat loss, which also show circadian rhythms. On the other hand, circadian rhythms in sleep-wakefulness are expressed by two independent but mutually coupled oscillators, the circadian pacemaker and the oscillator specific to sleep-wakefulness. However, neither the mechanism nor the site of oscillation of the latter is known. The time cues for these two oscillators are different. They are usually but frequently uncoupled under free-running conditions. Body temperature and sleep-wakefulness influence the counterpart in various extents, exerting masking effects on either circadian rhythm.

  19. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  20. A thermosensory pathway that controls body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2008-01-01

    Defending body temperature against environmental thermal challenges is one of the most fundamental homeostatic functions governed by the nervous system. Here we show a novel somatosensory pathway, which essentially constitutes the afferent arm of the thermoregulatory reflex triggered by cutaneous sensation of environmental temperature changes. Using rat in vivo electrophysiological and anatomical approaches, we revealed that lateral parabrachial neurons play a pivotal role in this pathway by glutamatergically transmitting cutaneous thermosensory signals received from spinal somatosensory neurons directly to the thermoregulatory command center, preoptic area. This feedforward pathway mediates not only sympathetic and shivering thermogenic responses but also metabolic and cardiac responses to skin cooling challenges. Notably, this ‘thermoregulatory afferent’ pathway exists in parallel with the spinothalamocortical somatosensory pathway mediating temperature perception. These findings make an important contribution to our understanding of both the somatosensory system and thermal homeostasis—two mechanisms fundamental to the nervous system and to our survival. PMID:18084288

  1. A thermosensory pathway that controls body temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Morrison, Shaun F

    2008-01-01

    Defending body temperature against environmental thermal challenges is one of the most fundamental homeostatic functions that are governed by the nervous system. Here we describe a somatosensory pathway that essentially constitutes the afferent arm of the thermoregulatory reflex that is triggered by cutaneous sensation of environmental temperature changes. Using in vivo electrophysiological and anatomical approaches in the rat, we found that lateral parabrachial neurons are pivotal in this pathway by glutamatergically transmitting cutaneous thermosensory signals received from spinal somatosensory neurons directly to the thermoregulatory command center, the preoptic area. This feedforward pathway mediates not only sympathetic and shivering thermogenic responses but also metabolic and cardiac responses to skin cooling challenges. Notably, this 'thermoregulatory afferent' pathway exists in parallel with the spinothalamocortical somatosensory pathway that mediates temperature perception. These findings make an important contribution to our understanding of both the somatosensory system and thermal homeostasis -- two mechanisms that are fundamental to the nervous system and to our survival.

  2. Body temperature in early postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; Suthar, V S; Voigtsberger, R; Bonk, S; Heuwieser, W

    2014-07-01

    A strategy widely adopted in the modern dairy industry is the introduction of postpartum health monitoring programs by trained farm personnel. Within these fresh cow protocols, various parameters (e.g., rectal temperature, attitude, milk production, uterine discharge, ketones) are evaluated during the first 5 to 14 days in milk (DIMs) to diagnose relevant diseases. It is well documented that 14% to 66% of healthy cows exhibit at least one temperature of 39.5 °C or greater within the first 10 DIM. Although widely adopted, data on diagnostic performance of body temperature (BT) measurement to diagnose infectious diseases (e.g., metritis, mastitis) are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify possible factors associated with BT in postpartum dairy cows. A study was conducted on a commercial dairy farm including 251 cows. In a total of 217 cows, a vaginal temperature logger was inserted from DIM 2 to 10, whereas 34 cows did not receive a temperature logger as control. Temperature loggers measured vaginal temperature every 10 minutes. Rectal temperature was measured twice daily in all cows. On DIM 2, 5, and 10, cows underwent a clinical examination. Body temperature was influenced by various parameters. Primiparous cows had 0.2 °C higher BT than multiparous cows. Multiparous cows that calved during June and July had higher BT than those that calved in May. In primiparous cows, this effect was only evident from DIM 7 to 10. Furthermore, abnormal calving conditions (i.e., assisted calving, dead calf, retained placenta, twins) affected BT in cows. This effect was more pronounced in multiparous cows. Abnormal vaginal discharge did increase BT in primiparous and multiparous cows. Primiparous cows suffering from hyperketonemia (beta-hydroxybutyrat ≥ 1.4 mmol/L) had higher BT than those not affected. In multiparous cows, there was no association between hyperketonemia and BT. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that BT is influenced

  3. Relationship between body temperature, weight, and hematological parameters of black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lucas Cardoso; Barros, Marilia

    2016-06-01

    Basal thermal values of captive adult black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata) in a thermoneutral environment were measured via different methods, along with body weight and hematological parameters. Body temperatures were recorded with rectal (RC), subcutaneous (SC) microchip transponder and infrared (left and right) tympanic membrane (TM) thermometries. Thermal values were correlated with body mass and some hematological data. Similar RC and SC temperatures were observed, these being significantly higher than the left and right TM values. SC temperature was positively correlated and in close agreement with RC measurements. Although body temperatures were not influenced by gender, capture time, or body weight, they were correlated with hematological parameters. Thus, body temperatures in this species seem to reflect some of the characteristics of the assessments' location, with SC microchip transponders being a less invasive method to assess body temperature in these small-bodied non-human primates. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Physical methods used to control body temperature].

    PubMed

    Ezquerro Rodríguez, Esther; Montes García, Yolanda; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2012-10-01

    The physical methods to control body temperature, either to induce hypothermia, or to increase body temperature, can be of two types: physical methods of external heating or cooling and invasive methods that require complex procedures and technology. There are many strategies for the induction of hypothermia, all based on three of the four basic mechanisms of heat transfer, evaporation, convection and conduction. In the hospital environment the external cooling methods or surface (blankets of cold air or water circulation, plates of hydrogel Artic Sun, methods of cooling helmet) are the most widely used for the induction of therapeutic hypothermia. The most non-invasive devices used are blades of hydrogel, which use water conduction high speed between the layers of pads. But there are quicker methods to induce hypothermia; i.e., invasive methods of internal cooling: infusion of intravenous crystalloid; endovascular catheters located in a central vein through which flows saline pumped by a closed circuit; By-pass cardio-pulmonary with extracorporeal circulation; and By-pass percutaneous venous system for continuous hemofiltration. The average physical external heating is based on the patient's ability to produce and retain heat or in the application of heat to the body surface of the patient (hot spring baths with hot water, air blankets, blankets of water). But when the answer to these methods are not sufficient or hypothermia is moderate or severe, other methods of internal heat are suggested: inhalation of oxygen or warm to 40-45 degrees C and wet by facial mask or endotracheal tube; intravenous (IV) infusion with hot solutions; Irrigation of body cavities with warm saline solution to 40-42 degrees C; peritoneal dialysis, haemodialysis and hemofiltration; Continuous reheating arterio-venous or venous-venous; extracorporeal circulation with cardiopulmonary bypass. In this article each of the methods listed above will be described for the induction of hypothermia

  5. Is Oral Temperature an Accurate Measurement of Deep Body Temperature? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Ganio, Matthew S.; Casa, Douglas J.; Vingren, Jakob; Klau, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Context: Oral temperature might not be a valid method to assess core body temperature. However, many clinicians, including athletic trainers, use it rather than criterion standard methods, such as rectal thermometry. Objective: To critically evaluate original research addressing the validity of using oral temperature as a measurement of core body temperature during periods of rest and changing core temperature. Data Sources: In July 2010, we searched the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTDiscus, Academic Search Premier, and the Cochrane Library for the following concepts: core body temperature, oral, and thermometers. Controlled vocabulary was used, when available, as well as key words and variations of those key words. The search was limited to articles focusing on temperature readings and studies involving human participants. Data Synthesis: Original research was reviewed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria and subsequently were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers. All 16 were included in the review because they met the minimal PEDro score of 4 points (of 10 possible points), with all but 2 scoring 5 points. A critical review of these studies indicated a disparity between oral and criterion standard temperature methods (eg, rectal and esophageal) specifically as the temperature increased. The difference was −0.50°C ± 0.31°C at rest and −0.58°C ± 0.75°C during a nonsteady state. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that, regardless of whether the assessment is recorded at rest or during periods of changing core temperature, oral temperature is an unsuitable diagnostic tool for determining body temperature because many measures demonstrated differences greater than the predetermined validity threshold of 0.27°C (0.5°F). In addition, the differences were greatest at the highest rectal temperatures. Oral temperature cannot

  6. Is oral temperature an accurate measurement of deep body temperature? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Ganio, Matthew S; Casa, Douglas J; Vingren, Jakob; Klau, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Oral temperature might not be a valid method to assess core body temperature. However, many clinicians, including athletic trainers, use it rather than criterion standard methods, such as rectal thermometry. To critically evaluate original research addressing the validity of using oral temperature as a measurement of core body temperature during periods of rest and changing core temperature. In July 2010, we searched the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTDiscus, Academic Search Premier, and the Cochrane Library for the following concepts: core body temperature, oral, and thermometers. Controlled vocabulary was used, when available, as well as key words and variations of those key words. The search was limited to articles focusing on temperature readings and studies involving human participants. Original research was reviewed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria and subsequently were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers. All 16 were included in the review because they met the minimal PEDro score of 4 points (of 10 possible points), with all but 2 scoring 5 points. A critical review of these studies indicated a disparity between oral and criterion standard temperature methods (eg, rectal and esophageal) specifically as the temperature increased. The difference was -0.50°C ± 0.31°C at rest and -0.58°C ± 0.75°C during a nonsteady state. Evidence suggests that, regardless of whether the assessment is recorded at rest or during periods of changing core temperature, oral temperature is an unsuitable diagnostic tool for determining body temperature because many measures demonstrated differences greater than the predetermined validity threshold of 0.27°C (0.5°F). In addition, the differences were greatest at the highest rectal temperatures. Oral temperature cannot accurately reflect core body temperature, probably because it is

  7. Assessing body composition: the skinfold method.

    PubMed

    Talbot, L A; Lister, Z

    1995-12-01

    1. Excess body fat contributes to many chronic diseases. Using a case scenario, an initial screening assessment is performed on two clients. The occupational health nurse provides feedback on current lifestyle behaviors and educates the clients about relevant lifestyle changes. 2. Tables illustrate the step by step procedures for measuring body fat using the skinfold thickness method. Photographs show the multiple body sites used in the skinfold analysis. 3. Commonly asked client questions related to body fat are discussed in detail, and the use of body fat assessment as a screening method for the health promotion professional is described.

  8. Impact of nesting material on mouse body temperature and physiology.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Brianna N; Gordon, Christopher J; Pajor, Edmond A; Lucas, Jeffrey R; Davis, Jerry K; Garner, Joseph P

    2013-02-17

    In laboratories, mice are housed at 20-24 °C, which is below their lower critical temperature (≈30 °C). Thus, mice are potentially cold stressed, which can alter metabolism, immune function, and reproduction. These physiological changes reflect impaired wellbeing, and affect scientific outcomes. We hypothesized that nesting material would allow mice to alleviate cold stress by controlling their thermal microenvironment, thus insulating them, reducing heat loss and thermogenic processes. Naïve C57BL/6, CD-1, and BALB/c mice (24 male and 24 female/strain in groups of 3) were housed in standard cages at 20 °C either with or without 8 g nesting material for 4 weeks. Core body temperature was followed using intraperitoneal radio telemetry. The thermal properties of the nests were assessed using a thermal imaging camera, and related to nest quality. Higher scoring nests were negatively correlated with the mean radiated temperature and were thus more insulating. No effects of nesting material on body temperature were found. CD-1 mice with nesting material had higher end body weights than controls. No effect was seen in the other two strains. Mice with the telemetry implant had larger spleens than controls, possibly indicating an immune response to the implant or low level infection from the surgery. BALB/c mice express less mRNA for the UCP1 protein than mice without nesting material. This indicates that BALB/c's with nesting material do not utilize their brown fat to create heat as readily as controls. Nests can alleviate thermal discomfort by decreasing the amount of radiated heat and reduce the need for non-shivering thermogenesis. However, different strains appear to use different behavioral (through different primary modes of behavioral thermoregulation) and physiological strategies (utilizing thermogenesis to different degrees) to maintain a constant body temperature under cool standard laboratory ambient temperatures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, A. Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8–17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance. PMID:22675136

  10. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-10-23

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8-17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance.

  11. Nocturnal body temperature in wintering blue tits is affected by roost-site temperature and body reserves.

    PubMed

    Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Johan F; Nilsson, J-Å

    2011-09-01

    Birds commonly use rest-phase hypothermia, a controlled reduction of body temperature (T(b)), to conserve energy during times of high metabolic demands. We assessed the flexibility of this heterothermic strategy by increasing roost-site temperature and recording the subsequent T(b) changes in wintering blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus L.), assuming that blue tits would respond to treatment by increasing T(b). We found that birds increased T(b) when roost-site temperature was increased, but only at low ambient temperatures. Moreover, birds with larger fat reserves regulated T(b) at higher levels than birds carrying less fat. This result implies that a roosting blue tit maintains its T(b) at the highest affordable level, as determined by the interacting effect of ecophysiological costs associated with rest-phase hypothermia and energy reserves, in order to minimize potential fitness costs associated with a low T(b).

  12. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  13. Assessing body composition in infants and toddlers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare different body composition techniques in infants and toddlers. Anthropometric measures including mid-upper arm circumference (MAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), and weight-for-height or -length Z-scores (WHZ), and measures of body fat mass assessed wit...

  14. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Carola W.; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from single-time probing to continuous temperature imaging. Whilst there is broad agreement that body temperature data is of value, procedural considerations of body temperature measurements in the context of metabolic phenotyping are missing. Here, we provide an overview of the various methods currently available for gathering body temperature data from mice. We explore the scope and limitations of thermometry in mice, with the hope of assisting researchers in the selection of appropriate approaches, and conditions, for comprehensive mouse phenotypic analyses. PMID:28824441

  15. Lower core body temperature and greater body fat are components of a human thrifty phenotype.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, M; Schlögl, M; Bonfiglio, S; Votruba, S B; Krakoff, J; Thearle, M S

    2016-05-01

    In small studies, a thrifty human phenotype, defined by a greater 24-hour energy expenditure (EE) decrease with fasting, is associated with less weight loss during caloric restriction. In rodents, models of diet-induced obesity often have a phenotype including a reduced EE and decreased core body temperature. We assessed whether a thrifty human phenotype associates with differences in core body temperature or body composition. Data for this cross-sectional analysis were obtained from 77 individuals participating in one of two normal physiology studies while housed on our clinical research unit. Twenty-four-hour EE using a whole-room indirect calorimeter and 24-h core body temperature were measured during 24 h each of fasting and 200% overfeeding with a diet consisting of 50% carbohydrates, 20% protein and 30% fat. Body composition was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. To account for the effects of body size on EE, changes in EE were expressed as a percentage change from 24-hour EE (%EE) during energy balance. A greater %EE decrease with fasting correlated with a smaller %EE increase with overfeeding (r=0.27, P=0.02). The %EE decrease with fasting was associated with both fat mass and abdominal fat mass, even after accounting for covariates (β=-0.16 (95% CI: -0.26, -0.06) %EE per kg fat mass, P=0.003; β=-0.0004 (-0.0007, -0.00004) %EE kg(-1) abdominal fat mass, P=0.03). In men, a greater %EE decrease in response to fasting was associated with a lower 24- h core body temperature, even after adjusting for covariates (β=1.43 (0.72, 2.15) %EE per 0.1 °C, P=0.0003). Thrifty individuals, as defined by a larger EE decrease with fasting, were more likely to have greater overall and abdominal adiposity as well as lower core body temperature consistent with a more efficient metabolism.

  16. Body temperatures of selected amphibian and reptile species.

    PubMed

    Raske, Matthew; Lewbart, Gregory A; Dombrowski, Daniel S; Hale, Peyton; Correa, Maria; Christian, Larry S

    2012-09-01

    Ectothermic vertebrates are a diverse group of animals that rely on external sources to maintain a preferred body temperature. Amphibians and reptiles have a preferred optimal temperature zone that allows for optimal biological function. Physiologic processes in ectotherms are influenced by temperature; these animals have capabilities in which they make use of behavioral and physiologic mechanisms to thermoregulate. Core body, ambient air, body surface, and surface/water temperatures were obtained from six ectothermic species including one anuran, two snakes, two turtles, and one alligator. Clinically significant differences between core body temperature and ambient temperature were noted in the black rat snake, corn snake, and eastern box turtle. No significant differences were found between core body and ambient temperature for the American alligator, bullfrog, mata mata turtle, dead spotted turtle, or dead mole king snake. This study indicates some ectotherms are able to regulate their body temperatures independent of their environment. Body temperature of ectotherms is an important component that clinicians should consider when selecting and providing therapeutic care. Investigation of basic physiologic parameters (heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature) from a diverse population of healthy ectothermic vertebrates may provide baseline data for a systematic health care approach.

  17. Radiotelemetric measurement of body temperature in feedlot steers during winter.

    PubMed

    Lefcourt, A M; Adams, W R

    1998-07-01

    Little is known concerning body temperature regulation in cattle under conditions of low ambient temperature. To investigate the influence of cold on body temperature regulation, core body temperatures of feedlot steers (crossbred Bos taurus) were monitored for two winters in Nebraska, from late December to mid-March in yr 1 and from late December through June in yr 2. In yr 1, radiotransmitters to monitor temperature were implanted in the peritoneum of five steers (360 kg); in yr 2, four steers (320 kg) were used. Body temperatures and ambient temperatures were recorded at 3-min intervals and were mathematically filtered to produce 120 readings/d. For yr 1 and 2, daily maximum (40.09 and 39.66 degrees C), minimum (38.78 and 38.64 degrees C), and average (39.29 and 39.06 degrees C) body temperatures were not affected by ambient temperatures. Body temperatures exhibited circadian rhythms with the minima at approximately 0800 and the maxima at approximately 1900. For both years, sharp peaks in body temperature were often seen in the evening and, for yr 2, to a lesser extent in the morning. The occurrence of peaks was normally congruent, within a 1.5-h window, across steers. Congruent peaks in the evening with peak heights of 1.05 and .77 degrees C occurred on 65 and 56% of the days in yr 1 and 2, respectively. Occurrence of congruent peaks was correlated with dusk; peaks followed dusk by 30 to 60 min. Ambient temperature also influenced the occurrence of peaks; few peaks were observed when average daily ambient temperatures were below -7.5 degrees C. The dynamic changes in body temperature throughout the day, including the peaks in body temperature after dusk, strongly suggest that thermoregulatory systems in steers respond not only to current ambient conditions, but also to more integrative measures such as day length and daily heat load.

  18. Thermographic analysis of body surface temperature of mammals.

    PubMed

    Mortola, Jacopo P

    2013-02-01

    Among mammals, the similarity in body temperature indicates that body size differences in heat loss must match the body size differences in heat production. This study tested the possibility that body surface temperature (Tbs), responsible for heat loss through radiation and convection, may vary systematically with the animal's body mass (M). Tbs was measured by whole body thermography in 53 specimens from 37 eutherian mammals ranging in M from a few grams to several tons. Numerous thermographs were taken from all angles, indoor, with the animals standing still in absence of air convection and of external radiant sources, at the ambient temperature of 20-22°C, 22-25°C, or 25-27°C. Data were analysed as whole body surface average, as average of the "effective" body surface area (those regions with temperatures exceeding ambient temperature by > 1.5°C or by > 5°C), as the peak histogram distribution and as average of the regions with the top 20% temperature values. For all modes of data analysis and at all ambient temperatures Tbs was independent of the animal's M. From these data, the heat loss by radiation and natural convection combined was estimated to vary to the 2/3 power of M. It is concluded that, for the same ambient conditions, the surface temperature responsible for radiation and convection is essentially body-size independent among mammals.

  19. Body/bone-marrow differential-temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Berdahl, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    Differential-temperature sensor developed to compare bone-marrow and body temperature in leukemia patients uses single stable amplifier to monitor temperature difference recorded by thermocouples. Errors are reduced by referencing temperatures to each other, not to separate calibration points.

  20. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted to intensive/neurocritical care with a diagnosis of severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 8). The review considered studies that measured brain temperature and core body temperature. Articles published in English from the years 1980 to 2012 were searched in databases, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid SP, Mednar and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database. For the review, publications of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, before and after studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion. Of 2,391 records identified via the search strategies, 37 were retrieved for detailed examination (including two via hand searching). Fifteen were reviewed and assessed for methodological quality. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review providing 15 brain-core body temperature comparisons. The direction of mean brain-body temperature differences was positive (brain higher than body temperature) and negative (brain lower than body temperature). Hypothermia is associated with large brain-body temperature differences. Brain temperature cannot be predicted reliably from core body temperature. Concurrent monitoring of brain and body temperature is recommended in patients where risk of temperature-related neuronal damage is a cause for clinical concern and when deliberate induction of below-normal body temperature is instituted. PMID:23680353

  1. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Lunn, Kueh Wern

    2013-04-22

    Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted to intensive/neurocritical care with a diagnosis of severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 8). The review considered studies that measured brain temperature and core body temperature. Articles published in English from the years 1980 to 2012 were searched in databases, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid SP, Mednar and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database. For the review, publications of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, before and after studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion. Of 2,391 records identified via the search strategies, 37 were retrieved for detailed examination (including two via hand searching). Fifteen were reviewed and assessed for methodological quality. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review providing 15 brain-core body temperature comparisons. The direction of mean brain-body temperature differences was positive (brain higher than body temperature) and negative (brain lower than body temperature). Hypothermia is associated with large brain-body temperature differences. Brain temperature cannot be predicted reliably from core body temperature. Concurrent monitoring of brain and body temperature is recommended in patients where risk of temperature-related neuronal damage is a cause for clinical concern and when deliberate induction of below-normal body temperature is instituted.

  2. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carola W; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Rectal probing is subject to procedural bias. This method is suitable for first-line phenotyping, provided probe depth and measurement duration are standardized. It is also useful for detecting individuals with out-of-range body temperatures (during hypothermia, torpor).The colonic temperature attained by inserting the probe >2 cm deep is a measure of deep (core) body temperature.IR imaging of the skin is useful for detecting heat leaks and autonomous thermoregulatory alterations, but it does not measure body temperature.Temperature of the hairy or shaved skin covering the inter-scapular brown adipose tissue can be used as a measure of BAT thermogenesis. However, obtaining such measurements of sufficient quality is very difficult, and interpreting them can be tricky. Temperature differences between the inter-scapular and lumbar areas can be a better measure of the thermogenic activity of inter-scapular brown adipose tissue.Implanted probes for precise determination of BAT temperature (changes) should be fixed close to the Sulzer's vein. For measurement of BAT thermogenesis, core body temperature and BAT temperature should be recorded simultaneously.Tail temperature is suitable to compare the presence or absence of vasoconstriction or vasodilation.Continuous, longitudinal monitoring of core body temperature is preferred over single probing, as the readings are taken in a non-invasive, physiological context.Combining core body temperature measurements with metabolic rate measurements yields insights into the interplay between heat production and heat loss (thermal conductance), potentially revealing novel thermoregulatory phenotypes. Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from

  3. Miniature ingestible telemeter devices to measure deep-body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. M.; Fryer, T. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A telemetry device comprised of a pill-size ingestible transmitter developed to obtain deep body temperature measurements of a human is described. The device has particular utility in the medical field where deep body temperatures provide an indication of general health.

  4. [Improving recovery of body temperature after ablution in premature infants].

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shu-Yen; Huang, Hisu-Min; Tseng, Chi-Ying

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve the problem of decreased body temperature after ablution in premature infants, and increase the rate of recovery of body temperature. Before administration of this program, the rate of body temperature recovery was slow. The body temperatures of only 35% of premature infants' reached 36.5 degrees C at 30 minutes after bath, those of 43% did so at 60 minutes after bath, and those of 70 % did so at 120 minutes after bath. After a warmth maintenance nursing standard had been set, the bathing nursing standard corrected, standard interventions promoted and the system inspected, the percentage of body temperature recovery to 36.5 degrees C was raised from 35% to 74% at 30 minutes after bath and the body temperature became normal in all premature infants at 60 minutes after bath. This program not only solves the problem of low body temperature after ablution in premature infants, but also consolidates nursing staffs' knowledge and skills in maintaining body temperature in prematurity to promote the quality of premature care.

  5. Core body temperature regulation of pediatric patients during radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Fredric A; Campos, Alvaro; Xiong, Xiaoping; Wu, Shengjie; Oigbokie, Nikita; Proctor, Kimberly

    2007-03-01

    Core body temperature elevation (hyperthermia) can occur during radiofrequency ablation of large centrally located tumors in small children. Hyperthermia can be predicted on the basis of long burn times, high wattage delivered by the RF system and low body weight. If hyperthermia is anticipated, cooling blankets using refrigerated air or water are recommended. The advantage of these systems is that the cooling can help maintain normal core body temperature.

  6. Implanted telemeter for electrocardiogram and body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    Measuring system requiring one blocking oscillator to generate modulated pulse repetition rate is implantable in the bodies of small animals. Device has life of two years and transmission range of about three feet. EKG sensing unit also is used to sense electromyogram or electrooculogram of laboratory animals.

  7. Body Temperature Cycles Control Rhythmic Alternative Splicing in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Preußner, Marco; Goldammer, Gesine; Neumann, Alexander; Haltenhof, Tom; Rautenstrauch, Pia; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Heyd, Florian

    2017-08-03

    The core body temperature of all mammals oscillates with the time of the day. However, direct molecular consequences of small, physiological changes in body temperature remain largely elusive. Here we show that body temperature cycles drive rhythmic SR protein phosphorylation to control an alternative splicing (AS) program. A temperature change of 1°C is sufficient to induce a concerted splicing switch in a large group of functionally related genes, rendering this splicing-based thermometer much more sensitive than previously described temperature-sensing mechanisms. AS of two exons in the 5' UTR of the TATA-box binding protein (Tbp) highlights the general impact of this mechanism, as it results in rhythmic TBP protein levels with implications for global gene expression in vivo. Together our data establish body temperature-driven AS as a core clock-independent oscillator in mammalian peripheral clocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mapping the body surface temperature of cattle by infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Salles, Marcia Saladini Vieira; da Silva, Suelen Corrêa; Salles, Fernando André; Roma, Luiz Carlos; El Faro, Lenira; Bustos Mac Lean, Priscilla Ayleen; Lins de Oliveira, Celso Eduardo; Martello, Luciane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is an alternative non-invasive method that has been studied as a tool for identifying many physiological and pathological processes related to changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the body surface temperature of Jersey dairy cattle in a thermoneutral environment in order to contribute to the determination of a body surface temperature pattern for animals of this breed in a situation of thermal comfort. Twenty-four Jersey heifers were used over a period of 35 days at APTA Brazil. Measurements were performed on all animals, starting with the physiological parameters. Body surface temperature was measured by IRT collecting images in different body regions: left and right eye area, right and left eye, caudal left foreleg, cranial left foreleg, right and left flank, and forehead. High correlations were observed between temperature and humidity index (THI) and right flank, left flank and forehead temperatures (0.85, 0.81, and 0.81, respectively). The IRT variables that exhibited the five highest correlation coefficients in principal component 1 were, in decreasing order: forehead (0.90), right flank (0.87), left flank (0.84), marker 1 caudal left foreleg (0.83), marker 2 caudal left foreleg (0.74). The THI showed a high correlation coefficient (0.88) and moderate to low correlations were observed for the physiological variables rectal temperature (0.43), and respiratory frequency (0.42). The thermal profile obtained indicates a surface temperature pattern for each region studied in a situation of thermal comfort and may contribute to studies investigating body surface temperature. Among the body regions studied, IRT forehead temperature showed the highest association with rectal temperature, and forehead and right and left flank temperatures are strongly associated with THI and may be adopted in future studies on thermoregulation and body heat production.

  9. The validity of temperature-sensitive ingestible capsules for measuring core body temperature in laboratory protocols.

    PubMed

    Darwent, David; Zhou, Xuan; van den Heuvel, Cameron; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Greg D

    2011-10-01

    The human core body temperature (CBT) rhythm is tightly coupled to an endogenous circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus. The standard method for assessing the status of this pacemaker is by continuous sampling of CBT using rectal thermometry. This research sought to validate the use of ingestible, temperature-sensitive capsules to measure CBT as an alternative to rectal thermometry. Participants were 11 young adult males who had volunteered to complete a laboratory protocol that extended across 12 consecutive days. A total of 87 functional capsules were ingested and eliminated by participants during the laboratory internment. Core body temperature samples were collected in 1-min epochs and compared to paired samples collected concurrently via rectal thermistors. Agreement between samples that were collected using ingestible sensors and rectal thermistors was assessed using the gold-standard limits of agreement method. Across all valid paired samples collected during the study (n = 120,126), the mean difference was 0.06°C, whereas the 95% CI (confidence interval) for differences was less than ±0.35°C. Despite the overall acceptable limits of agreement, systematic measurement bias was noted across the initial 5 h of sensor-transit periods and attributed to temperature gradations across the alimentary canal.

  10. Being cool: how body temperature influences ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Keil, Gerald; Cummings, Elizabeth; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Temperature is a basic and essential property of any physical system, including living systems. Even modest variations in temperature can have profound effects on organisms, and it has long been thought that as metabolism increases at higher temperatures so should rates of ageing. Here, we review the literature on how temperature affects longevity, ageing and life history traits. From poikilotherms to homeotherms, there is a clear trend for lower temperature being associated with longer lifespans both in wild populations and in laboratory conditions. Many life-extending manipulations in rodents, such as caloric restriction, also decrease core body temperature. Nonetheless, an inverse relationship between temperature and lifespan can be obscured or reversed, especially when the range of body temperatures is small as in homeotherms. An example is observed in humans: women appear to have a slightly higher body temperature and yet live longer than men. The mechanisms involved in the relationship between temperature and longevity also appear to be less direct than once thought with neuroendocrine processes possibly mediating complex physiological responses to temperature changes. Lastly, we discuss species differences in longevity in mammals and how this relates to body temperature and argue that the low temperature of the long-lived naked mole-rat possibly contributes to its exceptional longevity.

  11. Body temperature stability achieved by the large body mass of sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsufumi

    2014-10-15

    To investigate the thermal characteristics of large reptiles living in water, temperature data were continuously recorded from 16 free-ranging loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, during internesting periods using data loggers. Core body temperatures were 0.7-1.7°C higher than ambient water temperatures and were kept relatively constant. Unsteady numerical simulations using a spherical thermodynamic model provided mechanistic explanations for these phenomena, and the body temperature responses to fluctuating water temperature can be simply explained by a large body mass with a constant thermal diffusivity and a heat production rate rather than physiological thermoregulation. By contrast, body temperatures increased 2.6-5.1°C in 107-152 min during their emergences to nest on land. The estimated heat production rates on land were 7.4-10.5 times the calculated values in the sea. The theoretical prediction that temperature difference between body and water temperatures would increase according to the body size was confirmed by empirical data recorded from several species of sea turtles. Comparing previously reported data, the internesting intervals of leatherback, green and loggerhead turtles were shorter when the body temperatures were higher. Sea turtles seem to benefit from a passive thermoregulatory strategy, which depends primarily on the physical attributes of their large body masses. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Body temperature regulation and thermoneutrality in rats.

    PubMed

    Poole, S; Stephenson, J D

    1977-04-01

    Various concepts of thermoneutrality were considered for a proposed study of the role of hypothalamic amines in temperature regulation of rats. The classic definition, the ambient temperature over which metabolic rate is minimum and constant, gave a range of approximately 28 to 32 degrees C. However, within this temperature range rats were inactive, the inactivity apparently representing a behavioural response to heat stress and itself responsible for the reduced metabolic rate; certain thermoregulatory effectors were also activated to increase heat loss. Therefore an alternative range, 18.0 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.D.) to 28.1 +/- 1.0 degrees C, was defined in which rats displayed normal activity, behavioural thermoregulations being absent.

  13. [Development of a questionnaire to assess body dissatisfaction and shame, body boundary and body expression].

    PubMed

    Michels-Lucht, Felicitas; Lucht, Michael; Spitzer, Carsten; Freyberger, Harald J

    2010-01-01

    A new questionnaire to assess body dissatisfaction and shame, body boundary and body expression is presented. Scales BOUNDARY AND BODY PSYCHOTICISM, BODY EXPRESSION and BODY DISSATISFACTION AND SHAME were developed deductively. The first version was given to a sample of 134 nurse students and 512 psychotherapeutic inpatients. An item and factor analysis was conducted in the total sample. A 3-factor solution was found in a confirmatory factorial analysis (39% variance explained). The final version of the questionnaire consists of 46 items. The scales showed a satisfactory or good reliability and validity. To test criterion validity SCL-90-R and the body image questionnaire (FKB-20) were used. All SCL-90-R subscales were highly correlated with body dissatisfaction and shame (KUS) (r>0.5). BODY BOUNDARY AND PSYCHOTICISM scale (AKP) was correlated with SCL-90-R scales psychoticism (r=0.56), interpersonal sensitivity (r=.55) and anxiety (r=0.51). BODY DISSATISFACTION AND SHAME scale (KUS) was also correlated (r=0.77) with scale REJECTION OF THE BODY of FKB-20. First results of the Questionnaire of physical aspects of boundary, shame and expression (FK-ASA) suggest that the scales describe the postulated aspects of body image. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  14. Effects of body temperature on ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Ozkan I; Celik, Mehmet; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Martino, Janice M; Tugrul, Simru; Ozcan, Perihan E; Yilmazbayhan, Dilek; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Turkoz, Kemal H; Kiran, Bayram; Telci, Lütfi; Cakar, Nahit

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of body temperature on ventilator-induced lung injury. Thirty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 6 groups based on their body temperature (normothermia, 37 +/- 1 degrees C; hypothermia, 31 +/- 1 degrees C; hyperthermia, 41 +/- 1 degrees C). Ventilator-induced lung injury was achieved by ventilating for 1 hour with pressure-controlled ventilation mode set at peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) of 30 cmH2O (high pressure, or HP) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 0 cmH2O. In control subjects, PIP was set at 14 cmH2O (low pressure, or LP) and PEEP set at 0 cmH2O. Systemic chemokine and cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha , interleukin 1 beta , interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) levels were measured. The lungs were assessed for histological changes. Serum chemokines and cytokines were significantly elevated in the hyperthermia HP group compared with all 3 groups, LP (control), normothermia HP, and hypothermia HP. Oxygenation was better but not statistically significant in hypothermia HP compared with other HP groups. Cumulative mean histology scores were higher in hyperthermia HP and normothermia HP groups compared with control and normothermia HP groups. Concomitant hyperthermia increased systemic inflammatory response during HP ventilation. Although hypothermia decreased local inflammation in the lung, it did not completely attenuate systemic inflammatory response associated with HP ventilation.

  15. The functional architecture of the human body: assessing body representation by sorting body parts and activities.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Bettina; Schack, Thomas; Brugger, Peter

    2010-05-01

    We investigated mental representations of body parts and body-related activities in two subjects with congenitally absent limbs (one with, the other without phantom sensations), a wheelchair sports group of paraplegic participants, and two groups of participants with intact limbs. To analyse mental representation structures, we applied Structure Dimensional Analysis. Verbal labels indicating body parts and related activities were presented in randomized lists that had to be sorted according to a hierarchical splitting paradigm. Participants were required to group the items according to whether or not they were considered related, based on their own body perception. Results of the groups of physically intact and paraplegic participants revealed separate clusters for the lower body, upper body, fingers and head. The participant with congenital phantom limbs also showed a clear separation between upper and lower body (but not between fingers and hands). In the participant without phantom sensations of the absent arms, no such modularity emerged, but the specific practice of his right foot in communication and daily routines was reflected. Sorting verbal labels of body parts and activities appears a useful method to assess body representation in individuals with special body anatomy or function and leads to conclusions largely compatible with other assessment procedures.

  16. A comparison of noninvasive body temperature monitoring devices in the PACU.

    PubMed

    Darm, R M; Hecker, R B; Rubal, B J

    1994-06-01

    Critical measurement of patient body temperature in the PACU is an important parameter in patient management. Failure to achieve minimal acceptable body temperature standards has been associated with physiological derangement, the application of additional therapy, and prolonged PACU stays. Newer methods to monitor temperature have been introduced into the PACU that have been touted to be adequate for detecting clinically significant changes in temperature. This study compares skin core temperature-corrected liquid crystal thermography, axillary electronic, and oral electronic thermistor readings with temperatures obtained by infrared tympanic membrane thermometry in 215 PACU patients. Regression analysis suggests that when compared with tympanic temperature, the oral method is more accurate and has greater precision than either the liquid crystal or axillary methods. That the incidence of hypothermia depends on the method chosen to assess body temperature is a significant nursing implication.

  17. Effect of peritoneal lavage solution temperature on body temperature in anaesthetised cats and small dogs.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D C; Leece, E A; Trimble, T A; Demetriou, J L

    2017-05-20

    A prospective, randomised, non-blinded, clinical study to assess the effect of peritoneal lavage using warmed fluid on body temperature in anesthetised cats and dogs of less than 10 kg body mass undergoing coeliotomy. A standardised anaesthetic protocol was used. Oesophageal and rectal temperatures were measured at various time points. At the end of surgery, group 1 patients (n=10) were lavaged with 200 ml/kg sterile isotonic saline at 34±1°C and group 2 (n=10) at 40±1°C. Groups were similar with respect to age, mass, body condition and surgical incision length. Duration of anaesthesia, surgical procedures and peritoneal lavage was similar between groups. Linear regression showed no significant change in oesophageal temperature during the lavage period for group 1 (P=0.64), but a significant increase for group 2 patients (P<0.0001), with mean temperature changes of -0.5°C (from (36.3°C to 35.9°C) and +0.9°C (from 35.4°C to 36.3°C), respectively. Similar results were found for rectal temperature, with mean changes of -0.5°C and +0.8°C (P=0.922 and 0.045), respectively. The use of isotonic crystalloid solution for peritoneal lavage at a temperature of 40±1°C significantly warms small animal patients, when applied in a clinical setting, compared with lavage solution at 34±1°C. British Veterinary Association.

  18. The evolution of mammalian body temperature: the Cenozoic supraendothermic pulses.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2012-05-01

    In this study, I investigated the source(s) of variation in the body temperatures of mammals. I also attempted to reconstruct ancestral normothermic rest-phase body temperature states using a maximum parsimony approach. Body temperature at the familial level is not correlated with body mass. For small mammals, except the Macroscelidae, previously identified correlates, such as climate adaptation and zoogeography explained some, but not all, T(b) apomorphies. At the species level in large cursorial mammals, there was a significant correlation between body temperature and the ratio between metatarsal length and femur length, the proxy for stride length and cursoriality. With the exception of two primate families, all supraendothermic (T(b) > 37.9°C) mammals are cursorial, including Artiodactyla, Lagomorpha, some large Rodentia, and Carnivora. The ruminant supraendothermic cursorial pulse is putatively associated with global cooling and vegetation changes following the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Reconstructed ancestral body temperatures were highly unrealistic deep within the mammalian phylogeny because of the lack of fossil T(b) data that effectively creates ghost lineages. However, it is anticipated that the method of estimating body temperature from the abundance of ¹³C-¹⁸O bonds in the carbonate component of tooth bioapatite in both extant and extinct animals may be a very promising tool for estimating the T(b) of extinct mammals. Fossil T(b) data are essential for discerning derived T(b) reversals from ancestral states, and verifying the dates of supraendothermic pulses.

  19. Assessment methods in human body composition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Yeong; Gallagher, Dympna

    2008-09-01

    The present study reviews the most recently developed and commonly used methods for the determination of human body composition in vivo with relevance for nutritional assessment. Body composition measurement methods are continuously being perfected with the most commonly used methods being bioelectrical impedance analysis, dilution techniques, air displacement plethysmography, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and MRI or magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Recent developments include three-dimensional photonic scanning and quantitative magnetic resonance. Collectively, these techniques allow for the measurement of fat, fat-free mass, bone mineral content, total body water, extracellular water, total adipose tissue and its subdepots (visceral, subcutaneous, and intermuscular), skeletal muscle, select organs, and ectopic fat depots. There is an ongoing need to perfect methods that provide information beyond mass and structure (static measures) to kinetic measures that yield information on metabolic and biological functions. On the basis of the wide range of measurable properties, analytical methods and known body composition models, clinicians and scientists can quantify a number of body components and with longitudinal assessment, can track changes in health and disease with implications for understanding efficacy of nutritional and clinical interventions, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment in clinical settings. With the greater need to understand precursors of health risk beginning in childhood, a gap exists in appropriate in-vivo measurement methods beginning at birth.

  20. Assessment methods in human body composition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Yeong; Gallagher, Dympna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The present study reviews the most recently developed and commonly used methods for the determination of human body composition in vivo with relevance for nutritional assessment. Recent findings Body composition measurement methods are continuously being perfected with the most commonly used methods being bioelectrical impedance analysis, dilution techniques, air displacement plethysmography, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and MRI or magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Recent developments include three-dimensional photonic scanning and quantitative magnetic resonance. Collectively, these techniques allow for the measurement of fat, fat-free mass, bone mineral content, total body water, extracellular water, total adipose tissue and its subdepots (visceral, subcutaneous, and intermuscular), skeletal muscle, select organs, and ectopic fat depots. Summary There is an ongoing need to perfect methods that provide information beyond mass and structure (static measures) to kinetic measures that yield information on metabolic and biological functions. On the basis of the wide range of measurable properties, analytical methods and known body composition models, clinicians and scientists can quantify a number of body components and with longitudinal assessment, can track changes in health and disease with implications for understanding efficacy of nutritional and clinical interventions, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment in clinical settings. With the greater need to understand precursors of health risk beginning in childhood, a gap exists in appropriate in-vivo measurement methods beginning at birth. PMID:18685451

  1. [Pharmacological approaches to control of body temperature].

    PubMed

    Soto Ruiz, M Nelia; Ezquerro Rodríguez, Esther; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2012-05-01

    The main antipyretic drugs belong to two different therapeutic groups: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic; and analgesic and antipyretic. In some cases, both groups are included in the NSAID group (analgesics antipyretics and NSAID). Most of the chemical compounds included in this group have three actions, but the relative performance of each of them can be different, as well as the incidence of adverse effects. For this reason its clinical use will depend on effectiveness and relative toxicity. When there is fever, NSAID normalizes the action of the thermoregulatory center in the hypothalamus, decreasing production of prostaglandins by inhibiting enzymes cyclooxygenase. But not all are capable of controlling the temperature which increases in adaptative physiological situations, as in heat stroke, intense exercise or by increasing the temperature. The classification is based on chemical characteristics and can be grouped into nine classes: 1) Salicylates, 2) Para-aminophenol derivatives, 3) Derivatives of pyrazolone, 4) Acetic acid derivatives, 5) Derivatives propionic acid, 6) Anthranilic derivatives, 7) Oxicam derivatives, 8) COX-2 inhibitors, 9) Other NSAID. This article describes the indications, mechanism of action, clinical presentation, routes of administration, adverse reactions, contraindications, precautions and drug interactions of the most commonly used (Derivatives of Salicylic Acid, Paracetamol, Metamizole, Ibuprofen, Drantoleno).

  2. Body surface temperature distribution in relation to body composition in obese women.

    PubMed

    Chudecka, Monika; Lubkowska, Anna; Kempińska-Podhorodecka, Agnieszka

    2014-07-01

    Adipose tissue levels and human obesity are known to be associated with increased heat production. At the same time, subcutaneous adipose tissue provides an insulating layer that impedes heat loss. The energy implications of obesity and body thermoregulatory mechanisms remain relatively poorly understood. This study attempted to examine the potential relationship between body composition (subcutaneous and visceral fat) determined by bioimpedance as well as BMI (body mass index), and skin surface temperature distribution recorded at rest. One specific aim of this study was to draw a thermal map of body areas in obese women and compare this with women of normal body mass, and thus to identify body regions within which heat transfer is particularly impeded. As high fat content is a good insulator, it could reduce the body's ability to respond effectively to changes in environmental temperature, which would be problematic for thermal homeostasis. Our results showed that core temperature did not differ between obese and normal body mass participants, while skin temperature of most body surfaces was lower in obese subjects. The results of regression analysis showed that the mean body surface temperature (Tmean) decreased with increasing percentage of body fat (PBF) of the abdominal area. The opposite relationship was observed for the front area of the hand (simultaneous increase in Tmean and PBF). We also found a negative correlation between BMI and Tmean of the thigh areas, both the front and the back. From this it could be concluded that the mean body surface temperature is dependent on body fat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Body temperature control in sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Giueng-Chueng; Chi, Wei-Ming; Perng, Wan-Cherng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2003-12-31

    Body temperature is precisely regulated to maintain homeostasis in homeothermic animals. Although it remains unproved whether change of body temperature constitutes a beneficial or a detrimental component of the septic response, temperature control should be an important entity in septic experiments. We investigated the effect of body temperature control on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Acute lung injury in rats was induced by intratracheal spray of LPS and body temperature was either clamped at 37 degrees C for 5 hours or not controlled. The severity of lung injury was evaluated at the end of the experiment. Intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS caused a persistent decline in body temperature and a significant lung injury as indicated by an elevation of protein-concentration and LDH activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of lungs. Administration of LPS also caused neutrophil sequestration and lipid peroxidation in the lung tissue as indicated by increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, respectively. Control of body temperature at 37 degrees C after LPS (LPS/BT37, n = 11) significantly reduced acute lung injury as evidenced by decreases in BAL fluid protein concentration (983 +/- 189 vs. 1403 +/- 155 mg/L) and LDH activity (56 +/- 10 vs. 123 +/- 17 deltamAbs/min) compared with the LPS group (n = 11). Although the W/D ratio of lung and MDA level were lower in the rats received temperature control compared with those received LPS only, the differences were not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS induced a hypothermic response and acute lung injury in rats and controlling body temperature at a normal range may alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury.

  4. Elevated body temperature enhances the laryngeal chemoreflex in decerebrate piglets.

    PubMed

    Curran, A K; Xia, L; Leiter, J C; Bartlett, D

    2005-03-01

    Hyperthermia and reflex apnea may both contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Therefore, we investigated the effect of increased body temperature on the inhibition of breathing produced by water injected into the larynx, which elicits the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR). We studied decerebrated, vagotomized, neonatal piglets aged 3-15 days. Blood pressure, end-tidal CO(2), body temperature, and phrenic nerve activity were recorded. To elicit the LCR, we infused 0.1 ml of distilled water through a polyethylene tube passed through the nose and positioned just rostral to the larynx. Three to five LCR trials were performed with the piglet at normal body temperature. The animal's core body temperature was raised by approximately 2.5 degrees C, and three to five LCR trials were performed before the animal was cooled, and three to five LCR trials were repeated. The respiratory inhibition associated with the LCR was substantially prolonged when body temperature was elevated. Thus elevated body temperature may contribute to the pathogenesis of SIDS by increasing the inhibitory effects of the LCR.

  5. Universal temperature and body-mass scaling of feeding rates

    PubMed Central

    Rall, Björn C.; Brose, Ulrich; Hartvig, Martin; Kalinkat, Gregor; Schwarzmüller, Florian; Vucic-Pestic, Olivera; Petchey, Owen L.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of feeding rates is the basis to understand interaction strength and subsequently the stability of ecosystems and biodiversity. Feeding rates, as all biological rates, depend on consumer and resource body masses and environmental temperature. Despite five decades of research on functional responses as quantitative models of feeding rates, a unifying framework of how they scale with body masses and temperature is still lacking. This is perplexing, considering that the strength of functional responses (i.e. interaction strengths) is crucially important for the stability of simple consumer–resource systems and the persistence, sustainability and biodiversity of complex communities. Here, we present the largest currently available database on functional response parameters and their scaling with body mass and temperature. Moreover, these data are integrated across ecosystems and metabolic types of species. Surprisingly, we found general temperature dependencies that differed from the Arrhenius terms predicted by metabolic models. Additionally, the body-mass-scaling relationships were more complex than expected and differed across ecosystems and metabolic types. At local scales (taxonomically narrow groups of consumer–resource pairs), we found hump-shaped deviations from the temperature and body-mass-scaling relationships. Despite the complexity of our results, these body-mass- and temperature-scaling models remain useful as a mechanistic basis for predicting the consequences of warming for interaction strengths, population dynamics and network stability across communities differing in their size structure. PMID:23007080

  6. Elevated body temperature in ischemic stroke associated with neurological improvement.

    PubMed

    Khanevski, A N; Naess, H; Thomassen, L; Waje-Andreassen, U; Nacu, A; Kvistad, C E

    2017-11-01

    Some studies suggest that high body temperature within the first few hours of ischemic stroke onset is associated with improved outcome. We hypothesized an association between high body temperature on admission and detectable improvement within 6-9 hours of stroke onset. Consecutive ischemic stroke patients with NIHSS scores obtained within 3 hours and in the interval 6-9 hours after stroke onset were included. Body temperature was measured on admission. A total of 315 patients with ischemic stroke were included. Median NIHSS score on admission was 6. Linear regression showed that NIHSS score 6-9 hours after stroke onset was inversely associated with body temperature on admission after adjusting for confounders including NIHSS score <3 hours after stroke onset (P<.001). The same result was found in patients with proximal middle cerebral occlusion on admission. We found an inverse association between admission body temperature and neurological improvement within few hours after admission. This finding may be limited to patients with documented proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion on admission and suggests a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis within the first three hours. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of body temperature in individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Alfieri, Fábio Marcon; Massaro, Ayrton Roberto; Filippo, Thais Raquel; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    A stroke can cause alterations in thermal sensitivity. to verify the conditions of body temperature in hemiplegic patients after stroke as compared to healthy individuals, as well as establish relations between thermal sensitivity and gender, age, Body Mass Index (BMI), plegic side, time after stroke, reports of thermal alterations and the motricity of patients with stroke sequelae. This cross-sectional study included 100 patients (55.6±13 years) with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke sequelae with unilateral hemiparesis and thirty healthy subjects (55±12.9 years). Individuals with nervous peripheral lesions, diabetes, peripheral vascular diseases or tumors were not included in this study. The volunteers underwent axillary temperature evaluations with the use of a cutaneous thermometer and evaluations of cutaneous temperature of hands and feet as measured by infrared thermography captured by an infrared sensor (ThermaCAMTM SC 500-FLIR Systems). The mean temperature (°C) was analyzed with the SigmaStat 3.5 statistical package. The results have shown that healthy individuals have similar temperatures on either side of the body. The hemiplegic subjects presented a lower temperature on the plegic side and compared to the healthy subjects, both feet of the hemiparetic individuals were colder. The results have also shown that age, body mass index, and the time after stroke have no influence on the alterations in temperature. Regarding the paretic side, individuals with hemiplegia on the right side (right foot) had a lower temperature than those affected on the left side. Motricity was not related to any difference in temperature between the limbs and the reports of temperature differences had no relation with the actual differences found in the study. Healthy individuals have temperature symmetry between between sides of the body, while individuals with stroke sequelae present lower temperature in the paretic side, especially on their feet.

  8. Thermal equilibrium and temperature differences among body regions in European plethodontid salamanders.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Enrico; Manenti, Raoul; Canciani, Giancarlo; Scarì, Giorgio; Pennati, Roberta; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Information on species thermal physiology is extremely important to understand species responses to environmental heterogeneity and changes. Thermography is an emerging technology that allows high resolution and accurate measurement of body temperature, but until now it has not been used to study thermal physiology of amphibians in the wild. Hydromantes terrestrial salamanders are strongly depending on ambient temperature for their activity and gas exchanges, but information on their body temperature is extremely limited. In this study we tested if Hydromantes salamanders are thermoconform, we assessed whether there are temperature differences among body regions, and evaluated the time required to reach the thermal equilibrium. During summers of 2014 and 2015 we analysed 56 salamanders (Hydromantes ambrosii and Hydromantes italicus) using infrared thermocamera. We photographed salamanders at the moment in which we found them and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 15min after having kept them in the hands. Body temperature was equal to air temperature; salamanders attained the equilibrium with air temperature in about 8min, the time required to reach equilibrium was longer in individuals with large body size. We detected small temperature differences between body parts, the head being slightly warmer than the body and the tail (mean difference: 0.05°C). These salamanders quickly reach the equilibrium with the environment, thus microhabitat measurement allows obtaining accurate information on their tolerance limits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The quantitative assessment of body iron.

    PubMed

    Cook, James D; Flowers, Carol H; Skikne, Barry S

    2003-05-01

    Current initiatives to reduce the high prevalence of nutritional iron deficiency have highlighted the need for reliable epidemiologic methods to assess iron status. The present report describes a method for estimating body iron based on the ratio of the serum transferrin receptor to serum ferritin. Analysis showed a single normal distribution of body iron stores in US men aged 20 to 65 years (mean +/- 1 SD, 9.82 +/- 2.82 mg/kg). A single normal distribution was also observed in pregnant Jamaican women (mean +/- 1 SD, 0.09 +/- 4.48 mg/kg). Distribution analysis in US women aged 20 to 45 years indicated 2 populations; 93% of women had body iron stores averaging 5.5 +/- 3.35 mg/kg (mean +/- 1 SD), whereas the remaining 7% of women had a mean tissue iron deficit of 3.87 +/- 3.23 mg/kg. Calculations of body iron in trials of iron supplementation in Jamaica and iron fortification in Vietnam demonstrated that the method can be used to calculate absorption of the added iron. Quantitative estimates of body iron greatly enhance the evaluation of iron status and the sensitivity of iron intervention trials in populations in which inflammation is uncommon or has been excluded by laboratory screening. The method is useful clinically for monitoring iron status in those who are highly susceptible to iron deficiency.

  10. [Effects of mice body temperature on pressure inside plethysmograph].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-hua

    2011-05-01

    To observe temperature and pressure changes inside plethysmograph produced by body temperature of anesthetized mice. The temperature and pressure changes inside whole body plethysmograph generated from anesthetized mice were compared with those from dead mice. The temperature and pressure changes inside body chamber and head chamber of double-chamber with anesthetized mice in body chamber were synchronously measured. The respiratory frequencies and amplitudes of mice inside two kinds of head-out plethysmographs were synchronously measured. One of these two plethysmographs kept sealed all the time and the other was opened to the atmosphere for 1 min every 2 min. Temperature and pressure of air in the anesthetized mice chamber increased 1.18 degree and 2.710 mmHg within 6 min, and data from dead mice were 1.17 degree and 2.671 mmHg. There were no significant differences between these two groups. The temperature inside body chamber increased 1.92 degree in 20 min and the pressure was 5.554 mmHg, which were significantly higher than those of head chamber (0.09 degree and 0.627 mmHg). The respiratory frequencies of mice in the sealed head-out plethysmograph increased from 125.04 per min to 168.45 per min, and amplitudes of pressure changes generated from mice breath decreased from 1.090 mmHg to 0.883 mmHg. Significant differences occurred between different observation time points. Meanwhile respiratory frequencies in the open head-out plethysmograph were around 120 per min and amplitude of pressure changes kept about 1 mmHg. There were no significant differences between different time points. Increase of temperature and pressure inside pressure whole-body plethysmograph are mainly from body temperature of mice, and the increased pressure significantly influences respiration of mice.

  11. Hemoglobin dynamics in red blood cells: correlation to body temperature.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Digel, I; Artmann, G M; Embs, J P; Zaccai, G; Büldt, G

    2008-12-01

    A transition in hemoglobin behavior at close to body temperature has been discovered recently by micropipette aspiration experiments on single red blood cells (RBCs) and circular dichroism spectroscopy on hemoglobin solutions. The transition temperature was directly correlated to the body temperatures of a variety of species. In an exploration of the molecular basis for the transition, we present neutron scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of hemoglobin dynamics in whole human RBCs in vivo. The data reveal a change in the geometry of internal protein motions at 36.9 degrees C, at human body temperature. Above that temperature, amino acid side-chain motions occupy larger volumes than expected from normal temperature dependence, indicating partial unfolding of the protein. Global protein diffusion in RBCs was also measured and the findings compared favorably with theoretical predictions for short-time self-diffusion of noncharged hard-sphere colloids. The results demonstrated that changes in molecular dynamics in the picosecond time range and angstrom length scale might well be connected to a macroscopic effect on whole RBCs that occurs at body temperature.

  12. Hemoglobin Dynamics in Red Blood Cells: Correlation to Body Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, A. M.; Digel, I.; Artmann, G. M.; Embs, J. P.; Zaccai, G.; Büldt, G.

    2008-01-01

    A transition in hemoglobin behavior at close to body temperature has been discovered recently by micropipette aspiration experiments on single red blood cells (RBCs) and circular dichroism spectroscopy on hemoglobin solutions. The transition temperature was directly correlated to the body temperatures of a variety of species. In an exploration of the molecular basis for the transition, we present neutron scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of hemoglobin dynamics in whole human RBCs in vivo. The data reveal a change in the geometry of internal protein motions at 36.9°C, at human body temperature. Above that temperature, amino acid side-chain motions occupy larger volumes than expected from normal temperature dependence, indicating partial unfolding of the protein. Global protein diffusion in RBCs was also measured and the findings compared favorably with theoretical predictions for short-time self-diffusion of noncharged hard-sphere colloids. The results demonstrated that changes in molecular dynamics in the picosecond time range and angstrom length scale might well be connected to a macroscopic effect on whole RBCs that occurs at body temperature. PMID:18708462

  13. A Novel Intra-body Sensor for Vaginal Temperature Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; Caldeira, João; Vaidya, Binod

    2009-01-01

    Over the years some medical studies have tried to better understand the internal behavior of human beings. Many researchers in this domain have been striving to find relationships between intra-vaginal temperature and certain female health conditions, such as ovulation and fertile period since woman’s intra-vaginal temperature is one of the body parameters most preferred in such studies. However, due to lack of a appropriate technology, medical research devoted to studying correlations of such body parameters with certain womans’ body phenomena could not obtain better results. This article presents the design and implementation of a novel intra-body sensor for acquisition and monitoring of intra-vaginal temperatures. This novel intra-body sensor provides data collection that is used for studying the relation between temperature variations and female health conditions, such as anticipation and monitoring of the ovulation period, detection of pregnancy contractions, preterm labor prevention, etc.. The motivation for this work focuses on the development of this new intra-body sensor that will represent a major step in medical technology. The novel sensor was tested and validated on hospitalized women as well as normal healthy women. Finally our medical team has attested to the accuracy, usability and performance of this novel intra-body sensor. PMID:22574046

  14. Esophageal and rectal temperatures as estimates of core temperature during therapeutic whole-body hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subrata; Donn, Steven M; Bhagat, Indira; Dechert, Ronald E; Barks, John D

    2013-01-01

    We monitored whole-body cooling concurrently by both esophageal and rectal probes. Esophageal temperature was significantly higher compared with simultaneous rectal temperature during cooling, with a temperature gradient ranging from 0.46 to 1.03°C (median, 0.8°C; IQR, 0.6-0.8°C). During rewarming, this temperature difference disappeared.

  15. Brain and body temperature homeostasis during sodium pentobarbital anesthesia with and without body warming in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Brown, P Leon

    2005-03-31

    High-speed, multi-site thermorecording offers the ability to follow the dynamics of heat production and flow in an organism. This approach was used to study brain-body temperature homeostasis during the development of general anesthesia induced by sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, ip) in rats. Animals were chronically implanted with thermocouple probes in two brain areas, the abdominal cavity, and subcutaneously, and temperatures were measured during anesthesia both with and without (control) body warming. In control conditions, temperature in all sites rapidly and strongly decreased (from 36-37 degrees C to 32-33 degrees C, or 3.5-4.5 degrees C below baselines). Relative to body core, brain hypothermia was greater (by 0.3-0.4 degrees C) and skin hypothermia was less (by approximately 0.7 degrees C). If the body was kept warm with a heating pad, brain hypothermia was three-fold weaker ( approximately 1.2 degrees C), but the brain-body difference was significantly augmented (-0.6 degrees C). These results suggest that pentobarbital-induced inhibition of brain metabolic activity is a major factor behind brain hypothermia and global body hypothermia during general anesthesia. These data also indicate that body warming is unable to fully compensate for anesthesia-induced brain hypothermia and enhances the negative brain-body temperature differentials typical of anesthesia. Since temperature strongly affects various underlying parameters of neuronal activity, these findings are important for electrophysiological studies performed in anesthetized animal preparations.

  16. Effects of MDMA on body temperature in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liechti, Matthias E

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a severe complication associated with the recreational use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy). In this review, the clinical laboratory studies that tested the effects of MDMA on body temperature are summarized. The mechanisms that underlie the hyperthermic effects of MDMA in humans and treatment of severe hyperthermia are presented. The data show that MDMA produces an acute and dose-dependent rise in core body temperature in healthy subjects. The increase in body temperature is in the range of 0.2-0.8°C and does not result in hyperpyrexia (>40°C) in a controlled laboratory setting. However, moderately hyperthermic body temperatures >38.0°C occur frequently at higher doses, even in the absence of physical activity and at room temperature. MDMA primarily releases serotonin and norepinephrine. Mechanistic clinical studies indicate that the MDMA-induced elevations in body temperature in humans partially depend on the MDMA-induced release of norepinephrine and involve enhanced metabolic heat generation and cutaneous vasoconstriction, resulting in impaired heat dissipation. The mediating role of serotonin is unclear. The management of sympathomimetic toxicity and associated hyperthermia mainly includes sedation with benzodiazepines and intravenous fluid replacement. Severe hyperthermia should primarily be treated with additional cooling and mechanical ventilation. PMID:27626046

  17. Decreasing body temperature predicts early rehospitalization in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amany; Aboshady, Ibrahim; Munir, Shahzeb M; Gondi, Sreedevi; Brewer, Alan; Gertz, S David; Lai, Dejian; Shaik, Naushad A; Shankar, K J; Deswal, Anita; Casscells, S Ward

    2008-08-01

    In congestive heart failure (CHF), a low body temperature at hospital admission predicts in-hospital mortality. We hypothesized that a postdischarge reduction in body temperature predicts early CHF rehospitalization and death. We reviewed the records of 198 patients discharged after CHF hospitalization. We categorized the patients as hypothermic or normothermic (cutoff point, 36.3 degrees C/97.4 degrees F) according to body temperature at discharge. We classified the 2 groups according to the direction of temperature change between discharge and the first follow-up visit: normothermic/non-decreasing temperature (N+), normothermic/decreasing temperature (N-), hypothermic/non-decreasing temperature (H+), and hypothermic/decreasing temperature (H-). Ninety-three patients (47%) had decreasing temperatures, and 105 patients (53%) had non-decreasing temperatures. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significant intergroup difference in survival (P = .01) and rehospitalization time (P = .005). On logistic regression, a decreasing temperature was significantly associated with rehospitalization within 180 days (odds ratio, 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.63-10.02; P = .003). On Cox regression, the hazard ratios for death were 3.19 (P = .07), 6.49 (P = .004), and 5.17 (P = .07), for the N-, H+, and H- groups, respectively, versus the N+ group. For rehospitalization time, the hazard ratios were 7.02 (P = .01), 4.24 (P = .08), and 13.43 (P = .005) for the N-, H+, and H- groups, respectively, versus the N+ group. Decreasing body temperatures can predict readmission, decreased time to rehospitalization, and (in combination with hypothermia) decreased survival.

  18. [Problems in the measurement of human body temperature].

    PubMed

    Shakhov, E K; Mel'nikov, A A; Dolgova, I A

    2008-01-01

    The problems arising in the measurement of human body temperature are discussed. The results of the experimental research are described. The effect of the initial sensor temperature on the results of measurement is explained. It is shown that the thermal or cold irritation of skin when brought in contact with the sensor also has an effect on the measurement results. Recommendations for optimizing the temperature sensor size are given.

  19. Hypercoagulability in response to elevated body temperature and central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin A S; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Overgaard, Anders; Ganio, Matthew S; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G; Johansson, Pär I

    2013-12-01

    Coagulation abnormalities contribute to poor outcomes in critically ill patients. In trauma patients exposed to a hot environment, a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, elevated body temperature, and reduced central blood volume occur in parallel with changes in hemostasis and endothelial damage. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether experimentally elevated body temperature and reduced central blood volume (CBV) per se affects hemostasis and endothelial activation. Eleven healthy volunteers were subjected to heat stress, sufficient to elevate core temperature, and progressive reductions in CBV by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Changes in hemostasis were evaluated by whole blood haemostatic assays, standard hematologic tests and by plasma biomarkers of coagulation and endothelial activation/disruption. Elevated body temperature and decreased CBV resulted in coagulation activation evidenced by shortened activated partial tromboplastin time (-9% [IQR -7; -4]), thrombelastography: reduced reaction time (-15% [-24; -4]) and increased maximum amplitude (+4% (2; 6)), all P < 0.05. Increased fibrinolysis was documented by elevation of D-dimer (+53% (12; 59), P = 0.016). Plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline increased 198% (83; 346) and 234% (174; 363) respectively (P = 0.006 and P = 0.003). This experiment revealed emerging hypercoagulability in response to elevated body temperature and decreased CBV, whereas no effect on the endothelium was observed. We hypothesize that elevated body temperature and reduced CBV contributes to hypercoagulability, possibly due to moderate sympathetic activation, in critically ill patients and speculate that normalization of body temperature and CBV may attenuate this hypercoagulable response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased benefit of alteplase in patients with ischemic stroke and a high body temperature.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Inger; den Hertog, Heleen; van Gemert, Maarten; Dippel, Diederik; van der Worp, Bart

    2013-01-01

    In observational studies, a high body temperature has been associated with unfavorable outcome. In in vitro studies, the fibrinolytic activity of alteplase decreased 5% per degree Celsius reduction in temperature. The modifying effect of body temperature on treatment with alteplase in patients with acute ischemic stroke is unclear. We assessed the influence of baseline body temperature on the effect of alteplase on functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke, included in the Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) in Stroke (PAIS) trial. PAIS was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of high-dose paracetamol on functional outcome in patients with acute stroke. For this study, we selected all patients with ischemic stroke and randomization within 6 h of symptom onset. We estimated the effect of treatment with alteplase on the modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months with ordinal logistic regression, stratified by baseline body temperature. We made adjustments for confounding factors and expressed associations as adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We also tested for interaction between treatment with alteplase and body temperature. We included 647 of the 1,400 patients in PAIS in our study. Treatment with alteplase was associated with improved functional outcome at 3 months (aOR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09-2.08). In the 286 patients (44%) with a baseline body temperature of 37.0°C or higher, alteplase was associated with a larger effect (aOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.28-3.45) than in patients with a temperature below 37.0°C (aOR 1.11, 95% CI 0.71-1.69). A test for interaction between body temperature and alteplase did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.18). Patients with ischemic stroke and a high body temperature may have a larger benefit of treatment with alteplase than patients with lower body temperatures. These findings are in line with those from in vitro studies, in which lowering temperature decreased the fibrinolytic

  1. Effects of formula temperature on postprandial thermogenesis and body temperature of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Eckburg, J J; Bell, E F; Rios, G R; Wilmoth, P K

    1987-10-01

    To study the effect of formula temperature on the thermogenic response to gavage feeding, we fed formula at room temperature (mean 24.0 degrees C, SD 1.1) and at body temperature (mean 36.9 degrees C, SD 1.7) to premature infants in a crossover design while monitoring their metabolic heat production and gastric, rectal, and skin temperatures. After feeding with room temperature formula, stomach temperature fell by 6.9 degrees C, rectal temperature by 0.2 degree C, and mean skin temperature by 0.6 degree C, and metabolic rate increased by 16% in the first postprandial hour. After body temperature feedings, mean skin temperature fell by 0.2 degree C, but stomach and rectal temperatures did not change appreciably. The metabolic rate rose by 12% in the first hour, which was not significantly less than the rise after room temperature feeding. The heat required to warm the formula to body temperature did not result in a detectably greater rise in metabolic rate after cool feeding than after warm feeding. The effects of feed temperatures below room temperature were not studied, but it remains possible that cooler feedings might produce even greater body cooling and a greater thermogenic response.

  2. Temperature-responsive cross-linked poly(epsilon-caprolactone) membrane that functions near body temperature.

    PubMed

    Uto, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Hirase, Shohei; Aoyagi, Takao

    2006-01-10

    The objective of this study is to develop a sensitive temperature-responsive material that would function near body temperature. To achieve this purpose, we compounded 2-branched and 4-branched poly(epsilon-caprolactone) macromonomers to modulate the transition temperatures of the resulting cross-linked materials. The temperature-responsive properties were studied using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements. As a result, the mixing ratios of each macromonomer or the total macromonomer concentrations were very dominant in modulating the transition temperatures. The materials could successfully control the permeation of the model drug, prednisolone, near body temperature.

  3. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to infarct size and outcome.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Marjolein; Scheijmans, Féline E V; van Seeters, Tom; Biessels, Geert J; Kappelle, L Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K; van der Worp, H Bart

    2016-11-21

    High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In 419 patients with acute ischemic stroke we assessed the relation between body temperature on admission and during the first 3 days with both infarct size and functional outcome. Infarct size was measured in milliliters on CT or MRI after 3 days. Poor functional outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score ≥3 at 3 months. Body temperature on admission was not associated with infarct size or poor outcome in adjusted analyses. By contrast, each additional 1.0 °C in body temperature on day 1 was associated with 0.31 ml larger infarct size (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.59), on day 2 with 1.13 ml larger infarct size(95% CI, 0.83-1.43), and on day 3 with 0.80 ml larger infarct size (95% CI, 0.48-1.12), in adjusted linear regression analyses. Higher peak body temperatures on days two and three were also associated with poor outcome (adjusted relative risks per additional 1.0 °C in body temperature, 1.52 (95% CI, 1.17-1.99) and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.22-1.77), respectively). Higher peak body temperatures during the first days after ischemic stroke, rather than on admission, are associated with larger infarct size and poor functional outcome. This suggests that prevention of high temperatures may improve outcome if continued for at least 3 days.

  4. Wall temperature control of low-speed body drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of thermal means to control drag under turbulent boundary layer conditions is examined. Numerical calculations are presented for both skin friction and (unseparated) pressure drag for turbulent boundary-layer flows over a fuselage-like body with wall heat transfer. In addition, thermal control of separation on a bluff body is investigated. It is shown that a total drag reduction of up to 20 percent can be achieved for wall heating with a wall-to-total-freestream temperature ratio of 2. For streamlined slender bodies, partial wall heating of the forebody can produce almost the same order of total drag reduction as the full body heating case. For bluff bodies, the separation delay from partial wall cooling of the afterbody is approximately the same as for the fully cooled body.

  5. The relationship between virtual body ownership and temperature sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Llobera, Joan; Sanchez-Vives, M. V.; Slater, Mel

    2013-01-01

    In the rubber hand illusion, tactile stimulation seen on a rubber hand, that is synchronous with tactile stimulation felt on the hidden real hand, can lead to an illusion of ownership over the rubber hand. This illusion has been shown to produce a temperature decrease in the hidden hand, suggesting that such illusory ownership produces disownership of the real hand. Here, we apply immersive virtual reality (VR) to experimentally investigate this with respect to sensitivity to temperature change. Forty participants experienced immersion in a VR with a virtual body (VB) seen from a first-person perspective. For half the participants, the VB was consistent in posture and movement with their own body, and in the other half, there was inconsistency. Temperature sensitivity on the palm of the hand was measured before and during the virtual experience. The results show that temperature sensitivity decreased in the consistent compared with the inconsistent condition. Moreover, the change in sensitivity was significantly correlated with the subjective illusion of virtual arm ownership but modulated by the illusion of ownership over the full VB. This suggests that a full body ownership illusion results in a unification of the virtual and real bodies into one overall entity—with proprioception and tactile sensations on the real body integrated with the visual presence of the VB. The results are interpreted in the framework of a ‘body matrix’ recently introduced into the literature. PMID:23720537

  6. Opposite effects of gentle handling on body temperature and body weight in rats.

    PubMed

    Michel, C; Cabanac, M

    1999-10-01

    Opposite effects of gentle handling on body temperature and body weight in rats. PHhe aim of this study was to measure the body weight set point when rats are being handled gently and thus experience emotional rise in body temperature. Wistar male rats were used in this experiment, and each rat was its own control. Body weight set point was estimated from the rat's food hoarding behavior. The set point is the intersection of the regression line for hoarding with the X axis. During hoarding sessions the experimenter handled the rat and took its colonic temperature six to eight times, an action sufficient to arouse emotional fever. On alternate days the rats were not handled. Thus, body weight set point was obtained for each rat without handling and with handling. In sessions with handling, rats raised their body temperature, ate less, and defecated more than in control sessions. When handled, the body weight set point declined from 388 +/- 44 g to 366 +/- 47 g (p = 0.048, t = 2,39). The decline in the set point induced by gentle handling is believed to result from an elevation of the hypothalamic CRH.

  7. Effects of color temperature of fluorescent lamps on body temperature regulation in a moderately cold environment.

    PubMed

    Yasukouchi, A; Yasukouchi, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2000-05-01

    A study on the effects of different color temperatures of fluorescent lamps on skin and rectal temperatures in a moderately cold environment involving (i) changes in skin temperature of 7 male subjects exposed to an ambient temperature ranging from 28 degrees C to 18 degrees C (experiment I) and (ii) changes in skin and rectal temperatures and metabolic heat production of 11 male subjects exposed to ambient temperature of 15 degrees C for 90 min (Experiment II) was conducted. In Experiment I, the reduction of mean skin temperature from the control value was significantly greater under 3000 K than under 5000 K or 7500 K lighting. In Experiment II, the reductions in mean skin temperature and rectal temperature were respectively greater and smaller under 3000 K than those under 5000 K or 7500 K lighting. However, metabolic heat production was not affected by color temperature conditions. The relationships between morphological and physiological parameters revealed that no significant relation of rectal temperature to body surface area per unit body weight was found only under 3000 K. Furthermore, while the mean skin temperature was independent on the mean skinfold thickness under 3000 K, a significant negative correlation between the rectal and mean skin temperatures was observed. Therefore, body heat loss might be suppressed effectively by increasing the vasoconstrictor tone under a color temperature of 3000 K, and the body shell was dependent only on morphological factors under 5000 K and 7500 K lighting.

  8. Brain temperature, body core temperature, and intracranial pressure in acute cerebral damage

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, S; Zanier, E; Mauri, I; Columbo, A; Stocchetti, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the frequency of hyperthermia in a population of acute neurosurgical patients; to assess the relation between brain temperature (ICT) and core temperature (Tc); to investigate the effect of changes in brain temperature on intracranial pressure (ICP).
METHODS—The study involved 20 patients (10 severe head injury, eight subarachnoid haemorrhage, two neoplasms) with median Glasgow coma score (GCS) 6. ICP and ICT were monitored by an intraventricular catheter coupled with a thermistor. Internal Tc was measured in the pulmonary artery by a Swan-Ganz catheter.
RESULTS—Mean ICT was 38.4 (SD 0.8) and mean Tc 38.1 (SD 0.8)°C; 73% of ICT and 57.5% of Tc measurements were ⩾38°C. The mean difference between ICT and Tc was 0.3 (SD 0.3)°C (range −0.7 to 2.3°C) (p=0. 0001). Only in 12% of patients was Tc higher than ICT. The main reason for the differences between ICT and Tc was body core temperature: the difference between ICT and Tc increased significantly with body core temperature and fell significantly when this was lowered. The mean gradient between ICT and Tc was 0.16 (SD 0.31)°C before febrile episodes (ICT being higher than Tc), and 0.41 (SD 0.38)°C at the febrile peak (p<0.05). When changes in temperature were considered, ICT had a profound influence on ICP. Increases in ICT were associated with a significant rise in ICP, from 14.9(SD 7.9) to 22 (SD 10.4) mm Hg (p<0.05). As the fever ebbed there was a significant decrease in ICP, from 17.5 (SD 8.62) to 16 (SD 7.76) mm Hg (p=0.02).
CONCLUSIONS—Fever is extremely frequent during acute cerebral damage and ICT is significantly higher than Tc. Moreover, Tc may underestimate ICT during the phases when temperature has the most impact on the intracranial system because of the close association between increases in ICT and ICP.

 PMID:11561026

  9. Measurement of temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting glowing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. P.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.; Krishnan, S.

    1988-01-01

    A new method of measuring the thermodynamic temperature of an object as well as the surface emissivity based on laser reflectivity has been developed. By using rotator analyzer ellipsometry, the light reflected from the sample at a specific angle of incidence can be analyzed for its ellipticity. The normal incidence reflectivity and emissivity are then extracted using standard relations. The thermodynamic temperature of the body is obtained simultaneously by measuring the intensity of emitted light at the same angle of incidence. Room temperature measurements are carried out on selected metals to test the system. Elevated temperature measurements on platinum foils show that this technique is reliable and accurate for monitoring and measuring the temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting, glowing bodies.

  10. Measurement of temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting glowing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. P.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.; Krishnan, S.

    1988-01-01

    A new method of measuring the thermodynamic temperature of an object as well as the surface emissivity based on laser reflectivity has been developed. By using rotator analyzer ellipsometry, the light reflected from the sample at a specific angle of incidence can be analyzed for its ellipticity. The normal incidence reflectivity and emissivity are then extracted using standard relations. The thermodynamic temperature of the body is obtained simultaneously by measuring the intensity of emitted light at the same angle of incidence. Room temperature measurements are carried out on selected metals to test the system. Elevated temperature measurements on platinum foils show that this technique is reliable and accurate for monitoring and measuring the temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting, glowing bodies.

  11. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods.

    PubMed

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  12. Whole body immersion and hydromineral homeostasis: effect of water temperature.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Chantal; Regnard, Jacques; Robinet, Claude; Mourot, Laurent; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Chennaoui, Mounir; Jammes, Yves; Dumoulin, Gilles; Desruelle, Anne-Virginie; Melin, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was designed to assess the effects of prolonged whole body immersion (WBI) in thermoneutral and cold conditions on plasma volume and hydromineral homeostasis.10 navy "combat swimmers" performed three static 6-h immersions at 34 degrees C (T34), 18 degrees C (T18) and 10 degrees C (T10). Rectal temperature, plasma volume (PV) changes, plasma proteins, plasma and urine ions, plasma osmolality, renin, aldosterone and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured. Results show that compared to pre-immersion levels, PV decreased throughout WBI sessions, the changes being markedly accentuated in cold conditions. At the end of WBI, maximal PV variations were -6.9% at T34, -14.3% at T18, and -16.3% at T10. Plasma osmolality did not change during and after T34 immersion, while hyperosmolality was present at the end of T18 immersion and began after only 1 h of T10 immersion. In the three temperature conditions, significant losses of water (1.6-1.7 l) and salt (6-8 g) occurred and were associated with similar increases in osmolar and free water clearances. Furthermore, T18 and T10 immersions increased the glomerular filtration rate. There was little or no change in plasma renin and ADH, while the plasma level of aldosterone decreased equally in the three temperature conditions. In conclusion, our data indicate that cold water hastened PV changes induced by immersion, and increased the glomerular filtration rate, causing larger accumulated water losses. The iso-osmotic hypovolemia may impede the resumption of baseline fluid balance. Results are very similar to those repeatedly described by various authors during head-out water immersion.

  13. Regulation of body temperature by some Mesozoic marine reptiles.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Aurélien; Lécuyer, Christophe; Vincent, Peggy; Amiot, Romain; Bardet, Nathalie; Buffetaut, Eric; Cuny, Gilles; Fourel, François; Martineau, François; Mazin, Jean-Michel; Prieur, Abel

    2010-06-11

    What the body temperature and thermoregulation processes of extinct vertebrates were are central questions for understanding their ecology and evolution. The thermophysiologic status of the great marine reptiles is still unknown, even though some studies have suggested that thermoregulation may have contributed to their exceptional evolutionary success as apex predators of Mesozoic aquatic ecosystems. We tested the thermal status of ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and mosasaurs by comparing the oxygen isotope compositions of their tooth phosphate to those of coexisting fish. Data distribution reveals that these large marine reptiles were able to maintain a constant and high body temperature in oceanic environments ranging from tropical to cold temperate. Their estimated body temperatures, in the range from 35 degrees +/- 2 degrees C to 39 degrees +/- 2 degrees C, suggest high metabolic rates required for predation and fast swimming over large distances offshore.

  14. [Body temperature and its importance as a vital constant].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Ma Nelia Soto; García, José Ma; Fernández, Blanca Marín

    2009-09-01

    The authors carried out a theoretical review about body temperature as a decisive vital sign to maintain homeostasis. Emphasis needs be placed on the importance of maintaining a constant temperature within a range of 36.8 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C. After a brief review about thermoregulation mechanisms and thermal behavior in living organisms, the authors emphasize human beings' property as a homeo-thermal entity with characteristics which enable him to maintain a relatively constant body temperature in spite of physiological variations which make this temperature fluctuate. Upon evaluation this constant, we distinguish between relative values for superficial and central temperatures, detailing those mechanisms which influence the production or loss of heat that intervene to regulate body temperature by means of physioiogical responses to old and heat. Finally, the authors describe the necessity to maintain boy temperature following Virginia Henderson's fourteen necessities scale, once the factors which could modify it are kno wn in order to comprehend the meaning of measurements and their subsequent interpretation which leads to distinct Nursing diagnoses directed towards achieving independence in resolving this necessity.

  15. Body water balance and body temperature in vasopressin V1b receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, R; Kunitake, T; Kato, K; Tanoue, A; Tsujimoto, G; Kannan, H

    2007-10-30

    In an attempt to determine whether there is a specific vasopressin receptor (V(1b)) subtype involved in the regulation of body water balance and temperature, vasopressin V(1b) receptor knockout mice were used. Daily drinking behavior and renal excretory function were examined in V(1b)-deficient (V(1b)(-/-)) and control (V(1b)(+/+)) mice under the basal and stress-induced condition. In addition, body temperature and locomotor activity were measured with a biotelemetry system. The baseline daily water intake and urine volume were larger in V(1b)(-/-) mice than in V(1b)(+/+) mice. V(1b)(-/-) mice (V(1b)(-/-)) had significantly higher locomotor activity than wild-type, whereas the body temperature and oxygen consumption were lower in V(1b)(-/-) than in the V(1b)(+/+) mice. Next, the V(1b)(-/-) and V(1b)(+/+) mice were subjected to water deprivation for 48 hr. Under this condition, their body temperature decreased with the time course, which was significantly larger for V(1b)(-/-) than for V(1b)(+/+) mice. Central vasopressin has been reported to elicit drinking behavior and antipyretic action, and the V(1b) receptor has been reported to be located in the kidney. Thus, the findings suggest that the V(1b) receptor may be, at least in part, involved in body water balance and body temperature regulation.

  16. Endogenous and exogenous progesterone influence body temperature in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Suthar, V S; Burfeind, O; Bonk, S; Dhami, A J; Heuwieser, W

    2012-05-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of endogenous progesterone (P4) on body temperature comparing lactating, pregnant with lactating, nonpregnant cows, and to study the effect of exogenous P4 administered via a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) insert on body temperature in lactating dairy cows. Body temperature was measured vaginally and rectally using temperature loggers and a digital thermometer, respectively. In experiment 1, 10 cyclic lactating cows (3 primiparous, 7 multiparous) and 10 lactating, pregnant cows (3 primiparous, 7 multiparous) were included. Vaginal temperatures and serum P4 concentrations were greater in pregnant cows (vaginal: 0.3±0.01°C; P4: 5.5±0.4 ng/mL) compared with nonpregnant cows. In experiment 2, estrous cycles of 14 postpartum healthy, cyclic, lactating cows (10 primiparous, 4 multiparous) were synchronized, and cows were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 treatments (CIDR-P4 or CIDR-blank). A temperature logger was inserted 1 d after ovulation using a P4-free CIDR (CIDR-blank) and a CIDR containing 1.38g of P4 (CIDR-P4) in the control (n=7) and the P4-treated group (n=7), respectively. On d 3 after P4 treatment, vaginal temperature was 0.3±0.03°C greater compared with that on d 1 and d 5. In experiment 3, 9 cyclic multiparous lactating cows were enrolled 1±1 d after confirmed ovulation and a temperature logger inserted. Two days later, a CIDR-P4 was inserted on top of the CIDR-blank. On d 5±1 and d 7±1, respectively, the CIDR-P4 and CIDR-blank with the temperature logger were removed. During the CIDR-P4 treatment (48h), vaginal temperature was 0.2±0.05°C and 0.1±0.05°C greater than during the pre- and post-treatment periods (48h), respectively. Serum P4 concentration peaked during CIDR-P4 treatment (2.2±0.8 ng/mL) and was greater than during the pre-treatment period (0.2±0.2 ng/mL) for 48h. An increase in vaginal temperature could be due to endogenous and exogenous P4. However, a correlation between

  17. Non-invasive body temperature measurement of wild chimpanzees using fecal temperature decline.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Siv Aina; Mundry, Roger; Nunn, Charles L; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2009-04-01

    New methods are required to increase our understanding of pathologic processes in wild mammals. We developed a noninvasive field method to estimate the body temperature of wild living chimpanzees habituated to humans, based on statistically fitting temperature decline of feces after defecation. The method was established with the use of control measures of human rectal temperature and subsequent changes in fecal temperature over time. The method was then applied to temperature data collected from wild chimpanzee feces. In humans, we found good correspondence between the temperature estimated by the method and the actual rectal temperature that was measured (maximum deviation 0.22 C). The method was successfully applied and the average estimated temperature of the chimpanzees was 37.2 C. This simple-to-use field method reliably estimates the body temperature of wild chimpanzees and probably also other large mammals.

  18. Deviation from goal pace, body temperature and body mass loss as predictors of road race performance.

    PubMed

    Adams, William M; Hosokawa, Yuri; Belval, Luke N; Huggins, Robert A; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between pacing, gastrointestinal temperature (TGI), and percent body mass loss (%BML) on relative race performance during a warm weather 11.3km road race. Observational study of a sample of active runners competing in the 2014 Falmouth Road Race. Participants ingested a TGI pill and donned a GPS enabled watch with heart rate monitoring capabilities prior to the start of the race. Percent off predicted pace (%OFF) was calculated for seven segments of the race. Separate linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between pace, T​GI, and %BML on relative race performance. One-way ANOVA was used to analyse post race TGI (≥40°C vs <40°C) on pace and %OFF. Larger %BML was associated with faster finish times (R(2)=0.19, p=0.018), faster average pace (R(2)=0.29, p=0.012), and a greater %OFF (R(2)=0.15, p=0.033). %OFF during the first mile (1.61km) significantly predicted overall finish time (R(2)=0.64, p<0.001) while %OFF during the second mile (3.22km) (R(2) change=0.18, p<0.001) further added to the model (R(2)=0.82, p<0.001). Body temperature (pre race TGI and post race TGI) was not predictive of overall finish time (p>0.05). There was a trend in a slower pace (p=0.055) and greater %OFF (p=0.056) in runners finishing the race with a TGI>40°C. Overall, finish time was influenced by greater variations in pace during the first two miles of the race. In addition, runners who minimized fluid losses and had lower TGI were associated with meeting self-predicted goals. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Core body temperature control by total liquid ventilation using a virtual lung temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Mathieu; Micheau, Philippe; Robert, Raymond; Avoine, Olivier; Tissier, Renaud; Germim, Pamela Samanta; Vandamme, Jonathan; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Herve

    2014-12-01

    In total liquid ventilation (TLV), the lungs are filled with a breathable liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) while a liquid ventilator ensures proper gas exchange by renewal of a tidal volume of oxygenated and temperature-controlled PFC. Given the rapid changes in core body temperature generated by TLV using the lung has a heat exchanger, it is crucial to have accurate and reliable core body temperature monitoring and control. This study presents the design of a virtual lung temperature sensor to control core temperature. In the first step, the virtual sensor, using expired PFC to estimate lung temperature noninvasively, was validated both in vitro and in vivo. The virtual lung temperature was then used to rapidly and automatically control core temperature. Experimentations were performed using the Inolivent-5.0 liquid ventilator with a feedback controller to modulate inspired PFC temperature thereby controlling lung temperature. The in vivo experimental protocol was conducted on seven newborn lambs instrumented with temperature sensors at the femoral artery, pulmonary artery, oesophagus, right ear drum, and rectum. After stabilization in conventional mechanical ventilation, TLV was initiated with fast hypothermia induction, followed by slow posthypothermic rewarming for 1 h, then by fast rewarming to normothermia and finally a second fast hypothermia induction phase. Results showed that the virtual lung temperature was able to provide an accurate estimation of systemic arterial temperature. Results also demonstrate that TLV can precisely control core body temperature and can be favorably compared to extracorporeal circulation in terms of speed.

  20. The impact of morning light intensity and environmental temperature on body temperatures and alertness.

    PubMed

    Te Kulve, Marije; Schlangen, Luc J M; Schellen, Lisje; Frijns, Arjan J H; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2017-03-30

    Indoor temperature and light exposure are known to affect body temperature, productivity and alertness of building occupants. However, not much is known about the interaction between light and temperature exposure and the relationship between morning light induced alertness and its effect on body temperature. Light intensity and room temperature during morning office hours were investigated under strictly controlled conditions. In a randomized crossover study, two white light conditions (4000K, either bright 1200lx or dim 5lx) under three different room temperatures (26, 29 and 32°C) were investigated. A lower room temperature increased the core body temperature (CBT) and lowered skin temperature and the distal-proximal temperature gradient (DPG). Moreover, a lower room temperature reduced the subjective sleepiness and reaction time on an auditory psychomotor vigilance task (PVT), irrespective of the light condition. Interestingly, the morning bright light exposure did affect thermophysiological parameters, i.e. it decreased plasma cortisol, CBT and proximal skin temperature and increased the DPG, irrespective of the room temperature. During the bright light session, subjective sleepiness decreased irrespective of the room temperature. However, the change in sleepiness due to the light exposure was not related to these physiological changes.

  1. Relationships between brain and body temperature, clinical and imaging outcomes after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Karaszewski, Bartosz; Carpenter, Trevor K; Thomas, Ralph G R; Armitage, Paul A; Lymer, Georgina Katherine S; Marshall, Ian; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    Pyrexia soon after stroke is associated with severe stroke and poor functional outcome. Few studies have assessed brain temperature after stroke in patients, so little is known of its associations with body temperature, stroke severity, or outcome. We measured temperatures in ischemic and normal-appearing brain using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its correlations with body (tympanic) temperature measured four-hourly, infarct growth by 5 days, early neurologic (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS) and late functional outcome (death or dependency). Among 40 patients (mean age 73 years, median NIHSS 7, imaged at median 17 hours), temperature in ischemic brain was higher than in normal-appearing brain on admission (38.6°C-core, 37.9°C-contralateral hemisphere, P=0.03) but both were equally elevated by 5 days; both were higher than tympanic temperature. Ischemic lesion temperature was not associated with NIHSS or 3-month functional outcome; in contrast, higher contralateral normal-appearing brain temperature was associated with worse NIHSS, infarct expansion and poor functional outcome, similar to associations for tympanic temperature. We conclude that brain temperature is higher than body temperature; that elevated temperature in ischemic brain reflects a local tissue response to ischemia, whereas pyrexia reflects the systemic response to stroke, occurs later, and is associated with adverse outcomes. PMID:23571281

  2. Atropine-Induced Cutaneous Vasodilation Decreases Body Temperature during Exercise,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    during exercise in a cool environment after atropine treatment decreased body temperature and resulted in further suppression of eccrine sweating , thereby...block nsumber) FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP cholinergic blockage, skin blood flow, sweating , temperature regulation, vasodilation * 19. ABSTRACT (Contine on...revese sf neceury and Ilentify by block number) Jil ystemic atropine enhances forearm cutaneous blood flow (FBF) but depresses forearm sweating (Ia5) in

  3. Effects of irrigation fluid temperature on core body temperature during transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, J S; McCullough, T C; Harkaway, R C; Ginsberg, P C

    2001-06-01

    To determine the effect irrigation fluid temperature has on core body temperature changes in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Fifty-six male patients (mean age 71.2 +/- 8.2 years) scheduled for TURP were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized to one of two groups. Group 1 consisted of 27 patients who received room temperature irrigation fluid (70 degrees F) throughout TURP; group 2 consisted of 29 patients whose procedure was performed with warmed irrigation fluid (91.5 degrees F). The irrigation fluid used for both groups was glycine. The baseline temperature, final temperature, total time in the operating room, and amount of irrigation fluid used during the procedure were recorded for each patient. No significant difference in the average time spent in the operating room or in the total irrigation fluid used between the two groups was observed. Of the 27 patients who received room temperature irrigation fluid, 15 (55.6%) had a decrease in body temperature. A decrease in temperature was observed in 21 (72.4%) of the 29 patients who received warm irrigation fluid. Groups 1 and 2 had 12 (44.4%) of 27 and 8 (27.6%) of 29 patients, respectively, who demonstrated an elevation in their core body temperature. The results of our study suggest that irrigation fluid temperature is not a factor responsible for altering the core body temperature in patients undergoing TURP.

  4. Diurnal temperature fluctuations in an artificial small shallow water body.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Adrie F G; Heusinkveld, Bert G; Kraai, Aline; Paaijmans, Krijn P

    2008-03-01

    For aquatic biological processes, diurnal and annual cycles of water temperature are very important to plants as well as to animals and microbes living in the water. An existing one-dimensional model has been extended to simulate the temperature profile within a small water body. A year-round outdoor experiment has been conducted to estimate the model input parameters and to verify the model. Both model simulations and measurements show a strong temperature stratification in the water during daytime. Throughout the night, however, a well-mixed layer starting at the water surface develops. Because the water body is relatively small, it appears that the sediment heat flux has a strong effect on the behaviour of the water temperature throughout the seasons. In spring, the water temperature remains relatively low due to the cold surrounding soil, while in autumn the opposite occurs due to the relatively warm soil. It appears that, in small water bodies, the total amount of incoming long wave radiation is sensitive to the sky view factor. In our experiments, the intensity of precipitation also appears to have a small effect on the stratification of the water temperature.

  5. Differences in oral temperature and body shape in two populations with different propensities for obesity.

    PubMed

    Vozarova, B; Weyer, C; Bogardus, C; Ravussin, E; Tataranni, P A

    2002-06-01

    Body temperature is a function of heat production and heat dissipation. Substantial interindividual variability has been reported in healthy humans. We hypothesized that Pima Indians, a population with a high prevalence of abdominal obesity, may have a lower surface area relative to volume, that is, lower radiating area, and therefore a higher body temperature compared to Caucasians. Body composition, including volume (hydrodensitometry), and oral temperature were assessed in 69 nondiabetic Caucasian [age, 30 +/- 7 years; body fat, 21 +/- 8% (mean +/- SD)] and 115 Pima Indian males [age, 27 +/- 6 years; body fat, 28 +/- 6%]. Surface area was estimated from height, weight, and waist circumference (Bouchard's equation). In 47 Pima Indians, measures of insulin sensitivity (M, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp) were available. Compared to Caucasians, Pima Indians had a higher oral temperature [36.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C vs. 36.3 +/- 0.3 degrees C (mean +/- SD), p < 0.04] and lower surface area relative to volume (2.19 +/- 0.05 vs. 2.23 +/- 0.26 m(2), p < 0.0001). Surface area relative to volume was negatively correlated with oral temperature (r = -0.14, p < 0.05), but in a multiple linear regression model it did not entirely explain the ethnic difference in oral temperature. Oral temperature was inversely correlated with M (r = -0.28, p < 0.05). Conclusions-Pima Indians have higher oral temperature and lower surface area relative to volume than Caucasians. The ethnic difference in temperature does not seem to be entirely explained by differences in body composition and body shape. Interestingly, higher oral temperature was associated with insulin resistance, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

  6. [Core body temperature monitoring using the telemetric pill].

    PubMed

    Rav-Acha, M; Heled, Y; Slypher, N; Moran, D S

    2003-03-01

    Exposure to extreme weather or physical work conditions can lead to dangerous core temperature changes, and to the clinical syndromes accompanying them. Core temperature measurement is the main tool for diagnosing these syndromes. Recent technological advances particularly NASA's telemetry and miniaturizing technologies, have led to the development of a CorTemp Ingestible Temperature Sensor, or "pill". The pill is a small electronic device, which senses the body's temperature and transmits it through a radio wave signal to an external receiver. The advantage of the pill over other temperature measurement devices is that it is a simple device that enables core temperature measurement for many hours without the need of any wire connections or other cumbersome instruments. For this reason, the pill is an ideal tool for core temperature measurements in field locales or for continuous long duration temperature monitoring of ambulatory patients. The following study reviews available literature concerning the use of the pill and the validity of its measurements. A high correlation has been revealed between pill temperature measurements and rectal or esophageal measurements. Pill temperature values usually fall between the high rectal and the low esophageal measurements, considered the gold standard for core temperature measurement. A number of studies emphasizing the advantage of the pill are presented in this review.

  7. Do acute phase markers explain body temperature and brain temperature after ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, William N.; Thomas, Ralph; Lowe, Gordon; Rumley, Ann; Karaszewski, Bartosz; Armitage, Paul; Marshall, Ian; Lymer, Katherine; Dennis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Both brain and body temperature rise after stroke but the cause of each is uncertain. We investigated the relationship between circulating markers of inflammation with brain and body temperature after stroke. Methods: We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke and measured brain temperature at hospital admission and 5 days after stroke with multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in normal brain and the acute ischemic lesion (defined by diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]). We measured body temperature with digital aural thermometers 4-hourly and drew blood daily to measure interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen, for 5 days after stroke. Results: In 44 stroke patients, the mean temperature in DWI-ischemic brain soon after admission was 38.4°C (95% confidence interval [CI] 38.2–38.6), in DWI-normal brain was 37.7°C (95% CI 37.6–37.7), and mean body temperature was 36.6°C (95% CI 36.3–37.0). Higher mean levels of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were associated with higher temperature in DWI-normal brain at admission and 5 days, and higher overall mean body temperature, but only with higher temperature in DWI-ischemic brain on admission. Conclusions: Systemic inflammation after stroke is associated with elevated temperature in normal brain and the body but not with later ischemic brain temperature. Elevated brain temperature is a potential mechanism for the poorer outcome observed in stroke patients with higher levels of circulating inflammatory markers. PMID:22744672

  8. Environmental stressors during space flight: potential effects on body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauchem, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    1. Organisms may be affected by many environmental factors during space flight, e.g., acceleration, weightlessness, decreased pressure, changes in oxygen tension, radiofrequency radiation and vibration. 2. Previous studies of change in body temperature--one response to these environmental factors--are reviewed. 3. Conditions leading to heat stress and hypothermia are discussed.

  9. Environmental stressors during space flight: potential effects on body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauchem, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    1. Organisms may be affected by many environmental factors during space flight, e.g., acceleration, weightlessness, decreased pressure, changes in oxygen tension, radiofrequency radiation and vibration. 2. Previous studies of change in body temperature--one response to these environmental factors--are reviewed. 3. Conditions leading to heat stress and hypothermia are discussed.

  10. Noninvasive measurement system for human respiratory condition and body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Eiji; Sekiguchi, Sadamu; Nishimatsu, Toyonori

    1995-06-01

    A special chromel (C) and alumel wire (A) thermopile has been developed which can measure the human respiratory condition and body temperature without directly contacting a sensor to the human body. The measurement system enables high speed, real time, noninvasive, and simultaneous measurement of respiratory rates and body temperature with the same sensor. The special CA thermopile, with each sensing junction of approximately 25 μm, was constructed by using spot welded thermopile junctions. The thermoelectric power of 17 pairs of special CA thermopile is 0.7 mV/ °C. The special CA thermopile provides high sensitivity and fine frequency characteristics, of which the gain is flat to approximately 10 Hz.

  11. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69... COMMUNITY âFrameworkâ Provisions § 26.69 Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. The following shall apply with regard to the monitoring of conformity assessment bodies (CAB's) listed in subpart B of...

  12. Seasonal variability and influence of outdoor temperature on body temperature of cardiac arrest victims.

    PubMed

    Stratil, Peter; Wallmueller, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Stoeckl, Mathias; Hoerburger, David; Weiser, Christoph; Testori, Christoph; Krizanac, Danica; Spiel, Alexander; Uray, Thomas; Sterz, Fritz; Haugk, Moritz

    2013-05-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia is a major advance in post-resuscitation-care. Some questions remain unclear regarding the time to initiate cooling and the time to achieve target temperature below 34 °C. We examined whether seasonal variability of outside temperature influences the body temperature of cardiac arrest victims, and if this might have an effect on outcome. Patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were enrolled retrospectively. Temperature variables from 4 climatic stations in Vienna were provided from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics. Depending on the outside temperature at the scene the study participants were assigned to a seasonal group. To compare the seasonal groups a Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test was performed as appropriate. Of 134 patients, 61 suffered their cardiac arrest during winter, with an outside temperature below 10 °C; in 39 patients the event occurred during summer, with an outside temperature above 20 °C. Comparing the tympanic temperature recorded at hospital admission, the median of 36 °C (IQR 35.3-36.3) during summer differed significantly to winter with a median of 34.9 °C (IQR 34-35.6) (p<0.05). This seasonal alterations in core body temperature had no impact on the time-to-target-temperature, survival rate or neurologic recovery. The seasonal variability of outside temperature influences body temperature of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heat Shock Factor 1 Deficiency Affects Systemic Body Temperature Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Noichl, Erik; Stahr, Anna; Korf, Horst-Werner; Reinke, Hans; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a ubiquitous heat-sensitive transcription factor that mediates heat shock protein transcription in response to cellular stress, such as increased temperature, in order to protect the organism against misfolded proteins. In this study, we analysed the effect of HSF1 deficiency on core body temperature regulation. Body temperature, locomotor activity, and food consumption of wild-type mice and HSF1-deficient mice were recorded. Prolactin and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were measured by ELISA. Gene expression in brown adipose tissue was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. Hypothalamic HSF1 and its co-localisation with tyrosine hydroxylase was analysed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. HSF1-deficient mice showed an increase in core body temperature (hyperthermia), decreased overall locomotor activity, and decreased levels of prolactin in pituitary and blood plasma reminiscent of cold adaptation. HSF1 could be detected in various hypothalamic regions involved in temperature regulation, suggesting a potential role of HSF1 in hypothalamic thermoregulation. Moreover, HSF1 co-localises with tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, suggesting a potential role of HSF1 in the hypothalamic control of prolactin release. In brown adipose tissue, levels of prolactin receptor and uncoupled protein 1 were increased in HSF1-deficient mice, consistent with an up-regulation of heat production. Our data suggest a role of HSF1 in systemic thermoregulation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Lack of Integrative Control of Body Temperature after Capsaicin Administration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai Hee; Lee, Jae Woo; Osaka, Toshimasa; Kobayashi, Akiko; Namba, Yoshio; Inoue, Shuji; Kimura, Shuichi

    2000-01-01

    Background Body temperature is usually regulated by opposing controls of heat production and heat loss. However, systemic administration of capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of hot peppers, facilitated heat production and heat loss simultaneously in rats. We recently found that the capsaicin-induced heat loss and heat production occur simultaneously and that the biphasic change in body temperature is a sum of transient heat loss and long-lasting heat production. Moreover, suppression of the heat loss response did not affect capsaicin-induced heat production and suppression of heat production did not affect capsaicin-induced heat loss. These observations suggest the independent peripheral mechanisms of capsaicin-induced thermal responses. Thus, the capsaicin-induced thermal responses apparently lack an integrated control. Methods Male Wistar rats were maintained at an ambient temperature of 24 ± 1°C on a 12 h on-off lighting schedule at least for two weeks before the experiments. They were anesthetized with urethane (1.5 g/kg, i.p.) and placed on a heating pad, which was kept between 29 and 30 °C. Skin temperature(Ts) was measured with a small thermistor, which was taped to the dorsal surface of the rat’s tail, to assess vasoactive changes indirectly. Colonic temperature(Tc) was measured with another thermistor inserted about 60 mm into the anus. O2 consumption was measured by the open-circuit method, and values were corrected for metabolic body size (kg0.75). Capsaicin (Sigma) was dissolved in a solution comprising 80% saline, 10% Tween 80, and 10% ethanol, and injected subcutaneously at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Each rat received a single injection of capsaicin because repeated administration of capsaicin renders an animal insensitive to the subsequent administration of capsaicin. Laminectomy was performed at the level of the first and second cervical vertebrae to expose the cervical spinal cord for sectioning. The brain was transected at 4-mm rostral from the

  15. An improved estimation of mean body temperature using combined direct calorimetry and thermometry.

    PubMed

    Snellen, J W

    2000-06-01

    The conventional method used to estimate the change in mean body temperature (dMBT) is by taking X% of a body core temperature and (1-X)% of weighted mean skin temperature, the value of X being dependent upon ambient temperature. This technique is used widely, despite opposition from calorimetrists. In the present paper we attempt to provide a better method. Minute-by-minute changes in dMBT, as assessed using calorimetry, and 21 (20 if esophageal temperature was unavailable) various regional temperatures (dRBTs), as assessed using thermometry, including 6 subcutaneous measures, were collected from 7 young male adults at 6 calorimeter temperatures. Since a calorimeter measures only changes in heat storage, which can be converted to dMBT, all body temperatures are expressed as changes from the reasonably constant pre-exposure temperatures. The following three aspects were investigated. (1) The prediction of dMBT from the 21 (or 20) dRBTs with multi-linear regression analysis (MLR). This yields two results, model A with rectal temperature (dTre) alone, and model B with dTre and esophageal temperature (dTes). (2) The prediction of dMBT from dTre with or without dTes and 13 skin surface temperatures combined to one weighted mean skin temperature (dTsk), using MLR. This results in models C and D. Six more models (E-J) were added, representing the above two sets in various combinations with four factors. (3) The conventional method calculated with four values for X. Model A predicted better than 0.3 degree C in 70% of the cases. Model I was the best amongst the models with 13 weighted skin temperatures (better than 0.3 degree C in 60% of the cases). The conventional method was erratic.

  16. A simple method to predict body temperature of small reptiles from environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Mathew; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2016-05-01

    To study behavioral thermoregulation, it is useful to use thermal sensors and physical models to collect environmental temperatures that are used to predict organism body temperature. Many techniques involve expensive or numerous types of sensors (cast copper models, or temperature, humidity, radiation, and wind speed sensors) to collect the microhabitat data necessary to predict body temperatures. Expense and diversity of requisite sensors can limit sampling resolution and accessibility of these methods. We compare body temperature predictions of small lizards from iButtons, DS18B20 sensors, and simple copper models, in both laboratory and natural conditions. Our aim was to develop an inexpensive yet accurate method for body temperature prediction. Either method was applicable given appropriate parameterization of the heat transfer equation used. The simplest and cheapest method was DS18B20 sensors attached to a small recording computer. There was little if any deficit in precision or accuracy compared to other published methods. We show how the heat transfer equation can be parameterized, and it can also be used to predict body temperature from historically collected data, allowing strong comparisons between current and previous environmental temperatures using the most modern techniques. Our simple method uses very cheap sensors and loggers to extensively sample habitat temperature, improving our understanding of microhabitat structure and thermal variability with respect to small ectotherms. While our method was quite precise, we feel any potential loss in accuracy is offset by the increase in sample resolution, important as it is increasingly apparent that, particularly for small ectotherms, habitat thermal heterogeneity is the strongest influence on transient body temperature.

  17. Warm body temperature facilitates energy efficient cortical action potentials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P; McCormick, David A

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na(+) channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na(+), and outward K(+), currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na(+) entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37-42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code.

  18. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  19. Optimal Body Temperature in Transitional ELBW Infants Using Heart Rate and Temperature as Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Knobel, Robin B.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Schwartz, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants are vulnerable to cold stress after birth. Therefore, caregivers need to control body temperature optimally to minimize energy expenditure. Objective We explored body temperature in relationship to heart rate in ELBW infants during their first 12 hours to help identify the ideal set point for incubator control of body temperature. Design Within subject, multiple-case design. Setting A tertiary NICU in North Carolina. Participants 10 infants, born less than 29 weeks gestation and weighing 400-1000 grams. Methods Heart rate and abdominal body temperature were measured at 1-minute intervals for 12 hours. Heart rates were considered normal if they were between the 25th and 75th percentile for each infant. Results Abdominal temperatures were low throughout the 12-hour study period (mean 35.17° C-36.68° C). Seven of ten infants had significant correlations between abdominal temperature and heart rate. Heart rates above the 75th percentile were associated with low and high abdominal temperatures; heart rates less than the 25th percentile were associated with very low abdominal temperatures. The extent to which abdominal temperature was abnormally low was related the extent to which the heart rate trended away from normal in six of the ten infants. Optimal temperature control point that maximized normal heart rate observations for each infant was between 36.8° C and 37° C. Conclusions Hypothermia was associated with abnormal heart rates in transitional ELBW infants. We suggest nurses set incubator servo between 36.8° C and 36.9° C to optimally control body temperature for ELBW infants. PMID:20409098

  20. Whole-body cryostimulation increases parasympathetic outflow and decreases core body temperature.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Pawel; Bitner, Anna; Słomko, Joanna; Szrajda, Justyna; Klawe, Jacek J; Tafil-Klawe, Malgorzata; Newton, Julia L

    2014-10-01

    The cardiovascular, autonomic and thermal response to whole-body cryostimulation exposure are not completely known. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate objectively and noninvasively autonomic and thermal reactions observed after short exposure to very low temperatures. We examined 25 healthy men with mean age 30.1 ± 3.7 years and comparable anthropomorphical characteristic. Each subject was exposed to cryotherapeutic temperatures in a cryogenic chamber for 3 min (approx. -120 °C). The cardiovascular and autonomic parameters were measured noninvasively with Task Force Monitor. The changes in core body temperature were determined with the Vital Sense telemetric measurement system. Results show that 3 min to cryotherapeutic temperatures causes significant changes in autonomic balance which are induced by peripheral and central blood volume changes. Cryostimulation also induced changes in core body temperature, maximum drop of core temperature was observed 50-60 min after the stimulation. Autonomic and thermal reactions to cryostimulation were observed up to 6 h after the exposure and were not harmful for examined subjects.

  1. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  2. Temperature control of thermal radiation from composite bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Weiliang; Polimeridis, Athanasios G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that recent advances in nanoscale thermal transport and temperature manipulation can be brought to bear on the problem of tailoring thermal radiation from wavelength-scale composite bodies. We show that such objects—complicated arrangements of phase-change chalcogenide (Ge2Sb2Te5 ) glasses and metals or semiconductors—can be designed to exhibit strong resonances and large temperature gradients, which in turn lead to large and highly directional emission at midinfrared wavelengths. We find that partial directivity depends sensitively on a complicated interplay between shape, material dispersion, and temperature localization within the objects, requiring simultaneous design of the electromagnetic scattering and thermal properties of these structures. Our calculations exploit a recently developed fluctuating-volume current formulation of electromagnetic fluctuations that rigorously captures radiation phenomena in structures with strong temperature and dielectric inhomogeneities, such as those studied here.

  3. Effect of post-delivery care on neonatal body temperature.

    PubMed

    Johanson, R B; Spencer, S A; Rolfe, P; Jones, P; Malla, D S

    1992-11-01

    A prospective observational study of post-delivery care and neonatal body temperature, carried out at Kathmandu Maternity Hospital, was followed by a randomized controlled intervention study using three simple methods for maintaining body temperature. There were 500 infants in the initial observation study and 300 in the intervention study. In the observation study, 85% (420/495) of infants had temperatures < 36 degrees C at 2 h and nearly 50% (198/405) had temperatures < 36 degrees C at 24 h (14% were < 35 degrees C). Most of the infants who were cold at 24 h had initially become cold at the time of delivery (only seven infants had been both well dried and wrapped). In the intervention study, all infants were dried and wrapped before random assignment to one of the three methods: the "kangaroo" method, the traditional "oil massage" or a "plastic swaddler". All three were found to be equally effective. Overall, 38% (114/298) of the infants had temperatures < 36 degrees C at 2 h and 18% (41/231) at 24 h (when none was < 35 degrees C).

  4. How photoperiod influences body temperature selection in Lacerta viridis.

    PubMed

    Rismiller, P D; Heldmaier, G

    1988-02-01

    European green lizards, Lacerta viridis, show a distinct annual cycle in their day and nighttime selected body temperature (T b) levels when monitored under natural photoperiod. The amplitude between daily photophase and scotophase temperatures varies throughout the year. Highest body temperatures with smallest day/night variation are selected from May through July. Throughout fall, the difference between day and nighttime selected T b levels increases. Lizards inevitably enter a state of winter dormancy which terminates daily rhythmicity patterns. Under natural photoperiodic conditions, cessation of dormancy occurs spontaneously by mid-March, regardless whether high temperatures are available or not. Lacerta viridis respond to an artificial long photoperiod (16 h light, 8 h dark) at all times of the year with modifications in both diel patterns and levels of selected T b to summer-like conditions. When, however, the natural photoperiod at different phases in the annual cycle is held constant for six to eight weeks, T b selection of Lacerta viridis also remains stable at the level corresponding to the prevailing photoperiod. These results implicate that the photoperiod is a more prominent Zeitgeber for seasonal cueing of temperature selection than has been surmised in the past. Further, we suggest that the large variations recorded in daily T b cycles do not imply that this lizard is an "imprecise" thermoregulator, but rather indicates an important integral process necessary for seasonal acclimatization.

  5. Diamond stabilization of ice multilayers at human body temperature.

    PubMed

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander D; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2007-08-01

    Diamond is a promising material for wear-resistant medical coatings. Here we report a remarkable increase in the melting point of ice resting on a diamond (111) surface modified with a submonolayer of Na+. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the interfacial ice bilayer melts at a temperature 130 K higher than in free ice, and relatively thick ice films (2.6 nm at 298 K and 2.2 nm at 310 K ) are stabilized by dipole interactions with the substrate. This unique physical effect may enable biocompatibility-enhancing ice overcoatings for diamond at human body temperature.

  6. The effect of anesthesia on body temperature control.

    PubMed

    Lenhardt, Rainer

    2010-06-01

    The human thermoregulatory system usually maintains core body temperature near 37 degrees C. This homeostasis is accomplished by thermoregulatory defense mechanisms such as vasoconstriction and shivering or sweating and vasodilatation. Thermoregulation is impaired during general anesthesia. Suppression of thermoregulatory defense mechanisms during general anesthesia is dose dependant and mostly results in perioperative hypothermia. Several adverse effects of hypothermia have been identified, including an increase in postoperative wound infection, perioperative coagulopathy and an increase of postoperative morbid cardiac events. Perioperative hypothermia can be avoided by warming patients actively during general anesthesia. Fever is a controlled increase of core body temperature. Various causes of perioperative fever are given. Fever is usually attenuated by general anesthesia. Typically, patients develop a fever of greater magnitude in the postoperative phase. Postoperative fever is fairly common. The incidence of fever varies with type and duration of surgery, patient's age, surgical site and preoperative inflammation.

  7. Effects of passive body heating on body temperature and sleep regulation in the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Chun

    2002-11-01

    Insomnia in the elderly is associated with circadian body temperature changes. Manipulating body temperature prior to sleep onset may improve sleep quality in the elderly. This systematic review analyzed the effect of passive body heating on body temperature and sleep quality. Three studies related to passive body heating for the elderly identified from a computerized database search were evaluated. All of them used crossover designs to examine effects of passive body heating on sleep quality. Passive body heating such as a warm bath immersed to mid-thorax with 40-41 degrees C water for 30 min in the evening could increase rectal body temperature, delay occurrence of body temperature nadir and increase slow wave sleep (deep sleep) in healthy female elderly with insomnia. The elderly also perceived "good sleep" or "quickness of falling asleep" after the bathing condition. Evening warm bath facilitates nighttime sleep for the healthy elderly with insomnia. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Body temperatures in dinosaurs: what can growth curves tell us?

    PubMed

    Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the body temperature (BT) of seven dinosaurs Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) used an equation that predicts BT from the body mass and maximum growth rate (MGR) with the latter preserved in ontogenetic growth trajectories (BT-equation). The results of these authors evidence inertial homeothermy in Dinosauria and suggest that, due to overheating, the maximum body size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. In this paper, I revisit this hypothesis of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006). I first studied whether BTs derived from the BT-equation of today's crocodiles, birds and mammals are consistent with core temperatures of animals. Second, I applied the BT-equation to a larger number of dinosaurs than Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) did. In particular, I estimated BT of Archaeopteryx (from two MGRs), ornithischians (two), theropods (three), prosauropods (three), and sauropods (nine). For extant species, the BT value estimated from the BT-equation was a poor estimate of an animal's core temperature. For birds, BT was always strongly overestimated and for crocodiles underestimated; for mammals the accuracy of BT was moderate. I argue that taxon-specific differences in the scaling of MGR (intercept and exponent of the regression line, log-log-transformed) and in the parameterization of the Arrhenius model both used in the BT-equation as well as ecological and evolutionary adaptations of species cause these inaccuracies. Irrespective of the found inaccuracy of BTs estimated from the BT-equation and contrary to the results of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) I found no increase in BT with increasing body mass across all dinosaurs (Sauropodomorpha, Sauropoda) studied. This observation questions that, due to overheating, the maximum size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. However, the general high inaccuracy of dinosaurian BTs derived from the BT-equation makes a reliable test of whether body size in dinosaurs was ultimately limited

  9. Body Temperatures in Dinosaurs: What Can Growth Curves Tell Us?

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the body temperature (BT) of seven dinosaurs Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) used an equation that predicts BT from the body mass and maximum growth rate (MGR) with the latter preserved in ontogenetic growth trajectories (BT-equation). The results of these authors evidence inertial homeothermy in Dinosauria and suggest that, due to overheating, the maximum body size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. In this paper, I revisit this hypothesis of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006). I first studied whether BTs derived from the BT-equation of today’s crocodiles, birds and mammals are consistent with core temperatures of animals. Second, I applied the BT-equation to a larger number of dinosaurs than Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) did. In particular, I estimated BT of Archaeopteryx (from two MGRs), ornithischians (two), theropods (three), prosauropods (three), and sauropods (nine). For extant species, the BT value estimated from the BT-equation was a poor estimate of an animal’s core temperature. For birds, BT was always strongly overestimated and for crocodiles underestimated; for mammals the accuracy of BT was moderate. I argue that taxon-specific differences in the scaling of MGR (intercept and exponent of the regression line, log-log-transformed) and in the parameterization of the Arrhenius model both used in the BT-equation as well as ecological and evolutionary adaptations of species cause these inaccuracies. Irrespective of the found inaccuracy of BTs estimated from the BT-equation and contrary to the results of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) I found no increase in BT with increasing body mass across all dinosaurs (Sauropodomorpha, Sauropoda) studied. This observation questions that, due to overheating, the maximum size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. However, the general high inaccuracy of dinosaurian BTs derived from the BT-equation makes a reliable test of whether body size in dinosaurs was ultimately

  10. Effects of opioids, cannabinoids, and vanilloids on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Benamar, Khalid

    2011-06-01

    Cannabinoid and opioid drugs produce marked changes in body temperature. Recent findings have extended our knowledge about the thermoregulatory effects of cannabinoids and opioids, particularly as related to delta opioid receptors, endogenous systems, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although delta opioid receptors were originally thought to play only a minor role in thermoregulation compared to mu and kappa opioid receptors, their activation has been shown to produce hypothermia in multiple species. Endogenous opioids and cannabinoids also regulate body temperature. Mu and kappa opioid receptors are thought to be in tonic balance, with mu and kappa receptor activation producing hyperthermia and hypothermia, respectively. A particularly intense research focus is TRP channels, where TRPV1 channel activation produces hypothermia whereas TRPA1 and TRPM8 channel activation causes hyperthermia. The marked hyperthermia produced by TRPV1 channel antagonists suggests these warm channels tonically control body temperature. A better understanding of the roles of cannabinoid, opioid, and TRP systems in thermoregulation may have broad clinical implications and provide insights into interactions among neurotransmitter systems involved in thermoregulation.

  11. Nutritional assessment with body composition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.

    1987-09-01

    The measurement of body composition by multiple isotope dilution provides an accurate and precise measure of both the nutritional state and the response to nutritional support. A multiple isotope dilution technique has been developed that permits measurement of the three major components of body composition: body fat, extracellular mass (ECM), and body cell mass (BCM). Normal body composition was defined by data obtained in 25 healthy volunteers. Malnutrition is characterized by a loss of BCM and an expansion of the ECM, and as a result the lean body mass is not significantly different from normal. The loss of body weight with malnutrition therefore often reflects the loss of body fat. The utility of body composition measurements was demonstrated by determining the effect of total parenteral nutrition on body composition to determine the relationship between caloric intake and the change in the BCM. A statistically significant relationship was developed which demonstrated that a caloric intake in the range of 30-40 cal/kg/day is required for maintenance. To restore a depleted or malnourished BCM requires a caloric intake in excess of that required for maintenance. The measurement of body composition by multiple isotope dilution is complex and time consuming, and requires specialized laboratory facilities and specially trained personnel. As a result, these measurements are not suited for routine patient management, but should rather be reserved for research purposes.

  12. Basal body temperature as a biomarker of healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Simonsick, Eleanor M; Meier, Helen C S; Shaffer, Nancy Chiles; Studenski, Stephanie A; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Scattered evidence indicates that a lower basal body temperature may be associated with prolonged health span, yet few studies have directly evaluated this relationship. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between early morning oral temperature (95.0-98.6 °F) and usual gait speed, endurance walk performance, fatigability, and grip strength in 762 non-frail men (52 %) and women aged 65-89 years participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Since excessive adiposity (body mass index ≥35 kg/m(2) or waist-to-height ratio ≥0.62) may alter temperature set point, associations were also examined within adiposity strata. Overall, controlling for age, race, sex, height, exercise, and adiposity, lower temperature was associated with faster gait speed, less time to walk 400 m quickly, and lower perceived exertion following 5-min of walking at 0.67 m/s (all p ≤ 0.02). In the non-adipose (N = 662), these associations were more robust (all p ≤ 0.006). Direction of association was reversed in the adipose (N = 100), but none attained significance (all p > 0.22). Over 2.2 years, basal temperature was not associated with functional change in the overall population or non-adipose. Among the adipose, lower baseline temperature was associated with greater decline in endurance walking performance (p = 0.006). In longitudinal analyses predicting future functional performance, low temperature in the non-adipose was associated with faster gait speed (p = 0.021) and less time to walk 400 m quickly (p = 0.003), whereas in the adipose, lower temperature was associated with slower gait speed (p = 0.05) and more time to walk 400 m (p = 0.008). In older adults, lower basal body temperature appears to be associated with healthy aging in the absence of excessive adiposity.

  13. Is obesity associated with lower body temperatures? Core temperature: a forgotten variable in energy balance.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Young, James B; Leonard, William R; Linsenmeier, Robert A; Turek, Fred W

    2009-06-01

    The global increase in obesity, along with the associated adverse health consequences, has heightened interest in the fundamental causes of excessive weight gain. Attributing obesity to "gluttony and sloth", blaming the obese for overeating and limiting physical activity, oversimplifies a complex problem, since substantial differences in metabolic efficiency between lean and obese have been decisively demonstrated. The underlying physiological basis for these differences have remained poorly understood. The energetic requirements of homeothermy, the maintenance of a constant core temperature in the face of widely divergent external temperatures, accounts for a major portion of daily energy expenditure. Changes in body temperature are associated with significant changes in metabolic rate. These facts raise the interesting possibility that differences in core temperature may play a role in the pathophysiology of obesity. This review explores the hypothesis that lower body temperatures contribute to the enhanced metabolic efficiency of the obese state.

  14. Prediction of Core Body Temperature from Multiple Variables.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Victoria L; Davey, Sarah; Griggs, Katy; Havenith, George

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to improve the prediction of rectal temperature (T re) from insulated skin temperature (T is) and micro-climate temperature (T mc) previously reported (Richmond et al., Insulated skin temperature as a measure of core body temperature for individuals wearing CBRN protective clothing. Physiol Meas 2013; 34:1531-43.) using additional physiological and/or environmental variables, under several clothing and climatic conditions. Twelve male (25.8±5.1 years; 73.6±11.5kg; 178±6cm) and nine female (24.2±5.1 years; 62.4±11.5kg; 169±3cm) volunteers completed six trials, each consisting of two 40-min periods of treadmill walking separated by a 20-min rest, wearing permeable or impermeable clothing, under neutral (25°C, 50%), moderate (35°C, 35%), and hot (40°C, 25%) conditions, with and without solar radiation (600W m(-2)). Participants were measured for heart rate (HR) (Polar, Finland), skin temperature (T s) at 11 sites, T is (Grant, Cambridge, UK), and breathing rate (f) (Hidalgo, Cambridge, UK). T mc and relative humidity were measured within the clothing. T re was monitored as the 'gold standard' measure of T c for industrial or military applications using a 10cm flexible probe (Grant, Cambridge, UK). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was run to determine which of 30 variables (T is, T s at 11 sites, HR, f, T mc, temperature, and humidity inside the clothing front and back, body mass, age, body fat, sex, clothing, Thermal comfort, sensation and perception, and sweat rate) were the strongest on which to base the model. Using a bootstrap methodology to develop the equation, the best model in terms of practicality and validity included T is, T mc, HR, and 'work' (0 = rest; 1 = exercise), predicting T re with a standard error of the estimate of 0.27°C and adjusted r (2) of 0.86. The sensitivity and specificity for predicting individuals who reached 39°C was 97 and 85%, respectively. Insulated skin temperature was the most important individual

  15. Primate body temperature and sleep responses to lower body positive pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cephalic fluid shifts, induced by lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are known to influence various physiological systems (i.e., cardiovascular and renal). In earlier experiments, an apparent change in the arousal state of primates in such LBPP conditions was observed. This study was designed to examine the effects of LBPP on arousal state and body temperature level which is normally correlated with sleep. Chair-restrained male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 40 mmHg LBPP for 90-100 minutes between the daytime hours of 13:00-15:00. Each monkey was placed in a specially modified restraint chair to which they were highly trained. Deep body temperature (DBT) was collected from 10 animals. Sleep parameters were obtained from six animals chronically implanted for sleep recording. A video camera was used to observe each animal's apparent state of arousal. LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.9 C decrease in DBT. During video observation, some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP; however, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in the state of arousal. Thus, LBPP is capable of inducing a mild hyperthermia. Further, the mechanisms underlying the observed lowering of body temperature appear to be independent of arousal state.

  16. Primate body temperature and sleep responses to lower body positive pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cephalic fluid shifts, induced by lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are known to influence various physiological systems (i.e., cardiovascular and renal). In earlier experiments, an apparent change in the arousal state of primates in such LBPP conditions was observed. This study was designed to examine the effects of LBPP on arousal state and body temperature level which is normally correlated with sleep. Chair-restrained male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 40 mmHg LBPP for 90-100 minutes between the daytime hours of 13:00-15:00. Each monkey was placed in a specially modified restraint chair to which they were highly trained. Deep body temperature (DBT) was collected from 10 animals. Sleep parameters were obtained from six animals chronically implanted for sleep recording. A video camera was used to observe each animal's apparent state of arousal. LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.9 C decrease in DBT. During video observation, some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP; however, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in the state of arousal. Thus, LBPP is capable of inducing a mild hyperthermia. Further, the mechanisms underlying the observed lowering of body temperature appear to be independent of arousal state.

  17. Effects of body size and temperature on population growth.

    PubMed

    Savage, Van M; Gilloly, James F; Brown, James H; Charnov, Eric L

    2004-03-01

    For at least 200 years, since the time of Malthus, population growth has been recognized as providing a critical link between the performance of individual organisms and the ecology and evolution of species. We present a theory that shows how the intrinsic rate of exponential population growth, rmax, and the carrying capacity, K, depend on individual metabolic rate and resource supply rate. To do this, we construct equations for the metabolic rates of entire populations by summing over individuals, and then we combine these population-level equations with Malthusian growth. Thus, the theory makes explicit the relationship between rates of resource supply in the environment and rates of production of new biomass and individuals. These individual-level and population-level processes are inextricably linked because metabolism sets both the demand for environmental resources and the resource allocation to survival, growth, and reproduction. We use the theory to make explicit how and why rmax exhibits its characteristic dependence on body size and temperature. Data for aerobic eukaryotes, including algae, protists, insects, zooplankton, fishes, and mammals, support these predicted scalings for rmax. The metabolic flux of energy and materials also dictates that the carrying capacity or equilibrium density of populations should decrease with increasing body size and increasing temperature. Finally, we argue that body mass and body temperature, through their effects on metabolic rate, can explain most of the variation in fecundity and mortality rates. Data for marine fishes in the field support these predictions for instantaneous rates of mortality. This theory links the rates of metabolism and resource use of individuals to life-history attributes and population dynamics for a broad assortment of organisms, from unicellular organisms to mammals.

  18. Body Composition Assessment--Some Practical Answers to Teachers' Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David Q.; Whitehead, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Presents information about body composition assessment, including how useful the measurement is, how to conduct assessment, accurate skinfold measurement, body mass index versus skinfold results, interpreting results, standards for score interpretation, other types of measurement, how to approach skinfold assessment, and handling sensitivity and…

  19. Assessing positive body image: Contemporary approaches and future directions.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jennifer B; Wood-Barcalow, Nichole L; Tylka, Tracy L

    2015-06-01

    Empirical and clinical interest in positive body image has burgeoned in recent years. This focused attention is generating various measures and methods for researchers and psychotherapists to assess an array of positive body image constructs in populations of interest. No resource to date has integrated the available measures and methods for easy accessibility and comparison. Therefore, this article reviews contemporary scales for the following positive body image constructs: body appreciation, positive rational acceptance, body image flexibility, body functionality, attunement (body responsiveness, mindful self-care), positive/self-accepting body talk, body pride, body sanctification, broad conceptualization of beauty, and self-perceived body acceptance by others. Guidelines for the qualitative assessment of positive body image and recommendations for integrating positive body image assessment within psychotherapy and applied research settings are also offered. The article concludes with articulating broad future directions for positive body image assessment, including ideas for expanding its available measures, methods, and dynamic expressions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature Regulation during Upper Body Exercise: Able Bodied and Spinal Cord Injured

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    REFERENCES 1. Asmussen. E. and M . Nielsen. The regulation of the body temperature during work performed with the arms and with the legs. Acta Physiol. Scand...14:373-382. 1947. 2. Astrand. I. Aerobic work capacity in men and women. Acta Physiol. Scand. 49: (Suppl. 169)64-73, 1960. 3. Attia, M . and P. Engel...9:225-228. 1984. 10. Downey. J.A.. H.P. Chiodi and R.C. Darling. Central temperature regulation in the spinal man. J. AppI. Physiol. 22:91-94. 1967

  1. Examination of body checking, body image dissatisfaction, and negative affect using Ecological momentary assessment.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Emily C; Hudson, Danae L; Whisenhunt, Brooke L; Buchanan, Erin M; Latner, Janet D

    2016-08-01

    Research has shown that non-clinical women, particularly those with high body concern, engage in frequent body checking behaviors. The purpose of this study was to use ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to examine the frequency and correlates of body checking behavior, including its association with body image dissatisfaction and negative affect, in non-clinical women with high body concern. Undergraduate female participants with high body concern (n=22) were assessed five times per day for five days via text messages sent to their smart phones. During each assessment, participants reported the number of times they engaged in eight different body checking behaviors and their current level of negative affect and body dissatisfaction. After aggregation, a total of 3064 body checking behaviors were reported by the sample during the five-day period. All participants reported engaging in body checking at least once per day, with a mean of 27.85 checking behaviors per day. Hierarchical Linear Modeling revealed that body checking significantly predicted both body dissatisfaction and negative affect. These results provide preliminary support for the cognitive behavioral theory of eating disorders, suggesting that as women engage in more frequent body checking behaviors, they also experience higher levels of body dissatisfaction and negative affect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Junjie; Chen, Chensong; Cheng, Hongsen; Wang, Ren; Ma, Linhao

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched electronically. Relevant journals and references of studies included were hand-searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT) regarding the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke. Two reviewers independently performed data extraction and quality assessment. Data were analyzed using RevMan 5.3 software by the Cochrane Collaboration. Five studies were included. To compare the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in acute stroke, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI of body temperature reduction at 24h from the start of treatment were -0.3 (95% CI: -0.52 to -0.08), with statistical significance (P=0.007). Consistently, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI of body temperature at 24h from the start of treatment were -0.22 (-0.29, -0.15), with statistical significance (P<0.00001). When analyzing the body temperature reduction after 5days from the start of treatment, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI were 0.04 (95% CI: -0.20 to 0.29), with no statistical significance (P=0.73). For functional outcome (mRS≤2) analysis, the pooled RR and its 95% CI were 1.08 (0.88, 1.32), with no statistical significance (P=0.45). In addition, the difference of serious adverse events between acetaminophen and placebo was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.62 to 1.2), with no statistical significance (P=0.27). Acetaminophen was revealed to have some favorable influence in body temperature reduction in acute stroke, but showed no important effect on improving functional outcome and reducing adverse events of patients. What is already known on this

  3. Deep-body temperature changes in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, J.; Platt, W. T.; Holland, V. B.

    1971-01-01

    Deep-body temperature was monitored continuously by implant biotelemetry in unrestrained rats before, during, and after exposure to prolonged and almost continuous centrifugation. Rats subjected to centrifugation for the first time at various G loads ranging up to 2.5 G show a rapid and significant fall in temperature which is sustained below normal levels for periods as long as 3 days. The magnitude of the temperature fall and the recovery time were generally proportional to the G load imposed. The initial fall and recovery of body temperature closely parallels the decrease in food consumption and to a lesser degree the decrease in body mass experienced by centrifuged rats. After exposure to 2 weeks of centrifugation, rats show either no change or only a small transient increase in temperature when decelerated to a lower G level or when returned to normal gravity. Rats repeatedly exposed to centrifugation consistently showed a smaller temperature response compared to the initial exposure. Implant temperature biotelemetry has been found to be a sensitive, reliable, and extremely useful technique for assessing the initial stress of centrifugation and in monitoring the time course of recovery and acclimation of rats to increase as well as*decrease G.

  4. Genetic variation of body temperature of Coturnix coturnix in two ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Becker, W A; Harrison, P

    1975-05-01

    Coturnix quail were placed in an environmental chamber maintained at 21 degree C. and rectal temperatures taken. The birds were subjected to an abrupt change to 36 degree C. and the temperatures taken hourly for eight hours and at 25, 38 and 72 hours. Females had higher temperatures than males. When birds were moved to 36 degrees C. their temperatures rose rapidly and then dropped to a level higher than when birds were in the 21 degrees C. chamber. The genetic and total variation estimated from the analysis of variance method decreased under this sudden thermal stress condition. Birds kept in 36 degrees C. for three weeks were shifted to 21 degrees C. Their body temperature dropped sharply and then increased to a level lower than that obtained in the 36 degrees C. environment. The genetic variation was essentially zero when shifted to a lower temperature while the total variation increased.

  5. Effects of adenosine agonists on consumptive behaviour and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Coupar, Ian M; Tran, Binh L T

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of the A1-receptor selective agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), and the A2-selective agonist, 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-hydrochloride (CGS-21680) on consumptive behaviour and body temperature in rats in relation to the non-selective A1/A2 adenosine agonist, N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), and to morphine. It was shown that two subcutaneous injections of 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) CPA caused a similar decrease in food consumption to NECA (2 x 0.03 mg kg(-1)) and morphine (2 x 10 mg kg(-1)). However, two doses of 0.03 mg kg(-1) CPA and 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1)CGS-21680 enhanced feeding. These effects were not directly correlated to faecal output at all doses of the selective agonists, as NECA and morphine induced constipation. The doses of CPA and 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) of CGS-21680 enhanced water consumption, as did NECA, but not morphine. The stimulation of drinking by CPA was not absolutely associated with diuresis. Instead, urine output was reduced by 0.03 and 0.1 mg kg(-1) and increased by 0.3 mg kg(-1). CGS-21680 at 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) and NECA also induced diuresis, which was opposite to the effect of morphine. CPA and CGS-21680 both caused significant dose-dependent decreases in body temperature after the two-injection treatment, but their effects were significantly less after 36 h when four doses had been administered. The study indicates that highly selective A1 and A2A adenosine agonists might have the ability to interfere with consumptive behaviour, induce constipation, affect renal function and to lower body temperature.

  6. Systems Modeling for Crew Core Body Temperature Prediction Postlanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Cynthia; Ochoa, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, NASA s latest crewed spacecraft project, presents many challenges to its designers including ensuring crew survivability during nominal and off nominal landing conditions. With a nominal water landing planned off the coast of San Clemente, California, off nominal water landings could range from the far North Atlantic Ocean to the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. For all of these conditions, the vehicle must provide sufficient life support resources to ensure that the crew member s core body temperatures are maintained at a safe level prior to crew rescue. This paper will examine the natural environments, environments created inside the cabin and constraints associated with post landing operations that affect the temperature of the crew member. Models of the capsule and the crew members are examined and analysis results are compared to the requirement for safe human exposure. Further, recommendations for updated modeling techniques and operational limits are included.

  7. Systems Modeling for Crew Core Body Temperature Prediction Postlanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Cynthia; Ochoa, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, NASA s latest crewed spacecraft project, presents many challenges to its designers including ensuring crew survivability during nominal and off nominal landing conditions. With a nominal water landing planned off the coast of San Clemente, California, off nominal water landings could range from the far North Atlantic Ocean to the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. For all of these conditions, the vehicle must provide sufficient life support resources to ensure that the crew member s core body temperatures are maintained at a safe level prior to crew rescue. This paper will examine the natural environments, environments created inside the cabin and constraints associated with post landing operations that affect the temperature of the crew member. Models of the capsule and the crew members are examined and analysis results are compared to the requirement for safe human exposure. Further, recommendations for updated modeling techniques and operational limits are included.

  8. Novel Zero-Heat-Flux Deep Body Temperature Measurement in Lower Extremity Vascular and Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Marja-Tellervo; Pesonen, Anne; Jousela, Irma; Päivärinta, Janne; Poikajärvi, Satu; Albäck, Anders; Salminen, Ulla-Stina; Pesonen, Eero

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare deep body temperature obtained using a novel noninvasive continuous zero-heat-flux temperature measurement system with core temperatures obtained using conventional methods. A prospective, observational study. Operating room of a university hospital. The study comprised 15 patients undergoing vascular surgery of the lower extremities and 15 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Zero-heat-flux thermometry on the forehead and standard core temperature measurements. Body temperature was measured using a new thermometry system (SpotOn; 3M, St. Paul, MN) on the forehead and with conventional methods in the esophagus during vascular surgery (n = 15), and in the nasopharynx and pulmonary artery during cardiac surgery (n = 15). The agreement between SpotOn and the conventional methods was assessed using the Bland-Altman random-effects approach for repeated measures. The mean difference between SpotOn and the esophageal temperature during vascular surgery was+0.08°C (95% limit of agreement -0.25 to+0.40°C). During cardiac surgery, during off CPB, the mean difference between SpotOn and the pulmonary arterial temperature was -0.05°C (95% limits of agreement -0.56 to+0.47°C). Throughout cardiac surgery (on and off CPB), the mean difference between SpotOn and the nasopharyngeal temperature was -0.12°C (95% limits of agreement -0.94 to+0.71°C). Poor agreement between the SpotOn and nasopharyngeal temperatures was detected in hypothermia below approximately 32°C. According to this preliminary study, the deep body temperature measured using the zero-heat-flux system was in good agreement with standard core temperatures during lower extremity vascular and cardiac surgery. However, agreement was questionable during hypothermia below 32°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Body temperature regulation during hemodialysis in long-term patients: is it time to change dialysate temperature prescription?

    PubMed

    Pérgola, Pablo E; Habiba, Nusrath M; Johnson, John M

    2004-07-01

    During hemodialysis procedures, changes in the dialysate temperature can raise or lower body temperature because the blood is returned to the patient in thermal equilibrium with the dialysate. Even a dialysate temperature equal to the patient's body temperature as measured from the tympanic membrane, oral cavity, or axilla can result in an increase in the patient's body temperature, leading to cutaneous vasodilation and the potential for cardiovascular instability and hypotension. This deleterious cycle of events can be prevented by suitably adjusting the dialysate temperature. Lowering the dialysate temperature from 37 degrees C to 34-35.5 degrees C has improved the cardiovascular stability of many hemodialysis patients. Continuous monitoring of blood temperature allows the practitioner to make preemptive changes in dialysate temperature because a small change in body temperature can have enormous cardiovascular implications. For example, only 0.3 degrees C to 0.8 degrees C separates the thresholds for skin vasodilation from that for shivering. A suggested improvement in the hemodialysis procedure is to use devices that allow continuous monitoring of arterial and venous blood temperatures and adjust the dialysate temperature automatically, keeping the patient, not the dialysate, isothermic. Less optimal solutions appear to be (1) to monitor arterial and venous temperatures while manually adjusting the dialysate temperature to maintain arterial (and hence body) temperature stability; (2) to monitor peripheral temperatures (oral, tympanic) at regular intervals and adjust dialysate temperature to maintain the body temperature constant; (3) routinely use a dialysate temperature <37.0 degrees C in all patients unless contraindicated.

  10. The inability to screen exhibition swine for influenza A virus using body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew S.; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Workman, Jeffrey D.; Cooper, Maria; Fisher, Aaron E; Marsh, Bret; Forshey, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Summary Agricultural fairs create an unconventional animal-human interface that has been associated with swine-to-human transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) in recent years. Early detection of IAV-infected pigs at agricultural fairs would allow veterinarians to better protect swine and human health during these swine exhibitions. The present study assessed the use of swine body temperature measurement, recorded by infrared and rectal thermometers, as a practical method to detect IAV-infected swine at agricultural fairs. In our first objective, infrared thermometers were used to record the body surface temperature of 1,092 pigs at the time of IAV nasal swab collection at the end of the exhibition period of 55 agricultural fairs. IAV was recovered from 212 (19.4%) pigs and the difference in mean infrared body temperature measurement of IAV-positive and negative pigs was 0.83°C. In a second objective, snout wipes were collected from 1,948 pigs immediately prior to the unloading of the animals at a single large swine exhibition. Concurrent to the snout wipe collection, owners took the rectal temperatures of his/her pigs. In this case, 47 (2.4%) pigs tested positive for IAV before they entered the swine barn. The mean rectal temperatures differed by only 0.19°C between IAV-positive and negative pigs. The low prevalence of IAV among the pigs upon entry to the fair in the second objective provides evidence that limiting intra-species spread of IAV during the fairs will likely have significant impacts on the zoonotic transmission. However, in both objectives, the high degree of similarity in the body temperature measurements between the IAV-positive and negative pigs made it impossible to set a diagnostically meaningful cut point to differentiate IAV status of the individual animals. Unfortunately, body temperature measurement cannot be used to accurately screen exhibition swine for IAV. PMID:25884907

  11. An early rise in body temperature is related to unfavorable outcome after stroke: data from the PAIS study.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Heleen M; van der Worp, H Bart; van Gemert, H Maarten A; Algra, Ale; Kappelle, L Jaap; van Gijn, Jan; Koudstaal, Peter J; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2011-02-01

    Subfebrile temperature or fever is present in about a third of patients on the first day after stroke onset and is associated with poor outcome. However, the temporal profile of this association is not well established. We aimed to assess the relationship between body temperature on admission as well as the change in body temperature from admission to 24 h thereafter and functional outcome and death. We analyzed data of 1,332 patients admitted within 12 h of stroke onset. The relation between body temperature on admission or the change in body temperature from admission to 24 h thereafter (adjusted for body temperature on admission) on the one hand and unfavorable outcome (death, or a modified Rankin Scale score >2) at 3 months on the other were expressed as odds ratio per 1.0°C increase in body temperature. Adjustments for potential confounders were made with a multiple logistic regression model. No relation was found between admission body temperature and poor outcome (aOR 1.06; 95% CI 0.85-1.32) and death (aOR 1.23; 95% CI 0.95-1.60). In contrast, increased body temperature in the first 24 h after stroke onset was associated with poor outcome (aOR 1.30; 95% CI 1.05-1.63) and death (aOR 1.51; 95% CI 1.15-1.98). An early rise in body temperature rather than high body temperature on admission is a risk factor for unfavorable outcome in patients with acute stroke.

  12. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.70 Conformity assessment bodies. Each party recognizes that the conformity... conformity in relation to its requirements as specified in subpart B of this part. The parties shall...

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Temperature Sensitivity of the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program, established by the Clean Water Act, is used to establish limits on loading of pollutants from point and nonpoint sources necessary to achieve water quality standards. One important use of a temperature TMDL is to allocate thermal loads to achieve water temperature criteria established for the protection of cold water fisheries. The pollutant in this case is thermal load and allocations to reduce the load often involve restoration of stream shading, which reduces the solar input. While many temperature TMDLs have been established, the supporting analyses have generally assumed a stationary climate under which historical data on flow and air temperature can serve as an adequate guide to future conditions. Projected changes in climate over the 21st century contradict this assumption. Air temperature is expected to increase in most parts of the US, accompanied in many areas by seasonal shifts in the timing and amount of precipitation, which in turn will alter stream flow. This study evaluates the implications of climate change for the water temperature TMDL developed for the South Fork Nooksack River in northwest Washington by the Department of Ecology, where multiple water body segments exceed temperature criteria established for the protection of cold water salmonid populations (Ecology, 2016). The purpose of this report is to provide a “companion technical methods manual” as documentation for the draft SFNR tempera

  14. The effect of body temperature on the hunting response of the middle finger skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A; Van de Linde, F J; Romet, T T; Ducharme, M B

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between body temperature and the hunting response (intermittent supply of warm blood to cold exposed extremities) was quantified for nine subjects by immersing one hand in 8 degree C water while their body was either warm, cool or comfortable. Core and skin temperatures were manipulated by exposing the subjects to different ambient temperatures (30, 22, or 15 degrees C), by adjusting their clothing insulation (moderate, light, or none), and by drinking beverages at different temperatures (43, 37 and 0 degrees C). The middle finger temperature (Tfi) response was recorded, together with ear canal (Tear), rectal (Tre), and mean skin temperature (Tsk). The induced mean Tear changes were -0.34 (0.08) and +0.29 (0.03) degrees C following consumption of the cold and hot beverage, respectively. Tsk ranged from 26.7 to 34.5 degrees C during the tests. In the warm environment after a hot drink, the initial finger temperature (T(fi,base)) was 35.3 (0.4) degrees C, the minimum finger temperature during immersion (T(fi,min)) was 11.3 (0.5) degrees C, and 2.6 (0.4) hunting waves occurred in the 30-min immersion period. In the neutral condition (thermoneutral room and beverage) T(fi,base) was 32.1 (1.0) degrees C, T(fi,min) was 9.6 (0.3) degrees C, and 1.6 (0.2) waves occurred. In the cold environment after a cold drink, these values were 19.3 (0.9) degrees C, 8.7 (0.2) degrees C, and 0.8 (0.2) waves, respectively. A colder body induced a decrease in the magnitude and frequency of the hunting response. The total heat transferred from the hand to the water, as estimated by the area under the middle finger temperature curve, was also dependent upon the induced increase or decrease in Tear and Tsk. We conclude that the characteristics of the hunting temperature response curve of the finger are in part determined by core temperature and Tsk. Both T(fi,min) and the maximal finger temperature during immersion were higher when the core temperature was elevated; Tsk

  15. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  16. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  17. Central circuitries for body temperature regulation and fever.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-11-01

    Body temperature regulation is a fundamental homeostatic function that is governed by the central nervous system in homeothermic animals, including humans. The central thermoregulatory system also functions for host defense from invading pathogens by elevating body core temperature, a response known as fever. Thermoregulation and fever involve a variety of involuntary effector responses, and this review summarizes the current understandings of the central circuitry mechanisms that underlie nonshivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, shivering thermogenesis in skeletal muscles, thermoregulatory cardiac regulation, heat-loss regulation through cutaneous vasomotion, and ACTH release. To defend thermal homeostasis from environmental thermal challenges, feedforward thermosensory information on environmental temperature sensed by skin thermoreceptors ascends through the spinal cord and lateral parabrachial nucleus to the preoptic area (POA). The POA also receives feedback signals from local thermosensitive neurons, as well as pyrogenic signals of prostaglandin E(2) produced in response to infection. These afferent signals are integrated and affect the activity of GABAergic inhibitory projection neurons descending from the POA to the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) or to the rostral medullary raphe region (rMR). Attenuation of the descending inhibition by cooling or pyrogenic signals leads to disinhibition of thermogenic neurons in the DMH and sympathetic and somatic premotor neurons in the rMR, which then drive spinal motor output mechanisms to elicit thermogenesis, tachycardia, and cutaneous vasoconstriction. Warming signals enhance the descending inhibition from the POA to inhibit the motor outputs, resulting in cutaneous vasodilation and inhibited thermogenesis. This central thermoregulatory mechanism also functions for metabolic regulation and stress-induced hyperthermia.

  18. Getting the temperature right: Understanding thermal emission from airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, J.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Hayne, P. O.; Williams, J. P.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal infrared measurements are crucial for understanding a wide variety of processes present on airless bodies throughout the solar system. Although these data can be complex, they also contain an enormous amount of useful information. By building a framework for understanding thermal infrared datasets, significant advances are possible in the understanding of regolith development, detection of H2O and OH-, characterizing the nature and magnitude of Yarkovsky and YORP effects, and determination of the properties of newly identified asteroids via telescopic measurements. Airless bodies can have both extremely rough and insulating surfaces. For example, these two properties allow for sunlit and shaded or buried lunar materials separated by just a few centimeters to vary by 200K. In this sense, there is no "correct" temperature interpretable from orbital, or even in-situ, measurements. The surface contains a wide mixture of temperatures in the field of view, and rougher surfaces greatly enhance this anisothermality. We have used the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Radiometer to characterize these effects by developing new targeting and analysis methods, including extended off-nadir observations and combined surface roughness and thermal modeling (Fig. 1). These measurements and models have shown up to 100K brightness temperature differences from measurements that differ only in the viewing angle of the observation. In addition, the thermal emission near 3 μm can be highly dependent on the surface roughness, resulting in more extensive and prominent lunar 3 μm H2O and OH-absorptions than indicated in data corrected by isothermal models. The datasets serve as a foundation for the derivation and understanding of surface spectral and thermophysical properties. Roughness and anisothermality effects are likely to dominate infrared measurements from many spacecraft, including LRO, Dawn, BepiColombo, OSIRIS-REx, Hayabusa-2, and Europa Clipper.

  19. Beef cattle body temperature during climatic stress: a genome-wide association study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle are sold for use in multiple environments that differ greatly in multiple climactic parameters, making the ability to regulate body temperature across multiple environments essential. Collecting phenotypic body temperature measurements is difficult and expensive, thus a genomics approach is ...

  20. Formulation and synthesis of hydrogels having lower critical solution temperature near body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, A. Z.; Graha, H. P. R.; Trirahayu, D. A.

    2017-07-01

    Copolymerization between bacterial cellulose nanocrystal (CN) and methyl cellulose (MC) was carried out using UV light to produce a biocompatible hydrogel at body temperature and liquid at room temperature. Viscosity and salt effect of the MC and copolymer solution at room temperature and its Lower Critical Solution Temperature (LCST) were evaluated. The analysis showed that the higher concentration of methyl cellulose and salt content in the solution produced lower LCST and higher solution viscosity. All samples of polymer solution with MC concentrations of 1 and 2% have a viscosity less than 5000 cP at room temperature. The solutions with MC concentration of 1, 2, and 3% have respectively LCST of 59, 58, and 57°C, while its copolymer solutions with CN concentration of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5% have respectively LCST of 55, 51, and 41°C. The salt addition to the solution of MC-CN copolymer with concentrations of 1x and 1.5x Phosphat Buffered Saline (PBS) produces respectively LCST of 47 and 38°C. The results suggest that the copolymer solution of MC-CN could produce a lower LCST and the addition of salt could amplify the effect of LCST decrease that can be used to produce a biocompatible hydrogel with LCST as close as body temperature.

  1. Effects of Eucommia leaf extracts on autonomic nerves, body temperature, lipolysis, food intake, and body weight.

    PubMed

    Horii, Yuko; Tanida, Mamoru; Shen, Jiao; Hirata, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Naomi; Wada, Atsunori; Nagai, Katsuya

    2010-08-02

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliver leaf extracts (ELE) have been shown to exert a hypolipidemic effect in hamsters. Therefore, it was hypothesized that ELE might affect lipid metabolism via changes in autonomic nerve activities and causes changes in thermogenesis and body weight. We examined this hypothesis, and found that intraduodenal (ID) injection of ELE elevated epididymal white adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (WAT-SNA) and interscapular brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (BAT-SNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats and elevated the plasma concentration of free fatty acids (FFA) (a marker of lipolysis) and body temperature (BT) (a marker of thermogenesis) in conscious rats. Furthermore, it was observed that ID administration of ELE decreased gastric vagal nerve activity (GVNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats, and that ELE given as food reduced food intake, body and abdominal adipose tissue weights and decreased plasma triglyceride level. These findings suggest that ELE stimulates lipolysis and thermogenesis through elevations in WAT-SNA and BAT-SNA, respectively, suppresses appetite by inhibiting the activities of the parasympathetic nerves innervating the gastrointestinal tract, including GVNA, and decreases the amount of abdominal fat and body weight via these changes.

  2. Sex hormones, sleep, and core body temperature in older postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patricia J; Campbell, Scott S

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of relationships between polysomnographic sleep, sex hormones, and core body temperature in postmenopausal women. Ten women aged 57 to 71 years, at least 5 years past menopause. Laboratory of Human Chronobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. N/A. Lower estradiol (E2) and higher luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were significantly correlated with indices of poor sleep quality. Relationships between LH and polysomnographic variables were more robust than those for E2. Significant increases from basal LH levels (i.e., LH pulses) occurred more frequently after sleep onset than prior to sleep onset, and 30 of 32 of these LH pulses occurred prior to long awakenings from sleep. In addition, higher body core temperature prior to and during sleep was significantly correlated with poorer sleep efficiency and higher LH levels. Most investigations of relationships between sleep, sex hormones, and body temperature have focused on perimenopausal women, menopausal phenomena such as hot flashes, the role of declining estrogen, and treatment with exogenous estrogen. The current results suggest that altered levels of both sex steroids and gonadotropins may contribute to sleep disturbance in older women and confirm the results of previous studies indicating that higher body core temperature is associated with poorer sleep quality, even in women without vasomotor symptoms. The findings also raise the possibility of alternate treatment avenues for menopause- and age-related sleep disturbance that focus on altering LH levels.

  3. Energy content of the evening meal alters nocturnal body temperature but not sleep.

    PubMed

    Driver, H S; Shulman, I; Baker, F C; Buffenstein, R

    Meals of varying energy content and episodes of sleep influence body temperature. We compared the effect of an evening meal, varying from high-energy (11.91 +/- 0.86 MJ) to average (5.74 +/- 0.88 MJ) and a 10-h fast (no evening meal), on nocturnal body temperature and sleep. Seven healthy men (20-24 years, mean body mass index of 23.4 +/- 2.6 kg/m2) reported to the laboratory for an evening meal at 2000 h having consumed similar amounts of food before 1300 h. After completing the meal, subjective hunger ratings were assessed, and a venous blood sample taken. The subjects spent 4 nonconsecutive nights (an adaptation night, followed by either of the two meal conditions or the fast in random order) in the sleep laboratory when polysomnographic recordings were made from 2300 to 0700 h. Meal energy content and serum concentrations of insulin, triglyceride, and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) varied significantly. Lower rectal temperatures were measured during the fast than following the meals. Over the 8-h recording period, thermal response indices (TRI) varied with higher body temperatures following the higher energy meal. Similar rectal temperatures were attained by the end of the sleep periods. There were no significant differences in any of the subjective or objective sleep measures. The physiological responses associated with the transient dietary changes of an evening meal or a 10-h fast altered nocturnal body temperature but did not significantly affect sleep of good sleepers when sleep was initiated 2 to 3 h after finishing the meal.

  4. Acute normobaric hypoxia reduces body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    DiPasquale, Dana M; Kolkhorst, Fred W; Buono, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Anapyrexia is the regulated decrease in body temperature during acute exposure to hypoxia. This study examined resting rectal temperature (Trec) in adult humans during acute normobaric hypoxia (NH). Ten subjects breathed air consisting of 21% (NN), 14% (NH14), and 12% oxygen (NH12) for 30 min each in thermoneutral conditions while Trec and blood oxygen saturation (Spo2) were measured. Linear regression indicated that Spo2 was progressively lower in NH14 (p=0.0001) and NH12 (p=0.0001) compared to NN, and that Spo2 in NH14 was different than NH12 (p=0.00001). Trec was progressively lower during NH14 (p=0.014) and in NH12 (p=0.0001) compared to NN. The difference in Trec between NH14 and NH12 was also significant (p=0.0287). Spo2 was a significant predictor of Trec such that for every 1% decrease in Spo2, Trec decreased by 0.15°C (p=0.0001). The present study confirmed that, similar to many other species, human adults respond to acute hypoxia exposure by lowering rectal temperature.

  5. Type I collagen is thermally unstable at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Leikina, E; Mertts, M V; Kuznetsova, N; Leikin, S

    2002-02-05

    Measured by ultra-slow scanning calorimetry and isothermal circular dichroism, human lung collagen monomers denature at 37 degrees C within a couple of days. Their unfolding rate decreases exponentially at lower temperature, but complete unfolding is observed even below 36 degrees C. Refolding of full-length, native collagen triple helices does occur, but only below 30 degrees C. Thus, contrary to the widely held belief, the energetically preferred conformation of the main protein of bone and skin in physiological solution is a random coil rather than a triple helix. These observations suggest that once secreted from cells collagen helices would begin to unfold. We argue that initial microunfolding of their least stable domains would trigger self-assembly of fibers where the helices are protected from complete unfolding. Our data support an earlier hypothesis that in fibers collagen helices may melt and refold locally when needed, giving fibers their strength and elasticity. Apparently, Nature adjusts collagen hydroxyproline content to ensure that the melting temperature of triple helical monomers is several degrees below rather than above body temperature.

  6. Suitability of temperature-sensitive transponders to measure body temperature during animal experiments required for regulatory tests.

    PubMed

    Hartinger, Joachim; Külbs, Daniela; Volkers, Peter; Cussler, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Body temperature is a clinical parameter in vaccine quality control to detect systemic side-effects or to monitor progression of infectious diseases. Moreover, changes in body temperature are used as clinical parameters to define humane endpoints in animal experiments. However, measuring body temperature via the rectal route can be troublesome and distressing to the animal. Non-invasive measurement methods were developed in recent years. The aim of this investigation was to study and to compare rectally measured body temperature with data obtained with implanted temperature-sensitive transponders (TST) in mice, guinea pigs, rabbits and pigs under the controlled conditions of regulatory testing.

  7. Human body temperature and new approaches to constructing temperature-sensitive bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    White, Matthew D; Bosio, Catharine M; Duplantis, Barry N; Nano, Francis E

    2011-09-01

    Many of the live human and animal vaccines that are currently in use are attenuated by virtue of their temperature-sensitive (TS) replication. These vaccines are able to function because they can take advantage of sites in mammalian bodies that are cooler than the core temperature, where TS vaccines fail to replicate. In this article, we discuss the distribution of temperature in the human body, and relate how the temperature differential can be exploited for designing and using TS vaccines. We also examine how one of the coolest organs of the body, the skin, contains antigen-processing cells that can be targeted to provoke the desired immune response from a TS vaccine. We describe traditional approaches to making TS vaccines, and highlight new information and technologies that are being used to create a new generation of engineered TS vaccines. We pay particular attention to the recently described technology of substituting essential genes from Arctic bacteria for their homologues in mammalian pathogens as a way of creating TS vaccines.

  8. Human body temperature and new approaches to constructing temperature-sensitive bacterial vaccines

    PubMed Central

    White, Matthew D.; Bosio, Catharine M.; Duplantis, Barry N.

    2012-01-01

    Many of the live human and animal vaccines that are currently in use are attenuated by virtue of their temperature-sensitive (TS) replication. These vaccines are able to function because they can take advantage of sites in mammalian bodies that are cooler than the core temperature, where TS vaccines fail to replicate. In this article, we discuss the distribution of temperature in the human body, and relate how the temperature differential can be exploited for designing and using TS vaccines. We also examine how one of the coolest organs of the body, the skin, contains antigen-processing cells that can be targeted to provoke the desired immune response from a TS vaccine. We describe traditional approaches to making TS vaccines, and highlight new information and technologies that are being used to create a new generation of engineered TS vaccines. We pay particular attention to the recently described technology of substituting essential genes from Arctic bacteria for their homologues in mammalian pathogens as a way of creating TS vaccines. PMID:21626408

  9. Changes in basal body temperature and simple reaction times during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Simić, Nataša; Ravlić, Arijana

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown cyclic changes in the activation levels and performance of different tasks throughout the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to examine if changes in the reaction time to both light and sound stimuli may be associated with basal body temperature changes and subjective assessments of General and High Activation during the different phases of a menstrual cycle characterized by high (preovulatory and midluteal phase) and low (menstrual and early follicular phase) levels of oestrogen and progesterone. The study included measurements of basal body temperature, simple reaction times to light and sound and self-assessment of General and High Activation during the menstrual, early follicular, late follicular and luteal phase. The sample consisted of 19 female subjects with regular menstrual cycles. The results obtained in this study indicate lower basal body temperature values during phases with low sex hormone levels, while the activation assessments suggest stable levels of both General and High Activation throughout the menstrual cycle. Similar patterns of change have been shown for reaction times in visual and auditory sensory modalities. Reaction times were shorter during phases characterized by high sex hormone levels, while phases with low hormone levels were associated with longer reaction times. From the modified text on correlations in the data analysis section, it is evident that they were calculated from averaged data from all phases of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, they do not reflect intraindividual but rather interindividual variations between the observed variables, and are not related to the hypotheses of this paper.

  10. The effects of sodium oxybate on core body and skin temperature regulation in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Pijl, Hanno; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert J; Van Someren, Eus J W; Fronczek, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering from narcolepsy type 1 show altered skin temperatures, resembling the profile that is related to sleep onset in healthy controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of sodium oxybate, a widely used drug to treat narcolepsy, on the 24-h profiles of temperature and sleep-wakefulness in patients with narcolepsy and controls. Eight hypocretin-deficient male narcolepsy type 1 patients and eight healthy matched controls underwent temperature measurement of core body and proximal and distal skin twice, and the sleep-wake state for 24 h. After the baseline assessment, 2 × 3 g of sodium oxybate was administered for 5 nights, immediately followed by the second assessment. At baseline, daytime core body temperature and proximal skin temperature were significantly lower in patients with narcolepsy (core: 36.8 ± 0.05 °C versus 37.0 ± 0.05 °C, F = 8.31, P = 0.01; proximal: 33.4 ± 0.26 °C versus 34.3 ± 0.26 °C, F = 5.66, P = 0.03). In patients, sodium oxybate administration increased proximal skin temperature during the day (F = 6.46, P = 0.04) to a level similar as in controls, but did not affect core body temperature, distal temperature or distal-proximal temperature gradient. Sodium oxybate administration normalised the predictive value of distal skin temperature and distal-proximal temperature gradient for the onset of daytime naps (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sodium oxybate administration resulted in a partial normalisation of the skin temperature profile, by increasing daytime proximal skin temperature, and by strengthening the known relationship between skin temperature and daytime sleep propensity. These changes seem to be related to the clinical improvement induced by sodium oxybate treatment. A causal relationship is not proven.

  11. Seasonal patterns in body temperature of free-living rock hyrax (Procavia capensis).

    PubMed

    Brown, Kelly J; Downs, Colleen T

    2006-01-01

    Rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) are faced with large daily fluctuations in ambient temperature during summer and winter. In this study, peritoneal body temperature of free-living rock hyrax was investigated. During winter, when low ambient temperatures and food supply prevail, rock hyrax maintained a lower core body temperature relative to summer. In winter body temperatures during the day were more variable than at night. This daytime variability is likely a result of body temperatures being raised from basking in the sun. Body temperatures recorded during winter never fell to low levels recorded in previous laboratory studies. During summer ambient temperatures exceeded the thermoneutral zone of the rock hyrax throughout most of the day, while crevice temperatures remained within the thermoneutral zone of rock hyrax. However, in summer variation in core body temperature was small. Minimum and maximum body temperatures did not coincide with minimum and maximum ambient temperatures. Constant body temperatures were also recorded when ambient temperatures reached lethal limits. During summer it is likely that rock hyrax select cooler refugia to escape lethal temperatures and to prevent excessive water loss. Body temperature of rock hyrax recorded in this study reflects the adaptability of this animal to the wide range of ambient temperatures experienced in its natural environment.

  12. Sex, season, and time of day interact to affect body temperatures of the Giant Gartersnake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.; Halstead, B.J.; Gregory, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    1.We examined multiple hypotheses regarding differences in body temperatures of the Giant Gartersnake using temperature-sensitive radio telemetry and an information-theoretic analytical approach.2.Giant Gartersnakes selected body temperatures near 30 ??C, and males and females had similar body temperatures most of the year, except during the midsummer gestation period.3.Seasonal differences in the body temperatures of males and females may relate to both the costs associated with thermoregulatory behavior, such as predation, and the benefits associated with maintaining optimal body temperatures, such as successful incubation.

  13. Seasonal variation in body mass, body temperature and thermogenesis in the Hwamei, Garrulax canorus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mei-Xiu; Zhou, Li-Meng; Zhao, Li-Dan; Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    The basal thermogenesis of birds is beginning to be viewed as a highly flexible physiological trait influenced by environmental fluctuations, particularly changes in ambient temperature (Ta). Many birds living in regions with seasonal fluctuations in Ta typically respond to cold by increasing their insulation and adjusting their metabolic rate. To understand these metabolic adaptations, body temperature (Tb), metabolic rate (MR), thermal neutral zone (TNZ) and thermal conductance were measured within a range of temperatures from 5 to 40°C in free-living Hwamei, Garrulax canorus, in both winter and summer. Body mass was 61.2±0.3g in winter and 55.5±1.0g in summer, and mean Tb was 41.6±0.1°C in winter and 42.3±0.1°C in summer. TNZ was between 28.3 and 35.1°C in winter and between 28.7 and 33.2°C in summer. The mean basal metabolic rate (BMR) within TNZ was 203.32±11.81ml O2 h(-1) in winter and 168.99±6.45ml O2 h(-1) in summer. Minimum thermal conductance was 3.73±0.09joulesg(-1)h(-1)°C(-1) in winter and 3.26±0.06joulesg(-1)h(-1)°C(-1) in summer. Birds caught in winter had higher body mass, MR, and more variable TNZ than those in summer. The increased winter BMR indicates improved ability to cope with cold and maintenance of a high Tb. These results show that the Hwamei's metabolism is not constant, but exhibits pronounced seasonal phenotypic flexibility associated with maintenance of a high Tb.

  14. Ways to measure body temperature in the field.

    PubMed

    Langer, Franz; Fietz, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    Body temperature (Tb) represents one of the key parameters in ecophysiological studies with focus on energy saving strategies. In this study we therefore comparatively evaluated the usefulness of two types of temperature-sensitive passive transponders (LifeChips and IPTT-300) and one data logger (iButton, DS1922L) mounted onto a collar to measure Tb in the field. First we tested the accuracy of all three devices in a water bath with water temperature ranging from 0 to 40°C. Second, we evaluated the usefulness of the LifeChips and the modified iButtons for measuring Tb of small heterothermic mammals under field conditions. For this work we subcutaneously implanted 14 male edible dormice (Glis glis) with transponders, and equipped another 14 males with data loggers to simultaneously record Tb and oxygen consumption with a portable oxygen analyzer (Oxbox). In one individual we recorded Tb with both devices and analyzed recorded Tb patterns. LifeChips are able to measure temperature within the smallest range from 25 to 40°C with an accuracy of 0.07±0.12°C. IPTT-300 transponders measured temperature between 10 and 40°C, but accuracy decreased considerably at values below 30°C, with maximal deviations of nearly 7°C. An individual calibration of each transponder is therefore needed, before using it at low Tbs. The accuracy of the data logger was comparatively good (0.12±0.25°C) and stable over the whole temperature range tested (0-40°C). In all three devices, the repeatability of measurements was high. LifeChip transponders as well as modified iButtons measured Tb reliably under field conditions. Simultaneous Tb-recordings in one edible dormouse with an implanted LifeChip and a collar-mounted iButton revealed that values of both measurements were closely correlated. Taken together, we conclude that implanted temperature-sensitive transponders represent an appropriate and largely non-invasive method to measure Tb also under field conditions. Copyright © 2014

  15. Evaluation of a rotary laser body scanner for body volume and fat assessment.

    PubMed

    Pepper, M Reese; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H; Yu, Wurong; Stanforth, Philip R; Xu, Bugao

    2010-07-08

    This paper reports the evaluation tests on the reliability and validity of a 3-dimensional (3D) laser body scanner for estimation of body volume and % fat. Repeated measures of body imaging were performed for reproducibility analysis. Validity of the instrument was assessed by comparison of measures of body volume by imaging to hydrodensitometry, and body fat was compared to hydrodensitometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Reproducibility analysis showed little difference between within-subjects measurements of volume (ICC ≥ 0.99, p < 0.01). Body volume estimations by laser body scanner and hydrodensitometry were strongly related (r = 0.99, p < 0.01), and agreement was high (ICC = 0.99, p < 0.01). Measurements of % body fat also agreed strongly with each other between methods (ICC = 0.86, p < 0.01), and mean % fat estimates by body imaging did not differ from criterion methods (p > 0.05). These findings indicate that the 3D laser body scanner is a reliable and valid technique for the estimation of body volume. Furthermore, body imaging is an accurate measure of body fat, as compared to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. This new instrument is promising as a quick, simple to use, and inexpensive method of body composition analysis.

  16. Evaluation of a rotary laser body scanner for body volume and fat assessment

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, M. Reese; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H.; Yu, Wurong; Stanforth, Philip R.; Xu, Bugao

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the evaluation tests on the reliability and validity of a 3-dimensional (3D) laser body scanner for estimation of body volume and % fat. Repeated measures of body imaging were performed for reproducibility analysis. Validity of the instrument was assessed by comparison of measures of body volume by imaging to hydrodensitometry, and body fat was compared to hydrodensitometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Reproducibility analysis showed little difference between within-subjects measurements of volume (ICC ≥ 0.99, p < 0.01). Body volume estimations by laser body scanner and hydrodensitometry were strongly related (r = 0.99, p < 0.01), and agreement was high (ICC = 0.99, p < 0.01). Measurements of % body fat also agreed strongly with each other between methods (ICC = 0.86, p < 0.01), and mean % fat estimates by body imaging did not differ from criterion methods (p > 0.05). These findings indicate that the 3D laser body scanner is a reliable and valid technique for the estimation of body volume. Furthermore, body imaging is an accurate measure of body fat, as compared to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. This new instrument is promising as a quick, simple to use, and inexpensive method of body composition analysis. PMID:21552454

  17. The effect of body fat percentage and body fat distribution on skin surface temperature with infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Salamunes, Ana Carla Chierighini; Stadnik, Adriana Maria Wan; Neves, Eduardo Borba

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to search for relations between body fat percentage and skin temperature and to describe possible effects on skin temperature as a result of fat percentage in each anatomical site. Women (26.11±4.41 years old) (n =123) were tested for: body circumferences; skin temperatures (thermal camera); fat percentage and lean mass from trunk, upper and lower limbs; and body fat percentage (Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry). Values of minimum (TMi), maximum (TMa), and mean temperatures (TMe) were acquired in 30 regions of interest. Pearson's correlation was estimated for body circumferences and skin temperature variables with body fat percentage. Participants were divided into groups of high and low fat percentage of each body segment, of which TMe values were compared with Student's t-test. Linear regression models for predicting body fat percentage were tested. Body fat percentage was positively correlated with body circumferences and palm temperatures, while it was negatively correlated with most temperatures, such as TMa and TMe of posterior thighs (r =-0.495 and -0.432), TMe of posterior lower limbs (r =-0.488), TMa of anterior thighs (r =-0.406) and TMi and TMe of posterior arms (r =-0.447 and -0.430). Higher fat percentages in the specific anatomical sites tended to decrease TMe, especially in posterior thighs, shanks and arms. Skin temperatures and body circumferences predicted body fat percentage with 58.3% accuracy (R =0.764 and R(2) =0.583). This study clarifies that skin temperature distribution is influenced by the fat percentage of each body segment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal environment assessment reliability using temperature--humidity indices.

    PubMed

    d'Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor; Riccio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A reliable assessment of the thermal environment should take into account the whole of the six parameters affecting the thermal sensation (air temperature, air velocity, humidity, mean radiant temperature, metabolic rate and thermo-physical properties of clothing). Anyway, the need of a quick evaluation based on few measurements and calculations has leaded to like best temperature-humidity indices instead of rational methods based on the heat balance on the human body. Among these, Canadian Humidex, preliminarily used only for weather forecasts, is becoming more and more widespread for a generalized assessment of both outdoor and indoor thermal environments. This custom arouses great controversies since using an index validated in outdoor conditions does not assure its indoor reliability. Moreover is it really possible to carry out the thermal environment assessment ignoring some of variables involved in the physiological response of the human body? Aiming to give a clear answer to these questions, this paper deals with a comparison between the assessment carried out according to the rational methods suggested by International Standards in force and the Humidex index. This combined analysis under hot stress situations (indoor and outdoor) has been preliminarily carried out; in a second phase the study deals with the indoor comfort prediction. Obtained results show that Humidex index very often leads to the underestimation of the workplace dangerousness and a poor reliability of comfort prediction when it is used in indoor situations.

  19. Circadian rhythms in bed rest: Monitoring core body temperature via heat-flux approach is superior to skin surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Mendt, Stefan; Maggioni, Martina Anna; Nordine, Michael; Steinach, Mathias; Opatz, Oliver; Belavý, Daniel; Felsenberg, Dieter; Koch, Jochim; Shang, Peng; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Stahn, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Continuous recordings of core body temperature (CBT) are a well-established approach in describing circadian rhythms. Given the discomfort of invasive CBT measurement techniques, the use of skin temperature recordings has been proposed as a surrogate. More recently, we proposed a heat-flux approach (the so-called Double Sensor) for monitoring CBT. Studies investigating the reliability of the heat-flux approach over a 24-hour period, as well as comparisons with skin temperature recordings, are however lacking. The first aim of the study was therefore to compare rectal, skin, and heat-flux temperature recordings for monitoring circadian rhythm. In addition, to assess the optimal placement of sensor probes, we also investigated the effect of different anatomical measurement sites, i.e. sensor probes positioned at the forehead vs. the sternum. Data were collected as part of the Berlin BedRest study (BBR2-2) under controlled, standardized, and thermoneutral conditions. 24-hours temperature data of seven healthy males were collected after 50 days of -6° head-down tilt bed-rest. Mean Pearson correlation coefficients indicated a high association between rectal and forehead temperature recordings (r > 0.80 for skin and Double Sensor). In contrast, only a poor to moderate relationship was observed for sensors positioned at the sternum (r = -0.02 and r = 0.52 for skin and Double Sensor, respectively). Cross-correlation analyses further confirmed the feasibility of the forehead as a preferred monitoring site. The phase difference between forehead Double Sensor and rectal recordings was not statistically different from zero (p = 0.313), and was significantly smaller than the phase difference between forehead skin and rectal temperatures (p = 0.016). These findings were substantiated by cosinor analyses, revealing significant differences for mesor, amplitude, and acrophase between rectal and forehead skin temperature recordings, but not between forehead Double Sensor and rectal

  20. Overnight deep body temperature and urinary cortisol excretion in infants from economically deprived areas.

    PubMed

    Wailoo, M P; Westaway, J A; Joseph, D; Petersen, S A; Davies, T; Thompson, J R

    2003-11-01

    To assess the pattern of postnatal physiological maturation in economically deprived infants by measuring the age-related changes in deep body temperature during night-time sleep. Inner city Leicester, UK. Forty-eight infants aged 6-21 weeks from economically deprived areas and 87 control infants from more affluent areas. Average deep body temperature between 2 and 4 h after bedtime, overnight and early morning urinary cortisol excretion. Both groups showed a decline in overnight deep body temperature with age that averaged 0.030 degrees C per week (SE = 0.003). Over the age range studied, the average age-adjusted overnight temperature in the infants from deprived homes was 0.090 degrees C (SE = 0.028) higher than that for the affluent group (P = 0.001). Deprived infants had on average 51% higher overnight urinary cortisol and 80% higher morning cortisol. The differences remained when the effects of room temperature, clothing, smoking, birthweight and gestational age were taken into account. These indicators of postnatal physiological maturation suggest that infants from economically deprived homes mature less quickly. This might increase their vulnerability to illness.

  1. Water temperature, body mass and fasting heat production of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Fredy A A; Cruz, Thaline M P DA; Mourão, Gerson B; Cyrino, José Eurico P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on fasting heat production (HEf) of fish is key to develop bioenergetics models thus improving feeding management of farmed species. The core of knowledge on HEf of farmed, neotropical fish is scarce. This study assessed the effect of body mass and water temperature on standard metabolism and fasting heat production of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, an omnivore, Neotropical fresh water characin important for farming and fisheries industries all through South American continent. An automated, intermittent flow respirometry system was used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) of pacu (17 - 1,050 g) at five water temperatures: 19, 23, 26, 29 and 33 °C. Mass specific SMR increased with increasing water temperature but decreased as function of body mass. The allometric exponent for scaling HEf was 0.788, and lied in the range recorded for all studied warm-water fish. The recorded van't Hoff factor (Q10) for pacu (2.06) shows the species low response to temperature increases. The model HEf = 0.04643×W0.7882×T1.837 allows to predict HEf (kJ d-1) from body mass (W, kg) and water temperature (T, °C), and can be used in bioenergetical models for the species.

  2. Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Flouris, Andreas D; Westwood, David A; Mekjavic, Igor B; Cheung, Stephen S

    2008-10-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is an acute increase in peripheral blood flow observed during cold exposures. It is hypothesized to protect against cold injuries, yet despite continuous research it remains an unexplained phenomenon. Contrary to the traditionally held view, we propose that CIVD is a thermoregulatory reflex mechanism contributing to heat loss. Ten adults (4 females; 23.8 +/- 2.0 years) randomly underwent three 130-min exposures to -20 degrees C incorporating a 10-min moderate exercise period at the 65th min, while wearing a liquid conditioning garment (LCG) and military arctic clothing. In the pre-warming condition, rectal temperature was increased by 0.5 degrees C via the LCG before the cold exposure. In the warming condition, participants regulated the LCG throughout the cold exposure to subjective comfort. In the control condition, the LCG was worn but was not operated either before or during the cold exposure. Results demonstrated that the majority of CIVD occurred during the warming condition when the thermometrically-estimated mean body temperature (T (b)) was at its highest. A thermoregulatory pattern was identified whereby CIVD occurred soon after T (b) increased past a threshold (approximately 36.65 degrees C in warming and pre-warming; approximately 36.4 degrees C in control). When CIVD occurred, T (b) was reduced and CIVD ceased when T (b) fell below the threshold. These findings were independent of extremity temperature since CIVD episodes occurred at a large range of finger temperatures (7.2-33.5 degrees C). These observations were statistically confirmed by auto-regressive integrated moving average analysis (t = 9.602, P < 0.001). We conclude that CIVD is triggered by increased T (b) supporting the hypothesis that CIVD is a thermoregulatory mechanism contributing to heat loss.

  3. Placement of temperature probe in bovine vagina for continuous measurement of core-body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. N.; Gebremedhin, K. G.; Parkhurst, A.; Hillman, P. E.

    2015-09-01

    There has been increasing interest to measure core-body temperature in cattle using internal probes. This study examined the placement of HOBO water temperature probe with an anchor, referred to as the "sensor pack" (Hillman et al. Appl Eng Agric ASAE 25(2):291-296, 2009) in the vagina of multiparous Holstein cows under grazing conditions. Two types of anchors were used: (a) long "fingers" (4.5-6 cm), and (b) short "fingers" (3.5 cm). The long-finger anchors stayed in one position while the short-finger anchors were not stable in one position (rotate) within the vagina canal and in some cases came out. Vaginal temperatures were recorded every minute and the data collected were then analyzed using exponential mixed model regression for non-linear data. The results showed that the core-body temperatures for the short-finger anchors were lower than the long-finger anchors. This implied that the placement of the temperature sensor within the vagina cavity may affect the data collected.

  4. Placement of temperature probe in bovine vagina for continuous measurement of core-body temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, C N; Gebremedhin, K G; Parkhurst, A; Hillman, P E

    2015-09-01

    There has been increasing interest to measure core-body temperature in cattle using internal probes. This study examined the placement of HOBO water temperature probe with an anchor, referred to as the "sensor pack" (Hillman et al. Appl Eng Agric ASAE 25(2):291-296, 2009) in the vagina of multiparous Holstein cows under grazing conditions. Two types of anchors were used: (a) long "fingers" (4.5-6 cm), and (b) short "fingers" (3.5 cm). The long-finger anchors stayed in one position while the short-finger anchors were not stable in one position (rotate) within the vagina canal and in some cases came out. Vaginal temperatures were recorded every minute and the data collected were then analyzed using exponential mixed model regression for non-linear data. The results showed that the core-body temperatures for the short-finger anchors were lower than the long-finger anchors. This implied that the placement of the temperature sensor within the vagina cavity may affect the data collected.

  5. Women gaze behaviour in assessing female bodies: the effects of clothing, body size, own body composition and body satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Cundall, Amelia; Guo, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Often with minimally clothed figures depicting extreme body sizes, previous studies have shown women tend to gaze at evolutionary determinants of attractiveness when viewing female bodies, possibly for self-evaluation purposes, and their gaze distribution is modulated by own body dissatisfaction level. To explore to what extent women's body-viewing gaze behaviour is affected by clothing type, dress size, subjective measurements of regional body satisfaction and objective measurements of own body composition (e.g., chest size, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio), in this self-paced body attractiveness and body size judgement experiment, we compared healthy, young women's gaze distributions when viewing female bodies in tight and loose clothing of different dress sizes. In contrast to tight clothing, loose clothing biased gaze away from the waist-hip to the leg region, and subsequently led to enhanced body attractiveness ratings and body size underestimation for larger female bodies, indicating the important role of clothing in mediating women's body perception. When viewing preferred female bodies, women's higher satisfaction of a specific body region was associated with an increased gaze towards neighbouring body areas, implying satisfaction might reduce the need for comparison of confident body parts; furthermore undesirable body composition measurements were correlated with a gaze avoidance process if the construct was less changeable (i.e. chest size) but a gaze comparison process if the region was more changeable (i.e. body mass index, dress size). Clearly, own body satisfaction and body composition measurements had an evident impact on women's body-viewing gaze allocation, possibly through different cognitive processes.

  6. Caloric restriction and longevity: effects of reduced body temperature.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Andres E; Flouris, Andreas D

    2011-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) causes a reduction in body temperature (T(b)) which is suggested to contribute to changes that increase lifespan. Moreover, low T(b) has been shown to improve health and longevity independent of CR. In this review we examine the connections between CR, T(b) and mechanisms that influence longevity and ageing. Recent findings regarding the overlapping mechanisms of CR and T(b) that benefit longevity are discussed, including changes in body composition, hormone regulation, and gene expression, as well as reductions in low-level inflammation and reactive oxygen species-induced molecular damage. This information is summarized in a model describing how CR and low T(b), both synergistically and independently, increase lifespan. Moreover, the nascent notion that the rate of ageing may be pre-programmed in response to environmental influences at critical periods of early development is also considered. Based on current evidence, it is concluded that low T(b) plays an integral role in mediating the effects of CR on health and longevity, and that low T(b) may exert independent biological changes that increase lifespan. Our understanding of the overlap between CR- and T(b)-mediated longevity remains incomplete and should be explored in future research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Body temperature regulation: Sasang typology-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duong Duc; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-12-01

    Global warming induces a dramatic elevation of heat-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Individual variation of heat stress vulnerability depends on various factors such as age, gender, living area and conditions, health status, and individual innate characteristics. Sasang typology is a unique form of Korean traditional medicine, which is based on the hypothesis that constitution-specific traits of an individual determine the particular distinctive tendency in various aspects, including responses to the external environment. Recent scientific evidence shows that Sasang types differ in body composition, metabolic profile, susceptibility to certain disease patterns, and perspiration. This review aims to interpret these findings under the context of heat balance consisting of heat production (Hprod), heat loss (Hloss), and heat load (Hload). Based on the published data, at a given body mass, the TaeEum type tended to have a lower Hprod at rest and at the exhaustion state, which may indicate the lower metabolic efficiency of this type. Meanwhile, the surface-to-mass ratio and heat capacity of the TaeEum type appear to be lower, implying a lower heat dissipation capacity and heat storage tolerance. Thus, because of these characteristics, the TaeEum type seems to be more vulnerable to heat stress than the other constitutions. Differences in temperature regulation across constitutional types should be taken into account in daily physical activity, health management, and medical research.

  8. Sex Hormones, Sleep, and Core Body Temperature in Older Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patricia J.; Campbell, Scott S.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Assessment of relationships between polysomnographic sleep, sex hormones, and core body temperature in postmenopausal women. Design and Participants: Ten women aged 57 to 71 years, at least 5 years past menopause. Setting: Laboratory of Human Chronobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Lower estradiol (E2) and higher luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were significantly correlated with indices of poor sleep quality. Relationships between LH and polysomnographic variables were more robust than those for E2. Significant increases from basal LH levels (i.e., LH pulses) occurred more frequently after sleep onset than prior to sleep onset, and 30 of 32 of these LH pulses occurred prior to long awakenings from sleep. In addition, higher body core temperature prior to and during sleep was significantly correlated with poorer sleep efficiency and higher LH levels. Conclusions: Most investigations of relationships between sleep, sex hormones, and body temperature have focused on perimenopausal women, menopausal phenomena such as hot flashes, the role of declining estrogen, and treatment with exogenous estrogen. The current results suggest that altered levels of both sex steroids and gonadotropins may contribute to sleep disturbance in older women and confirm the results of previous studies indicating that higher body core temperature is associated with poorer sleep quality, even in women without vasomotor symptoms. The findings also raise the possibility of alternate treatment avenues for menopause- and age-related sleep disturbance that focus on altering LH levels. Citation: Murphy PJ; Campbell SS. Sex hormones, sleep, and core body temperature in older postmenopausal women. SLEEP 2007;30(12):1788-1794. PMID:18246988

  9. Self-assessment of attractiveness of persons with body decoration.

    PubMed

    Kozieł, S; Sitek, A

    2013-08-01

    Tattoos and body piercing are forms of body decoration that have been known for ages. The use of such ornamentation is becoming more and more common. Researchers attempt to explain the meaning of this phenomenon within the discipline of behavioural ecology, attributing a sexual selection aspect to body decoration, and thus interpreting it in an evolutionary sense. The hypothesis that superior biological quality of individuals is indicated by body modification is becoming more and more popular. In the present study, this hypothesis is tested on the basis of physical attractiveness as an indicator of genotype quality. The total of 64 males and 52 females with tattoos and body piercings were subjected to tests consisting of the self-assessment of the attractiveness of their bodies. The control group comprised 86 subjects (38 males and 48 females) without body decoration. The results confirm that both women and men with body decoration assess the attractiveness of different parts of their bodies higher (regardless whether the decoration is located there or not) than people without tattoos and body piercing. Thus, the hypothesis has been confirmed that body decoration is a signal of superior biological quality of individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. 17 degrees Celsius body temperature--resuscitation successful?

    PubMed

    Hungerer, Sven; Ebenhoch, Michael; Bühren, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The resuscitation of patients with accidental profound hypothermia is challenging. A 17-year-old man got lost on the first of January, after a New Year's Eve party in the foothills of the Alps. After a search of four hours, he was found unconscious with fixed pupils, a Glasgow Coma Scale of three points, and a body temperature below 20° Celsius. There were no signs for traumatic injuries. Initial electrocardiogram (ECG) showed no heart activity. Basic life support was begun by the mountain rescue service and continued by the medical helicopter team. The patient was transferred under continuous cardiac massage, airway management with intubation and intravenous line via external jugular vein by helicopter to the nearest hospital for analysis of serum potassium. Body temperature was 17°C measured by urinary bladder electronic thermometer. The serum potassium was 7.55 mmol/L, therefore the patient was transferred by helicopter to the next cardiovascular center for rewarming with extracorporal circulation (ECC). Under the rewarming process with ECC, the heart activity restarted at 25°C with external defibrillation. The patient was rewarmed to 37.2°C after four hours of ECC. Cerebral CT scans after 24 h and 48 h revealed no significant hypoxia and after extubation the early rehabilitation process started. After six weeks, the patient regained the ability to walk and started to communicate on a basic level. After 54 days the patient presented signs of septic shock. After initial stabilization and CT diagnostic, a laparotomy was performed. The intraoperative finding was a total necrosis of the small bowel and colon. The patient died on the same day. Post mortem examination showed a necrotizing enterocolitis with transmural necrosis of the bowel. Survivors of uncontrolled profound hypothermia below 20°C core temperature are rare. The epicrisis is often prolonged by complications of different causes. The present case reports a necrotizing enterocolitis with a non

  11. Effects of body temperature during exercise training on myocardial adaptations.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B; Starnes, J W

    2001-05-01

    This study determined the role of body temperature during chronic exercise on myocardial stress proteins and antioxidant enzymes as well as functional recovery after an ischemic insult. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exercised for 3, 6, or 9 wk in a 23 degrees C room (3WK, 6WK, and 9WK, respectively) or in a 4-8 degrees C environment with wetted fur (3WKC, 6WKC, and 9WKC, respectively). The colder room prevented elevations in core temperature. During weeks 3-9 the animals ran 5 days/wk up a 6% grade at 20 m/min for 60 min. Myocardial heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) increased 12.3-fold (P < 0.05) in 9WK versus sedentary (SED) rats but was unchanged in the cold-room runners. Compared with SED rats, alphaB-crystallin was 90% higher in 9WKC animals, HSP 90 was 50% higher in 3WKC and 6WKC animals, and catalase was 23% higher in 3WK animals (P < 0.05 for all). Cytosolic superoxide dismutase increased and mitochondrial SOD decreased (P < 0.05) in 3WK and 6WK rats compared with 3WKC and 6WKC rats. Antioxidant enzymes returned to SED values in all runners by 9 wk. No differences were observed among any of the groups for glucose-regulated protein 75, heme oxygenase-1, or glutathione peroxidase. Mechanical recovery of isolated working hearts after 22.5 min of global ischemia was enhanced in 9WK (P < 0.05) but not in 9WKC rats. We conclude that exercise training results in dynamic changes in cardioprotective proteins over time which are influenced by core temperature. In addition, cardioprotection resulting from chronic exercise appears to be due to increased HSP 70.

  12. Locomotor Activity and Body Temperature Patterns over a Temperature Gradient in the Highveld Mole-Rat (Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae).

    PubMed

    Haupt, Meghan; Bennett, Nigel C; Oosthuizen, Maria K

    2017-01-01

    African mole-rats are strictly subterranean mammals that live in extensive burrow systems. High humidity levels in the burrows prevent mole-rats from thermoregulating using evaporative cooling. However, the relatively stable environment of the burrows promotes moderate temperatures and small daily temperature fluctuations. Mole-rats therefore display a relatively wide range of thermoregulation abilities. Some species cannot maintain their body temperatures at a constant level, whereas others employ behavioural thermoregulation. Here we test the effect of ambient temperature on locomotor activity and body temperature, and the relationship between the two parameters, in the highveld mole-rat. We exposed mole-rats to a 12L:12D and a DD light cycle at ambient temperatures of 30°C, 25°C and 20°C while locomotor activity and body temperature were measured simultaneously. In addition, we investigated the endogenous rhythms of locomotor activity and body temperature at different ambient temperatures. Mole-rats displayed nocturnal activity at all three ambient temperatures and were most active at 20°C, but least active at 30°C. Body temperature was highest at 30°C and lowest at 20°C, and the daily cycle was highly correlated with locomotor activity. We show that the mole-rats have endogenous rhythms for both locomotor activity and body temperature. However, the endogenous body temperature rhythm appears to be less robust compared to the locomotor activity rhythm. Female mole-rats appear to be more sensitive to temperature changes than males, increased heterothermy is evident at lower ambient temperatures, whilst males show smaller variation in their body temperatures with changing ambient temperatures. Mole-rats may rely more heavily on behavioural thermoregulation as it is more energy efficient in an already challenging environment.

  13. Locomotor Activity and Body Temperature Patterns over a Temperature Gradient in the Highveld Mole-Rat (Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae)

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Meghan; Bennett, Nigel C.

    2017-01-01

    African mole-rats are strictly subterranean mammals that live in extensive burrow systems. High humidity levels in the burrows prevent mole-rats from thermoregulating using evaporative cooling. However, the relatively stable environment of the burrows promotes moderate temperatures and small daily temperature fluctuations. Mole-rats therefore display a relatively wide range of thermoregulation abilities. Some species cannot maintain their body temperatures at a constant level, whereas others employ behavioural thermoregulation. Here we test the effect of ambient temperature on locomotor activity and body temperature, and the relationship between the two parameters, in the highveld mole-rat. We exposed mole-rats to a 12L:12D and a DD light cycle at ambient temperatures of 30°C, 25°C and 20°C while locomotor activity and body temperature were measured simultaneously. In addition, we investigated the endogenous rhythms of locomotor activity and body temperature at different ambient temperatures. Mole-rats displayed nocturnal activity at all three ambient temperatures and were most active at 20°C, but least active at 30°C. Body temperature was highest at 30°C and lowest at 20°C, and the daily cycle was highly correlated with locomotor activity. We show that the mole-rats have endogenous rhythms for both locomotor activity and body temperature. However, the endogenous body temperature rhythm appears to be less robust compared to the locomotor activity rhythm. Female mole-rats appear to be more sensitive to temperature changes than males, increased heterothermy is evident at lower ambient temperatures, whilst males show smaller variation in their body temperatures with changing ambient temperatures. Mole-rats may rely more heavily on behavioural thermoregulation as it is more energy efficient in an already challenging environment. PMID:28072840

  14. Initial Findings Using an Alternative Assessment of Body Shape Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryujin, Donald H.; And Others

    Due to concerns that body shape preferences contribute to eating disorders among women, a new method to assess observer preferences for female body shapes was devised. In prior studies women have preferred thin models, but men have preferred models of average weight. In Experiment 1, an underweight female model was photographed in a white top and…

  15. [Measuring body temperature in dairy cows--applications and influencing factors].

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; Suthar, V; Heuwieser, W

    2013-01-01

    Measuring body temperature plays an integral role in early puerperal cow monitoring programs. Furthermore, body temperature is part of the definition of puerperal metritis. Antibiotic treatment decisions are based on body temperature in several international publications on intervention strategies widely adopted in the modern dairy industry. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the most recent publications on this important criterion. Several factors can influence the measurement of the body temperature (type of thermometer, insertion depth, skills of the investigator) as well as the cow's body temperature (days in milk, parity, time of the day, climate at calving). Furthermore, the occurrence of increased body temperature in healthy cows was demonstrated independently by several investigations. In ambiguous cases (e.g. raised body temperature as the only symptom) results should be interpreted with caution.

  16. [Measurement Error Analysis and Calibration Technique of NTC - Based Body Temperature Sensor].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chi; Hu, Wei; Diao, Shengxi; Lin, Fujiang; Qian, Dahong

    2015-11-01

    A NTC thermistor-based wearable body temperature sensor was designed. This paper described the design principles and realization method of the NTC-based body temperature sensor. In this paper the temperature measurement error sources of the body temperature sensor were analyzed in detail. The automatic measurement and calibration method of ADC error was given. The results showed that the measurement accuracy of calibrated body temperature sensor is better than ± 0.04 degrees C. The temperature sensor has high accuracy, small size and low power consumption advantages.

  17. On the average temperature of airless spherical bodies and the magnitude of Earth's atmospheric thermal effect.

    PubMed

    Volokin, Den; ReLlez, Lark

    2014-01-01

    The presence of atmosphere can appreciably warm a planet's surface above the temperature of an airless environment. Known as a natural Greenhouse Effect (GE), this near-surface Atmospheric Thermal Enhancement (ATE) as named herein is presently entirely attributed to the absorption of up-welling long-wave radiation by greenhouse gases. Often quoted as 33 K for Earth, GE is estimated as a difference between planet's observed mean surface temperature and an effective radiating temperature calculated from the globally averaged absorbed solar flux using the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) radiation law. This approach equates a planet's average temperature in the absence of greenhouse gases or atmosphere to an effective emission temperature assuming ATE ≡ GE. The SB law is also routinely employed to estimating the mean temperatures of airless bodies. We demonstrate that this formula as applied to spherical objects is mathematically incorrect owing to Hölder's inequality between integrals and leads to biased results such as a significant underestimation of Earth's ATE. We derive a new expression for the mean physical temperature of airless bodies based on an analytic integration of the SB law over a sphere that accounts for effects of regolith heat storage and cosmic background radiation on nighttime temperatures. Upon verifying our model against Moon surface temperature data provided by the NASA Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we propose it as a new analytic standard for evaluating the thermal environment of airless bodies. Physical evidence is presented that Earth's ATE should be assessed against the temperature of an equivalent airless body such as the Moon rather than a hypothetical atmosphere devoid of greenhouse gases. Employing the new temperature formula we show that Earth's total ATE is ~90 K, not 33 K, and that ATE = GE + TE, where GE is the thermal effect of greenhouse gases, while TE > 15 K is a thermodynamic enhancement independent of the

  18. Computerized assessment of body image in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: comparison with standardized body image assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Asaf; Amiaz, Revital; Davidson, Noa; Czerniak, Efrat; Gur, Eitan; Kiryati, Nahum; Harari, Daniel; Furst, Miriam; Stein, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Body image disturbances are a prominent feature of eating disorders (EDs). Our aim was to test and evaluate a computerized assessment of body image (CABI), to compare the body image disturbances in different ED types, and to assess the factors affecting body image. The body image of 22 individuals undergoing inpatient treatment with restricting anorexia nervosa (AN-R), 22 with binge/purge AN (AN-B/P), 20 with bulimia nervosa (BN), and 41 healthy controls was assessed using the Contour Drawing Rating Scale (CDRS), the CABI, which simulated the participants' self-image in different levels of weight changes, and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2-Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-2-BD) scale. Severity of depression and anxiety was also assessed. Significant differences were found among the three scales assessing body image, although most of their dimensions differentiated between patients with EDs and controls. Our findings support the use of the CABI in the comparison of body image disturbances in patients with EDs vs.

  19. Effects of whole body cryotherapy and cold water immersion on knee skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Costello, J T; Donnelly, A E; Karki, A; Selfe, J

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to (a) compare and contrast the effect of 2 commonly used cryotherapy treatments, 4 min of -110 °C whole body cryotherapy and 8 °C cold water immersion, on knee skin temperature and (b) establish whether either protocol was capable of achieving a skin temperature (<13 °C) believed to be required for analgesic purposes. After ethics committee approval and written informed consent was obtained, 10 healthy males (26.5±4.9 yr, 183.5±6.0 cm, 90.7±19.9 kg, 26.8±5.0 kg/m2, 23.0±9.3% body fat; mean±SD) participated in this randomised controlled crossover study. Skin temperature around the patellar region was assessed in both knees via non-contact, infrared thermal imaging and recorded pre-, immediately post-treatment and every 10 min thereafter for 60 min. Compared to baseline, average, minimum and maximum skin temperatures were significantly reduced (p<0.001) immediately post-treatment and at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min after both cooling modalities. Average and minimum skin temperatures were lower (p<0.05) immediately after whole body cryotherapy (19.0±0.9 °C) compared to cold water immersion (20.5±0.6 °C). However, from 10 to 60 min post, the average, minimum and maximum skin temperatures were lower (p<0.05) following the cold water treatment. Finally, neither protocol achieved a skin temperature believed to be required to elicit an analgesic effect.

  20. Nonlinear effects of temperature on body form and developmental canalization in the threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Ramler, D; Mitteroecker, P; Shama, L N S; Wegner, K M; Ahnelt, H

    2014-03-01

    Theoretical models predict that nonlinear environmental effects on the phenotype also affect developmental canalization, which in turn can influence the tempo and course of organismal evolution. Here, we used an oceanic population of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to investigate temperature-induced phenotypic plasticity of body size and shape using a paternal half-sibling, split-clutch experimental design and rearing offspring under three different temperature regimes (13, 17 and 21 °C). Body size and shape of 466 stickleback individuals were assessed by a set of 53 landmarks and analysed using geometric morphometric methods. At approximately 100 days, individuals differed significantly in both size and shape across the temperature groups. However, the temperature-induced differences between 13 and 17 °C (mainly comprising relative head and eye size) deviated considerably from those between 17 and 21 °C (involving the relative size of the ectocoracoid, the operculum and the ventral process of the pelvic girdle). Body size was largest at 17 °C. For both size and shape, phenotypic variance was significantly smaller at 17 °C than at 13 and 21 °C, indicating that development is most stable at the intermediate temperature matching the conditions encountered in the wild. Higher additive genetic variance at 13 and 21 °C indicates that the plastic response to temperature had a heritable basis. Understanding nonlinear effects of temperature on development and the underlying genetics are important for modelling evolution and for predicting outcomes of global warming, which can lead not only to shifts in average morphology but also to destabilization of development.

  1. Manipulation of Core Body and Skin Temperature Improves Vigilance and Maintenance of Wakefulness in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fronczek, Rolf; Raymann, Roy J.E.M.; Romeijn, Nico; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Fischer, Maria; van Dijk, J. Gert; Lammers, Gert Jan; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Impaired vigilance and sleepiness are two major daily complaints of patients with narcolepsy. We previously showed their sleepiness to be correlated to an abnormally regulated skin temperature, i.e., increased distal skin temperature compared with proximal skin temperature. Objective: Our goal was to investigate a possible causal contribution of skin temperature disturbances to impairments in the ability to maintain vigilance and wakefulness in narcolepsy. Design: In a modified constant routine protocol, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) were repeatedly assessed. Meanwhile, skin and core body temperatures were mildly manipulated within the thermoneutral range of the normal diurnal rhythm using a thermosuit and hot or cold food and drinks. Setting: Tertiary narcolepsy referral center in a university hospital Patients or Other Participants: Eight patients (5 males) diagnosed with narcolepsy with cataplexy according to the ICSD-2 criteria (mean age ± SD: 28.6 ± 6.4, range 18-35 years). Intervention(s): None Main Outcome Measure(s): MWT sleep latency and PVT response speed. Results: Compared to core cooling, core warming attenuated the typical decline in PVT response speed with increasing time-on-task by 25% (P = 0.02). Compared to distal skin warming, distal skin cooling increased the time that the patients were able to maintain wakefulness by 24% (distal warming: 1.88 min. vs. distal warming: 2.34 min.; P < 0.01). Conclusions: Core body and skin temperatures causally affect vigilance and sleepiness in narcolepsy. This could lead to future practical applications. Citation: Fronczek R; Raymann RJEM; Romeijn N; Overeem S; Fischer M; van Dijk JG; Lammers GJ; Van Someren EJW. Manipulation of core body and skin temperature improves vigilance and maintenance of wakefulness in narcolepsy. SLEEP 2008;31(2):233-240. PMID:18274271

  2. Critical body temperature profile as indicator of heat stress vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Nag, P K; Dutta, Priya; Nag, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Extreme climatic heat is a major health concern among workers in different occupational pursuits. People in the regions of western India confront frequent heat emergencies, with great risk of mortality and morbidity. Taking account of informal occupational groups (foundry and sheet metal, FSM, N=587; ceramic and pottery, CP, N=426; stone quarry, SQ, N=934) in different seasons, the study examined the body temperature profiling as indicator of vulnerability to environmental warmth. About 3/4th of 1947 workers had habitual exposure at 30.1-35.5°C WBGT and ~10% of them were exposed to 38.2-41.6°C WBGT. The responses of FSM, CP and SQ workers indicated prevailing high heat load during summer and post-monsoon months. Local skin temperatures (T(sk)) varied significantly in different seasons, with consistently high level in summer, followed by post-monsoon and winter months. The mean difference of T(cr) and T(sk) was ~5.2°C up to 26.7°C WBGT, and ~2.5°C beyond 30°C WBGT. Nearly 90% of the workers had T(cr) within 38°C, suggesting their self-adjustment strategy in pacing work and regulating T(cr). In extreme heat, the limit of peripheral adjustability (35-36°C T(sk)) and the narrowing down of the difference between T(cr) and T(sk) might indicate the limit of one's ability to withstand heat exposure.

  3. Statistical models for fever forecasting based on advanced body temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jorge; Miro-Martinez, Pau; Vargas, Borja; Varela-Entrecanales, Manuel; Cuesta-Frau, David

    2017-02-01

    Body temperature monitoring provides health carers with key clinical information about the physiological status of patients. Temperature readings are taken periodically to detect febrile episodes and consequently implement the appropriate medical countermeasures. However, fever is often difficult to assess at early stages, or remains undetected until the next reading, probably a few hours later. The objective of this article is to develop a statistical model to forecast fever before a temperature threshold is exceeded to improve the therapeutic approach to the subjects involved. To this end, temperature series of 9 patients admitted to a general internal medicine ward were obtained with a continuous monitoring Holter device, collecting measurements of peripheral and core temperature once per minute. These series were used to develop different statistical models that could quantify the probability of having a fever spike in the following 60 minutes. A validation series was collected to assess the accuracy of the models. Finally, the results were compared with the analysis of some series by experienced clinicians. Two different models were developed: a logistic regression model and a linear discrimination analysis model. Both of them exhibited a fever peak forecasting accuracy greater than 84%. When compared with experts' assessment, both models identified 35 (97.2%) of 36 fever spikes. The models proposed are highly accurate in forecasting the appearance of fever spikes within a short period in patients with suspected or confirmed febrile-related illnesses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The reaction of human surface and inside body temperature to extreme hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Panchenko, O A; Onishchenko, V O; Liakh, Iu Ie

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in the parameters of the surface and core body temperature under the systematic impact of ultra-low temperature is described in this article. As a source of ultra-low temperature was used (Cryo Therapy Chamber) Zimmer Medizin Systeme firm Zimmer Electromedizin (Germany) (-110 degrees C). Surface and internal body temperature was measured by infrared thermometer immediately before visiting cryochamber and immediately after exiting. In the study conducted 47,464 measurements of body temperature. It was established that the internal temperature of the human body under the influence of ultra-low temperatures in the proposed mode of exposure remains constant, and the surface temperature of the body reduces by an average of 11.57 degrees C. The time frame stabilization of adaptive processes of thermoregulation under the systematic impact of ultra-low temperature was defined in the study.

  5. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on core body temperature and inflammatory response during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Ye, Luyou; Liu, Zhongtang; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Xu, Xinxian

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of irrigation fluid on the patients' physiological response to arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients who were scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were prospectively included in this study. They were randomly assigned to receive warm arthroscopic irrigation fluid (Group W, n = 33) or room temperature irrigation fluid (Group RT, n = 33) intraoperatively. Core body temperature was measured at regular intervals. The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10 were measured in drainage fluid and serum. The changes of core body temperatures in Group RT were similar with those in Group W within 15 min after induction of anesthesia, but the decreases in Group RT were significantly greater after then. The lowest temperature was 35.1 ± 0.4 °C in Group RT and 35.9 ± 0.3 °C in Group W, the difference was statistically different (P < 0.05). Hypothermia occurred in 31 out of 33 subjects in Group RT (31/33; 94 %), but was significantly lower in Group W (9/24; 27 %; P < 0.05). Serum TNF-α changes were undetectable postoperatively. No statistical significant differences in serum IL-1 and serum IL-10 levels were observed between groups. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower in Group W (P < 0.05). The levels of the above cytokines in drainage fluid were all significantly lower in Group W after surgery (P < 0.05). Hypothermia occurs more often in arthroscopic shoulder surgery by using room temperature irrigation fluid compared with warm irrigation fluid. And local inflammatory response is significantly reduced by using warm irrigation fluid. It seems that warm irrigation fluid is more recommendable for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  6. Development and Validation of the Body Size Scale for Assessing Body Weight Perception in African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Emmanuel; Bernard, Jonathan Y.; Ponty, Amandine; Ndao, Amadou; Amougou, Norbert; Saïd-Mohamed, Rihlat; Pasquet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background The social valorisation of overweight in African populations could promote high-risk eating behaviours and therefore become a risk factor of obesity. However, existing scales to assess body image are usually not accurate enough to allow comparative studies of body weight perception in different African populations. This study aimed to develop and validate the Body Size Scale (BSS) to estimate African body weight perception. Methods Anthropometric measures of 80 Cameroonians and 81 Senegalese were used to evaluate three criteria of adiposity: body mass index (BMI), overall percentage of fat, and endomorphy (fat component of the somatotype). To develop the BSS, the participants were photographed in full face and profile positions. Models were selected for their representativeness of the wide variability in adiposity with a progressive increase along the scale. Then, for the validation protocol, participants self-administered the BSS to assess self-perceived current body size (CBS), desired body size (DBS) and provide a “body self-satisfaction index.” This protocol included construct validity, test-retest reliability and convergent validity and was carried out with three independent samples of respectively 201, 103 and 1115 Cameroonians. Results The BSS comprises two sex-specific scales of photos of 9 models each, and ordered by increasing adiposity. Most participants were able to correctly order the BSS by increasing adiposity, using three different words to define body size. Test-retest reliability was consistent in estimating CBS, DBS and the “body self-satisfaction index.” The CBS was highly correlated to the objective BMI, and two different indexes assessed with the BSS were consistent with declarations obtained in interviews. Conclusion The BSS is the first scale with photos of real African models taken in both full face and profile and representing a wide and representative variability in adiposity. The validation protocol proved its

  7. Body temperature in captive long-beaked echidnas (Zaglossus bartoni).

    PubMed

    Grigg, Gordon C; Beard, Lyn A; Barnes, Julie A; Perry, Larry I; Fry, Gary J; Hawkins, Margaret

    2003-12-01

    The routine occurrence of both short-term (daily) and long-term torpor (hibernation) in short-beaked echidnas, but not platypus, raises questions about the third monotreme genus, New Guinea's Zaglossus. We measured body temperatures (T(b)) with implanted data loggers over three and a half years in two captive Zaglossus bartoni at Taronga Zoo, Sydney. The modal T(b) of both long-beaks was 31 degrees C, similar to non-hibernating short-beaked echidnas, Tachyglossus aculeatus, in the wild (30-32 degrees C) and to platypus (32 degrees C), suggesting that this is characteristic of normothermic monotremes. T(b) cycled daily, usually over 2-4 degrees C. There were some departures from this pattern to suggest periods of inactivity but nothing to indicate the occurrence of long-term torpor. In contrast, two short-beaked echidnas monitored concurrently in the same pen showed extended periods of low T(b) in the cooler months (hibernation) and short periods of torpor at any time of the year, as they do in the wild. Whether torpor or hibernation occurs in Zaglossus in the wild or in juveniles remains unknown. However, given that the environment in this study was conducive to hibernation in short-beaks, which do not easily enter torpor in captivity, and their large size, we think that torpor in wild adult Zaglossus is unlikely.

  8. Elevated body temperature during sleep in orexin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Sakurai, Takeshi; Scammell, Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Core body temperature (Tb) is influenced by many physiological factors, including behavioral state, locomotor activity, and biological rhythms. To determine the relative roles of these factors, we examined Tb in orexin knockout (KO) mice, which have a narcolepsy-like phenotype with severe sleep-wake fragmentation. Because orexin is released during wakefulness and is thought to promote heat production, we hypothesized that orexin KO mice would have lower Tb while awake. Surprisingly, Tb was the same in orexin KO mice and wild-type (WT) littermates during sustained wakefulness. Orexin KO mice had normal diurnal variations in Tb, but the ultradian rhythms of Tb, locomotor activity, and wakefulness were markedly reduced. During the first 15 min of spontaneous sleep, the Tb of WT mice decreased by 1.0 degrees C, but Tb in orexin KO mice decreased only 0.4 degrees C. Even during intense recovery sleep after 8 h of sleep deprivation, the Tb of orexin KO mice remained 0.7 degrees C higher than in WT mice. This blunted fall in Tb during sleep may be due to inadequate activation of heat loss mechanisms or sustained activity in heat-generating systems. These observations reveal an unexpected role for orexin in thermoregulation. In addition, because heat loss is an essential aspect of sleep, the blunted fall in Tb of orexin KO mice may provide an explanation for the fragmented sleep of narcolepsy.

  9. Impact of Elevated Core Body Temperature on Attention Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Jiang, Qingjun; Li, Li; Li, Bo; Yang, Zhen; Qian, Shaowen; Li, Min; Sun, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive function can be impaired after passive heat exposure and with an elevation in core body temperature (Tcore). This study examined the dynamic correlation among passive heat exposure, Tcore, and cognition. We gave the Attention Network Test of alerting, orienting, and executive control to five groups of five young men who were being exposed to a hyperthermic condition (50°C, 40% relative humidity) for 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40 minutes. We used the participants' reaction time, accuracy (correct responses), efficiency (accuracy÷reaction time), and Tcore to estimate optimal curve models for best fit of data. We could not estimate an appropriate curve model for either alerting or orienting with Tcore, change in Tcore, or duration of passive heat exposure. We estimated quadratic models for Tcore and duration (adjusted R=0.752), change in Tcore and duration (0.906), executive control score and duration (0.509), and efficiency of executive control and duration (0.293). We estimated linear models for executive control score and Tcore (0.479), efficiency of executive control and Tcore (0.261), executive control score and change in Tcore (0.279), and efficiency of executive control and change in Tcore (0.262). Different attentional abilities had different sensitivities to thermal stress. Executive control of attention deteriorated linearly with a rise in Tcore within the normal physiologic range, but deteriorated nonlinearly with longer passive heat exposure.

  10. [Central regulation of body temperature by RANKL/RANK pathway].

    PubMed

    Hanada, Reiko; Penninger, Josef M

    2011-08-01

    Receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and its specific receptor RANK are key regulators of bone remodeling, lymph node formation, establishment of the thymic microenviroment, mammary gland development during pregnancy, bone metastasis in cancer and sex-hormone, progestin, -driven breast cancer. RANKL and RANK are also expressed in the central nervous systems (CNS) especially existed in the main region of thermoregulation. Central RANKL injection to the rodents induces fever via PGE(2)/EP3R pathway. This pathway is related with inflammation related fever. On the other hand, female mice with RANK gene deletion in neuron and astrocytes show increased their basal body temperature at the dark phase, which suggests RANKL/RANK system also regulates physiological thremoregulation in female. Not only in rodents but also in human, two children with a homozygous RANK mutation exhibit an abrogated fever response in pneumonia compare with the age-matched children with pneumonia. Thus, the central RANKL/RANK pathway has an important role for thermoregulation.

  11. Body temperature - a marker of infarct size in the era of early reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dor, Itsik; Haim, Moti; Rechavia, Eldad; Murininkas, Daniel; Nahon, Merav; Harell, Daniella; Porter, Avital; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Scapa, Erez; Battler, Alexander; Hasdai, David

    2005-01-01

    We measured body temperature in 40 consecutive patients treated for a first ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with primary percutaneous coronary interventions. Left ventricular function was assessed by echocardiography, and blood samples were drawn for highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), white blood cell (WBC) count, fibrinogen, creatine kinase (CK), and cardiac troponin I levels (cTnI). The median (25th, 75th quartiles) peak 24-hour temperature was 37.4 degrees C (36.9 degrees C, 37.6 degrees C). Variables significantly associated with peak 24-hour temperature were CK (p = 0.01, r = 0.42), wall motion index (p = 0.01, r = 0.41), hs-CRP (p = 0.01, r = 0.41), and cTnI (p = 0.03, r = 0.35). There was no significant correlation between peak 24-hour temperature and WBC count (p = 0.39, r = 0.14) and fibrinogen (p = 0.12, r = 0.21). Thus, peak 24-hour body temperature after ST elevation AMI probably reflects infarct size rather than a nonspecific inflammatory response.

  12. Is higher body temperature beneficial in ischemic stroke patients with normal admission CT angiography of the cerebral arteries?

    PubMed

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Khanevski, Andrej; Nacu, Aliona; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Low body temperature is considered beneficial in ischemic stroke due to neuroprotective mechanisms, yet some studies suggest that higher temperatures may improve clot lysis and outcomes in stroke patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The effect of increased body temperature in stroke patients treated with tPA and with normal computed tomography angiography (CTA) on admission is unknown. We hypothesized a beneficial effect of higher body temperature in the absence of visible clots on CTA, possibly due to enhanced lysis of small, peripheral clots. Patients with ischemic stroke admitted to our Stroke Unit between February 2006 and April 2013 were prospectively registered in a database (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). Ischemic stroke patients treated with tPA with normal CTA of the cerebral arteries were included. Outcomes were assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 1 week. An excellent outcome was defined as mRS=0, and a favorable outcome as mRS=0-1. A total of 172 patients were included, of which 48 (27.9%) had an admission body temperature ≥37.0°C, and 124 (72.1%) had a body temperature <37.0°C. Body temperature ≥37.0°C was independently associated with excellent outcomes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-6.46; P=0.014) and favorable outcomes (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.13-4.98; P=0.015) when adjusted for confounders. We found an association between higher admission body temperature and improved outcome in tPA-treated stroke patients with normal admission CTA of the cerebral arteries. This may suggest a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis in the absence of visible clots on CTA.

  13. Is higher body temperature beneficial in ischemic stroke patients with normal admission CT angiography of the cerebral arteries?

    PubMed Central

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Khanevski, Andrej; Nacu, Aliona; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Background Low body temperature is considered beneficial in ischemic stroke due to neuroprotective mechanisms, yet some studies suggest that higher temperatures may improve clot lysis and outcomes in stroke patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The effect of increased body temperature in stroke patients treated with tPA and with normal computed tomography angiography (CTA) on admission is unknown. We hypothesized a beneficial effect of higher body temperature in the absence of visible clots on CTA, possibly due to enhanced lysis of small, peripheral clots. Methods Patients with ischemic stroke admitted to our Stroke Unit between February 2006 and April 2013 were prospectively registered in a database (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). Ischemic stroke patients treated with tPA with normal CTA of the cerebral arteries were included. Outcomes were assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 1 week. An excellent outcome was defined as mRS=0, and a favorable outcome as mRS=0–1. Results A total of 172 patients were included, of which 48 (27.9%) had an admission body temperature ≥37.0°C, and 124 (72.1%) had a body temperature <37.0°C. Body temperature ≥37.0°C was independently associated with excellent outcomes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24–6.46; P=0.014) and favorable outcomes (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.13–4.98; P=0.015) when adjusted for confounders. Conclusion We found an association between higher admission body temperature and improved outcome in tPA-treated stroke patients with normal admission CTA of the cerebral arteries. This may suggest a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis in the absence of visible clots on CTA. PMID:24482573

  14. Variation in the sensitivity of organismal body temperature to climate change over local and geographic scales.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Sarah E; Wethey, David S; Helmuth, Brian

    2006-06-20

    Global climate change is expected to have broad ecological consequences for species and communities. Attempts to forecast these consequences usually assume that changes in air or water temperature will translate into equivalent changes in a species' organismal body temperature. This simple change is unlikely because an organism's body temperature is determined by a complex series of interactions between the organism and its environment. Using a biophysical model, validated with 5 years of field observations, we examined the relationship between environmental temperature change and body temperature of the intertidal mussel Mytilus californianus over 1,600 km of its geographic distribution. We found that at all locations examined simulated changes in air or water temperature always produced less than equivalent changes in the daily maximum mussel body temperature. Moreover, the magnitude of body temperature change was highly variable, both within and among locations. A simulated 1 degrees C increase in air or water temperature raised the maximum monthly average of daily body temperature maxima by 0.07-0.92 degrees C, depending on the geographic location, vertical position, and temperature variable. We combined these sensitivities with predicted climate change for 2100 and calculated increases in monthly average maximum body temperature of 0.97-4.12 degrees C, depending on location and climate change scenario. Thus geographic variation in body temperature sensitivity can modulate species' experiences of climate change and must be considered when predicting the biological consequences of climate change.

  15. Variation in the sensitivity of organismal body temperature to climate change over local and geographic scales

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Sarah E.; Wethey, David S.; Helmuth, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to have broad ecological consequences for species and communities. Attempts to forecast these consequences usually assume that changes in air or water temperature will translate into equivalent changes in a species’ organismal body temperature. This simple change is unlikely because an organism’s body temperature is determined by a complex series of interactions between the organism and its environment. Using a biophysical model, validated with 5 years of field observations, we examined the relationship between environmental temperature change and body temperature of the intertidal mussel Mytilus californianus over 1,600 km of its geographic distribution. We found that at all locations examined simulated changes in air or water temperature always produced less than equivalent changes in the daily maximum mussel body temperature. Moreover, the magnitude of body temperature change was highly variable, both within and among locations. A simulated 1°C increase in air or water temperature raised the maximum monthly average of daily body temperature maxima by 0.07–0.92°C, depending on the geographic location, vertical position, and temperature variable. We combined these sensitivities with predicted climate change for 2100 and calculated increases in monthly average maximum body temperature of 0.97–4.12°C, depending on location and climate change scenario. Thus geographic variation in body temperature sensitivity can modulate species’ experiences of climate change and must be considered when predicting the biological consequences of climate change. PMID:16763050

  16. Estimation of Circadian Body Temperature Rhythm Based on Heart Rate in Healthy, Ambulatory Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sim, Soo Young; Joo, Kwang Min; Kim, Han Byul; Jang, Seungjin; Kim, Beomoh; Hong, Seungbum; Kim, Sungwan; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-03-01

    Core body temperature is a reliable marker for circadian rhythm. As characteristics of the circadian body temperature rhythm change during diverse health problems, such as sleep disorder and depression, body temperature monitoring is often used in clinical diagnosis and treatment. However, the use of current thermometers in circadian rhythm monitoring is impractical in daily life. As heart rate is a physiological signal relevant to thermoregulation, we investigated the feasibility of heart rate monitoring in estimating circadian body temperature rhythm. Various heart rate parameters and core body temperature were simultaneously acquired in 21 healthy, ambulatory subjects during their routine life. The performance of regression analysis and the extended Kalman filter on daily body temperature and circadian indicator (mesor, amplitude, and acrophase) estimation were evaluated. For daily body temperature estimation, mean R-R interval (RRI), mean heart rate (MHR), or normalized MHR provided a mean root mean square error of approximately 0.40 °C in both techniques. The mesor estimation regression analysis showed better performance than the extended Kalman filter. However, the extended Kalman filter, combined with RRI or MHR, provided better accuracy in terms of amplitude and acrophase estimation. We suggest that this noninvasive and convenient method for estimating the circadian body temperature rhythm could reduce discomfort during body temperature monitoring in daily life. This, in turn, could facilitate more clinical studies based on circadian body temperature rhythm.

  17. Plasticity in body temperature and metabolic capacity sustains winter activity in a small endotherm (Rattus fuscipes).

    PubMed

    Glanville, Elsa J; Seebacher, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Small mammals that remain active throughout the year at a constant body temperature have a much greater energy and food requirement in winter. Lower body temperatures in winter may offset the increased energetic cost of remaining active in the cold, if cellular metabolism is not constrained by a negative thermodynamic effect. We aimed to determine whether variable body temperatures can be advantageous for small endotherms by testing the hypothesis that body temperature fluctuates seasonally in a wild rat (Rattus fuscipes); conferring an energy saving and reducing food requirements during resource restricted winter. Additionally we tested whether changes in body temperature affected tissue specific metabolic capacity. Winter acclimatized rats had significantly lower body temperatures and thicker fur than summer acclimatized rats. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the activity of enzymes that control oxidative (citrate synthase, cytochrome c-oxidase) and anaerobic (lactate dehydrogenase) metabolism were elevated in winter and were not negatively affected by the lower body temperature. Energy transfer modeling showed that lower body temperatures in winter combined with increased fur thickness to confer a 25 kJ day(-1) energy saving, with up to 50% owing to reduced body temperature alone. We show that phenotypic plasticity at multiple levels of organization is an important component of the response of a small endotherm to winter. Mitochondrial function compensates for lower winter body temperatures, buffering metabolic heat production capacity.

  18. Procedure of rectal temperature measurement affects brain, muscle, skin, and body temperatures and modulates the effects of intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Bae, David D; Brown, P Leon; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2007-06-18

    Rectal probe thermometry is commonly used to measure body core temperature in rodents because of its ease of use. Although previous studies suggest that rectal measurement is stressful and results in long-lasting elevations in body temperatures, we evaluated how this procedure affects brain, muscle, skin, and core temperatures measured with chronically implanted thermocouple electrodes in rats. Our data suggest that the procedure of rectal measurement results in powerful locomotor activation, rapid and strong increases in brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures, as well as a biphasic, down-up fluctuation in skin temperature, matching the response pattern observed during tail-pinch, a representative stressful procedure. This response, moreover, did not habituate after repeated day-to-day testing. Repeated rectal probe insertions also modified temperature responses induced by intravenous cocaine. Under quiet resting conditions, cocaine moderately increased brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures. However, during repeated rectal measurements, which increased temperatures, cocaine induced both hyperthermic and hypothermic responses. Direct comparisons revealed that body temperatures measured by a rectal probe are typically lower (approximately 0.6 degrees C) and more variable than body temperatures recorded by chronically implanted electrodes; the difference is smaller at low and greater at high basal temperatures. Because of this difference and temperature increases induced by the rectal probe per se, cocaine had no significant effect on rectal temperatures compared to control animals exposed to repeated rectal probes. Therefore, although rectal temperature measurements provide a decent correlation with directly measured deep body temperatures, the arousing influence of this procedure may drastically modulate the effects of other arousing stimuli and drugs.

  19. FDTD computation of temperature elevation in human body for RF far-field exposure.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Asano, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in an anatomically-based human model for RF far-field exposure. First, we investigated the effect of blood temperature variation and thermoregulation modeling on body-core temperature. The modeling of blood temperature variation was found to be the dominant factor influencing the body core temperature. This is because the temperature in the inner tissues is elevated via the circulation of blood warmed due to EM absorption. For the same whole-body average SAR at different frequencies, the body-core temperature elevation was almost same, suggesting the effectiveness of the measure used in the ICNIRP guidelines. Then, we discussed the effect of sweating rate on the temperature elevation and thermal time constant of blood temperature. The uncertainty of temperature elevation due to the sweating rate was 30% or so.

  20. Effects of the Melatonin MT-1/MT-2 Agonist Ramelteon on Daytime Body Temperature and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Markwald, Rachel R.; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo L.; Burke, Tina M.; Snider, Jesse A.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: A reduction in core temperature and an increase in the distal-proximal skin gradient (DPG) are reported to be associated with shorter sleep onset latencies (SOL) and better sleep quality. Ramelteon is a melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist approved for the treatment of insomnia. At night, ramelteon has been reported to shorten SOL. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ramelteon would reduce core temperature, increase the DPG, as well as shorten SOL, reduce wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), and increase total sleep time (TST) during a daytime sleep opportunity. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Eight mg ramelteon or placebo was administered 2 h prior to a 4-h daytime sleep opportunity. Setting: Sleep and chronobiology laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy adults (5 females), aged (23.2 ± 4.2 y). Measurements and Results: Primary outcome measures included core body temperature, the DPG and sleep physiology (minutes of total sleep time [TST], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and SOL). We also assessed as secondary outcomes, proximal and distal skin temperatures, sleep staging and subjective TST. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed ramelteon significantly reduced core temperature and increased the DPG (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, ramelteon reduced WASO and increased TST, and stages 1 and 2 sleep (all P < 0.05). The change in the DPG was negatively correlated with SOL in the ramelteon condition. Conclusions: Ramelteon improved daytime sleep, perhaps mechanistically in part by reducing core temperature and modulating skin temperature. These findings suggest that ramelteon may have promise for the treatment of insomnia associated with circadian misalignment due to circadian sleep disorders. Citation: Markwald RR; Lee-Choing TL; Burke TM; Snider JA; Wright KP. Effects of the melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist ramelteon on daytime body temperature and sleep. SLEEP 2010;33(6):825-831 PMID:20550024

  1. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies.

  2. The influence of body temperature on image contrast in post mortem MRI.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Thomas D; Hatch, Gary M; Siegenthaler, Lea; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Mathier, Sandra; Thali, Michael J; Weber, Oliver M

    2012-06-01

    To assess the temperature dependency of tissue contrast on post mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) images both objectively and subjectively; and to visually demonstrate the changes of image contrast at various temperatures. The study was approved by the responsible justice department and the ethics committee. The contrast of water, fat, and muscle was measured using regions of interest (ROI) in the orbit of 41 human corpses to assess how body temperature (range 2.1-39.8 °C) relates to image contrast of T1-weighted (T1W) and T2-weighted (T2W) sequences on PMMR. Regressions were calculated using the method of least squares. Three readers judged visible changes of image contrast subjectively by consensus. There was a positive relationship between temperature and contrast on T1-weighted (T1W) images and between temperature and the contrast of fat/muscle on T2-weighted (T2W) images. There was a negative relationship between temperature and the contrast of water/fat and water/muscle on T2W images. Subjectively, the influence of temperature became visible below 20 °C on T2W images, and below 10 °C on T1W images. Image contrast on PMMR depends on the temperature of a corpse. Radiologists involved in post mortem imaging must be aware of temperature-related changes in MR image contrast. To preserve technical quality, scanning corpses below 10 °C should be avoided. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Inability to Screen Exhibition Swine for Influenza A Virus Using Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bowman, A S; Nolting, J M; Workman, J D; Cooper, M; Fisher, A E; Marsh, B; Forshey, T

    2016-02-01

    Agricultural fairs create an unconventional animal-human interface that has been associated with swine-to-human transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) in recent years. Early detection of IAV-infected pigs at agricultural fairs would allow veterinarians to better protect swine and human health during these swine exhibitions. This study assessed the use of swine body temperature measurement, recorded by infrared and rectal thermometers, as a practical method to detect IAV-infected swine at agricultural fairs. In our first objective, infrared thermometers were used to record the body surface temperature of 1,092 pigs at the time of IAV nasal swab collection at the end of the exhibition period of 55 agricultural fairs. IAV was recovered from 212 (19.4%) pigs, and the difference in mean infrared body temperature measurement of IAV-positive and IAV-negative pigs was 0.83°C. In a second objective, snout wipes were collected from 1,948 pigs immediately prior to the unloading of the animals at a single large swine exhibition. Concurrent to the snout wipe collection, owners took the rectal temperatures of his/her pigs. In this case, 47 (2.4%) pigs tested positive for IAV before they entered the swine barn. The mean rectal temperatures differed by only 0.19°C between IAV-positive and IAV-negative pigs. The low prevalence of IAV among the pigs upon entry to the fair in the second objective provides evidence that limiting intraspecies spread of IAV during the fairs will likely have significant impacts on the zoonotic transmission. However, in both objectives, the high degree of similarity in the body temperature measurements between the IAV-positive and IAV-negative pigs made it impossible to set a diagnostically meaningful cut point to differentiate IAV status of the individual animals. Unfortunately, body temperature measurement cannot be used to accurately screen exhibition swine for IAV. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Limitations of forehead infrared body temperature detection for fever screening for severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Chang, Ray-E; Chang, Wen-Cheng

    2004-12-01

    We investigated alternative measurement methodology for infrared body thermometry to increase accuracy for outdoor fever screening during the 2003 SARS epidemic. Our results indicate that the auditory meatus temperature is a superior alternative compared with the forehead body surface temperature due to its close approximation to the tympanic temperature.

  5. Body composition assessment in horses using bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ward, L C; White, K J; van der Aa Kuhle, K; Cawdell-Smith, J; Bryden, W L

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of equine body composition using objective measurements is difficult owing to the large size of the animals and the costs involved. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS), a technique widely used for the assessment of body composition in humans, was investigated for practicality of use in horses. BIS uses algorithms that require values for the apparent resistivities of body fluids and body proportion factors (Kb), currently not available for horses. Aims of the present study were to derive resistivity coefficients and body proportion factors and to validate their use for prediction of body composition horses. Validation of coefficients and predictive power using a split-sample agreement study design using correlation and limits of agreement analysis. Whole body impedance measurements were performed on 35 standardbred horses, yearlings to 14 yr, concurrently with determination of total body water volume (TBW) by deuterium dilution and extracellular water volume (ECW) by bromide dilution. Kb was determined in an independent group of 38 mixed-breed, age, and sex horses. Mean apparent resistivity coefficients were 511.4 and 1415.9 ohm.cm for intracellular water and TBW, respectively. Mean Kb was 1.52 ± 0.1. Using these coefficients, TBW and fat-free mass could be predicted with limits of agreement (2SD) of ± 11.6%; mean fat-free mass and fat mass were under- and overestimated by 3.1% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to measured reference values although these differences were not statistically significant. BIS is a practical technique for the assessment of body composition in equids, but the relatively wide limits of agreement, particularly for fat mass, may limit its usefulness for predicting body composition in individual horses.

  6. Changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function, body temperature, body weight and food intake with repeated social stress exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, S; Vining, C; Iyer, V; Kinni, V

    2006-01-01

    These present studies aimed to compare changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity and body temperature in response to acute social defeat, to repeated social stress and to novel restraint after repeated stress, as well as to assess effects on metabolic parameters by measuring body weight gain and food and water intake. We found that social defeat produced a marked increase in both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone compared to placement in a novel cage. Similarly, body temperature was also increased during social defeat and during 30 min of recovery from defeat. We then examined the effects of 6 days of repeated social stress and observed minimal HPA responses to repeated social stress compared to control rats. These neuroendocrine responses were contrasted by robust increases in body temperature during stress and during recovery from stress during 6 days of repeated stress. However, in response to novel restraint, repeatedly stressed rats displayed facilitated body temperature responses compared to controls, similar to our previous findings with HPA activity. Food intake was increased during the light period during which defeat took place, but later intake during the dark period was not affected. Repeated stress decreased body weight gain in the dark period but food intake was increased overall during the 6 days of repeated stress in the light period. As a result, repeated stress increased cumulative food intake during the light period in the stressed rats but these relatively small increases in food intake were unable to prevent the diminished total weight gain in repeatedly stressed rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that, although acute social defeat has similar effects on temperature and HPA activity, repeated exposure to social stress has divergent effects on HPA activity compared to body temperature and that dampened weight gain produced by repeated social stress cannot be fully explained by changes in food intake.

  7. Effects of meal size, meal type, body temperature, and body size on the specific dynamic action of the marine toad, Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M; Faulkner, Angela C

    2002-01-01

    Specific dynamic action (SDA), the accumulated energy expended on all physiological processes associated with meal digestion, is strongly influenced by features of both the meal and the organism. We assessed the effects of meal size, meal type, body temperature, and body size on the postprandial metabolic response and calculated SDA of the marine toad, Bufo marinus. Peak postprandial rates of O(2) consumption (.V(O2)) and CO(2) production (.V(CO2)) and SDA increased with meal size (5%-20% of body mass). Postprandial metabolism was impacted by meal type; the digestion of hard-bodied superworms (Zophobas larva) and crickets was more costly than the digestion of soft-bodied earthworms and juvenile rats. An increase in body temperature (from 20 degrees to 35 degrees C) altered the postprandial metabolic profile, decreasing its duration and increasing its magnitude, but did not effect SDA, with the cost of meal digestion remaining constant across body temperatures. Allometric mass exponents were 0.69 for standard metabolic rate, 0.85 for peak postprandial .V(O2), and 1.02 for SDA; therefore, the factorial scope of peak postprandial .V(O2) increased with body mass. The mass of nutritive organs (stomach, liver, intestines, and kidneys) accounted for 38% and 20% of the variation in peak postprandial .V(O2) and SDA, respectively. Toads forced to exercise experienced 25-fold increases in .V(O2) much greater than the 5.5-fold increase experience during digestion. Controlling for meal size, meal type, and body temperature, the specific dynamic responses of B. marinus are similar to those of the congeneric Bufo alvarius, Bufo boreas, Bufo terrestris, and Bufo woodhouseii.

  8. A Method for Hypothermia-Induction and Maintenance Allows Precise Body and Brain Temperature Control in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Yongshan; Wilgenburg, Brian J.; Lee, Yang-ja; Hallenbeck, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The benefits as well as mechanisms of hypothermia in brain injuries are actively studied at the bench and in the clinic. However, methods used in controlling hypothermia vary among laboratories, and usually brain temperatures are not monitored directly in animals due to the need for an invasive procedure. Here we show a method, water immersion technique, which we developed recently to regulate body temperature in mice during hypothermia process. This method significantly reduced the temperature variation around target temperature. Importantly, this method demonstrated a parallel and consistent relationship between rectal temperature and brain temperature (the brain temperature was consistently 0.5 C higher than rectal temperature) throughout hypothermia maintenance. This technique may be well-adapted to hypothermia studies in mice and other rodents, especially to the assessment and regulation of brain temperature during studies. PMID:23174093

  9. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. ); Ainsworth, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Described is the background work performed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom with the purpose of developing a high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for reactor components. Existing creep-fatigue crack-growth models are reviewed, and the most promising methods are identified. Sources of material data are outlined, and results of the fundamental deformation and crack-growth tests are discussed. Results of subcritical crack-growth exploratory tests, creep-fatigue crack-growth tests under repeated thermal transient conditions, and exploratory failure tests are presented and contrasted with the analytical modeling. Crack-growth assessment methods are presented and applied to a typical liquid-metal reactor component. The research activities presented herein served as a foundation for the Flaw Assessment Guide for High-Temperature Reactor Components Subjected to Creep-Fatigue Loading published separately. 30 refs., 108 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Effects of peripheral cold application on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Asgar Pour, Hossein; Yavuz, Meryem

    2014-04-01

    This study designed to assess the effects of peripheral cold application (PCA) on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients. This study was an experimental, repeated-measures performed in the neurosurgical intensive-care unit. The research sample included all patients with fever in postoperative period. PCA was performed for 20 min. During fever, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (O2 Sat) decreased by 5.07 ± 7.89 mm Hg, 0.191 ± 6.00 mm Hg and 0.742% ± 0.97%, respectively, whereas the pulse rate and diastolic blood pressure increased by 8.528 ± 4.42 beats/ min and 1.842 ± 6.9 mmHg, respectively. Immediately after PCA, core body temperature and pulse rate decreased by 0.3°C, 3.3 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2 Sat increased by, 1.40 mm Hg, 1.87 mm Hg, 0.98 mmHg and 0.27%, respectively. Thirty minutes after the end of PCA, core body temperature, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased by 0.57°C, 0.34 mm Hg, 0.60 mm Hg and 4.5 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic blood pressure and O2 Sat increased by 0.98 mm Hg and 0.04%, respectively. The present results showed that PCA increases systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2 Sat, and decreases core body temperature and pulse rate.

  11. Comparison between auricular and standard rectal thermometers for the measurement of body temperature in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Marlos G.; Carareto, Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Valdo A.; Aquino, Monally C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Although the rectal mucosa remains the traditional site for measuring body temperature in dogs, an increasing number of clinicians have been using auricular temperature to estimate core body temperature. In this study, 88 mature healthy dogs had body temperatures measured with auricular and rectal thermometers. The mean temperature and confidence intervals were similar for each method, but Bland-Altman plots showed high biases and limits of agreement unacceptable for clinical purposes. The results indicate that auricular and rectal temperatures should not be interpreted interchangeably. PMID:21731094

  12. Effects of repeated surgical stress on daily changes of body core temperature in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanizsai, P; Vámos, Z; Solymár, M; Garami, A; Szelényi, Z

    2010-06-01

    Daily body core temperature rhythm has been known to become blunted for several days following intra-abdominal implantation of biotelemetry transmitters in small rodents and about a week is required for re-establishment of stable body core temperature oscillation. In the present study carried out on mice it was found that a repetition of the same minor surgical intervention (laparotomy) several days apart could speed up the stabilization of body temperature oscillations. Melatonin supplied with the drinking water continuously was found to speed up the return of stable daily body temperature rhythm further on consecutive laparotomies, while daily injections of methylprednisolone resulted in some delay in the development of stable body core temperature oscillations. It is concluded that in C57BL/6 mice possessing low plasma levels of melatonin exhibit an adaptive response to repeated stresses influencing the dynamics of daily body temperature rhythm.

  13. Normal oral, rectal, tympanic and axillary body temperature in adult men and women: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Forsberg, Christina; Wahren, Lis Karin

    2002-06-01

    Normal oral, rectal, tympanic and axillary body temperature in adult men and women: a systematic literature review The purpose of this study was to investigate normal body temperature in adult men and women. A systematic review of data was performed. Searches were carried out in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and manually from identified articles reference lists. Studies from 1935 to 1999 were included. Articles were classified as (1) strong, (2) fairly strong and (3) weak evidence. When summarizing studies with strong or fairly strong evidence the range for oral temperature was 33.2-38.2 degrees C, rectal: 34.4-37.8 degrees C, tympanic: 35.4- 37.8 degrees C and axillary: 35.5-37.0 degrees C. The range in oral temperature for men and women, respectively, was 35.7-37.7 and 33.2-38.1 degrees C, in rectal 36.7-37.5 and 36.8-37.1 degrees C, and in tympanic 35.5-37.5 and 35.7-37.5 degrees C. The ranges of normal body temperature need to be adjusted, especially for the lower values. When assessing body temperature it is important to take place of measurement and gender into consideration. Studies with random samples are needed to confirm the range of normal body temperature with respect to gender and age.

  14. Article comprising a garment or other textile structure for use in controlling body temperature

    DOEpatents

    Butzer, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    There is disclosed an article for use in cooling body temperature which comprises a garment having a coat and pant, with each having a body section adapted to receive a portion of the torso of the wearer and extensions from the body section to receive the wearer's limbs. The garment includes a system for circulating temperature controlling fluid from a suitable source through patches removably received in pockets in each of body section and extensions.

  15. In utero heat stress increases postnatal core body temperature in pigs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J S; Sanz Fernandez, M V; Seibert, J T; Ross, J W; Lucy, M C; Safranski, T J; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S; Rhoads, R P; Baumgard, L H

    2015-09-01

    In utero heat stress (IUHS) negatively impacts postnatal development, but how it alters future body temperature parameters and energetic metabolism is not well understood. Future body temperature indices and bioenergetic markers were characterized in pigs from differing in utero thermal environments during postnatal thermoneutral (TN) and cyclical heat stress (HS) exposure. First-parity pregnant gilts ( = 13) were exposed to 1 of 4 ambient temperature (T) treatments (HS [cyclic 28°C to 34°C] or TN [cyclic 18°C to 22°C]) applied for the entire gestation (HSHS, TNTN), HS for the first half of gestation (HSTN), or HS for the second half of gestation (TNHS). Twenty-four offspring (23.1 ± 1.2 kg BW; = 6 HSHS, = 6 TNTN, = 6 HSTN, = 6 TNHS) were housed in TN (21.7°C ± 0.7°C) conditions and then exposed to 2 separate but similar HS periods (HS1 = 6 d; HS2 = 6 d; cycling 28°C to 36°C). Core body temperature (T) was assessed every 15 min with implanted temperature recorders. Regardless of in utero treatment, T increased during both HS periods ( = 0.01; 0.58°C). During TN, HS1, and HS2, all IUHS pigs combined had increased T ( = 0.01; 0.36°C, 0.20°C, and 0.16°C, respectively) compared to TNTN controls. Although unaffected by in utero environment, the total plasma thyroxine to triiodothyronine ratio was reduced ( = 0.01) during HS1 and HS2 (39% and 29%, respectively) compared with TN. In summary, pigs from IUHS maintained an increased T compared with TNTN controls regardless of external T, and this thermal differential may have practical implications to developmental biology and animal bioenergetics.

  16. [The temperature and temperature gradient distribution in the thermophysical model of the rabbit body subjected internal and external changes of temperature].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, G V

    2002-03-01

    In a laboratory heat-physical model of the rabbit reflecting basic heat-physical parameters of animal body (weight, heat absorption and heat production, size of a relative surface, capacity heat-production etc.), the changes of radial distribution of temperature and size of a cross superficial temperature gradient of the body were investigated with various parities (ratio) of environmental temperature and size of capacity heat production imitated by an electrical heater. Superficial layer of the body dependent from capacity heat production and environmental temperature can serve for definition of general heat content changes in the body for maintaining its thermal balance within the environment.

  17. [Assessment of body adiposity in school students in Arequipa, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio; Pablos Abella, Carlos; Arruda, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    To assess the relation between the percentage of body fat, the Body Mass Index and the abdominal perimeter in a population of school students who live at a moderate altitude. A cross-sectional study was conducted, for which 394 boys and 405 girls between 6 and 11 years of age were selected using a probabilistic method. All the school students chosen were middle class children who lived in the urban area of Arequipa, Peru, located at a moderate altitude (2320m above sea level). The percentage of fat, the Body Mass Index and the abdominal perimeter were assessed. There was a moderate correlation between the percentage of fat and the abdominal perimeter in boys (0.59) and girls (0.68). Lower figures were obtained between the percentage of fat and the Body Mass Index in boys (0.56) and girls (0.66). A connection among the categories of fat percentage (%F) and the abdominal perimeter (p<0.05) was observed; yet, there was no connection between the %F and the Body Mass Index (p>0.05). The abdominal perimeter has a moderate correlation with the percentage of body fat and can be used as an indicator of adiposity in the mid-section of the body of children who live in Arequipa (Peru) at a moderate altitude.

  18. Influence of exposure to a prolonged hyperdynamic field on body temperature in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gravitational loading on the regulation of body temperature is examined. Five adult male squirrel monkeys were exposed to a 2-G environment twice for 48 hours, once beginning in the middle of their light cycle and the second time in the middle of their dark cycle. It is observed that a reduction in body temperature occurs during the light cycle phase and at night there is an insignificant change in body temperature. The rhythmic characteristics of the light and dark cycles are analyzed. The data reveal that the body temperature in animals at 2 G is influenced more during the active phase of the animals 24-hour cycle.

  19. Insulated skin temperature as a measure of core body temperature for individuals wearing CBRN protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Richmond, V L; Wilkinson, D M; Blacker, S D; Horner, F E; Carter, J; Havenith, G; Rayson, M P

    2013-11-01

    This study assessed the validity of insulated skin temperature (Tis) to predict rectal temperature (Tre) for use as a non-invasive measurement of thermal strain to reduce the risk of heat illness for emergency service personnel. Volunteers from the Police, Fire and Rescue, and Ambulance Services performed role-related tasks in hot (30 °C) and neutral (18 °C) conditions, wearing service specific personal protective equipment. Insulated skin temperature and micro climate temperature (Tmc) predicted Tre with an adjusted r(2) = 0.87 and standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 0.19 °C. A bootstrap validation of the equation resulted in an adjusted r(2) = 0.85 and SEE = 0.20 °C. Taking into account the 0.20 °C error, the prediction of Tre resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 91%, respectively. Insulated skin temperature and Tmc can be used in a model to predict Tre in emergency service personnel wearing CBRN protective clothing with an SEE of 0.2 °C. However, the model is only valid for Tis over 36.5 °C, above which thermal stability is reached between the core and the skin.

  20. Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Maurya, Santosh K; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) (∼ 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to "internal desynchrony" between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.

  1. Body temperature variability (Part 1): a review of the history of body temperature and its variability due to site selection, biological rhythms, fitness, and aging.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Greg

    2006-12-01

    Body temperature is a complex, non-linear data point, subject to many sources of internal and external variation. While these sources of variation significantly complicate interpretation of temperature data, disregarding knowledge in favor of oversimplifying complex issues would represent a significant departure from practicing evidence-based medicine. Part 1 of this review outlines the historical work of Wunderlich on temperature and the origins of the concept that a healthy normal temperature is 98.6 degrees F (37.0 degrees C). Wunderlich's findings and methodology are reviewed and his results are contrasted with findings from modern clinical thermometry. Endogenous sources of temperature variability, including variations caused by site of measurement, circadian, menstrual, and annual biological rhythms, fitness, and aging are discussed. Part 2 will review the effects of exogenous masking agents - external factors in the environment, diet, or lifestyle that can influence body temperature, as well as temperature findings in disease states.

  2. Temperature regulation in burying beetles (Nicrophorus spp.: Coleoptera: Silphidae): effects of body size, morphology and environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Melissa J; Smith, Rosemary J

    2004-02-01

    This study compares the thermoregulatory ability of three species of burying beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae: Nicrophorus hybridus, Nicrophorus guttula and Nicrophorus investigator) that vary significantly in body size. It also explores possible mechanisms for temperature regulation in burying beetles, including physiological and behavioral thermoregulatory strategies, and the influence of environmental temperatures on body temperature and activity times. We measured beetle thoracic and abdominal temperatures before and after short (<5 s) flights, and thoracic temperature during sustained, tethered flights and following flight in the field. We calculated two measures of thermoregulatory ability: the slope of post-flight thoracic temperature against ambient air temperature and the slope of post-flight thoracic temperature against operative flight temperature. Thoracic temperatures following flight were significantly higher than abdominal temperatures, and the largest species, N. hybridus, was determined to be the better thermoregulator, with regression slopes closer to zero (0.315-0.370) than N. guttula (0.636-0.771) or N. investigator (0.575-0.610). We also examined the roles that insulation, wing loading, physiological heat transfer, basking and perceived environmental temperature play on temperature regulation and activity times in Nicrophorus: This study shows that body size, morphological features, such as wing loading and insulation, and perceived environmental temperatures affect thermoregulation and activity times in burying beetles.

  3. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, Laura N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate. PMID:25392761

  4. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Amos, William; Filipe, Laura N S

    2014-01-01

    Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate.

  5. Skin Temperature Measurements on Small Bodies of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2002-11-26

    The temperature of the top millimeter of a water surface is generally a few tenths of a degree Celsius cooler than the 'bulk' temperature, i.e., the temperature approximately 1 meter deep, which is routinely measured by buoys and ships. This is because of a daytime temperature gradient between the bulk location and the surface, and because of the thin skin at the surface. This difference is important for climate and weather forecasting because of the atmospheric forcing by the oceans.

  6. Human conscious response to thermal input is adjusted to changes in mean body temperature.

    PubMed

    Flouris, A D; Cheung, S S

    2009-03-01

    To detect the dependable criteria of behavioural thermoregulation through modelling temperature fluctuations of individuals allowed to freely manipulate inlet water temperature of a liquid conditioning garment (LCG) during 130 min of passive exposure to -20 degrees C interspersed with a 10 min period of moderate exercise at the 65th minute using a double-blind experiment. Eleven volunteers (5 women; 23.40 (SD 2.09) years; BMI: 23.24 (SD 2.19)) who lacked previous experience with LCG and cold exposure experiments. Despite variations in core and skin temperatures, thermal comfort, thermal sensation, and mean body temperature did not fluctuate significantly over time. Participants were able to find a desired level of LCG inlet temperature within 25 minutes which was maintained at similar levels until the 65th minute of the cold exposure. During exercise, LCG inlet water temperature decreased significantly. Regression models demonstrated that mean skin temperature and change in mean body temperature were significantly associated with thermal comfort and thermal sensation. Subsequent models revealed that, although all temperature variables were associated with LCG inlet water temperature, the coefficient of determination mainly depended on mean skin temperature and change in mean body temperature. The involvement of skin temperature was anticipated as the liquid conditioning garment was in contact with the skin. Humans generate conscious thermoregulatory responses in resting and exercise conditions during exposures to cold environments that are aimed towards maintaining a threshold mean body temperature, rather than temperature changes in individual body regions.

  7. Body composition assessment in Taiwanese individuals with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Lai, Chien-Hung; Chen, Shih-Ching; Hsiao, Wen-Tien; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2011-07-01

    To measure the changes in the total and regional body fat mass, and assess the clinical usefulness of the body mass index (BMI) in detecting overweight subjects with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Prospective, cross-sectional study. General community. Subjects with poliomyelitis (n=17; age range, 42-57y; mean, 47y; 12 men, 5 women) and able-bodied people (n=17) matched by sex, age, body weight, and body height participated in the study. Not applicable. Total and regional body composition was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Clinical characteristics such as blood pressure, serum biochemical studies, and habitual behaviors (daily cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and exercise regimen) of all participants were evaluated. Compared with able-bodied controls, subjects with poliomyelitis had a 50% greater total body fat mass, significant increases in the regional fat mass in every part of the body, and had the greatest increase of fat mass in the thorax. Nearly all the subjects (94%) with poliomyelitis were obese according to standards of body composition. However, one third of them had a BMI value of less than 25.0kg/m(2). People with poliomyelitis have a higher prevalence of obesity and a significant increase in total and regional fat mass. Current BMI underestimates the total body fat mass percentage compared with the control; therefore, a population-specific BMI should be used to address the prevalence of obesity in postpolio survivors. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rectal foreign bodies: imaging assessment and medicolegal aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Miele, Vittorio; Pinto, Fabio; Mizio, Veronica Di; Panico, Maria Rita; Muzj, Carlo; Romano, Luigia

    2015-02-01

    The amount of patients presenting at the emergency hospitals with retained rectal foreign bodies appears recently to have increased. Foreign objects retained in the rectum may result from direct introduction through the anus (more common) or from ingestion. Affected individuals often make ineffective attempts to extract the object themselves, resulting in additional delay of medical care and potentially increasing the risk of complications. The goals of radiological patient assessment are to identify the type of object retained, its location, and the presence of associated complications. Plain film radiographs still play an important role in the assessment of retained rectal foreign bodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An assessment of skin temperature gradients in a tropical primate using infrared thermography and subcutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cynthia L; Scheidel, Caleb; Glander, Kenneth E; Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermography has become a useful tool to assess surface temperatures of animals for thermoregulatory research. However, surface temperatures are an endpoint along the body's core-shell temperature gradient. Skin and fur are the peripheral tissues most exposed to ambient thermal conditions and are known to serve as thermosensors that initiate thermoregulatory responses. Yet relatively little is known about how surface temperatures of wild mammals measured by infrared thermography relate to subcutaneous temperatures. Moreover, this relationship may differ with the degree that fur covers the body. To assess the relationship between temperatures and temperature gradients in peripheral tissues between furred and bare areas, we collected data from wild mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in Costa Rica. We used infrared thermography to measure surface temperatures of the furred dorsum and bare facial areas of the body, recorded concurrent subcutaneous temperatures in the dorsum, and measured ambient thermal conditions via a weather station. Temperature gradients through cutaneous tissues (subcutaneous-surface temperature) and surface temperature gradients (surface-ambient temperature) were calculated. Our results indicate that there are differences in temperatures and temperature gradients in furred versus bare areas of mantled howlers. Under natural thermal conditions experienced by wild animals, the bare facial areas were warmer than temperatures in the furred dorsum, and cutaneous temperature gradients in the face were more variable than the dorsum, consistent with these bare areas acting as thermal windows. Cutaneous temperature gradients in the dorsum were more closely linked to subcutaneous temperatures, while facial temperature gradients were more heavily influenced by ambient conditions. These findings indicate that despite the insulative properties of fur, for mantled howling monkeys surface temperatures of furred areas still demonstrate a

  10. Body image assessment in oncology: an update review.

    PubMed

    Muzzatti, Barbara; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta

    2017-03-01

    Body image is a psychological dimension of the experience of cancer, which varies along the clinical features of the disease itself and in its phases, as well as its effects in terms of functioning and quality of life. In 2012, Supportive Care in Cancer published a review addressing the relevance, application, and instruments of body image assessment for oncological settings. Since then, many research papers have been published on this topic and new questionnaires for assessing body image in oncology are now available. This contribution aims to offer both researchers and clinicians an updated review of body image assessment tools. We searched PubMed, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, and Scopus databases, which allowed us to identify pertinent papers, classified according to the body image tool to which they refer. We then extracted the characteristics and the psychometric properties from each study. From the 657 initial records, 23 papers met the selection criteria referring to 8 body image measurements. Although increasing in number and being the subject of a growing number of studies, these papers are still not exhaustive with respect to the verified psychometric properties. In particular, it is worth noting that their applicability to all types of cancer is limited and that a focus on women with breast cancer prevails. A complete validation (including a study of all types of validity and reliability) and an indication of the case results are not currently available for any of the eight instruments described. However, studies designed to apply body image assessment tools to patients other than those experiencing breast cancer as well to cultural contexts other than English-speaking countries, are increasing.

  11. Low-temperature softening in body-centered cubic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pink, E.; Arsenault, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    In the low-temperature range, bcc alloys exhibit a lower stress-temperature dependence than the pure base metals. This effect often leads to a phenomenon that is called 'alloy softening': at low temperatures, the yield stress of an alloy may be lower than that of the base metal. Various theories are reviewed; the most promising are based either on extrinsic or intrinsic models of low-temperature deformation. Some other aspects of alloy softening are discussed, among them the effects on the ductile-brittle transition temperature.

  12. Low-temperature softening in body-centered cubic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pink, E.; Arsenault, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    In the low-temperature range, bcc alloys exhibit a lower stress-temperature dependence than the pure base metals. This effect often leads to a phenomenon that is called 'alloy softening': at low temperatures, the yield stress of an alloy may be lower than that of the base metal. Various theories are reviewed; the most promising are based either on extrinsic or intrinsic models of low-temperature deformation. Some other aspects of alloy softening are discussed, among them the effects on the ductile-brittle transition temperature.

  13. Assessment of two-temperature kinetic model for ionizing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1987-01-01

    A two-temperature chemical-kinetic model for air is assessed by comparing theoretical results with existing experimental data obtained in shock-tubes, ballistic ranges, and flight experiments. In the model, named the TTv model, one temperature (T) is assumed to characterize the heavy-particle translational and molecular rotational energies, and another temperature (Tv) to characterize the molecular vibrational, electron translational, and electronic excitation energies. The theoretical results for nonequilibrium air flow in shock tubes are obtained using the computer code STRAP (Shock-Tube Radiation Program), and for flow along the stagnation streamline in the shock layer over spherical bodies using the newly developed code STRAP (Stagnation-Point Radiation Program). Substantial agreement is shown between the theoretical and experimental results for relaxation times and radiative heat fluxes. At very high temperatures the spectral calculations need further improvement. The present agreement provides strong evidence that the two-temperature model characterizes principal features of nonequilibrium air flow. New theoretical results using the model are presented for the radiative heat fluxes at the stagnation point of a 6-m-radius sphere, representing an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle, over a range of free-stream conditions. Assumptions, approximations, and limitations of the model are discussed.

  14. Temperature distribution in the human body under various conditions of induced hyperthermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korobko, O. V.; Perelman, T. L.; Fradkin, S. Z.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model based on heat balance equations was developed for studying temperature distribution in the human body under deep hyperthermia which is often induced in the treatment of malignant tumors. The model yields results which are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The distribution of temperature under various conditions of induced hyperthermia, i.e. as a function of water temperature and supply rate, is examined on the basis of temperature distribution curves in various body zones.

  15. Global warming and Bergmann's rule: do central European passerines adjust their body size to rising temperatures?

    PubMed

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Recent climate change has caused diverse ecological responses in plants and animals. However, relatively little is known about homeothermic animals' ability to adapt to changing temperature regimes through changes in body size, in accordance with Bergmann's rule. We used fluctuations in mean annual temperatures in south-west Germany since 1972 in order to look for direct links between temperature and two aspects of body size: body mass and flight feather length. Data from regionally born juveniles of 12 passerine bird species were analysed. Body mass and feather length varied significantly among years in eight and nine species, respectively. Typically the inter-annual changes in morphology were complexly non-linear, as was inter-annual variation in temperature. For six (body mass) and seven species (feather length), these inter-annual fluctuations were significantly correlated with temperature fluctuations. However, negative correlations consistent with Bergmann's rule were only found for five species, either for body mass or feather length. In several of the species for which body mass and feather length was significantly associated with temperature, morphological responses were better predicted by temperature data that were smoothed across multiple years than by the actual mean breeding season temperatures of the year of birth. This was found in five species for body mass and three species for feather length. These results suggest that changes in body size may not merely be the result of phenotypic plasticity but may hint at genetically based microevolutionary adaptations.

  16. Infralimbic cortex controls core body temperature in a histamine dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Riveros, M E; Perdomo, G; Torrealba, F

    2014-04-10

    An increase in body temperature accelerates biochemical reactions and behavioral and physiological responses. A mechanism to actively increase body temperature would be beneficial during motivated behaviors. The prefrontal cortex is implicated in organizing motivated behavior; the infralimbic cortex, a subregion of the medial prefrontal cortex, has the necessary connectivity to serve the role of initiating such thermogenic mechanism at the beginning of the appetitive phase of motivated behavior; further, this cortex is active during motivated behavior and its disinhibition produces a marked behavioral and vegetative arousal increase, together with increases in histamine levels. We wanted to explore if this arousal was related to histaminergic activation after pharmacological infralimbic disinhibition and during the appetitive phase of motivated behavior. We measured core temperature and motor activity in response to picrotoxin injection in the infralimbic cortex, as well as during food-related appetitive behavior, evoked by enticing hungry rats with food. Pretreatment with the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine decreased thermal response to picrotoxin and enticement and completely blunted motor response to enticement. Motor and temperature responses to enticement were also completely abolished by infralimbic cortex inhibition with muscimol. To assess if this histamine dependent temperature increase was produced by an active sympathetic mediated thermogenic mechanism or was just a consequence of increased locomotor activity, we injected propranolol (i.p.), a β adrenergic receptor blocker, before picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex. Propranolol reduced the temperature increase without affecting locomotor activity. Altogether, these results suggest that infralimbic activation is necessary for appetitive behavior by inducing a motor and a vegetative arousal increase mediated by central histamine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of myostatin genotype on body temperature during extreme temperature events.

    PubMed

    Howard, J T; Kachman, S D; Nielsen, M K; Mader, T L; Spangler, M L

    2013-07-01

    Extreme heat and cold events can create deleterious physiological changes in cattle as they attempt to cope. The genetic background of animals can influence their response to these events. The objective of the current study was to determine the impact of myostatin genotype (MG) on body temperature during periods of heat and cold stress. Two groups of crossbred steers and heifers of unknown pedigree and breed fraction with varying percentages of Angus, Simmental, and Piedmontese were placed in a feedlot over 2 summers and 2 winters. Before arrival, animals were genotyped for the Piedmontese-derived myostatin mutation (C313Y) to determine their MG as either homozygous normal (0 copy; n = 84), heterozygous (1 copy; n = 96), or homozygous for inactive myostatin (2 copy; n = 59). Hourly tympanic and vaginal temperature measurements were collected for steers and heifers, respectively, for 5 d during times of anticipated heat and cold stress. Mean (±SD) ambient temperature for summer and winter stress events were 24.4 (±4.64) and -1.80 (±11.71), respectively. A trigonometric function (sine + cosine) with periods of 12 and 24 h was used to describe the diurnal cyclical pattern. Hourly body temperature was analyzed within a season, and fixed effects included MG, group, trigonometric functions nested within group, and interaction of MG with trigonometric functions nested within group; random effects were animal and residual (Model [I]). A combined analysis of season and group was also investigated with the inclusion of season as a main effect and the nesting of effects within both group and season (Model [C]). In both models, the residual was fitted using an autoregressive covariance structure. A 3-way interaction of MG, season, and trigonometric function periodicities of 24 h (P < 0.001) and 12 h (P < 0.02) for Model [C] indicate that a genotype × environment interaction exists for MG. For MG during summer stress events the additive estimate was 0.10°C (P < 0.01) and

  18. Regulation of body temperature and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis by bombesin receptor subtype-3.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Dalya M; Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo; Xiao, Cuiying; Reitman, Marc L

    2014-03-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) regulates energy homeostasis, with Brs3 knockout (Brs3(-/y)) mice being hypometabolic, hypothermic, and hyperphagic and developing obesity. We now report that the reduced body temperature is more readily detected if body temperature is analyzed as a function of physical activity level and light/dark phase. Physical activity level correlated best with body temperature 4 min later. The Brs3(-/y) metabolic phenotype is not due to intrinsically impaired brown adipose tissue function or in the communication of sympathetic signals from the brain to brown adipose tissue, since Brs3(-/y) mice have intact thermogenic responses to stress, acute cold exposure, and β3-adrenergic activation, and Brs3(-/y) mice prefer a cooler environment. Treatment with the BRS-3 agonist MK-5046 increased brown adipose tissue temperature and body temperature in wild-type but not Brs3(-/y) mice. Intrahypothalamic infusion of MK-5046 increased body temperature. These data indicate that the BRS-3 regulation of body temperature is via a central mechanism, upstream of sympathetic efferents. The reduced body temperature in Brs3(-/y) mice is due to altered regulation of energy homeostasis affecting higher center regulation of body temperature, rather than an intrinsic defect in brown adipose tissue.

  19. Regional and circadian variations of sweating rate and body surface temperature in camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Abdoun, Khalid A; Samara, Emad M; Okab, Aly B; Al-Haidary, Ahmed A

    2012-07-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate the regional variations in surface temperature and sweating rate and to visualize body thermal windows responsible for the dissipation of excess body heat in dromedary camels. This study was conducted on five dromedary camels with mean body weight of 450 ± 20.5 kg and 2 years of age. Sweating rate, skin and body surface temperature showed significant (P < 0.001) circadian variation together with the variation in ambient temperature. However, daily mean values of sweating rate, skin and body surface temperature measured on seven regions of the camel body did not significantly differ. The variation in body surface temperature compared to the variation in skin temperature was higher in the hump compared to the axillary and flank regions, indicating the significance of camel's fur in protecting the skin from daily variation in ambient temperature. Infrared thermography revealed that flank and axillary regions had lower thermal gradients at higher ambient temperature (T(a) ) and higher thermal gradients at lower T(a) , which might indicate the working of flank and axillary regions as thermal windows dissipating heat during the night. Sweating rate showed moderate correlation to skin and body surface temperatures, which might indicate their working as potential thermal drivers of sweating in camels. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-11-01

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role.

  1. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-11-02

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role.

  2. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role. PMID:27804981

  3. Analysis of the effect of lying on the ear on body temperature measurement using a tympanic thermometer.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Gulsah Gurol; Eser, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of lying on the ear on the measurement of body temperature by a tympanic thermometer. Participants in the study were healthy young people of the Nursing Department of the College of Health, Izmir, Turkey. Sixty-eight participants who agreed to participate, and who had no discharge or infection of the ear and no upper respiratory tract infection, were included in the study. Immediately after the first temperature reading, measurement had been performed five times. Non-probability sampling method was used and the study was conducted in January 2007. Tympanic thermometer body temperature results were significantly higher (p < 0.05) when measurements were taken following lying on the ear compared to those when the subject did not lie on the ear prior to temperature measurement. There are significant differences in tympanic temperature caused by the subject lying on his or her ear. This is important to keep in mind during health workers' assessments.

  4. Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) in stroke 2 (PAIS 2): protocol for a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of high-dose paracetamol on functional outcome in patients with acute stroke and a body temperature of 36.5 °C or above.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Inger R; de Jong, Frank Jan; den Hertog, Heleen M; Lingsma, Hester F; van Gemert, H Maarten A; Schreuder, A H C M L Tobien; Ruitenberg, Annemieke; Maasland, E Lisette; Saxena, Ritu; Oomes, Peter; van Tuijl, Jordie; Koudstaal, Peter J; Kappelle, L Jaap; Algra, Ale; van der Worp, H Bart; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2015-04-01

    In the first hours after stroke onset, subfebrile temperatures and fever have been associated with poor functional outcome. In the first Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) in Stroke trial, a randomized clinical trial of 1400 patients with acute stroke, patients who were treated with high-dose paracetamol showed more improvement on the modified Rankin Scale at three-months than patients treated with placebo, but this difference was not statistically significant. In the 661 patients with a baseline body temperature of 37.0 °C or above, treatment with paracetamol increased the odds of functional improvement (odds ratio 1.43; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.97). This relation was also found in the patients with a body temperature of 36.5 °C or higher (odds ratio 1.31; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.68). These findings need confirmation. The study aims to assess the effect of high-dose paracetamol in patients with acute stroke and a body temperature of 36.5 °C or above on functional outcome. The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) In Stroke 2 trial is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. We use a power of 85% to detect a significant difference in the scores on the modified Rankin Scale of the paracetamol group compared with the placebo group at a level of significance of 0.05 and assume a treatment effect of 7%. Fifteen-hundred patients with acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage and a body temperature of 36.5 °C or above will be included within 12 h of symptom onset. Patients will be treated with paracetamol in a daily dose of six-grams or matching placebo for three consecutive days. The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) In Stroke 2 trial has been registered as NTR2365 in The Netherlands Trial Register. The primary outcome will be improvement on the modified Rankin Scale at three-months as analyzed by ordinal logistic regression. If high-dose paracetamol will be proven effective, a simple, safe, and extremely cheap therapy will be

  5. TRIAGE DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR PARTIAL-BODY EXPOSURE: DICENTRIC ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Pellmar, Terry C.

    2009-01-01

    Partial-body biodosimetry is likely to be required after a radiological or nuclear exposure. Clinical signs and symptoms, distribution of dicentrics in circulating blood cells, organ-specific biomarkers, physical signals in teeth and nails all can provide indications of non-homogeneous exposures. Organ specific biomarkers may provide early warning regarding physiological systems at risk after radiation injury. Use of a combination of markers and symptoms will be needed for clinical insights for therapeutic approaches. Analysis of dicentrics, a marker specific for radiation injury, is the “Gold standard” of biodosimetry and can reveal partial-body exposures. Automation of sample processing for dicentric analysis can increase throughput with customization of off-the-shelf technologies for cytogenetic sample processing and information management. Automated analysis of the metaphase spreads is currently limited but improvements are in development. Our efforts bridge the technological gaps to allow the use of dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) for risk-based stratification of mass casualties. This article summarizes current knowledge on partial-body cytogenetic dose assessment synthesizing information leading to the proposal of an approach to triage dose prediction in radiation mass casualties, based on equivalent whole-body doses under partial-body exposure conditions and assesses the validity of using this model. An initial screening using only 20 metaphase spreads per subject can confirm irradiation above 2-Gy. A subsequent increase to 50 metaphases improves dose determination to allow risk stratification for clinical triage. Metaphases evaluated for inhomogeneous distribution of dicentrics can reveal partial-body exposures. We tested the validity of this approach in an in vitro model that simulates partial-body irradiation by mixing irradiated and un-irradiated lymphocytes in various proportions. Our preliminary results support the notion that this approach will

  6. Description of a Portable Wireless Device for High-Frequency Body Temperature Acquisition and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Frau, David; Varela, Manuel; Aboy, Mateo; Miró-Martínez, Pau

    2009-01-01

    We describe a device for dual channel body temperature monitoring. The device can operate as a real time monitor or as a data logger, and has Bluetooth capabilities to enable for wireless data download to the computer used for data analysis. The proposed device is capable of sampling temperature at a rate of 1 sample per minute with a resolution of 0.01 °C . The internal memory allows for stand-alone data logging of up to 10 days. The device has a battery life of 50 hours in continuous real-time mode. In addition to describing the proposed device in detail, we report the results of a statistical analysis conducted to assess its accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:22408473

  7. Validation of an interpretation bias assessment for body dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Mary K; Holzinger, Jayne B; Chasson, Gregory S

    2014-09-01

    Currently, research on interpretation bias and body dissatisfaction is limited. The few experimental paradigms that have been used to explore this phenomenon utilized a method that may not accurately capture the nature of interpretation bias as explained by cognitive theory. The present study investigated the reliability and validity of a novel computerized assessment of interpretation bias (WSAP) for body dissatisfaction, which may more accurately reflect the cognitive processing involved in such bias by implementing the Word Sentence Association Paradigm (WSAP), a previously established method of measuring interpretation bias in other clinical populations. Undergraduate females (n=214) completed the WSAP and other measures. Results indicate initial support for the WSAP as a valid, reliable measure of interpretation bias for body dissatisfaction. Although preliminary, this study contributes to the minimal research in this area and serves as the first psychometric investigation of the WSAP to measure such interpretation bias for body dissatisfaction.

  8. Observation of temperature trace, induced by changing of temperature inside the human body, on the human body skin using commercially available IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2015-05-01

    As it is well-known, application of the passive THz camera for the security problems is very promising way. It allows seeing concealed object without contact with a person and this camera is non-dangerous for a person. In previous papers, we demonstrate new possibility of the passive THz camera using for a temperature difference observing on the human skin if this difference is caused by different temperatures inside the body. For proof of validity of our statement we make the similar physical experiment using the IR camera. We show a possibility of temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body due to water drinking. We use as a computer code that is available for treatment of images captured by commercially available IR camera, manufactured by Flir Corp., as well as our developed computer code for computer processing of these images. Using both codes we demonstrate clearly changing of human body skin temperature induced by water drinking. Shown phenomena are very important for the detection of forbidden samples and substances concealed inside the human body using non-destructive control without X-rays using. Early we have demonstrated such possibility using THz radiation. Carried out experiments can be used for counter-terrorism problem solving. We developed original filters for computer processing of images captured by IR cameras. Their applications for computer processing of images results in a temperature resolution enhancing of cameras.

  9. Isotopic ordering in eggshells reflects body temperatures and suggests differing thermophysiology in two Cretaceous dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagle, Robert A.; Enriquez, Marcus; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Hu, David; Tütken, Thomas; Montanari, Shaena; Loyd, Sean J.; Ramirez, Pedro; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Kohn, Matthew J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Chiappe, Luis M.; Eiler, John M.

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary transitions leading to the modern endothermic state of birds and mammals is incomplete, partly because tools available to study the thermophysiology of extinct vertebrates are limited. Here we show that clumped isotope analysis of eggshells can be used to determine body temperatures of females during periods of ovulation. Late Cretaceous titanosaurid eggshells yield temperatures similar to large modern endotherms. In contrast, oviraptorid eggshells yield temperatures lower than most modern endotherms but ~6 °C higher than co-occurring abiogenic carbonates, implying that this taxon did not have thermoregulation comparable to modern birds, but was able to elevate its body temperature above environmental temperatures. Therefore, we observe no strong evidence for end-member ectothermy or endothermy in the species examined. Body temperatures for these two species indicate that variable thermoregulation likely existed among the non-avian dinosaurs and that not all dinosaurs had body temperatures in the range of that seen in modern birds.

  10. Influence of the Environment on Body Temperature of Racing Greyhounds

    PubMed Central

    McNicholl, Jane; Howarth, Gordon S.; Hazel, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Heat strain is a potential risk factor for racing greyhounds in hot climates. However, there have been limited studies into the incidence of heat strain (when excess heat causes physiological or pathological effects) in racing greyhounds. The aim of this study was to determine if heat strain occurs in racing greyhounds, and, if so, whether environmental factors (e.g., ambient temperature and relative humidity) or dog-related factors (e.g., sex, bodyweight, color) are associated with the risk of heat strain. A total of 229 greyhounds were included in over 46 race meetings and seven different race venues in South Australia, Australia. Rectal temperatures of dogs were measured pre- and postrace and urine samples collected for analysis of myoglobinuria. Ambient temperature at race times ranged between 11.0 and 40.8°C and relative humidity ranged from 17 to 92%. There was a mean increase in greyhound rectal temperature of 2.1°C (range 1.1–3.1°C). A small but significant association was present between ambient temperature and increase in rectal temperature (r2 = 0.033, P = 0.007). The mean ambient temperature at race time, of dogs with postrace rectal temperature of or exceeding 41.5°C, was significantly greater than at race time of dogs with a postrace rectal temperature ≤41.5°C (31.2 vs. 27.3°C, respectively, P = 0.004). When the ambient temperature reached 38oC, over one-third (39%) of dogs had a rectal temperature >41.5°C. Over half of postrace urine samples were positive by Dipstick reading for hemoglobin/myoglobin, and of 77 urine samples positive for Dipstick readings, 95% were positive for myoglobin. However, urinary myoglobin levels were not associated with ambient temperature or postrace rectal temperatures. The mean increase in rectal temperature was greater in dark (black, blue, brindle) than light (fawn and white) colored greyhounds. The results suggest heat strain occurs in racing greyhounds, evidenced by postrace rectal temperatures

  11. Is there an association between body temperature and serum lactate levels in hip fracture patients?

    PubMed

    Murtuza, F; Farrier, A J; Venkatesan, M; Smith, R; Khan, A; Uzoigwe, C E; Chami, G

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Hyperlactataemia is associated with adverse outcomes in trauma cases. It is thought to be the result of anaerobic respiration during hypoperfusion. This produces much less energy than complete aerobic glycolysis. Low body temperature in the injured patient carries an equally poor prognosis. Significant amounts of energy are expended in maintaining euthermia. Consequently, there may be a link between lactate levels and dysthermia. Hyperlactataemia may be indicative of inefficient energy production and therefore insufficient energy to maintain euthermia. Alternatively, significant amounts of available oxygen may be sequestered in thermoregulation, resulting in anaerobic respiration and lactate production. Our study investigated whether there is an association between lactate levels and admission body temperature in hip fracture patients. Furthermore, it looked at whether there is a difference in the mean lactate levels between hip fracture patients with low (<36.5°C), normal (36.5-37.5°C) and high (>37.5°C) body temperature on admission, and for patients who have low body temperature, whether there is a progressive rise in serum lactate levels as body temperature falls. Methods The admission temperature and serum lactate of 1,162 patients presenting with hip fracture were recorded. Patients were divided into the euthermic (body temperature 36.5-37.5°C), the pyrexial (>37.5°C) and those with low body temperature (<36.5°C). Admission lactate and body temperature were compared. Results There was a significant difference in age between the three body temperature groups (p=0.007). The pyrexial cohort was younger than the low body temperature group (mean: 78 vs 82 years). Those with low body temperature had a higher mean lactate level than the euthermic (2.2mmol/l vs 2.0mmol/l, p=0.03). However, there was no progressive rise in serum lactate level as admission temperature fell. Conclusions The findings suggest that in hip fracture patients, the body

  12. Is there an association between body temperature and serum lactate levels in hip fracture patients?

    PubMed Central

    Murtuza, F; Farrier, AJ; Venkatesan, M; Smith, R; Khan, A; Uzoigwe, CE; Chami, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hyperlactataemia is associated with adverse outcomes in trauma cases. It is thought to be the result of anaerobic respiration during hypoperfusion. This produces much less energy than complete aerobic glycolysis. Low body temperature in the injured patient carries an equally poor prognosis. Significant amounts of energy are expended in maintaining euthermia. Consequently, there may be a link between lactate levels and dysthermia. Hyperlactataemia may be indicative of inefficient energy production and therefore insufficient energy to maintain euthermia. Alternatively, significant amounts of available oxygen may be sequestered in thermoregulation, resulting in anaerobic respiration and lactate production. Our study investigated whether there is an association between lactate levels and admission body temperature in hip fracture patients. Furthermore, it looked at whether there is a difference in the mean lactate levels between hip fracture patients with low (<36.5°C), normal (36.5–37.5°C) and high (>37.5°C) body temperature on admission, and for patients who have low body temperature, whether there is a progressive rise in serum lactate levels as body temperature falls. Methods The admission temperature and serum lactate of 1,162 patients presenting with hip fracture were recorded. Patients were divided into the euthermic (body temperature 36.5–37.5°C), the pyrexial (>37.5°C) and those with low body temperature (<36.5°C). Admission lactate and body temperature were compared. Results There was a significant difference in age between the three body temperature groups (p=0.007). The pyrexial cohort was younger than the low body temperature group (mean: 78 vs 82 years). Those with low body temperature had a higher mean lactate level than the euthermic (2.2mmol/l vs 2.0mmol/l, p=0.03). However, there was no progressive rise in serum lactate level as admission temperature fell. Conclusions The findings suggest that in hip fracture patients, the body

  13. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN...

  14. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN...

  15. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICE...

  16. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  17. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY...

  18. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  19. 21 CFR 26.70 - Conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conformity assessment bodies. 26.70 Section 26.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  20. 21 CFR 26.69 - Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monitoring of conformity assessment bodies. 26.69 Section 26.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY...

  1. Limits to sustained energy intake. XVI. Body temperature and physical activity of female mice during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Yuko; Bernard, Amelie; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Al Jothery, Aqeel; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2013-06-15

    Lactation is the most energy-demanding phase of mammalian reproduction, and lactation performance may be affected by events during pregnancy. For example, food intake may be limited in late pregnancy by competition for space in the abdomen between the alimentary tract and fetuses. Hence, females may need to compensate their energy budgets during pregnancy by reducing activity and lowering body temperature. We explored the relationships between energy intake, body mass, body temperature and physical activity throughout pregnancy in the MF1 mouse. Food intake and body mass of 26 females were recorded daily throughout pregnancy. Body temperature and physical activity were monitored every minute for 23 h a day by implanted transmitters. Body temperature and physical activity declined as pregnancy advanced, while energy intake and body mass increased. Compared with a pre-mating baseline period, mice increased energy intake by 56% in late pregnancy. Although body temperature declined as pregnancy progressed, this served mostly to reverse an increase between baseline and early pregnancy. Reduced physical activity may compensate the energy budget of pregnant mice but body temperature changes do not. Over the last 3 days of pregnancy, food intake declined. Individual variation in energy intake in the last phase of pregnancy was positively related to litter size at birth. As there was no association between the increase in body mass and the decline in intake, we suggest the decline was not caused by competition for abdominal space. These data suggest overall reproductive performance is probably not constrained by events during pregnancy.

  2. Assessment of high-temperature battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, R K

    1989-02-01

    Three classes of high-temperature batteries are being developed internationally with transportation and stationary energy storage applications in mind: sodium/sulfur, lithium/metal sulfide, and sodium/metal chloride. Most attention is being given to the sodium/sulfur system. The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) and the Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) are actively supporting the development of this battery system. It is anticipated that pilot-scale production facilities for sodium/sulfur batteries will be in operation in the next couple of years. The lithium/metal sulfide and the sodium/metal chloride systems are not receiving the same level of attention as the sodium/sulfur battery. Both of these systems are in an earlier stage of development than sodium/sulfur. OTS and OESD are supporting work on the lithium/iron sulfide battery in collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the work is being carried out at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The sodium/metal chloride battery, the newest member of the group, is being developed by a Consortium of South African and British companies. Very little DOE funds are presently allocated for research on this battery. The purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the present status of the three technologies and to identify for each technology a prioritized list of R and D issues. Finally, the assessment includes recommendations to DOE for a proposed high-temperature battery research and development program. 18 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Effect of environmental temperature on body temperature and metabolic heat production in a heterothermic rodent, Spermophilus tereticaudus.

    PubMed

    Wooden, K Mark; Walsberg, Glenn E

    2002-07-01

    This study quantifies the thermoregulatory ability and energetics of a mammal, the round-tailed ground squirrel Spermophilus tereticaudus, that can relax thermoregulatory limits without becoming inactive. We measured body temperature and metabolic rate in animals exposed for short periods (1 h) to air temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 degrees C and for long periods (8 h) to air temperatures ranging from 10 to 30 degrees C. Within 45 min of exposure to air temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 degrees C, the mean body temperatures of alert and responsive animals ranged from 32.1 degrees C (T(air)=10 degrees C) to 40.4 degrees C (T(air)=45 degrees C). This thermolability provided significant energetic savings below the thermoneutral zone, ranging from 0.63 W (18 %) at 10 degrees C to 0.43 W (43 %) at 30 degrees C. When exposed for 8 h to air temperatures between 10 and 30 degrees C, animals varied their body temperature significantly over time. At all air temperatures, the lowest body temperature (maintained for at least 1 h) was 31.2 degrees C. The highest body temperatures (maintained for at least 1 h) were 33.6 degrees C at 10 degrees C, 35.3 degrees C at 20 degrees C and 36.3 degrees C at 30 degrees C. The energetic savings realized by maintaining the minimum rather than the maximum body temperature was 0.80 W (25 %) at 10 degrees C, 0.71 W (33 %) at 20 degrees C and 0.40 W (47 %) at 30 degrees C. This study demonstrates in several ways the ability of this species to adjust energy expenditure through heterothermy.

  4. Comparing mercury-in-glass, tympanic and disposable thermometers in measuring body temperature in healthy young people.

    PubMed

    Khorshid, Leyla; Eşer, Ismet; Zaybak, Ayten; Yapucu, Ulkü

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a disposable thermometer was at least as accurate as a tympanic thermometer when compared with a mercury-in-glass thermometer and to investigate the waiting periods of mercury-in-glass thermometers. Although different methods of temperature measurement have been widely studied and described during the last decade, comparison between readings obtained when measuring body temperature using disposable, mercury-in-glass and tympanic thermometers is little documented and there is confusion about the waiting periods of mercury-in-glass thermometers. This research was descriptive and comparative. Temperature measurements included three sequential readings using first a tympanic thermometer in the left ear, then a disposable thermometer in the left axillary area and finally a mercury-in-glass thermometer in the right axillary area. All the temperatures were measured on the Celsius (degrees C) scale. To identify the stabilization periods of the mercury-in-glass thermometers, the temperature measurement was repeated until the reading stabilized. F-tests were used to compare readings of the mean temperatures. It was found that body temperature readings measured by tympanic thermometer were higher than axillary mercury-in-glass thermometer by 0.12 degrees C, body temperature readings measured by tympanic thermometer were higher than axillary disposable thermometer readings by 0.65 degrees C and body temperature readings measured by axillary mercury-in-glass thermometer were higher by 0.53 degrees C than readings measured by axillary disposable thermometer. It was found that readings measured by mercury-in-glass thermometer stabilized in the eighth minute. When assessing body temperature it is important to take the type of thermometer into consideration. In addition, axillary mercury-in-glass thermometers must be kept in place a minimum of eight minutes.

  5. Temperature and body weight affect fouling of pig pens.

    PubMed

    Aarnink, A J A; Schrama, J W; Heetkamp, M J W; Stefanowska, J; Huynh, T T T

    2006-08-01

    Fouling of the solid lying area in pig housing is undesirable for reasons of animal welfare, animal health, environmental pollution, and labor costs. In this study the influence of temperature on the excreting and lying behavior of growing-finishing pigs of different BW (25, 45, 65, 85, or 105 kg) was studied. Ten groups of 5 pigs were placed in partially slatted pens (60% solid concrete, 40% metal-slatted) in climate respiration chambers. After an adaptation period, temperatures were raised daily for 9 d. Results showed that above certain inflection temperatures (IT; mean 22.6 degrees C, SE = 0.78) the number of excretions (relative to the total number of excretions) on the solid floor increased with temperature (mean increase 9.7%/ degrees C, SE = 1.41). Below the IT, the number of excretions on the solid floor was low and not influenced by temperature (mean 13.2%, SE = 3.5). On average, the IT for excretion on the solid floor decreased with increasing BW, from approximately 25 degrees C at 25 kg to 20 degrees C at 100 kg of BW (P < 0.05). Increasing temperature also affected the pattern and postural lying. The temperature at which a maximum number of pigs lay on the slatted floor (i.e., the IT for lying) decreased from approximately 27 degrees C at 25 kg to 23 degrees C at 100 kg of BW (P < 0.001). At increasing temperatures, pigs lay more on their sides and less against other pigs (P < 0.001). Temperature affects lying and excreting behavior of growing-finishing pigs in partially slatted pens. Above certain IT, pen fouling increases linearly with temperature. Inflection temperatures decrease at increasing BW.

  6. Body temperature and circulating progesterone levels before and after parturition in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Etsuko; Jaroenporn, Sukanya; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Konno, Seiki; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Killer whales were used to evaluate peripartum changes and interactions between body temperature and circulating progesterone concentration. Daily body temperature was measured between 0800 h and 0830 h before activity. Body temperature clearly increased during the first phase of pregnancy, and this was followed by a gradual decline until full term. The initial increase was paralleled by circulating levels of progesterone. A decrease in body temperature was first detected on day 5 (p < 0.01) before parturition, and body temperature decreased significantly every 2 days until delivery. Five days before delivery, body temperature was 0.3 C lower than the mean value during the pregnancy period, and the decrease was more marked on day 1 before delivery (0.8 C). Serum progesterone levels during pregnancy showed a general pattern of initial rapid elevation (increasing phase), followed by a gradual decline (decreasing phase) throughout the remainder of pregnancy. However, statistically significant correlations between body temperature and progesterone pattern were only found only during the increasing phase. These results suggest that monitoring body temperature variation can be considered valuable for predicting impending parturition in killer whales.

  7. Basal body temperature method for detecting ovarian cycle in the Captive Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Etsuko; Furuta, Chie; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between basal body temperature and circulating progesterone levels were investigated in a female beluga. Body temperature and serum concentrations of progesterone were measured daily and at 2-4 week intervals respectively, in a female beluga that was in captivity for 7 years between 1996 and 2003. The beluga first ovulated in April, 2000 (13 years old). Thereafter, serum concentrations of progesterone showed cyclic changes, indicating that the ovulatory cycle had started. Serum concentrations of progesterone ranged from 0.1 ng/ml to 15.7 ng/ml. Body temperature also showed cyclic changes during the estrous cycle. Body temperature ranged from 34.9 to 35.9 C, and tended to reach the peak during the high progesterone phase. Mating behavior was observed during the low body temperature phase. The changes in body temperature positively correlated with the circulating progesterone levels. The length of the estrous cycle was 36.7 +/- 3.9 (mean +/- SEM) days based on the intervals between the days of mating behavior. This is the first report demonstrating that body temperature clearly changes during the estrous cycle in a captive female beluga. The present finding suggests that measurement of body temperature is a useful method for detecting the ovarian cycle of the beluga in captivity.

  8. Estimation of body temperature rhythm based on heart activity parameters in daily life.

    PubMed

    Sooyoung Sim; Heenam Yoon; Hosuk Ryou; Kwangsuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Body temperature contains valuable health related information such as circadian rhythm and menstruation cycle. Also, it was discovered from previous studies that body temperature rhythm in daily life is related with sleep disorders and cognitive performances. However, monitoring body temperature with existing devices during daily life is not easy because they are invasive, intrusive, or expensive. Therefore, the technology which can accurately and nonintrusively monitor body temperature is required. In this study, we developed body temperature estimation model based on heart rate and heart rate variability parameters. Although this work was inspired by previous research, we originally identified that the model can be applied to body temperature monitoring in daily life. Also, we could find out that normalized Mean heart rate (nMHR) and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability showed better performance than other parameters. Although we should validate the model with more number of subjects and consider additional algorithms to decrease the accumulated estimation error, we could verify the usefulness of this approach. Through this study, we expect that we would be able to monitor core body temperature and circadian rhythm from simple heart rate monitor. Then, we can obtain various health related information derived from daily body temperature rhythm.

  9. Efficacy comparison of Korean ginseng and American ginseng on body temperature and metabolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Mi-Hwi; Kim, Eung-Hwi; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Park, In-Sun; Yang, Duck-Choon; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Ginseng has beneficial effects in cancer, diabetes and aging. There are two main varieties of ginseng: Panax ginseng (Korean ginseng) and Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng). There are anecdotal reports that American ginseng helps reduce body temperature, whereas Korean ginseng improves blood circulation and increases body temperature; however, their respective effects on body temperature and metabolic parameters have not been studied. We investigated body temperature and metabolic parameters in mice using a metabolic cage. After administering ginseng extracts acutely (single dose of 1000 mg/kg) or chronically (200 mg/kg/day for four weeks), core body temperature, food intake, oxygen consumption and activity were measured, as well as serum levels of pyrogen-related factors and mRNA expression of metabolic genes. Acute treatment with American ginseng reduced body temperature compared with PBS-treated mice during the night; however, there was no significant effect of ginseng treatment on body temperature after four weeks of treatment. VO 2, VCO 2, food intake, activity and energy expenditure were unchanged after both acute and chronic ginseng treatment compared with PBS treatment. In acutely treated mice, serum thyroxin levels were reduced by red and American ginseng, and the serum prostaglandin E2 level was reduced by American ginseng. In chronically treated mice, red and white ginseng reduced thyroxin levels. We conclude that Korean ginseng does not stimulate metabolism in mice, whereas a high dose of American ginseng may reduce night-time body temperature and pyrogen-related factors.

  10. Influence of body temperature on the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Kalatsky, Valery A

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals and conventional electrophysiological methods were used to investigate the correlation between the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex and core body temperature. The results show that hypothermia (25-36 °C) decreases the intensity of optical imaging in the visual cortex and the imaging signal reversibly disappears at 25 °C. Hyperthermia (39-41 °C) increases the intensity but decreases the quality of cortical imaging when body temperature is above 40 °C. The change of optical imaging was in line with that of neuronal activities and local field potentials (LFPs) directly recorded from the visual cortex at 25-39 °C. Hypothermia decreases neuron firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Most of the recorded neurons ceased firing to visual stimulation at 25 °C. Hyperthermia increases neuronal firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Both are reduced when body temperature is above 40 °C, though neither change was statistically significant. These results suggest: (1) Body temperature has an important impact on the visual cortical evoked activities and optical imaging generally reflects these effects when body temperature is between 25 and 39 °C; (2) Optical imaging may not properly reflect the neuronal activity when body temperature is over 40 °C. It is important to maintain core body temperature within 3 °C of the normal body temperature to obtain verifiable results.

  11. Turtles (Chelodina longicollis) regulate muscle metabolic enzyme activity in response to seasonal variation in body temperature.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, F; Sparrow, J; Thompson, M B

    2004-04-01

    Fluctuations in the thermal environment may elicit different responses in animals: migration to climatically different areas, regulation of body temperature, modification of biochemical reaction rates, or assuming a state of dormancy. Many ectothermic reptiles are active over a range of body temperatures that vary seasonally. Here we test the hypothesis that metabolic enzyme activity acclimatises seasonally in freshwater turtles (Chelodina longicollis) in addition to, or instead of, behavioural regulation of body temperatures. We measured body temperatures in free-ranging turtles (n = 3) by radiotelemetry, and we assayed phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), citrate synthase (CS) and cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activities in early autumn (March, n = 10 turtles), late autumn (May, n = 7) and mid-winter (July, n = 7) over a range of assay temperatures (10 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C). Body temperatures were either not different from, or higher than expected from a theoretical null-distribution of a randomly moving animal. Field body temperatures at any season were lower, however, than expected from animals that maximised their sun exposure. Turtles maintained constant PFK, LDH and CCO activities in different months, despite body temperature differences of nearly 13.0 degrees C between March (average daily body temperature = 24.4 degrees C) and July (average = 11.4 degrees C). CS activity did not vary between March and May (average daily body temperature = 20.2 degrees C), but it decreased in July. Thus C. longicollis use a combination of behavioural thermoregulation and biochemical acclimatisation in response to seasonally changing thermal conditions. Ectothermic reptiles were often thought not to acclimatise biochemically, and our results show that behavioural attainment of a preferred body temperature is not mandatory for activity or physiological performance in turtles.

  12. Effect of a Single Musical Cakra Activation Manoeuvre on Body Temperature: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Sumathy, Sundar; Parmar, Parin N

    2016-01-01

    Cakra activation/balancing and music therapy are part of the traditional Indian healing system. Little is known about effect of musical (vocal) technique of cakra activation on body temperature. We conducted a single-session exploratory study to evaluate effects of a single musical (vocal) cakra activation manoeuvre on body temperature in controlled settings. Seven healthy adults performed a single musical (vocal) cakra activation manoeuvre for approximately 12 minutes in controlled environmental conditions. Pre- and post-manoeuvre body temperatures were recorded with a clinical mercury thermometer. After a single manoeuvre, increase in body temperature was recorded in all seven subjects. The range of increase in body temperature was from 0.2°F to 1.4°F; with mean temperature rise being 0.5°F and median temperature rise being 0.4°F. We conclude that a single session of musical (vocal) technique of cakra activation elevated body temperatures in all 7 subjects. Further research is required to study effects of various cakra activation techniques on body temperature and other physiological parameters.

  13. Effect of a Single Musical Cakra Activation Manoeuvre on Body Temperature: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumathy, Sundar; Parmar, Parin N

    2016-01-01

    Cakra activation/balancing and music therapy are part of the traditional Indian healing system. Little is known about effect of musical (vocal) technique of cakra activation on body temperature. We conducted a single-session exploratory study to evaluate effects of a single musical (vocal) cakra activation manoeuvre on body temperature in controlled settings. Seven healthy adults performed a single musical (vocal) cakra activation manoeuvre for approximately 12 minutes in controlled environmental conditions. Pre- and post-manoeuvre body temperatures were recorded with a clinical mercury thermometer. After a single manoeuvre, increase in body temperature was recorded in all seven subjects. The range of increase in body temperature was from 0.2°F to 1.4°F; with mean temperature rise being 0.5°F and median temperature rise being 0.4°F. We conclude that a single session of musical (vocal) technique of cakra activation elevated body temperatures in all 7 subjects. Further research is required to study effects of various cakra activation techniques on body temperature and other physiological parameters. PMID:28182030

  14. Body temperatures and behavior of American alligators during cold winter weather

    SciTech Connect

    Brisbin, I.L., Jr.; Standora, E.A.; Vargo, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Data from two large (188 and 135 kg) male alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) indicated that 4-5 C seemed to be the lowest body temperatures that they could endure with subsequent recovery. Although one animal in shallow water managed to keep a breathing hole open for several days, in ice that was 1.5 cm thick, it later died following a decrease of its body temperature to 4.0 C. The second alligator which was located in a deeper portion of the reservoir used both terrestrial and aquatic basking behavior to raise its body temperature and level of activity. Except in the case of basking events, there was not clear evidence of significant evaluations of the body temperatures of either the live or dead alligators above those of their adjacent water. When located side-by-side, diurnal cycles of deep body temperatures exceeding adjacent water temperatures to a maximum extent near dawn and usually falling below water temperatures during the afternoon and early evening hours. The physical properties and thermal inertia of the bodies of such large alligators, when placed in appropriate microclimates, may be sufficient in themselves to explain the general patterns and levels of body temperature changes observed at these low temperatures.

  15. Mechanisms of temperature-dependent swimming: the importance of physics, physiology and body size in determining protist swimming speed.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Oliver S; Petchey, Owen L; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-12-15

    Body temperatures and thus physiological rates of poikilothermic organisms are determined by environmental temperature. The power an organism has available for swimming is largely dependent on physiological rates and thus body temperature. However, retarding forces such as drag are contingent on the temperature-dependent physical properties of water and on an organism's size. Consequently, the swimming ability of poikilotherms is highly temperature dependent. The importance of the temperature-dependent physical properties of water (e.g. viscosity) in determining swimming speed is poorly understood. Here we propose a semi-mechanistic model to describe how biological rates, size and the physics of the environment contribute to the temperature dependency of microbial swimming speed. Data on the swimming speed and size of a predatory protist and its protist prey were collected and used to test our model. Data were collected by manipulating both the temperature and the viscosity (independently of temperature) of the organism's environment. Protists were either cultured in their test environment (for several generations) or rapidly exposed to their test environment to assess their ability to adapt or acclimate to treatments. Both biological rates and the physics of the environment were predicted to and observed to contribute to the swimming speed of protists. Body size was not temperature dependent, and protists expressed some ability to acclimate to changes in either temperature or viscosity. Overall, using our parameter estimates and novel model, we are able to suggest that 30 to 40% (depending on species) of the response in swimming speed associated with a reduction in temperature from 20 to 5°C is due to viscosity. Because encounter rates between protist predators and their prey are determined by swimming speed, temperature- and viscosity-dependent swimming speeds are likely to result in temperature- and viscosity-dependent trophic interactions.

  16. Estimating changes in volume-weighted mean body temperature using thermometry with an individualized correction factor.

    PubMed

    Jay, Ollie; DuCharme, Michel B; Webb, Paul; Reardon, Francis D; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated whether the estimation error of volume-weighted mean body temperature (DeltaT(b)) using changes in core and skin temperature can be accounted for using personal and environmental parameters. Whole body calorimetry was used to directly measure DeltaT(b) in an Experimental group (EG) of 36 participants (24 males, 12 females) and a Validation group (VG) of 20 (9 males, 11 females) throughout 90 min of cycle ergometry at 40 degrees C, 30% relative humidity (RH) (n = 9 EG, 5 VG); 30 degrees C, 30% RH (n = 9 EG, 5 VG); 30 degrees C, 60% RH (n = 9 EG, 5 VG); and 24 degrees C, 30% RH (n = 9 EG, 5 VG). The core of the two-compartment thermometry model was represented by rectal temperature and the shell by a 12-point mean skin temperature (DeltaT(sk)). The estimation error (X(0)) between DeltaT(b) from calorimetry and DeltaT(b) from thermometry using core/shell weightings of 0.66/0.34, 0.79/0.21, and 0.90/0.10 was calculated after 30, 60, and 90 min of exercise, respectively. The association between X(0) and the individual variation in metabolic heat production (M - W), body surface area (BSA), body fat percentage (%fat), and body surface area-to-mass ratio (BSA/BM) as well as differences in environmental conditions (Oxford index) in the EG data were assessed using stepwise linear regression. At all time points and with all core/shell weightings tested, M - W, BSA, and Oxford index independently correlated significantly with the residual variance in X(0), but %fat and BSA/BM did not. The subsequent regression models were used to predict the thermometric estimation error (X(0_pred)) for each individual in the VG. The value estimated for X(0_pred) was then added to the DeltaT(b) estimated using the two-compartment thermometry models yielding an adjusted estimation (DeltaT(b)_(adj)) for the individuals in the VG. When comparing DeltaT(b)_(adj) to the DeltaT(b) derived from calorimetry in the VG, the best performing model used a core/shell weighting of 0

  17. In vivo body composition studies in rats: assessment of total body protein.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, S; Stamatelatos, I E; Boozer, C N; Moore, R; Ma, R

    1998-01-01

    The precision and accuracy of a prompt-gamma neutron activation facility developed to assess total body protein in rats is estimated. The coefficient of variation of nitrogen measurement, as estimated by repeated measurements on 15 rats, was 5.5% for an equivalent dose of 60 mSv (Q = 20). Good agreement was observed in comparing the results of in vivo neutron activation analysis and chemical carcass analysis performed by the Kjeldahl method. The application of the technique in comparing the effect of a low-fat and a high-fat diet on body protein in rats is demonstrated.

  18. Seasonal patterns of body temperature and microhabitat selection in a lacertid lizard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Zaida; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-11-01

    In temperate areas, seasonal changes entail a source of environmental variation potentially important for organisms. Temperate ectotherms may be adapted to the seasonal fluctuations in environmental traits. For lizards, behavioural adaptations regarding microhabitat selection could arise to improve thermoregulation during the different seasons. However, little is still known about which traits influence microhabitat selection of lizards and their adaptation to seasonality. Here we used Podarcis guadarramae to study the role of potential intrinsic (body size, sex, age) and environmental traits (air and substrate temperatures, wind speed, and sunlight) in the seasonal changes of body temperatures and microhabitat selection of lizards. We measured body temperatures of lizards in the same habitat during the four seasons and compared the climatic variables of the microhabitats selected by lizards with the mean climatic conditions available in their habitat. Body temperatures were similar for adult males, adult females, and juveniles within each season, being significantly higher in summer than in the other seasons, and in spring than in winter. The same pattern was found regarding substrate and air temperatures of the selected microhabitats. Wind speed and air temperature did not affect body temperatures, while body length was marginally significant and substrate temperatures and season did affect the body temperatures of lizards. Our results during the whole year support the idea that the seasonality could be the most important factor affecting body temperatures of these temperate species. Regarding microhabitat selection, environmental constraints, as environmental temperatures and wind speed, affected the seasonal changes on behavioural thermoregulation of lizards. This effect was similar between sexes and age classes, and was independent of body size. In addition, importance of sunlight exposure of the selected microhabitats (full sun, filtered sun, or shade) also

  19. Extracellular hyperosmolality and body temperature during physical exercise in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, S.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Turlejska, E.; Nazar, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that thermoregulation during exercise can be affected by extracellular fluid hyperosmolality without changing the plasma Na(+) concentration. The effects of preexercise venous infusions of hypertonic mannitol and NaCl solutions on rectal temperature responses were compared in dogs running at moderate intensity for 60 min on a treadmill. Plasma Na(+) concentration was increased by 12 meq after NaCl infusion, and decreased by 9 meq after mannitol infusion. Both infusions increased plasma by 15 mosmol/kg. After both infusions, rectal temperature was essentially constant during 60 min rest. However, compared with the noninfusion exercise increase in osmolality of 1.3 C, rectal temperature increased by 1.9 C after both postinfusion exercise experiments. It was concluded that inducing extracellular hyperosmolality, without elevating plasma, can induce excessive increases in rectal temperature during exericse but not at rest.

  20. Extracellular hyperosmolality and body temperature during physical exercise in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, S.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Turlejska, E.; Nazar, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that thermoregulation during exercise can be affected by extracellular fluid hyperosmolality without changing the plasma Na(+) concentration. The effects of preexercise venous infusions of hypertonic mannitol and NaCl solutions on rectal temperature responses were compared in dogs running at moderate intensity for 60 min on a treadmill. Plasma Na(+) concentration was increased by 12 meq after NaCl infusion, and decreased by 9 meq after mannitol infusion. Both infusions increased plasma by 15 mosmol/kg. After both infusions, rectal temperature was essentially constant during 60 min rest. However, compared with the noninfusion exercise increase in osmolality of 1.3 C, rectal temperature increased by 1.9 C after both postinfusion exercise experiments. It was concluded that inducing extracellular hyperosmolality, without elevating plasma, can induce excessive increases in rectal temperature during exericse but not at rest.

  1. The effects of elevated body temperature on the complexity of the diaphragm EMG signals during maturation.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, David; Akay, Yasemin M; Akay, Metin

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of elevated body temperature on the complexity of the diaphragm electromyography (EMGdia), the output of the respiratory neural network--using the approximate entropy method. The diaphragm EMG, EEG, EOG as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume) in chronically instrumented rats were recorded at two postnatal ages: 25-35 days age (juvenile, n = 5) and 36-44 days age (early adult, n = 6) groups during control (36-37 degrees C), mild elevated body temperature (38 degrees C) and severe elevated body temperature (39-40 degrees C). Three to five trials of the recordings were performed at normal body temperature before raising the animal's core temperature by 1-4 degrees C with an electric heating pad. At the elevated temperature, another 3-5 trials were performed. Finally, the animal was cooled to the original temperature, and trials were again repeated. Complexity values of the diaphragm EMG signal were estimated and evaluated using the approximate entropy method (ApEn) over the ten consecutive breaths. Our results suggested that the mean approximate entropy values for the juvenile age group were 1.01 +/- 0.01 (standard error) during control, 0.91 +/- 0.02 during mild elevated body temperature and 0.81 +/- 0.02 during severe elevated body temperature. For the early adult age group, these values were 0.94 +/- 0.01 during control, 0.93 +/- 0.01 during mild elevated body temperature and 0.92 +/- 0.01 during severe elevated body temperature. Our results show that the complexity values and the durations of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) were significantly decreased when the elevated body temperature was shifted from control or mild to severe body temperature (p < 0.05) for the juvenile age group. However, for the early adult age group, an increase in body temperature slightly reduced the complexity measures and the duration of the EMGdia. But, these changes were not statistically

  2. Agreement between axillary, tympanic, and mid-forehead body temperature measurements in adult emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Sener, Serkan; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Eken, Cenker; Yaylaci, Serpil; Ozsarac, Murat

    2012-08-01

    To assess the agreement between noncontact infrared thermometer (noncontact) with infrared tympanic thermometer (tympanic) and electronic axillary thermometer (axillary) in an adult emergency department population. This is a single-center, cross-sectional, prospective trial carried out in a Joint Commission accredited private hospital in Turkiye. All consecutive patients above 16 years were included in the study. The agreements between three methods were analyzed by Bland-Altman analysis with MedCalc 11.0.4 statistical software. Body temperatures were measured on 400 patients (48% were men, mean 35.9±17.3°C). Mean noncontact, tympanic, and axillary measurements (±SD) were 37.22±1.03, 36.72±0.95, and 36.91±0.96°C, respectively, whereas Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of all measurements was 0.892 (95% confidence interval 0.821-0.929). Binary comparisons between body temperature measurements produced mean differences Δ axillary-tympanic, Δ axillary-noncontact, and Δ tympanic-noncontact as 0.5±0.63, 0.2±0.71, and 0.31±0.61°C, respectively. However, the agreement limits for axillary and noncontact was between -1.2 and 1.6°C; -1.74 and 0.74°C for tympanic and noncontact, and -1.52 and 0.9°C for tympanic and noncontact. There is a lack of agreement between body temperature measurements by noncontact, tympanic, and axillary in the adult emergency department population. The easy application may lead noncontact to be the preferable method for healthcare providers but large agreement limits should be considered.

  3. Effect of aluminized covers on body temperature in patients having abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Erickson, R S; Yount, S T

    1991-05-01

    An unintended fall in body temperature is commonly associated with surgery. One promising strategy to help conserve body heat is use of covers made of aluminum-coated plastic. We compared the effect of three combinations of the covers (head cover, body covers, both) and a control condition on tympanic temperature in 60 adults having major abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. The covers were applied from the time of transport to the operating room until exit from the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Tympanic temperature was measured with an infrared thermometer. Between transport and PACU entry, the four groups had mean temperature decreases ranging from 1.6 degrees to 2.3 degrees F (0.9 degree to 1.3 degrees C). After controlling for background variables affecting body temperature, adjusted PACU entry temperature was higher in the two groups with aluminized body covers. Regression analysis showed that use of the body covers accounted for 7% of the temperature variance at PACU entry and predicted a 0.9 degree F (0.5 degree C) higher temperature at that time. These findings indicate that aluminized body covers help to reduce heat loss in patients having major abdominal surgery.

  4. Lack of Accuracy of Body Temperature for Detecting Serious Bacterial Infection in Febrile Episodes.

    PubMed

    De, Sukanya; Williams, Gabrielle J; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Macaskill, Petra; McCaskill, Mary; Isaacs, David; Craig, Jonathan C

    2015-09-01

    Body temperature is a time-honored marker of serious bacterial infection, but there are few studies of its test performance. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of temperature measured on presentation to medical care for detecting serious bacterial infection. Febrile children 0-5 years of age presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary care pediatric hospital were sampled consecutively. The accuracy of the axillary temperature measured at presentation was evaluated using logistic regression models to generate receiver operating characteristic curves. Reference standard tests for serious bacterial infection were standard microbiologic/radiologic tests and clinical follow-up. Age, clinicians' impression of appearance of the child (well versus unwell) and duration of illness were assessed as possible effect modifiers. Of 15,781 illness episodes 1120 (7.1%) had serious bacterial infection. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for temperature was 0.60 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.58-0.62]. A threshold of ≥ 38°C had a sensitivity of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.64-0.70), specificity of 0.45 (95% CI: 0.44-0.46), positive likelihood ratio of 1.2 (95% CI: 1.2-1.3) and negative likelihood ratio of 0.7 (95% CI: 0.7-0.8). Age and illness duration had a small but significant effect on the accuracy of temperature increasing its "rule-in" potential. Measured temperature at presentation to hospital is not an accurate marker of serious bacterial infection in febrile children. Younger age and longer duration of illness increase the rule-in potential of temperature but without substantial overall change in its test accuracy.

  5. Effects of the melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist ramelteon on daytime body temperature and sleep.

    PubMed

    Markwald, Rachel R; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo L; Burke, Tina M; Snider, Jesse A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    A reduction in core temperature and an increase in the distal-proximal skin gradient (DPG) are reported to be associated with shorter sleep onset latencies (SOL) and better sleep quality. Ramelteon is a melatonin MT-1/MT-2 agonist approved for the treatment of insomnia. At night, ramelteon has been reported to shorten SOL. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ramelteon would reduce core temperature, increase the DPG, as well as shorten SOL, reduce wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), and increase total sleep time (TST) during a daytime sleep opportunity. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Eight mg ramelteon or placebo was administered 2 h prior to a 4-h daytime sleep opportunity. Sleep and chronobiology laboratory. Fourteen healthy adults (5 females), aged (23.2 +/- 4.2 y). Primary outcome measures included core body temperature, the DPG and sleep physiology (minutes of total sleep time [TST], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and SOL). We also assessed as secondary outcomes, proximal and distal skin temperatures, sleep staging and subjective TST. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed ramelteon significantly reduced core temperature and increased the DPG (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, ramelteon reduced WASO and increased TST, and stages 1 and 2 sleep (all P < 0.05). The change in the DPG was negatively correlated with SOL in the ramelteon condition. Ramelteon improved daytime sleep, perhaps mechanistically in part by reducing core temperature and modulating skin temperature. These findings suggest that ramelteon may have promise for the treatment of insomnia associated with circadian misalignment due to circadian sleep disorders.

  6. Integration of body temperature into the analysis of energy expenditure in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo; Xiao, Cuiying; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We quantified the effect of environmental temperature on mouse energy homeostasis and body temperature. Methods The effect of environmental temperature (4–33 °C) on body temperature, energy expenditure, physical activity, and food intake in various mice (chow diet, high-fat diet, Brs3-/y, lipodystrophic) was measured using continuous monitoring. Results Body temperature depended most on circadian phase and physical activity, but also on environmental temperature. The amounts of energy expenditure due to basal metabolic rate (calculated via a novel method), thermic effect of food, physical activity, and cold-induced thermogenesis were determined as a function of environmental temperature. The measured resting defended body temperature matched that calculated from the energy expenditure using Fourier's law of heat conduction. Mice defended a higher body temperature during physical activity. The cost of the warmer body temperature during the active phase is 4–16% of total daily energy expenditure. Parameters measured in diet-induced obese and Brs3-/y mice were similar to controls. The high post-mortem heat conductance demonstrates that most insulation in mice is via physiological mechanisms. Conclusions At 22 °C, cold-induced thermogenesis is ∼120% of basal metabolic rate. The higher body temperature during physical activity is due to a higher set point, not simply increased heat generation during exercise. Most insulation in mice is via physiological mechanisms, with little from fur or fat. Our analysis suggests that the definition of the upper limit of the thermoneutral zone should be re-considered. Measuring body temperature informs interpretation of energy expenditure data and improves the predictiveness and utility of the mouse to model human energy homeostasis. PMID:26042200

  7. Integration of body temperature into the analysis of energy expenditure in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo; Xiao, Cuiying; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2015-06-01

    We quantified the effect of environmental temperature on mouse energy homeostasis and body temperature. The effect of environmental temperature (4-33 °C) on body temperature, energy expenditure, physical activity, and food intake in various mice (chow diet, high-fat diet, Brs3 (-/y) , lipodystrophic) was measured using continuous monitoring. Body temperature depended most on circadian phase and physical activity, but also on environmental temperature. The amounts of energy expenditure due to basal metabolic rate (calculated via a novel method), thermic effect of food, physical activity, and cold-induced thermogenesis were determined as a function of environmental temperature. The measured resting defended body temperature matched that calculated from the energy expenditure using Fourier's law of heat conduction. Mice defended a higher body temperature during physical activity. The cost of the warmer body temperature during the active phase is 4-16% of total daily energy expenditure. Parameters measured in diet-induced obese and Brs3 (-/y) mice were similar to controls. The high post-mortem heat conductance demonstrates that most insulation in mice is via physiological mechanisms. At 22 °C, cold-induced thermogenesis is ∼120% of basal metabolic rate. The higher body temperature during physical activity is due to a higher set point, not simply increased heat generation during exercise. Most insulation in mice is via physiological mechanisms, with little from fur or fat. Our analysis suggests that the definition of the upper limit of the thermoneutral zone should be re-considered. Measuring body temperature informs interpretation of energy expenditure data and improves the predictiveness and utility of the mouse to model human energy homeostasis.

  8. Geographic variation in body size: the effects of ambient temperature and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Yoram; Geffen, Eli

    2006-06-01

    Latitudinal trends in body size have been explained as a response to temperature- or water-related factors, which are predictors of primary production. We used the first principal component calculated from three body parameters (weight, body length and the greatest length of the skull) of a sample of mammals from Israel and Sinai to determine those species that vary in size geographically, and whether such variation is related to annual rainfall, average minimum January temperature and average maximum August temperature. We used a conservative approach to discern the effects of precipitation and temperature by applying sequential regression. Variable priorities were assigned according to their bivariate correlation with body size, except for rainfall and its interactions that entered into the model last. Eleven species (Acomys cahirinus, Apodemus mystacinus, Canis lupus, Crocidura suaveolens, Gerbillus dasyurus, Hyaena hyaena, Lepus capensis, Meles meles, Meriones tristrami, Rousettus aegyptius and Vulpes vulpes) of the 17 species examined varied in size geographically. In five of them, rainfall was positively related to body size, while in one species it was negatively related to it. Contrary to the prediction of Bergmann's rule, mean minimum January temperature was positively related to body size in five species and negatively related to body size in two species (C. suaveolens and G. dasyurus). As predicted by Bergmann's rule, maximum June temperature was negatively related to body size in three species, and positively so in one (L. capensis). Primary production, particularly in desert and semi-desert areas, is determined mainly by precipitation. The above results indicate that, in our sample, primary production has an important effect on body size of several species of mammals. This is evident from the considerable proportion of the variability in body size explained by rain. However, low ambient temperatures may slow down and even inhibit photosynthesis. Hence

  9. Body temperature and resistance to evaporative water loss in tropical Australian frogs.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Christopher R; Christian, Keith A; Betts, Gregory; Tracy, C Richard

    2008-06-01

    Although the skin of most amphibians measured to date offers no resistance to evaporative water loss (EWL), some species, primarily arboreal frogs, produce skin secretions that increase resistance to EWL. At high air temperatures, it may be advantageous for amphibians to increase EWL as a means to decrease body temperature. In Australian hylid frogs, most species do not decrease their resistance at high air temperature, but some species with moderate resistance (at moderate air temperatures) gradually decrease resistance with increasing air temperature, and some species with high resistance (at moderate air temperatures) abruptly decrease resistance at high air temperatures. Lower skin resistance at high air temperatures decreases the time to desiccation, but the lower body temperatures allow the species to avoid their critical thermal maximum (CT(Max)) body temperatures. The body temperatures of species with low to moderate resistances to EWL that do not adjust resistance at high air temperatures do not warm to their CT(Max), although for some species, this is because they have high CT(Max) values. As has been reported previously for resistance to EWL generally, the response pattern of change of EWL at high air temperatures has apparently evolved independently among Australian hylids. The mechanisms involved in causing resistance and changes in resistance are unknown.

  10. Thermal reference points as an index for monitoring body temperature in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Melero, Mar; Rodríguez-Prieto, Víctor; Rubio-García, Ana; García-Párraga, Daniel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2015-09-04

    Monitoring body temperature is essential in veterinary care as minor variations may indicate dysfunction. Rectal temperature is widely used as a proxy for body temperature, but measuring it requires special equipment, training or restraining, and it potentially stresses animals. Infrared thermography is an alternative that reduces handling stress, is safer for technicians and works well for untrained animals. This study analysed thermal reference points in five marine mammal species: bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus); beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas); Patagonian sea lion (Otaria flavescens); harbour seal (Phoca vitulina); and Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens). The thermogram analysis revealed that the internal blowhole mucosa temperature is the most reliable indicator of body temperature in cetaceans. The temperatures taken during voluntary breathing with a camera held perpendicularly were practically identical to the rectal temperature in bottlenose dolphins and were only 1 °C lower than the rectal temperature in beluga whales. In pinnipeds, eye temperature appears the best parameter for temperature control. In these animals, the average times required for temperatures to stabilise after hauling out, and the average steady-state temperature values, differed according to species: Patagonian sea lions, 10 min, 31.13 °C; harbour seals, 10 min, 32.27 °C; Pacific walruses, 5 min, 29.93 °C. The best thermographic and most stable reference points for monitoring body temperature in marine mammals are open blowhole in cetaceans and eyes in pinnipeds.

  11. Voluntary Running Aids to Maintain High Body Temperature in Rats Bred for High Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira M.; Silvennoinen, Mika; Ma, Hongqiang; Törmäkangas, Timo; Rantalainen, Timo; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Lensu, Sanna; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The production of heat, i.e., thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA) level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect core body temperature. Here we use rat models selectively bred to differ in maximal treadmill endurance running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR), that as adults are divergent for aerobic exercise capacity, aging, and metabolic disease risk to study the connection between PA and body temperature. Ten high capacity runner (HCR) and ten low capacity runner (LCR) female rats were studied between 9 and 21 months of age. Rectal body temperature of HCR and LCR rats was measured before and after 1-year voluntary running/control intervention to explore the effects of aging and PA. Also, we determined whether injected glucose and spontaneous activity affect the body temperature differently between LCR and HCR rats at 9 vs. 21 months of age. HCRs had on average 1.3°C higher body temperature than LCRs (p < 0.001). Aging decreased the body temperature level of HCRs to similar levels with LCRs. The opportunity to run voluntarily had a significant impact on the body temperature of HCRs (p < 0.001) allowing them to maintain body temperature at a similar level as when at younger age. Compared to LCRs, HCRs were spontaneously more active, had higher relative gastrocnemius muscle mass and higher UCP2, PGC-1α, cyt c, and OXPHOS levels in the skeletal muscle (p < 0.050). These results suggest that higher PA level together with greater relative muscle mass and higher mitochondrial content/function contribute to the accumulation of heat in the HCRs. Interestingly, neither aging nor voluntary training had a significant impact on core body temperature of LCRs. However, glucose injection resulted in a lowering of the body temperature of LCRs (p < 0

  12. Voluntary Running Aids to Maintain High Body Temperature in Rats Bred for High Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Sira M; Silvennoinen, Mika; Ma, Hongqiang; Törmäkangas, Timo; Rantalainen, Timo; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Lensu, Sanna; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The production of heat, i.e., thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA) level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect core body temperature. Here we use rat models selectively bred to differ in maximal treadmill endurance running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR), that as adults are divergent for aerobic exercise capacity, aging, and metabolic disease risk to study the connection between PA and body temperature. Ten high capacity runner (HCR) and ten low capacity runner (LCR) female rats were studied between 9 and 21 months of age. Rectal body temperature of HCR and LCR rats was measured before and after 1-year voluntary running/control intervention to explore the effects of aging and PA. Also, we determined whether injected glucose and spontaneous activity affect the body temperature differently between LCR and HCR rats at 9 vs. 21 months of age. HCRs had on average 1.3°C higher body temperature than LCRs (p < 0.001). Aging decreased the body temperature level of HCRs to similar levels with LCRs. The opportunity to run voluntarily had a significant impact on the body temperature of HCRs (p < 0.001) allowing them to maintain body temperature at a similar level as when at younger age. Compared to LCRs, HCRs were spontaneously more active, had higher relative gastrocnemius muscle mass and higher UCP2, PGC-1α, cyt c, and OXPHOS levels in the skeletal muscle (p < 0.050). These results suggest that higher PA level together with greater relative muscle mass and higher mitochondrial content/function contribute to the accumulation of heat in the HCRs. Interestingly, neither aging nor voluntary training had a significant impact on core body temperature of LCRs. However, glucose injection resulted in a lowering of the body temperature of LCRs (p < 0

  13. Regulation of the peripheral body temperature by foods: a temperature decrease induced by the Japanese persimmon (kaki, Diospyros kaki).

    PubMed

    Hibino, Gaku; Nadamoto, Tomonori; Fujisawa, Fumiko; Fushiki, Tohru

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether the ingestion of the Japanese persimmon (kaki, Diospyros kaki) could lower the human peripheral body temperature. It was found that the temperatures recorded at the foot and wrist were depressed after kaki consumption compared to after the same amount of water consumption. The effects of ingesting freeze-dried kaki and eating a cookie (as its nutritional counterpart) containing the same amount of carbohydrate, protein, fat, and water were compared. A similar temperature-reducing effect of kaki was observed. The recovery of finger temperature after soaking the finger in ice-cooled water was also studied. The temperature recovery was delayed after kaki consumption. It was thus quantitatively demonstrated that ingesting kaki indeed had the effect of lowering (or repressing the rise) of the peripheral human body temperature, as has been traditionally believed in China for many hundreds of years.

  14. Homeostatic and circadian control of body temperature in the fat-tailed gerbil.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, R

    1998-01-01

    The interplay of homeostasis and circadian rhythmicity in the control of body temperature was studied in the fat-tailed gerbil (Pachyuromys duprasi). In a first study, the body temperature rhythm of 8 gerbils maintained at 24 degrees C under a 14L:10D light-dark cycle was studied by telemetry. Data from 9 other species of small mammals were also obtained for comparison. The gerbils were found to exhibit a robust rhythm of body temperature (the most robust of the 10 species) with a high plateau during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle and a low plateau during the light phase. In a second experiment, 5 gerbils were allowed to select the temperature of their environment by moving along a thermal gradient. The animals consistently selected higher ambient temperatures during the light phase of the light-dark cycle (when their body temperature was at the low plateau). In a third experiment, the metabolic response of 8 gerbils to an acute cold exposure was determined by indirect calorimetry. Greater cold-induced thermogenesis was observed during the light phase. The fact that the animals selected higher ambient temperatures and displayed greater cold-induced thermogenesis when their body temperature was lower contradicts the hypothesis that the body temperature rhythm is caused by a rhythmic oscillation of the thermoregulatory set point.

  15. The effect of temperature and body weight on the routine metabolic rate and postprandial metabolic response in mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Igor; Booth, Mark A

    2009-09-01

    Specific dynamic action (SDA) is the energy expended on the physiological processes associated with meal digestion and is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the meal and the body weight (BW) and temperature of the organism. This study assessed the effects of temperature and body weight on the routine metabolic rate (RMR) and postprandial metabolic response in mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus. RMR and SDA were established at 3 temperatures (14, 20 and 26 degrees C). 5 size classes of mulloway ranging from 60 g to 1.14 kg were used to establish RMR with 3 of the 5 size classes (60, 120 and 240 g) used to establish SDA. The effect of body size on the mass-specific RMR (mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1)) varied significantly depending on the temperature; there was a greater relative increase in the mass-specific RMR for smaller mulloway with increasing temperature. No statistical differences were found between the mass exponent (b) values at each temperature when tested against H(0): b=0.8. The gross RMR of mulloway (mg O(2) fish(-1) h(-1)) can be described as function of temperature (T; 14-26 degrees C) as: (0.0195T-0.0454)BW(g)(0.8) and the mass-specific RMR (mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1)) can be described as: (21.042T-74.867)BW(g)(-0.2). Both SDA duration and time to peak SDA were influenced by temperature and body weight; SDA duration occurred within 41-89 h and peak time occurred within 17-38 h of feeding. The effect of body size on peak metabolic rate varied significantly depending on temperature, generally increasing with temperature and decreasing with increasing body size. Peak gross oxygen consumption (MO(2): mg O(2) fish(-1) h(-1)) scaled allometrically with BW. Temperature, but not body size, significantly affected SDA scope, although the difference was numerically small. There was a trend for MO(2) above RMR over the SDA period to increase with temperature; however, this was not statistically significant. The average proportion of energy expended over the SDA period

  16. Impact of highway construction on water bodies: a geospatial assessment.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kushwaha, Vikash K; Mardikar, Trupti; Labhasetwar, P K

    2017-08-01

    India has witnessed a massive infrastructure boom in the past few years. One of such projects is National Highway-7 (NH-7), a North-South highway connecting Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu, to Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, traversing many water bodies. The present study aims to assess the pre- and post-construction impact due to existing, new and widened NH-7 on the physical status of the water bodies, using remote sensing techniques. Satellite images spanning 22 years were procured and analysed for change detection in land use and land cover within the waterbodies. The study indicates that construction activities have led to transformation within the water bodies regarding reduction in area and inter-changing of land use and land cover classes, in turn leading to siltation and reduction of recharge.

  17. Skin sites to predict deep-body temperature while wearing firefighters' personal protective equipment during periodical changes in air temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siyeon; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate stable and valid measurement sites of skin temperatures as a non-invasive variable to predict deep-body temperature while wearing firefighters' personal protective equipment (PPE) during air temperature changes. Eight male firefighters participated in an experiment which consisted of 60-min exercise and 10-min recovery while wearing PPE without self-contained breathing apparatus (7.75 kg in total PPE mass). Air temperature was periodically fluctuated from 29.5 to 35.5 °C with an amplitude of 6 °C. Rectal temperature was chosen as a deep-body temperature, and 12 skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that the forehead and chest were identified as the most valid sites to predict rectal temperature (R(2) = 0.826 and 0.824, respectively) in an environment with periodically fluctuated air temperatures. This study suggests that particular skin temperatures are valid as a non-invasive variable when predicting rectal temperature of an individual wearing PPE in changing ambient temperatures. Practitioner Summary: This study should offer assistance for developing a more reliable indirect indicating system of individual heat strain for firefighters in real time, which can be used practically as a precaution of firefighters' heat-related illness and utilised along with physiological monitoring.

  18. [Diurnal rhythm of body temperature during space flight].

    PubMed

    Lkhagva, L

    1984-01-01

    The axillary temperature of the Mongolian Salyut-6 crewmember was measured in the daytime before, during and after flight. The temperature was recorded immediately after awakening to going to sleep every 2 hours: a month prelaunch in the Cosmonauts' Training Center during 5 days, a week prelaunch at the Baikonur launch site during 3 days, inflight from the middle of mission day 2 to the middle of mission day 7 every day, and postflight at Baikonur during 4 days. It was found that inflight the axillary temperature decreased significantly by 0.44 degrees C as compared to the data obtained in the Cosmonauts' Training Center and by 0.22 degrees C as compared to the data obtained at the launch site. There were also some changes in the pattern of acrophases on the time scale. It is recommended to continue thermal regulation measurements in space flight.

  19. The validity of mass body temperature screening with ear thermometers in a warm thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Koji; Wada, Yuko; Kagitani, Hideaki; Arioka, Tetsuya; Maeda, Koji; Kida, Kenichi

    2010-10-01

    Identification of people who have a fever in public places during the occurrence of emerging infectious diseases is essential for controlling disease spread. The measurement of body temperature could identify infected persons. The environment affects body temperature, but little is known about the validity of measurements under different thermal environments. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the validity of measuring body temperature in cold and warm environments. We recruited 50 participants aged 18-69 years (26 males, 24 females) to measure body temperature using an axillary thermometer and an ear thermometer and by infrared thermal imaging (thermography). The body temperature obtained with an axillary thermometer was used as a reference; receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted to determine the validity of temperatures obtained by measurement with an ear thermometer and thermography at 36.7°C (median of the axillary body temperature). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicates the validity of measurements. The AUC for ear thermometers in a warm environment (mean temperature: 20.0°C) showed a fair accuracy (AUC: 0.74 [95% CI: 0.64-0.83]), while that (AUC: 0.62 [95% CI: 0.51-0.72]) in a cold environment (mean temperature: 12.6°C) and measurements with thermography used in both environments (AUC: 0.57 [95% CI: 0.45-0.68] in a warm environment and AUC: 0.65 [95% CI: 0.54-0.76] in a cold environment) showed a low accuracy. In conclusion, in a warm environment, measurement of body temperature with an ear thermometer is a valid procedure and effective for mass body temperature screening.

  20. Best practice in the measurement of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Davie, A; Amoore, J

    In the last two decades, there has been a significant change in the technology of clinical thermometry. Mercury-in-glass thermometers have been replaced with electronic devices that offer faster readings with minimal inconvenience to the patient. Each user should be aware of the characteristics and limitations of these devices to interpret correctly the temperature reading on the display. The article provides an insight into commonly used clinical thermometers, how they determine each temperature reading and, crucially, how users affect the measurement process.

  1. Selection does not favor larger body size at lower temperature in a seed-feeding beetle.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, R Craig; Moya-Laraño, Jordi; Fox, Charles W

    2008-10-01

    Body size of many animals increases with increasing latitude, a phenomenon known as Bergmann's rule (Bergmann clines). Latitudinal gradients in mean temperature are frequently assumed to be the underlying cause of this pattern because temperature covaries systematically with latitude, but whether and how temperature mediates selection on body size is unclear. To test the hypothesis that the "relative" advantage of being larger is greatest at cooler temperatures we compare the fitness of replicate lines of the seed beetle, Stator limbatus, for which body size was manipulated via artificial selection ("Large,"Control," and "Small" lines), when raised at low (22 degrees C) and high (34 degrees C) temperatures. Large-bodied beetles (Large lines) took the longest to develop but had the highest lifetime fecundity, and highest fitness (r(C)), at both low and high temperatures. However, the relative difference between the Large and Small lines did not change with temperature (replicate 2) or was greatest at high temperature (replicate 1), contrary to the prediction that the fitness advantage of being large relative to being small will decline with increasing temperature. Our results are consistent with two previous studies of this seed beetle, but inconsistent with prior studies that suggest that temperature-mediated selection on body size is a major contributor to the production of Bergmann clines. We conclude that other environmental and ecological variables that covary with latitude are more likely to produce the gradient in natural selection responsible for generating Bergmann clines.

  2. Changes in Body Temperature in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury by Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun-Gyu; Won, Yu Hui; Park, Sung-Hee; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Seo, Jeong-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    To investigate changes in the core temperature and body surface temperature in patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries (SCI). In incomplete SCI, the temperature change is difficult to see compared with complete spinal cord injuries. The goal of this study was to better understand thermal regulation in patients with incomplete SCI. Fifty-six SCI patients were enrolled, and the control group consisted of 20 healthy persons. The spinal cord injuries were classified according to International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury. The patients were classified into two groups: upper (neurological injury level T6 or above) and lower (neurological injury level T7 or below) SCIs. Body core temperature was measured using an oral thermometer, and body surface temperature was measured using digital infrared thermographic imaging. Twenty-nine patients had upper spinal cord injuries, 27 patients had lower SCIs, and 20 persons served as the normal healthy persons. Comparing the skin temperatures of the three groups, the temperatures at the lower abdomen, anterior thigh and anterior tibia in the patients with upper SCIs were lower than those of the normal healthy persons and the patients with lower SCIs. No significant temperature differences were observed between the normal healthy persons and the patients with lower SCIs. In our study, we found thermal dysregulation in patients with incomplete SCI. In particular, body surface temperature regulation was worse in upper SCIs than in lower injuries. Moreover, cord injury severity affected body surface temperature regulation in SCI patients.

  3. Changes in Body Temperature in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury by Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun-Gyu; Won, Yu Hui; Park, Sung-Hee; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes in the core temperature and body surface temperature in patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries (SCI). In incomplete SCI, the temperature change is difficult to see compared with complete spinal cord injuries. The goal of this study was to better understand thermal regulation in patients with incomplete SCI. Methods Fifty-six SCI patients were enrolled, and the control group consisted of 20 healthy persons. The spinal cord injuries were classified according to International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury. The patients were classified into two groups: upper (neurological injury level T6 or above) and lower (neurological injury level T7 or below) SCIs. Body core temperature was measured using an oral thermometer, and body surface temperature was measured using digital infrared thermographic imaging. Results Twenty-nine patients had upper spinal cord injuries, 27 patients had lower SCIs, and 20 persons served as the normal healthy persons. Comparing the skin temperatures of the three groups, the temperatures at the lower abdomen, anterior thigh and anterior tibia in the patients with upper SCIs were lower than those of the normal healthy persons and the patients with lower SCIs. No significant temperature differences were observed between the normal healthy persons and the patients with lower SCIs. Conclusion In our study, we found thermal dysregulation in patients with incomplete SCI. In particular, body surface temperature regulation was worse in upper SCIs than in lower injuries. Moreover, cord injury severity affected body surface temperature regulation in SCI patients. PMID:26605167

  4. Metabolic heat production, heat loss and the circadian rhythm of body temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2003-05-01

    Metabolic heat production (calculated from oxygen consumption), dry heat loss (measured in a calorimeter) and body temperature (measured by telemetry) were recorded simultaneously at 6 min intervals over five consecutive days in rats maintained in constant darkness. Robust circadian rhythmicity (confirmed by chi square periodogram analysis) was observed in all three variables. The rhythm of heat production was phase-advanced by about half an hour in relation to the body temperature rhythm, whereas the rhythm of heat loss was phase-delayed by about half an hour. The balance of heat production and heat loss exhibited a daily oscillation 180 deg out of phase with the oscillation in body temperature. Computations indicated that the amount of heat associated with the generation of the body temperature rhythm (1.6 kJ) corresponds to less than 1 % of the total daily energy budget (172 kJ) in this species. Because of the small magnitude of the fraction of heat balance associated with the body temperature rhythm, it is likely that the daily oscillation in heat balance has a very slow effect on body temperature, thus accounting for the 180 deg phase difference between the rhythms of heat balance and body temperature.

  5. A biphasic basal body temperature record during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Urman, B C; McComb, P F

    1989-01-01

    A case of biphasic temperature record is reported during the course of an ectopic pregnancy. Possible implications of this phenomenon may improve our understanding of the role of ovum transmigration and the endocrinological interaction of pregnancy with hormonal control of ovulation.

  6. Effect of heat stress on body temperature in healthy early postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; Suthar, V S; Heuwieser, W

    2012-12-01

    Measurement of body temperature is the most common method for an early diagnosis of sick cows in fresh cow protocols currently used on dairy farms. Thresholds for fever range from 39.4 °C to 39.7 °C. Several studies attempted to describe normal temperature ranges for healthy dairy cows in the early puerperium. However, the definition of a healthy cow is variable within these studies. It is challenging to determine normal temperature ranges for healthy cows because body temperature is usually included in the definition. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify factors that influence body temperature in healthy dairy cows early postpartum and to determine normal temperature ranges for healthy cows that calved in a moderate (temperature humidity index: 59.8 ± 3.8) and a hot period (temperature humidity index: 74.1 ± 4.4), respectively, excluding body temperature from the definition of the health status. Furthermore, the prevalence of fever was calculated for both periods separately. A subset of 17 (moderate period) and 15 cows (hot period) were used for analysis. To ensure their uterine health only cows with a serum haptoglobin concentration ≤ 1.1 g/L were included in the analysis. Therefore, body temperature could be excluded from the definition. A vaginal temperature logger that measured vaginal temperature every 10 min was inserted from Day 2 to 10 after parturition. Additionally rectal temperature was measured twice daily. Day in milk (2 to 10), period (moderate and hot), and time of day had an effect on rectal and vaginal temperature. The prevalence of fever (≥ 39.5 °C) was 7.4% and 28.1% for rectal temperature in the moderate and hot period, respectively. For vaginal temperature (07.00 to 11.00 h) it was 10% and 33%, respectively, considering the same threshold and period. This study demonstrates that body temperature in the early puerperium is influenced by several factors (day in milk, climate, time of day). Therefore, these factors

  7. Body temperature and major neurological improvement in tPA-treated stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kvistad, C E; Thomassen, L; Waje-Andreassen, U; Logallo, N; Naess, H

    2014-05-01

    Major neurological improvement (MNI) at 24 hours represents a marker of early recanalization in ischaemic stroke. Although low body temperature is considered neuroprotective in cerebral ischaemia, some studies have suggested that higher body temperature may promote clot lysis in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke. We hypothesized that higher body temperature was associated with MNI in severe stroke patients treated with tPA, suggesting a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis and recanalization. Patients with ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) treated with tPA between February 2006 and August 2012 were prospectively included and retrospectively analysed. Body temperature was measured upon admission. MNI was defined by a ≥8 point improvement in NIHSS score at 24 hours as compared to NIHSS score on admission. No significant improvement (no-MNI) was defined by either an increase in NIHSS score or a decrease of ≤2 points at 24 hours in patients with an admission NIHSS score of ≥8. Of the 2351 patients admitted with ischaemic stroke or TIA, 347 patients (14.8%) were treated with tPA. A total of 32 patients (9.2%) had MNI and 56 patients (16.1%) had no-MNI. Patients with MNI had higher body temperatures compared with patients with no-MNI (36.7°C vs 36.3°C, P = 0.004). Higher body temperature was independently associated with MNI when adjusted for confounders (OR 5.16, P = 0.003). Higher body temperature was independently associated with MNI in severe ischaemic stroke patients treated with tPA. This may suggest a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis and recanalization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Plasticity of Performance Curves Can Buffer Reaction Rates from Body Temperature Variation in Active Endotherms

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Little, Alexander G.

    2017-01-01

    Endotherms regulate their core body temperature by adjusting metabolic heat production and insulation. Endothermic body temperatures are therefore relatively stable compared to external temperatures. The thermal sensitivity of biochemical reaction rates is thought to have co-evolved with body temperature regulation so that optimal reaction rates occur at the regulated body temperature. However, recent data show that core body temperatures even of non-torpid endotherms fluctuate considerably. Additionally, peripheral temperatures can be considerably lower and more variable than core body temperatures. Here we discuss whether published data support the hypothesis that thermal performance curves of physiological reaction rates are plastic so that performance is maintained despite variable body temperatures within active (non-torpid) endotherms, and we explore mechanisms that confer plasticity. There is evidence that thermal performance curves in tissues that experience thermal fluctuations can be plastic, although this question remains relatively unexplored for endotherms. Mechanisms that alter thermal responses locally at the tissue level include transient potential receptor ion channels (TRPV and TRPM) and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) both of which can influence metabolism and energy expenditure. Additionally, the thermal sensitivity of processes that cause post-transcriptional RNA degradation can promote the relative expression of cold-responsive genes. Endotherms can respond to environmental fluctuations similarly to ectotherms, and thermal plasticity complements core body temperature regulation to increase whole-organism performance. Thermal plasticity is ancestral to endothermic thermoregulation, but it has not lost its selective advantage so that modern endotherms are a physiological composite of ancestral ectothermic and derived endothermic traits. PMID:28824463

  9. Plasticity of Performance Curves Can Buffer Reaction Rates from Body Temperature Variation in Active Endotherms.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Little, Alexander G

    2017-01-01

    Endotherms regulate their core body temperature by adjusting metabolic heat production and insulation. Endothermic body temperatures are therefore relatively stable compared to external temperatures. The thermal sensitivity of biochemical reaction rates is thought to have co-evolved with body temperature regulation so that optimal reaction rates occur at the regulated body temperature. However, recent data show that core body temperatures even of non-torpid endotherms fluctuate considerably. Additionally, peripheral temperatures can be considerably lower and more variable than core body temperatures. Here we discuss whether published data support the hypothesis that thermal performance curves of physiological reaction rates are plastic so that performance is maintained despite variable body temperatures within active (non-torpid) endotherms, and we explore mechanisms that confer plasticity. There is evidence that thermal performance curves in tissues that experience thermal fluctuations can be plastic, although this question remains relatively unexplored for endotherms. Mechanisms that alter thermal responses locally at the tissue level include transient potential receptor ion channels (TRPV and TRPM) and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) both of which can influence metabolism and energy expenditure. Additionally, the thermal sensitivity of processes that cause post-transcriptional RNA degradation can promote the relative expression of cold-responsive genes. Endotherms can respond to environmental fluctuations similarly to ectotherms, and thermal plasticity complements core body temperature regulation to increase whole-organism performance. Thermal plasticity is ancestral to endothermic thermoregulation, but it has not lost its selective advantage so that modern endotherms are a physiological composite of ancestral ectothermic and derived endothermic traits.

  10. Enlargement of postoperative aqueductal air due to elevated body temperature. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bilginer, Burçak; Ziyal, Ibrahim M; Celik, Ozgür; Ayhan, Selim; Akalan, Nejat

    2007-01-01

    Pneumocephalus has been reported after posterior fossa surgery especially with procedures performed in the sitting position. The gravitational effect is the decisive factor in the development of pneumocephalus. The entrapped air in the aqueduct may enlarge due to several factors such as elevated body temperature and may cause to deterioration in neurological status. We report a rare case of tension pneumocephalus associated with the enlargement of massive air in aqueduct due to elevated body temperature, following removal of a cervicomedullary tumor. We believe her neurological deterioration was due to the compression of the reticular formation by dilatation of postoperative air in the aqueduct due to the elevation of her body temperature.

  11. No Relation between Body Temperature and Arterial Recanalization at Three Days in Patients with Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geurts, Marjolein; van der Worp, H. Bart; Horsch, Alexander D.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Biessels, Geert J.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recanalization of an occluded intracranial artery is influenced by temperature-dependent enzymes, including alteplase. We assessed the relation between body temperature on admission and recanalization. Methods We included 278 patients with acute ischaemic stroke within nine hours after symptom onset, who had an intracranial arterial occlusion on admission CT angiography, in 13 participating centres. We calculated the relation per every 0.1°Celsius increase in admission body temperature and recanalization at three days. Results Recanalization occurred in 80% of occluded arteries. There was no relation between body temperature and recanalization at three days after adjustments for age, NIHSS score on admission and treatment with alteplase (adjusted odds ratio per 0.1°Celsius, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.05; p = 0.70). Results for patients treated or not treated with alteplase were essentially the same. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in patients with acute ischaemic stroke there is no relation between body temperature on admission and recanalization of an occluded intracranial artery three days later, irrespective of treatment with alteplase. PMID:26473959

  12. Microchip transponder thermometry for monitoring core body temperature of antelope during capture.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Fuller, Andrea; Hetem, Robyn S; Lease, Hilary M; Mitchell, Duncan; Meyer, Leith C R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia is described as the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with capture, immobilization and restraint of wild animals. Therefore, accurately determining the core body temperature of wild animals during capture is crucial for monitoring hyperthermia and the efficacy of cooling procedures. We investigated if microchip thermometry can accurately reflect core body temperature changes during capture and cooling interventions in the springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis), a medium-sized antelope. Subcutaneous temperature measured with a temperature-sensitive microchip was a weak predictor of core body temperature measured by temperature-sensitive data loggers in the abdominal cavity (R(2)=0.32, bias >2 °C). Temperature-sensitive microchips in the gluteus muscle, however, provided an accurate estimate of core body temperature (R(2)=0.76, bias=0.012 °C). Microchips inserted into muscle therefore provide a convenient and accurate method to measure body temperature continuously in captured antelope, allowing detection of hyperthermia and the efficacy of cooling procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of Factors Affecting Body Temperature Changes During Routine Clinical Head Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Seong

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (RF) magnetic fields, required to produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from tissue during the MRI procedure have been shown to heat tissues. To investigate the relationship between body temperature rise and the RF power deposited during routine clinical MRI procedures, and to determine the correlation between this effect and the body's physiological response. We investigated 69 patients from the Korean national cancer center to identify the main factors that contribute to an increase in body temperature (external factors and the body's response) during a clinical brain MRI. A routine protocol sequence of MRI scans (1.5 T and 3.0 T) was performed. The patient's tympanic temperature was recorded before and immediately after the MRI procedure and compared with changes in variables related to the body's physiological response to heat. Our investigation of the physiological response to RF heating indicated a link between increasing age and body temperature. A higher increase in body temperature was observed in older patients after a 3.0-T MRI (r = 0.07, P = 0.29 for 1.5-T MRI; r = 0.45, P = 0.002 for 3.0-T MRI). The relationship between age and body heat was related to the heart rate (HR) and changes in HR during the MRI procedure; a higher RF power combined with a reduction in HR resulted in an increase in body temperature. A higher magnetic field strength and a decrease in the HR resulted in an increase in body temperature during the MRI procedure.

  14. Effects of developmental change in body size on ectotherm body temperature and behavioral thermoregulation: caterpillars in a heat-stressed environment.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Matthew E; Papaj, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms increase in size dramatically during development, and this growth should have substantial effects on their body temperature and ability to thermoregulate. To better understand how this change in size affects temperature, we examined the direct effects of body size on body temperature in Battus philenor caterpillars, and also how body size affects both the expression and effectiveness of thermal refuge-seeking, a thermoregulatory behavior. Field studies of both live caterpillars and physical operative temperature models indicated that caterpillar body temperature increases with body size. The operative temperature models also showed that thermal refuges have a greater cooling effect for larger caterpillars, while a laboratory study found that larger caterpillars seek refuges at a lower temperature. Although the details may vary, similar connections between developmental growth, temperature, and thermoregulation should be common among ectotherms and greatly affect both their development and thermal ecology.

  15. Profound and Rapid Reduction in Body Temperature Induced by the Melanocortin Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid reduction in both body temperature and energy expenditure, which was independent of its effect on feeding and followed by a prolonged increase in energy expenditure. The rapid reduction was at least partly mediated by brain neurons since intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist, produced a similar response. In addition, the body temperature-lowering effect of MTII was independent of the presence of MC4Rs, but in a similar fashion to the previously shown effect on body temperature by 5′AMP. Moreover, β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) were required for the recovery from low body temperature induced by MTII and further pharmacological studies showed that the MTII’s effect on body temperature may be partially mediated by the vasopressin V1a receptors. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the melanocortin pathway in rapidly lowering body temperature. PMID:25065745

  16. Feeling numb: temperature, but not thermal pain, modulates feeling of body ownership.

    PubMed

    Kammers, Marjolein P M; Rose, Katy; Haggard, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    There is an important link between pain, regulation of body temperature, and body ownership. For example, an altered feeling of body ownership - due to either chronic pain or "rubber-hand illusions" (RHI) - is associated with reduced temperature of the affected limb. However, the causal relationships within this triad are not well understood. We therefore investigated whether external manipulation of body temperature can influence body ownership. We used a thermode to make the right hand of healthy participants either painfully cold, cool, neutral, warm or painfully hot. Next, we induced the RHI and investigated its effects on the perceived position of the hand, on the subjective feeling of body ownership, and on physical changes in hand temperature. We replicate previous reports that inducing the RHI produces a decrease in limb temperature. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time a causal effect in the opposite direction. Cooling down the participant's hand increased the strength of the RHI, while warming the hand externally decreased the strength of the RHI. Finally, we show that the painful extremes of these temperatures do not modulate the RHI. Hence, while thermosensation is an important driver of body ownership, pain seems to bypass the multisensory mechanisms of embodiment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Profound and rapid reduction in body temperature induced by the melanocortin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2014-08-22

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid reduction in both body temperature and energy expenditure, which was independent of its effect on feeding and followed by a prolonged increase in energy expenditure. The rapid reduction was at least partly mediated by brain neurons since intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist, produced a similar response. In addition, the body temperature-lowering effect of MTII was independent of the presence of MC4Rs, but in a similar fashion to the previously shown effect on body temperature by 5'AMP. Moreover, β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) were required for the recovery from low body temperature induced by MTII and further pharmacological studies showed that the MTII's effect on body temperature may be partially mediated by the vasopressin V1a receptors. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the melanocortin pathway in rapidly lowering body temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Body composition assessment for the definition of cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Amato, M C; Guarnotta, V; Giordano, C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a major prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and high risk of cardiovascular events and contributes to the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Beyond the fat mass per se, the pattern of fat distribution has a profound influence on cardiometabolic risk. The increase in abdominal adipose tissue confers an independent risk, while the amount of gluteofemoral body fat is thought to be protective. Changes in the capacity of different depots to store and release fatty acids and to produce adipocytokines are important determinants of fat distribution and its metabolic consequences. Because of the complexity of the assessment of body fat with imaging techniques, great attention has been paid to other measures of adiposity, such as waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), which provide information on body fat distribution, although body mass index (BMI) is the established clinical measure to estimate the cardiovascular risk disease associated with excessive body weight. Abdominal obesity is a main predictive factor of the metabolic syndrome, so it is certain that it represents a better marker of cardiovascular risk than BMI. Visceral adiposity index (VAI) has recently proven to be a marker of visceral adipose distribution and function, associated with insulin sensitivity in patients at metabolic risk; however, the evidence needs to be further confirmed. In summary, BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR, and VAI are all useful tools for assessing adiposity/ obesity in clinical practice, and should be evaluated along with other cardiometabolic risk factors to define cardiovascular risk stratification.

  19. Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, D. J.; Gilbert, C.; Thierry, A.-M.; Currie, J.; Le Maho, Y.; Ancel, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40′ S 140° 01′ E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate. PMID:23466479

  20. Importance of Early Postoperative Body Temperature Management for Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Eiichi; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Goto, Hisaharu; Oku, Takayuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Fujiyama, Yuichi; Shirao, Satoshi; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-06-01

    The importance of acute-phase brain temperature management is widely accepted for prevention of exacerbation of brain damage by a high body temperature. In this study, we investigated the influence of body temperature in the early postoperative period on the outcomes of 62 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage who were admitted to our department. Body temperature was measured from day 4 to day 14 after onset. The patients were divided into those treated with surgical clipping (clip group) and coil embolization (coil group), those graded I-III (mild) and IV-V (severe) based on the Hunt & Hess classification on admission, those with and without development of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), and those with favorable and poor outcomes. Body temperatures throughout the hospital stay were compared in each group. There was no significant difference in body temperature between the clip and coil groups or between the mild and severe groups, but body temperature was significantly higher in patients with DCI compared to those without DCI, and in patients with a poor outcome compared to those with a favorable outcome. Fever in the early postoperative period of subarachnoid hemorrhage is associated with development of DCI and a poor outcome. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of leptin in body temperature regulation and lipid metabolism following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, T S; Amorim, C E N; Barros, C C; Haro, A S; Wasinski, F; Russo, F J; Bacurau, R F P; Araujo, R C

    2015-12-01

    The physiological changes in serum triglycerides and body temperature that are induced by splenectomy are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate parameters related to lipid and glucose metabolism, as well as thermoregulation, in splenectomized mice. Splenectomized and sham-operated WT mice (C57Bl/6) and ob/ob mice were randomly divided and treated with a standard or high fat diet, and several metabolic parameters and the body temperature were investigated. Splenectomy induced a significant increase in triglyceride levels regardless of the diet. It was found that the splenectomized WT mice showed greater serum leptin and insulin levels compared with the sham-operated mice. Additionally, the body temperatures of the splenectomized WT mice were greater than the body temperatures of the control animals regardless of diet; this result too was observed without any significant change in the temperature of the splenectomized ob/ob animals. The results suggest that splenectomy interferes with serum triglyceride metabolism and body temperature regardless of the fat content in the diet and that leptin is involved in the regulation of body temperature related to splenectomy.

  2. Comparison of remotely acquired deep-body and subdermal temperature measurements for detecting fever in cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Seawright, G.L.; Brown, R.R.; Campbell, K.; Levings, R.L.; Araki, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    Results of two studies in which deep-body and subdermal temperatures were compared with fevers that were experimentally induced with viruses are given. In the first study, test animals were held indoors where ambient temperatures were stable; in the second study, animals were held outdoors during the winter months when temperatures were highly variable. A computerized temperature telemetry system used for the studies is described for the first time. (PSB)

  3. cAMP signalling in mushroom bodies modulates temperature preference behaviour in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Tae; Bang, Sunhoe; Hyun, Seogang; Kang, Jongkyun; Jeong, Kyunghwa; Paik, Donggi; Chung, Jongkyeong; Kim, Jaeseob

    2008-08-07

    Homoiotherms, for example mammals, regulate their body temperature with physiological responses such as a change of metabolic rate and sweating. In contrast, the body temperature of poikilotherms, for example Drosophila, is the result of heat exchange with the surrounding environment as a result of the large ratio of surface area to volume of their bodies. Accordingly, these animals must instinctively move to places with an environmental temperature as close as possible to their genetically determined desired temperature. The temperature that Drosophila instinctively prefers has a function equivalent to the 'set point' temperature in mammals. Although various temperature-gated TRP channels have been discovered, molecular and cellular components in Drosophila brain responsible for determining the desired temperature remain unknown. We identified these components by performing a large-scale genetic screen of temperature preference behaviour (TPB) in Drosophila. In parallel, we mapped areas of the Drosophila brain controlling TPB by targeted inactivation of neurons with tetanus toxin and a potassium channel (Kir2.1) driven with various brain-specific GAL4s. Here we show that mushroom bodies (MBs) and the cyclic AMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway are essential for controlling TPB. Furthermore, targeted expression of cAMP-PKA pathway components in only the MB was sufficient to rescue abnormal TPB of the corresponding mutants. Preferred temperatures were affected by the level of cAMP and PKA activity in the MBs in various PKA pathway mutants.

  4. 16 CFR 1112.25 - What are a third party conformity assessment body's recordkeeping responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conformity assessment body must make copies of the original (non-English language) available to the CPSC... body's recordkeeping responsibilities? 1112.25 Section 1112.25 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT BODIES General Requirements Pertaining to Third Party Conformity Assessment Bodies...

  5. Intraoperative body temperature control: esophageal thermometer versus infrared tympanic thermometer.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Vanessa de Brito; Nascimento, Ariane de Souza

    2016-01-01

    To verify the correlation between temperature measurements performed using an infrared tympanic thermometer and an esophageal thermometer during the intraoperative period. A longitudinal study of repeated measures was performed including subjects aged 18 years or older undergoing elective oncologic surgery of the digestive system, with anesthesia duration of at least 1 hour. Temperature measurements were performed simultaneously by a calibrated esophageal thermometer and by a calibrated infrared tympanic thermometer, with laboratory reading precision of ±0.2ºC. The operating room temperature remained between 19 and 21ºC. The study included 51 patients, mostly men (51%), white (80.4%). All patients were kept warm by a forced-air heating system, for an average of 264.14 minutes (SD = 87.7). The two temperature measurements showed no different behavior over time (p = 0.2205), however, tympanic measurements were consistently 1.24°C lower (p<0.0001). The tympanic thermometer presented reliable results but reflected lower temperatures than the esophageal thermometer. Verificar a correlação entre as medidas de temperatura realizadas por meio de um termômetro timpânico por infravermelho e por um termômetro esofágico, durante o período intraoperatório. Realizou-se um estudo longitudinal, de medidas repetidas, incluindo sujeitos com idade igual ou superior a 18 anos, submetidos à cirurgia oncológica eletiva do sistema digestório, com duração da anestesia de, no mínimo, 1 hora. As medidas de temperatura eram realizadas, ao mesmo tempo, por meio de um termômetro esofágico calibrado e por termômetro timpânico por infravermelho calibrado, com precisão de leitura em laboratório de ±0,2ºC. A temperatura da sala operatória permaneceu entre 19 e 21ºC. Foram incluídos 51 pacientes, em sua maioria homens (51%), brancos (80,4%). Todos os pacientes foram aquecidos com o sistema de ar forçado aquecido, em média por 264,14 minutos (DP = 87,7). As duas

  6. Body-temperature maintenance as the predominant function of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Gavva, Narender R

    2008-11-01

    Agonists of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), such as capsaicin, cause pain and a drop in body temperature (hypothermia). Conversely, antagonists of TRPV1 block pain behaviors in rodent models of inflammation, osteoarthritis and cancer. Efforts that evaluate TRPV1 antagonists in on-target challenge models have uncovered that TRPV1 blockade elicits an increase in body temperature (hyperthermia) from rodents to primates, revealing the intimate relationship between the role of TRPV1 in pain and body-temperature maintenance. This evolutionarily conserved function of TRPV1 in body-temperature maintenance became a hurdle for clinical development of one antagonist, AMG 517. However, several other TRPV1 antagonists are currently being evaluated in the clinic and soon-to-be-published results should shed light on the potential of managing antagonist-induced hyperthermia while developing them as therapeutics.

  7. Brünnich's guillemots (Uria lomvia) maintain high temperature in the body core during dives.

    PubMed

    Niizuma, Yasuaki; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Sato, Katsufumi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2007-06-01

    A major challenge for diving birds, reptiles, and mammals is regulating body temperature while conserving oxygen through a reduction in metabolic processes. To gain insight into how these needs are met, we measured dive depth and body temperatures at the core or periphery between the skin and abdominal muscles simultaneously in freely diving Brünnich's guillemots (Uria lomvia), an arctic seabird, using an implantable data logger (16-mm diameter, 50-mm length, 14-g mass, Little Leonardo Ltd., Tokyo). Guillemots exhibited increased body core temperatures, but decreased peripheral temperatures, during diving. Heat conservation within the body core appeared to result from the combined effect of peripheral vasoconstriction and a high wing beat frequency that generates heat. Conversely, the observed tissue hypothermia in the periphery should reduce metabolic processes as well as heat loss to the water. These physiological effects are likely one of the key physiological adaptations that makes guillemots to perform as an efficient predator in arctic waters.

  8. Hibernation in black bears: independence of metabolic suppression from body temperature.

    PubMed

    Tøien, Øivind; Blake, John; Edgar, Dale M; Grahn, Dennis A; Heller, H Craig; Barnes, Brian M

    2011-02-18

    Black bears hibernate for 5 to 7 months a year and, during this time, do not eat, drink, urinate, or defecate. We measured metabolic rate and body temperature in hibernating black bears and found that they suppress metabolism to 25% of basal rates while regulating body temperature from 30° to 36°C, in multiday cycles. Heart rates were reduced from 55 to as few as 9 beats per minute, with profound sinus arrhythmia. After returning to normal body temperature and emerging from dens, bears maintained a reduced metabolic rate for up to 3 weeks. The pronounced reduction and delayed recovery of metabolic rate in hibernating bears suggest that the majority of metabolic suppression during hibernation is independent of lowered body temperature.

  9. ["In vivo" body composition assessment; part I: a historic overview].

    PubMed

    Carnero, Elvis A; Alvero-Cruz, José Ramón; Giráldez García, Manuel Avelino; Sardinha, Luis B

    2015-05-01

    The study of body composition (BC) has gained in relevance over the last decades, mainly because of its important health- and disease- related applications within both the clinical and the sports setting. It is not a new area, and its especial relevance as an area of biology dates from the second half of the nineteenth century. In this paper, we have reviewed the three historic periods of BC, with special reference to the most important advances in in vivo assessment. Even though the earliest findings about human BC date from antiquity, the first (or 'early') stage of discovery began in 1850. Said early stage was mainly characterized by data obtained from the dissection of cadavers and by the application of biochemical methods in vivo. Longitudinal changes in body composition were also a concern. The second (so called 'recent') stage, in the second half of the twentieth century, was marked by milestones such as the formulation of the first mathematical models for the estimation of body components, and technological advances. Within the third ('contemporary' or 'current') stage of research, several groups have focused on validating the classical BC models in specific populations, on analysis of the genetic determinants (i.e. phenotypes and, more recently genotypes) of body composition, and on re-instigating the study of dynamic BC.

  10. A study on the applicability of implantable microchip transponders for body temperature measurements in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The applicability of an electronic monitoring system using microchip transponders for measurement of body temperatures was tested in 6-week-old conventional Danish weaners infected with classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Subcutaneous tissue temperatures obtained by the implantable transponders were compared with rectal temperatures, recorded by a conventional digital thermometer. Methods In a preliminary study, transponders were inserted subcutaneously at 6 different positions of the body of 5 pigs. The transponders positioned by the ear base provided the best correlation to rectal temperature. To test the stability of the monitoring system in a larger group of pigs, transponders were therefore inserted by the left ear base in a subsequent infection experiment with 30 pigs. Results Generally, the microchip transponders measured a subcutaneous tissue temperature, which was about 1°C lower than the rectal temperature. However, a simple linear relationship between the measures of the two methods was found. Conclusions Our study showed that the tested body monitoring system may represent a promising tool to obtain an approximate correlate of body temperatures in groups of pigs. In contrast, however, the tested system did not constitute a suitable tool to measure body temperatures of individual animals in the present pig infection experiment. PMID:20444254

  11. The time of day differently influences fatigue and locomotor activity: is body temperature a key factor?

    PubMed

    Machado, Frederico Sander Mansur; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the possible interactions between exercise capacity and spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) during the oscillation of core body temperature (Tb) that occurs during the light/dark cycle. Wistar rats (n=11) were kept at an animal facility under a light/dark cycle of 14/10h at an ambient temperature of 23°C and water and food ad libitum. Initially, in order to characterize the daily oscillation in SLA and Tb of the rats, these parameters were continuously recorded for 24h using an implantable telemetric sensor (G2 E-Mitter). The animals were randomly assigned to two progressive exercise test protocols until fatigue during the beginning of light and dark-phases. Fatigue was defined as the moment rats could not keep pace with the treadmill. We assessed the time to fatigue, workload and Tb changes induced by exercise. Each test was separated by 3days. Our results showed that exercise capacity and heat storage were higher during the light-phase (p<0.05). In contrast, we observed that both SLA and Tb were higher during the dark-phase (p<0.01). Notably, the correlation analysis between the amount of SLA and the running capacity observed at each phase of the daily cycle revealed that, regardless of the time of the day, both types of locomotor physical activity have an important inherent component (r=0.864 and r=0.784, respectively, p<0.01) without a direct relationship between them. This finding provides further support for the existence of specific control mechanisms for each type of physical activity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the relationship between the body temperature and different types of physical activity might be affected by the light/dark cycle. These results mean that, although exercise performance and spontaneous locomotor activity are not directly associated, both are strongly influenced by daily cycles of light and dark.

  12. [The effect of body temperature control on organ function and prognosis in patients with refractory septic shock].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Yang, Yanli; Zhou, Xiang; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Zhang, Hongmin; Zhang, Qing; He, Huaiwu

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the effect of body temperature control on organ function and prognosis in patients with refractory septic shock. A total of 67 eligible patients with the body temperature over 38.5 °C were enrolled in the study and all patients were treated with a water-flow cooling blanket to control the body temperature below 38.3 °C for 72 hours. The core and peripheral temperature was tested at 1 hour interval. All patients were devised into the following two groups according to their mean core temperature within the 72 hours: the HT group with a mean core temperature ≥ 37.5 °C and the LT group with a mean core temperature <37.5 °C. Hemodynamic, respiratory, and laboratory parameters were tested every 6 hours during the first 72 hours after the temperature increased above 38.5 °C. Thirty-four patients (50.7%) were classified into the HT group, while thirty-three patients (49.3%) were in the LT group. Compared with the HT group, higher mortality rate at Day 28 was observed in the LT group (69.7% vs 35.3%, P = 0.005). Significant difference in the increase of sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was found between of the HT and the LT groups (1.30 ± 0.90 vs 2.30 ± 2.10, P = 0.02). Statistical differences were observed between the two groups in mean core temperature [(37.90 ± 0.30) °C vs (36.80 ± 0.60) °C, P < 0.000 1], mean peripheral temperature [(37.20 ± 0.30) °C vs (36.30 ± 0.60) °C, P < 0.000 1], minimum core temperature [(36.90 ± 0.30)°C vs (35.80 ± 0.60) °C, P < 0.000 1] and minimum peripheral temperature [(36.20 ± 0.40) °C vs (35.50 ± 0.60) °C, P < 0.000 1], but not in maximum core and peripheral temperature.Statistical difference was also shown in troponin I, fibrinogen, partial thromboplastin and activated partial thromboplastin between the two groups. Cox regression analysis revealed that the mean core temperature was the only independent predictor for the mortality rate at Day 28. Body temperature control within

  13. Persistent middle cerebral artery occlusion associated with lower body temperature on admission.

    PubMed

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Øygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Low body temperature is considered neuroprotective in ischemic stroke, yet some studies suggest that low body temperature may also inhibit clot lysis and recanalization. We hypothesized that low body temperature was associated with persistent proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting with symptoms of proximal MCA occlusion, suggesting a possible detrimental effect of low body temperature on recanalization. All patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to our Stroke Unit between February 2006 and August 2012 were prospectively registered in a database. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed in patients admitted <6 hours after stroke onset. Based on presenting symptoms, patients were classified according to the Oxford Community Stroke Project classification (OCSP). Patients with symptomatic proximal MCA occlusion were compared to patients with total anterior circulation infarct (TACI) without MCA occlusion on CT angiography. During the study period, 384 patients with acute ischemic stroke were examined with CT angiography. A total of 79 patients had proximal MCA occlusion and 31 patients had TACI without MCA occlusion. Median admission body temperatures were lower in patients with MCA occlusion compared to patients without occlusion (36.3°C versus 36.7°C, P = 0.027). Admission body temperature <36.5°C was independently associated with persistent MCA occlusion when adjusted for confounders in multivariate analyses (odds ratio 3.7, P = 0.007). Our study showed that low body temperature on admission was associated with persistent proximal MCA occlusion. These results may support a possible detrimental effect of low body temperature on clot lysis and recanalization.

  14. Wearable sensors in intelligent clothing for measuring human body temperature based on optical fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiang; Yang, Haijing; Li, Enbang; Liu, Zhihui; Wei, Kejia

    2012-05-21

    Measuring body temperature is considerably important to physiological studies as well as clinical investigations. In recent years, numerous observations have been reported and various methods of measurement have been employed. The present paper introduces a novel wearable sensor in intelligent clothing for human body temperature measurement. The objective is the integration of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensors into functional textiles to extend the capabilities of wearable solutions for body temperature monitoring. In addition, the temperature sensitivity is 150 pm/°C, which is almost 15 times higher than that of a bare FBG. This study combines large and small pipes during fabrication to implant FBG sensors into the fabric. The law of energy conservation of the human body is considered in determining heat transfer between the body and its clothing. The mathematical model of heat transmission between the body and clothed FBG sensors is studied, and the steady-state thermal analysis is presented. The simulation results show the capability of the material to correct the actual body temperature. Based on the skin temperature obtained by the weighted average method, this paper presents the five points weighted coefficients model using both sides of the chest, armpits, and the upper back for the intelligent clothing. The weighted coefficients of 0.0826 for the left chest, 0.3706 for the left armpit, 0.3706 for the right armpit, 0.0936 for the upper back, and 0.0826 for the right chest were obtained using Cramer's Rule. Using the weighting coefficient, the deviation of the experimental result was ± 0.18 °C, which favors the use for clinical armpit temperature monitoring. Moreover, in special cases when several FBG sensors are broken, the weighted coefficients of the other sensors could be changed to obtain accurate body temperature.

  15. Low-cost compact thermal imaging sensors for body temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Myung-Soo; Han, Seok Man; Kim, Hyo Jin; Shin, Jae Chul; Ahn, Mi Sook; Kim, Hyung Won; Han, Yong Hee

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a 32x32 microbolometer thermal imaging sensor for human body temperature measurement. Waferlevel vacuum packaging technology allows us to get a low cost and compact imaging sensor chip. The microbolometer uses V-W-O film as sensing material and ROIC has been designed 0.35-um CMOS process in UMC. A thermal image of a human face and a hand using f/1 lens convinces that it has a potential of human body temperature for commercial use.

  16. The Effect of Antipyretic Drugs on the Circadian Rhythm in Body Temperature of Rats. Revision 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    sodium salicylate, acetylsalicylic acid and indomethacin at 5:OOpm and at 9:OOam. Administration of these drugs had little effect on body temperature... acetylsalicylic acid , indomethacin, prostaglandins, body temperature -ori S___ f 1_____’_ 6 J;Dis Ms. No. R301-6 Rev. 1 3 INTRODUCTION A circadian...We administered the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors sodium salicylate, acetylsalicylic acid and indomethacin at 5:00pm (during the rising phase

  17. Persistent middle cerebral artery occlusion associated with lower body temperature on admission

    PubMed Central

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Øygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Background Low body temperature is considered neuroprotective in ischemic stroke, yet some studies suggest that low body temperature may also inhibit clot lysis and recanalization. We hypothesized that low body temperature was associated with persistent proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting with symptoms of proximal MCA occlusion, suggesting a possible detrimental effect of low body temperature on recanalization. Methods All patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to our Stroke Unit between February 2006 and August 2012 were prospectively registered in a database. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed in patients admitted <6 hours after stroke onset. Based on presenting symptoms, patients were classified according to the Oxford Community Stroke Project classification (OCSP). Patients with symptomatic proximal MCA occlusion were compared to patients with total anterior circulation infarct (TACI) without MCA occlusion on CT angiography. Results During the study period, 384 patients with acute ischemic stroke were examined with CT angiography. A total of 79 patients had proximal MCA occlusion and 31 patients had TACI without MCA occlusion. Median admission body temperatures were lower in patients with MCA occlusion compared to patients without occlusion (36.3°C versus 36.7°C, P = 0.027). Admission body temperature <36.5°C was independently associated with persistent MCA occlusion when adjusted for confounders in multivariate analyses (odds ratio 3.7, P = 0.007). Conclusion Our study showed that low body temperature on admission was associated with persistent proximal MCA occlusion. These results may support a possible detrimental effect of low body temperature on clot lysis and recanalization. PMID:23807851

  18. Comparison of heating devices for maintaining body temperature in anesthetized laboratory rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Sikoski, Paul; Young, Richard W; Lockard, Mandy

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of various external heating devices in maintaining body temperature in anesthetized rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Rabbits were divided into 3 groups and placed on either no heating device, a circulating warm-water blanket, or a forced-air warming device. The animals underwent identical surgical procedures unrelated to the scope of the study, and body temperatures were monitored at 5-min intervals for a 45-min period. Results showed that rabbits had a statistically significant loss of body temperature during the procedure when no heating device was used, no significant loss in body temperature with the use of the forced air-warming device, and a minor increase in body temperature with the use of the circulating warm-water blanket. This study shows that external heating devices are necessary for maintenance of normal body temperature in rabbits under general anesthesia, and forced-air warming devices and circulating warm-water blankets are effective heating devices.

  19. Hypothalamic cholinergic regulation of body temperature and water intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Ishimaru, H; Ikarashi, Y; Kishi, E; Maruyama, Y

    2001-12-10

    Without disturbing the behavior of unanesthetized rats, the perfusion of neostigmine through microdialysis probe into the anterior hypothalamus (AH), paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and lateral ventricle (LV) decreased body temperature and increased water intake. On the other hand, the perfusion into the supraoptic nucleus (SON) increased the body temperature. The perfusion of neostigmine increased the extracellular concentration of acetylcholine in the perfusion sites except LV. Changes, both decrease and increase, in body temperature and increase in water intake were correlated with increases in c-fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the hypothalamus, pons and medulla. Distinct Fos-IR was found in the PVN, SON, median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), locus coeruleus (LC), area postrema and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Co-administration of atropine with neostigmine completely suppressed the changes in the body temperature, water intake and Fos-IR, all of which were induced by the neostigmine perfusion into AH, PVN and SON. In the LV-perfused rats, on the other hand, co-administration of atropine and neostigmine only partially prevented body temperature reduction and still induced significant hypothermia. These results suggest that muscarinic receptor activation in specific regions of the hypothalamus and the activation of LC and NTS are implicated in the regulation of body temperature and water intake. Other receptor processes are involved in the LV-induced changes.

  20. Oral contraceptives alter sleep and raise body temperature in young women.

    PubMed

    Baker, F C; Mitchell, D; Driver, H S

    2001-08-01

    Female reproductive steroids, oestrogen and progesterone, not only affect reproductive function, but also thermoregulation and sleep. Chronic administration of synthetic steroids, as occurs in women taking oral contraceptives, may affect these regulatory systems differently from endogenous oestrogen and progesterone. We therefore investigated body temperature and sleep in ten young women taking oral contraceptives, in the active and placebo phases of the contraceptive pack, and compared them to a group of nine women with ovulatory cycles, in the mid-follicular and mid-luteal phases. Body temperature was raised throughout 24 h in the women taking oral contraceptives in the active phase, and in the naturally cycling women in the luteal phase, compared to the follicular phase. The women taking oral contraceptives in the placebo phase, however, continued to have raised body temperatures, similar to those in the active phase, indicating a prolonged action of synthetic reproductive steroids on body temperature. Sleep also was influenced by the endogenous and synthetic reproductive steroids, but independently of body temperature. The women taking oral contraceptives had more stage-2 non-rapid eye movement sleep in the active phase, both compared to their placebo phase and the naturally cycling women. The naturally cycling women, however, had more slow wave sleep in the luteal phase compared to the contraceptive group of women. Exogenous reproductive steroids therefore influence body temperature and sleep differently from endogenous progesterone and oestrogen.

  1. Regulation of body temperature and neuroprotection by endogenous interleukin-6 in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Oliver; Tarabin, Victoria; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Attigah, Nicolas; Coserea, Irinel; Schneider, Armin; Vogel, Johannes; Prinz, Simone; Schwab, Stefan; Monyer, Hannah; Brombacher, Frank; Schwaninger, Markus

    2003-04-01

    Although the function of fever is still unclear, it is now beyond doubt that body temperature influences the outcome of brain damage. An elevated body temperature is often found in stroke patients and denotes a bad prognosis. However, the pathophysiologic basis and treatment options of elevated body temperature after stroke are still unknown. Cerebral ischemia rapidly induced neuronal interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in mice. In IL-6-deficient mice, body temperature was markedly decreased after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), but infarct size was comparable to that in control mice. If body temperature was controlled by external warming after MCAO, IL-6-deficient mice had a reduced survival, worse neurologic status, and larger infarcts than control animals. In cell culture, IL-6 exerted an antiapoptotic and neuroprotective effect. These data suggest that IL-6 is a key regulator of body temperature and an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia. Neuroprotective properties apparently compensate for its pyretic action after MCAO and enhance the safety of this endogenous pyrogen.

  2. The influence of metabolic heat production on body temperature of a small lizard, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard P; Au, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Little is known about the impact of increased metabolism on body temperatures of small ectotherms. We found that postprandial metabolic rates of 5 g Anolis carolinensis lizards were elevated by factorial increases of 2.3+/-1.0 (mean+/-S.E.) at 26 degrees C and 3.8+/-2.1 at 30 degrees C over their fasting rates. Cloacal body temperatures exceeded environmental temperatures by a small amount in fasted individuals (26 degrees C: 0.3+/-0.02 degrees C, 30 degrees C: 0.3+/-0.02 degrees C), and by a significantly larger amount in fed individuals (26 degrees C: 1.0+/-0.06 degrees C, 30 degrees C: 0.8+/-0.08 degrees C). We conclude that an increased metabolic rate due to specific dynamic action leads to a small but significant elevation of body temperature in this species. Comparisons with thermal increments reported for a large (750 g) varanid lizard suggest that body size has only a minor influence on body-air temperature differentials of ectotherms. This is consistent with theoretical predictions. Finally, endogenous heat production could help elevate body temperatures in the wild and therefore play a minor role in thermoregulation.

  3. Changes in body temperature and sleep-wakefulness after intrapreoptic injection of methoxamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Vetrivelan, Ra; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2003-01-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that the noradrenergic afferents in the medial preoptic area produce sleep and hypothermia by acting on alphal adrenergic receptors. On the other hand, in a few studies monitoring body temperature with a rectal probe, preoptic injection of the alphal adrenergic agonist methoxamine produced contradictory changes in body temperature and sleep-wakefulness. Such contradictions call for the re-examination of methoxamine induced body temperature changes using a better technique like telemetric recording. In the present study, we monitored body temperature and sleep-wakefulness simultaneously after the micro-injection of 0.5, 1, and 2 micromol methoxamine, into the medial preoptic area of adult male Wistar rats. Methoxamine injection produced hypothermia but no major change in sleep-wakefulness during the 3 hours after drug injection, except for a short period (15 min) of sleep after 120 min of injection. A short period of wakefulness, coinciding with the maximum fall in body temperature (30 min after injection) occurred when methoxamine was administered at higher doses. The results of this study indicate that alphal adrenergic receptors participate in preoptically mediated thermoregulatory measures that reduce body temperature. Hypothermia induced by methoxamine might have masked the hypnogenic action of this drug.

  4. Changes in Body Temperature and Sleep-Wakefulness After Intrapreoptic Injection of Methoxamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivelan, Ra.; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2003-01-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that the noradrenergic afferents in the medial preoptic area produce sleep and hypothermia by acting on α1 adrenergic receptors. On the other hand, in a few studies monitoring body temperature with a rectal probe, preoptic injection of the α1 adrenergic agonist methoxamine produced contradictory changes in body temperature and sleep-wakefulness. Such contradictions call for the re-examination of methoxamine induced body temperature changes using a better technique like telemetric recording. In the present study, we monitored body temperature and sleep-wakefulness simultaneously after the micro-injection of 0.5, 1, and 2 μmol methoxamine, into the medial preoptic area of adult male Wistar rats. Methoxamine injection produced hypothermia but no major change in sleep-wakefulness during the 3 hours after drug injection, except for a short period (15 min) of sleep after 120 min of injection. A short period of wakefulness, coinciding with the maximum fall in body temperature (30 min after injection) occurred when methoxamine was administered at higher doses. The results of this study indicate that 1 adrenergic receptors participate in preoptically mediated thermoregulatory measures that reduce body temperature. Hypothermia induced by methoxamine might have masked the hypnogenic action of this drug. PMID:15152981

  5. Thermal Imaging of Body Surface Temperature Distribution in Women with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chudecka, Monika; Lubkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The drastic reduction in body weight observed in anorexia nervosa (AN) leads to various endocrine changes and consequently to disturbance in thermoregulation mechanisms and body temperature. Thermography allows for a noninvasive diagnosis of the distribution of skin surface temperatures, which is especially important for difficult patients such as women with AN, who are often very sensitive and difficult to treat. The main aim of this study was to measure the mean temperatures (Tmean ) of selected body areas in young women diagnosed with AN and identify those areas where the temperature differences were particularly significant between healthy women and them. Additionally, we determined the relationships between body mass index, body composition (especially subcutaneous and VFM) and the value of mean surface temperature (Tmean ) in AN woman. In the subjects with AN, Tmean of the abdomen, lower back and thighs were significantly higher than in the reference group, while Tmean of the hands were significantly lower. Among other things, analysis showed a significant negative correlation between Tmean of the abdomen, lower back and thighs, and the mass of subcutaneous and visceral fat. The lower Tmean of the hand was directly proportional to the reduced anthropomorphic parameters. The direct evaluation of body surface temperature distribution could provide clinical implications for the treatment of anorexic patients, including the potential use of thermotherapy in stimulating the circulatory system, especially in hypothermia, bradycardia and hypotension.

  6. Assessing stream temperature response to environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R. J.; Boon, S.; Byrne, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Stream temperature controls aquatic ecosystem function by directly influencing water quality, ecosystem productivity, and the physiological functioning of aquatic organisms. To date, there are limited studies of the impacts of environmental disturbance on stream temperature, particularly on the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains. This region provides key habitat for native salmonid species such as westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), which are listed as ‘threatened’ and ‘species of special concern’, respectively. Increases in stream temperature could limit habitat availability, reduce competitive advantage, and potentially increase mortality rates for these native species. This study uses field data collected at high spatiotemporal resolution to develop a spatial stream temperature model that simulates the mass and energy balance of the stream system. Preliminary field results demonstrate the high spatial and temporal variability in processes governing stream temperature in three study stream reaches. Groundwater/surface water interactions, topographic setting, and local meteorological conditions all contribute in determining stream thermal regimes. This work discusses how these primary drivers of stream temperature can be incorporated into a physically based spatial model, and demonstrates how depending on the scale of interest, the temperature of a stream can be governed by very different contributing factors.

  7. Plasticity of preferred body temperatures as means of coping with climate change?

    PubMed

    Gvozdík, Lumír

    2012-04-23

    Thermoregulatory behaviour represents an important component of ectotherm non-genetic adaptive capacity that mitigates the impact of ongoing climate change. The buffering role of behavioural thermoregulation has been attributed solely to the ability to maintain near optimal body temperature for sufficiently extended periods under altered thermal conditions. The widespread occurrence of plastic modification of target temperatures that an ectotherm aims to achieve (preferred body temperatures) has been largely overlooked. I argue that plasticity of target temperatures may significantly contribute to an ectotherm's adaptive capacity. Its contribution to population persistence depends on both the effectiveness of acute thermoregulatory adjustments (reactivity) in buffering selection pressures in a changing thermal environment, and the total costs of thermoregulation (i.e. reactivity and plasticity) in a given environment. The direction and magnitude of plastic shifts in preferred body temperatures can be incorporated into mechanistic models, to improve predictions of the impact of global climate change on ectotherm populations.

  8. Seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadibolova, Renata; Longo, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Vision of the body, even when non-informative about stimulation, affects somatosensory processing. We investigated whether seeing the body also modulates autonomic control in the periphery by measuring skin temperature while manipulating vision. Using a mirror box, the skin temperature was measured from left hand dorsum while participants: (i) had the illusion of seeing their left hand, (ii) had the illusion of seeing an object at the same location or (iii) looked directly at their contralateral right hand. Skin temperature of the left hand increased when participants had the illusion of directly seeing that hand but not in the other two view conditions. In experiment 2, participants viewed directly their left or right hand, or the box while we recorded both hand dorsum temperatures. Temperature increased in the viewed hand but not the contralateral hand. These results show that seeing the body produces limb-specific modulation of thermal regulation.

  9. Effects of room temperature on physiological and subjective responses during whole-body bathing, half-body bathing and showering.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Ni, Furong; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    The effects of bathroom thermal conditions on physiological and subjective responses were evaluated before, during, and after whole-body bath (W-bath), half-body bath (H-bath) and showering. The air temperature of the dressing room and bathroom was controlled at 10 degrees C, 17.5 degrees C, and 25 degrees C. Eight healthy males bathed for 10 min under nine conditions on separate days. The water temperature of the bathtub and shower was controlled at 40 degrees C and 41 degrees C, respectively. Rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (Tsk), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), body weight loss and blood characteristics (hematocrit: Hct, hemoglobin: Hb) were evaluated. Also, thermal sensation (TS), thermal comfort (TC) and thermal acceptability (TA) were recorded. BP decreased rapidly during W-bath and H-bath compared to showering. HR during W-bath was significantly higher than for H-bath and showering (p < 0.01). The double products due to W-bath during bathing were also greater than for H-bath and showering (p < 0.05). There were no distinct differences in Hct and Hb among the nine conditions. However, significant differences in body weight loss were observed among the bathing methods: W-bath > H-bath > showering (p < 0.001). W-bath showed the largest increase in Tre and Tsk, followed by H-bath, and showering. Significant differences in Tre after bathing among the room temperatures were found only at H-bath. The changes in Tre after bathing for H-bath at 25 degrees C were similar to those for W-bath at 17.5 degrees C and 10 degrees C. TS and TC after bathing significantly differed for the three bathing methods at 17.5 degrees C and 10 degrees C (TS: p < 0.01 TC: p < 0.001). Especially, for showering, the largest number of subjects felt "cold" and "uncomfortable". Even though all of the subjects could accept the 10 degrees C condition after W-bath, such conditions were intolerable to half of them after showering. These results suggested that the

  10. Considerations for the measurement of core, skin and mean body temperatures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Tipton, Michael J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-12-01

    Despite previous reviews and commentaries, significant misconceptions remain concerning deep-body (core) and skin temperature measurement in humans. Therefore, the authors have assembled the pertinent Laws of Thermodynamics and other first principles that govern physical and physiological heat exchanges. The resulting review is aimed at providing theoretical and empirical justifications for collecting and interpreting these data. The primary emphasis is upon deep-body temperatures, with discussions of intramuscular, subcutaneous, transcutaneous and skin temperatures included. These are all turnover indices resulting from variations in local metabolism, tissue conduction and blood flow. Consequently, inter-site differences and similarities may have no mechanistic relationship unless those sites have similar metabolic rates, are in close proximity and are perfused by the same blood vessels. Therefore, it is proposed that a gold standard deep-body temperature does not exist. Instead, the validity of each measurement must be evaluated relative to one's research objectives, whilst satisfying equilibration and positioning requirements. When using thermometric computations of heat storage, the establishment of steady-state conditions is essential, but for clinically relevant states, targeted temperature monitoring becomes paramount. However, when investigating temperature regulation, the response characteristics of each temperature measurement must match the forcing function applied during experimentation. Thus, during dynamic phases, deep-body temperatures must be measured from sites that track temperature changes in the central blood volume. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Body temperature-related structural transitions of monotremal and human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Digel, I; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch; Zerlin, K F; Linder, Pt; Kasischke, N; Kayser, P; Porst, D; Temiz Artmann, A; Artmann, G M

    2006-10-15

    In this study, temperature-related structural changes were investigated in human, duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, body temperature T(b) = 31-33 degrees C), and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus, body temperature T(b) = 32-33 degrees C) hemoglobin using circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The average hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) and fractional (normalized) change in the ellipticity (F(obs)) at 222 +/- 2 nm of hemoglobin were measured. The temperature was varied stepwise from 25 degrees C to 45 degrees C. The existence of a structural transition of human hemoglobin at the critical temperature T(c) between 36-37 degrees C was previously shown by micropipette aspiration experiments, viscosimetry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on light-scattering measurements, this study proves the onset of molecular aggregation at T(c). In two different monotremal hemoglobins (echidna and platypus), the critical transition temperatures were found between 32-33 degrees C, which are close to the species' body temperature T(b). The data suggest that the correlation of the structural transition's critical temperature T(c) and the species' body temperature T(b) is not mere coincidence but, instead, is a more widespread structural phenomenon possibly including many other proteins.

  12. Body Temperature-Related Structural Transitions of Monotremal and Human Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Digel, I.; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch.; Zerlin, K. F.; Linder, Pt.; Kasischke, N.; Kayser, P.; Porst, D.; Temiz Artmann, A.; Artmann, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, temperature-related structural changes were investigated in human, duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, body temperature Tb = 31–33°C), and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus, body temperature Tb = 32–33°C) hemoglobin using circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The average hydrodynamic radius (Rh) and fractional (normalized) change in the ellipticity (Fobs) at 222 ± 2 nm of hemoglobin were measured. The temperature was varied stepwise from 25°C to 45°C. The existence of a structural transition of human hemoglobin at the critical temperature Tc between 36–37°C was previously shown by micropipette aspiration experiments, viscosimetry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on light-scattering measurements, this study proves the onset of molecular aggregation at Tc. In two different monotremal hemoglobins (echidna and platypus), the critical transition temperatures were found between 32–33°C, which are close to the species' body temperature Tb. The data suggest that the correlation of the structural transition's critical temperature Tc and the species' body temperature Tb is not mere coincidence but, instead, is a more widespread structural phenomenon possibly including many other proteins. PMID:16844747

  13. Body Temperature Monitoring Using Subcutaneously Implanted Thermo-loggers from Holstein Steers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y; Bok, J D; Lee, H J; Lee, H G; Kim, D; Lee, I; Kang, S K; Choi, Y J

    2016-02-01

    Body temperature (BT) monitoring in cattle could be used to early detect fever from infectious disease or physiological events. Various ways to measure BT have been applied at different locations on cattle including rectum, reticulum, milk, subcutis and ear canal. In other to evaluate the temperature stability and reliability of subcutaneous temperature (ST) in highly fluctuating field conditions for continuous BT monitoring, long term ST profiles were collected and analyzed from cattle in autumn/winter and summer season by surgically implanted thermo-logger devices. Purposes of this study were to assess ST in the field condition as a reference BT and to determine any location effect of implantation on ST profile. In results, ST profile in cattle showed a clear circadian rhythm with daily lowest at 05:00 to 07:00 AM and highest around midnight and rather stable temperature readings (mean±standard deviation [SD], 37.1°C to 37.36°C±0.91°C to 1.02°C). STs are 1.39°C to 1.65°C lower than the rectal temperature and sometimes showed an irregular temperature drop below the normal physiologic one: 19.4% or 36.4% of 54,192 readings were below 36.5°C or 37°C, respectively. Thus, for BT monitoring purposes in a fever-alarming-system, a correction algorithm is necessary to remove the influences of ambient temperature and animal resting behavior especially in winter time. One way to do this is simply discard outlier readings below 36.5°C or 37°C resulting in a much improved mean±SD of 37.6°C±0.64°C or 37.8°C±0.55°C, respectively. For location the upper scapula region seems the most reliable and convenient site for implantation of a thermo-sensor tag in terms of relatively low influence by ambient temperature and easy insertion compared to lower scapula or lateral neck.

  14. Body Temperature Monitoring Using Subcutaneously Implanted Thermo-loggers from Holstein Steers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y.; Bok, J. D.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, H. G.; Kim, D.; Lee, I.; Kang, S. K.; Choi, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    Body temperature (BT) monitoring in cattle could be used to early detect fever from infectious disease or physiological events. Various ways to measure BT have been applied at different locations on cattle including rectum, reticulum, milk, subcutis and ear canal. In other to evaluate the temperature stability and reliability of subcutaneous temperature (ST) in highly fluctuating field conditions for continuous BT monitoring, long term ST profiles were collected and analyzed from cattle in autumn/winter and summer season by surgically implanted thermo-logger devices. Purposes of this study were to assess ST in the field condition as a reference BT and to determine any location effect of implantation on ST profile. In results, ST profile in cattle showed a clear circadian rhythm with daily lowest at 05:00 to 07:00 AM and highest around midnight and rather stable temperature readings (mean±standard deviation [SD], 37.1°C to 37.36°C±0.91°C to 1.02°C). STs are 1.39°C to 1.65°C lower than the rectal temperature and sometimes showed an irregular temperature drop below the normal physiologic one: 19.4% or 36.4% of 54,192 readings were below 36.5°C or 37°C, respectively. Thus, for BT monitoring purposes in a fever-alarming-system, a correction algorithm is necessary to remove the influences of ambient temperature and animal resting behavior especially in winter time. One way to do this is simply discard outlier readings below 36.5°C or 37°C resulting in a much improved mean±SD of 37.6°C±0.64°C or 37.8°C±0.55°C, respectively. For location the upper scapula region seems the most reliable and convenient site for implantation of a thermo-sensor tag in terms of relatively low influence by ambient temperature and easy insertion compared to lower scapula or lateral neck. PMID:26732455

  15. [The effect of pre-warming for patients under abdominal surgery on body temperature, anxiety, pain, and thermal comfort].

    PubMed

    Park, Ok Bun; Choi, Heejung

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of pre-warming on body temperature, anxiety, pain, and thermal comfort. Forty patients who were scheduled for abdominal surgery were recruited as study participants and were assigned to the experimental or control group. For the experimental group, a forced air warmer was applied for 45-90 min (M=68.25, SD=15.50) before surgery. Body temperature and anxiety were measured before and after the experiment, but pain and thermal comfort were assessed only after the surgery. Hypotheses were tested using t-test and repeated measured ANOVA. The experimental group showed higher body temperature than the control group from right before induction to two hours after surgery. Post-operative anxiety and pain in the experimental group were less than those of the control group. In addition, the score of thermal comfort was significantly higher in the experiment group. Pre-warming is effective in maintaining body temperature, lowering sensitivity to pain and anxiety, and promoting thermal comfort. Therefore, pre-warming can be recommended as a preoperative nursing intervention.

  16. 3D Printed "Earable" Smart Devices for Real-Time Detection of Core Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hiroki; Chao, Minghan; Gao, Yuji; Wu, Eric; Tai, Li-Chia; Chen, Kevin; Matsuoka, Yasutomo; Iwai, Kosuke; Fahad, Hossain M; Gao, Wei; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Lin, Liwei; Javey, Ali

    2017-07-28

    Real-time detection of basic physiological parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate is an important target in wearable smart devices for healthcare. Among these, the core body temperature is one of the most important basic medical indicators of fever, insomnia, fatigue, metabolic functionality, and depression. However, traditional wearable temperature sensors are based upon the measurement of skin temperature, which can vary dramatically from the true core body temperature. Here, we demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) printed wearable "earable" smart device that is designed to be worn on the ear to track core body temperature from the tympanic membrane (i.e., ear drum) based on an infrared sensor. The device is fully integrated with data processing circuits and a wireless module for standalone functionality. Using this smart earable device, we demonstrate that the core body temperature can be accurately monitored regardless of the environment and activity of the user. In addition, a microphone and actuator are also integrated so that the device can also function as a bone conduction hearing aid. Using 3D printing as the fabrication method enables the device to be customized for the wearer for more personalized healthcare. This smart device provides an important advance in realizing personalized health care by enabling real-time monitoring of one of the most important medical parameters, core body temperature, employed in preliminary medical screening tests.

  17. Assessing temperature pattern projections made in 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouffer, Ronald J.; Manabe, Syukuro

    2017-03-01

    Successful projection of the distribution of surface temperature change increases our confidence in climate models. Here we evaluate projections of global warming from almost 30 years ago using the observations made during the past half century.

  18. Winter hibernation and body temperature fluctuation in the Japanese badger, Meles meles anakuma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    This study examined seasonal changes in body weight, hibernation period, and body temperature of the Japanese badger (Meles meles anakuma) from 1997 to 2001. Adult badgers showed seasonal changes in body weight. Between mid-December and February, badger activity almost ceased, as the animals remained in their setts most of the time. Adult male badgers were solitary hibernators; adult females hibernated either alone or with their cubs and/or yearlings. The total hibernation period of Japanese badgers ranged from 42 to 80 days, with a mean length of 60.1 days. Japanese badgers did not always spend the winters in the same sett, although they seldom changed setts during hibernation. I equipped a male cub with an intraperitoneally implanted data logger to record its body temperature between November and April, while the cub hibernated with its mother. Over the winter, the body weight of the cub decreased from 5.3 kg to 3.6 kg, a weight loss of 32.1%, and its body temperature ranged from 32.0 to 39.8 degrees C. The mean monthly body temperature was 35.1 degrees C in December, 34.8 degrees C in January, 35.9 degrees C in February, 37.1 degrees C in March, and 37.4 degrees C in April, so the monthly decrease in body temperature of this cub was not great. The results indicate that during hibernation, when body temperature is low, there is likely considerable economy of energy and a reduced demand for adipose reserves.

  19. Mechanical response of a low-temperature sintered body consisting of submicron gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibutani, Tadahiro; Yu, Qiang; Fujisawa, Yoshitomo; Shiratori, Masaki; Tsurumi, Kazunori; Ogashiwa, Toshinori; Miyairi, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    Sintered materials formed by sub-micron powder have been attracting attention as next generation functional materials. Since the surface energy of sub-micron particles is high, the sintering temperature is relatively low. Once a sub-micron powder is sintered, its structure is stable in the used temperature range. Therefore, sintered body of sub-micron particles are expected to be alternatives to current interconnect materials that have reached the limits of miniaturization. However, the mechanisms of deformation and fracture in sintered body formed from sub-micron particles are unclear yet. Specially, low temperature sintered body consisting of clusters of sub-micron particles provide several interesting mechanical properties. In this study, mechanical response of low temperature sintered body was examined. The gold powder and solvent were mixed into a paste and that was then sintered. Tensile strength and elongation of the sintered body were evaluated experimentally. Because microstructure of sintered body affects several mechanical properties, cluster structure was simulated using DLA (diffusion-limited aggregation) model and tensile properties of cluster structure were extracted from finite element analysis. Comparing with experimental results, the validity of cluster model simulation was examined. Low temperature sintered body has lower tensile strength and elastic modulus because of network of clusters. Cluster structure depends on the porosity and the sintering temperature. Simulated elastic stiffness depends cluster structure and its value is lower than bulk. The fracture behavior of particles in clusters connects macroscopic tensile strength and elongation of sintered body. It agrees with the SEM observation of the fracture surface. Cluster of particles characterizes the macroscopic mechanical properties of sintered body.

  20. The elite athlete - assessing body shape, size, proportion and composition.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D A; Ackland, T R; Schreiner, A B

    1995-03-01

    In the quest to optimize performance of the elite athlete the sport scientist has sought to determine the ideal physique for a given sport or event. For some sports, specific structural characteristics offer definite performance advantages; for example in rowing, in addition to height, a large arm span has been identified as important. In other sports. such as long distance running, low levels of adiposity or 'fatness' appear to be linked with faster running times. There are four areas where appraisal of the athlete's physique can provide useful information: (1) identification of talented athletes; (2) to assess and monitor the growing athlete; (3) to monitor training and performance; and (4) to determine 'race weight' in weight-category sports. As a research tool a particular method must be reliable and valid. Other considerations include how expensive the method is, if it is suitable for a field situation and if large amounts of data on a number of subjects can be collected quickly. The method should be safe for both the athlete and the tester and provide useful feedback for the athlete or coach. Anthropometry, with training is able to fulfil most of these criteria and is the most widely used method of physique assessment in sports science. Large anthropometric data bases have been collected on elite athletes at Olympic games and world championships according to a standard protocol. Kinanthropometry, which has developed from anthropometry, is concerned with measurement and evaluation of different aspects of human movement and individual variation in body shape, size, proportion and composition. For the assessment of adiposity a sum of skinfolds, usually over six sites, is most commonly used rather than percentage body fat formulae. Muscle mass can be assessed indirectly through girth and corrected girth measurements. Limb lengths and breadths are used to assess skeletal structure and proportional differences in limb size. The anthropometric methods most commonly

  1. Skin surface temperature of broiler chickens is correlated to body core temperature and is indicative of their thermoregulatory status.

    PubMed

    Giloh, M; Shinder, D; Yahav, S

    2012-01-01

    Extreme thermal conditions may dramatically affect the performance of broilers and other domestic animals, thereby impairing animal welfare and causing economic losses. Although body core temperature is the parameter that best reflects a bird's thermal status, practical and physiological obstacles make it irrelevant as a source of information on the thermal status of commercial flocks. Advances in the technology of infrared thermal imaging have enabled highly accurate, noncontact, and noninvasive measurements of skin surface temperature. Providing that skin surface temperature correlates with body temperature, this technology could enable acquisition of reliable information on the thermal status of animals, thereby improving diagnoses of environmental stress in a flock. This study of broiler chickens found a strong positive correlation between body core temperature and facial surface temperature, as recorded by infrared thermal imaging. The correlation was equally strong at all ages from 8 to 36 d during exposure to acute heat stress with or without proper ventilation and after acclimation to chronic heat exposure. A similar correlation was found by measurements in commercial flocks of broilers. Measurements of blood plasma concentrations of corticosterone, thyroid hormones, and arginine vasotocin confirmed that metabolic activity was low after acclimation to chronic exposure to heat, whereas ventilation was at least as efficient as acclimation in reducing thermal stress but did not impair metabolism. In light of these novel results, commercial benefits of infrared thermal imaging technology are suggested, especially in climate control for commercial poultry flocks. The application of this technique to other domestic animals should be investigated in future experiments.

  2. Use of infrared thermography to assess the influence of high environmental temperature on rabbits.

    PubMed

    de Lima, V; Piles, M; Rafel, O; López-Béjar, M; Ramón, J; Velarde, A; Dalmau, A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to ascertain if infrared thermography (IRT) can be used on rabbits to assess differences in surface body temperature when they are subjected to two different environmental temperatures outside the comfort zone. Rabbits housed in room A were maintained at a temperature of below 30°C and rabbits in room B at a temperature of above 32°C for a year. Faeces were collected six times during the year to assess stress by means of faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM). The assessment of IRT was carried out to assess maximum and minimum temperatures on the eyes, nose and ears. FCM concentration was higher in room B than A, to confirm that stress conditions were higher in room B. Significant differences in IRT were found between the animals housed in both rooms. It was observed that it was more difficult for animals from room B to maintain a regular heat loss. Although all the body zones used to assess temperature with IRT gave statistical differences, the correlations found between the eyes, nose and ears were moderate, suggesting that they were giving different information. In addition, differences up to 3.36°C were found in the eye temperature of rabbits housed in the same room, with a clear effect of their position in relation to extractors and heating equipments. Therefore, IRT could be a good tool to assess heat stress in animals housed on typical rabbit farm buildings, giving a measure of how the animal is perceiving a combination of humidity, temperature and ventilation. Some face areas were better for analysing images. Minimum temperature on eyes and temperatures on nose are suggested to assess heat losses and critical areas of the farm for heat stress in rabbits.

  3. Radiation exposure and risk assessment for critical female body organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark D.; Hardy, Alva C.

    1991-01-01

    Space radiation exposure limits for astronauts are based on recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. These limits now include the age at exposure and sex of the astronaut. A recently-developed computerized anatomical female (CAF) model is discussed in detail. Computer-generated, cross-sectional data are presented to illustrate the completeness of the CAF model. By applying ray-tracing techniques, shield distribution functions have been computed to calculate absorbed dose and dose equivalent values for a variety of critical body organs (e.g., breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, etc.) and mission scenarios. Specific risk assessments, i.e., cancer induction and mortality, are reviewed.

  4. Radiation exposure and risk assessment for critical female body organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark D.; Hardy, Alva C.

    1991-01-01

    Space radiation exposure limits for astronauts are based on recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. These limits now include the age at exposure and sex of the astronaut. A recently-developed computerized anatomical female (CAF) model is discussed in detail. Computer-generated, cross-sectional data are presented to illustrate the completeness of the CAF model. By applying ray-tracing techniques, shield distribution functions have been computed to calculate absorbed dose and dose equivalent values for a variety of critical body organs (e.g., breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, etc.) and mission scenarios. Specific risk assessments, i.e., cancer induction and mortality, are reviewed.

  5. Comparison of Body Composition Assessment Methods in Pediatric Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nilesh M.; Raphael, Bram; Guteirrez, Ivan; Quinn, Nicolle; Mitchell, Paul D.; Litman, Heather J.; Jaksic, Tom; Duggan, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the agreement of multifrequency bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometry with reference methods for body composition assessment in children with intestinal failure (IF). Methods We conducted a prospective pilot study in children 14 years of age or younger with IF resulting from either short bowel syndrome (SBS) or motility disorders. Bland Altman analysis was used to examine the agreement between BIA and deuterium dilution in measuring total body water (TBW) and lean body mass (LBM); and between BIA and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) techniques in measuring LBM and FM. Fat mass (FM) and percent body fat (%BF) measurements by BIA and anthropometry, were also compared in relation to those measured by deuterium dilution. Results Fifteen children with IF, median (IQR) age 7.2 (5.0, 10.0) years, 10 (67%) male, were studied. BIA and deuterium dilution were in good agreement with a mean bias (limits of agreement) of 0.9 (-3.2, 5.0) for TBW (L) and 0.1 (-5.4 to 5.6) for LBM (kg) measurements. The mean bias (limits) for FM (kg) and %BF measurements were 0.4 (-3.8, 4.6) kg and 1.7 (-16.9, 20.3)% respectively. The limits of agreement were within 1 SD of the mean bias in 12/14 (86%) subjects for TBW and LBM, and in 11/14 (79%) for FM and %BF measurements. Mean bias (limits) for LBM (kg) and FM (kg) between BIA and DXA were 1.6 (-3.0 to 6.3) kg and -0.1 (-3.2 to 3.1) kg, respectively. Mean bias (limits) for FM (kg) and %BF between anthropometry and deuterium dilution were 0.2 (-4.2, 4.6) and -0.2 (-19.5 to 19.1), respectively. The limits of agreement were within 1 SD of the mean bias in 10/14 (71%) subjects. Conclusions In children with intestinal failure, TBW and LBM measurements by multifrequency BIA method were in agreement with isotope dilution and DXA methods, with small mean bias. In comparison to deuterium dilution, BIA was comparable to anthropometry for FM and %BF assessments with small mean bias. However, the limits of agreement

  6. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through Klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of wave guide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  7. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of waveguide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  8. In utero heat stress increases postnatal core body temperature in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In utero heat stress (IUHS) negatively impacts postnatal development, but how it alters future body temperature parameters and energetic metabolism is not well-understood. Objectives were to characterize future temperature indices and bioenergetic markers in pigs originating from differing in utero...

  9. Is body temperature an independent predictor of mortality in hip fracture patients?

    PubMed

    Faizi, Murtuza; Farrier, Adam J; Venkatesan, Murali; Thomas, Christopher; Uzoigwe, Chika Edward; Balasubramanian, Siva; Smith, Robert P

    2014-12-01

    Admission body temperature is a critical parameter in all trauma patients. Low admission temperature is strongly associated with adverse outcomes. We have previously shown, in a prospective study that low admission body temperature is common and associated with high mortality in hip fracture patients (Uzoigwe et al., 2014). However, no previous studies have evaluated whether admission temperature is an independent predictor of mortality in hip fracture patients after adjustment for the 7 recognised independent prognostic indicators (Maxwell et al., 2008). We retrospectively collated data on all patients presenting to our institution between June 2011 and February 2013 with a hip fracture. This included patients involved in the original prospective study (Uzoigwe et al., 2014). Admission tympanic temperature, measured on initial presentation at triage, was recorded. The prognosticators of age, gender, source of admission, abbreviated mental test score, haemoglobin, co-morbid disease and the presence or absence of malignancy were also recorded. Using multiple logistic regression, adjustment was made for these potentially confounding prognostic indicators of 30-day mortality, to determine if admission low body temperature were independently linked to mortality. 1066 patients were included. 781 patients, involved in the original prospective study (Uzoigwe et al., 2014), presented in the relevant time frame and were included in the retrospective study. The mean age was 81. There were 273 (26%) men and 793 (74%) women. 407 (38%) had low body temperature (<36.5 °C). Adjustment was made for age, gender, source of admission, abbreviated mental test score, haemoglobin, co-morbid disease and the presence or absence of malignancy. Those with low body temperature had an adjusted odds ratio of 30-day mortality that was 2.1 times that of the euthermic (36.5–37.5 °C). Low body temperature is strongly and independently associated with 30-day mortality in hip fracture patients.

  10. Long-term calorie restriction, but not endurance exercise, lowers core body temperature in humans

    PubMed Central

    Soare, Andreea; Cangemi, Roberto; Omodei, Daniela; Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of body temperature has been proposed to contribute to the increased lifespan in calorie restricted animals and mice overexpressing the uncoupling protein-2 in hypocretin neurons. However, nothing is known regarding the long-term effects of calorie restriction (CR) with adequate nutrition on body temperature in humans. In this study, 24-hour core body temperature was measured every minute by using ingested telemetric capsules in 24 men and women (mean age 53.7±9.4 yrs) consuming a CR diet for an average of 6 years, 24 age- and sex-matched sedentary (WD) and 24 body fat-matched exercise-trained (EX) volunteers, who were eating Western diets. The CR and EX groups were significantly leaner than the WD group. Energy intake was lower in the CR group (1769±348 kcal/d) than in the WD (2302±668 kcal/d) and EX (2798±760 kcal/d) groups (P<0.0001). Mean 24-hour, day-time and night-time core body temperatures were all significantly lower in the CR group than in the WD and EX groups (P≤0.01). Long-term CR with adequate nutrition in lean and weight-stable healthy humans is associated with a sustained reduction in core body temperature, similar to that found in CR rodents and monkeys. This adaptation is likely due to CR itself, rather than to leanness, and may be involved in slowing the rate of aging. PMID:21483032