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Sample records for assessing individual interethnic

  1. Assessing interethnic admixture using an X-linked insertion-deletion multiplex.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; dos Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; dos Santos, Andrea Kely Campos Ribeiro; Pereira, Rui; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Zago, Marco Antonio; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a PCR multiplex was optimized, allowing the simultaneous analysis of 13 X-chromosome Insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs). Genetic variation observed in Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans reveals high inter-population variability. The estimated proportions of X-chromosomes in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon region show a predominant Amerindian contribution (approximately 41%), followed by European (approximately 32%) and African (approximately 27%) contributions. The proportion of Amerindian contribution based on X-linked data is similar to the expected value based on mtDNA and Y-chromosome information. The accuracy for assessing interethnic admixture, and the high differentiation between African, European, and Native American populations, demonstrates the suitability of this INDEL set to measure ancestry proportions in three-hybrid populations, as it is the case of Latin American populations.

  2. Relationship Quality in Interethnic Marriages and Cohabitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohmann-Marriott, Bryndl E.; Amato, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the factors underlying differences in relationship quality between interethnic and same-ethnic couples. Using the National Survey of Families and Households and the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we examine relationship satisfaction, interpartner conflict and subjective assessments of relationship instability in…

  3. Psychological essentialism and nationalism as determinants of interethnic bias.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Saori; Enright, Joe; Karasawa, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether individuals without strong national identity (i.e., low nationalism) would be susceptible to temporarily elicited essentialism to alter their mental representations of ethnic boundaries, and thus increase interethnic bias. To test these ideas we experimentally induced essentialist beliefs among Japanese subjects about the boundary between Japanese and Chinese ethnicities, while measuring the strength of nationalism as an individual variable. The results were generally consistent with predictions, suggesting that the activation of essentialist beliefs can strengthen interethnic biases among people without strong nationalism. PMID:24003580

  4. Psychological essentialism and nationalism as determinants of interethnic bias.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Saori; Enright, Joe; Karasawa, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether individuals without strong national identity (i.e., low nationalism) would be susceptible to temporarily elicited essentialism to alter their mental representations of ethnic boundaries, and thus increase interethnic bias. To test these ideas we experimentally induced essentialist beliefs among Japanese subjects about the boundary between Japanese and Chinese ethnicities, while measuring the strength of nationalism as an individual variable. The results were generally consistent with predictions, suggesting that the activation of essentialist beliefs can strengthen interethnic biases among people without strong nationalism.

  5. Interethnic Romantic Relationships: Enacting Affiliative Ethnic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yodanis, Carrie; Lauer, Sean; Ota, Risako

    2012-01-01

    Through in-depth interviews with respondents who were in interethnic relationships (N = 28), the authors extended and refined a new approach to mate selection based on affiliative ethnic identities (T. Jimenez, 2010). Rather than assimilation and a breakdown of ethnic group boundaries, they found that people pursued interethnic relationships…

  6. Interethnic marriage: bringing in the context through multilevel modelling.

    PubMed

    Lievens, J

    1998-06-01

    "This article deals with the underlying causes of interethnic marriages of Turks and Moroccans living in Belgium.... Higher odds [of interethnic marriage] are generally found for the second generation and at higher levels of age at marriage and educational attainment. Interethnic marriage is further promoted by a small size of the ethnic group, by low ethnic heterogeneity and by low correlation between the ethnic and the socio-economic dimension. Interethnic marriages are generally more prevalent in districts where the common language is French and where the majority of immigrants originate from urban regions in the country of origin." (EXCERPT)

  7. Interethnic difference in thiopurine methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Klemetsdal, B; Tollefsen, E; Loennechen, T; Johnsen, K; Utsi, E; Gisholt, K; Wist, E; Aarbakke, J

    1992-01-01

    A number of metabolic pathways are subject to both genetic polymorphism and interethnic differences. A catabolic pathway of 6-mercaptopurine, red blood cell (RBC) thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity showed genetic polymorphism in Caucasians, but variation according to ethnicity has not been studied. We investigated if red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase was subject to interethnic variation in a Saami (Lappish; n = 36) and a Caucasian population (n = 50). The Saami population sample had 29% higher thiopurine methyltransferase activity, 17.0 +/- 3.3 U/ml red blood cell compared with the Caucasian population sample, 13.1 +/- 2.9 U/ml red blood cell (p much less than 0.001). Probit plots and frequency distribution histograms supported bimodality consistent with genetic polymorphism in both study populations. Differences in chronic diseases, drug consumption, age, or gender could not explain the interethnic difference in red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase activity. The higher red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase activity in the Saami population group indicates that these subjects may require higher dosages of thiopurine drugs than Caucasians.

  8. Methodology of Diagnostics of Interethnic Relations and Ethnosocial Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maximova, Svetlana G.; Noyanzina, Oksana Ye.; Omelchenko, Daria A.; Maximov, Maxim B.; Avdeeva, Galina C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research the methodological approaches to the study of interethnic relations and ethno-social processes. The analysis of the literature was conducted in three main areas: 1) the theoretical and methodological issues of organizing the research of inter-ethnic relations, allowing to highlight the current…

  9. Intimate Partner Violence and Alcohol Problems in Interethnic and Intraethnic Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Caetano, Raul

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing number of interethnic marriages in the United States, few studies have examined intimate partner violence (IPV) in interethnic couples. This article examined past-year occurrences of IPV across interethnic and intraethnic couples and tested correlates of IPV specifically in interethnic couples. Data were from a national survey…

  10. Assessing and Managing Risk with Suicidal Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linehan, Marsh M.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Ward-Ciesielski, Erin F.

    2012-01-01

    The University of Washington Risk Assessment Protocol (UWRAP) and Risk Assessment and Management Protocol (UWRAMP) have been used in numerous clinical trials treating high-risk suicidal individuals over several years. These protocols structure assessors and treatment providers to provide a thorough suicide risk assessment, review standards of care…

  11. A Quasi Actuarial Prospect for Individual Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, William A.

    A conceptual model of individual assessment through the use of biodata responses with minimal input information is outlined. The process is considered especially applicable to industrial psychology. A scored autobiographical data form, which measures the individual's past behavior and experiences, provides for assignment to a specific subgroup…

  12. Assessing Speech Discrimination in Individual Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Derek M.; Horn, David L.; Qi, Rong; Ting, Jonathan Y.; Gao, Sujuan

    2007-01-01

    Assessing speech discrimination skills in individual infants from clinical populations (e.g., infants with hearing impairment) has important diagnostic value. However, most infant speech discrimination paradigms have been designed to test group effects rather than individual differences. Other procedures suffer from high attrition rates. In this…

  13. Intimate Partner Violence and Alcohol Problems in Interethnic and Intra-ethnic Couples

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Caetano, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing number of interethnic marriages in the U.S., few studies have examined intimate partner violence (IPV) in interethnic couples. This article examined past-year occurrences of IPV across interethnic and intra-ethnic couples and tested correlates of IPV specifically in interethnic couples. Data were from a national survey of couples 18 years of age and older from the 48 contiguous states. Interethnic couples (n = 116) included partners from different ethnic backgrounds, including black-white, Hispanic-white, and black-Hispanic couples. White (n = 555), black (n = 358), and Hispanic (n = 527) intra-ethnic couples included partners with the same ethnicity. Data analyses were prevalence rates and logistic regressions. The analyses showed that interethnic couples were comparatively younger and had shorter relationships than intra-ethnic white, black, and Hispanic couples. Male partners in interethnic couples had higher rates of binge drinking and alcohol problems compared to male partners in intra-ethnic couples. Past year prevalence rates for any occurrence of IPV and acts of severe IPV were higher for interethnic couples relative to intra-ethnic couples. Most occurrences of IPV for interethnic couples were mutual. Factors predicting IPV among interethnic couples included marital status, couples’ age, male alcohol problems, and female impulsivity. Mounting evidence points to interethnic couples as a high risk group for IPV. Interethnic couples may be at greater risk for IPV because of their younger age, binge drinking and alcohol problems. Future research could build on this study by examining cohort effects and regional differences in IPV for interethnic couples, and the risk for IPV across interethnic couples of different ethnic compositions. PMID:22203625

  14. Interracial-Interethnic Unions and Fertility in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Vincent Kang

    2008-01-01

    How does the fertility of interracial and interethnic couples compare to the fertility of endogamous couples? If exogamous couples have transcended the boundary between them, then exogamy should not affect fertility. Alternatively, opposition to the relationship from the couple's family and friends may reduce fertility. This study uses 2000-2005…

  15. Chicano Hip-Hop as Interethnic Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Pancho

    2008-01-01

    Hip-hop is an interethnic contact zone that allows for the creation of new expressive cultures and new identities for young people. Its openness derives in part from the wide range of expression and interpretation allowed in 182 "McFarland" African musics. Moving beyond the often stifling options offered by an earlier generation that focused on…

  16. Masking Reality: An Indian View of Inter-Ethnic Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provost, Paul Jean

    Carnival, which falls within the category of events described by Edward Norbeck as rites of reversal, functions as a catharsis for modern Indian groups of northern Veracruz; it is a socially non-threatening mechanism whereby an oppressed minority identifies and deals with inter-ethnic group discrimination and oppression. Subcultures of the area…

  17. College Students' Intercultural Competence and Interethnic Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnyshev, A. D.; Karnysheva, O. A.; Ivanova, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Data from studies of interethnic tolerance among college students in Russia show that positive or negative attitudes toward other ethnic groups is a factor of both personal characteristics and experience of and access to other groups. Levels of tolerance in turn are associated with different levels of interest in other groups and in building…

  18. Negative outcomes of interethnic adoption of Mexican American children.

    PubMed

    Bausch, R S; Serpe, R T

    1997-03-01

    This article identifies concerns about four possible negative outcomes of interethnic adoption involving Mexican American children and non-Mexican American parents. A sample of 861 Mexican Americans age 18 or older were asked whether they agreed or disagreed that four outcomes result from interethnic adoption: (1) The child may have an ethnic identity conflict, (2) the child may forget his or her Latino background, (3) the child's participation in Latino cultural events may be limited, and (4) the child may not acquire the skills to cope with racism. Respondents' agreement with the likelihood of these outcomes was associated with a belief in the importance of structural and cultural barriers preventing Latinos from adopting; with higher levels of participation in Mexican American cultural events; and with income, education, and acculturation. However, agreement that the outcomes were likely did not necessarily reflect approval or disapproval of interethnic adoption. Suggestions are made for future research on Mexican American children adopted by non-Mexican American parents.

  19. Who Is to Blame? Rape of Hindu-Muslim Women in Interethnic Violence in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthi, Meera

    2009-01-01

    This research examined attitudes that predict rape blame in contexts of interethnic violence between minority Muslims and dominant Hindu communities in Mumbai, India. I hypothesized that, in contexts of interethnic violence, prejudicial attitudes toward communities and attitudes that view rape as a conflict tool (i.e., an effective strategy to…

  20. The Effects of the Economic Crisis on Inter-Ethnic Relations in Cypriot Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vryonides, Marios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine the effects of the current economic crisis in the way teenagers experience and report interethnic relations with emphasis on interethnic violence in the school environment in Cyprus. It will report findings from an EU funded project which was recently completed (2012) titled: "Children's voices: Exploring…

  1. Making Contact. Generating Interethnic Contact for Multicultural Integration and Tolerance in Amsterdam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Floris

    2012-01-01

    Interethnic contact is considered a potent tool for the generation of interethnic understanding and tolerance. This faith has engendered countless social projects that seek to stimulate contact between members of different ethnic groups under "optimal conditions". However, the academic literature does not stipulate how, if at all, these optimal…

  2. Psychomotor Assessment of the Severely Handicapped Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowden, Joey

    Guidelines are presented to special educators and adapted physical educators for assessing the psychomotor development of severely handicapped students. The importance of determining whether there is an abnormality in central nervous system development is emphasized. Assessment information is presented for 15 topic areas: reflex analysis, muscle…

  3. Assessing Individual Performance in the College Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Mark U.

    2009-01-01

    Semester assessment of college wind band members is an issue that conductors would probably agree falls within their academic freedom. Institutions may award as little as no credit or even a percentage of a credit for ensemble participation, although the time and effort required of the students and their conductor is undoubtedly equivalent to, or…

  4. Group Assessment: Comparing Group and Individual Undergraduate Module Marks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a small study that analysed module marks of one cohort of science undergraduates from one academic year. It explored how group summative assessment marking affected the overall marks in comparison with individual assessment. A tutor allocated students to mixed ability project groups. Individual marks for the group work…

  5. Essentialism promotes children's inter-ethnic bias

    PubMed Central

    Diesendruck, Gil; Menahem, Roni

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the developmental foundation of the relation between social essentialism and attitudes. Forty-eight Jewish Israeli secular 6-year-olds were exposed to either a story emphasizing essentialism about ethnicity, or stories controlling for the salience of ethnicity or essentialism per se. After listening to a story, children's attitudes were assessed in a drawing and in an IAT task. Compared to the control conditions, children in the ethnic essentialism condition drew a Jewish and an Arab character as farther apart from each other, and the Jewish character with a more positive affect than the Arab character. Moreover, boys in the ethnic essentialism condition manifested a stronger bias in the IAT. These findings reveal an early link between essentialism and inter-group attitudes. PMID:26321992

  6. Pharmacogenetics in Central American healthy volunteers: interethnic variability.

    PubMed

    Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Naranjo, María-Eugenia G; Ramírez, Ronald; Serrano, Víctor; Fariñas, Humberto; Barrantes, Ramiro; LLerena, Adrián

    2015-03-01

    Ethnicity is one of the major factors involved in interindividual variability to drug response. This study aims to describe the frequency of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes in Central American healthy volunteers and to determine its interethnic variability. Twenty-six original research articles on allelic, genotypes or metabolic phenotype frequencies were analyzed, in which a total number of 7611 Central American healthy volunteers were included (6118 were analyzed for genotype and 1799 for metabolic phenotype). No reports were available for population from Belize and Honduras. The CYP2D6*4 and *5 frequencies in Amerindian populations from Costa Rica have shown to be among the highest frequencies so far reported in the world. Furthermore, NAT2*5 and *6 presented higher frequencies in admixed populations than in Amerindians, but, inversely, the NAT2*7 was more frequent in Amerindians compared to an admixed population. Likewise, different patterns of distribution have been shown in HLA-A*02, *03 and HLA-B*07 among Native populations from Latin America. Reports on Central American populations were also found for the CYP2C19, LDLR, CYP2E1, MDR1, G6PD, TP53, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 biomarkers, but no data were available for the other 91 pharmacogenetic biomarkers revised in Central American populations. Differences in the frequency of some pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes were found, showing interethnic variability within Central American and with other Latin American populations. PMID:25490028

  7. Assessing Individuals with Disabilities in Educational, Employment, and Counseling Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Ruth B., Ed.; Smith, Douglas K., Ed.

    This book is designed to assist testing professionals as they face the challenge of how best to assess and test people with disabilities. Chapters include: (1) "Testing Individuals with Disabilities: Reconciling Social Science and Social Policy" (Diana Pullin); (2) "The Psychometrics of Testing Individuals with Disabilities" (Kurt F. Geisinger and…

  8. Trainable Mentally Retarded Individual Behavioral Assessment Guide (BAG).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    Presented is the individual Behavior Assessment Guide (BAG) for trainable mentally handicapped children. It is explained that the BAG, developed by teachers and staff members, is designed to serve as the basis for individualized programs. Following is a list of curriculum areas with examples of sub skills in parentheses: communication…

  9. Idea Bank: Individualized Assessment in the Choral Ensemble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furby, Victoria J.

    2013-01-01

    Choral directors will always be assessed by the quality of their choral performances. The concepts presented in this article are designed to strengthen and improve choral performance. If choral directors can design an individualized assessment plan and implement some of these ideas during each grading period, grades will be more equitably…

  10. Using pictures to assess reinforcers in individuals with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Graff, Richard B; Gibson, Lenwood

    2003-09-01

    Tangible preference assessments were compared with pictorial preference assessments for 4 individuals with developmental disabilities. In the tangible assessment, on each trial two stimuli were selected and placed in front of the participant, who approached one. In the pictorial assessment, on each trial two line drawings were placed in front of the participant, who pointed to one. For both assessments, the percentage of opportunities each stimulus was approached or touched was calculated, and hierarchies of preferred items were developed. The two assessments yielded similar preference hierarchies for 3 of 4 participants. Reinforcer assessments using a simple free operant response confirmed that items identified as highly preferred on tangible and pictorial assessments functioned as reinforcers. PMID:12971123

  11. Revisiting Individual Creativity Assessment: Triangulation in Subjective and Objective Assessment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Namgyoo K.; Chun, Monica Youngshin; Lee, Jinju

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the significant development of creativity studies, individual creativity research has not reached a meaningful consensus regarding the most valid and reliable method for assessing individual creativity. This study revisited 2 of the most popular methods for assessing individual creativity: subjective and objective methods. This study…

  12. The Well-Being of Children Living with Interethnic Parents: Are They at a Disadvantage?

    PubMed Central

    Pearce-Morris, Jennifer; King, Valarie

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of U.S. children are living with interethnic parents, yet we know relatively little about how they are faring. Using data from the first wave (1987–1988) of the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), this study examines differences in child well-being between children living with interethnic parents and those living with same-ethnic parents. Results provide only limited evidence that child well-being is lower among children living with interethnic parents. Compared with children in same-ethnic families, children living with interethnic parents exhibited higher levels of negative affect, and this difference could not be explained by differences in background or family characteristics, levels of parents relationship stressors, or parenting quality. At the same time, however, no differences were found in global well-being, positive affect, or behavior problems. Children living with interethnic parents may face some greater difficulties that warrant concern, but they do not appear to face pervasive disadvantages. PMID:23372279

  13. Perceptions of interethnic group racism predict increased vascular reactivity to a laboratory challenge in college women.

    PubMed

    Clark, R

    2000-01-01

    African-Americans have disproportionately higher rates of hypertension than any other U.S. ethnic group. Researchers have postulated that the psychosocial-stress association with racism may help explain these higher rates in African-Americans, as well as blood pressure variability among African-Americans. Using a quasi-experimental design, this study examined the relationship between perceived interethnic group racism (racism) and blood pressure responses in 39 African-American females. Measurements of blood pressure were obtained before, during, and after a laboratory challenge where participants spoke about their personal views and feelings concerning animal rights. Perceptions of racism, as well as psychological and coping responses to racism, were assessed via the Perceived Racism Scale. The results revealed that on average, participants perceived racism 75.25 times/year. Racist statements were perceived most often, and speaking up was the most frequently reported coping response. The overwhelming majority of participants (76.47%) used active and passive coping responses to deal with racism. Among the psychological responses to racism, the magnitude of emotional responding was greatest for anger. Multivariate regression analyses indicated that perceived racism was significantly and positively related to diastolic blood pressure changes during the speech (p = .01), early recovery (p < .003), and late recovery (p = .01) periods. Potential confounders did not mitigate these effects. The findings highlight the importance of delineating the role of more real-world behavioral challenges in future research exploring blood pressure variability and hypertension risk in African-Americans.

  14. Integrating Individual Differences in Career Assessment: The Atlas Model of Individual Differences and the Strong Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Rounds, James

    2010-01-01

    Career assessment methods often include measures of individual differences constructs, such as interests, personality, abilities, and values. Although many researchers have recently called for the development of integrated models, career counseling professionals have long faced the challenge of integrating this information into their practice. The…

  15. Appendectomy in South African inter-ethnic school pupils.

    PubMed

    Walker, A R; Walker, B F

    1987-03-01

    In 1984-1985, prevalences of appendectomy in inter-ethnic series of South African school pupils of 16-18 yr were: rural blacks, 0.5%; urban blacks, 1.0%; Indians, 2.6%; coloreds (Eur-African-Malay), 2.2%; Afrikaans whites, 13.4%; and English whites, 9.9%. Corresponding respective annual incidences per 1000 pupils of 10-19 yr were: 0.3, 0.6, 1.9, 1.7, 9.8, and 7.8. Thus, appendectomy is rare or infrequent in all except the white populations. Peak occurrence was postpubertal. There was no consistent sex bias. Dietarily, mean daily fiber intake was relatively low in all groups, 17.9-26.1 g. While the percentage of energy from fat intake was low in blacks, 16.3-22.3%, it was much higher in the other populations, 32.7-39.5%. Clearly, factors other than diet are involved in regulating frequency of appendectomy. While mortality is negligible and morbidity slight, elucidation of causation and prevention of the disease is desirable since subsequently appendectomy patients are at greater than average risk to certain cancers. PMID:3030094

  16. The Individual Education Plan: A Gendered Assessment Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsh, Asa

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study is gendered differences and similarities in the distribution of individual education plan (IEP) targets given to pupils in Swedish schools. IEP writing is seen as part of teachers' formal assessment practice. Through qualitative content analysis of data, two main target types emerged: "learning targets," related to school…

  17. Using Metacognitive Assessments to Create Individualized Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    Today more than ever, educators are challenged to meet the literacy needs of all learners in increasingly diverse classrooms. To help them meet this challenge, author Susan E. Israel, shows how to use metacognitive assessments to adapt literacy instruction to elementary students' individual needs. This book supplies teachers with easy access to…

  18. Integrative Learning and the Individualized Prior Learning Assessment Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Tai

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author has drawn upon three strands of thought to tie the individualized prior learning assessment narrative to the current movement for integration of learning in higher education. First, he explores integrative learning as defined by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Then, he considers the…

  19. Communication Assessment for Individuals with Rett Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; Kagohara, Debora; van der Meer, Larah; Green, Vanessa A.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Lang, Russell; Rispoli, Mandy; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed studies that aimed to determine whether behaviors, such as body movements, vocalizations, eye gaze, and facial expressions, served a communicative function for individuals with Rett syndrome. A systematic search identified eight studies, which were summarized in terms of (a) participants, (b) assessment targets, (c) assessment…

  20. Preferences in Individuals with Angelman Syndrome Assessed by a Modified Choice Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didden, R.; Korzilius, H.; Kamphuis, A.; Sturmey, P.; Lancioni, G.; Curfs, L. M. G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS) seem to have a strong preference for water-related items. Until present, preference assessment in AS has not been reported. Methods: An adapted Dutch version of the Choice Assessment Scale (CAS) was administered by parents and other caregivers to 105 individuals with AS. The CAS was adapted by…

  1. Algorithm to assess causality after individual adverse events following immunizations.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Neal A; Edwards, Kathryn M; Dekker, Cornelia L; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Larussa, Philip; Marchant, Colin; Slade, Barbara; Vellozzi, Claudia

    2012-08-24

    Assessing individual reports of adverse events following immunizations (AEFI) can be challenging. Most published reviews are based on expert opinions, but the methods and logic used to arrive at these opinions are neither well described nor understood by many health care providers and scientists. We developed a standardized algorithm to assist in collecting and interpreting data, and to help assess causality after individual AEFI. Key questions that should be asked during the assessment of AEFI include: Is the diagnosis of the AEFI correct? Does clinical or laboratory evidence exist that supports possible causes for the AEFI other than the vaccine in the affected individual? Is there a known causal association between the AEFI and the vaccine? Is there strong evidence against a causal association? Is there a specific laboratory test implicating the vaccine in the pathogenesis? An algorithm can assist with addressing these questions in a standardized, transparent manner which can be tracked and reassessed if additional information becomes available. Examples in this document illustrate the process of using the algorithm to determine causality. As new epidemiologic and clinical data become available, the algorithm and guidelines will need to be modified. Feedback from users of the algorithm will be invaluable in this process. We hope that this algorithm approach can assist with educational efforts to improve the collection of key information on AEFI and provide a platform for teaching about causality assessment.

  2. Individual differences and subjective workload assessment - Comparing pilots to nonpilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.; Pandit, Parimal

    1987-01-01

    Results by two groups of subjects, pilots and nonpilots, for two subjective workload assessment techniques (the SWAT and NASA-TLX tests) intended to evaluate individual differences in the perception and reporting of subjective workload are compared with results obtained for several traditional personality tests. The personality tests were found to discriminate between the groups while the workload tests did not. It is concluded that although the workload tests may provide useful information with respect to the interaction between tasks and personality, they are not effective as pure tests of individual differences.

  3. Psychophysical Assessment of Timing in Individuals With Autism

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Melissa J.; DeLeon, Iser G.; Wearden, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Perception of time, in the seconds to minutes range, is not well characterized in autism. The required interval timing system (ITS) develops at the same stages during infancy as communication, social reciprocity, and other cognitive and behavioral functions. The authors used two versions of a temporal bisection procedure to study the perception of duration in individuals with autism and observed quantifiable differences and characteristic patterns in participants’ timing functions. Measures of timing performance correlated with certain autism diagnostic and intelligence scores, and parents described individuals with autism as having a poor sense of time. The authors modeled the data to provide a relative assessment of ITS function in these individuals. The implications of these results for the understanding of autism are discussed. PMID:21381951

  4. Intercultural-Bilingual Education for an Interethnic-Plurilingual Society? The Case of Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Latin American models of "intercultural-bilingual" education may be inappropriate for multilingual, interethnic regions such as Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast, where five indigenous and Afro-Caribbean minorities interact in overlapping territories. Examination of one such program and of Coast people's complex linguistic and cultural practices…

  5. Using the Multicultural Family Support Centers and Adjustment among Interethnic and Interracial Families in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Grace H.; Yoo, Joan P.

    2013-01-01

    The present study proposes a model of using the Multicultural Family Support Centers and adjustment among foreign brides and their interethnic and interracial families in South Korea based on the narratives of 10 foreign brides married to Korean men and 11 service providers who directly interact with these women and their families. The results…

  6. Interethnic Contacts in an Alternative Educational Environment: The Israeli Shelef Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichilov, Orit; Even-Dar, Shira

    1984-01-01

    The unique interethnic contact situation provided by the Israeli Shelef project and its consequence in changes of ethnic stereotypes among Shelef participants is examined. The results confirmed the hypothesis that the participants' tendency to generalize and to relate to people categorically would decrease over the course of the year. (Author/EGS)

  7. Sense of Community and Interethnic Relations: Comparing Local Communities Varying in Ethnic Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellini, Federica; Colombo, Monica; Maffeis, Daniele; Montali, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the sense of community and interethnic relations in two different metropolitan areas that vary in ethnic heterogeneity. The study was conducted in Milan, Italy using a sample of 318 participants living in different city districts that vary in ethnic heterogeneity (low vs. high). The participants completed a questionnaire…

  8. Children's Perceptions of Interethnic and Interracial Friendships in a Multiethnic School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica-Smith, Cinzia

    2011-01-01

    Some literature exists on children's real-life interracial and interethnic friendships. However, a scarcity of research exists on children's perceptions of these relationships. This cross-sectional study investigated children's perceptions of interracial friendships by employing the Perceptions of Intergroup Friendships Questionnaire. A total of…

  9. What standardized tests ignore when assessing individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio, Marcela; Campos, Ruth; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In this article we critique the use of traditional standardized tests for the cognitive assessment of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Limitations stem from the lack of integrating (a) results from research into the psychological functioning of these populations, and (b) the main arguments underlying models of human development. We identify four secondary issues in this discussion: (1) these instruments cannot be used with children who have particularly low cognitive functioning; (2) little or no variance in the scores obtained by individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders, because all are at floor, prevent adequate interpretations; (3) measurements do not provide information useful for the design of intervention strategies; and (4) different cognitive and/or neural processes may underlie behavioural scores ‘in the normal range’. Rethinking traditional assessment methods in favour of technologically-mediated games yields new cognitive assessment possibilities. PMID:26778874

  10. A Systematic Review of Inter-ethnic Variability in Facial Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Frank; Clapham, Philip J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The earliest recorded facial proportional analysis is in the Greek neoclassical canons (c. 450 B.C.). In contemporary times, there has not yet been a study that describes the relative differences in facial proportions among the world’s different ethnic groups. The specific aim of this project is to perform a systematic review of data from the existing literature in order to evaluate the degree of variability in the facial dimensions among various ethnic groups. Methods A PubMed database review identified primary articles containing measurements of facial proportions from various ethnic groups. Data extracted from these articles were the actual means and standard deviations of recorded facial measurements. These facial measurements included the heights and widths of the upper, middle, and lower face which are the features originally described by the neoclassical canons. Coefficients of variation (CV) were calculated to derive a unit-free comparison of the degree of variability among different ethnic groups in each of the neoclassically-measured facial dimensions. Results Our literature search identified 239 potential articles. After screening for the inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were selected. These articles contained data on 11 linear facial measurements from 2359 male and female individuals from 27 different ethnic groups. 95% confidence intervals of the CVs of the measurements indicated that the features that demonstrated the largest differences between the different ethnic populations are the forehead height, interocular distance, and nasal width. The least amount of variability is found in the ear height and upper, middle, and lower facial widths. Conclusions The greatest inter-ethnic variability in facial proportions exists in the height of the forehead. More pronounced difference among the ethnic groups is also present in the measurements of the eyes, nose, and mouth. There is no significant difference between sexes

  11. Role of individual susceptibility in risk assessment of pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Leng, G.; Lewalter, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study presents criteria for assessing the individual pesticide burden of workers in the chemical industry. METHODS: A group of 1003 workers exposed to methylparathion or ethylparathion (alkyl phosphates), propoxur (carbamate), or cyfluthrin (pyrethroid) was investigated. After exposure to methylparathion or ethylparathion the methylparathion or ethylparathion and methylparaoxon or ethylparaoxon concentrations in plasma, the p-nitrophenol concentration in urine, and the activities of cholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase were measured. For exposure to propoxur the propoxur concentration in plasma, the 2-isopropoxyphenol concentration in urine, and the cholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase activities were measured. For exposure to cyfluthrin the cyfluthrin concentration in plasma was measured. RESULTS: At the same propoxur concentration only workers with a low individual acetylcholinesterase activity reported symptoms. Workers who metabolised cyfluthrin rapidly reported less symptoms than workers with a lower rate of metabolism. This tendency was also evident in cases of mixed exposure (cyfluthrin and methylparathion). CONCLUSIONS: In the assessment of exposure to pesticides susceptibility of the individual person has to be considered.   PMID:10472315

  12. Self-Assessment of Individual Differences in Language Switching

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Krämer, Ulrike M.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Festman, Julia; Münte, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Language switching is omnipresent in bilingual individuals. In fact, the ability to switch languages (code switching) is a very fast, efficient, and flexible process that seems to be a fundamental aspect of bilingual language processing. In this study, we aimed to characterize psychometrically self-perceived individual differences in language switching and to create a reliable measure of this behavioral pattern by introducing a bilingual switching questionnaire. As a working hypothesis based on the previous literature about code switching, we decomposed language switching into four constructs: (i) L1 switching tendencies (the tendency to switch to L1; L1-switch); (ii) L2 switching tendencies (L2-switch); (iii) contextual switch, which indexes the frequency of switches usually triggered by a particular situation, topic, or environment; and (iv) unintended switch, which measures the lack of intention and awareness of the language switches. A total of 582 Spanish–Catalan bilingual university students were studied. Twelve items were selected (three for each construct). The correlation matrix was factor-analyzed using minimum rank factor analysis followed by oblique direct oblimin rotation. The overall proportion of common variance explained by the four extracted factors was 0.86. Finally, to assess the external validity of the individual differences scored with the new questionnaire, we evaluated the correlations between these measures and several psychometric (language proficiency) and behavioral measures related to cognitive and attentional control. The present study highlights the importance of evaluating individual differences in language switching using self-assessment instruments when studying the interface between cognitive control and bilingualism. PMID:22291668

  13. Step length and individual anaerobic threshold assessment in swimming.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, R J; Sousa, M; Machado, L; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic threshold is widely used for diagnosis of swimming aerobic endurance but the precise incremental protocols step duration for its assessment is controversial. A physiological and biomechanical comparison between intermittent incremental protocols with different step lengths and a maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) test was conducted. 17 swimmers performed 7×200, 300 and 400 m (30 s and 24 h rest between steps and protocols) in front crawl until exhaustion and an MLSS test. The blood lactate concentration values ([La-]) at individual anaerobic threshold were 2.1±0.1, 2.2±0.2 and 1.8±0.1 mmol.l - 1 in the 200, 300 and 400 m protocols (with significant differences between 300 and 400 m tests), and 2.9±1.2 mmol.l - 1 at MLSS (higher than the incremental protocols); all these values are much lower than the traditional 4 mmol.l - 1 value. The velocities at individual anaerobic threshold obtained in incremental protocols were similar (and highly related) to the MLSS, being considerably lower than the velocity at 4 mmol.l - 1. Stroke rate increased and stroke length decreased throughout the different incremental protocols. It was concluded that it is valid to use intermittent incremental protocols of 200 and 300 m lengths to assess the swimming velocity corresponding to individual anaerobic threshold, the progressive protocols tend to underestimate the [La-] at anaerobic threshold assessed by the MLSS test, and swimmers increase velocity through stroke rate increases.

  14. Assessment of the criminal recidivism among individuals with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Filov, G Izabela

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies conducted in various regions through the world point to an increased risk of violence among individuals with mental disorders. Violent behaviour occurs in a certain social system that involves a whole person with a certain history of life, with a certain state of health or disease, and interaction with other socal circumastances. There are different methods of risk assessment, but basically two broad categories of methods determine assessment of the risk: clinical and statistical. The main purpose of the investigation is by using the statistical scale to determine risk factors of a psychopathological and social nature as well as individual traits that determine violent behaviour. The investigation has been conducted in psychiatric hospitals in Macedonia. The experimental group--perpetrators of a criminal act (PCA)--encompasses 89 patients, admitted to psychiatric hospitals in Macedonia as forensic patients. These patients have committed criminal acts. According to the forensic expertise they have had a diagnosis of psychiatric disorders (ICD 10). The control group--patients with mental disorders who had not committed a criminal act and had not expressed violent behavior--the control group without violence (CG WV) encompasses 60 patients. Methodologically is the: VRAG (Violence Risk Assessment Guide) was the instrument used in the investigation Psychiatric disorder does not have a predictive value per se, but assossiated with other factors such as comorbidity with antisocial personality disorder, alcohol abuse, violent behaviour during the developmental period of life and life in an incomplete family is a considerable predictive basis for prevention and management of further violence among individuals with mental disorders.

  15. Relationship satisfaction of Mexican American and non-Hispanic white American interethnic couples: issues of acculturation and clinical intervention.

    PubMed

    Negy, C; Snyder, D K

    2000-07-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of interethnic marriages, remarkably little empirical literature exists for guiding clinical interventions offered to these couples. This study compared the marriages of 72 couples with one Mexican-American partner and one non-Hispanic White American partner, 75 Mexican-American couples, and 66 non-Hispanic White couples. Overall, the interethnic couples were more similar to non-Hispanic White couples than they were to Mexican-American couples across multiple domains, with the latter group indicating modestly higher levels of relationship distress. Among interethnic couples, Mexican-American wives' level of acculturation related significantly to both their own marital- and parental-role orientation and to distress in their relationships with children, as well as to their husbands' marital distress regarding child rearing and the couple's interactions regarding finances. Implications for clinical interventions with Mexican- and White-American interethnic couples are discussed.

  16. Assessing facial attractiveness: individual decisions and evolutionary constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kocsor, Ferenc; Feldmann, Adam; Bereczkei, Tamas; Kállai, János

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies showed that facial attractiveness, as a highly salient social cue, influences behavioral responses. It has also been found that attractive faces evoke distinctive neural activation compared to unattractive or neutral faces. Objectives Our aim was to design a face recognition task where individual preferences for facial cues are controlled for, and to create conditions that are more similar to natural circumstances in terms of decision making. Design In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, subjects were shown attractive and unattractive faces, categorized on the basis of their own individual ratings. Results Statistical analysis of all subjects showed elevated brain activation for attractive opposite-sex faces in contrast to less attractive ones in regions that previously have been reported to show enhanced activation with increasing attractiveness level (e.g. the medial and superior occipital gyri, fusiform gyrus, precentral gyrus, and anterior cingular cortex). Besides these, females showed additional brain activation in areas thought to be involved in basic emotions and desires (insula), detection of facial emotions (superior temporal gyrus), and memory retrieval (hippocampus). Conclusions From these data, we speculate that because of the risks involving mate choice faced by women during evolutionary times, selection might have preferred the development of an elaborated neural system in females to assess the attractiveness and social value of male faces. PMID:24693356

  17. How School Norms, Peer Norms, and Discrimination Predict Interethnic Experiences among Ethnic Minority and Majority Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tropp, Linda R.; O'Brien, Thomas C.; González Gutierrez, Roberto; Valdenegro, Daniel; Migacheva, Katya; de Tezanos-Pinto, Pablo; Berger, Christian; Cayul, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    This research tests how perceived school and peer norms predict interethnic experiences among ethnic minority and majority youth. With studies in Chile (654 nonindigenous and 244 Mapuche students, M = 11.20 and 11.31 years) and the United States (468 non-Hispanic White and 126 Latino students, M = 11.66 and 11.68 years), cross-sectional results…

  18. Ethnic diversity, trust, and the mediating role of positive and negative interethnic contact: a priming experiment.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Ruud; Veit, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This study not only shows that the empirically well-established negative relationship between residential diversity and trust in neighbors holds for the case of Germany, but goes beyond existing research by providing experimental evidence on the causal nature of the diversity effect. Respondents exposed to experimental stimuli that made salient the ethnic or religious heterogeneity of their neighborhoods display significantly lower levels of trust in their neighbors than do respondents in the control group. Further, we explore the role of interethnic contact in mediating the relationship between diversity and trust in a degree of detail unmatched by earlier studies. We consider not only positive forms of interethnic contact such as friendships, but also neutral and negative encounters between people of native and immigrant origin. We find that interethnic contacts mediate negative diversity effects on trust in different ways for both groups. For natives, distant encounters and negative experiences with immigrants in diverse contexts reduce trust, whereas for people of immigrant origin trust in neighbors suffers from the relatively small number of native acquaintances in diverse neighborhoods.

  19. 30 CFR 724.12 - When an individual civil penalty may be assessed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS INDIVIDUAL CIVIL PENALTIES § 724.12 When an individual...) The Office shall not assess an individual civil penalty in situations resulting from a...

  20. Two Thinking Skills Assessment Approaches: "Assessment of Pupils' Thinking Skills" and "Individual Thinking Skills Assessments"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lynsey A.; Williams, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is linked to a previous paper outlining an evaluation of a thinking skills intervention (Burke & Williams, 2008). Following extensive requests for the assessment tools used in the intervention, this short paper presents the development and potential uses of two thinking skills assessment tools. The aim of the paper is simply to make…

  1. Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention for Abuse among Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczynski, Susan M.; Connolly, Sarah; Dubard, Melanie; Henderson, Amanda; Mcintosh, David

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities are at increased risk for abuse by their parents, caretakers, and the staff who are entrusted with their care as well as from the general population. Many individuals with disabilities have cognitive or communication impairments that place them at even higher risk for abuse. These limitations also make it more…

  2. Using Self-Assessment to Support Individualized Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    Self-assessment is frequently used to enable students to "reflect" on a learning experience. Often only the person involved in the "reflection" knows the criteria used to underpin the process. Here the author explains how, when the self-assessment is given some structure some tangible benefits can be observed. While the approach might not be a…

  3. Performance assessment in complex individual and team tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is an eclectic, performance based approach to assessing cognitive performance from multiple perspectives. The experience gained from assessing the effects of antihistamines and scenario difficulty on C (exp 2) decision making performance in Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) weapons director (WD) teams can serve as a model for realistic simulations in space operations. Emphasis is placed on the flexibility of measurement, hierarchical organization of measurement levels, data collection from multiple perspectives, and the difficulty of managing large amounts of data.

  4. Metabolomics of aging assessed in individual parasitoid wasps

    PubMed Central

    Kapranas, Apostolos; Snart, Charles J. P.; Williams, Huw; Hardy, Ian C. W.; Barrett, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics studies of low-biomass organisms, such as small insects, have previously relied on the pooling of biological samples to overcome detection limits, particularly using NMR. We show that the differentiation of metabolite profiles of individual 1 mg parasitoid wasps of different ages is possible when using a modified sample preparation and a combination of untargeted NMR and LC-MS based metabolomics. Changes were observed between newly emerged and older wasps in glycerolipids, amino acids and circulatory sugars. This advance in chemical profiling has important implications for the study of the behaviour and ecology of parasitoids and many other species of small organisms because predictions and observations are typically made at the level of the individual. Thus, the metabolomic state of low-biomass individuals can now be related to their behaviour and ecological performance. We discuss specifically the utility of age-related metabolomic profiling but our new approach can be applied to a wide range of biological research. PMID:27713504

  5. Concert hall acoustics assessment with individually elicited attributes.

    PubMed

    Lokki, Tapio; Patynen, Jukka; Kuusinen, Antti; Vertanen, Heikki; Tervo, Sakari

    2011-08-01

    Concert hall acoustics was evaluated with a descriptive sensory analysis method by employing an individual vocabulary development technique. The goal was to obtain sensory profiles of three concert halls by eliciting perceptual attributes for evaluation and comparison of the halls. The stimuli were gathered by playing back anechoic symphony music from 34 loudspeakers on stage in each concert hall and recording the sound field with a microphone array. Four musical programs were processed for multichannel 3D sound reproduction in the actual listening test. Twenty screened assessors developed their individual set of attributes and performed a comparative evaluation of nine seats, three in each hall. The results contain the distinctive groups of elicited attributes and show good agreement within assessors, even though they applied individual attributes when rating the samples. It was also found that loudness and distance gave the strongest perceptual direction to the principal component basis. In addition, the study revealed that the perception of reverberance is related to the size of the space or to the enveloping reverberance, depending on the assessor.

  6. Pennsylvania Training Model: Individual Assessment Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerton-Fair, Ellen; Turner, Keith D.

    The guide provides information on four sequences in the instruction of severely and profoundly handicapped students. The Curriculum Assessment Guide produces an overview of the student's skill development in input modes (tactile, auditory, and visual development); output modes (gross motor and fine motor); activities of daily living…

  7. Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

  8. Behavioral Assessment of Feeding Problems of Individuals with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munk, Dennis D.; Repp, Alan C.

    1994-01-01

    A behavioral assessment procedure was evaluated with five children with severe/profound mental retardation who exhibited feeding problems of limited intake. Subjects were fed various types of foods. Results indicated each subject fit into one of four categories: (1) total food refusal, (2) food type selectivity, (3) food texture selectivity, or…

  9. Supporting Interethnic and Interracial Friendships among Youth to Reduce Prejudice and Racism in Schools: The Role of the School Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica-Smith, Cinzia; Poynton, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Supporting interethnic and interracial friendships in schools among children and adolescents is an important part of a progressive educational agenda informed in equity, social justice frameworks, and critical multicultural education that leads to a reduction in racial prejudice. Positive intergroup contact is a necessary condition in prejudice…

  10. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  11. Camouflage simulation and effectiveness assessment for the individual soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepfinger, Lisa B.

    1990-09-01

    The mission of the Individual Protection Directorate of the U. S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center is to develop clothing and equipment to protect the individual combat soldier against battlefield chemical, ballistic, surveillance, environmental and nuclear hazards. In an effort to meet our countersurveillance mission, the Terrain Analysis Systn was developed by Natick in conjunction with Decilog, Inc., Melville, New York. The Terrain Analysis System was developed to satisfy the need for a scientific method of designing camouflage patterns based on natural terrain reflectance data. It functions as a portable, abridged spectrophotometer to obtain spectral refltance data in the visible and near-infrared on any scene of interest. Data is collected on videotape in the field, digitized into the computer back in the laboratory, and spectral reflectance factors determined for each pixel in the scene. The 1976 CIE L*a*b* color coordinates are calculated and the image is clustered to a user-specific number of color domains. Camouflage patterns can be designed based on these domains, and visual camouflage evaluations can be made by overlaying the designed patterns on any desired background scene. Additional capabilities include calculation of values analogous to the CIE values, which use infrared film or an image intensifier as the observer. The Terrain Analysis System is also capable of analyzing video data taken through an image intensifier or thermal imager and calculating the probability of detection of a user-defined target against the background. "What if" cases can be run to determine the detection probability under other sets of conditions, such as a detector with a different spectral response or under different atmospheric conditions.

  12. Measuring Motivation Multidimensionally: Development of the Assessment of Individual Motives-Questionnaire (AIM-Q)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Larry C.; Mills, Michael; Swenson, Leland; Walsh, R. Patricia

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of the Assessment of Individual Motives-Questionnaire (AIM-Q), a new instrument based on an evolutionary psychology theory of human motivation. It provides multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) assessment of individual differences on 15 motive scales. A total heterogeneous sample of N = 1,251 participated in eight studies that…

  13. Assessing the Health of Individuals and Populations in Surveys of the Elderly: Some Concepts and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Health survey research assesses health of individuals in population. Measures include prevalence/incidence of diseases, signs/symptoms, functional states, and health services utilization. Although assessing individual biologic robustness can be problematic, testable approaches do exist. Characteristics of health of populations/communities, not…

  14. A Robust Approach for Mapping Group Marks to Individual Marks Using Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spatar, Ciprian; Penna, Nigel; Mills, Henny; Kutija, Vedrana; Cooke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Group work can form a substantial component of degree programme assessments. To satisfy institutional and student expectations, students must often be assigned individual marks for their contributions to the group project, typically by mapping a single holistic group mark to individual marks using peer assessment scores. Since the early 1990s,…

  15. 28 CFR 105.11 - Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment. 105.11 Section 105.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIMINAL HISTORY BACKGROUND CHECKS Aviation Training for Aliens and Other Designated Individuals § 105.11 Individuals...

  16. 28 CFR 105.11 - Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment. 105.11 Section 105.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIMINAL HISTORY BACKGROUND CHECKS Aviation Training for Aliens and Other Designated Individuals § 105.11 Individuals...

  17. 28 CFR 105.11 - Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment. 105.11 Section 105.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIMINAL HISTORY BACKGROUND CHECKS Aviation Training for Aliens and Other Designated Individuals § 105.11 Individuals...

  18. 28 CFR 105.11 - Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment. 105.11 Section 105.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIMINAL HISTORY BACKGROUND CHECKS Aviation Training for Aliens and Other Designated Individuals § 105.11 Individuals...

  19. Interethnic variability and admixture in Latin America--social implications.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Francisco M

    2004-09-01

    Past and present attempts to classify and characterize the human biological variability are examined, considering the race concept, ethnic identification problems, assortative mating based on ethnicity, and historical genetics. In relation to the latter, a review is made of the methods presently available for admixture quantification and of previous studies aimed at the characterization of the parental continental contributions to Latin American populations, with emphasis in global evaluations of the Costa Rican and Brazilian gene pools. Finally, the question of racism and discrimination is considered, including the relation between human rights and affirmative actions. The right to equal opportunity should be strictly respected. Biological inequality has nothing to do with the ethical principle that someone's position in a given society should be an accurate reflection of her/his individual ability.

  20. Interethnic variability and admixture in Latin America--social implications.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Francisco M

    2004-09-01

    Past and present attempts to classify and characterize the human biological variability are examined, considering the race concept, ethnic identification problems, assortative mating based on ethnicity, and historical genetics. In relation to the latter, a review is made of the methods presently available for admixture quantification and of previous studies aimed at the characterization of the parental continental contributions to Latin American populations, with emphasis in global evaluations of the Costa Rican and Brazilian gene pools. Finally, the question of racism and discrimination is considered, including the relation between human rights and affirmative actions. The right to equal opportunity should be strictly respected. Biological inequality has nothing to do with the ethical principle that someone's position in a given society should be an accurate reflection of her/his individual ability. PMID:17361535

  1. Interethnic genetic differentiation: GM polymorphism in eastern Senegal.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Van Blyenburgh, N H; Sevin, A; Pison, G; Langaney, A

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of GM polymorphism has been performed on 1,806 individuals representing three sympatric ethnic groups--Bedik, Fulani, and Mandenkalu--of eastern Senegal. Haplotype frequencies estimated by maximum likelihood have been used to compute common genetic pools between the three samples and a number of other sub-Saharan African populations. Despite extreme linguistic and sociocultural differentiations and very high levels of endogamy, especially in the Bedik and Niokholo Mandenkalu, the three populations share about 90%-95% of their haplotype frequencies in a system which commonly provides strong genetic differentiations. This supports the view that, despite its importance at a large continental scale level, as it is discussed for a set of populations from many regions of sub-Saharan Africa, sociocultural differentiation usually has little effect on local genetic diversity. PMID:2105642

  2. Interethnic admixture and the evolution of Latin American populations.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Sans, Mónica

    2014-03-01

    A general introduction to the origins and history of Latin American populations is followed by a systematic review of the data from molecular autosomal assessments of the ethnic/continental (European, African, Amerindian) ancestries for 24 Latin American countries or territories. The data surveyed are of varying quality but provide a general picture of the present constitution of these populations. A brief discussion about the applications of these results (admixture mapping) is also provided. Latin American populations can be viewed as natural experiments for the investigation of unique anthropological and epidemiological issues. PMID:24764751

  3. Interethnic admixture and the evolution of Latin American populations

    PubMed Central

    Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Sans, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    A general introduction to the origins and history of Latin American populations is followed by a systematic review of the data from molecular autosomal assessments of the ethnic/continental (European, African, Amerindian) ancestries for 24 Latin American countries or territories. The data surveyed are of varying quality but provide a general picture of the present constitution of these populations. A brief discussion about the applications of these results (admixture mapping) is also provided. Latin American populations can be viewed as natural experiments for the investigation of unique anthropological and epidemiological issues. PMID:24764751

  4. 7 CFR 1463.7 - Division of class assessment to individual entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Division of class assessment to individual entities. 1463.7 Section 1463.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY... TRANSITION PROGRAM Tobacco Transition Assessments § 1463.7 Division of class assessment to...

  5. The Use of Group versus Individual Settings for Assessing Student Achievement in Kindergarten and First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Rowan, Brian; Correnti, Richard

    This paper reports on an experiment examining the consequences of assessing kindergarten and first-grade students' academic achievement in group versus individualized assessment settings. Students (n=442) blocked by classroom and grade level were randomly assigned to one of two assessment modes: a small group setting with 8 other students from…

  6. How School Norms, Peer Norms, and Discrimination Predict Interethnic Experiences Among Ethnic Minority and Majority Youth.

    PubMed

    Tropp, Linda R; O'Brien, Thomas C; González Gutierrez, Roberto; Valdenegro, Daniel; Migacheva, Katya; de Tezanos-Pinto, Pablo; Berger, Christian; Cayul, Oscar

    2016-09-01

    This research tests how perceived school and peer norms predict interethnic experiences among ethnic minority and majority youth. With studies in Chile (654 nonindigenous and 244 Mapuche students, M = 11.20 and 11.31 years) and the United States (468 non-Hispanic White and 126 Latino students, M = 11.66 and 11.68 years), cross-sectional results showed that peer norms predicted greater comfort in intergroup contact, interest in cross-ethnic friendships, and higher contact quality, whereas longitudinal results showed that school norms predicted greater interest in cross-ethnic friendships over time. Distinct effects of school and peer norms were also observed for ethnic minority and majority youth in relation to perceived discrimination, suggesting differences in how they experience cross-ethnic relations within school environments. PMID:27684397

  7. Neither bridging nor bonding: A test of socialization effects by ethnically diverse voluntary associations on participants' inter-ethnic tolerance, inter-ethnic trust and intra-ethnic belonging.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The distinction between bridging and bonding associations is a cornerstone of social capital research. Nevertheless, this study is the first to provide a direct test of the socialization mechanism that supposedly causes ethnically mixed (bridging) associations to generate interethnic tolerance and trust, and homogenous (bonding) associations to cement self-affirming identities. This multilevel analysis of the Citizenship, Involvement & Democracy (CID) 1999/2000 survey data on Mannheim (Germany), Enschede (the Netherlands), and Aberdeen (Scotland) covers 3166 active participants in 645 associations. The CID includes objective, exogenous measures of each association's composition and aim. Socialization and self-selection effects are pulled apart through interactions with detailed measures of associational involvement. The results display no evidence for (diverse and homogenous) associations as socializing agents. Although inter-ethnic tolerance is higher in ethnically diverse associations, this should be attributed to self-selection effects.

  8. 30 CFR 724.17 - Procedure for assessment of individual civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Phone: 703-235-3800), in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1300 et seq.; or (2) The Office and the individual or... narrative explanation of the reasons for the penalty, the amount to be assessed, and a copy of...

  9. 30 CFR 724.17 - Procedure for assessment of individual civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Phone: 703-235-3800), in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1300 et seq.; or (2) The Office and the individual or... narrative explanation of the reasons for the penalty, the amount to be assessed, and a copy of...

  10. 30 CFR 724.17 - Procedure for assessment of individual civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Phone: 703-235-3800), in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1300 et seq.; or (2) The Office and the individual or... narrative explanation of the reasons for the penalty, the amount to be assessed, and a copy of...

  11. The Assessment of Print Materials. Individualized Inservice Packet Number I. Teaching Teen Reading Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This individualized inservice packet provides teachers with guidelines for the meaningful selection and assessment of print materials, so that they may locate and utilize the appropriate reading content for individual students. It is one of a nine-part series of booklets--Teaching Teen Reading--in self-instructional format, intended as a practical…

  12. Ignoring Individual Differences in Times of Assessment in Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulombe, Patrick; Selig, James P.; Delaney, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often collect longitudinal data to model change over time in a phenomenon of interest. Inevitably, there will be some variation across individuals in specific time intervals between assessments. In this simulation study of growth curve modeling, we investigate how ignoring individual differences in time points when modeling change over…

  13. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part one of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  14. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level III, IO-WU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four performance assessment resources booklets for Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The four booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level III developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. Each of…

  15. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part two of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  16. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level I, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part one of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level I of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level I of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  17. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level I, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part two of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level I of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level I of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  18. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level III, WYY-IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four performance assessment resources booklets for Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The four booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level III developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. Each of…

  19. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level III, ES-WB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four performance assessment resources booklets for Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The four booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level III developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. Each of…

  20. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level III, WW-CP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four performance assessment resources booklets for Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The four booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level III developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. Each of…

  1. English proficiency and peer interethnic relations as predictors of math achievement among Latino and Asian immigrant students.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Alice N; Barile, John P; Malm, Esther K; Weaver, Scott R

    2012-12-01

    Studies show math achievement to be the best predictor of entering post-secondary education. However, less is known about the predictors of math achievement, particularly among immigrant youth. This study examined English proficiency and peer interethnic relations as predictors of mathematics achievement among Latino and Asian high school students, postulating an interaction between the predictors and mediation by academic motivation. A multilevel moderated-mediation model was used to analyze data from a national sample of 2113 non-native English speaking Latino and Asian students attending high school in the U.S. We found that higher academic motivation mediated the relationship between English proficiency during their sophomore year and gains in senior math achievement scores for both Asian and Latino students. For Latino students however, this indirect path was only significant for students whose perceptions of positive peer interethnic relations at school were average or above average. PMID:22959129

  2. A meta-analysis of the relationship between individual assessments and job performance.

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott B; Daisley, Rebecca L; Wheeler, Megan; Boyer, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Though individual assessments are widely used in selection settings, very little research exists to support their criterion-related validity. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted of 39 individual assessment validation studies. For the current research, individual assessments were defined as any employee selection procedure that involved (a) multiple assessment methods, (b) administered to an individual examinee, and (c) relying on assessor judgment to integrate the information into an overall evaluation of the candidate's suitability for a job. Assessor recommendations were found to be useful predictors of job performance, although the level of validity varied considerably across studies. Validity tended to be higher for managerial than nonmanagerial occupations and for assessments that included a cognitive ability test. Validity was not moderated by the degree of standardization of the assessment content or by use of multiple assessors for each candidate. However, higher validities were found when the same assessor was used across all candidates than when different assessors evaluated different candidates. These results should be interpreted with caution, given a small number of studies for many of the moderator subgroups as well as considerable evidence of publication bias. These limitations of the available research base highlight the need for additional empirical work to inform individual assessment practices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Utility of Formal Preference Assessments for Individuals Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Ronald; Alcalay, Aditt; Leaf, Jeremy A.; Ravid, Daniel; Dale, Stephanie; Kassardjian, Alyne; Tsuji, Kathleen; Taubman, Mitchell; McEachin, John; Oppenheim-Leaf, Misty

    2015-01-01

    The systematic use of reinforcers is an essential component of behavioral intervention for individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Today, the use of rigorous formal preference assessments, including paired-preference assessments, are widely conducted to help determine which items to use as reinforcers during intervention. Although…

  4. The Individualized Needs for Service Assessment (INSA) for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosser, Rene C.; Flisher, Alan J.

    This paper reports on efforts underway in New York State to develop the Individualized Needs for Services Assessment (INSA). The INSA is a set of standardized procedures and data definitions to guide assessment of service needs for children with serious emotional disturbances (SED). The INSA procedure for children with SED is designed to be…

  5. Clinical Decision Making and Preference Assessment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virués-Ortega, Javier; Pritchard, Kristen; Grant, Robin L.; North, Sebastian; Hurtado-Parrado, Camilo; Lee, May S. H.; Temple, Bev; Julio, Flavia; Yu, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities are able to reliably express their likes and dislikes through direct preference assessment. Preferred items tend to function as rewards and can therefore be used to facilitate the acquisition of new skills and promote task engagement. A number of preference assessment methods are…

  6. Culturalizing the ethnic patient: educational films and images of interethnic relations in health care.

    PubMed

    Glastra, F J; Kats, E

    1992-12-01

    In the wake of an apparent increased utilization of health services by people from ethnic minorities and the perceptions of this as problematic, an educational 'offensive' has been launched in The Netherlands. It is directed at ethnic minority groups and health care professionals, and makes extensive use of educational films. In this article, we discuss results of a qualitative analysis of the ways in which educational films represent interethnic relations in health care, and compare them with the outcomes of an earlier analysis of educational films on discrimination and racism. Instead of a tendency to moralize ethnic attitudes of whites in the latter, we found that films on health care presuppose a professional will to learn and to adapt, but at the same time they emphasize the obstacles posed by ethnic backgrounds. In such films, the traditional culture, rather than institutional constraints, figures as the main reason for the setbacks the ethnic patient experiences and for the problems professionals face in order to accommodate the new situation. Educational films on ethnic minorities and health (care) could be improved by analysing problems rather than focusing on ready-made solutions, and by paying attention to institutional constraints rather than showing a seemingly boundless flexibility of medical professionals in their interaction with ethnic minorities.

  7. Quantitative Approach to Collaborative Learning: Performance Prediction, Individual Assessment, and Group Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cen, Ling; Ruta, Dymitr; Powell, Leigh; Hirsch, Benjamin; Ng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning, although widely reported, lack the quantitative rigor and detailed insight into the dynamics of interactions within the group, while individual contributions and their impacts on group members and their collaborative work remain hidden behind joint group assessment. To bridge this gap we intend to address…

  8. Individualizing Elementary General Music Instruction: Case Studies of Assessment and Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvador, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Elementary general music teachers typically teach hundreds of students every week. Each child has individual learning needs due to a variety of factors, such as prior experiences with music, music aptitude, learning style, and personality. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore ways that experienced teachers used assessments to…

  9. Assessment of Cognitive and Adaptive Behaviour among Individuals with Congenital Insensitivity to Pain and Anhidrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erez, Daniella Levy; Levy, Jacov; Friger, Michael; Aharoni-Mayer, Yael; Cohen-Iluz, Moran; Goldstein, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) are reported to have mental retardation but to our knowledge no detailed study on the subject has ever been published. The present study assessed and documented cognitive and adaptive behaviour among Arab Bedouin children with CIPA. Methods: Twenty-three Arab Bedouin…

  10. Using New Technology to Assess the Academic Writing Styles of Male and Female Pairs and Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James; Pennebaker, James W.; Fox, Claire

    2003-01-01

    Background: Previous research suggests that there are advantages to writing in groups or in pairs compared with writing individually, and that men write differently from women. However, as far as we know, no one has yet used new technology to assess published academic articles written in these different modes. Method: We assembled 80 papers from…

  11. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Modified for Individuals Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Phillips, Natalie; Nasreddine, Ziad S.; Chertkow, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating the cognitive status of individuals who are visually impaired is limited by the design of the test that is used. This article presents data on the sensitivity and specificity of the version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment for people who are visually impaired. The original validation data were reanalyzed, excluding the five visual…

  12. Welfare Policy and Subjective Well-Being across Nations: An Individual-Level Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacek, Alexander C.; Radcliff, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    In the vast and diverse literature on determinants of life-satisfaction and happiness, there is a relative dearth of empirical research on the role of specifically political factors. We identify one such possible factor, the industrial welfare state, and assess its impact on how individuals perceive their well-being. The voluminous literature on…

  13. VULNERABILITY AS A FUNCTION OF INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP RESOURCES IN CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The field of risk assessment has focused on protecting the health of individual people or populations of wildlife from single risks, mostly from chemical exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently began to address multiple risks to communities in the ...

  14. 77 FR 43606 - Preliminary Damage Assessment for Individual Assistance Operations Manual (9327.2-PR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Operations Manual (9327.2-PR) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... Assessment for Individual Assistance Operations Manual (9327.2-PR). The Federal Emergency Management Agency..., 2011. DATES: This manual is effective July 18, 2012. ADDRESSES: This final manual is available...

  15. 76 FR 63628 - Preliminary Damage Assessment for Individual Assistance Operations Manual (9327.2-PR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Operations Manual (9327.2-PR) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... comments on the draft Preliminary Damage Assessment for Individual Assistance Operations Manual (9327.2-PR... proposed manual is not a rulemaking and the Federal Rulemaking Portal is being utilized only as a...

  16. The Assessment of Meta-Cognition in Different Contexts: Individualized vs. Peer Assisted Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamir, Adina; Mevarech, Zemira R.; Gida, Carmit

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of assessing young children's meta-cognition in different contexts (i.e., individual learning (IL), peer assisted learning (PAL) and self-reports). Additionally, the contributions of declarative and procedural meta-cognition in IL and PAL, TOM and language ability on children's cognitive performance…

  17. An Assessment-for-Learning System in Mathematics for Individuals with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Eric G.; Shute, Valerie J.; Landau, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the usability of an assessment-for-learning (AfL) system that provides audio-tactile graphics for algebra content (geometric sequences) for individuals with visual impairments--two who are blind and two with low vision. It found that the system is generally usable as a mathematics AfL system. (Contains 4 tables.)

  18. Assessment of Language and Literacy: A Process of Hypothesis Testing for Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Cheryl M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Older school-aged children and adolescents with persistent language and literacy impairments vary in their individual profiles of linguistic strengths and weaknesses. Given the multidimensional nature and complexity of language, designing an assessment protocol capable of uncovering linguistic variation is challenging. A process of…

  19. Psychologists' Clinical Practices in Assessing Dementia in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Ellen; Scior, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    There are now ample guidelines for the assessment and diagnosis of possible dementia in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) and Down syndrome. However, little is known about their implementation in clinical practice. This study set out to examine the clinical practice of one key professional group, namely clinical psychologists. A…

  20. Assessment of Preference for Edible and Leisure Items in Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Javier Virues; Iwata, Brian A.; Nogales-Gonzalez, Celia; Frades, Belen

    2012-01-01

    We conducted 2 studies on reinforcer preference in patients with dementia. Results of preference assessments yielded differential selections by 14 participants. Unlike prior studies with individuals with intellectual disabilities, all participants showed a noticeable preference for leisure items over edible items. Results of a subsequent analysis…

  1. Review of the Choice and Preference Assessment Literature for Individuals with Severe to Profound Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullis, Christopher A.; Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Basbigill, Abby R.; Yeager, Amanda; Fleming, Courtney V.; Payne, Daniel; Wu, Pei-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Since 2002, the body of literature examining choice interventions and preference assessments for individuals with severe to profound disabilities has grown substantially. This paper is an extension of the Lancioni, O'Reilly, & Emerson (1996) and Cannella, O'Reilly, & Lancioni (2005) papers and reviews 50 studies conducted between 2002 and 2010…

  2. Assessing Retest Effects at the Individual Level: A General IRT-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2015-01-01

    Test-retest studies for assessing stability and change are widely used in different domains and allow improved or additional individual estimates of interest to be obtained. However, if these estimates are to be validly interpreted the responses given at Time-2 must be free of retest effects, and the fulfilment of this assumption must be…

  3. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Béres, Ilona; Magyar, Timea; Turcsányi-Szabó, Márta

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP--Collaboration--Evaluation--Critical thinking--Individual assessment--learner Profile) evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C) collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E) developing…

  4. Identifying and Assessing Substance Abuse Problems with Deaf, Deafened, and Hard of Hearing Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthmann, Debra

    This report provides an overview of chemical dependency, communication barriers, and assessment/treatment considerations for individuals who are deaf or have hearing impairments and have drug or alcohol problems. Following a discussion of the pattern of substance abuse, risk factors, and signs and symptoms, the report describes a model treatment…

  5. Implementing Fairness in Racial-Group Assessment Requires Assessment of Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    Replies to comments by R. J. Griffore and D. A. Newman et al. on the author's original article on test validity and cultural bias in racial-group assessment. Helms notes that, given that within-group variance exceeds between-groups variance, racial groups are probably simulating a psychological construct that is more strongly related to…

  6. Assessing English literacy as a predictor of postschool outcomes in the lives of deaf individuals.

    PubMed

    Garberoglio, Carrie Lou; Cawthon, Stephanie W; Bond, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Lower English literacy achievement of deaf students is often hypothesized to be an impediment for successful adult life experiences. Yet, literacy practices that individuals engage in throughout their daily lives are much more complex than what school-based measures of English can capture and particularly so for deaf individuals. A national large-scale data set with a sample of over 1,000 deaf youths was used to assess what, precisely, standardized measures of literacy may predict in terms of postschool outcomes in three domains: life, employment, and education. Regression analyses indicate that these measures predicted some postschool outcomes, but not all, and if significant, only a small amount of variation in the outcomes was explained. Findings suggest that English literacy, particularly the narrow conceptualization of English literacy skills that are measured through school-based assessments, may not play a significant role in the lives of deaf individuals, contrary to expectations. PMID:24077877

  7. Assessment of soil pollution based on total petroleum hydrocarbons and individual oil substances.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, J; Ibáñez, R; Lijzen, J P A; Irabien, Á

    2013-11-30

    Different oil products like gasoline, diesel or heavy oils can cause soil contamination. The assessment of soils exposed to oil products can be conducted through the comparison between a measured concentration and an intervention value (IV). Several national policies include the IV based on the so called total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) measure. However, the TPH assessment does not indicate the individual substances that may produce contamination. The soil quality assessment can be improved by including common hazardous compounds as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aromatic volatile hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). This study, focused on 62 samples collected from different sites throughout The Netherlands, evaluates TPH, PAH and BTEX concentrations in soils. Several indices of pollution are defined for the assessment of individual variables (TPH, PAH, B, T, E, and X) and multivariables (MV, BTEX), allowing us to group the pollutants and simplify the methodology. TPH and PAH concentrations above the IV are mainly found in medium and heavy oil products such as diesel and heavy oil. On the other hand, unacceptable BTEX concentrations are reached in soils contaminated with gasoline and kerosene. The TPH assessment suggests the need for further action to include lighter products. The application of multivariable indices allows us to include these products in the soil quality assessment without changing the IV for TPH. This work provides useful information about the soil quality assessment methodology of oil products in soils, focussing the analysis into the substances that mainly cause the risk.

  8. Assessment of fluctuating decision-making capacity in individuals with communication barriers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pachet, Arlin; Allan, Lauren; Erskine, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    A current need exists for research to assist clinicians in the capacity evaluation process, especially in relation to assessment of clients with complex issues such as fluctuating capacity and communication barriers. The aim of this article is to promote knowledge and consideration of these issues through an examination of neuropsychological, ethical, and medical-legal factors associated with the assessment of capacity in an individual with both fluctuating capacity and communication impairments. The discussion includes a narrative case study of a complex individual case seen by the Regional Capacity Assessment Team (RCAT) for an assessment of decision-making capacity related to personal and financial matters. Relevant background information about this client, behavioral observations, neuropsychological test results, and the process and outcome of the RCAT targeted capacity interview are presented. Based on previous literature and the case study, a series of recommendations are provided to guide the clinician through the capacity evaluation process with individuals with complex issues. Common pitfalls, nuances, and dilemmas involved in capacity assessment are addressed.

  9. Measuring motivation multidimensionally: development of the Assessment of Individual Motives-Questionnaire (AIM-Q).

    PubMed

    Bernard, Larry C; Mills, Michael; Swenson, Leland; Walsh, R Patricia

    2008-03-01

    We report the development of the Assessment of Individual Motives-Questionnaire (AIM-Q), a new instrument based on an evolutionary psychology theory of human motivation. It provides multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) assessment of individual differences on 15 motive scales. A total heterogeneous sample of N = 1,251 participated in eight studies that evaluated the homogeneity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and MTMM convergent and discriminant validities of the AIM-Q's three methods. These studies generally support the overall strategy of assessing individual differences in multiple evolutionary-based motives with multiple methods. Additional validity studies are underway and, when validated further, the AIM-Q may offer a promising option for evolutionary psychologists and behavioral geneticists wanting to incorporate individual differences into their research but have had to use existing self-report measures of personality, which were not designed for such a purpose. It may also offer clinical and counseling psychologists an additional approach to personality measures for the prediction of behavior.

  10. Reliabilities of mental rotation tasks: limits to the assessment of individual differences.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Thielsch, Meinald T; Zernikow, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Mental rotation tasks with objects and body parts as targets are widely used in cognitive neuropsychology. Even though these tasks are well established to study between-groups differences, the reliability on an individual level is largely unknown. We present a systematic study on the internal consistency and test-retest reliability of individual differences in mental rotation tasks comparing different target types and orders of presentations. In total n = 99 participants (n = 63 for the retest) completed the mental rotation tasks with hands, feet, faces, and cars as targets. Different target types were presented in either randomly mixed blocks or blocks of homogeneous targets. Across all target types, the consistency (split-half reliability) and stability (test-retest reliabilities) were good or acceptable both for intercepts and slopes. At the level of individual targets, only intercepts showed acceptable reliabilities. Blocked presentations resulted in significantly faster and numerically more consistent and stable responses. Mental rotation tasks-especially in blocked variants-can be used to reliably assess individual differences in global processing speed. However, the assessment of the theoretically important slope parameter for individual targets requires further adaptations to mental rotation tests. PMID:24195068

  11. Vulnerability as a Function of Individual and Group Resources in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    deFur, Peter L.; Evans, Gary W.; Hubal, Elaine A. Cohen; Kyle, Amy D.; Morello-Frosch, Rachel A.; Williams, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Background The field of risk assessment has focused on protecting the health of individual people or populations of wildlife from single risks, mostly from chemical exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently began to address multiple risks to communities in the “Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment” [EPA/630/P02/001F. Washington DC:Risk Assessment Forum, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2003)]. Simultaneously, several reports concluded that some individuals and groups are more vulnerable to environmental risks than the general population. However, vulnerability has received little specific attention in the risk assessment literature. Objective Our objective is to examine the issue of vulnerability in cumulative risk assessment and present a conceptual framework rather than a comprehensive review of the literature. In this article we consider similarities between ecologic and human communities and the factors that make communities vulnerable to environmental risks. Discussion The literature provides substantial evidence on single environmental factors and simple conditions that increase vulnerability or reduce resilience for humans and ecologic systems. This observation is especially true for individual people and populations of wildlife. Little research directly addresses the topic of vulnerability in cumulative risk situations, especially at the community level. The community level of organization has not been adequately considered as an end point in either human or ecologic risk assessment. Furthermore, current information on human risk does not completely explain the level of response in cumulative risk conditions. Ecologic risk situations are similarly more complex and unpredictable for cases of cumulative risk. Conclusions Psychosocial conditions and responses are the principal missing element for humans. We propose a model for including psychologic and social factors as an integral component of cumulative risk assessment. PMID

  12. Assessment instruments measuring malingering used with individuals who have mental retardation: potential problems and issues.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Kolleen E; Deal, William Paul

    2006-04-01

    Malingering, the exaggeration or fabrication of physical and/or psychological symptoms, can threaten the psychological assessment process (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). To enhance the validity of psychological evaluations, researchers have studied trends in malingering and developed instruments for its detection (Rogers, Bagby, & Dickens, 1992; Tombaugh, 1996). These instruments, however, may not be appropriate for individuals with significant subaverage intellectual functioning. Four instruments assessing malingering, frequently used in forensic evaluations, were administered to individuals with mental retardation. Results show that by utilizing established cut-off scores, we were able to classify a significant percentage of participants as "malingering," in spite of directions to perform optimally. Practical implications as well as directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Telepractice in the Assessment and Treatment of Individuals with Aphasia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Nerissa; Boisvert, Michelle; Steele, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Telepractice involves the application of technology to deliver services over a geographical distance. Studies in which telepractice procedures were used in the assessment or treatment of individuals with aphasia were reviewed. Systematic searches identified 10 studies meeting inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of the: (a) characteristics of the participants, (b) technology utilized (c), services delivered via telepractice, (d) research methodology, and (e) results and conclusions of the study. Telepractice was used by speech-language pathologists and allied health professionals to assist with the delivery of services to participants with aphasia by their caretakers or clinicians. The services delivered included appraisal, diagnostic assessments, interventions, and consultation. This review suggests that telepractice is a viable method of service delivery for individuals with aphasia, however further research is warranted. Guidelines for practitioners and potential directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25945211

  14. Long term post-flood damage assessments to analyze the strategies of adaptation at individual scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémond, Pauline; Bonte, Bruno; Erdlenbruch, Katrin; Grelot, Frédéric; Richert, Claire

    2015-04-01

    RETINA is a project which studies the opportunity for adaptation in the aftermath of flood events. To handle this research question, we consider adaptation to flood risk at individual and collective scale as well as the influence of the urban planning regulation (Flood risk mapping). For the purpose of this research, collective adaptation means actions that are undertaken at collective scale such as dikes, relocation of collective infrastructures (roads, treatment plant...) and individual adaptation means actions decided at individual level (households, enterprises or farmers) such as relocation, elevation of critical components, new organization.... In this presentation, we focus on individual adaptation and analyse which are the mechanisms that incite or constrain the adaptation to flood risk of individual assets considering their own trajectory. The originality of our approach is to carry out long term post-flood assessments and comprehensive interviews at individual scale. To catch the drivers of adaptation, we sequenced the interview guide in three periods: 1/ the situation before the reference event occurred, 2/ what happened during and just after the flood event, 3/ what happened from the flood event until the moment of the interview. Two case studies have been chosen. The first case study is the Aude department where an exceptional flooding occurred in 1999. The second case study is the Var department where more recent and frequent flood events occurred in 2010, 2011, 2014. On each case study, we plan to conduct about fifty interviews including households and economic activities. In this presentation, we will develop methodological aspects on long term post-flood damage assessments. Carrying out a long term post-flood assessment enabled us to consider adaptation to flood risk among the whole of strategic decisions a household or an enterprise has to take. Moreover, we found out that contrary to what is usually assumed, the fact that the reference event was

  15. Radiation Risk Assessment of the Individual Astronaut: A Complement to Radiation Interests at the NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Predicting human risks following exposure to space radiation is uncertain in part because of unpredictable distribution of high-LET and low-dose-derived damage amongst cells in tissues, unknown synergistic effects of microgravity upon gene- and protein-expression, and inadequately modeled processing of radiation-induced damage within cells to produce rare and late-appearing malignant cancers. Furthermore, estimation of risks of radiogenic outcome within small numbers of astronauts is not possible using classic epidemiologic study. It therefore seems useful to develop strategies of risk-assessment based upon large datasets acquired from correlated biological models useful for resolving radiogenic risk-assessment for irradiated individuals. In this regard, it is suggested that sensitive cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the biomolecular risk of malignant transformation be developed in order to resolve these NASA-specific challenges. Multiparametric cellular biodosimeters could be developed using analyses of gene-expression and protein-expression whereby large datasets of cellular response to radiation-induced damage are analyzed for markers predictive for acute response as well as cancer-risk. A new paradigm is accordingly addressed wherein genomic and proteomic datasets are registered and interrogated in order to provide statistically significant dose-dependent risk estimation in individual astronauts. This evaluation of the individual for assessment of radiogenic outcomes connects to NIH program in that such a paradigm also supports assignment of a given patient to a specific therapy, the diagnosis of response of that patient to therapy, and the prediction of risks accumulated by that patient during therapy - such as risks incurred by scatter and neutrons produced during high-energy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

  16. Contextual and individual assessment of dental pain period prevalence in adolescents: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that health and disease occur in social contexts, the vast majority of studies addressing dental pain exclusively assessed information gathered at individual level. Objectives To assess the association between dental pain and contextual and individual characteristics in Brazilian adolescents. In addition, we aimed to test whether contextual Human Development Index is independently associated with dental pain after adjusting for individual level variables of socio-demographics and dental characteristics. Methods The study used data from an oral health survey carried out in São Paulo, Brazil, which included dental pain, dental exams, individual socioeconomic and demographic conditions, and Human Development Index at area level of 4,249 12-year-old and 1,566 15-year-old schoolchildren. The Poisson multilevel analysis was performed. Results Dental pain was found among 25.6% (95%CI = 24.5-26.7) of the adolescents and was 33% less prevalent among those living in more developed areas of the city than among those living in less developed areas. Girls, blacks, those whose parents earn low income and have low schooling, those studying at public schools, and those with dental treatment needs presented higher dental-pain prevalence than their counterparts. Area HDI remained associated with dental pain after adjusting for individual level variables of socio demographic and dental characteristics. Conclusions Girls, students whose parents have low schooling, those with low per capita income, those classified as having black skin color and those with dental treatment needs had higher dental pain prevalence than their counterparts. Students from areas with low Human Development Index had higher prevalence of dental pain than those from the more developed areas regardless of individual characteristics. PMID:20707920

  17. An interactive mapping tool to assess individual mobility patterns in neighborhood studies.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Basile; Kestens, Yan; Perchoux, Camille; Karusisi, Noëlla; Merlo, Juan; Labadi, Karima

    2012-10-01

    As their most critical limitation, neighborhood and health studies published to date have not taken into account nonresidential activity places where individuals travel in their daily lives. However, identifying low-mobility populations residing in low-resource environments, assessing cumulative environmental exposures over multiple activity places, and identifying specific activity locations for targeting interventions are important for health promotion. Daily mobility has not been given due consideration in part because of a lack of tools to collect locational information on activity spaces. Thus, the first aim of the current article is to describe VERITAS (Visualization and Evaluation of Route Itineraries, Travel Destinations, and Activity Spaces), an interactive web mapping application that can geolocate individuals' activity places, routes between locations, and relevant areas such as experienced or perceived neighborhoods. The second aim is to formalize the theoretic grounds of a contextual expology as a subdiscipline to better assess the spatiotemporal configuration of environmental exposures. Based on activity place data, various indicators of individual patterns of movement in space (spatial behavior) are described. Successive steps are outlined for elaborating variables of multiplace environmental exposure (collection of raw locational information, selection/exclusion of locational data, defining an exposure area for measurement, and calculation). Travel and activity place network areas are discussed as a relevant construct for environmental exposure assessment. Finally, a note of caution is provided that these measures require careful handling to avoid increasing the magnitude of confounding (selective daily mobility bias).

  18. Constructing interethnic conflict and cooperation: why some people harmed Jews and others helped them during the Holocaust in Romania.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Diana; Johnson, Carter

    2011-01-01

    The authors draw on a natural experiment to demonstrate that states can reconstruct conflictual interethnic relationships into cooperative relationships in relatively short periods of time. The article examines differences in how the gentile population in each of two neighboring territories in Romania treated its Jewish population during the Holocaust. These territories had been part of tsarist Russia and subject to state-sponsored anti-Semitism until 1917. During the interwar period one territory became part of Romania, which continued anti-Semitic policies, and the other became part of the Soviet Union, which pursued an inclusive nationality policy, fighting against inherited anti-Semitism and working to integrate its Jews. Both territories were then reunited under Romanian administration during World War II, when Romania began to destroy its Jewish population. The authors demonstrate that, despite a uniform Romanian state presence during the Holocaust that encouraged gentiles to victimize Jews, the civilian population in the area that had been part of the Soviet Union was less likely to harm and more likely to aid Jews as compared with the region that had been part of Romania. Their evidence suggests that the state construction of interethnic relationships can become internalized by civilians and outlive the life of the state itself.

  19. Transformations in Kinship, Land Rights and Social Boundaries among the Wampar in Papua New Guinea and the Generative Agency of Children of Interethnic Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schworer, Doris Bacalzo

    2012-01-01

    Among the Wampar in Papua New Guinea, children are active participants in the dynamics of kinship and identity construction. This article explores the transformative capabilities of children of interethnic marriages, particularly those with non-Wampar fathers. It examines children's notions of belonging and rights through their practices and…

  20. Asian American Interethnic Relations and Politics. Asians in America: The Peoples of East, Southeast, and South Asia in American Life and Culture Series, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Franklin, Ed.

    The articles in this anthology address the complex subject of interethnic relations and Asian American politics, transcending ideas of Asian Americans as the model minority. The articles are: (1) "Opening the American Mind and Body: The Role of Asian American Studies" (Shirley Hume); (2) "Surviving Democracy's 'Mistake": Japanese Americans and the…

  1. Parental Choice of Schooling, Learning Processes and Inter-Ethnic Friendship Patterns: The Case of Malay Students in Chinese Primary Schools in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sua, Tan Yao; Ngah, Kamarudin; Darit, Sezali Md.

    2013-01-01

    This study surveys 200 Malay students enrolled in three Chinese primary schools in relation to three issues, i.e., parental choice of schooling, learning processes and inter-ethnic friendship patterns. The three issues are explored through a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Parental expectations for their…

  2. Romantic Relationships in Intra-Ethnic and Inter-Ethnic Adolescent Couples in Germany: The Role of Attachment to Parents, Self-Esteem, and Conflict Resolution Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucx, Freek; Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2010-01-01

    We investigated romantic relationships in a sample of 380 adolescents who formed 190 heterosexual couples (mean age: females 17 years; males 18 years): 173 intra-ethnic (German) couples and 17 inter-ethnic couples. Factor analyses revealed two types of love experiences: (a) experiences of attraction and a passionate focus on the partner…

  3. Feathers as a Tool to Assess Mercury Contamination in Gentoo Penguins: Variations at the Individual Level.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Sara; Xavier, José C; Tavares, Sílvia; Trathan, Phil N; Ratcliffe, Norman; Paiva, Vitor H; Medeiros, Renata; Pereira, Eduarda; Pardal, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Feathers have been widely used to assess mercury contamination in birds as they reflect metal concentrations accumulated between successive moult periods: they are also easy to sample and have minimum impact on the study birds. Moult is considered the major pathway for mercury excretion in seabirds. Penguins are widely believed to undergo a complete, annual moult during which they do not feed. As penguins lose all their feathers, they are expected to have a low individual-variability in feather mercury concentration as all feathers are formed simultaneously from the same somatic reserves. This assumption is central to penguin studies that use feathers to examine the annual or among-individual variation in mercury concentrations in penguins. To test this assumption, we measured the mercury concentrations in 3-5 body feathers of 52 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 38°W). Twenty-five percent of the penguins studied showed substantial within-individual variation in the amount of mercury in their feathers (Coefficient of Variation: 34.7-96.7%). This variation may be caused by differences in moult patterns among individuals within the population leading to different interpretations in the overall population. Further investigation is now needed to fully understand individual variation in penguins' moult. PMID:26352664

  4. Feathers as a Tool to Assess Mercury Contamination in Gentoo Penguins: Variations at the Individual Level

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Sara; Xavier, José C.; Tavares, Sílvia; Trathan, Phil N.; Ratcliffe, Norman; Paiva, Vitor H.; Medeiros, Renata; Pereira, Eduarda; Pardal, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Feathers have been widely used to assess mercury contamination in birds as they reflect metal concentrations accumulated between successive moult periods: they are also easy to sample and have minimum impact on the study birds. Moult is considered the major pathway for mercury excretion in seabirds. Penguins are widely believed to undergo a complete, annual moult during which they do not feed. As penguins lose all their feathers, they are expected to have a low individual-variability in feather mercury concentration as all feathers are formed simultaneously from the same somatic reserves. This assumption is central to penguin studies that use feathers to examine the annual or among-individual variation in mercury concentrations in penguins. To test this assumption, we measured the mercury concentrations in 3–5 body feathers of 52 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 38°W). Twenty-five percent of the penguins studied showed substantial within-individual variation in the amount of mercury in their feathers (Coefficient of Variation: 34.7–96.7%). This variation may be caused by differences in moult patterns among individuals within the population leading to different interpretations in the overall population. Further investigation is now needed to fully understand individual variation in penguins’ moult. PMID:26352664

  5. Feathers as a Tool to Assess Mercury Contamination in Gentoo Penguins: Variations at the Individual Level.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Sara; Xavier, José C; Tavares, Sílvia; Trathan, Phil N; Ratcliffe, Norman; Paiva, Vitor H; Medeiros, Renata; Pereira, Eduarda; Pardal, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Feathers have been widely used to assess mercury contamination in birds as they reflect metal concentrations accumulated between successive moult periods: they are also easy to sample and have minimum impact on the study birds. Moult is considered the major pathway for mercury excretion in seabirds. Penguins are widely believed to undergo a complete, annual moult during which they do not feed. As penguins lose all their feathers, they are expected to have a low individual-variability in feather mercury concentration as all feathers are formed simultaneously from the same somatic reserves. This assumption is central to penguin studies that use feathers to examine the annual or among-individual variation in mercury concentrations in penguins. To test this assumption, we measured the mercury concentrations in 3-5 body feathers of 52 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 38°W). Twenty-five percent of the penguins studied showed substantial within-individual variation in the amount of mercury in their feathers (Coefficient of Variation: 34.7-96.7%). This variation may be caused by differences in moult patterns among individuals within the population leading to different interpretations in the overall population. Further investigation is now needed to fully understand individual variation in penguins' moult.

  6. Assessment of causality of individual adverse events following immunization (AEFI): a WHO tool for global use.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Asturias, Edwin J; Balakrishnan, Madhava Ram; Halsey, Neal A; Law, Barbara; Zuber, Patrick L F

    2013-10-17

    Serious illnesses or even deaths may rarely occur after childhood vaccinations. Public health programs are faced with great challenges to establish if the events presenting after the administration of a vaccine are due to other conditions, and hence a coincidental presentation, rather than caused by the administered vaccines. Given its priority, the Global Advisory Committee for Vaccine Safety (GACVS) commissioned a group of experts to review the previously published World Health Organization (WHO) Adverse Event Following Immunization (AEFI) causality assessment methodology and aide-memoire, and to develop a standardized and user friendly tool to assist health care personnel in the processing and interpretation of data on individual events, and to assess the causality after AEFIs. We describe a tool developed for causality assessment of individual AEFIs that includes: (a) an eligibility component for the assessment that reviews the diagnosis associated with the event and identifies the administered vaccines; (b) a checklist that systematically guides users to gather available information to feed a decision algorithm; and (c) a decision support algorithm that assists the assessors to come to a classification of the individual AEFI. Final classification generated by the process includes four categories in which the event is either: (1) consistent; (2) inconsistent; or (3) indeterminate with respect of causal association; or (4) unclassifiable. Subcategories are identified to assist assessors in resulting public health decisions that can be used for action. This proposed tool should support the classification of AEFI cases in a standardized, transparent manner and to collect essential information during AEFI investigation. The algorithm should provide countries and health officials at the global level with an instrument to respond to vaccine safety alerts, and support the education, research and policy decisions on immunization safety.

  7. Interethnic variability of pharmacogenetic biomarkers in Mexican healthy volunteers: a report from the RIBEF (Ibero-American Network of Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics).

    PubMed

    Fricke-Galindo, Ingrid; Jung-Cook, Helgi; LLerena, Adrián; López-López, Marisol

    2016-06-01

    Mexico presents a complex population diversity integrated by Mexican indigenous (MI) (7% of Mexico's population) and Mexican mestizos (MMs). This composition highlights the importance of pharmacogenetic studies in Mexican populations. The aims of this study were to analyze the reported frequencies of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes in healthy volunteers from Mexican populations and to assess its interethnic variability across MI and MM populations. After a literature search in PubMed, and according to previously defined inclusion criteria, 63 pharmacogenetic studies performed in Mexican healthy volunteers up to date were selected. These reports comprised 56,292 healthy volunteers (71.58% MM). Allele frequencies in 31 pharmacogenetic biomarkers, from 121 searched, are described. Nine of these biomarkers presented variation within MM and MI groups. The frequencies of CYP2D6*3, *4, *5, *10, *17, *35 and *41 alleles in the MM group were different from those reported in the MI group. CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles were more frequent in MM than in MI populations (χ2 test, p<0.05). CYP2C19*3 allele was not found in the MM or MI populations reported. For UGT1A1*28, only one study was found. HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 were present in some MM and MI populations. Poor metabolizers for CYP2D6 and CYP2C9 were more frequent in MM than in MI groups (χ2 test, p<0.05). Only 26% of the relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers searched have been studied in Mexican healthy volunteers; therefore, further studies are warranted. The frequency variation of biomarkers in MM and MI populations could be important for the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics in Mexico.

  8. Interethnic variability of pharmacogenetic biomarkers in Mexican healthy volunteers: a report from the RIBEF (Ibero-American Network of Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics).

    PubMed

    Fricke-Galindo, Ingrid; Jung-Cook, Helgi; LLerena, Adrián; López-López, Marisol

    2016-06-01

    Mexico presents a complex population diversity integrated by Mexican indigenous (MI) (7% of Mexico's population) and Mexican mestizos (MMs). This composition highlights the importance of pharmacogenetic studies in Mexican populations. The aims of this study were to analyze the reported frequencies of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes in healthy volunteers from Mexican populations and to assess its interethnic variability across MI and MM populations. After a literature search in PubMed, and according to previously defined inclusion criteria, 63 pharmacogenetic studies performed in Mexican healthy volunteers up to date were selected. These reports comprised 56,292 healthy volunteers (71.58% MM). Allele frequencies in 31 pharmacogenetic biomarkers, from 121 searched, are described. Nine of these biomarkers presented variation within MM and MI groups. The frequencies of CYP2D6*3, *4, *5, *10, *17, *35 and *41 alleles in the MM group were different from those reported in the MI group. CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles were more frequent in MM than in MI populations (χ2 test, p<0.05). CYP2C19*3 allele was not found in the MM or MI populations reported. For UGT1A1*28, only one study was found. HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 were present in some MM and MI populations. Poor metabolizers for CYP2D6 and CYP2C9 were more frequent in MM than in MI groups (χ2 test, p<0.05). Only 26% of the relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers searched have been studied in Mexican healthy volunteers; therefore, further studies are warranted. The frequency variation of biomarkers in MM and MI populations could be important for the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics in Mexico. PMID:26812836

  9. Nutrient Status Assessment in Individuals and Populations for Healthy Aging-Statement from an Expert Workshop.

    PubMed

    Péter, Szabolcs; Saris, Wim H M; Mathers, John C; Feskens, Edith; Schols, Annemie; Navis, Gerjan; Kuipers, Folkert; Weber, Peter; Eggersdorfer, Manfred

    2015-12-16

    A workshop organized by the University Medical Center Groningen addressed various current issues regarding nutrient status of individuals and populations, tools and strategies for its assessment, and opportunities to intervene. The importance of nutrient deficiencies and information on nutrient status for health has been illustrated, in particular for elderly and specific patient groups. The nutrient profile of individuals can be connected to phenotypes, like hypertension or obesity, as well as to socio-economic data. This approach provides information on the relationship between nutrition (nutrient intake and status) and health outcomes and, for instance, allows us to use the findings to communicate and advocate a healthy lifestyle. Nutrition is complex: a broader profile of nutrients should be considered rather than focusing solely on a single nutrient. Evaluating food patterns instead of intake of individual nutrients provides better insight into relationships between nutrition and health and disease. This approach would allow us to provide feedback to individuals about their status and ways to improve their nutritional habits. In addition, it would provide tools for scientists and health authorities to update and develop public health recommendations.

  10. Nutrient Status Assessment in Individuals and Populations for Healthy Aging—Statement from an Expert Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Péter, Szabolcs; Saris, Wim H. M.; Mathers, John C.; Feskens, Edith; Schols, Annemie; Navis, Gerjan; Kuipers, Folkert; Weber, Peter; Eggersdorfer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    A workshop organized by the University Medical Center Groningen addressed various current issues regarding nutrient status of individuals and populations, tools and strategies for its assessment, and opportunities to intervene. The importance of nutrient deficiencies and information on nutrient status for health has been illustrated, in particular for elderly and specific patient groups. The nutrient profile of individuals can be connected to phenotypes, like hypertension or obesity, as well as to socio-economic data. This approach provides information on the relationship between nutrition (nutrient intake and status) and health outcomes and, for instance, allows us to use the findings to communicate and advocate a healthy lifestyle. Nutrition is complex: a broader profile of nutrients should be considered rather than focusing solely on a single nutrient. Evaluating food patterns instead of intake of individual nutrients provides better insight into relationships between nutrition and health and disease. This approach would allow us to provide feedback to individuals about their status and ways to improve their nutritional habits. In addition, it would provide tools for scientists and health authorities to update and develop public health recommendations. PMID:26694458

  11. 14 CFR 13.18 - Civil penalties: Administrative assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. 13.18 Section 13.18... assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. (a) General. (1... procedures against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman, under 49...

  12. 14 CFR 13.18 - Civil penalties: Administrative assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. 13.18 Section 13.18... assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. (a) General. (1... procedures against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman, under 49...

  13. 14 CFR 13.18 - Civil penalties: Administrative assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. 13.18 Section 13.18... assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. (a) General. (1... procedures against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman, under 49...

  14. The Key to Individualized Addiction Treatment is Comprehensive Assessment and Monitoring of Symptoms and Behavioral Change

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Thomas F.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern health services now strive for individualized treatment. This approach has been enabled by the increase in knowledge derived from neuroscience and genomics. Substance use disorders are no exception to individualized treatment even though there are no gene-specific medications yet available. What is available is the ability to quickly and precisely assess and monitor biopsychosocial variables known to vary during addiction recovery and which place addicts at increased risk of relapse. Monitoring a broad spectrum of biopsychosocial health enables providers to address diverse genome-specific changes that might trigger withdrawal from treatment or recovery relapse in time to prevent that from occurring. This paper describes modern measurement tools contained in the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the NIH Toolbox and suggests how they might be applied to support recovery from alcohol and other substance use disorders in both pharmacological and abstinence-oriented modalities of care. PMID:26529025

  15. Communication Services and Supports for Individuals With Severe Disabilities: Guidance for Assessment and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nancy C; Bruce, Susan; Goldman, Amy; Erickson, Karen; Mineo, Beth; Ogletree, Bill T; Paul, Diane; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose; Siegel, Ellin; Schoonover, Judith; Snell, Marti; Sylvester, Lorraine; Wilkinson, Krista

    2016-03-01

    The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of People With Severe Disabilities (NJC) reviewed literature regarding practices for people with severe disabilities in order to update guidance provided in documents originally published in 1992. Changes in laws, definitions, and policies that affect communication attainments by persons with severe disabilities are presented, along with guidance regarding assessment and intervention practices. A revised version of the Communication Bill of Rights, a powerful document that describes the communication rights of all individuals, including those with severe disabilities is included in this article. The information contained within this article is intended to be used by professionals, family members, and individuals with severe disabilities to inform and advocate for effective communication services and opportunities. PMID:26914467

  16. Communication Services and Supports for Individuals With Severe Disabilities: Guidance for Assessment and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nancy C; Bruce, Susan; Goldman, Amy; Erickson, Karen; Mineo, Beth; Ogletree, Bill T; Paul, Diane; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose; Siegel, Ellin; Schoonover, Judith; Snell, Marti; Sylvester, Lorraine; Wilkinson, Krista

    2016-03-01

    The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of People With Severe Disabilities (NJC) reviewed literature regarding practices for people with severe disabilities in order to update guidance provided in documents originally published in 1992. Changes in laws, definitions, and policies that affect communication attainments by persons with severe disabilities are presented, along with guidance regarding assessment and intervention practices. A revised version of the Communication Bill of Rights, a powerful document that describes the communication rights of all individuals, including those with severe disabilities is included in this article. The information contained within this article is intended to be used by professionals, family members, and individuals with severe disabilities to inform and advocate for effective communication services and opportunities.

  17. The Key to Individualized Addiction Treatment is Comprehensive Assessment and Monitoring of Symptoms and Behavioral Change.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Thomas F; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Modern health services now strive for individualized treatment. This approach has been enabled by the increase in knowledge derived from neuroscience and genomics. Substance use disorders are no exception to individualized treatment even though there are no gene-specific medications yet available. What is available is the ability to quickly and precisely assess and monitor biopsychosocial variables known to vary during addiction recovery and which place addicts at increased risk of relapse. Monitoring a broad spectrum of biopsychosocial health enables providers to address diverse genome-specific changes that might trigger withdrawal from treatment or recovery relapse in time to prevent that from occurring. This paper describes modern measurement tools contained in the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the NIH Toolbox and suggests how they might be applied to support recovery from alcohol and other substance use disorders in both pharmacological and abstinence-oriented modalities of care.

  18. Communication Services and Supports for Individuals with Severe Disabilities: Guidance for Assessment and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Nancy C.; Bruce, Susan; Goldman, Amy; Erickson, Karen; Mineo, Beth; Ogletree, Bill T.; Paul, Diane; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose; Siegel, Ellin; Schoonover, Judith; Snell, Marti; Sylvester, Lorraine; Wilkinson, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of People with Severe Disabilities (NJC) reviewed literature regarding practices for people with severe disabilities in order to update guidance provided in documents originally published in 1992. Changes in laws, definitions, and policies that affect communication attainments by persons with severe disabilities are presented, along with guidance regarding assessment and intervention practices. A revised version of the Communication Bill of Rights, a powerful document that describes the communication rights of all individuals, including those with severe disabilities is included in this article. The information contained within this article is intended to be used by professionals, family members, and individuals with severe disabilities to inform and advocate for effective communication services and opportunities. PMID:26914467

  19. Assessment of individual agreements with repeated measurements based on generalized confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Jorge; Burdick, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    Individual agreement between two measurement systems is determined using the total deviation index (TDI) or the coverage probability (CP) criteria as proposed by Lin (2000) and Lin et al. (2002). We used a variance component model as proposed by Choudhary (2007). Using the bootstrap approach, Choudhary (2007), and generalized confidence intervals, we construct bounds on TDI and CP. A simulation study was conducted to assess whether the bounds maintain the stated type I error probability of the test. We also present a computational example to demonstrate the statistical methods described in the paper.

  20. Use of body mass index of adults in assessing individual and community nutritional status.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, K. V.; Ferro-Luzzi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Adult malnutrition is much more widespread than is commonly recognized. Described in this article is the use of body mass index (BMI = weight in kg/(height in metres)2) as a measure of adult nutritional status, both of individuals and of communities. Concurrent assessment of the nutritional status of children and adults permits conclusions to be drawn about whether there is generalized undernutrition in a community or whether other factors (e.g., childhood infections or feeding practices) are more important in childhood malnutrition. Included is a tabular presentation that permits rapid assessment of both thinness or underweight (BMI values < 16, 17 and 18.5) and overweight (BMI > 25, 30 and 40). Examples of the use of BMI in both clinical and public health practice are also given. PMID:8846494

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction by pro-oxidant vanadium: ex vivo assessment of individual susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Visalli, Giuseppa; Bertuccio, Maria Paola; Picerno, Isa; Spataro, Pasquale; Di Pietro, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the individual susceptibility to mitochondrial impairment induced by ex vivo exposure to vanadium, an airborne pro-oxidant pollutant. In lymphocyte cultures V(IV)-treated of forty-five healthy subjects, we evaluated the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) and the H2O2 in comparison to background values. As variables, we included both lifestyle factors and genetic polymorphisms (GSTM1 and GSTT1 variants, and C677T and A1298C variants of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase MTHFR). H2O2 mitochondrial content increased significantly (P<0.05) after metal exposure while, in comparison to basal Δψm, both depolarisation and hyperpolarisation were recorded. This underlined the mitochondrial dysfunction vanadium-induced that worsens the redox imbalance by endogenous ROS overproduction. Only age was found to contribute significantly to the high inter-individual variability, as assessed by multivariate analysis. In older subjects, the H2O2/Δψm values underline the organelle impairment and, under V-exposure, Δψm values were inversely related to age (R=-0.591; P=0.012).

  2. Assessing Fidelity of Treatment Delivery in Group and Individual 12-Step Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Barbara K.; Manuel, Jennifer K.; Manser, Sarah Turcotte; Peavy, K. Michelle; Stelmokas, Julija; McCarty, Dennis; Guydish, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Twelve Step Facilitation (TSF) is an emerging, empirically supported treatment, the study of which will be strengthened by rigorous fidelity assessment. This report describes the development, reliability and concurrent validity of the Twelve Step Facilitation Adherence Competence Empathy Scale (TSF ACES), a comprehensive fidelity rating scale for group and individual TSF treatment developed for the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network study, Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step. Independent raters used TSF ACES to rate treatment delivery fidelity of 966 (97% of total) TSF group and individual sessions. TSF ACES summary measures assessed therapist treatment adherence, competence, proscribed behaviors, empathy and overall session performance. TSF ACES showed fair to good overall reliability; weighted kappa coefficients for 59 co-rated sessions ranged from .31–1.00, with a mean of .69. Reliability ratings for session summary measures were good to excellent (.69–.91). Internal consistency for the instrument was variable (.47–.71). Relationships of the TSF ACES summary measures with each other, as well as relationships of the summary measures with a measure of therapeutic alliance provided support for concurrent and convergent validity. Implications and future directions for use of TSF ACES in clinical trials and community treatment implementation are discussed. PMID:22944595

  3. Copy number variation associates with mortality in long-lived individuals: a genome-wide assessment.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marianne; Debrabant, Birgit; Tan, Qihua; Deelen, Joris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; de Craen, Anton J M; Beekman, Marian; Jeune, Bernard; Slagboom, Pieternella E; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2016-02-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) represent a significant source of genetic variation in the human genome and have been implicated in numerous diseases and complex traits. To date, only a few studies have investigated the role of CNVs in human lifespan. To investigate the impact of CNVs on prospective mortality at the extreme end of life, where the genetic component of lifespan appears most profound, we analyzed genomewide CNV data in 603 Danish nonagenarians and centenarians (mean age 96.9 years, range 90.0-102.5 years). Replication was performed in 500 long-lived individuals from the Leiden Longevity Study (mean age 93.2 years, range 88.9-103.4 years). First, we assessed the association between the CNV burden of each individual (the number of CNVs, the average CNV length, and the total CNV length) and mortality and found a significant increase in mortality per 10 kb increase in the average CNV length, both for all CNVs (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.024, P = 0.002) and for duplications (HR = 1.011, P = 0.005), as well as per 100 kb increase in the total length of deletions (HR = 1.009, P = 0.0005). Next, we assessed the relation between specific deletions and duplications and mortality. Although no genome-wide significant associations were discovered, we identified six deletions and one duplication that showed consistent association with mortality in both or either of the sexes across both study populations. These results indicate that the genome-wide CNV burden, specifically the average CNV length and the total CNV length, associates with higher mortality in long-lived individuals. PMID:26446717

  4. Individualized Risk of Surgical Complications: An Application of the Breast Reconstruction Risk Assessment Score

    PubMed Central

    Mlodinow, Alexei S.; Khavanin, Nima; Hume, Keith M.; Simmons, Christopher J.; Weiss, Michael J.; Murphy, Robert X.; Gutowski, Karol A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Risk discussion is a central tenet of the dialogue between surgeon and patient. Risk calculators have recently offered a new way to integrate evidence-based practice into the discussion of individualized patient risk and expectation management. Focusing on the comprehensive Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons (TOPS) database, we endeavored to add plastic surgical outcomes to the previously developed Breast Reconstruction Risk Assessment (BRA) score. Methods: The TOPS database from 2008 to 2011 was queried for patients undergoing breast reconstruction. Regression models were constructed for the following complications: seroma, dehiscence, surgical site infection (SSI), explantation, flap failure, reoperation, and overall complications. Results: Of 11,992 cases, 4439 met inclusion criteria. Overall complication rate was 15.9%, with rates of 3.4% for seroma, 4.0% for SSI, 6.1% for dehiscence, 3.7% for explantation, 7.0% for flap loss, and 6.4% for reoperation. Individualized risk models were developed with acceptable goodness of fit, accuracy, and internal validity. Distribution of overall complication risk was broad and asymmetric, meaning that the average risk was often a poor estimate of the risk for any given patient. These models were added to the previously developed open-access version of the risk calculator, available at http://www.BRAscore.org. Conclusions: Population-based measures of risk may not accurately reflect risk for many individual patients. In this era of increasing emphasis on evidence-based medicine, we have developed a breast reconstruction risk assessment calculator from the robust TOPS database. The BRA Score tool can aid in individualizing—and quantifying—risk to better inform surgical decision making and better manage patient expectations. PMID:26090295

  5. Kinematic measures for assessing gait stability in elderly individuals: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, D.; Singh, N.B.; Van Dieën, J.H.; Heller, M.O.; Taylor, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Falls not only present a considerable health threat, but the resulting treatment and loss of working days also place a heavy economic burden on society. Gait instability is a major fall risk factor, particularly in geriatric patients, and walking is one of the most frequent dynamic activities of daily living. To allow preventive strategies to become effective, it is therefore imperative to identify individuals with an unstable gait. Assessment of dynamic stability and gait variability via biomechanical measures of foot kinematics provides a viable option for quantitative evaluation of gait stability, but the ability of these methods to predict falls has generally not been assessed. Although various methods for assessing gait stability exist, their sensitivity and applicability in a clinical setting, as well as their cost-effectiveness, need verification. The objective of this systematic review was therefore to evaluate the sensitivity of biomechanical measures that quantify gait stability among elderly individuals and to evaluate the cost of measurement instrumentation required for application in a clinical setting. To assess gait stability, a comparative effect size (Cohen's d) analysis of variability and dynamic stability of foot trajectories during level walking was performed on 29 of an initial yield of 9889 articles from four electronic databases. The results of this survey demonstrate that linear variability of temporal measures of swing and stance was most capable of distinguishing between fallers and non-fallers, whereas step width and stride velocity prove more capable of discriminating between old versus young (OY) adults. In addition, while orbital stability measures (Floquet multipliers) applied to gait have been shown to distinguish between both elderly fallers and non-fallers as well as between young and old adults, local stability measures (λs) have been able to distinguish between young and old adults. Both linear and nonlinear measures of foot

  6. Individual Differences in the Post-Illumination Pupil Response to Blue Light: Assessment without Mydriatics.

    PubMed

    Bruijel, Jessica; van der Meijden, Wisse P; Bijlenga, Denise; Dorani, Farangis; Coppens, Joris E; Te Lindert, Bart H W; Kooij, J J Sandra; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2016-09-09

    Melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells play an important role in the non-image forming effects of light, through their direct projections on brain circuits involved in circadian rhythms, mood and alertness. Individual differences in the functionality of the melanopsin-signaling circuitry can be reliably quantified using the maximum post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) after blue light. Previous protocols for acquiring PIPR relied on the use of mydriatics to dilate the light-exposed eye. However, pharmacological pupil dilation is uncomfortable for the participants and requires ophthalmological expertise. Hence, we here investigated whether an individual's maximum PIPR can be validly obtained in a protocol that does not use mydriatics but rather increases the intensity of the light stimulus. In 18 participants (5 males, mean age ± SD: 34.6 ± 13.6 years) we evaluated the PIPR after exposure to intensified blue light (550 µW/cm²) provided to an undilated dynamic pupil. The test-retest reliability of the primary PIPR outcome parameter was very high, both between day-to-day assessments (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.85), as well as between winter and summer assessments (ICC = 0.83). Compared to the PIPR obtained with the use of mydriatics and 160 µW/cm² blue light exposure, the method with intensified light without mydriatics showed almost zero bias according to Bland-Altman plots and had moderate to strong reliability (ICC = 0.67). In conclusion, for PIPR assessments, increasing the light intensity is a feasible and reliable alternative to pupil dilation to relieve the participant's burden and to allow for performance outside the ophthalmological clinic.

  7. Individual Differences in the Post-Illumination Pupil Response to Blue Light: Assessment without Mydriatics.

    PubMed

    Bruijel, Jessica; van der Meijden, Wisse P; Bijlenga, Denise; Dorani, Farangis; Coppens, Joris E; Te Lindert, Bart H W; Kooij, J J Sandra; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells play an important role in the non-image forming effects of light, through their direct projections on brain circuits involved in circadian rhythms, mood and alertness. Individual differences in the functionality of the melanopsin-signaling circuitry can be reliably quantified using the maximum post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) after blue light. Previous protocols for acquiring PIPR relied on the use of mydriatics to dilate the light-exposed eye. However, pharmacological pupil dilation is uncomfortable for the participants and requires ophthalmological expertise. Hence, we here investigated whether an individual's maximum PIPR can be validly obtained in a protocol that does not use mydriatics but rather increases the intensity of the light stimulus. In 18 participants (5 males, mean age ± SD: 34.6 ± 13.6 years) we evaluated the PIPR after exposure to intensified blue light (550 µW/cm²) provided to an undilated dynamic pupil. The test-retest reliability of the primary PIPR outcome parameter was very high, both between day-to-day assessments (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.85), as well as between winter and summer assessments (ICC = 0.83). Compared to the PIPR obtained with the use of mydriatics and 160 µW/cm² blue light exposure, the method with intensified light without mydriatics showed almost zero bias according to Bland-Altman plots and had moderate to strong reliability (ICC = 0.67). In conclusion, for PIPR assessments, increasing the light intensity is a feasible and reliable alternative to pupil dilation to relieve the participant's burden and to allow for performance outside the ophthalmological clinic. PMID:27618116

  8. Neuropsychological assessment of individuals with brain tumor: comparison of approaches used in the classification of impairment.

    PubMed

    Dwan, Toni Maree; Ownsworth, Tamara; Chambers, Suzanne; Walker, David G; Shum, David H K

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to classifying neuropsychological impairment after brain tumor vary according to testing level (individual tests, domains, or global index) and source of reference (i.e., norms, controls, and pre-morbid functioning). This study aimed to compare rates of impairment according to different classification approaches. Participants were 44 individuals (57% female) with a primary brain tumor diagnosis (mean age = 45.6 years) and 44 matched control participants (59% female, mean age = 44.5 years). All participants completed a test battery that assesses pre-morbid IQ (Wechsler adult reading test), attention/processing speed (digit span, trail making test A), memory (Hopkins verbal learning test-revised, Rey-Osterrieth complex figure-recall), and executive function (trail making test B, Rey-Osterrieth complex figure copy, controlled oral word association test). Results indicated that across the different sources of reference, 86-93% of participants were classified as impaired at a test-specific level, 61-73% were classified as impaired at a domain-specific level, and 32-50% were classified as impaired at a global level. Rates of impairment did not significantly differ according to source of reference (p > 0.05); however, at the individual participant level, classification based on estimated pre-morbid IQ was often inconsistent with classification based on the norms or controls. Participants with brain tumor performed significantly poorer than matched controls on tests of neuropsychological functioning, including executive function (p = 0.001) and memory (p < 0.001), but not attention/processing speed (p > 0.05). These results highlight the need to examine individuals' performance across a multi-faceted neuropsychological test battery to avoid over- or under-estimation of impairment.

  9. Accuracy Assessment of Crown Delineation Methods for the Individual Trees Using LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. T.; Lin, C.; Lin, Y. C.; Liu, J. K.

    2016-06-01

    Forest canopy density and height are used as variables in a number of environmental applications, including the estimation of biomass, forest extent and condition, and biodiversity. The airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is very useful to estimate forest canopy parameters according to the generated canopy height models (CHMs). The purpose of this work is to introduce an algorithm to delineate crown parameters, e.g. tree height and crown radii based on the generated rasterized CHMs. And accuracy assessment for the extraction of volumetric parameters of a single tree is also performed via manual measurement using corresponding aerial photo pairs. A LiDAR dataset of a golf course acquired by Leica ALS70-HP is used in this study. Two algorithms, i.e. a traditional one with the subtraction of a digital elevation model (DEM) from a digital surface model (DSM), and a pit-free approach are conducted to generate the CHMs firstly. Then two algorithms, a multilevel morphological active-contour (MMAC) and a variable window filter (VWF), are implemented and used in this study for individual tree delineation. Finally, experimental results of two automatic estimation methods for individual trees can be evaluated with manually measured stand-level parameters, i.e. tree height and crown diameter. The resulting CHM generated by a simple subtraction is full of empty pixels (called "pits") that will give vital impact on subsequent analysis for individual tree delineation. The experimental results indicated that if more individual trees can be extracted, tree crown shape will became more completely in the CHM data after the pit-free process.

  10. Symbolic bones and interethnic violence in a frontier zone, northwest Mexico, ca. 500-900 C.E.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ben A; Martin, Debra L

    2015-07-28

    Although extensive deposits of disarticulated, commingled human bones are common in the prehispanic Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica, detailed bioarchaeological analyses of them are not. To our knowledge, this article provides the first such analysis of bone from a full residential-ceremonial complex and evaluates multiple hypotheses about its significance, concluding that the bones actively represented interethnic violence as well as other relationships among persons living and dead. Description of these practices is important to the discussion of multiethnic societies because the frontier was a context where urbanism and complexity were emerging and groups with the potential to form multiethnic societies were interacting, possibly in the same ways that groups did before the formation of larger multiethnic city-states in the core of Mesoamerica. PMID:25941398

  11. Symbolic bones and interethnic violence in a frontier zone, northwest Mexico, ca. 500-900 C.E.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ben A; Martin, Debra L

    2015-07-28

    Although extensive deposits of disarticulated, commingled human bones are common in the prehispanic Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica, detailed bioarchaeological analyses of them are not. To our knowledge, this article provides the first such analysis of bone from a full residential-ceremonial complex and evaluates multiple hypotheses about its significance, concluding that the bones actively represented interethnic violence as well as other relationships among persons living and dead. Description of these practices is important to the discussion of multiethnic societies because the frontier was a context where urbanism and complexity were emerging and groups with the potential to form multiethnic societies were interacting, possibly in the same ways that groups did before the formation of larger multiethnic city-states in the core of Mesoamerica.

  12. Living in a Genetic World: How Learning About Interethnic Genetic Similarities and Differences Affects Peace and Conflict.

    PubMed

    Kimel, Sasha Y; Huesmann, Rowell; Kunst, Jonas R; Halperin, Eran

    2016-05-01

    Information about the degree of one's genetic overlap with ethnic outgroups has been emphasized in genocides, is frequently learned about through media reporting, and is increasingly being accessed via personal genetic testing services. However, the consequence of learning about whether your own ethnic group is either genetically related to or genetically distinct from a disliked ethnic group remains unknown. Across four experiments, using diverse samples, measures and contexts, we demonstrate that altering perceptions of genetic overlap between groups in conflict--in this case Arabs and Jews--impacts factors that are directly related to interethnic hostility (e.g., aggressive behaviors, support of conflict-related policies). Our findings indicate that learning about the genetic difference between oneself and an ethnic outgroup may contribute to the promotion of violence, whereas learning about the similarities may be a vital step toward fostering peace in some contexts. Possible interventions and implications are discussed. PMID:27029578

  13. Symbolic bones and interethnic violence in a frontier zone, northwest Mexico, ca. 500–900 C.E.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Ben A.; Martin, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Although extensive deposits of disarticulated, commingled human bones are common in the prehispanic Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica, detailed bioarchaeological analyses of them are not. To our knowledge, this article provides the first such analysis of bone from a full residential-ceremonial complex and evaluates multiple hypotheses about its significance, concluding that the bones actively represented interethnic violence as well as other relationships among persons living and dead. Description of these practices is important to the discussion of multiethnic societies because the frontier was a context where urbanism and complexity were emerging and groups with the potential to form multiethnic societies were interacting, possibly in the same ways that groups did before the formation of larger multiethnic city-states in the core of Mesoamerica. PMID:25941398

  14. Flow cytometric assessment of the signaling status of human B lymphocytes from normal and autoimmune individuals.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Fischer, Randy; Lee, Olivia; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in lymphocyte signaling cascades are thought to play an important role in the development of autoimmune disease. However, the large amount of cellular material needed for standard biochemical assessment of signaling status has made it difficult to evaluate putative abnormalities completely using primary lymphocytes. The development of technology to employ intracellular staining and flow cytometry to assess the signaling status of individual cells has now made it possible to delineate the perturbations that are present in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disease. As an example, human B cells from the Ramos B cell line and the periphery of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients or normal nonautoimmune controls were assessed for activation of the NF-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades by intracellular multiparameter flow cytometric analysis and biochemical Western blotting. In combination with fluorochrome conjugated antibodies specific for surface proteins that define B cell subsets, antibodies that recognize activated, or phosphorylated inhibitors of kappaB (IkappaB) as well as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPKs were used to stain fixed and permeabilized human B cells and analyze them flow cytometrically. Examination of the known signaling pathways following engagement of CD40 on human B cells confirmed that intracellular flow cytometry and Western blotting equivalently assay CD154-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB proteins as well as phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK, JNK and p38. In addition, B cells from the periphery of SLE patients had a more activated status immediately ex vivo as assessed by intracellular flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 when compared with B cells from the periphery of normal, nonautoimmune individuals. Together, these results indicate that multiparameter intracellular flow cytometric

  15. Flow cytometric assessment of the signaling status of human B lymphocytes from normal and autoimmune individuals

    PubMed Central

    Grammer, Amrie C; Fischer, Randy; Lee, Olivia; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in lymphocyte signaling cascades are thought to play an important role in the development of autoimmune disease. However, the large amount of cellular material needed for standard biochemical assessment of signaling status has made it difficult to evaluate putative abnormalities completely using primary lymphocytes. The development of technology to employ intracellular staining and flow cytometry to assess the signaling status of individual cells has now made it possible to delineate the perturbations that are present in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disease. As an example, human B cells from the Ramos B cell line and the periphery of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients or normal nonautoimmune controls were assessed for activation of the NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades by intracellular multiparameter flow cytometric analysis and biochemical Western blotting. In combination with fluorochrome conjugated antibodies specific for surface proteins that define B cell subsets, antibodies that recognize activated, or phosphorylated inhibitors of κB (IκB) as well as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPKs were used to stain fixed and permeabilized human B cells and analyze them flow cytometrically. Examination of the known signaling pathways following engagement of CD40 on human B cells confirmed that intracellular flow cytometry and Western blotting equivalently assay CD154-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IκB proteins as well as phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK, JNK and p38. In addition, B cells from the periphery of SLE patients had a more activated status immediately ex vivo as assessed by intracellular flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 when compared with B cells from the periphery of normal, nonautoimmune individuals. Together, these results indicate that multiparameter intracellular flow cytometric analysis of

  16. Housing and mobility demands of individual households and their life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Saner, Dominik; Heeren, Niko; Jäggi, Boris; Waraich, Rashid A; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2013-06-01

    Household consumption, apart from governmental consumption, is the main driver of worldwide economy. Attached to each household purchase are economic activities along the preceding supply chain, with the associated resource use and emissions. A method to capture and assess all these resource uses and emissions is life cycle assessment. We developed a model for the life cycle assessment of housing and land-based mobility (excluding air travel) consumption of individual households a small village in Switzerland. Statistical census and dwelling register data are the foundations of the model. In a case study performed on a midsized community, we found a median value of greenhouse gas emissions of 3.12 t CO2 equiv and a mean value of 4.30 t CO2 equiv per capita and year for housing and mobility. Twenty-one percent of the households in the investigated region were responsible for 50% of the total greenhouse gas emissions, meaning that if their emissions could be halved the total emissions of the community would be reduced by 25%. Furthermore, a cluster analysis revealed that driving factors for large environmental footprints are demands of large living area heated by fossil energy carriers, as well as large demands of motorized private transportation. PMID:23647391

  17. Uncertainty in assessment of radiation-induced diffusion index changes in individual patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate repeatability coefficients of diffusion tensor indices to assess whether longitudinal changes in diffusion indices were true changes beyond the uncertainty for individual patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Twenty-two patients who had low-grade or benign tumors and were treated by partial brain radiation therapy (PBRT) participated in an IRB-approved MRI protocol. The diffusion tensor images in the patients were acquired pre-RT, week 3 during RT, at the end of RT, and 1, 6, and 18 months after RT. As a measure of uncertainty, repeatability coefficients (RC) of diffusion indices in the segmented cingulum, corpus callosum, and fornix were estimated by using test-retest diffusion tensor datasets from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA) database. The upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence interval of the estimated RC from the test and retest data were used to evaluate whether the longitudinal percentage changes in diffusion indices in the segmented structures in the individual patients were beyond the uncertainty and thus could be considered as true radiation-induced changes. Diffusion indices in different white matter structures showed different uncertainty ranges. The estimated RC for fractional anisotropy (FA) ranged from 5.3% to 9.6%, for mean diffusivity (MD) from 2.2% to 6.8%, for axial diffusivity (AD) from 2.4% to 5.5%, and for radial diffusivity (RD) from 2.9% to 9.7%. Overall, 23% of the patients treated by RT had FA changes, 44% had MD changes, 50% had AD changes, and 50% had RD changes beyond the uncertainty ranges. In the fornix, 85.7% and 100% of the patients showed changes beyond the uncertainty range at 6 and 18 months after RT, demonstrating that radiation has a pronounced late effect on the fornix compared to other segmented structures. It is critical to determine reliability of a change observed in an individual patient for clinical decision making. Assessments of the repeatability and

  18. Uncertainty in assessment of radiation-induced diffusion index changes in individual patients.

    PubMed

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H; Lawrence, Theodore S; Tsien, Christina I; Cao, Yue

    2013-06-21

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate repeatability coefficients of diffusion tensor indices to assess whether longitudinal changes in diffusion indices were true changes beyond the uncertainty for individual patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Twenty-two patients who had low-grade or benign tumors and were treated by partial brain radiation therapy (PBRT) participated in an IRB-approved MRI protocol. The diffusion tensor images in the patients were acquired pre-RT, week 3 during RT, at the end of RT, and 1, 6, and 18 months after RT. As a measure of uncertainty, repeatability coefficients (RC) of diffusion indices in the segmented cingulum, corpus callosum, and fornix were estimated by using test-retest diffusion tensor datasets from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA) database. The upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence interval of the estimated RC from the test and retest data were used to evaluate whether the longitudinal percentage changes in diffusion indices in the segmented structures in the individual patients were beyond the uncertainty and thus could be considered as true radiation-induced changes. Diffusion indices in different white matter structures showed different uncertainty ranges. The estimated RC for fractional anisotropy (FA) ranged from 5.3% to 9.6%, for mean diffusivity (MD) from 2.2% to 6.8%, for axial diffusivity (AD) from 2.4% to 5.5%, and for radial diffusivity (RD) from 2.9% to 9.7%. Overall, 23% of the patients treated by RT had FA changes, 44% had MD changes, 50% had AD changes, and 50% had RD changes beyond the uncertainty ranges. In the fornix, 85.7% and 100% of the patients showed changes beyond the uncertainty range at 6 and 18 months after RT, demonstrating that radiation has a pronounced late effect on the fornix compared to other segmented structures. It is critical to determine reliability of a change observed in an individual patient for clinical decision making. Assessments of the repeatability and

  19. Selecting measures for balance and mobility to improve assessment and treatment of individuals after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kegelmeyer, Deb A; Kloos, Anne D; Siles, Amelia B

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of individuals with stroke using reliable and valid outcome measures is a key component of the treatment planning process. Health care professionals may have difficulty selecting balance and mobility measures given the large number of measures to choose from. This article utilizes a case-based approach to describe the benefits of using a common set of outcome measures and a process for selecting optimal measures across body structure/function, activity, and participation domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model and stages of stroke recovery. Specific measures for use in acute care, rehabilitation, outpatient, and home health care settings are discussed based on StrokEDGE task force recommendations by the Neurology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association.

  20. Review of Individual Technology Assessment Reports (ITAR) for industrial boiler applications

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, T.; Bakshi, P.; Weisenberg, I.J.

    1980-01-01

    Eight Individual Technology Assessment Reports and one Background Study in Support of New Source Performance Standards for Industrial Boilers are reviewed. These ITARs were prepared for the EPA and include studies of particulate control, flue-gas desulfurization, fluidized-bed combustion, NO/sub x/ combustion modification, NO/sub x/ flue-gas treatment, coal cleaning, synthetic fuels, and oil cleaning. The ITARs provide engineering and cost data for the air pollution control technologies that will be required to meet the New Source Performance Standards for industrial boilers. The pollutants considered were SO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, and particulates. Each ITAR is reviewed from the standpoint of engineering, demonstrated technology, and costing methodology. The cost review includes a comparison of the costing methodology of each ITAR with the costing methodology recommended by the EPA background document.

  1. A novel paradigm for engineering education: virtual internships with individualized mentoring and assessment of engineering thinking.

    PubMed

    Chesler, Naomi C; Ruis, A R; Collier, Wesley; Swiecki, Zachari; Arastoopour, Golnaz; Williamson Shaffer, David

    2015-02-01

    Engineering virtual internships are a novel paradigm for providing authentic engineering experiences in the first-year curriculum. They are both individualized and accommodate large numbers of students. As we describe in this report, this approach can (a) enable students to solve complex engineering problems in a mentored, collaborative environment; (b) allow educators to assess engineering thinking; and (c) provide an introductory experience that students enjoy and find valuable. Furthermore, engineering virtual internships have been shown to increase students'-and especially women's-interest in and motivation to pursue engineering degrees. When implemented in first-year engineering curricula more broadly, the potential impact of engineering virtual internships on the size and diversity of the engineering workforce could be dramatic.

  2. Assessing the Dynamic Effects of Climate on Individual Tree Growth Across Time and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itter, M.; Finley, A. O.; D'Amato, A. W.; Foster, J. R.; Bradford, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between climate variability and an ecosystem process, such as forest growth, is frequently not fixed over time, but changes due to complex interactions between unobserved ecological factors and the process of interest. Climate data and forecasts are frequently spatially and temporally misaligned with ecological observations making inference regarding the effects of climate on ecosystem processes particularly challenging. Here we develop a Bayesian dynamic hierarchical model for annual tree growth increment that allows the effects of climate to evolve over time, applies climate data at a spatial-temporal scale consistent with observations, and controls for individual-level variability commonly encountered in ecological datasets. The model is applied to individual tree data from northern Minnesota using a modified Thornthwaite-type water balance model to transform PRISM temperature and precipitation estimates to physiologically relevant values of actual and potential evapotranspiration (AET, PET), and climatic water deficit. Model results indicate that mean tree growth is most sensitive to AET during the growing season and PET and minimum temperature in the spring prior to growth. The effects of these variables on tree growth, however, are not stationary with significant effects observed in only a subset of years during the 111-year study period. Importantly, significant effects of climate do not result from anomalous climate observations, but follow from large growth deviations unexplained by tree age and size, and time since forest disturbance. Results differ markedly from alternative models that assume the effects of climate are stationary over time or apply climate estimates at the individual scale. Forecasts of future tree growth as a function of climate follow directly from the dynamic hierarchical model allowing for assessment of forest change. Current work is focused on extending the model framework to include regional climate and ecosystem

  3. Toxicity assessment of individual ingredients of synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs).

    PubMed

    Bakhtyar, Sajida; Gagnon, Marthe Monique

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs) offer excellent technical characteristics while providing improved environmental performance over other drilling muds. The low acute toxicity and high biodegradability of SBMs suggest their discharge at sea would cause minimal impacts on marine ecosystems, however, chronic toxicity testing has demonstrated adverse effects of SBMs on fish health. Sparse environmental monitoring data indicate effects of SBMs on bottom invertebrates. However, no environmental toxicity assessment has been performed on fish attracted to the cutting piles. SBM formulations are mostly composed of synthetic base oils, weighting agents, and drilling additives such as emulsifiers, fluid loss agents, wetting agents, and brine. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of exposure to individual ingredients of SBMs on fish health. To do so, a suite of biomarkers [ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, biliary metabolites, sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, DNA damage, and heat shock protein] have been measured in pink snapper (Pagrus auratus) exposed for 21 days to individual ingredients of SBMs. The primary emulsifier (Emul S50) followed by the fluid loss agent (LSL 50) caused the strongest biochemical responses in fish. The synthetic base oil (Rheosyn) caused the least response in juvenile fish. The results suggest that the impact of Syndrill 80:20 on fish health might be reduced by replacement of the primary emulsifier Emul S50 with an alternative ingredient of less toxicity to aquatic biota. The research provides a basis for improving the environmental performance of SBMs by reducing the environmental risk of their discharge and providing environmental managers with information regarding the potential toxicity of individual ingredients. PMID:21928151

  4. Neuropsychological Assessment of Individuals with Brain Tumor: Comparison of Approaches Used in the Classification of Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dwan, Toni Maree; Ownsworth, Tamara; Chambers, Suzanne; Walker, David G.; Shum, David H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to classifying neuropsychological impairment after brain tumor vary according to testing level (individual tests, domains, or global index) and source of reference (i.e., norms, controls, and pre-morbid functioning). This study aimed to compare rates of impairment according to different classification approaches. Participants were 44 individuals (57% female) with a primary brain tumor diagnosis (mean age = 45.6 years) and 44 matched control participants (59% female, mean age = 44.5 years). All participants completed a test battery that assesses pre-morbid IQ (Wechsler adult reading test), attention/processing speed (digit span, trail making test A), memory (Hopkins verbal learning test-revised, Rey–Osterrieth complex figure-recall), and executive function (trail making test B, Rey–Osterrieth complex figure copy, controlled oral word association test). Results indicated that across the different sources of reference, 86–93% of participants were classified as impaired at a test-specific level, 61–73% were classified as impaired at a domain-specific level, and 32–50% were classified as impaired at a global level. Rates of impairment did not significantly differ according to source of reference (p > 0.05); however, at the individual participant level, classification based on estimated pre-morbid IQ was often inconsistent with classification based on the norms or controls. Participants with brain tumor performed significantly poorer than matched controls on tests of neuropsychological functioning, including executive function (p = 0.001) and memory (p < 0.001), but not attention/processing speed (p > 0.05). These results highlight the need to examine individuals’ performance across a multi-faceted neuropsychological test battery to avoid over- or under-estimation of impairment. PMID:25815271

  5. Approaches for assessment of terrestrial vertebrate responses to contaminants: moving beyond individual organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Heinz, G.H.; Hall, R.J.; Albers, Peter H.; Heinz, Gary H.; Ohlendorf, Harry M.

    2000-01-01

    Conclusions: A need for a broader range ofinformation on effects of contaminants on individuals exists among the 4 classes of terrestrial vertebrates, especially mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Separation of contaminant effects from other effects and reduction of speculative extrapolation within and among species requires information that can be produced only by combined field and laboratory investigations that incorporate seasonal or annual cycles and important spatial and interaction conditions. Assessments of contaminant effects at the population level and higher are frequently dependent on extrapolations from a lower organizational level. Actual measurements of the effects of contaminants on populations or communities, possibly in conjunction with case studies that establish relations between effects on individuals and effects on populations, are needed to reduce the uncertainty associated with these extrapolations. Associated with these assessment levels is the need for acceptable definitions of what we mean when we refer to a 'meaningful population change' or an 'effect on communities or ecosystems.' At these higher levels of organization we are also confronted with the need for procedures useful for separating contaminant effects from effects caused by other environmental conditions. Although the bulk of literature surveyed was of the focused cause-and-effect type that is necessary for proving relations between contaminants and wildlife, community or ecosystem field assessments, as sometimes performed with reptiles and amphibians, might be a useful alternative for estimating the potential of a contaminant to cause environmental harm. Assumptions about the special usefulness of reptiles and amphibians as environmental indicators ought to be tested with comparisons to mammals and birds. Information on the effects of contaminants above the individual level is needed to generate accurate estimates of the potential consequences of anthropogenic pollution (e

  6. Examining the Reliability of Scores from the Consensual Assessment Technique in the Measurement of Individual and Small Group Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanic, Nicholas; Randles, Clint

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reliability of measures of both individual and group creative work using the consensual assessment technique (CAT). CAT was used to measure individual and group creativity among a population of pre-service music teachers enrolled in a secondary general music class (n = 23) and was evaluated from…

  7. Assessing the heterogeneity of treatment effects via potential outcomes of individual patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Wang, Chenguang; Nie, Lei; Soon, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is growing interest in understanding the heterogeneity of treatment effects (HTE), which has important implications in treatment evaluation and selection. The standard approach to assessing HTE (i.e. subgroup analyses based on known effect modifiers) is informative about the heterogeneity between subpopulations but not within. It is arguably more informative to assess HTE in terms of individual treatment effects, which can be defined by using potential outcomes. However, estimation of HTE based on potential outcomes is challenged by the lack of complete identifiability. The paper proposes methods to deal with the identifiability problem by using relevant information in baseline covariates and repeated measurements. If a set of covariates is sufficient for explaining the dependence between potential outcomes, the joint distribution of potential outcomes and hence all measures of HTE will then be identified under a conditional independence assumption. Possible violations of this assumption can be addressed by including a random effect to account for residual dependence or by specifying the conditional dependence structure directly. The methods proposed are shown to reduce effectively the uncertainty about HTE in a trial of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25506088

  8. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (P<.001). For reproducibility, the differences were 6.6, 5.8, and 11.0 µm indicating the poorest reproducibility for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION Our results indicated that impressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility. PMID:27350856

  9. The Academic Diligence Task (ADT): Assessing Individual Differences in Effort on Tedious but Important Schoolwork.

    PubMed

    Galla, Brian M; Plummer, Benjamin D; White, Rachel E; Meketon, David; D'Mello, Sidney K; Duckworth, Angela L

    2014-10-01

    The current study reports on the development and validation of the Academic Diligence Task (ADT), designed to assess the tendency to expend effort on academic tasks which are tedious in the moment but valued in the long-term. In this novel online task, students allocate their time between solving simple math problems (framed as beneficial for problem solving skills) and, alternatively, playing Tetris or watching entertaining videos. Using a large sample of high school seniors (N = 921), the ADT demonstrated convergent validity with self-report ratings of Big Five conscientiousness and its facets, self-control and grit, as well as discriminant validity from theoretically unrelated constructs, such as Big Five extraversion, openness, and emotional stability, test anxiety, life satisfaction, and positive and negative affect. The ADT also demonstrated incremental predictive validity for objectively measured GPA, standardized math and reading achievement test scores, high school graduation, and college enrollment, over and beyond demographics and intelligence. Collectively, findings suggest the feasibility of online behavioral measures to assess noncognitive individual differences that predict academic outcomes.

  10. The Academic Diligence Task (ADT): Assessing Individual Differences in Effort on Tedious but Important Schoolwork

    PubMed Central

    Galla, Brian M.; Plummer, Benjamin D.; White, Rachel E.; Meketon, David; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Duckworth, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study reports on the development and validation of the Academic Diligence Task (ADT), designed to assess the tendency to expend effort on academic tasks which are tedious in the moment but valued in the long-term. In this novel online task, students allocate their time between solving simple math problems (framed as beneficial for problem solving skills) and, alternatively, playing Tetris or watching entertaining videos. Using a large sample of high school seniors (N = 921), the ADT demonstrated convergent validity with self-report ratings of Big Five conscientiousness and its facets, self-control and grit, as well as discriminant validity from theoretically unrelated constructs, such as Big Five extraversion, openness, and emotional stability, test anxiety, life satisfaction, and positive and negative affect. The ADT also demonstrated incremental predictive validity for objectively measured GPA, standardized math and reading achievement test scores, high school graduation, and college enrollment, over and beyond demographics and intelligence. Collectively, findings suggest the feasibility of online behavioral measures to assess noncognitive individual differences that predict academic outcomes. PMID:25258470

  11. The effect of an environmental enrichment device on individually caged rabbits in a safety assessment facility.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Colena A; Pallozzi, Wendi A; Geiger, Leann; Szumiloski, John L; Castiglia, Lynn; Dahl, Noelle P; Destefano, James A; Pratt, Stacy J; Hall, Steven J; Beare, Carolann M; Gallagher, Michael; Klein, Hilton J

    2003-09-01

    The primary enclosure of a laboratory animal's environment should encourage species-typical behavior and enhancement of the animal's well-being, as indicated by the Guide. Enrichment devices have been documented to decrease the incidence of stereotypical behaviors and increase overall activity of rabbits. An 8-week study was performed to evaluate the effect of an environmental enrichment device, stainless-steel rabbit rattles on spring clips, on individually housed rabbits in a Safety Assessment facility. We used 48 New Zealand White rabbits; the devices were placed on cages of 32 study rabbits, and 16 control rabbits had no devices. Food consumption measurements and observations of device manipulations (taken during a predetermined peak interaction 1-h timeframe) were collected 5 days per week. All rabbits were bled for evaluation of hematologic parameters for the stress triad (neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and eosinopenia) and weighed weekly. No significant differences were found between study and control rabbits when body weights, food consumption, and hematologic parameters were analyzed. Our study supports previous findings that interaction with enrichment devices decreases over time, thus indicating the need for frequent rotation of different enrichment devices. In addition, no adverse effects of the analyzed parameters were found, indicating that stainless-steel rabbit rattles on spring clips are suitable devices for safety assessment studies, in which the introduction of new variables is often unacceptable.

  12. Immunological risk assessment: The key to individualized immunosuppression after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pratschke, Johann; Dragun, Duska; Hauser, Ingeborg A; Horn, Sabine; Mueller, Thomas F; Schemmer, Peter; Thaiss, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    The wide range of immunosuppressive therapies and protocols permits tailored planning of the initial regimen according to the immunological risk status of individual patients. Pre-transplant risk assessment can include many factors, but there is no clear consensus on which parameters to take into account, and their relative importance. In general younger patients are known to be at higher risk for acute rejection, compounded by higher rates of non-adherence in adolescents. Donor age and recipient gender do not appear to exert a meaningful effect on risk of rejection per se, but black recipient ethnicity remains a well-established risk factor even under modern immunosuppression regimens. Little difference in risk is now observed between deceased- and living-donor recipients. Immunological risk assessment has developed substantially in recent years. Cross-match testing with cytotoxic analysis has long been supplemented by flow cytometry, but development of solid-phase single-bead antigen testing of solubilized human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) permits a far more nuanced stratification of immunological risk status, including the different classes and intensities of HLA antibodies Class I and/or II, including HLA-DSA. Immunologic risk evaluation is now often based on a combination of these tests, but other assessments are becoming more widely introduced, such as measurement of non-HLA antibodies against angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptors or T-cell ELISPOT assay of alloantigen-specific donor. Targeted densensitization protocols can improve immunological risk, notably for DSA-positive patients with negative cytotoxicity and flow cross-match. HLA mismatch remains an important and undisputed risk factor for rejection. Delayed graft function also increases the risk of subsequent acute rejection, and the early regimen can be modified in such cases. Overall, there is a shift towards planning the immunosuppressive regimen based on pre

  13. Individual Differences in the Post-Illumination Pupil Response to Blue Light: Assessment without Mydriatics

    PubMed Central

    Bruijel, Jessica; van der Meijden, Wisse P.; Bijlenga, Denise; Dorani, Farangis; Coppens, Joris E.; te Lindert, Bart H. W.; Kooij, J. J. Sandra; Van Someren, Eus J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells play an important role in the non-image forming effects of light, through their direct projections on brain circuits involved in circadian rhythms, mood and alertness. Individual differences in the functionality of the melanopsin-signaling circuitry can be reliably quantified using the maximum post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) after blue light. Previous protocols for acquiring PIPR relied on the use of mydriatics to dilate the light-exposed eye. However, pharmacological pupil dilation is uncomfortable for the participants and requires ophthalmological expertise. Hence, we here investigated whether an individual’s maximum PIPR can be validly obtained in a protocol that does not use mydriatics but rather increases the intensity of the light stimulus. In 18 participants (5 males, mean age ± SD: 34.6 ± 13.6 years) we evaluated the PIPR after exposure to intensified blue light (550 µW/cm2) provided to an undilated dynamic pupil. The test-retest reliability of the primary PIPR outcome parameter was very high, both between day-to-day assessments (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.85), as well as between winter and summer assessments (ICC = 0.83). Compared to the PIPR obtained with the use of mydriatics and 160 µW/cm2 blue light exposure, the method with intensified light without mydriatics showed almost zero bias according to Bland-Altman plots and had moderate to strong reliability (ICC = 0.67). In conclusion, for PIPR assessments, increasing the light intensity is a feasible and reliable alternative to pupil dilation to relieve the participant’s burden and to allow for performance outside the ophthalmological clinic. PMID:27618116

  14. The Utility and Psychometric Properties of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Gerry D.; Abel, Gene G.; Jordan, Alan; Wiegel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and utility of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "individuals with intellectual disabilities" (ABID) for assessment of sexual interest and problematic sexual behaviors. The study examined the preliminary psychometric properties and evaluated the clinical utility of the ABID based on a sample of 495…

  15. Velar activity in individuals with velopharyngeal insufficiency assessed by acoustic rhinometry

    PubMed Central

    TRINDADE, Inge Elly Kiemle; ARAÚJO, Bruna Mara Adorno Marmontel; TEIXEIRA, Ana Claudia Martins Sampaio; da SILVA, Andressa Sharllene Carneiro; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic rhinometry is routinely used for the evaluation of nasal patency. Objective To investigate whether the technique is able to identify the impairment of velopharyngeal (VP) activity in individuals with clinical diagnosis of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Methods Twenty subjects with repaired cleft palate and inadequate velopharyngeal function (IVF) and 18 non-cleft controls with adequate velopharyngeal function (AVF), adults, of both genders, were evaluated. Area-distance curves were obtained during VP rest and speech activity, using an Eccovision Acoustic Rhinometry system. Volume was determined by integrating the area under the curve at the segment corresponding to the nasopharynx. VP activity (∆V) was estimated by the absolute and relative differences between nasopharyngeal volume at rest (Vr) and during an unreleased /k/ production (Vk). The efficiency of the technique to discriminate IVF and AVF was assessed by a ROC curve. Results Mean Vk and Vr values (±SD) obtained were: 23.2±3.6 cm3 and 15.9±3.8 cm3 (AVF group), and 22.7±7.9 cm3 and 20.7±7.4 cm3 (IVF group), corresponding to a mean ∆V decay of 7.3 cm3 (31%) for the AVF group and a significantly smaller ∆V decay of 2.0 cm3 (9%) for the IVF group (p<0.05). Seventy percent of the IVF individuals showed a ∆V suggesting impaired VP function (below the cutoff score of 3.0 cm3 which maximized both sensitivity and specificity of the test), confirming clinical diagnosis. Conclusion Acoustic rhinometry was able to identify, with a good discriminatory power, the impairment of VP activity which characterizes VPI. PMID:25141205

  16. 20 CFR 641.230 - Must the individual assessment conducted by the SCSEP grantee and the assessment performed by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult programs under title... determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult programs under title IB of WIA?...

  17. Use of articulated registration for response assessment of individual metastatic bone lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Stephen; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Accurate skeleton registration is necessary to match corresponding metastatic bone lesions for response assessment over multiple scans. In articulated registration (ART), whole-body skeletons are registered by auto-segmenting individual bones, then rigidly aligning them. Performance and robustness of the ART in lesion matching were evaluated and compared to other commonly used registration techniques. Sixteen prostate cancer patients were treated either with molecular targeted therapy or chemotherapy. Ten out of the 16 patients underwent the double baseline whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans for test-retest (TRT) evaluation. Twelve of the 16 patients underwent pre- and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Skeletons at different time points were registered using ART, rigid, and deformable (DR) registration algorithms. The corresponding lesions were contoured and identified on successive PET images based on including the voxels with the standardized uptake value over 15. Each algorithm was evaluated for its ability to accurately align corresponding lesions via skeleton registration. A lesion matching score (MS) was measured for each lesion, which quantified the per cent overlap between the lesion's two corresponding contours. Three separate sensitivity studies were conducted to investigate the robustness of ART in matching: sensitivity of lesion matching to various contouring threshold levels, effects of imperfections in the bone auto-segmentation and sensitivity of mis-registration. The performance of ART (MS = 82% for both datasets, p ≪ 0.001) in lesion matching was significantly better than rigid (MSTRT = 53%, MSResponse = 46%) and DR (MSTRT = 46%, MSResponse = 45%) algorithms. Neither varying threshold levels for lesion contouring nor imperfect bone segmentation had significant (p∼0.10) impact on the ART matching performance as the MS remained unchanged. Despite the mis-registration reduced MS for ART, as low as 67% (p ≪ 0.001), the performance remained to

  18. Office workers' objectively assessed total and prolonged sitting time: Individual-level correlates and worksite variations.

    PubMed

    Hadgraft, Nyssa T; Healy, Genevieve N; Owen, Neville; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Lynch, Brigid M; Sethi, Parneet; Eakin, Elizabeth G; Moodie, Marj; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Wiesner, Glen; Willenberg, Lisa; Dunstan, David W

    2016-12-01

    Sedentary behavior is highly prevalent in office-based workplaces; however, few studies have assessed the attributes associated with this health risk factor in the workplace setting. This study aimed to identify the correlates of office workers' objectively-assessed total and prolonged (≥ 30 min bouts) workplace sitting time. Participants were 231 Australian office workers recruited from 14 sites of a single government employer in 2012-13. Potential socio-demographic, work-related, health-related and cognitive-social correlates were measured through a self-administered survey and anthropometric measurements. Associations with total and prolonged workplace sitting time (measured with the activPAL3) were tested using linear mixed models. Worksites varied significantly in total workplace sitting time (overall mean [SD]: 79% [10%] of work hours) and prolonged workplace sitting time (42% [19%]), after adjusting for socio-demographic and work-related characteristics. Organisational tenure of 3-5 years (compared to tenure > 5 years) was associated with more time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time, while having a BMI categorised as obese (compared to a healthy BMI) was associated with less time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Significant variations in sitting time were observed across different worksites of the same employer and the variation remained after adjusting for individual-level factors. Only BMI and organisational tenure were identified as correlates of total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Additional studies are needed to confirm the present findings across diverse organisations and occupations. PMID:27413681

  19. Converging Indicators for Assessing Individual Differences in Adaptation to Extreme Environments: Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; DeRoshia, Charles W.; Taylor, Bruce; Hines, Seleimah; Bright, Andrew; Dodds, Anika

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a new methodology for assessing the deleterious effects of spaceflight on crew health and performance. It is well known that microgravity results in various physiological alterations, e.g., headward fluid shifts which can impede physiological adaptation. Other factors that may affect crew operational efficiency include disruption of sleep-wake cycles, high workload, isolation, confinement, stress and fatigue. From an operational perspective, it is difficult to predict which individuals will be most or least affected in this unique environment given that most astronauts are first-time flyers. During future lunar and Mars missions space crews will include both men and women of multi-national origins, different professional backgrounds, and various states of physical condition. Therefore, new methods or technologies are needed to monitor and predict astronaut performance and health, and to evaluate the effects of various countermeasures on crew during long duration missions. This paper reviews several studies conducted in both laboratory and operational environments with men and women ranging in age between 18 to 50 years. The studies included the following: soldiers performing command and control functions during mobile operations in enclosed armored vehicles; subjects participating in laboratory tests of an anti-motion sickness medication; subjects exposed to chronic hypergravity aboard a centrifuge, and subject responses to 36-hours of sleep deprivation. Physiological measurements, performance metrics, and subjective self-reports were collected in each study. The results demonstrate that multivariate converging indicators provide a significantly more reliable method for assessing environmental effects on performance and health than any single indicator.

  20. Converging indicators for assessing individual differences in adaptation to extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Deroshia, Charles; Taylor, Bruce; Hines, A'Liah; Bright, Andrew; Dodds, Anika

    2007-05-01

    It is well known that microgravity results in various physiological alterations, for example, head-ward fluid shifts which can impede physiological adaptation. Other factors that may affect crew operational efficiency include disruption of sleep-wake cycles, high workload, isolation, confinement, stress, and fatigue. From an operational perspective, it is difficult to predict which individuals will be most or least affected in this unique environment given that most astronauts are first-time flyers. During future lunar and Mars missions space crews will include both men and women of multi-national origins, different professional backgrounds, and various states of physical condition. Therefore, new methods or technologies are needed to monitor and predict astronaut performance and health, and to evaluate the effects of various countermeasures on crew during long-duration missions. Herein we describe the development and validation of a new methodology for assessing the deleterious effects of spaceflight on crew health and performance. We reviewed several studies conducted in both laboratory and operational environments with men and women ranging in age between 18 to 50 yr. The studies included the following: soldiers performing command and control functions during mobile operations in enclosed armored vehicles; subjects participating in laboratory tests of an anti-motion sickness medication; subjects exposed to chronic hypergravity aboard a centrifuge; and subject responses to 36-h of sleep deprivation. Physiological measurements, performance metrics, and subjective self-reports were collected in each study. The results demonstrate that multivariate converging indicators provide a significantly more reliable method for assessing environmental effects on performance and health than any single indicator. PMID:17547321

  1. Accountability for the Results of Educating Students with Disabilities: Assessment Conference Report on the New Assessment Provisions of the 1997 Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Reschly, Daniel

    Based on the findings of a 1998 conference on the new assessment and accountability requirements in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), this report discusses critical issues that surround the assessment provisions included in the 1997 IDEA amendments and contains recommendations related to state and district-wide assessments…

  2. Assessing age in the desert tortoise Gopherus agassizii: Testing skeletochronology with individuals of known age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtin, A.J.; Zug, G.R.; Medica, P.A.; Spotila, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Eight desert tortoises Gopherus agassizii from a long-term mark-recapture study in the Mojave Desert, Nevada, USA, afforded an opportunity to examine the accuracy of skeletochronological age estimation on tortoises from a seasonal, yet environmentally erratic environment. These 8 tortoises were marked as hatchlings or within the first 2 yr of life, and their carcasses were salvaged from predator kills. Using d blind protocol, 2 skeletochronological protocols (correction-factor and ranking) provided age estimates for a set of 4 bony elements (humerus, scapula, femur, ilium) from these tortoises of known age. The age at death of the tortoises ranged from 15 to 50 yr. The most accurate protocol - ranking using the growth layers within each of the 4 elements - provided estimates from 21 to 47 yr, with the highest accuracy from the ilia. The results indicate that skeletochronological age estimation provides a reasonably accurate method for assessing the age at death of desert tortoises and, if used with a large sample of individuals, will provide a valuable tool for examining age-related mortality parameters in desert tortoise and likely in other gopher tortoises (Gopherus). ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  3. A study of two "quick-and-easy" methods of assessing individual differences in student learning.

    PubMed

    Newstead, S E

    1992-11-01

    A study is reported which examined the reliability and validity of two measures of individual differences in learning, a short form of the Approaches to Studying Inventory (Entwistle and Ramsden, 1983) and the Learning Style Inventory (Kolb, 1976). Both of these are short and easy to administer, making them attractive for use in the classroom. The Approaches to Studying Inventory was found to be a potentially useful measure: the predicted factors emerged, the scales were moderately reliable and those students adopting a deep approach to learning were more likely to be successful in their exams. The Learning Style Inventory, on the other hand, was relatively unreliable and the underlying factor structure did not correspond to what was predicted; there was, however, a correlation between scores on the active/passive dimension and academic success. It is concluded that the short form of the Approaches to Studying Inventory has some potential in assessing the learning styles of students, but that further refinement is required before it is adopted for general use.

  4. Architecture and Design Process of the Individualized Assessment System Integrable to Distance Education Softwares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozyurt, Hacer; Ozyurt, Ozcan; Baki, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Assessment is one of the methods used for evaluation of the learning outputs. Nowadays, use of adaptive assessment systems estimating ability level and abilities of the students is becoming widespread instead of traditional assessment systems. Adaptive assessment system evaluates students not only according to their marks that they take in test…

  5. An assessment of genetic counseling services for individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Stephanie; Guimond, Colleen; Butler, Rachel; Dwosh, Emily; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Sadovnick, A Dessa

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects up to 1/500 Canadians. The University of British Columbia MS Clinic (UBC Clinic) is the only MS clinic in Canada (and likely internationally) that routinely offers genetic counseling to patients and their families. A typical session includes the collection of family history and demographic data, discussion of the inheritance of MS, interpretation of family-specific recurrence risks and psychosocial counseling. The aims of this study were to explore patients': 1) expectations of the genetic counseling session; 2) understanding of the etiology of MS (both pre and post-session); and 3) post-session perceptions of genetic counseling. A two-part questionnaire to assess genetic counseling services was distributed before and after sessions to all consenting patients seen during the period October 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009 inclusive. Sixty-two completed questionnaires were analysed. Genetic counseling was found to significantly increase the number of individuals who were able to correctly identify the etiology of MS (p < 0.001). Patient satisfaction with genetic counseling was high, with an average satisfaction score of 32.4/35 (92.6 %). Of those who provided comments (n = 42/60) regarding the usefulness of the genetic counseling session, 95.2 % reported it useful (n = 40/42). Findings suggest that genetic counseling is effective in increasing patients' knowledge of the etiology of MS and is viewed by patients as a useful service. Based on the high level of positive feedback regarding genetic counseling by the study sample, this study suggests that the services provided by genetic counselors may be beneficial for patients with MS seen in other centers.

  6. Assessing the Effects of Organizational Culture, Rewards, and Individual Creativity on Technical Workgroup Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navaresse, Daniel O.; Yauch, Charlene A.; Goff, Kathy; Fonseca, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This study used an experimental approach to investigate the conditions under which creative outcomes should be expected from the interplay of individual creativity, the innovation orientation of the organizational culture, and the rewards distribution rules. The results of this study suggest that the individual creativity of technically educated…

  7. Assessing Individual Social Capital Capacity: The Development and Validation of a Network Accessibility Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatala, John-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Any organization that is able to promote the importance of increased levels of social capital and individuals who can leverage and use the resources that exist within the network may experience higher levels of performance. This study sought to add to our knowledge about individuals' accessing social resources for the purpose of accomplishing…

  8. Assessing English Literacy as a Predictor of Postschool Outcomes in the Lives of Deaf Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garberoglio, Carrie Lou; Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Bond, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Lower English literacy achievement of deaf students is often hypothesized to be an impediment for successful adult life experiences. Yet, literacy practices that individuals engage in throughout their daily lives are much more complex than what school-based measures of English can capture and particularly so for deaf individuals. A national…

  9. Rapid Assessment of Severe Cognitive Impairment in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, D. M.; Finwall, J.; Touchette, P. E.; McGregor, M. R.; Fernandez, G. E.; Lott, I. T.; Sandman, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Most standardized intelligence tests require more than 1hour for administration, which is problematic when evaluating individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (IDDD), because a significant proportion of these individuals can not tolerate lengthy evaluations. Furthermore, most standardized intelligence…

  10. Individual Action and Reflection: Four Case Studies of Teachers' Responses to a Statewide Assessment Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Patricia A.

    The success of alternative assessments such as the Vermont Assessment Program (VAP) is heavily dependent on the involvement and commitment of teachers. This paper focuses on the implementation of the writing portfolio component of the VAP in the classrooms of four teachers who have different knowledge and beliefs about teaching and assessment. The…

  11. Individual Personality Dynamics in Family Assessment and Counseling: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kent W.

    2001-01-01

    Integrative Family Therapy provides four family systems assessment components and an intrapsychic assessment component as the foundation for understanding family strengths and challenges. Presents a case study in which obtaining a balanced assessment of the systemic and intrapsychic dynamics was critical to the success of therapy. (GCP)

  12. Individually assessed boldness predicts Perca fluviatilis behaviour in shoals, but is not associated with the capture order or angling method.

    PubMed

    Kekäläinen, J; Podgorniak, T; Puolakka, T; Hyvärinen, P; Vainikka, A

    2014-11-01

    Selectivity of recreational angling on fish behaviour was studied by examining whether capture order or lure type (natural v. artificial bait) in ice-fishing could explain behavioural variation among perch Perca fluviatilis individuals. It was also tested if individually assessed personality predicts fish behaviour in groups, in the presence of natural predators. Perca fluviatilis showed individually repeatable behaviour both in individual and in group tests. Capture order, capture method, condition factor or past growth rate did not explain variation in individual behaviour. Individually determined boldness as well as fish size, however, were positively associated with first entrance to the predator zone (i.e. initial risk taking) in group behaviour tests. Individually determined boldness also explained long-term activity and total time spent in the vicinity of predators in the group. These findings suggest that individual and laboratory-based boldness tests predict boldness of P. fluviatilis in also ecologically relevant conditions, i.e. in shoals and in the presence of natural predators. The present results, however, also indicate that the above-mentioned two angling methods may not be selective for certain behavioural types in comparison to each other. PMID:25270290

  13. Exploring Individual and Item Factors that Affect Assessment Validity for Diverse Learners: Results from a Large-Scale Cognitive Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Phoebe C.; Kopriva, Rebecca J.; Chen, Chen-Su; Emick, Jessica E.

    2006-01-01

    A cognitive lab technique (n=156) was used to investigate interactions between individual factors and item factors presumed to affect assessment validity for diverse students, including English language learners. Findings support the concept of "access"--an interaction between specific construct-irrelevant item features and individual…

  14. A Needs-Assessment of Agencies Serving Individuals with Deaf-Blindness: A National Profile of Transitional Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiler, Lauren H.; And Others

    A national needs assessment of 719 educational and adult service agencies providing or proposing to provide transitional services to individuals with deaf-blindness was conducted to determine national and regional technical assistance needs. On average, each agency expressed a need for technical assistance in 20 separate areas. In the area of…

  15. Using Regression Equations Built from Summary Data in the Psychological Assessment of the Individual Case: Extension to Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, John R.; Garthwaite, Paul H.; Denham, Annie K.; Chelune, Gordon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regression equations have many useful roles in psychological assessment. Moreover, there is a large reservoir of published data that could be used to build regression equations; these equations could then be employed to test a wide variety of hypotheses concerning the functioning of individual cases. This resource is currently underused because…

  16. Parental Stress and Child Behavior and Temperament in the First Year after the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Pal, Sylvia; Maguire, Celeste M.; Le Cessie, Saskia; Veen, Sylvia; Wit, Jan M.; Walther, Frans J.; Bruil, Jeanet

    2008-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial involving 128 infants born prematurely compared basic developmental care (nests and incubator covers) and the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) intervention (behavior observations and guidance by a trained developmental specialist) in relation to effects on parental stress and…

  17. 14 CFR 13.18 - Civil penalties: Administrative assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil penalties: Administrative assessment against an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman. 13.18 Section 13.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL...

  18. 14 CFR 13.16 - Civil Penalties: Administrative assessment against a person other than an individual acting as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil Penalties: Administrative assessment against a person other than an individual acting as a pilot, flight engineer, mechanic, or repairman... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES...

  19. The ability of individuals to assess population density influences the evolution of emigration propensity and dispersal distance.

    PubMed

    Poethke, Hans Joachim; Gros, Andreas; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We analyze the simultaneous evolution of emigration and settlement decisions for actively dispersing species differing in their ability to assess population density. Using an individual-based model we simulate dispersal as a multi-step (patch to patch) movement in a world consisting of habitat patches surrounded by a hostile matrix. Each such step is associated with the same mortality risk. Our simulations show that individuals following an informed strategy, where emigration (and settlement) probability depends on local population density, evolve a lower (natal) emigration propensity but disperse over significantly larger distances - i.e. postpone settlement longer - than individuals performing density-independent emigration. This holds especially when variation in environmental conditions is spatially correlated. Both effects can be traced to the informed individuals' ability to better exploit existing heterogeneity in reproductive chances. Yet, already moderate distance-dependent dispersal costs prevent the evolution of multi-step (long-distance) dispersal, irrespective of the dispersal strategy.

  20. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    PubMed Central

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  1. What about Me?: Individual Self-Assessment by Skill and Level of Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmeier, Cindy; Vanderplank, Robert; Strube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In an investigation with advanced language learners, Brantmeier [Brantmeier, C., 2006. "Advanced L2 learners and reading placement: self-assessment, computer based testing, and subsequent performance." "System" 34 (1), 15-35.] reports that self-assessment (SA) of second language (L2) reading ability, when measured with self-rated scales, is not an…

  2. Student Online Self-Assessment: Structuring Individual-Level Learning in a New Venture Creation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human, Sherrie E.; Clark, Thomas; Baucus, Melissa S.

    2005-01-01

    The use of self-assessment instruments to determine students' entrepreneurial characteristics represents a well-accepted practice in entrepreneurship courses, and many professors are only now beginning to embrace Web-based instruments. We describe how we use a comprehensive array of online self-assessments in an undergraduate New Venture Creation…

  3. African Americans and Mathematics Outcomes on National Assessment of Educational Progress: Parental and Individual Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard, III; Morton, Crystal Hill

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated within group differences between African American female and male students who participated in the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress mathematics assessment. Using results from participating states, we compare average scale scores of African American students based on home regulatory environment and interest…

  4. Combining the Tasks of Grading Individual Assignments and Assessing Student Outcomes in Project-Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    ABET requires that engineering programs demonstrate continuous assessment and continuous improvement in order to be accredited. Central to the process is establishing and assessing measurable "student outcomes" that reflect whether the goals and objectives of the program are being met. This paper examines effective strategies for…

  5. Faculty Perspectives on Programme Curricular Assessment: Individual and Institutional Characteristics That Influence Participation Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emil, Serap; Cress, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Driven by issues of accountability, the assessment movement in higher education has gained significant momentum in recent years. However, successful implementation of assessment processes varies radically across institutions. A key issue is faculty engagement. This qualitative inquiry explored factors that impact faculty participation in a…

  6. Practical Measures for Assessing Work Performance Behaviors in Individuals with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Virginia Anne; Parkerson, Sandra

    This paper describes the Work Performance Assessment (WPA) and the Work Personality Profile (WPP) and provides instructions for their use. The WPA and WPP evaluate behaviors associated with job retention and advancement among disabled workers. Together the two evaluation components form a comprehensive observational assessment designed to provide…

  7. Characterization of individual barium titanate nanorods and their assessment as building blocks of new circuit architectures.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Kristina; Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Joan Daniel; Morante, Joan Ramon; Rečnik, Aleksander; Ceh, Miran

    2011-09-23

    In this work, we report on the integration of individual BaTiO(3) nanorods into simple circuit architectures. Polycrystalline BaTiO(3) nanorods were synthesized by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of barium titanate sol into aluminium oxide (AAO) templates and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed the presence of slabs of hexagonal polymorphs intergrown within cubic grains, resulting from the local reducing atmosphere during the thermal treatment. Electrical measurements performed on individual BaTiO(3) nanorods revealed resistivity values between 10 and 100 Ω cm, which is in good agreement with typical values reported in the past for oxygen-deficient barium titanate films. Consequently the presence of oxygen vacancies in their structure was indirectly validated. Some of these nanorods were tested as proof-of-concept humidity sensors. They showed reproducible responses towards different moisture concentrations, demonstrating that individual BaTiO(3) nanorods may be integrated in complex circuit architectures with functional capacities.

  8. Individual rights advocacy in tobacco control policies: an assessment and recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Katz, J

    2005-01-01

    Efforts to control environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) could be assisted if the tobacco control movement gave greater emphasis to the issue of individual rights. Benefits that may accrue from the promotion of a clear individual rights perspective in tobacco control include adding coherence to the tobacco control advocacy agenda and winning support from those who may have been concerned about loss of personal freedom, excessive governmental power, use of social coercion, or the rights of smokers. Risks also attend to such a policy. It might inadvertently assist the tobacco industry, stir resistance to ETS limitation efforts, or confuse tobacco control supporters. On balance, though, liabilities are outweighed by the ethical and operational merits in tobacco control of a heightened pro-individual rights stance. PMID:16046700

  9. Measuring individuality in habitat use across complex landscapes: approaches, constraints, and implications for assessing resource specialization.

    PubMed

    Fodrie, F Joel; Yeager, Lauren A; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Layman, Craig A; Sherwood, Graham D; Kenworthy, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    Many mobile marine species are presumed to utilize a broad spectrum of habitats, but this seemingly generalist life history may arise from conspecifics specializing on distinct habitat alternatives to exploit foraging, resting/refuge, or reproductive opportunities. We acoustically tagged 34 red drum, and mapped sand, seagrass, marsh, or oyster (across discrete landscape contexts) use by each uniquely coded individual. Using 144,000 acoustic detections, we recorded differences in habitat use among red drum: proportional use of seagrass habitat ranged from 0 to 100%, and use of oyster-bottom types also varied among fish. WIC/TNW and IS metrics (previously applied vis-à-vis diet specialization) consistently indicated that a typical red drum overlapped >70% with population-level niche exploitation. Monte Carlo permutations showed these values were lower than expected had fish drawn from a common habitat-use distribution, but longitudinal comparisons did not provide evidence of temporally consistent individuality, suggesting that differences among individuals were plastic and not reflective of true specialization. Given the range of acoustic detections we captured (from tens to 1,000s per individual), which are substantially larger sample sizes than in many diet studies, we extended our findings by serially reducing or expanding our data in simulations to evaluate sample-size effects. We found that the results of null hypothesis testing for specialization were highly dependent on sample size, with thresholds in the relationship between sample size and associated P-values. These results highlight opportunities and potential caveats in exploring individuality in habitat use. More broadly, exploring individual specialization in fine-scale habitat use suggests that, for mobile marine species, movement behaviors over shorter (≤weeks), but not longer (≥months), timescales may serve as an underlying mechanism for other forms of resource specialization. PMID:25669451

  10. Assessment of individual differences in the rat nucleus accumbens transcriptome following taste-heroin extended access.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Caesar G; McFalls, Ashley J; Colechio, Elizabeth M; Masser, Dustin R; Vrana, Kent E; Grigson, Patricia S; Freeman, Willard M

    2016-05-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse that harms the individual through devaluation of personal responsibilities in favor of finding and using drugs. Only some recreational heroin users devolve into addiction but the basis of these individual differences is not known. We have shown in rats that avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual animals with greater addiction-like behavior for heroin. Here rats received 5min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 6h. Large Suppressors of the heroin-paired taste cue displayed increased drug escalation, motivation for drug, and drug loading behavior compared with Small Suppressors. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of these individual differences in addiction-like behavior. We examined the individual differences in mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rats that were behaviorally stratified by addiction-like behavior using next-generation sequencing. We hypothesized that based on the avoidance of the drug-paired cue there will be a unique mRNA profile in the NAc. Analysis of strand-specific whole genome RNA-Seq data revealed a number of genes differentially regulated in NAc based on the suppression of the natural saccharine reward. Large Suppressors exhibited a unique mRNA prolife compared to Saline controls and Small Suppressors. Genes related to immunity, neuronal activity, and behavior were differentially expressed among the 3 groups. In total, individual differences in avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue are associated with addiction-like behavior along with differential NAc gene expression. PMID:26733446

  11. Measuring individuality in habitat use across complex landscapes: approaches, constraints, and implications for assessing resource specialization.

    PubMed

    Fodrie, F Joel; Yeager, Lauren A; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Layman, Craig A; Sherwood, Graham D; Kenworthy, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    Many mobile marine species are presumed to utilize a broad spectrum of habitats, but this seemingly generalist life history may arise from conspecifics specializing on distinct habitat alternatives to exploit foraging, resting/refuge, or reproductive opportunities. We acoustically tagged 34 red drum, and mapped sand, seagrass, marsh, or oyster (across discrete landscape contexts) use by each uniquely coded individual. Using 144,000 acoustic detections, we recorded differences in habitat use among red drum: proportional use of seagrass habitat ranged from 0 to 100%, and use of oyster-bottom types also varied among fish. WIC/TNW and IS metrics (previously applied vis-à-vis diet specialization) consistently indicated that a typical red drum overlapped >70% with population-level niche exploitation. Monte Carlo permutations showed these values were lower than expected had fish drawn from a common habitat-use distribution, but longitudinal comparisons did not provide evidence of temporally consistent individuality, suggesting that differences among individuals were plastic and not reflective of true specialization. Given the range of acoustic detections we captured (from tens to 1,000s per individual), which are substantially larger sample sizes than in many diet studies, we extended our findings by serially reducing or expanding our data in simulations to evaluate sample-size effects. We found that the results of null hypothesis testing for specialization were highly dependent on sample size, with thresholds in the relationship between sample size and associated P-values. These results highlight opportunities and potential caveats in exploring individuality in habitat use. More broadly, exploring individual specialization in fine-scale habitat use suggests that, for mobile marine species, movement behaviors over shorter (≤weeks), but not longer (≥months), timescales may serve as an underlying mechanism for other forms of resource specialization.

  12. Assessing Individual Differences in Adaptation to Extreme Environments: A 36-Hour Sleep Deprivation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Jacqueline; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    In space, astronauts may experience effects of cumulative sleep loss due to demanding work schedules that can result in cognitive performance impairments, mood state deteriorations, and sleep-wake cycle disruption. Individuals who experience sleep deprivation of six hours beyond normal sleep times experience detrimental changes in their mood and performance states. Hence, the potential for life threatening errors increases exponentially with sleep deprivation. We explored the effects of 36-hours of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance, mood states, and physiological responses to identify which metrics may best predict fatigue induced performance decrements of individuals.

  13. 30 CFR 846.17 - Procedure for assessment of individual civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quincy Street, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (Phone: 703-235-3800), in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1300 et seq... penalty assessment, including a narrative explanation of the reasons for the penalty, the amount to...

  14. 30 CFR 846.17 - Procedure for assessment of individual civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quincy Street, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (Phone: 703-235-3800), in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1300 et seq... penalty assessment, including a narrative explanation of the reasons for the penalty, the amount to...

  15. 30 CFR 846.17 - Procedure for assessment of individual civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quincy Street, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (Phone: 703-235-3800), in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1300 et seq... penalty assessment, including a narrative explanation of the reasons for the penalty, the amount to...

  16. The Assessment of Social Functioning in Individuals with Mental Retardation: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielecki, Joanne; Swender, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    Social skills deficits and excesses are a defining aspect of mental retardation (MR). Research indicates that there is an established relationship between social skills and maladaptive behaviors. A number of studies demonstrate that the social competence of individuals with MR and comorbid psychopathology can be enhanced with social skills…

  17. Assessment of Aging Individuals with Down Syndrome in Clinical Trials: Results of Baseline Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sano, Mary; Aisen, Paul S.; Dalton, Arthur J.; Andrews, Howard F.; Tsai, Wei-Yann

    2005-01-01

    A major challenge to developing therapeutic interventions for cognitive loss and dementia in aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) is the selection of appropriate outcome measures. This report describes the adaptation of the Brief Praxis Test (a nonverbal cognitive test) as a primary outcome measure, as well as the selection of secondary…

  18. An Assessment of Publication Productivity in Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals: 1978-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Darlene D.; Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This literature review examined publication patterns in the journal of "Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals" across 35 years of publication. Overall, 732 contributors affiliated with 267 organizations were identified in our analysis of 436 articles. Frequency counts identified the most productive scholars in…

  19. Methodological Challenges of Selectivity in Family Interaction: Assessing Temporal Patterns of Individuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Catherine R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Families (N=20) participated in a Plan Something Together task used to measure three dimensions of family individuation: self-assertion, validation, and permeability. Discusses results in the context of several methodological challenges encountered in analyses of family interaction; discusses general strategies for responding to these challenges.…

  20. Research Study to Assess Individual and Vocational Program Needs for Adult Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbold, Patricia L.

    This report provides detailed information of a year-long study of programmatic and individual needs for adult vocational education in Connecticut. Chapter 1 outlines study objectives. Chapter 2 summarizes principal findings and conclusions and recommendations. Findings are categorized by seven factors studied: population, labor force…

  1. Parental Assessment of Pain Coping in Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkitt, Chantel C.; Breau, Lynn M.; Zabalia, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Pain coping is thought to be the most significant behavioural contribution to the adjustment to pain. Little is known about how those with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) cope with pain. We describe parental reported coping styles and how coping relates to individual factors. Seventy-seven caregivers of children and adults with…

  2. Development of a Diabetes Learning Needs Assessment Tool to Promote an Individualized Predischarge Patient Education Plan.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Ann Marie; Davis, Audrey; Glowatz, Tina

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to feature a nursing staff initiative to improve patients' understanding of their diabetes management by empowering them with knowledge for successful glycemic control. This initiative also enhanced patient and family-centered care and patient safety through individualized, targeted instruction. PMID:26509398

  3. Examining the Definition and Assessment of Social Support: A Resource for Individuals and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Betty D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes social support as a significant resource for individuals and family members encountering stress. Presents a definition of social support and an instrument, the Social Support Inventory, to measure two dimensions of social support: kind of support, such as emotional, esteem, network, appraisal and altruistic; and source of support, such…

  4. Cognitive Flexibility among Individuals with Down Syndrome: Assessing the Influence of Verbal and Nonverbal Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Colin; Landry, Oriane; Russo, Natalie; Flores, Heidi; Jacques, Sophie; Burack, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    The influences of verbal mental age (VMA) and performance mental age (PMA) on cognitive flexibility were examined among a group of participants with Down syndrome (DS), in order to disentangle the relative contributions of each. The impaired cognitive flexibility typically observed among individuals with DS in combination with uneven VMA and PMA…

  5. Ability and Motivation: Assessing Individual Factors that Contribute to University Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alarcon, Gene M.; Edwards, Jean M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study explored individual differences in ability and motivation factors of retention in first-year college students. We used discrete-time survival mixture analysis to model university retention. Parents' education, gender, American College Test (ACT) scores, conscientiousness, and trait affectivity were explored as predictors of…

  6. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-02-02

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  7. Direct assessment of multiple testing correction in case-control association studies with related individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuoheng

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies typically test large numbers of genetic variants in association with trait values. It is well known that linkage disequilibrium (LD) between nearby markers tends to introduce correlation among association tests. Failure to properly adjust for multiple comparisons can lead to false-positive results or missing true-positive signals. The Bonferroni correction is generally conservative in the presence of LD. The permutation procedure, although has been widely employed to adjust for correlated tests, is not applicable when related individuals are included in case-control samples. With related individuals, the dependence among relatives' genotypes can also contribute to the correlation between tests. We present a new method P(norm) to correct for multiple hypothesis testing in case-control association studies in which some individuals are related. The adjustment with P(norm) simultaneously accounts for two sources of correlations of the test statistics: (1) LD among genetic markers (2) dependence among genotypes across related individuals. Using simulated data based on the International HapMap Project, we demonstrate that it has better control of type I error and is more powerful than some of the recently developed methods. We apply the method to a genome-wide association study of alcoholism in the GAW 14 COGA data set and detect genome-wide significant association. PMID:21181898

  8. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds. PMID:26848693

  9. Does Negative Mood Influence Self-Report Assessment of Individual and Relational Measures? An Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heene, Els; De Raedt, Rudi; Buysse, Ann; Van Oost, Paulette

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the influence of negative mood on the self-report of individual and relational correlates of depression and marital distress. The authors applied a combined experimental mood induction procedure, based on music, autobiographical recall, and environmental manipulation. Results showed that the mood manipulation…

  10. Assessing the reproductive competence of individual embryos: a proposal for the validation of new "-omics" technologies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Richard T; Treff, Nathan R

    2010-08-01

    Rapid technological advances now provide the tools needed to evaluate the molecular genetics, proteomics, and microenvironment of an individual embryo in an effort to predict its reproductive competence. Rigorous criteria for accepting any test as a validated marker of embryonic reproductive competence should be established, and practitioners should be cautious about applying these tests clinically before the availability of comprehensive and convincing evidence.

  11. Development of a Diabetes Learning Needs Assessment Tool to Promote an Individualized Predischarge Patient Education Plan.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Ann Marie; Davis, Audrey; Glowatz, Tina

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to feature a nursing staff initiative to improve patients' understanding of their diabetes management by empowering them with knowledge for successful glycemic control. This initiative also enhanced patient and family-centered care and patient safety through individualized, targeted instruction.

  12. A novel technique for the quantitative assessment of apraxic deficits: application to individuals with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Rossor, Martin N; Warrington, Elizabeth K

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply two novel quantitative assessments of apraxia to issues surrounding the cognitive profile of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In particular, it was wished to determine whether such quantitative assessment techniques can detect minor degrees of impairment at a stage in the putative disease process before apraxia has become clinically obvious. A total of 23 individuals with MCI and 75 healthy controls were assessed on two 3-item sequential movement tasks involving either meaningful or meaningless actions. A traditional rating scale assessment of gesture-to-command was also administered. MCI patients took significantly longer than control subjects to complete the sequential movement tasks despite unimpaired performance on the traditional gesture production tasks. Furthermore, retrospective analyses revealed that, at the group level, only MCI patients who subsequently proceeded to a clinical diagnosis of AD were significantly slower than controls at the initial assessment. These findings provide the first evidence that the neuropsychological deficits associated with MCI may extend to the domain of praxic functions. Consequently, this work contributes to the growing literature questioning the clinical usefulness of the concept of MCI and the appropriateness of current diagnostic criteria for distinguishing this condition from mild AD.

  13. Diagnostic assessment to estimate and minimize neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals at cyclotron facilities.

    PubMed

    Reina, L C; Silva, A X; Suita, J C; Souza, M I S; Facure, A; Silva, J C P; Furlanetto, J A D; Rebello, W

    2010-03-01

    Since 2003, radiopharmaceuticals for medical diagnostic purposes have been produced at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, in Brazil, using two cyclotron accelerators - CV-28 and RDS111. As a result of the ever increasing production, a diagnostic assessment to reduce neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals during irradiation processes has been developed. The purpose of this work is to present this assessment, which is currently being applied to both the Fluorine and Iodine targets of CV-28 and RDS111 cyclotron accelerators.

  14. Individual social security accounts: issues in assessing administrative feasibility and costs.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K A; Salisbury, D L

    1998-11-01

    Whether to add individual accounts (IAs) to the Social Security system is a highly political issue. But almost lost in the debate so far have been any practical considerations about how to administer such accounts. Any discussion of whether to create individual accounts must also address the basic but critical questions of how they would work: Who would run them? What would they cost? Logistically, are they even possible? This EBRI Issue Brief provides an overview of the most salient administrative issues facing the current Social Security reform debate--issues that challenge proponents to carefully think through how their proposals could be implemented so as to achieve their policy goals. The options and difficulties in administering IAs raise concerns that cut across ideology. The object of this report is neither to dissuade the advocates nor support the critics of individual accounts. Rather, it is to bring practical considerations to a political debate that has largely ignored the pragmatic challenges of whether IAs would be too complex for participants to understand or too difficult for record keepers to administer. The major findings in this analysis include: Adding individual accounts to Social Security could be the largest undertaking in the history of the U.S. financial market, and no system to date has the capacity to administer such a system. The number of workers currently covered by Social Security--the largest single entitlement program in the nation--is at least four times higher than the combined number of all tax-favored employment-based retirement accounts in the United States, which are administered by hundreds of entities. Direct comparisons between employment-based retirement savings plans and Social Security reform are tenuous at best. Social Security covers workers and businesses that are disproportionately excluded from employment-based plans. Because of these differences, a system of individual Social Security accounts would be more

  15. Assessment of first and second degree relatives of individuals with bipolar disorder shows increased genetic risk scores in both affected relatives and young At‐Risk Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Daniel L.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana; Liu, Hai; Glowinski, Anne L.; McInnis, Melvin G.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Frankland, Andrew; Roberts, Gloria; Schofield, Peter R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Nurnberger, John I.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the polygenic nature of bipolar disorder (BP), and identified common risk variants associated with illness. However, the role of common polygenic risk in multiplex families has not previously been examined. The present study examined 249 European‐ancestry families from the NIMH Genetics Initiative sample, comparing subjects with narrowly defined BP (excluding bipolar II and recurrent unipolar depression; n = 601) and their adult relatives without BP (n = 695). Unrelated adult controls (n = 266) were from the NIMH TGEN control dataset. We also examined a prospective cohort of young (12–30 years) offspring and siblings of individuals with BPI and BPII disorder (at risk; n = 367) and psychiatrically screened controls (n = 229), ascertained from five sites in the US and Australia and assessed with standardized clinical protocols. Thirty‐two disease‐associated SNPs from the PGC‐BP Working Group report (2011) were genotyped and additive polygenic risk scores (PRS) derived. We show increased PRS in adult cases compared to unrelated controls (P = 3.4 × 10−5, AUC = 0.60). In families with a high‐polygenic load (PRS score ≥32 in two or more subjects), PRS distinguished cases with BPI/SAB from other relatives (P = 0.014, RR = 1.32). Secondly, a higher PRS was observed in at‐risk youth, regardless of affected status, compared to unrelated controls (GEE‐χ2 = 5.15, P = 0.012). This report is the first to explore common polygenic risk in multiplex families, albeit using only a small number of robustly associated risk variants. We show that individuals with BP have a higher load of common disease‐associated variants than unrelated controls and first‐degree relatives, and illustrate the potential utility of PRS assessment in a family context. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID

  16. Assessing meiofaunal variation among individuals utilising morphological and molecular approaches: an example using the Tardigrada

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Chester J; Convey, Peter; Linse, Katrin; McInnes, Sandra J

    2008-01-01

    Background Meiofauna – multicellular animals captured between sieve size 45 μm and 1000 μm – are a fundamental component of terrestrial, and marine benthic ecosystems, forming an integral element of food webs, and playing a critical roll in nutrient recycling. Most phyla have meiofaunal representatives and studies of these taxa impact on a wide variety of sub-disciplines as well as having social and economic implications. However, studies of variation in meiofauna are presented with several important challenges. Isolating individuals from a sample substrate is a time consuming process, and identification requires increasingly scarce taxonomic expertise. Finding suitable morphological characters in many of these organisms is often difficult even for experts. Molecular markers are extremely useful for identifying variation in morphologically conserved organisms. However, for many species markers need to be developed de novo, while DNA can often only be extracted from pooled samples in order to obtain sufficient quantity and quality. Importantly, multiple independent markers are required to reconcile gene evolution with species evolution. In this primarily methodological paper we provide a proof of principle of a novel and effective protocol for the isolation of meiofauna from an environmental sample. We also go on to illustrate examples of the implications arising from subsequent screening for genetic variation at the level of the individual using ribosomal, mitochondrial and single copy nuclear markers. Results To isolate individual tardigrades from their habitat substrate we used a non-toxic density gradient media that did not interfere with downstream biochemical processes. Using a simple DNA release technique and nested polymerase chain reaction with universal primers we were able amplify multi-copy and, to some extent, single copy genes from individual tardigrades. Maximum likelihood trees from ribosomal 18S, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, and

  17. A new way of assessing foraging behaviour at the individual level using faeces marking and satellite telemetry.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Marie-Andrée; Dussault, Christian; Lecomte, Nicolas; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity in foraging behaviour can profoundly influence ecological processes shaping populations. To scale-up from individual foraging behaviour to processes occurring at the population scale, one needs to sample foraging behaviour at the individual level, and over large temporal scales or during critical seasons known to influence life-history traits. We developed an innovative technique to monitor foraging behaviour at the individual level in secretive species, a technique that can be ultimately used to investigate the links between foraging behaviour and life-history traits. First, the technique used a novel approach, namely the combination of telemetry tracking and biomarking of faeces with food dyes to locate fresh signs of presence left by individuals equipped with GPS collars. Second, the technique is based on the simultaneous or successive sampling of life-history traits and individual foraging behaviour, using tracks with high probabilities of recovery of dyed faeces. We first describe our methodological approach, using a case study of a large herbivore, and then provide recommendations and guidelines for its use. Sampling single snow tracks of individuals equipped with a GPS collar was a reliable way to assess individual winter foraging behaviour in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann) population. During that period, the probability of recovery of dyed faeces within the range of the collar precision was very high for single snow tracks of equipped deer (97%). Our approach is well suited to study individual foraging behaviour, and could ultimately be used to investigate the interplay between intra-population heterogeneity in foraging behaviour, life-history traits, and demographic processes. PMID:23166754

  18. Sequential Learning Models for the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: Assessing Processes in Substance Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Kruschke, John K.; Stout, Julie C.; Bechara, Antoine; McCabe, David P.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sort Task (WCST) is a commonly used neuropsychological test of executive or frontal lobe functioning. Traditional behavioral measures from the task (e.g., perseverative errors) distinguish healthy controls from clinical populations, but such measures can be difficult to interpret. In an attempt to supplement traditional measures, we developed and tested a family of sequential learning models that allowed for estimation of processes at the individual subject level in the WCST. Testing the model with substance dependent individuals and healthy controls, the model parameters significantly predicted group membership even when controlling for traditional behavioral measures from the task. Substance dependence was associated with a) slower attention shifting following punished trials and b) reduced decision consistency. Results suggest that model parameters may offer both incremental content validity and incremental predictive validity. PMID:20495607

  19. Individualized nutritional recommendations: do we have the measurements needed to assess risk and make dietary recommendations?

    PubMed

    Arab, Lenore

    2004-02-01

    Is the information currently available to adjust nutritional recommendations and develop individualized nutrition? No. There is not even the information needed for setting dietary recommendations with confidence now at the group level. Will it be available soon? The answer to this question depends on the drive and will of the nutritional community, the success in recruiting funding to the area, the education of nutritionists and the spawning of great ideas and approaches. The emerging tools of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are enabling the in-depth study of relationships between diet, genetics and metabolism. The advent of technologies can be compared with the discovery of the microscope and the new dimensions of scientific visualization enabled by that discovery. Nutritionists stand at the crest of new waves of data that can be generated, and new methods for their digestion will be required. To date, the study of dietary requirements has been based largely on a black box approach. Subjects are supplemented or depleted and clinical outcomes are observed. Few recommendations are based on metabolic outcomes. Metabolomics and nutrigenomics promise tools with which recommendations can be refined to meet individual requirements and the potential of individualized nutrition can be explored. As yet, these tools are not being widely applied in nutritional research and are rarely being applied by nutritionists. The result is often interesting research that is frequently nutritionally flawed, resulting in inappropriate conclusions. Nutritional education is needed to put nutritionists at the forefront of the development of applications for these technologies, creating a generation of nutrigenomicists. A new generation of nutritionists should be working interdisciplinarily with geneticists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians in the development of research strategies. The present paper reviews the current status of nutrigenomic research, the current

  20. Inter-individual susceptibility to environmental toxicants-A current assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Nebert, Daniel W. . E-mail: dan.nebert@uc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Virtually all diseases have an environmental component. The two most important factors affecting your unique risk of an environmental disease (toxicity or cancer) are (a) your exposure to the environmental agent and (b) your genes. Epidemiologists have found ways to calculate inter-individual risk-if the exposure to environmental agents is sufficiently high and can be documented (e.g., years of cigarette smoking, taking prescribed drugs, drinking alcohol, or exposure to radon or other radioactive material, etc.). If the dose of environmental agents is lower and more ambiguous (e.g., exposure to chemicals on the job, herbicides sprayed on a golf course, outdoor or indoor air pollution, endocrine disruptors in cans of food, living near a toxic waste dump site, etc.), however, calculations of inter-individual risk become much more difficult. Highly accurate DNA tests for genetic susceptibility to toxicity and cancer have been sought in order to identify individuals at increased risk; this type of research represents the leading edge of phenotype-genotype association studies and is the major goal of most public health and preventive medicine programs. The task, however, has turned out to be far more challenging than anticipated. The major stumbling block has been the difficulty in determining an unequivocal phenotype or an unequivocal genotype. We were quite optimistic 5-10 years ago that this would be easy, but now we are beginning to appreciate how difficult it is to determine an unequivocal phenotype or genotype with certainty. For many reasons set forth in this overview, it appears that DNA testing alone, to predict and prevent environmental disease on an individual basis, may be virtually impossible with current knowledge and technologies and will require novel insights before major practical applications will evolve.

  1. Individualized nutritional recommendations: do we have the measurements needed to assess risk and make dietary recommendations?

    PubMed

    Arab, Lenore

    2004-02-01

    Is the information currently available to adjust nutritional recommendations and develop individualized nutrition? No. There is not even the information needed for setting dietary recommendations with confidence now at the group level. Will it be available soon? The answer to this question depends on the drive and will of the nutritional community, the success in recruiting funding to the area, the education of nutritionists and the spawning of great ideas and approaches. The emerging tools of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are enabling the in-depth study of relationships between diet, genetics and metabolism. The advent of technologies can be compared with the discovery of the microscope and the new dimensions of scientific visualization enabled by that discovery. Nutritionists stand at the crest of new waves of data that can be generated, and new methods for their digestion will be required. To date, the study of dietary requirements has been based largely on a black box approach. Subjects are supplemented or depleted and clinical outcomes are observed. Few recommendations are based on metabolic outcomes. Metabolomics and nutrigenomics promise tools with which recommendations can be refined to meet individual requirements and the potential of individualized nutrition can be explored. As yet, these tools are not being widely applied in nutritional research and are rarely being applied by nutritionists. The result is often interesting research that is frequently nutritionally flawed, resulting in inappropriate conclusions. Nutritional education is needed to put nutritionists at the forefront of the development of applications for these technologies, creating a generation of nutrigenomicists. A new generation of nutritionists should be working interdisciplinarily with geneticists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians in the development of research strategies. The present paper reviews the current status of nutrigenomic research, the current

  2. Assessment of the Exercise Intensity of Short Stick Exercises in Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kurasawa, Shigeki; Yokoi, Katsushi; Miyai, Nobuyuki; Takemura, Shigeki; Miyashita, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to obtain basic data for applying the short stick exercises to frail elderly individuals. A total of 20 individuals aged ≥60 years (10 men, and 10 women) with independence in activities of daily living participated in a short stick exercise program. During the exercise program, the time required and the number of times the short stick was dropped were investigated. The exercise intensity was also evaluated based on expired gas and heart rate measurements. The mean exercise intensity of the short stick exercises was 1.9 ± 0.3 metabolic equivalents (METs), equivalent to talking while standing or walking indoors. Compared to the early elderly (those aged 60 to 74 years), the late elderly (those aged ≥75 years) had a significantly higher number of stick drops and significantly lower increase in heart rate from resting to the warming-up exercise. The short stick exercises had a low exercise intensity and can be applicable to exercise interventions of the frail elderly individuals. However, in the case of the late elderly, the high frequency of short stick drops and the change in heart rate during warming up must be considered. PMID:25734017

  3. Ensuring Confidentiality of Geocoded Health Data: Assessing Geographic Masking Strategies for Individual-Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Zandbergen, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Public health datasets increasingly use geographic identifiers such as an individual's address. Geocoding these addresses often provides new insights since it becomes possible to examine spatial patterns and associations. Address information is typically considered confidential and is therefore not released or shared with others. Publishing maps with the locations of individuals, however, may also breach confidentiality since addresses and associated identities can be discovered through reverse geocoding. One commonly used technique to protect confidentiality when releasing individual-level geocoded data is geographic masking. This typically consists of applying a certain amount of random perturbation in a systematic manner to reduce the risk of reidentification. A number of geographic masking techniques have been developed as well as methods to quantity the risk of reidentification associated with a particular masking method. This paper presents a review of the current state-of-the-art in geographic masking, summarizing the various methods and their strengths and weaknesses. Despite recent progress, no universally accepted or endorsed geographic masking technique has emerged. Researchers on the other hand are publishing maps using geographic masking of confidential locations. Any researcher publishing such maps is advised to become familiar with the different masking techniques available and their associated reidentification risks. PMID:26556417

  4. How artificial intelligence tools can be used to assess individual patient risk in cardiovascular disease: problems with the current methods

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    Background In recent years a number of algorithms for cardiovascular risk assessment has been proposed to the medical community. These algorithms consider a number of variables and express their results as the percentage risk of developing a major fatal or non-fatal cardiovascular event in the following 10 to 20 years Discussion The author has identified three major pitfalls of these algorithms, linked to the limitation of the classical statistical approach in dealing with this kind of non linear and complex information. The pitfalls are the inability to capture the disease complexity, the inability to capture process dynamics, and the wide confidence interval of individual risk assessment. Artificial Intelligence tools can provide potential advantage in trying to overcome these limitations. The theoretical background and some application examples related to artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic have been reviewed and discussed. Summary The use of predictive algorithms to assess individual absolute risk of cardiovascular future events is currently hampered by methodological and mathematical flaws. The use of newer approaches, such as fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks, linked to artificial intelligence, seems to better address both the challenge of increasing complexity resulting from a correlation between predisposing factors, data on the occurrence of cardiovascular events, and the prediction of future events on an individual level. PMID:16672045

  5. A model to assess the emission of individual isoprenoids emitted from Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper Pacheco, C. J.; Fares, S.; Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a GIS-based model to estimate the emissions from the Italian forest ecosystems. The model was aimed at generating a species-specific emission inventory for isoprene and individual monoterpenes that could have been validated with experimental data collected in selected sites of the CARBOITALY network. The model was develop for the year 2006. At a resolution of 1 km2 with a daily time resolution. By using the emission rates of individual components obtained through several laboratory and field experiments carried out on different vegetation species of the Mediterranean basin, maps of individual isoprenoids were generated for the Italian ecosystems. The spatial distribution and fractional contents of vegetation species present in the Italian forest ecosystems was obtained by combining the CORINE IV land cover map with National Forest Inventory based on ground observations performed at local levels by individual Italian regions (22) in which the country is divided. In general, basal emission rates for individual isoprenoids was reported by Steinbrecher et al. 1997 and Karl et al. 2009 were used. In this case, classes were further subdivided into T and L+T emitters as functions of the active pool. In many instances, however they were revised based on the results obtained in our Institute through determinations performed at leaf, branch (cuvette method) or ecosystem level (REA and the gradient method). In the latter case, studies performed in Italy and/or Mediterranean countries were used. An empirical light extinction function as a function of the canopy type and structure was introduced. The algorithms proposed by (Guenther et al. 1993) were used, but, they were often adapted to fit with the experimental observations made in the Mediterranean Areas. They were corrected for a seasonality factor (Steinbrecher et al. 2009) taking into account a time lag in leaf sprouting due to the plant elevation. A simple parameterization with LAI was

  6. Teaching Medieval Towns: Group Exercises, Individual Presentations and Self-Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Andrew; Gunn, Vicky

    2002-01-01

    Examines the use of innovative collaborative small group activities in a Medieval History undergraduate honors course. Discusses student evaluations and feedback from a focus group to investigate the use of group exercises that involve the construction of three-dimensional models of medieval towns and the use of self-assessment. (Author/LRW)

  7. Assessing and Identifying the Development and Educational Needs of the Exceptional Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Wei-fan

    The author stresses that diagnosis is desirable only when it leads to special education intervention. Diagnosis in a service vacuum is seen to be unnecessary and frustrating for parents and teachers of handicapped children. It is also emphasized that assessment of intraindividual differences is more valuable than that of interindividual…

  8. The Assessment of Pain and Discomfort in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Angela; Edwards, Christopher L.; Robinson, Elwood L.

    2005-01-01

    This research was conducted to replicate and expanded the work of Bodfish et al. [Bodfish, J. W., Harper, V. N., Deacon, J. R., & Symons, F. J. (2001, May). "Identifying and measuring pain in persons with developmental disabilities: A manual for the Pain and Discomfort Scale (PADS)." Western Carolina Center Research Reports] by assessing the…

  9. Assessing the Micro-Environments of Individual Preschool Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopyera, John

    The work completed to date on the development and validation of a procedure for assessing the micro-environments of preschool children is summarized. It was speculated that the lack of evidence that compensatory programs facilitate developmental changes in children might be due to actual lack of influence by the programs, to the subtlety of the…

  10. 28 CFR 105.11 - Individuals not requiring a security risk assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requiring a security risk assessment. (a) Citizens and nationals of the United States. A citizen or national of the United States is not subject to section 113 of ATSA unless otherwise designated by the Under... citizen or national of the United States prior to providing training in the operation of an aircraft...

  11. An Occupational Therapy Work Skills Assessment for Individuals with Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an occupational therapy skills assessment protocol developed and used to evaluate physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities for persons seeking to return to work following head injuries. It measures them within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills, and safety. (Contains 48 references.) (Author/JOW)

  12. An Assessment Instrument for Families: Evaluating Employment Programs for Individuals with Deaf-Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helen Keller National Center - Technical Assistance Center, Sands Point, NY.

    This employment assessment tool for parents of young adults with deaf-blindness was created to assist in examining strengths and weaknesses of various employment programs in relation to their child's employment wants and needs, to guide parents in advocating for what is needed from a specific job to ensure their child's success, and to provide a…

  13. Estimated effects of ionizing radiation upon military task performance: individual combat crewmember assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, G.H.; Wilson, D.B.

    1984-04-01

    Quantitative estimates are developed of the performance levels for selected individual Army combat crewmembers exposed to prompt ionizing radiation from nuclear weapons. The performance levels, expressed in percent of normal (baseline) task performance, provide information for military operations planning, combat training, and computer simulation modeling of combat crew and unit effectiveness. The methodology is described where data from two separate bodies of information: acute radiation sickness symptomatology, and judgment of task performance time from Army combat crew questionnaires - are integrated to compute performance levels as a function of dose (free-in-air) and post-exposure time.

  14. Does negative mood influence self-report assessment of individual and relational measures? An experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Heene, Els; De Raedt, Rudi; Buysse, Ann; Van Oost, Paulette

    2007-03-01

    The present study was designed to test the influence of negative mood on the self-report of individual and relational correlates of depression and marital distress. The authors applied a combined experimental mood induction procedure, based on music, autobiographical recall, and environmental manipulation. Results showed that the mood manipulation was effective, and the depressed Mood Induction Procedure (MIP) and neutral MIP groups did not differ in their self-rated measures of the above-mentioned variables. In conclusion, the authors argue that these measures are generally insensitive to depressed mood, providing an important contribution to this literature.

  15. Pesticide Environmental Accounting: a method for assessing the external costs of individual pesticide applications.

    PubMed

    Leach, A W; Mumford, J D

    2008-01-01

    The Pesticide Environmental Accounting (PEA) tool provides a monetary estimate of environmental and health impacts per hectare-application for any pesticide. The model combines the Environmental Impact Quotient method and a methodology for absolute estimates of external pesticide costs in UK, USA and Germany. For many countries resources are not available for intensive assessments of external pesticide costs. The model converts external costs of a pesticide in the UK, USA and Germany to Mediterranean countries. Economic and policy applications include estimating impacts of pesticide reduction policies or benefits from technologies replacing pesticides, such as sterile insect technique. The system integrates disparate data and approaches into a single logical method. The assumptions in the system provide transparency and consistency but at the cost of some specificity and precision, a reasonable trade-off for a method that provides both comparative estimates of pesticide impacts and area-based assessments of absolute impacts. PMID:17604888

  16. Pesticide Environmental Accounting: a method for assessing the external costs of individual pesticide applications.

    PubMed

    Leach, A W; Mumford, J D

    2008-01-01

    The Pesticide Environmental Accounting (PEA) tool provides a monetary estimate of environmental and health impacts per hectare-application for any pesticide. The model combines the Environmental Impact Quotient method and a methodology for absolute estimates of external pesticide costs in UK, USA and Germany. For many countries resources are not available for intensive assessments of external pesticide costs. The model converts external costs of a pesticide in the UK, USA and Germany to Mediterranean countries. Economic and policy applications include estimating impacts of pesticide reduction policies or benefits from technologies replacing pesticides, such as sterile insect technique. The system integrates disparate data and approaches into a single logical method. The assumptions in the system provide transparency and consistency but at the cost of some specificity and precision, a reasonable trade-off for a method that provides both comparative estimates of pesticide impacts and area-based assessments of absolute impacts.

  17. Unidirectional Expiratory Valve Method to Assess Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in Individuals without Artificial Airway

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Samantha Torres; Kimoto, Karen Yumi Mota; Azevedo, Elen Moda de Oliveira; Lança, Marina; de Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; de Brito, Christina May Moran; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) is considered an effective method to estimate strength of inspiratory muscles, but still leads to false positive diagnosis. Although MIP assessment with unidirectional expiratory valve method has been used in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, no previous studies investigated the application of this method in subjects without artificial airway. Objectives This study aimed to compare the MIP values assessed by standard method (MIPsta) and by unidirectional expiratory valve method (MIPuni) in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. MIPuni reproducibility was also evaluated. Methods This was a crossover design study, and 31 subjects performed MIPsta and MIPuni in a random order. MIPsta measured MIP maintaining negative pressure for at least one second after forceful expiration. MIPuni evaluated MIP using a unidirectional expiratory valve attached to a face mask and was conducted by two evaluators (A and B) at two moments (Tests 1 and 2) to determine interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of MIP values. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1]) was used to determine intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility. Results The mean values for MIPuni were 14.3% higher (-117.3 ± 24.8 cmH2O) than the mean values for MIPsta (-102.5 ± 23.9 cmH2O) (p<0.001). Interobserver reproducibility assessment showed very high correlation for Test 1 (ICC[2,1] = 0.91), and high correlation for Test 2 (ICC[2,1] = 0.88). The assessment of the intraobserver reproducibility showed high correlation for evaluator A (ICC[2,1] = 0.86) and evaluator B (ICC[2,1] = 0.77). Conclusions MIPuni presented higher values when compared with MIPsta and proved to be reproducible in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. PMID:26360255

  18. Distinctive Gut Microbiota of Honey Bees Assessed Using Deep Sampling from Individual Worker Bees

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Nancy A.; Hansen, Allison K.; Powell, J. Elijah; Sabree, Zakee L.

    2012-01-01

    Surveys of 16S rDNA sequences from the honey bee, Apis mellifera, have revealed the presence of eight distinctive bacterial phylotypes in intestinal tracts of adult worker bees. Because previous studies have been limited to relatively few sequences from samples pooled from multiple hosts, the extent of variation in this microbiota among individuals within and between colonies and locations has been unclear. We surveyed the gut microbiota of 40 individual workers from two sites, Arizona and Maryland USA, sampling four colonies per site. Universal primers were used to amplify regions of 16S ribosomal RNA genes, and amplicons were sequenced using 454 pyrotag methods, enabling analysis of about 330,000 bacterial reads. Over 99% of these sequences belonged to clusters for which the first blastn hits in GenBank were members of the known bee phylotypes. Four phylotypes, one within Gammaproteobacteria (corresponding to “Candidatus Gilliamella apicola”) one within Betaproteobacteria (“Candidatus Snodgrassella alvi”), and two within Lactobacillus, were present in every bee, though their frequencies varied. The same typical bacterial phylotypes were present in all colonies and at both sites. Community profiles differed significantly among colonies and between sites, mostly due to the presence in some Arizona colonies of two species of Enterobacteriaceae not retrieved previously from bees. Analysis of Sanger sequences of rRNA of the Snodgrassella and Gilliamella phylotypes revealed that single bees contain numerous distinct strains of each phylotype. Strains showed some differentiation between localities, especially for the Snodgrassella phylotype. PMID:22558460

  19. Esthetic, Functional, and Everyday Life Assessment of Individuals with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    PubMed Central

    Papamanou, Despina A.; Karamolegkou, Marina; Dorotheou, Domna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the level of satisfaction of individuals with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) and their parents concerning the esthetic and functional treatment outcomes, the impact of the cleft on everyday life, and potential associations with treatment outcome satisfaction. Subjects and Methods. The sample consisted of 33 patients (7 CP, 20 unilateral CLP, and 6 bilateral CLP; median age: 17.1, range: 9.0–33.1 years) and 30 parents, who responded to a questionnaire in an interview-guided session. All participants received their orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics in the University of Athens. Results. Patients and their parents were quite satisfied with esthetics and function. Patients with UCLP primarily were concerned about nose esthetics (BCLP about lip esthetics and CP about speech). Increased satisfaction was associated with decreased influence of the cleft in everyday life (0.35 < rho < 0.64, P < 0.05). Parents reported significant influence of the cleft on family life, while patients did not. Conclusions. Despite the limited sample size of subgroups, the main concerns of patients with different cleft types and the importance of satisfying lip, nose, and speech outcomes for an undisturbed everyday life were quite evident. Thus, the need for targeted treatment strategies is highlighted for individuals with cleft lip and/or palate. PMID:26064918

  20. Assessing visual green effects of individual urban trees using airborne Lidar data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyue; Xu, Bing; Gao, Bingbo

    2015-12-01

    Urban trees benefit people's daily life in terms of air quality, local climate, recreation and aesthetics. Among these functions, a growing number of studies have been conducted to understand the relationship between residents' preference towards local environments and visual green effects of urban greenery. However, except for on-site photography, there are few quantitative methods to calculate green visibility, especially tree green visibility, from viewers' perspectives. To fill this research gap, a case study was conducted in the city of Cambridge, which has a diversity of tree species, sizes and shapes. Firstly, a photograph-based survey was conducted to approximate the actual value of visual green effects of individual urban trees. In addition, small footprint airborne Lidar (Light detection and ranging) data was employed to measure the size and shape of individual trees. Next, correlations between visual tree green effects and tree structural parameters were examined. Through experiments and gradual refinement, a regression model with satisfactory R2 and limited large errors is proposed. Considering the diversity of sample trees and the result of cross-validation, this model has the potential to be applied to other study sites. This research provides urban planners and decision makers with an innovative method to analyse and evaluate landscape patterns in terms of tree greenness.

  1. Assessment Data-Informed Guidance to Individualize Kindergarten Reading Instruction: Findings from a Cluster-Randomized Control Field Trial.

    PubMed

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Connor, Carol M; Folsom, Jessica Sidler; Greulich, Luana; Meadows, Jane; Li, Zhi

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomized control field trial was to was to examine the extent to which kindergarten teachers could learn a promising instructional strategy, wherein kindergarten reading instruction was differentiated based upon students' ongoing assessments of language and literacy skills and documented child characteristic by instruction (CXI) interactions; and to test the efficacy of this differentiated reading instruction on the reading outcomes of students from culturally diverse backgrounds. The study involved 14 schools and included 23 treatment (n = 305 students) and 21 contrast teacher (n = 251 students). Teachers in the contrast condition received only a baseline professional development that included a researcher-delivered summer day-long workshop on individualized instruction. Data sources included parent surveys, individually administered child assessments of language, cognitive, and reading skills and videotapes of classroom instruction. Using Hierarchical Multivariate Linear Modeling (HMLM), we found students in treatment classrooms outperformed students in the contrast classrooms on a latent measure of reading skills, comprised of letter-word reading, decoding, alphabetic knowledge, and phonological awareness (ES = .52). Teachers in both conditions provided small group instruction, but teachers in the treatment condition provided significantly more individualized instruction. Our findings extend research on the efficacy of teachers using Individualized Student Instruction to individualize instruction based upon students' language and literacy skills in first through third grade. Findings are discussed regarding the value of professional development related to differentiating core reading instruction and the challenges of using Response to Intervention approaches to address students' needs in the areas of reading in general education contexts.

  2. Assessment of impairment in activities of daily living in mild cognitive impairment using an individualized scale.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Giseli de Fátima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Alexandra Martini; Chaves, Juliana Aparecida Dos Santos; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente; Aprahamian, Ivan; Nunes, Paula Villela

    2016-07-01

    Mild impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) can occur in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but the nature and extent of these difficulties need to be further explored. The Canadian occupational performance measure (COPM) is one of the few individualized scales designed to identify self-perceived difficulties in ADL. The present study investigated impairments in ADL using the COPM in elderly with MCI. A total of 58 MCI patients were submitted to the COPM for studies of its validity and reliability. The COPM proved a valid and consistent instrument for evaluating ADL in elderly MCI patients. A total of 74.6% of the MCI patients reported difficulties in ADL. Of these problems, 41.2% involved self-care, 31.4% productivity and 27.4% leisure. This data further corroborates recent reports of possible functional impairment in complex ADL in MCI. PMID:27487375

  3. Assessment of passive knee stiffness and viscosity in individuals with spinal cord injury using pendulum test

    PubMed Central

    Joghtaei, Mahmoud; Arab, Amir Massoud; Hashemi-Nasl, Hamed; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Tokhi, Mohammad Osman

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stiffness and viscosity represent passive resistances to joint motion related with the structural properties of the joint tissue and of the musculotendinous complex. Both parameters can be affected in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to measure passive knee stiffness and viscosity in patients with SCI with paraplegia and healthy subjects using Wartenberg pendulum test. Design Non-experimental, cross-sectional, case–control design. Setting An outpatient physical therapy clinic, University of social welfare and Rehabilitation Science, Iran. Patients A sample of convenience sample of 30 subjects participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: individuals with paraplegic SCI (n = 15, age: 34.60 ± 9.18 years) and 15 able-bodied individuals as control group (n = 15, age: 30.66 ± 11.13 years). Interventions Not applicable. Main measures Passive pendulum test of Wartenberg was used to measure passive viscous-elastic parameters of the knee (stiffness, viscosity) in all subjects. Results Statistical analysis (independent t-test) revealed significant difference in the joint stiffness between healthy subjects and those with paraplegic SCI (P = 0.01). However, no significant difference was found in the viscosity between two groups (P = 0.17). Except for first peak flexion angle, all other displacement kinematic parameters exhibited no statistically significant difference between normal subjects and subjects with SCI. Conclusions Patients with SCI have significantly greater joint stiffness compared to able-bodied subjects. PMID:25437824

  4. Reliability of the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool in Individuals with Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Love, Michael O.; Joe, Galen; Davenport, Todd E.; Koziol, Deloris; Rose, Kristen Abbett; Shrader, Joseph A.; Vasconcelos, Olavo M.; McElroy, Beverly; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool (AMAT) is a 13-item performance-based battery developed to assess functional status and muscle endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of the AMAT in adults with myosits. Methods Nineteen raters (13 physical therapists and 6 physicians) scored videotaped recordings of patients with myositis performing the AMAT for a total of 114 tests and 1,482 item observations per session. Raters rescored the AMAT test and item observations during a follow up session (19 ±6 days between scoring sessions). All raters completed a single, self-directed, electronic training module prior to the initial scoring session. Results Intrarater and interrater reliability correlation coefficients were .94 or greater for the AMAT Functional Subscale, Endurance Subscale, and Total score (all p < 0.02 for Ho:ρ ≤ 0.75). All AMAT items had satisfactory intrarater agreement (Kappa statistics with Fleiss-Cohen weights, Kw = .57-1.00). Interrater agreement was acceptable for each AMAT item (K = .56-.89) except the sit up (K = .16). The standard error of measurement and 95% confidence interval range for the AMAT Total scores did not exceed 2 points across all observations (AMAT Total score range = 0-45). Conclusions The AMAT is a reliable, domain-specific assessment of functional status and muscle endurance for adult subjects with myositis. Results of this study suggest that physicians and physical therapists may reliably score the AMAT following a single training session. The AMAT Functional Subscale, Endurance Subscale, and Total score exhibit interrater and intrarater reliability suitable for clinical and research use. PMID:25201624

  5. Monitoring signals for vaccine safety: the assessment of individual adverse event reports by an expert advisory committee. Advisory Committee on Causality Assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Collet, J. P.; MacDonald, N.; Cashman, N.; Pless, R.

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring vaccine safety is a complex and shared responsibility. It can be carried out in many ways, one of which is the reporting of individual cases of adverse reactions thought to be due to vaccination. The task is difficult because ascribing causality to an individual case report is fraught with challenges. A standardized evaluation instrument--known as the causality assessment form--was therefore developed for use by an expert advisory committee to facilitate the process. By following the several sections in this form, the members of the committee are taken through a series of points to establish causality. These points include the basic criteria for causation such as biological plausibility, the time elapsed between the vaccine administration and the onset of the adverse event, and whether other factors (drugs, chemicals or underlying disease) could account for the adverse symptoms. The form concludes with a consensus assessment of causality, a commentary about the assessment, and advice for further study or follow-up. This method of assessing the more serious cases of adverse reaction reported to vaccination has proven useful in evaluating ongoing safety of vaccines in Canada. Through analyses such as this, new signals can be identified and investigated further. PMID:10743282

  6. STUDYING TRAVEL-RELATED INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENTS AND DESIRES BY COMBINING HIERARCHICALLY STRUCTURED ORDINAL VARIABLES

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tingting; Wittkowski, Knut M.

    2010-01-01

    Ordinal measures are frequently encountered in travel behavior research. This paper presents a new method for combining them when a hierarchical structure of the data can be presumed. This method is applied to study the subjective assessment of the amount of travel by different transportation modes among a group of French clerical workers, along with the desire to increase or decrease the use of such modes. Some advantages of this approach over traditional data reduction technique such as factor analysis when applied to ordinal data are then illustrated. In this study, combining evidence from several variables sheds light on the observed moderately negative relationship between the personal assessment of the amount of travel and the desire to increase or decrease it, thus integrating previous partial (univariate) results. We find a latent demand for travel, thus contributing to clarify the behavioral mechanisms behind the induced traffic phenomenon. Categorizing the above relationship by transportation mode shows a desire for a less environmental-friendly mix of modes (i.e. a greater desire to use heavy motorized modes and a lower desire to use two-wheeled modes), whenever the respondents do not feel to travel extensively. This result, combined with previous theoretical investigations concerning the determinants of the desire to alter trips consumption levels, shows the importance of making people aware of how much they travel. PMID:20953273

  7. Assessing the exposure risk and impacts of pharmaceuticals in the environment on individuals and ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kathryn E; Boxall, Alistair B A; Brown, A Ross; Cuthbert, Richard J; Gaw, Sally; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Jobling, Susan; Madden, Judith C; Metcalfe, Chris D; Naidoo, Vinny; Shore, Richard F; Smits, Judit E; Taggart, Mark A; Thompson, Helen M

    2013-08-23

    The use of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals is increasing. Over the past decade, there has been a proliferation of research into potential environmental impacts of pharmaceuticals in the environment. A Royal Society-supported seminar brought together experts from diverse scientific fields to discuss the risks posed by pharmaceuticals to wildlife. Recent analytical advances have revealed that pharmaceuticals are entering habitats via water, sewage, manure and animal carcases, and dispersing through food chains. Pharmaceuticals are designed to alter physiology at low doses and so can be particularly potent contaminants. The near extinction of Asian vultures following exposure to diclofenac is the key example where exposure to a pharmaceutical caused a population-level impact on non-target wildlife. However, more subtle changes to behaviour and physiology are rarely studied and poorly understood. Grand challenges for the future include developing more realistic exposure assessments for wildlife, assessing the impacts of mixtures of pharmaceuticals in combination with other environmental stressors and estimating the risks from pharmaceutical manufacturing and usage in developing countries. We concluded that an integration of diverse approaches is required to predict 'unexpected' risks; specifically, ecologically relevant, often long-term and non-lethal, consequences of pharmaceuticals in the environment for wildlife and ecosystems. PMID:23804293

  8. Microcirculation assessment using an individualized model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and conventional laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömberg, Tomas; Karlsson, Hanna; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Nyström, Fredrik H.; Larsson, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    Microvascular assessment would benefit from co-registration of blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation dynamics during stimulus response tests. We used a fiber-optic probe for simultaneous recording of white light diffuse reflectance (DRS; 475-850 nm) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF; 780 nm) spectra at two source-detector distances (0.4 and 1.2 mm). An inverse Monte Carlo algorithm, based on a multiparameter three-layer adaptive skin model, was used for analyzing DRS data. LDF spectra were conventionally processed for perfusion. The system was evaluated on volar forearm recordings of 33 healthy subjects during a 5-min systolic occlusion protocol. The calibration scheme and the optimal adaptive skin model fitted DRS spectra at both distances within 10%. During occlusion, perfusion decreased within 5 s while oxygenation decreased slowly (mean time constant 61 s dissociation of oxygen from hemoglobin). After occlusion release, perfusion and oxygenation increased within 3 s (inflow of oxygenized blood). The increased perfusion was due to increased blood tissue fraction and speed. The supranormal hemoglobin oxygenation indicates a blood flow in excess of metabolic demands. In conclusion, by integrating DRS and LDF in a fiber-optic probe, a powerful tool for assessment of blood flow and oxygenation in the same microvascular bed has been presented.

  9. Individual participation in intergroup contests is mediated by numerical assessment strategies in black howler and tufted capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Van Belle, Sarie; Scarry, Clara J

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetries in resource-holding potential between opposing groups frequently determine outcomes of intergroup contests. Since both numerical superiority and high intergroup dominance rank may confer competitive advantages, group members should benefit from assessing the relative strength of rivals prior to engaging in defensive displays. However, differences in individual assessment may emerge when cost-benefit trade-offs differ among group members. We examine the influence of numerical superiority and intergroup dominance relationships on individual participation in intergroup encounters in black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) and tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus nigritus). Black howlers responded with longer vocal displays during encounters with neighbours with an equal number of resident males, while tufted capuchins increased their participation with increasing relative male group size. Within each species, males and females responded similarly to varying numerical odds, suggesting that despite pay-off asymmetries between males and females, both sexes were similarly influenced by numerical asymmetries in deciding to participate in collective group defence. Whereas the outcome of contests among tufted capuchins was determined by relative male group size, reflected in a pronounced intergroup dominance hierarchy, the absence of dominance relationships among black howler groups may have provoked prolonged vocal displays in order to assess rival groups with matching competitive abilities.

  10. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that a small but significant number of participants in sleep deprivation studies or in simulated shift work experiments manifests an exaggerated performance decrement when they reach a critical point in the experiment, usually near the trough of the circadian cycle or the middle of the night. Those who show this exaggerated response do not appear to differ from other normal volunteers in any substantial way according to usual screening criteria or baseline values. The present study aims to examine factors that may provide the basis for this extreme response. We propose that a preexisting sleep deficit-as manifested by low values on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)-may account for extreme responders. Roth and colleagues (1993) have shown that among normal volunteers screened for a variety of studies, approximately 20 to 25 percent show low (< or = 6 minutes) MSLT scores on a consistent basis, whereas a like proportion shows consistently high MSLT scores (> or = 13 minutes). Additionally, studies by this group have indicated that subjects with low MSLT scores may suffer from chronic insufficient sleep (Roth et al., 1993), as further substantiated by the finding that they have consistently higher nocturnal sleep efficiency and that their MSLT scores rise to normal values when sleep is extended (Roehrs et al., 1996). We hypothesize that the short MSLT subjects have a significant long-term sleep deficit that leads to a marked intolerance for sleep deprivation or shift work. We further suggest that this sleep debt may signify an increased sleep need in these individuals that is not met either due to personal preference or to societal pressures (or both). If this speculation is accurate, then we predict that the tolerance for sleep deprivation in such individuals can be increased by "pretreatment" with sleep extension. Thus, the present study is designed to test the following two hypotheses: subjects with nominal sleep patterns who have

  11. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that a small but significant number of participants in sleep deprivation studies or in simulated shift work experiments manifests an exaggerated performance decrement when they reach a critical point in the experiment, usually near the trough of the circadian cycle or the middle of the night. Those who show this exaggerated response do not appear to differ from other non-nal volunteers in any substantial way according to usual screening criteria or baseline values. The present study aims to examine factors that may provide the basis for this extreme response. We propose that a preexisting sleep deficit-as manifested by low values on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)-may account for extreme responders. Roth and colleagues (1993) have shown that among normal volunteers screened for a variety of studies, approximately 20 to 25 percent show low (< 6 minutes) MSLT scores on a consistent basis, whereas a like proportion shows consistently high MSLT scores (> 13 minutes). Additionally, studies by this group have indicated that subjects with low MSLT scores may suffer from chronic insufficient sleep (Roth et al., 1993), as further substantiated by the finding that they have consistently higher nocturnal sleep efficiency and that their MSLT scores rise to normal values when sleep is extended (Roehrs et al., 1996). We hypothesize that the short MSLT subjects have a significant long-term sleep deficit that leads to a marked intolerance for sleep deprivation or shift work. We further suggest that this sleep debt may signify an increased sleep need in these individuals that is not met either due to personal preference or to societal pressures (or both). If this speculation is accurate, then we predict that the tolerance for sleep deprivation in such individuals can be increased by "pretreatment" with sleep extension. Thus, the present study is designed to test the following two hypotheses: subjects with nominal sleep patterns who have low MSLT

  12. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that a small but significant number of participants in sleep deprivation studies or in simulated shift work experiments manifests an exaggerated performance decrement when they reach a critical point in the experiment, usually near the trough of the circadian cycle or the middle of the night. Those who show this exaggerated response do not appear to differ from other non-nal volunteers in any substantial way according to usual screening criteria or baseline values. The present study aims to examine factors that may provide the basis for this extreme response. We propose that a preexisting sleep deficit-as manifested by low values on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT)-may account for extreme responders. It has been shown that among normal volunteers screened for a variety of studies, approximately 20 to 25 percent show low (< 6 minutes) MSLT scores on a consistent basis, whereas a like proportion shows consistently high MSLT scores (> 13 minutes). Additionally, studies by this group have indicated that subjects with low MSLT scores may suffer from chronic insufficient sleep, as further substantiated by the finding that they have consistently higher nocturnal sleep efficiency and that their MSLT scores rise to normal values when sleep is extended. We hypothesize that the short MSLT subjects have a significant long-term sleep deficit that leads to a marked intolerance for sleep deprivation or shift work. We further suggest that this sleep debt may signify an increased sleep need in these individuals that is not met either due to personal preference or to societal pressures (or both). If this speculation is accurate, then we predict that the tolerance for sleep deprivation in such individuals can be increased by "pretreatment" with sleep extension. Thus, the present study is designed to test the following two hypotheses: (1) subjects with nominal sleep patterns who have low MSLT scores (e.g., Sleepy subjects) will show an exaggerated

  13. Preliminary assessment of the radiological impact for individual waste management areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.

    1987-09-01

    This study estimates the radiological impact (i.e., the potential doses) for individual waste management areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ranks the areas for remedial action based on the off-site doses that result from these discharges to White Oak Creek. Dose estimates are given for the drinking water pathway based on known discharges from White Oak Dam. Estimates are also made of doses for eating fish caught in the Clinch River near the confluence with White Oak Creek. The results of a search for data concerning the discharges of /sup 90/Sr, /sup 3/H, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 60/Co from individual waste management areas are presented. A qualitative assessment is presented, and areas are ranked for remedial investigation based on the available information. 29 refs., 8 figs., 45 tabs.

  14. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening.

  15. Assessing individual risk for high-risk colorectal adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2015-10-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective US studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs. 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio [OR] = 9.41), and 6.6% vs. 2.1% for women (OR = 3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the US population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  16. Assessing Individual Risk for High-Risk Colorectal Adenoma at First-Time Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Rosner, Bernard A.; Ma, Jing; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk of colorectal adenoma at first-time colonoscopy that are of higher likelihood of developing advanced neoplasia during surveillance could help tailor first-line colorectal cancer screening. We developed prediction models for high-risk colorectal adenoma (at least one adenoma ≥1 cm, or with advanced histology, or ≥3 adenomas) among 4,881 asymptomatic white men and 17,970 women who underwent colonoscopy as their first-time screening for colorectal cancer in two prospective U.S. studies using logistic regressions. C-statistics and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests were used to evaluate discrimination and calibration. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for internal validation. A total of 330 (6.7%) men and 678 (3.8%) women were diagnosed with high-risk adenoma at first-time screening colonoscopy. The model for men included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, sitting watching TV/VCR, regular aspirin/NSAID use, physical activity, and a joint term of multivitamin and alcohol. For women, the model included age, family history of colorectal cancer, BMI, smoking, alcohol, beef/pork/lamb as main dish, regular aspirin/NSAID, calcium, and oral contraceptive use. The C-statistic of the model for men was 0.67 and 0.60 for women (0.64 and 0.57 in cross-validation). Both models calibrated well. The predicted risk of high-risk adenoma for men in the top decile was 15.4% vs 1.8% for men in the bottom decile (Odds Ratio[OR]=9.41), and 6.6% vs 2.1% for women (OR=3.48). In summary, we developed and internally validated an absolute risk assessment tool for high-risk colorectal adenoma among the U.S. population that may provide guidance for first-time colorectal cancer screening. PMID:25820865

  17. A simplified approach to assessing penile endothelial function in young individuals at risk of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Lee, Chun-Ho; Chen, Chin-Jung; Tsai, I-Ting; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) reflects a risk for systemic cardiovascular diseases by virtue of a common etiology of vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is increasingly reported to affect young adults. On the basis of physiological phenomenon of reactive hyperemia (RH), systemic and penile endothelial functions in healthy young adults were compared with the use of digital data on arterial waveforms before and after RH induction. Between July 2009 and March 2011, 32 young adult volunteers with normal erectile functions were recruited. Questionnaires on medical histories and sexual functions and blood samples for testosterone and biochemical analyses were obtained. Dilatation index (DI) and penile arterial waveform amplitude (PAWA) ratios for assessing systemic and penile endothelial function were acquired with an air pressure sensing system on the arm and a penile arterial waveform analyzing system on the penis, respectively. A total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (TC/HDL) ratio greater than 4.1 was used to define high risk for ED. Remarkable positive correlation was noted between DI and PAWA ratio (r = .640, P < .001). DI showed significant positive associations with serum testosterone (P = .012) and serum HDL level, whereas it showed negative correlations with total triglyceride and glycosylated hemoglobulin levels, body weight, waist circumference, body mass index, and diastolic blood pressure. Similarly, the PAWA ratio showed significant positive correlations with serum testosterone (P < .001) and HDL levels, but negative associations with body weight, waist circumference, and body mass index. Both DI and PAWA ratio successfully identified participants at high risk for ED (eg, TC/HDL ratio > 4.1; P < .05). Our results demonstrated that penile endothelial function can be assessed by evaluating systemic endothelial function in young healthy adults for early identification of risk for ED.

  18. Assessment of Inter-Individual, Geographic, and Seasonal Variability in Estimated Human Exposure to Fine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wan; Frey, H. Christopher; Cao, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Health effects associated with ambient fine particle (PM2.5) exposure are typically estimated based on concentration-response (C-R) functions using area-wide concentration as an exposure surrogate. Persons 65 and older are particularly susceptible to adverse effects from PM2.5 exposure. Using a stochastic microenvironmental simulation model, distributions of daily PM2.5 exposures were estimated based on ambient concentration, air exchange rate, penetration factor, deposition rate, indoor emission sources, census data, and activity diary data, and compared for selected regions and seasons. Even though the selected subpopulation spends an average of over 20 hours per day indoors, the ratio of daily average estimated exposure to ambient concentration (Ea/C) is approximately 0.5. The daily average Ea/C ratio varies by a factor of 4 to 5 over a 95% frequency range among individuals, primarily from variability in air exchange rates. The mean Ea/C varies by 6 to 36% among selected NC, TX and NYC domains, and 15 to 34% among four seasons, as a result of regional differences in housing stock and seasonal differences in air exchange rates. Variability in Ea/C is a key factor that may help explain heterogeneity in C-R functions across cities and seasons. Priorities for improving exposure estimates are discussed. PMID:23095102

  19. DNA damage repair and genetic polymorphisms: Assessment of individual sensitivity and repair capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornetta, Tommaso; Festa, Fabiola; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata Prof. . E-mail: cozzi@uniroma3.it

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To study the repair capacity after X-ray irradiation in human peripheral blood cells of healthy subjects, in relation to their genotypes. Methods and Materials: The peripheral blood of 50 healthy subjects was irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X rays and the induced DNA damage was measured by Comet assay immediately after irradiation. DNA repair was detected by analyzing the cells at defined time intervals after the exposure. Furthermore, all subjects were genotyped for XRCC1, OGG1, and XPC genes. Results: After X-ray irradiation, persons bearing XRCC1 homozygous variant (codon 399) genotype exhibited significantly lower Tail DNA values than those bearing wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. These results are also confirmed at 30 and 60 min after irradiation. Furthermore, XPC heterozygous subjects (variant codon 939) showed lower residual DNA damage 60 min after irradiation compared with wild-type and homozygous genotypes. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could influence individual DNA repair capacity.

  20. Individual Muscle use in Hamstring Exercises by Soccer Players Assessed using Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, R; Tesch, P A; Linnehan, R M; Kreider, R B; Di Salvo, V; Suarez-Arrones, L; Alomar, X; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Rodas, G

    2016-06-01

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare individual muscle use in exercises aimed at preventing hamstring injuries. Thirty-six professional soccer players were randomized into 4 groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg curl, Russian belt or conic-pulley exercise. MRIs were performed before and immediately after a bout of 4 sets of 8 repetitions. Pre-post exercise differences in contrast shift (T2) were analyzed for the long (BFLh) and short head (BFSh) of biceps femoris, semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM) and gracilis (GR) muscles. Flywheel leg curl increased (P<0.001) T2 of GR (95%), ST (65%), BFSh (51%) and BFLh (14%). After the Nordic hamstring, GR (39%), ST (16%) and BFSh (14%) showed increased T2 (P<0.001). Russian belt and conic-pulley exercise produced subtle (P<0.02) T2 increases of ST (9 and 6%, respectively) and BFLh (7 and 6%, respectively). Russian belt increased T2 of SM (7%). Among exercises examined, flywheel leg curl showed the most substantial hamstring and GR muscle use. However, no single exercise executed was able to increase T2 of all hamstring and synergist muscles analyzed. It is therefore suggested that multiple exercises must be carried out to bring in, and fully activate all knee flexors and hip extensors. PMID:27116347

  1. Assessing individual bioequivalence with high-order cross-over designs: a unified procedure.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Francis C; Reeve, Russell

    2003-09-30

    The U.S. FDA's newly issued guidance on bioequivalence recommends the use of individual bioequivalence (IBE) for highly variable drugs and possibly for modified release dosage forms. The recommended approach to the analysis is to follow the methodology of Hyslop, Hsuan and Holder (HHH), based on a linear mixed model. A limitation of the HHH method is that it works only for uniform designs, such as RTRT/TRTR. In this paper, we present an alternative approach based on a multivariate model. The multivariate model is shown to be a strict superset of the linear mixed model and can successfully model data where the mixed model fails. Our multivariate approach coincides with the HHH method where the HHH method applies, but generalizes to any high-order cross-over design, such as the Balaam design, RTR/TRT, and TRSS/RSTT/STRR. We present numerical examples to demonstrate the proposed method, and examine its properties with a simulation study. PMID:12953284

  2. Assessment of strategic processing during narrative comprehension in individuals with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Creamer, Scott

    2010-07-01

    A think-aloud protocol was used to examine the strategies used by individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) during text comprehension. Twenty-three participants with MCI and 23 cognitively healthy older adults (OA) read narratives, pausing to verbalize their thoughts after each sentence. The verbal protocol analysis developed by Trabasso and Magliano (1996) was then used to code participants' utterances into inferential and non-inferential statements; inferential statements were further coded to identify the memory operation used in their generation. Compared with OA controls, the MCI participants showed poorer story comprehension and produced fewer inferences. The MCI participants were also less skilled at providing explanations of story events and in using prior text information to support inference generation. Poorer text comprehension was associated with poorer verbal memory abilities and poorer use of prior text events when producing inferential statements. The results suggest that the memory difficulties of the MCI group may be an important cognitive factor interfering with their ability to integrate narrative events through the use of inferences and to form a global coherence to support text comprehension.

  3. Individualized cosinor assessment of circadian hormonal variation in third trimester human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Meis, P J; Buster, J E; Kundu, N; Magyar, D; Marshall, J R; Halberg, F

    1983-01-01

    Two clinically healthy pregnant women were studied in a single 24-h span during the third trimester. Blood drawn every 20 min was assayed for cortisol (F), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), estriol (E3), and prolactin (PRL). Blood drawn hourly was assayed for progesterone (P), human placental lactogen (HPL) and 15alpha-hydroxyestriol (E4). Breast temperature (BT) was continuously monitored. Single cosinor analysis demonstrated statistically significant circadian rhythms for plasma concentrations of F, DHEA-S, and BT for both subjects, and of E3 for one subject. Statistically significant circadian rhythms in plasma concentrations of P, HPL, E4 or PRL could not be demonstrated in our third trimester subjects. However, analysis of data from subjects sampled at earlier gestational ages revealed highly significant PRL circadian rhythms. These results suggest that plasma concentrations of PRL show a progressive decrease in circadian amplitude despite a progressive increase in mesor with advancing gestational age. Frequent sampling and cosinor data analysis permit identification of circadian rhythms in BT. The use of BT as a potential marker for rhythms in plasma concentration of certain hormones awaits further scrutiny. The demonstration of several circadian endocrine rhythms in individual subjects in the third trimester of human pregnancy facilitates the usefulness of such marker rhythms. PMID:6221911

  4. Risk assessment tools for identifying individuals at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Buijsse, Brian; Simmons, Rebecca K; Griffin, Simon J; Schulze, Matthias B

    2011-01-01

    Trials have demonstrated the preventability of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications or drugs in people with impaired glucose tolerance. However, alternative ways of identifying people at risk of developing diabetes are required. Multivariate risk scores have been developed for this purpose. This article examines the evidence for performance of diabetes risk scores in adults by 1) systematically reviewing the literature on available scores and 2) their validation in external populations; and 3) exploring methodological issues surrounding the development, validation, and comparison of risk scores. Risk scores show overall good discriminatory ability in populations for whom they were developed. However, discriminatory performance is more heterogeneous and generally weaker in external populations, which suggests that risk scores may need to be validated within the population in which they are intended to be used. Whether risk scores enable accurate estimation of absolute risk remains unknown; thus, care is needed when using scores to communicate absolute diabetes risk to individuals. Several risk scores predict diabetes risk based on routine noninvasive measures or on data from questionnaires. Biochemical measures, in particular fasting plasma glucose, can improve prediction of such models. On the other hand, usefulness of genetic profiling currently appears limited.

  5. Development and validation of an instrument to assess treatment adherence for each individual drug taken by a patient

    PubMed Central

    Sidorkiewicz, Stéphanie; Tran, Viet-Thi; Cousyn, Cécile; Perrodeau, Elodie; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate an instrument to assess adherence to each individual drug taken by patients undergoing long-term treatment. Design Multicentre prospective observational validation study. Setting Six general practitioners' clinics and 6 university hospitals in Paris, France. Participants Patients 18 years and older receiving at least one long-term treatment. Methods The instrument was developed from a literature search and interviews with experts. Clarity and wording were assessed during pilot testing with 51 patients. The tool was validated in a sample of consecutive patients. We assessed agreement between adherence measured with our tool and drug diaries and compared measurements from our instrument with (1) the Lu instrument; (2) the Adherence Estimator (AE); (3) patient's adherence assessed by physicians; (4) the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items (MMAS-4); and (5) the Treatment Burden Questionnaire (TBQ). Reliability was assessed by a test–retest method. Results A total of 243 patients taking 961 drugs were recruited in 2014. We found good agreement between adherence measured by our tool and drug diaries (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.69, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.91) and a linear relationship between measurement with our tool and (1) the Lu instrument (p<0.01); (2) 2 items of the AE (perceived need for medication (p<0.01) and concerns about medication (p<0.01)); (3) patients' adherence assessed by their physicians (p<0.01); (4) the MMAS-4 (p<0.01) and (5) the TBQ (p<0.01). Reliability of the retest was good (ICC 0.67, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.85). Conclusions We developed an instrument with acceptable validity and reliability to assess adherence for each drug taken by patients, usable in hospital and primary care settings. PMID:27165645

  6. Economic modelling assessment of the HPV quadrivalent vaccine in Brazil: a dynamic individual-based approach.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Tazio; Luz, Paula Mendes; Foss, Anna; Mesa-Frias, Marco; Legood, Rosa

    2012-07-01

    We examined the cost-effectiveness of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine for the pre-adolescent female population of Brazil. Using demographic, epidemiological and cancer data, we developed a dynamic individual-based model representing the natural history of HPV/cervical cancer as well as the impact of screening and vaccination programmes. Assuming the current screening strategies, we calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for cohorts with and without vaccination taking into account different combinations of vaccination coverage (50%, 70%, 90%) and cost per vaccinated woman (US$25, US$55, US$125, US$556). The results varied from cost-saving (coverage 50% or 70% and cost per vaccinated woman US$25) to 5950 US$/QALY (coverage 90% and cost per vaccinated 556 US$). In a scenario in which a booster shot was needed after 10 years in order to secure lifelong protection, the ICER resulted in 13,576 US$/QALY. Considering the very cost-effective and cost-effective thresholds based on Brazil's GDP per capita, apart from the booster scenario which would be deemed cost-effective, all the other scenarios would be deemed very cost-effective. Both the cost per dose of vaccine and discount rate (5%) had an important impact on the results. Vaccination in addition to the current screening programme is likely to save years of life and, depending on the cost of vaccination, may even save resources. Price negotiations between governments and manufacturers will be paramount in determining that the vaccine not only represents good value for money, but is also affordable in middle-income countries like Brazil.

  7. Inflammageing assessed by MMP9 in normal Japanese individuals and the patients with Werner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Makoto; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Age-associated minor inflammation: inflammageing may explain human ageing mechanism(s). Our previous study reported a significant increase in the serum level of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with normal ageing and the patients with Werner syndrome (WS). To further study the minor inflammatory condition associated with ageing, another possible ageing biomarker: matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) was examined in the sera from 217 normal Japanese individuals aged between 1 and 100 years and 41 mutation-proven Japanese WS aged between 32 and 70 years. MMP9 was assayed by ELISA. The serum level of MMP9 was elevated significantly (p < 0.001) with normal ageing from both sexes as hsCRP. In contrast to normal ageing, the serum MMP9 level in WS decreased significantly with calendar age (p < 0.05). The MMP9 level (ng/mL) in WS (147.2 ± 28.5) was not significantly different in comparison with those from age-matched normal adult population aged between 25 and 70 years (109.1 ± 9.4), nor normal elderly population aged between 71 and 100 years (179.9 ± 16.1). Although both normal ageing and WS were associated with minor inflammation, the inflammatory parameters such as serum MMP9 and hsCRP changed differently between normal ageing and WS. The WS-specific chronic inflammation including skin ulcer and diabetes mellitus may contribute the different behavior of both ageing biomarkers from normal ageing. PMID:27195193

  8. LiDAR Individual Tree Detection for Assessing Structurally Diverse Forest Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, Sean

    Contemporary forest management on public land incorporates a focus on restoration and maintenance of ecological functions through silvicultural manipulation of forest structure on a landscape scale. Incorporating reference conditions into restoration treatment planning and monitoring can improve treatment efficacy, but the typical ground-based methods of quantifying reference condition data---and comparing it to pre- and post-treatment stands---are expensive, time-consuming, and limited in scale. Airborne LiDAR may be part of the solution to this problem, since LiDAR acquisitions have both broad coverage and high resolution. I evaluated the ability of LiDAR Individual Tree Detection (ITD) to describe forest structure across a structurally variable landscape in support of large-scale forest restoration. I installed nineteen 0.25 ha stem map plots across a range of structural conditions in potential reference areas (Yosemite National Park) and potential restoration treatment areas (Sierra National Forest) in the Sierra Nevada of California. I used the plots to evaluate a common ITD algorithm, the watershed transform, compare it to past uses of ITD, and determine which aspects of forest structure contributed to errors in ITD. I found that ITD across this structurally diverse landscape was generally less accurate than across the smaller and less diverse areas over which it has previously been studied. However, the pattern of tree recognition is consistent: regardless of forest structure, canopy dominants are almost always detected and relatively shorter trees are almost never detected. Correspondingly, metrics dominated by large trees, such as biomass, basal area, and spatial heterogeneity, can be measured using ITD, while metrics dominated by smaller trees, such as stand density, cannot. Bearing these limitations in mind, ITD can be a powerful tool for describing forest structure across heterogeneous landscape restoration project areas.

  9. Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia in Obese Individuals Undergoing Physical Stress Echocardiography (PSE)

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Mara Graziele Maciel; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral; Santos, Marcos Antônio Almeida; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Melo, Luiza Dantas; de Andrade, Loren Suyane Oliveira; Santos, Emmanuel Lima Almeida; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical stress echocardiography is an established methodology for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease in patients with physical capacity. In obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2) the usefulness of pharmacological stress echocardiography has been demonstrated; however, has not been reported the use of physical stress echocardiography in this growing population group. Objective To assess the frequency of myocardial ischemia in obese and non-obese patients undergoing physical stress echocardiography and compare their clinical and echocardiographic differences. Methods 4,050 patients who underwent treadmill physical stress echocardiography were studied according to the Bruce protocol, divided into two groups: obese (n = 945; 23.3%) and non-obese (n = 3,105; 76.6%). Results There was no difference regarding gender. Obese patients were younger (55.4 ± 10.9 vs. 57.56 ± 11.67) and had a higher frequency of hypertension (75.2% vs. 57, 2%; p < 0.0001), diabetis mellitus (15.2% vs. 10.9%; p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (59.5% vs 51.9%; p < 0.0001), family history of coronary artery disease (59.3% vs. 55.1%; p = 0.023) and physical inactivity (71.4% vs. 52.9%, p < 0.0001). The obese had greater aortic dimensions (3.27 vs. 3.14 cm; p < 0.0001), left atrium (3.97 vs. 3.72 cm; p < 0.0001) and the relative thickness of the ventricule (33.7 vs. 32.8 cm; p < 0.0001). Regarding the presence of myocardial ischemia, there was no difference between groups (19% vs. 17.9%; p = 0.41). In adjusted logistic regression, the presence of myocardial ischemia remained independently associated with age, female gender, diabetes and hypertension. Conclusion Obesity did not behave as a predictor of the presence of ischemia and the physical stress echocardiography. The application of this assessment tool in large scale sample demonstrates the feasibility of the methodology, also in obese. PMID:25714197

  10. Early Memories of Individuals on the Autism Spectrum Assessed Using Online Self-Reports

    PubMed Central

    Zamoscik, Vera; Mier, Daniela; Schmidt, Stephanie N. L.; Kirsch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    “When I was one and a half years old, I was on a ferry lying on red seats” – while several autobiographical accounts by people with autism reveal vivid memories of early childhood, the vast amount of experimental investigations found deficits in personal autobiographic memory in autism. To assess this contradiction empirically, we implemented an online questionnaire on early childhood events to compare people on the autism spectrum (AS) and non-autistic people with respect to their earliest autobiographical episodic memories and the earliest semantic know event as told by another person. Results indicate that people on the AS do not differ from non-autistic people in the age of their earliest know events but remember events from an earlier age in childhood and with more sensory details, contradicting the assumption of an overall deficit in personal episodic memory in autism. Furthermore, our results emphasize the supporting influence of language for memory formation and give evidence for an important role of sensory features in memories of people on the AS. PMID:27199786

  11. Demographic profile and nutrient intake assessment of individuals using emergency food programs.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, N M; Read, M H

    1989-09-01

    A dietary assessment of food pantry and soup kitchen users was conducted. A demographic and socioeconomic profile of participants was developed. One hundred ninety-one persons completed 30- to 40-minute interviews while in line to receive food assistance. Dietary status was determined from 24-hour recall data. Intakes of calcium, iron, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, protein, vitamin A, and vitamin C were compared with the 1980 RDAs for age and sex. A dietary adequacy score was developed to evaluate nutrient quality by calculation of a nutrient density ratio (total intake for a nutrient divided by the RDA). A value of one was considered the norm. A score of 0.67 or less was considered an inadequate nutrient intake. Sixty-eight percent of the sample demonstrated some degree of inadequate nutrient intake. Nutrients that tended to be the lowest were calcium (76% inadequate), vitamin C (74% inadequate), and thiamin (74% inadequate). Inadequate nutrient intake was significantly associated with a lack of cooking facilities, lower monthly incomes, and lesser amounts of money spent on food. Comparison of food pantry users with soup kitchen participants indicated calcium was a problem nutrient for both groups.

  12. Assessing pathogenicity for novel mutation/sequence variants: the value of healthy older individuals.

    PubMed

    Zatz, Mayana; Pavanello, Rita de Cassia M; Lourenço, Naila Cristina V; Cerqueira, Antonia; Lazar, Monize; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-12-01

    Improvement in DNA technology is increasingly revealing unexpected/unknown mutations in healthy persons and generating anxiety due to their still unknown health consequences. We report a 44-year-old healthy father of a 10-year-old daughter with bilateral coloboma and hearing loss, but without muscle weakness, in whom a whole-genome CGH revealed a deletion of exons 38-44 in the dystrophin gene. This mutation was inherited from her asymptomatic father, who was further clinically and molecularly evaluated for prognosis and genetic counseling (GC). This deletion was never identified by us in 982 Duchenne/Becker patients. To assess whether the present case represents a rare case of non-penetrance, and aiming to obtain more information for prognosis and GC, we suggested that healthy older relatives submit their DNA for analysis, to which several complied. Mutation analysis revealed that his mother, brother, and 56-year-old maternal uncle also carry the 38-44 deletion, suggesting it an unlikely cause of muscle weakness. Genome sequencing will disclose mutations and variants whose health impact are still unknown, raising important problems in interpreting results, defining prognosis, and discussing GC. We suggest that, in addition to family history, keeping the DNA of older relatives could be very informative, in particular for those interested in having their genome sequenced.

  13. The ABC’s of Suicide Risk Assessment: Applying a Tripartite Approach to Individual Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Keith M.; Syu, Jia-Jia; Lello, Owen D.; Chew, Y. L. Eileen; Willcox, Christopher H.; Ho, Roger H. M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable need for accurate suicide risk assessment for clinical, screening, and research purposes. This study applied the tripartite affect-behavior-cognition theory, the suicidal barometer model, classical test theory, and item response theory (IRT), to develop a brief self-report measure of suicide risk that is theoretically-grounded, reliable and valid. An initial survey (n = 359) employed an iterative process to an item pool, resulting in the six-item Suicidal Affect-Behavior-Cognition Scale (SABCS). Three additional studies tested the SABCS and a highly endorsed comparison measure. Studies included two online surveys (Ns = 1007, and 713), and one prospective clinical survey (n = 72; Time 2, n = 54). Factor analyses demonstrated SABCS construct validity through unidimensionality. Internal reliability was high (α = .86-.93, split-half = .90-.94)). The scale was predictive of future suicidal behaviors and suicidality (r = .68, .73, respectively), showed convergent validity, and the SABCS-4 demonstrated clinically relevant sensitivity to change. IRT analyses revealed the SABCS captured more information than the comparison measure, and better defined participants at low, moderate, and high risk. The SABCS is the first suicide risk measure to demonstrate no differential item functioning by sex, age, or ethnicity. In all comparisons, the SABCS showed incremental improvements over a highly endorsed scale through stronger predictive ability, reliability, and other properties. The SABCS is in the public domain, with this publication, and is suitable for clinical evaluations, public screening, and research. PMID:26030590

  14. Content validation of a clinical assessment instrument for stair ascent and descent in individuals with hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Natalio, Mavie A.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Michaelsen, Stella M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Among the current instruments used to assess stair ambulation, none were observed that specifically evaluated the quality of movement or biomechanical strategies adopted by stroke patients. Objective: To evaluate the content validity of a clinical instrument designed to identify the qualitative and kinematic characteristics and strategies adopted by stroke patients during stair ascent and descent. Method: The first developed version, which comprised 80 items, had its content evaluated by an expert panel, which was composed of 9 well-known national and international professionals who are involved in stroke rehabilitation. The content validity index (CVI) and modified Kappa coefficients were employed for the statistical analyses. The items that demonstrated a CVI≥0.80 and Kappa≥0.75 were considered valid. Results: The content validation was performed in three stages. The final version of the instrument consisted of 38 items, which were divided into descriptive (8 items), a General Characteristics Domain (16 items) and adopted strategies (14 items) during stair ascent and descent. The total scores ranged from zero to 70 and zero to 74 for ascent and descent, respectively. Lower scores corresponded with better performance. Conclusion: Despite the satisfactory results obtained during the process of content validation, other psychometric properties of the instrument are necessary and must be evaluated. PMID:25054384

  15. The Two-Stage Examination: A Method to Assess Individual Competence and Collaborative Problem Solving in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Morton, David A.; Pippitt, Karly; Lamb, Sara; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Effectively solving problems as a team under stressful conditions is central to medical practice; however, because summative examinations in medical education must test individual competence, they are typically solitary assessments. Approach Using two-stage examinations, in which students first answer questions individually (Stage 1) and then discuss them in teams prior to resubmitting their answers (Stage 2), is one method for rectifying this discordance. On the basis of principles of social constructivism, the authors hypothesized that two-stage examinations would lead to better retention of, specifically, items answered incorrectly at Stage 1. In fall 2014, they divided 104 first-year medical students into two groups of 52 students. Groups alternated each week between taking one- and two-stage examinations such that each student completed 6 one-stage and 6 two-stage examinations. The authors reassessed 61 concepts on a final examination and, using the Wilcoxon signed ranked tests, compared performance for all concepts and for just those students initially missed, between Stages 1 and 2. Outcomes Final examination performance on all previously assessed concepts was not significantly different between the one-and two-stage conditions (P = .77); however, performance on only concepts that students initially answered incorrectly on a prior examination improved by 12% for the two-stage condition relative to the one-stage condition (P = .02, r = 0.17). Next Steps Team assessment may be most useful for assessing concepts students find difficult, as opposed to all content. More research is needed to determine whether these results apply to all medical school topics and student cohorts. PMID:27049544

  16. Individual fertility assessment and pro-fertility counselling; should this be offered to women and men of reproductive age?

    PubMed

    Hvidman, Helene W; Petersen, Kathrine Birch; Larsen, Elisabeth C; Macklon, Kirsten Tryde; Pinborg, Anja; Nyboe Andersen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    During the 1970s new contraceptive options developed and legal abortions became accessible. Family planning clinics targeting young women and men provided advice and assistance on contraception. Today, delayed childbearing, low total fertility rates and increasing use of social oocyte freezing create a need for pro-fertility initiatives. Three years ago we established a new separate unit: The Fertility Assessment and Counselling (FAC) clinic. The FAC clinic offers free individual counselling based on a clinical assessment including measurement of serum anti-Müllerian hormone and ovarian and pelvic sonography in women, sperm analysis in men, and a review of reproductive risk factors in both sexes. The FAC clinic includes a research programme with the goal to improve prediction and protection of fertility. Our first proposition is that clinics for individual assessment and counselling need to be established, as there is a strong unmet demand among women and men to obtain: (i) knowledge of fertility status, (ii) knowledge of reproductive lifespan (women) and (iii) pro-fertility advice. Addressing these issues is often more challenging than treating infertile patients. Therefore, we propose that fertility assessment and counselling should be developed by specialists in reproductive medicine. There are two main areas of concern: As our current knowledge on reproductive risk factors is primarily based on data from infertile patients, the first concern is how precisely we are able to forecast future reproductive problems. Predictive parameters from infertile couples, such as duration of infertility, are not applicable, diagnostic factors like tubal patency are unavailable and other parameters may be unsuitable when applied to the general population. Therefore, strict validation of reproductive forecasting in women and men from the general population is crucial. The second main concern is that we may turn clients into patients. Screening including reproductive forecasting

  17. Assessment of anti-slip devices from healthy individuals in different ages walking on slippery surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gard, Gunvor; Berggård, Glenn

    2006-03-01

    The interest for effective preventive strategies for slips and falls is growing. Much remains to be done, however, to prevent slips and falls in the traffic environment. Using an appropriate anti-slip device may reduce the risk of slips and falls on different surfaces outdoors during winter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the best anti-slip devices of different designs in the Swedish market on a larger group of healthy individuals in different ages on five different slippery surfaces as a way to develop a standard method to test anti-slip devices. Three different designs of anti-slip devices: heel device, foot-blade device and whole-foot device were evaluated on ice surfaces uncovered or covered with gravel, sand, salt or snow. The evaluations were done according to subject's perceived walking safety and balance, videorecordings of walking postures and movements, time to take on and off each anti-slip device, advantages/disadvantages with each anti-slip device and a list of priorities for own use according to three criteria: safety, balance and appearance. The heel device was perceived to be the most safe on all five surfaces, followed by the toe device and the whole-foot device. The heel device was also perceived to be the one with the best walking balance on uncovered ice and on snow covered ice. There were some significant differences due to gender and age. Most subjects walked with a normal muscle function in the hip and knee when walking with or without an anti-slip device on all surfaces. The heel device was perceived as the most rapid one to take on and the toe device as the most rapid one to take off. All three devices were perceived as having a good foothold. The heel device was perceived to fit the shoe and to be stable at heel-strike. The toe device was easily portable and stable on uncovered ice. The whole-foot device was comfortable to walk with and safe on snow covered ice. The heel device had the highest priority according to walking safety

  18. Aquatic toxicity and ecological risk assessment of seven parabens: Individual and additive approach.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tamura, Ikumi; Hirata, Yoshiko; Kato, Jun; Kagota, Keiichiro; Katsuki, Shota; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kagami, Yoshihiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, aquatic concentrations of seven parabens were determined in urban streams highly affected by treated or untreated domestic sewage in Tokushima and Osaka, Japan. The detected highest concentrations were 670, 207, and 163ngl(-1) for methylparaben, n-propylparaben, and n-butylparaben, respectively in sampling sites with watershed area of no sewer system in Tokushima. Conventional acute/chronic toxicity tests were conducted using medaka (Oryzias latipes), Daphnia magna, and Psuedokirchneriella subcapitata for four parabens, which was consistent with our previous study on three parabens, n-butylparaben, i-butylparaben, and benzylparaben. The aquatic toxicity on fish, daphnia, and algae was weaker for the parabens with a shorter alkyl chain than those with a longer alkyl chain as predicted by their hydrophobicity. Medaka vitellogenin assays and DNA microarray analysis were carried out for methylparaben and found induction of significant vitellogenin in male medaka at 630μgl(-1) of methylparaben, while the expression levels of genes encoding proteins such as choriogenin and vitellogenin increased for concentrations at 10μgl(-1) of methylparaben. Measured environmental concentrations (MECs) of seven parabens in Tokushima and Osaka were divided by predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs) and hazard quotient (MEC/PNEC) was determined for individual parabens. The MEC/PNEC was highest for n-propylparaben and was 0.010 followed by n-butylparaben (max. of 0.0086) and methylparaben (max. of 0.0042). The sum of the MEC/PNEC for the seven parabens was 0.0049. Equivalence factors were assigned for each paraben on the basis of the toxicity of n-butylparaben for each species, and n-butylparaben equivalence was calculated for the measured environmental concentrations. The MEC/PNEC approach was also conducted for the n-butylparaben-based equivalence values. The maximum MEC/PNEC was 0.018, which is lower than the trigger level for further detailed study such as

  19. Aquatic toxicity and ecological risk assessment of seven parabens: Individual and additive approach.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tamura, Ikumi; Hirata, Yoshiko; Kato, Jun; Kagota, Keiichiro; Katsuki, Shota; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kagami, Yoshihiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, aquatic concentrations of seven parabens were determined in urban streams highly affected by treated or untreated domestic sewage in Tokushima and Osaka, Japan. The detected highest concentrations were 670, 207, and 163ngl(-1) for methylparaben, n-propylparaben, and n-butylparaben, respectively in sampling sites with watershed area of no sewer system in Tokushima. Conventional acute/chronic toxicity tests were conducted using medaka (Oryzias latipes), Daphnia magna, and Psuedokirchneriella subcapitata for four parabens, which was consistent with our previous study on three parabens, n-butylparaben, i-butylparaben, and benzylparaben. The aquatic toxicity on fish, daphnia, and algae was weaker for the parabens with a shorter alkyl chain than those with a longer alkyl chain as predicted by their hydrophobicity. Medaka vitellogenin assays and DNA microarray analysis were carried out for methylparaben and found induction of significant vitellogenin in male medaka at 630μgl(-1) of methylparaben, while the expression levels of genes encoding proteins such as choriogenin and vitellogenin increased for concentrations at 10μgl(-1) of methylparaben. Measured environmental concentrations (MECs) of seven parabens in Tokushima and Osaka were divided by predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs) and hazard quotient (MEC/PNEC) was determined for individual parabens. The MEC/PNEC was highest for n-propylparaben and was 0.010 followed by n-butylparaben (max. of 0.0086) and methylparaben (max. of 0.0042). The sum of the MEC/PNEC for the seven parabens was 0.0049. Equivalence factors were assigned for each paraben on the basis of the toxicity of n-butylparaben for each species, and n-butylparaben equivalence was calculated for the measured environmental concentrations. The MEC/PNEC approach was also conducted for the n-butylparaben-based equivalence values. The maximum MEC/PNEC was 0.018, which is lower than the trigger level for further detailed study such as

  20. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  1. The utility of harvest recoveries of marked individuals to assess polar bear (Ursus maritimus) survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Laake, Jeff; Laidre, Kristin L.; Born, Erik W.; Atkinson, Stephen N.

    2012-01-01

    Management of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations requires the periodic assessment of life history metrics such as survival rate. This information is frequently obtained during short-term capture and marking efforts (e.g., over the course of three years) that result in hundreds of marked bears remaining in the population after active marking is finished. Using 10 additional years of harvest recovery subsequent to a period of active marking, we provide updated estimates of annual survival for polar bears in the Baffin Bay population of Greenland and Canada. Our analysis suggests a decline in survival of polar bears since the period of active marking that ended in 1997; some of the decline in survival can likely be attributed to a decline in springtime ice concentration over the continental shelf of Baffin Island. The variance around the survival estimates is comparatively high because of the declining number of marks available; therefore, results must be interpreted with caution. The variance of the estimates of survival increased most substantially in the sixth year post-marking. When survival estimates calculated with recovery-only and recapture-recovery data sets from the period of active marking were compared, survival rates were indistinguishable. However, for the period when fewer marks were available, survival estimates were lower using the recovery-only data set, which indicates that part of the decline we detected for 2003 – 09 may be due to using only harvest recovery data. Nevertheless, the decline in the estimates of survival is consistent with population projections derived from harvest numbers and earlier vital rates, as well as with an observed decline in the extent of sea ice habitat.

  2. An example of population-level risk assessments for small mammals using individual-based population models.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Walter; Auteri, Domenica; Bastiansen, Finn; Ebeling, Markus; Liu, Chun; Luttik, Robert; Mastitsky, Sergey; Nacci, Diane; Topping, Chris; Wang, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study demonstrating the application of 3 individual-based, spatially explicit population models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) in ecological risk assessments to predict long-term effects of a pesticide to populations of small mammals. The 3 IBMs each used a hypothetical fungicide (FungicideX) in different scenarios: spraying in cereals (common vole, Microtus arvalis), spraying in orchards (field vole, Microtus agrestis), and cereal seed treatment (wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus). Each scenario used existing model landscapes, which differed greatly in size and structural complexity. The toxicological profile of FungicideX was defined so that the deterministic long-term first tier risk assessment would result in high risk to small mammals, thus providing the opportunity to use the IBMs for risk assessment refinement (i.e., higher tier risk assessment). Despite differing internal model design and scenarios, results indicated in all 3 cases low population sensitivity unless FungicideX was applied at very high (×10) rates. Recovery from local population impacts was generally fast. Only when patch extinctions occured in simulations of intentionally high acute toxic effects, recovery periods, then determined by recolonization, were of any concern. Conclusions include recommendations for the most important input considerations, including the selection of exposure levels, duration of simulations, statistically robust number of replicates, and endpoints to report. However, further investigation and agreement are needed to develop recommendations for landscape attributes such as size, structure, and crop rotation to define appropriate regulatory risk assessment scenarios. Overall, the application of IBMs provides multiple advantages to higher tier ecological risk assessments for small mammals, including consistent and transparent direct links to specific protection goals, and the consideration of more realistic scenarios.

  3. An example of population-level risk assessments for small mammals using individual-based population models.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Walter; Auteri, Domenica; Bastiansen, Finn; Ebeling, Markus; Liu, Chun; Luttik, Robert; Mastitsky, Sergey; Nacci, Diane; Topping, Chris; Wang, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study demonstrating the application of 3 individual-based, spatially explicit population models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) in ecological risk assessments to predict long-term effects of a pesticide to populations of small mammals. The 3 IBMs each used a hypothetical fungicide (FungicideX) in different scenarios: spraying in cereals (common vole, Microtus arvalis), spraying in orchards (field vole, Microtus agrestis), and cereal seed treatment (wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus). Each scenario used existing model landscapes, which differed greatly in size and structural complexity. The toxicological profile of FungicideX was defined so that the deterministic long-term first tier risk assessment would result in high risk to small mammals, thus providing the opportunity to use the IBMs for risk assessment refinement (i.e., higher tier risk assessment). Despite differing internal model design and scenarios, results indicated in all 3 cases low population sensitivity unless FungicideX was applied at very high (×10) rates. Recovery from local population impacts was generally fast. Only when patch extinctions occured in simulations of intentionally high acute toxic effects, recovery periods, then determined by recolonization, were of any concern. Conclusions include recommendations for the most important input considerations, including the selection of exposure levels, duration of simulations, statistically robust number of replicates, and endpoints to report. However, further investigation and agreement are needed to develop recommendations for landscape attributes such as size, structure, and crop rotation to define appropriate regulatory risk assessment scenarios. Overall, the application of IBMs provides multiple advantages to higher tier ecological risk assessments for small mammals, including consistent and transparent direct links to specific protection goals, and the consideration of more realistic scenarios. PMID:25891765

  4. Repeated measurements for assessment of urinary 2-naphthol levels in individuals exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping; Diawara, Norou; Peng, Chiung-Yu; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2011-01-01

    A repeated measurement cohort study was conducted to determine whether 2-napthol can be a suitable biomarker for evaluating the magnitude of exposure to PAHs from coke oven emissions. Time-course patterns of urinary 2-naphthol levels in coke-oven workers were examined. Also, the correlation between urinary 2-naphthol levels and PAHs from personal breathing zone samples was analyzed while examining and adjusting possible confounding factors, such as smoking alcohol consumption, and age of human subjects. A total of 8 spot urine samples were collected from each high-exposure group (topside-oven workers, n = 17) and low-exposure group (side-oven workers, n = 25) during the whole working cycle, which consists of six consecutive working days followed by 2 days off. Personal breathing zone samples were collected to quantify PAH intake. A questionnaire was distributed and collected from each worker for assessment of demographic parameters. Our results confirmed that the topside-oven area contained significantly higher PAH levels than the side-oven area. Urinary 2-naphthol levels correlated with the levels of PAH species, including pyrene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benezo[g,h,i]pyrene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, and total PAHs. During the working cycle, urinary 2-naphthol levels remained stable at around 46-97 ng/mg creatinine during the working days and dramatically increased during the off days. After stratification of data based on smoking status, smokers had significantly higher urinary 2-naphthol levels than non-smokers, and 2-naphthol levels positively correlated with smoking status. Coke-oven emissions are a source of exposure to naphthalene. Also, smoking is a significant source of exposure to naphthalene and served as a confounder factor. Due to its abundance, positive association with total PAHs and certain carcinogenic PAH compounds, and slower elimination kinetics, urinary 2-naphthol may have the potential

  5. Development of a risk assessment tool for projecting individualized probabilities of developing breast cancer for Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Gao, Ying; Battsend, Munkhzul; Chen, Kexin; Lu, Wenli; Wang, Yaogang

    2014-11-01

    The optimal approach regarding breast cancer screening for Chinese women is unclear due to the relative low incidence rate. A risk assessment tool may be useful for selection of high-risk subsets of population for mammography screening in low-incidence and resource-limited developing country. The odd ratios for six main risk factors of breast cancer were pooled by review manager after a systematic research of literature. Health risk appraisal (HRA) model was developed to predict an individual's risk of developing breast cancer in the next 5 years from current age. The performance of this HRA model was assessed based on a first-round screening database. Estimated risk of breast cancer increased with age. Increases in the 5-year risk of developing breast cancer were found with the existence of any of included risk factors. When individuals who had risk above median risk (3.3‰) were selected from the validation database, the sensitivity is 60.0% and the specificity is 47.8%. The unweighted area under the curve (AUC) was 0.64 (95% CI = 0.50-0.78). The risk-prediction model reported in this article is based on a combination of risk factors and shows good overall predictive power, but it is still weak at predicting which particular women will develop the disease. It would be very helpful for the improvement of a current model if more population-based prospective follow-up studies were used for the validation. PMID:25085581

  6. Assessing risk of baleen whale hearing loss from seismic surveys: The effect of uncertainty and individual variation.

    PubMed

    Gedamke, Jason; Gales, Nick; Frydman, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    The potential for seismic airgun "shots" to cause acoustic trauma in marine mammals is poorly understood. There are just two empirical measurements of temporary threshold shift (TTS) onset levels from airgun-like sounds in odontocetes. Considering these limited data, a model was developed examining the impact of individual variability and uncertainty on risk assessment of baleen whale TTS from seismic surveys. In each of 100 simulations: 10000 "whales" are assigned TTS onset levels accounting for: inter-individual variation; uncertainty over the population's mean; and uncertainty over weighting of odontocete data to obtain baleen whale onset levels. Randomly distributed whales are exposed to one seismic survey passage with cumulative exposure level calculated. In the base scenario, 29% of whales (5th/95th percentiles of 10%/62%) approached to 1-1.2 km range were exposed to levels sufficient for TTS onset. By comparison, no whales are at risk outside 0.6 km when uncertainty and variability are not considered. Potentially "exposure altering" parameters (movement, avoidance, surfacing, and effective quiet) were also simulated. Until more research refines model inputs, the results suggest a reasonable likelihood that whales at a kilometer or more from seismic surveys could potentially be susceptible to TTS and demonstrate that the large impact uncertainty and variability can have on risk assessment.

  7. Reliability of Joint Mobility and Pain Assessment of the Thoracic Spine and Rib Cage in Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Heiderscheit, Bryan; Boissonnault, William

    2008-01-01

    Despite the importance of correctly diagnosing a spinal dysfunction, limited research exists related to physical therapists' ability to reliably identify a joint exhibiting signs of dysfunction. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of a thoracic spine and rib cage joint mobility and pain assessment between two experienced manipulative physical therapists. Nine healthy subjects (3 male, 6 female; ages 23–35) without history of mid- or low back pain participated. Posterior-to-anterior pressures were applied to the thoracic spine and rib articulations with anterior-to-posterior pressures applied to the costosternal joints of each subject by two examiners to evaluate joint mobility and pain provocation. Both examiners assessed all subjects twice and were blinded to subject identity. Kappa statistics were calculated using a strict and expanded definition of agreement to determine the between- and within-examiner reliability for each outcome. Intra-examiner reliability of joint mobility assessment ranged from slight to fair based on the strict agreement but improved to good when findings were compared across ± 1 spinal/rib level. Pain provocation reliability increased to very good under the expanded agreement; however, this finding should be viewed with caution due to limited pain prevalence in the subject sample. Selected clinical prediction rules, applied to the care of individuals with back pain, characterize the patient's regional mobility simply as hypomobile, normal, or hypermobile; consequently, we feel the results of an expanded definition of agreement may be more appropriate for clinic practice. Further research is needed to determine the reliability in individuals with thoracic spine and rib cage symptoms. PMID:19771193

  8. Long-term individual housing in C57BL/6J and DBA/2 mice: assessment of behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Võikar, V; Polus, A; Vasar, E; Rauvala, H

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of individual housing on mouse behavior. The male mice of the C57BL/6J and DBA/2 strains were separated at the age of 4 weeks and kept in individual housing for 7 weeks until behavioral testing began. Their behavior was compared to the group-housed mice in a battery of tests during the following 7 weeks. The single-housed mice were hyperactive and displayed reduced habituation in the tests assessing activity and exploration. Reduced anxiety was established in the elevated plus-maze, but an opposite effect was observed in the dark-light (DL) and hyponeophagia tests. Immobility in the forced swimming test was reduced by social isolation. The DBA mice displayed higher anxiety-like behavior than the B6 mice in the plus-maze and DL exploration test, but hyponeophagia was reduced in the DBA mice. Moreover, all effects of individual housing on the exploratory and emotional behavior were more evident in the DBA than in the B6 mice. Novel object recognition and fear conditioning (FC) were significantly impaired in the single-housed mice, whereas water-maze (WM) learning was not affected. Marked strain differences were established in all three learning tests. The B6 mice performed better in the object recognition and FC tasks. Initial spatial learning in the WM was faster and memory retention slightly enhanced in the B6 mice. The DBA mice displayed lower preference to the new and enhanced preference to the old platform location than the B6 mice after reversal learning in the WM. We conclude that individual housing has strong strain- and test-specific effects on emotional behavior and impairs memory in certain tasks.

  9. Flexible work schedules and family time allocation: Assessment of a system change on individual behavior using self-report logs

    PubMed Central

    Winett, Richard A.; Neale, Michael S.

    1981-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a flexible work schedule (“flextime”) on time allocated to children and spouse by federal workers. Direct behavioral observations of family, home, and work functions were precluded because of the cost involved in observing many people for long periods of time. In order to obtain detailed individual data, participants completed hour-by-hour activity logs a mean of twice per week for 35 weeks. Participants received prior training on log completion, initial feedback on the detail of their log entries, and were prompted to complete the forms. Four different procedures assessing reliability indicated a corroboration rate of 80% with other sources. Log data were reliably reduced to nine categories such as “PM time with children” and 37 subcategories such as “time at dinner.” The log data were presented in time-series form and the use of a quasi-experimental design showed that participants who altered their work schedule were able to spend more PM time with their families. The log data demonstrated that the capacity exists to assess closely the effects of large-scale changes at a micro-behavioral level, but other methods are needed to make complex self-reporting systems less expensive and more capable of immediate monitoring of the intervention's effects. PMID:16795640

  10. Assessing Individuals' Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Kelly Carter; Braskamp, David C.; Braskamp, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Global Perspective Inventory (GPI), a survey instrument that measures participants' global perspective in terms of cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal domains--each in terms of both development and acquisition. A summary of the recent research on the GPI is provided along with a discussion of potential uses.

  11. GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model to Estimate Time-Location of Individuals for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments: Model Evaluation in Central North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure...

  12. Assessing the Value of Television as Environmental Enrichment for Individually Housed Rhesus Monkeys: A Behavioral Economic Approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Linda D.; Briand, Edward J.; Orth, Rushawn; Galbicka, Gregory

    1999-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate television as a source of environmental enrichment for individually housed rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) by using the concepts of behavioral economics. Phase I entailed the use of operant conditioning to assess the behavior of eight rhesus monkeys given the opportunity to control their environment through lever activation of a television (TV). Success in shaping was variable, and only two animals successfully acquired lever pressing. Phase II used an alternating reinforcement/ extinction procedure as a control method to determine the degree to which lever pressing depended on TV presentation. Both animals responded with more lever pressing on the days when lever pressing produced TV. The first animal, tested with the alternating reinforcement/extinction procedure for 12 weeks yielded a mean significant difference of 3.85 (p = 0.036); the second assessed for 9 weeks was associated with a mean significant difference of 6.0 (p = 0.018). Therefore, TV (and not lever pressing itself) was positively reinforcing. The final phase of the study progressively increased the fixed ratio (FR) from 1 to 8. Linear regression of the data points, plotted as the log of price (or FR) vs the consumption of TV, revealed a significantly negative slope (-2.179, p, 0.05) and accounted for 89% of the variance. The negative demand curve suggested that TV is not a valued commodity and is highly elastic. TV provided to individually housed rhesus monkeys appears to be a weakly positive reinforcer for some animals, which may contribute to overall environmental enrichment.

  13. Assessing the Value of Television as Environmental Enrichment for Individually Housed Rhesus Monkeys: A Behavioral Economic Approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Linda D.; Briand, Edward J.; Orth, Rushawn; Galbicka, Gregory

    1999-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate television as a source of environmental enrichment for individually housed rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) by using the concepts of behavioral economics. Phase I entailed the use of operant conditioning to assess the behavior of eight rhesus monkeys given the opportunity to control their environment through lever activation of a television (TV). Success in shaping was variable, and only two animals successfully acquired lever pressing. Phase II used an alternating reinforcement/ extinction procedure as a control method to determine the degree to which lever pressing depended on TV presentation. Both animals responded with more lever pressing on the days when lever pressing produced TV. The first animal, tested with the alternating reinforcement/extinction procedure for 12 weeks yielded a mean significant difference of 3.85 (p = 0.036); the second assessed for 9 weeks was associated with a mean significant difference of 6.0 (p = 0.018). Therefore, TV (and not lever pressing itself) was positively reinforcing. The final phase of the study progressively increased the fixed ratio (FR) from 1 to 8. Linear regression of the data points, plotted as the log of price (or FR) vs the consumption of TV, revealed a significantly negative slope (-2.179, p, 0.05) and accounted for 89% of the variance. The negative demand curve suggested that TV is not a valued commodity and is highly elastic. TV provided to individually housed rhesus monkeys appears to be a weakly positive reinforcer for some animals, which may contribute to overall environmental enrichment. PMID:12086433

  14. Assessing cognitive insight in nonpsychiatric individuals and outpatients with schizophrenia in Taiwan: an investigation using the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) was designed for the assessment of the cognitive processes involved in self-reflection and the ability to modify erroneous beliefs and misinterpretations. Studies investigating the factor structure of the BCIS have indicated a two-factor model in the psychotic population. The factor structure of the BCIS, however, has not received much consideration in the nonpsychiatric population. The present study examined the factor structure and validity of the BCIS and compared its scores between nonpsychiatric individuals and outpatients with psychosis. Method The Taiwanese version of the BCIS was administered to 507 nonpsychiatric individuals and 118 outpatients with schizophrenia. The psychometric properties of the BCIS were examined through the following analyses: exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, reliability, correlation analyses, and discriminative validity. Results The BCIS showed adequate internal consistency and stability over time. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on the 15-item measure indicated a two-factor solution that supported the two dimensions of the Taiwanese BCIS, which was also observed with the original BCIS. Following the construct validation, we obtained a composite index (self-reflectiveness minus self-certainty) of the Taiwanese BCIS that reflected cognitive insight. Consistent with previous studies, our results indicated that psychosis is associated with low self-reflectiveness and high self-certainty, which possibly reflect lower cognitive insight. Our results also showed that better cognitive insight is related to worse depression in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, but not in nonpsychiatric individuals. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses revealed that the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.731. A composite index of 3 was a good limit, with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 51%. Conclusion The BCIS proved to be useful for measuring

  15. Skin-Picking in Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome: Prevalence, Functional Assessment, and Its Comorbidity with Compulsive and Self-Injurious Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are at increased risk for mental health and behaviour problems, such as skin-picking and compulsive behaviours. Prevalence and functional assessment of skin-picking, and its association with compulsive behaviour and self-injury, were investigated in a large group of individuals with PWS (n =…

  16. Guidance in Individual and Family Assessment for the Child and Family Resource Program: A Child and Family Resource Program Guidance Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingle Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This paper describes the assessment procedures used by the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) to identify and address the needs of families and of individual family members. CFRP was developed as part of the Head Start Improvement and Innovation effort to provide individualized comprehensive developmental services to families with children…

  17. Is the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) effective for preterm infants with intrauterine growth restriction?

    PubMed Central

    Als, H; Duffy, FH; McAnulty, GB; Fischer, CB; Kosta, S; Butler, SC; Parad, RB; Blickman, JG; Zurakowski, D; Ringer, SA

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the effectiveness of the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) on neurobehavioral and electrophysiological functioning of preterm infants with severe intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Study Design Thirty IUGR infants, 28 to 33 weeks gestational age, randomized to standard care (control/C = 18), or NIDCAP (experimental/E = 12), were assessed at 2 weeks corrected age (2wCA) and 9 months corrected age (9mCA) in regard to health, anthropometrics, and neurobehavior, and additionally at 2wCA in regard to electrophysiology (EEG). Result The two groups were comparable in health and anthropometrics at 2wCA and 9mCA. The E-group at 2wCA showed significantly better autonomic, motor, and self-regulation functioning, improved motility, intensity and response thresholds, and reduced EEG connectivity among several adjacent brain regions. At 9mCA, the E-group showed significantly better mental performance. Conclusion This is the first study to show NIDCAP effectiveness for IUGR preterm infants. PMID:20651694

  18. Assessing Nonverbal Same/Different Judgments of Auditory Stimuli in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Methodological Investigation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Richard W; Preston, Mark A; Thompson, G Brooks

    2009-01-01

    This methodological paper reports an initial attempt to evaluate the feasibility and utility of a nonverbal task for assessing generalized same/different judgments of auditory stimuli in individuals who have intellectual disabilities. Study 1 asked whether participants could readily acquire a baseline of auditory same/different, go-left/go-right performance with minimal prompting. Sample stimuli consisted of pairs of successively presented sine-wave tones. If the tones were identical, participants were reinforced for selections of a visual stimulus on the left side of the computer screen; if the two stimuli were different, selections of the visual stimulus on the right were reinforced. Two of five participants readily acquired the task, generalized performance to other stimuli and completed a rudimentary protocol for examining auditory discriminations that are potentially more difficult than those used to establish the initial task. In Study 2, two participants who could not perform the go-left/go-right task with tone stimuli, but could do so with spoken-word stimuli, successfully transferred control by spoken words to tones via an auditory superimposition-and-fading procedure. The findings support the feasibility of using the task as a general-purpose auditory discrimination assessment.

  19. Assessing multimedia/multipathway exposures to inorganic arsenic at population and individual level using MERLIN-Expo.

    PubMed

    Van Holderbeke, Mirja; Fierens, Tine; Standaert, Arnout; Cornelis, Christa; Brochot, Céline; Ciffroy, Philippe; Johansson, Erik; Bierkens, Johan

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we report on model simulations performed using the newly developed exposure tool, MERLIN-Expo, in order to assess inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure to adults resulting from past emissions by non-ferrous smelters in Belgium (Northern Campine area). Exposure scenarios were constructed to estimate external iAs exposure as well as the toxicologically relevant As (tAs, i.e., iAs, MMA and DMA) body burden in adults living in the vicinity of the former industrial sites as compared to adults living in adjacent areas and a reference area. Two scenarios are discussed: a first scenario studying exposure to iAs at the aggregated population level and a second scenario studying exposure at the individual level for a random sub-sample of subjects in each of the three different study areas. These two scenarios only differ in the type of human related input data (i.e., time-activity data, ingestion rates and consumption patterns) that were used, namely averages (incl. probability density functions, PDFs) in the simulation at population level and subject-specific values in the simulation at individual level. The model predictions are shown to be lower than the corresponding biomonitoring data from the monitoring campaign. Urinary tAs levels in adults, irrespective of the area they lived in, were under-predicted by MERLIN-Expo by 40% on average. The model predictions for individual adults, by contrast, under-predict the biomonitoring data by 7% on average, but with more important under-predictions for subjects at the upper end of exposure. Still, average predicted urinary tAs levels from the simulations at population level and at individual level overlap, and, at least for the current case, lead to similar conclusions. These results constitute a first and partial verification of the model performance of MERLIN-Expo when dealing with iAs in a complex site-specific exposure scenario, and demonstrate the robustness of the modelling tool for these situations.

  20. A descriptive study to assess the impact of surgical stomas on individuals' sleep perceptions & response to sleep hygiene.

    PubMed

    Vorbeck, Ellen; Willette-Murphy, Karen; Meiers, Sonja; Rudel, Rebecca; Alakhras, Mazen

    2010-01-01

    Multiple factors affect the sleep quality of individuals with surgically created stomas. Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation as the theoretical framework, a study was conducted to: 1) assess subjective sleep quality perceptions and objective sleep measurement in adults with stomas, 2) determine if there is a correlation between subjective and objective measurement of sleep in this group, and 3) implement a stoma-specific sleep hygiene intervention to improve these sleep quality perceptions. Subjective assessment focused on sleep subset questions from the Stoma Quality of Life Index (SQOLI) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Respondents' (n = 26) subjective sleep scores were 7.23 mean global score on seven questions (PSQI, range: 0 [no difficulty sleeping] to 3 [severe difficulty sleeping], total 0 to 21) with a mean score of 7.32 on three questions (SQOLI, range 1 [severe difficulty sleeping] to 4 [no difficulty sleeping], total 0 to 12) on sleep subset questions; composite scores of 5 or greater (PSQI) and 3 or less (SQOLI) indicating sleep problems. Scores showed that adults with stomas have increased sleep disruption and poor sleep quality. Five respondents who met intervention enrollment criteria participated in an objective sleep assessment using actigraphy, overnight oxygenation studies, and a 4-week sleep hygiene intervention. Mean PSQI score improved by 1.20 but the difference was not statistically significant. Because the results of this study confirm that sleep problems are common in older adults with a stoma, larger sample size studies of >4 weeks' duration are warranted. Until additional research results are available, the existence of sleep quality and overnight pouching concerns should be recognized and use of the low-cost, easy-to-use, stoma-specific sleep hygiene intervention considered.

  1. [Screening for breast cancer on basis of individual risk assessment for women ineligible for the national population screening program].

    PubMed

    van Asperen, C J; de Bock, G H; van der Horst, F; de Koning, H J; Rutgers, E J

    2001-01-20

    For healthy women, without malignancies in their personal histories, a positive family history for breast cancer is the single indication for individual breast surveillance outside the population screening. Management of women is based on individual risk assessment. A cumulative risk of 20% and more, as a result of a positive family history, will in practice be an indication for breast surveillance. This threshold is not evidence-based yet, nor are data available on the benefits of this surveillance efficacy. When a personal cumulative risk of more than 30% exists to develop breast cancer, a consultation with a clinical geneticist involved in a family cancer clinic should be offered. Surveillance of women with a high-risk cumulative risk should preferably be included in a prospective study design. Only in this way will data about compliance and the estimates of different ways of surveillance become available. There is no convincing evidence that population screening for women aged 40-49 years does lead to important mortality reduction in combination with a good balance between pros and cons for the women involved. Women in the age category 50-75 years, with breast cancer in their personal histories, who are not followed anymore, should be informed by their specialist about participating (again) in the population breast screening. There is no evidence of mortality reduction as a result of breast self-examination nor of palpation performed by a physician. However, awareness of the own body can be useful for early recognition of breast abnormalities; it may reduce the delay between the first recognizable symptom and the subsequently initiated therapy.

  2. Soft-tissue facial areas and volumes in individuals with ectodermal dysplasia: a three-dimensional non invasive assessment.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Dellavia, Claudia; Serrao, Graziano; Sforza, Chiarella

    2004-04-30

    The objective of this study was to supply quantitative information about the facial soft-tissues of a group of patients with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. The three-dimensional coordinates of 28 soft-tissue facial landmarks were obtained by an electromagnetic digitizer in 11 male and 9 female patients with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia aged 7-41 years, and in 318 healthy individuals of the same age, ethnicity, and sex. From the landmarks, facial areas (eyes, ears, nose, and lips) and volumes (nose and lips) were calculated according to a geometrical model of face. Data were compared to those collected in the normal subjects by computing z-scores. Male and female z-scores were not significantly different. In the pooled sample, the deviations from the norm were particularly evident in the lips, with a significant (Student's t-test, P < 0.05) increment of the total lip area (mean z-score: 0.96) and of the vermilion area of the upper lip (mean z-score: 1.07), a finding negatively related (r = -0.632) to the number of teeth present in the mouth. The eye area was reduced in most patients, a finding significant on the left side (mean z-score: -0.76). Most of the facial areas and volumes of the ectodermal dysplasia patients had z-scores deviating only +/-2 standard deviations from the reference groups. Only 4% of measurements had z-scores larger than +/-3. Additionally, a large inter-individual variability was found, together with a certain age-related trend of improvement of the number of measurements within the +/-2 interval. The method allowed a simple, low cost, fast, and non invasive examination of the patients, and provided a quantitative assessment of the deviation from the norm.

  3. Objective assessment of internal nasal dimensions and speech resonance in individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate after rhinoseptoplasty.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Inge Elly Kiemle; Bertier, Carlos Eduardo; Sampaio-Teixeira, Ana Claudia Martins

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the current study was to analyze the effects of rhinoseptoplasty on internal nasal dimensions and speech resonance of individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate, estimated by acoustic rhinometry and nasometry, respectively. Twenty-one individuals (aged 15-46 years) with previously repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate were analyzed before (PRE), and 6 to 9 (POST1) and 12 to 18 months (POST2) after surgery. Acoustic rhinometry was used to measure the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of segments corresponding to the nasal valve (CSA1), anterior portion (CSA2), and posterior portion (CSA3) of the lower turbinate, and the volumes at the nasal valve (V1) and turbinate (V2) regions at cleft and noncleft sides, before and after nasal decongestion with a topical vasoconstrictor. Nasometry was used to evaluate speech nasalance during the reading of a set of sentences containing nasal sounds and other devoid of nasal sounds. At the cleft side, before nasal decongestion, there was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in mean CSA1 and V1 values at POST1 and POST2 compared with PRE. After decongestion, increased values were also observed for CSA2 and V2 at POST2. No significant changes were observed at the noncleft side. Mean nasalance values at PRE, POST1, and POST2 were not different from each other in both oral and nasal sentences. The measurement of CSAs and volumes by acoustic rhinometry revealed that rhinoseptoplasty provided, in most cases analyzed, a significant increase in nasal patency, without concomitant changes in speech resonance, as estimated by nasalance assessment.

  4. The Effectiveness of FES-Evoked EMG Potentials to Assess Muscle Force and Fatigue in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H.; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M.

    2014-01-01

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05) between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population. PMID:25025551

  5. The effectiveness of FES-evoked EMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M

    2014-07-14

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05) between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population.

  6. Assessment of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals susceptible to arsenic induced toxicity in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Som, Arundhati; Ghoshal, Sarbani; Mondal, Lakshmikanta; Chaubey, Ramesh C; Bhilwade, Hari N; Rahman, Mohammad M; Giri, Ashok K

    2005-10-15

    Assessment of DNA damage was carried out using alkaline comet assay in lymphocytes of 30 individuals exposed to high levels of arsenic (247.12+/-18.93 microg/l) through contaminated groundwater in North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal, India. All of them exhibited high arsenic contents in nail (4.20+/-0.67 microg/g), hair (2.06+/-0.20 microg/g) and urine (259.75+/-33.89 microg/l) samples and manifested various arsenical skin lesions. Unexposed samples were collected from 30 residents of the unaffected East Midnapur district with very little or no exposure to arsenic (7.69+/-0.49 microg/l) in drinking water. The results were evaluated principally by manual analysis of comets and partly by computerized image analysis. Both the analytical methods exhibited a high degree of agreement in results. The exposed participants expressed significantly higher DNA damage (p < 0.01) in their lymphocytes than the unexposed participants. Alkaline comet assay was also combined with formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase enzyme digestion to confirm that arsenic induced oxidative base damage in the lymphocytes. Significant positive trend effects of comet lengths in relation to arsenic levels in water prove that DNA damage can be used as a sensitive biomarker of arsenic exposure. This study demonstrates that arsenic induced significant DNA damage in the exposed participants, which could correspond to a higher susceptibility to arsenic induced toxicity and carcinogenicity.

  7. Communicating HIV Status in Sexual Interactions: Assessing Social Cognitive Constructs, Situational Factors, and Individual Characteristics Among South African MSM

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vasu; Kaighobadi, Farnaz; Nel, Dawie; Sandfort, Theo

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed whether social cognitive constructs, situational factors, and individual characteristics were associated with communicating HIV status and whether communication was related to sexual risk behavior. A quota-sampling method stratified by age, race, and township was used to recruit 300 men who have sex with men to participate in a community-based survey in Pretoria in 2008. Participants reported characteristics of their last sexual encounter involving anal sex, including whether they or their partner had communicated their HIV status. Fifty-nine percent of participants reported that they or their partner had communicated their HIV status. HIV communication self-efficacy (aOR = 1.2, 95 % CI: 1.04–1.68), being with a steady partner (aOR = 0.36, 95 % CI: 0.19–0.67), and being Black (versus White; aOR = 0.08, 95 % CI: 0.03–0.27) were independently associated with communicating HIV status. Communicating HIV status was not associated with unprotected anal intercourse. HIV communication self-efficacy increases men’s likelihood of communicating HIV status. Being with a steady partner and being Black reduces that likelihood. Communication about HIV status did not lead to safer sex. PMID:23065127

  8. Plant food supplement (PFS) market structure in EC Member States, methods and techniques for the assessment of individual PFS intake.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Murga, Liliana; Garcia-Alvarez, Alicia; Roman-Viñas, Blanca; Ngo, Joy; Ribas-Barba, Lourdes; van den Berg, Suzanne J P L; Williamson, Gary; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2011-12-01

    The popularity of herbal products, especially plant food supplements (PFS) and herbal medicine is on the rise in Europe and other parts of the world, with increased use in the general population as well as among specific subgroups encompassing children, women or those suffering from diseases such as cancer. The aim of this paper is to examine the PFS market structures in European Community (EC) Member States as well as to examine issues addressing methodologies and consumption data relating to PFS use in Europe. A revision of recent reports on market data, trends and main distribution channels, in addition an example of the consumption of PFS in Spain, is presented. An overview of the methods and administration techniques used to assess individual food consumption as a starting point, including their uses and limitations, as well as some examples of studies that collect Food Supplement (FS) information, including herbal/botanical/plant-derived products are also discussed. Additionally, the intake estimation process of food nutrients is described and used to propose the PFS ingredients intake estimation process. Nationally representative PFS consumption data is scarce in Europe. The majority of studies have been conducted in Scandinavia and the UK. However the heterogeneity of definitions, study design and objectives make it difficult to compare results and extrapolate conclusions. PMID:21879100

  9. The Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) with Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC): Comprehensive Care for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Als, Heidelise; McAnulty, Gloria B.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art Newborn Intensive Care Units (NICUs), instrumental in the survival of high-risk and ever-earlier-born preterm infants, often have costly human repercussions. The developmental sequelae of newborn intensive care are largely misunderstood. Developed countries eager to export their technologies must also transfer the knowledge-base that encompasses all high-risk and preterm infants’ personhood as well as the neuro-essential importance of their parents. Without such understanding, the best medical care, while assuring survival jeopardizes infants’ long-term potential and deprives parents of their critical role. Exchanging the womb for the NICU environment at a time of rapid brain growth compromises preterm infants’ early development, which results in long-term physical and mental health problems and developmental disabilities. The Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) aims to prevent the iatrogenic sequelae of intensive care and to maintain the intimate connection between parent and infant, one expression of which is Kangaroo Mother Care. NIDCAP embeds the infant in the natural parent niche, avoids over-stimulation, stress, pain, and isolation while it supports self-regulation, competence, and goal orientation. Research demonstrates that NIDCAP improves brain development, functional competence, health, and life quality. It is cost effective, humane, and ethical, and promises to become the standard for all NICU care. PMID:25473384

  10. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  11. Assessing the Influence of an Individual Event in Complex Fault Spreading Network Based on Dynamic Uncertain Causality Graph.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Identifying the pivotal causes and highly influential spreaders in fault propagation processes is crucial for improving the maintenance decision making for complex systems under abnormal and emergency situations. A dynamic uncertain causality graph-based method is introduced in this paper to explicitly model the uncertain causalities among system components, identify fault conditions, locate the fault origins, and predict the spreading tendency by means of probabilistic reasoning. A new algorithm is proposed to assess the impacts of an individual event by investigating the corresponding node's time-variant betweenness centrality and the strength of global causal influence in the fault propagation network. The algorithm does not depend on the whole original and static network but on the real-time spreading behaviors and dynamics, which makes the algorithm to be specifically targeted and more efficient. Experiments on both simulated networks and real-world systems demonstrate the accuracy, effectiveness, and comprehensibility of the proposed method for the fault management of power grids and other complex networked systems.

  12. Assessment to Guide Individualized Transition Plans from School to Post-School for Children Ages 14+ with Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    As a part of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), special education teachers work along with their student with special needs and their parent(s)/guardian(s) to create and implement Individualized Transition Plans (ITP) to assist the student with their transition to the post-school environment. As mandated by Individuals with Disabilities…

  13. Inter-Ethnic Differences in Quantified Coronary Artery Disease Severity and All-Cause Mortality among Dutch and Singaporean Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gijsberts, Crystel M.; Seneviratna, Aruni; Hoefer, Imo E.; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Rittersma, Saskia Z. H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hartman, Mikael; Pinto de Carvalho, Leonardo; Richards, A. Mark; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.; Chan, Mark Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a global problem with increasing incidence in Asia. Prior studies reported inter-ethnic differences in the prevalence of CAD rather than the severity of CAD. The angiographic “synergy between percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with taxus and cardiac surgery” (SYNTAX) score quantifies CAD severity and predicts outcomes. We studied CAD severity and all-cause mortality in four globally populous ethnic groups: Caucasians, Chinese, Indians and Malays. Methods We quantified SYNTAX scores of 1,000 multi-ethnic patients undergoing PCI in two tertiary hospitals in the Netherlands (Caucasians) and Singapore (Chinese, Indians and Malays). Within each ethnicity we studied 150 patients with stable CAD and 100 with ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). We made inter-ethnic comparisons of SYNTAX scores and all-cause mortality. Results Despite having a younger age (mean age Indians: 56.8 and Malays: 57.7 vs. Caucasians: 63.7 years), multivariable adjusted SYNTAX scores were significantly higher in Indians and Malays than Caucasians with stable CAD: 13.4 [11.9-14.9] and 13.4 [12.0-14.8] vs. 9.4 [8.1-10.8], p<0.001. Among STEMI patients, SYNTAX scores were highest in Chinese and Malays: 17.7 [15.9-19.5] and 18.8 [17.1-20.6] vs. 15.5 [13.5-17.4] and 12.7 [10.9-14.6] in Indians and Caucasians, p<0.001. Over a median follow-up of 709 days, 67 deaths (stable CAD: 37, STEMI: 30) occurred. Among STEMI patients, the SYNTAX score independently predicted all-cause mortality: HR 2.5 [1.7-3.8], p<0.001 for every 10-point increase. All-cause mortality was higher in Indian and Malay STEMI patients than Caucasians, independent of SYNTAX score (adjusted HR 7.2 [1.5-34.7], p=0.01 and 5.8 [1.2-27.2], p=0.02). Conclusion Among stable CAD and STEMI patients requiring PCI, CAD is more severe in Indians and Malays than in Caucasians, despite having a younger age. Moreover, Indian and Malay STEMI patients had a greater adjusted risk of all

  14. 20 CFR 641.230 - Must the individual assessment conducted by the SCSEP grantee or sub-recipient and the assessment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accepted for use by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult... by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult...

  15. 20 CFR 641.230 - Must the individual assessment conducted by the SCSEP grantee or sub-recipient and the assessment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accepted for use by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult... by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult...

  16. 20 CFR 641.230 - Must the individual assessment conducted by the SCSEP grantee or sub-recipient and the assessment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accepted for use by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult... by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult...

  17. 20 CFR 641.230 - Must the individual assessment conducted by the SCSEP grantee or sub-recipient and the assessment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accepted for use by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult... by either entity to determine the individual's need for services in the SCSEP and adult...

  18. Nyquist and Bode stability criteria to assess changes in dynamic knee stability in healthy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed individuals during walking.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kristin D; Zheng, Yanbing; Bush, Heather; Noehren, Brian

    2016-06-14

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most frequently injured knee ligaments. Despite reconstruction, many individuals report difficulty returning to high level activities that require greater dynamic stability. Since few methods have been tested to assess dynamic stability post ACL reconstruction (ACLR), the purpose of this study was to evaluate between and within dynamic knee stability in control and ACLR individuals using Nyquist and Bode stability criteria. Sixteen control and sixteen post ACLR individuals performed a walking protocol. Nyquist and Bode stability criteria were implemented to classify and quantify individual step-to-step sagittal plane dynamic knee stability from the gait waveforms at initial contact, 15% and 30% of stance based on the resulting gain and phase margins. An ANOVA compared differences in phase margins between the control and ACLR limbs and found that the ACLR limbs were overall significantly more unstable than the non-reconstructed and control limbs (p=0.001). The results indicated that the ACLR individuals who exhibited stable steps adopted a more compensatory strategy aimed to stabilize the knee. These methods of evaluating dynamic knee stability may help clinicians to assess dynamic knee stability progression throughout rehabilitation and help assess return-to-sport with minimal risk to the individual.

  19. Proteome profiling for assessing diversity: analysis of individual heads of Drosophila melanogaster using LC-ion mobility-MS.

    PubMed

    Taraszka, John A; Gao, Xinfeng; Valentine, Stephen J; Sowell, Renã A; Koeniger, Stormy L; Miller, David F; Kaufman, Thomas C; Clemmer, David E

    2005-01-01

    The proteomes of three heads of individual Drosophila melanogaster organisms have been analyzed and compared by a combination of liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry, and mass spectrometry approaches. In total, 197 proteins are identified among all three individuals (an average of 120 +/- 20 proteins per individual), of which at least 101 proteins are present in all three individuals. Within all three datasets, more than 25 000 molecular ions (an average of 9000 +/- 2000 per individual) corresponding to protonated precursor ions of individual peptides have been observed. A comparison of peaks among the datasets reveals that peaks corresponding to protonated peptides that are found in all heads are more intense than those features that appear between pairs of or within only one of the individuals. Moreover, there is little variability in the relative intensities of the peaks common among all individuals. It appears that it is the lower abundance components of the proteome that play the most significant role in determining unique features of individuals.

  20. The Use of the 6-Min Walk Test as a Proxy for the Assessment of Energy Expenditure during Gait in Individuals with Lower-Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kark, Laurena; McIntosh, Andrew S.B; Simmons, Annea

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine, and compare, the utility of the 6-min walk test (6 MWT) and self-selected walking speed over 15 m as proxies for the assessment of energy expenditure during gait in individuals with lower-limb amputation. Patients with unilateral, transfemoral amputation (n = 6) and patients with unilateral,…

  1. Assessment and Accommodation Issues under the No Child Left behind Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act: Information for IEP Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriner, James G.; Ganguly, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Including students with disabilities in the new standards and accountability systems is one of the key challenges facing school districts around the nation. In this article, the authors first address the evolving assessment and accommodations requirements of both the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities…

  2. Aggregate versus Individual-Level Sexual Behavior Assessment: How Much Detail Is Needed to Accurately Estimate HIV/STI Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Galletly, Carol L.; McAuliffe, Timothy L.; DiFranceisco, Wayne; Raymond, H. Fisher; Chesson, Harrell W.

    2010-01-01

    The sexual behaviors of HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention intervention participants can be assessed on a partner-by-partner basis: in aggregate (i.e., total numbers of sex acts, collapsed across partners) or using a combination of these two methods (e.g., assessing five partners in detail and any remaining partners in aggregate).…

  3. The Bridge: An Authentic Literacy Assessment Strategy for Individualizing and Informing Practice with Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Patsy L.; Summer, Gail; O'deKirk, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Early literacy development, assessment, and teaching have been significant foci of research and practice in the 21st, century. Multiple new early literacy curricula and assessments for preschoolers have been created since 2001. Tracking the emergent literacy growth of developmentally young children is essential to planning appropriate programs…

  4. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment Practices in the United States: The Influence of Individual and Institutional Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carrie B.; Myers, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the contexts that influence the use of learner-centered assessment (LCA) practices in undergraduate courses has not kept pace with those focusing on teaching practices. Such research is needed given that conceptualizations of effective pedagogy generally include both teaching and assessment. The authors examined a range of…

  5. Assessing Preferences for AAC Options in Communication Interventions for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meer, Larah; Sigafoos, Jeff; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.

    2011-01-01

    We synthesized studies that assessed preference for using different augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) options. Studies were identified via systematic searches of electronic databases, journals, and reference lists. Studies were evaluated in terms of: (a) participants, (b) setting, (c) communication options assessed, (d) design, (e)…

  6. An Assessment Instrument for Families: Evaluating Community-Based Residential Programs for Individuals with Deaf-Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helen Keller National Center - Technical Assistance Center, Sands Point, NY.

    This community living assessment tool for parents of children with deaf-blindness was developed to help parents identify the strengths and weaknesses of their child's residential program using a user-friendly instrument. Three areas of assessment are covered: physical attributes of the home, available resources for promoting capabilities, and…

  7. Assessing role activities of individuals receiving long-term hemodialysis: psychometric testing of the revised Inventory of Functional Status-Dialysis (IFS-Dialysis).

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the reliability and validity of the revised IFS-Dialysis, a theory-based self-report measure of the extent to which individuals receiving long-term hemodialysis are actually performing role activities. The IFS-Dialysis was administered to 186 individuals receiving hemodialysis. Chronbach's alpha was used to assess internal consistency reliability, and structural equation modeling was used to assess the construct validity of the revised measure. Alpha reliability for the total instrument was 0.88, and subscale alpha coefficients ranged from 0.75 to 0.85. Construct validity of the IFS-Dialysis was supported by the significant relationship of each item to its respective subscale latent variable, and model testing indicated a good fit of the measurement model to the data. The IFS-Dialysis can be used to obtain clinical assessments of the extent to which individuals receiving long-term hemodialysis treatments are engaging in role activities. Interventions can then be implemented to facilitate an optimal level of activity performance for each individual.

  8. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF A MODIFIED ISOMETRIC DYNAMOMETER IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MUSCULAR PERFORMANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Paccola, Cleber Jansen; Salvini, Tânia Fátima; Prado, Christiane Lanatovits; Junior, Wilson A. Mello

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a modified isometric dynamometer (MID) in performance deficits of the knee extensor and flexor muscles in normal individuals and in those with ACL reconstructions. Methods: Sixty male subjects were invited to participate of the study, being divided into three groups with 20 subjects each: control group (GC), group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft (GTP, and group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with hamstrings graft (GTF). All individuals performed isometric tests in the MID, muscular strength deficits collected were subsequently compared to the tests performed on the Biodex System 3 operating in the isometric and isokinetic mode at speeds of 60°/s and 180o/s. Intraclass ICC correlation calculations were done in order to assess MID reliability, specificity, sensitivity and Kappa's consistency coefficient calculations, respectively, for assessing the MID's validity in detecting muscular deficits and intra- and intergroup comparisons when performing the four strength tests using the ANOVA method. Results: The modified isometric dynamometer (MID) showed excellent reliability and good validity in the assessment of the performance of the knee extensor and flexor muscles groups. In the comparison between groups, the GTP showed significantly greater deficits as compared to the GTF and GC groups. Conclusion: Isometric dynamometers connected to mechanotherapy equipments could be an alternative option to collect data concerning performance deficits of the extensor and flexor muscles groups of the knee in subjects with ACL reconstruction. PMID:27004175

  9. The Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) questionnaire as a screening-instrument in the detection of individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mossaheb, Nilufar; Becker, Jana; Schaefer, Miriam R; Klier, Claudia M; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Amminger, G Paul

    2012-11-01

    Recent findings on intervention options in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis underline the necessity of a screening tool that facilitates early detection in low-threshold, non-specialized settings. The aim of this study was to examine, whether the Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) could be used as a screening tool to detect individuals at an increased risk for developing psychosis in a clinical, help-seeking population. The utility of the CAPE was assessed against the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS). The CAPE is a 42-item self-report questionnaire that proved to be stable, reliable and valid for self reported psychotic-like experiences in the general population. 165 individuals between 13 and 24years of age were assessed for being at UHR for developing psychosis. 50.9% individuals were CAARMS-positive and 49.1% were CAARMS-negative. The ROC-analysis provided two cut-off points: The cut-off value of 3.20 in the positive dimension showed a sensitivity of 67%, a specificity of 73%, a positive predictive value of 72% and a negative predictive value of 68%. The cut-off value of 2.80 in the positive dimension showed a higher sensitivity (83%) and a better negative predictive value (74%), but a lower specificity (49%) and a reduced positive predictive value (63%). Our results show promise that the CAPE is a valid, simple and cost-effective instrument for detecting individuals at UHR in a clinical population. It may represent a useful screening tool for calling clinicians' attention to subjects with psychotic-like experiences.

  10. The Identity Consolidation Inventory (ICI): development and application of a questionnaire for assessing the structuralization of individual identity.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Steven; Akhtar, Salman

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the author's effort to develop a self-rating scale to measure the consolidation of identity in a given individual. It describes the construction of the 35-item Identity Consolidation Inventory (ICI) and, as an appendix to the paper, includes the final version of this questionnaire. The scale's reliability and validity are demonstrated via its administration to 238 normal controls, 80 individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder and 13 subjects with Dissociative Identity Disorder ("multiple personality"). The clinical and research usefulness of ICI lies in the realm of discerning the syndrome of identity diffusion that underlies all severe personality disorders.

  11. From video recordings to whisker stable isotopes: a critical evaluation of timescale in assessing individual foraging specialisation in Australian fur seals.

    PubMed

    Kernaléguen, Laëtitia; Dorville, Nicole; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Hoskins, Andrew J; Baylis, Alastair M M; Hindell, Mark A; Semmens, Jayson; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg J; Cherel, Yves; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-03-01

    Estimating the degree of individual specialisation is likely to be sensitive to the methods used, as they record individuals' resource use over different time-periods. We combined animal-borne video cameras, GPS/TDR loggers and stable isotope values of plasma, red cells and sub-sampled whiskers to investigate individual foraging specialisation in female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) over various timescales. Combining these methods enabled us to (1) provide quantitative information on individuals' diet, allowing the identification of prey, (2) infer the temporal consistency of individual specialisation, and (3) assess how different methods and timescales affect our estimation of the degree of specialisation. Short-term inter-individual variation in diet was observed in the video data (mean pairwise overlap = 0.60), with the sampled population being composed of both generalist and specialist individuals (nested network). However, the brevity of the temporal window is likely to artificially increase the level of specialisation by not recording the entire diet of seals. Indeed, the correlation in isotopic values was tighter between the red cells and whiskers (mid- to long-term foraging ecology) than between plasma and red cells (short- to mid-term) (R(2) = 0.93-0.73 vs. 0.55-0.41). δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of whiskers confirmed the temporal consistency of individual specialisation. Variation in isotopic niche was consistent across seasons and years, indicating long-term habitat (WIC/TNW = 0.28) and dietary (WIC/TNW = 0.39) specialisation. The results also highlight time-averaging issues (under-estimation of the degree of specialisation) when calculating individual specialisation indices over long time-periods, so that no single timescale may provide a complete and accurate picture, emphasising the benefits of using complementary methods.

  12. Interethnic differences in the relevance of CYP2C9 genotype and environmental factors for diclofenac metabolism in Hispanics from Cuba and Spain.

    PubMed

    Llerena, A; Alvarez, M; Dorado, P; González, I; Peñas-LLedó, E; Pérez, B; Cobaleda, J; Calzadilla, L R

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the diclofenac metabolism in Hispanics from Cuba and Spain and its relation to ethnicity, CYP2C9 genotypes and environmental factors. Diclofenac hydroxylation capacity (concentration ratios of diclofenac/metabolites in 8-h urine) was studied in 160 Cuban (classified as 76 Cuban-Whites-CWs and 84 Cuban-Mestizos-CMs) and 148 Spaniard (SPs) healthy volunteers. Diclofenac and its main metabolites, 4'-hydroxy (OH), 3'-OH and 5-OH diclofenac, and CYP2C9*2 to *6 and *8 alleles were also determined in 132 and 128 CWs and CMs, respectively. Gender, tobacco, caffeine and ethanol consumption were also evaluated. The mean diclofenac/4'-OH diclofenac ratio was higher in CMs (0.72±0.25) than in CWs (0.64±0.20; P<0.05) and SPs (0.57±0.26; P<0.001). The mean diclofenac/4'-OH diclofenac ratio was higher (P<0.05) in subjects with CYP2C9*1/*3 (0.77±0.19; n=22) and CYP2C9*1/*8 (0.93±0.33; n=4) genotypes than with CYP2C9*1/*1 (0.65±0.24; n=90). Environmental factors did not seem to influence the diclofenac metabolism in these populations. The present findings show for the first time interethnic differences between Hispanic groups in urinary diclofenac/4'-OH diclofenac ratios, and the relevance of CYP2C9*3 and CYP2C9*8 alleles.

  13. A fixed-links modeling approach to assess individual differences in the attentional blink: Analysis of behavioral and psychophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Felicitas L; Rammsayer, Thomas H; Schweizer, Karl; Troche, Stefan J

    2015-07-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a fundamental limitation of the ability to select relevant information from irrelevant information. It can be observed with the detection rate in an AB task as well as with the corresponding P300 amplitude of the event-related potential. In previous research, however, correlations between these two levels of observation were weak and rather inconsistent. A possible explanation of this finding might be that multiple processes underlie the AB and, thus, obscure a possible relationship between AB-related detection rate and the corresponding P300 amplitude. The present study investigated this assumption by applying a fixed-links modeling approach to represent behavioral individual differences in the AB as a latent variable. Concurrently, this approach enabled us to control for additional sources of variance in AB performance by deriving two additional latent variables. The correlation between the latent variable reflecting behavioral individual differences in AB magnitude and a corresponding latent variable derived from the P300 amplitude was high (r=.70). Furthermore, this correlation was considerably stronger than the correlations of other behavioral measures of the AB magnitude with their psychophysiological counterparts (all rs<.40). Our findings clearly indicate that the systematic disentangling of various sources of variance by utilizing the fixed-links modeling approach is a promising tool to investigate behavioral individual differences in the AB and possible psychophysiological correlates of these individual differences.

  14. Assessing the Factors Deemed to Support Individual Student Intrinsic Motivation in Technology Supported Online and Face-to-Face Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroff, Ronnie H.; Vogel, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    Research has established that intrinsic motivation has a positive effect on learning and academic achievement. In order to investigate the phenomenon of intrinsic motivation in technology-supported learning environments, this paper investigates the factors deemed to support individual student intrinsic motivation in online discussions. A research…

  15. The Role of Self-Monitoring in Assessing Individual Students' Quantity and Quality of Comments in Large-Class Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carstens, B. A.; Wright, J. M.; Coles, J. T.; McCleary, L. N.; Williams, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    This study developed a reliable and valid self-monitoring procedure for student use in recording and rating the quality of their individual comments in large college classes. Students used daily record cards immediately to record and rate each comment they made each day. However, a limit was set on the amount of credit students could claim for…

  16. Assessment Data-Informed Guidance to Individualize Kindergarten Reading Instruction: Findings from a Cluster-Randomized Control Field Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Connor, Carol M.; Folsom, Jessica S.; Greulich, Luana; Meadows, Jane; Li, Zhi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomized control field trial was to examine whether kindergarten teachers could learn to differentiate classroom reading instruction using Individualized Student Instruction for Kindergarten (ISI-K) and to test the efficacy of differentiation on reading outcomes. The study involved 14 schools, 23 ISI-K (n = 305…

  17. Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK): A Questionnaire to Assess Overdose Knowledge in Individuals Who Use Illicit or Prescribed Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Barrett, Frederick S.; Yepez-Laubach, Claudia; Meyer, Andrew C.; Hruska, Bryce J.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opioid overdose is a public health crisis. This study describes efforts to develop and validate the Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK) questionnaire to assess patient knowledge gaps related to opioid overdose risks. Methods: Two samples of illicit opioid users and a third sample of patients receiving an opioid for the treatment of chronic pain (total N = 848) completed self-report items pertaining to opioid overdose risks. Results: A 3-factor scale was established, representing Opioid Knowledge (4 items), Opioid Overdose Knowledge (4 items), and Opioid Overdose Response Knowledge (4 items). The scale had strong internal and face validity. Patients with chronic pain performed worse than illicit drug users in almost all items assessed, highlighting the need to increase knowledge of opioid overdose risk to this population. Conclusions: This study sought to develop a brief, internally valid method for quickly assessing deficits in opioid overdose risk areas within users of illicit and prescribed opioids, to provide an efficient metric for assessing and comparing educational interventions, facilitate conversations between physicians and patients about overdose risks, and help formally identify knowledge deficits in other patient populations. PMID:27504923

  18. The MMPI-168(L) and ADD in Assessing Psychopathology in Individuals with Mental Retardation: Between and within Instrument Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, William F.; Passmore, Corie E.; Sewell, Hollie M.

    2003-01-01

    A study involving 58 adults with mental retardation and mental disorders found few correlations between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the Assessment of Dual Diagnosis (ADD). The major exception was the Mania scale of the MMPI, which correlated moderately well with the ADD Schizophrenia and Dementia scales. (Contains…

  19. Measurement Tools and Target Symptoms/Skills Used to Assess Treatment Response for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Erin Elizabeth; Diehl, Joshua John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the measurement tools and target symptoms/skills used to assess treatment response during Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) intervention trials from 2001 through 2010. Data from 195 prospective trials were analyzed. There were 289 unique measurement tools, of which 61.6% were used only once, and 20.8 % were investigator-designed.…

  20. Assessing the health of colonies and individual honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a commercial beekeeping operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metrics of honey bee health were assessed every six weeks over three years in colonies owned by a migratory beekeeper. The colonies were located in six apiaries during the summer months in North Dakota and were transported to California for almond pollination every winter. We previously characteri...

  1. Further Explorations of Perceptual Speed Abilities in the Context of Assessment Methods, Cognitive Abilities, and Individual Differences during Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Phillip L.; Beier, Margaret E.

    2007-01-01

    Measures of perceptual speed ability have been shown to be an important part of assessment batteries for predicting performance on tasks and jobs that require a high level of speed and accuracy. However, traditional measures of perceptual speed ability sometimes have limited cost-effectiveness because of the requirements for administration and…

  2. Food Safety Practices Assessment Tool: An Innovative Way to Test Food Safety Skills among Individuals with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Elena T.; Scarpati, Stanley E.; Pivarnik, Lori F.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an innovative assessment tool designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a food safety skills curriculum for learners receiving special education services. As schools respond to the increased demand for training students with special needs about food safety, the need for effective curricula and tools is also increasing. A…

  3. Individualizing Functional Assessments for Children with Autism: The Contribution of Perseverative Behavior and Sensory Disturbances to Disruptive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Matthew; Richman, David M.; Zarcone, Jennifer; Zarcone, Troy

    2003-01-01

    A functional assessment interview was conducted with care providers of 100 children (ages 2-5) with autism regarding reinforcement contingencies contributing to maintenance of disruptive behavior. Gaining access to perseverative activities and escaping demands while engaged in these activities frequently contributed to disruptive behavior in the…

  4. Assessing Self-Regulation in Individuals with Visual Impairments: Generality versus Specificity in Self-Regulatory Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Vassilios; Sideridis, Georgios D.; Botsas, George; Padeliadu, Susana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess self-regulation of students with visual impairments across two academic subjects, language and math. The participants were 46 Greek students with visual impairments who completed self-regulation measures across the subject matters of language and math. Initially, the factorial validity of the scale…

  5. Scaling up from an individual to a population-level assessment for risks of pesticides to threatened and endangered birds

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with the National Marine Fisheries Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently developing a methodology to assess the risks of pesticides to federally-listed threatened and endangered species. In thi...

  6. Concern and Helplessness: Citizens' Assessments of Individual and Collective Action on the Provision of Environmental Public Goods in a Coastal City at Risk of Inundation.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, Sabrina; Collins, Alan; Duffy, David

    2016-09-01

    Survey data from a representative sample of 1005 households in the UK coastal city of Portsmouth are examined to discern commonalities and contrasts in their assessment of actions to address the related environmental threats of climate change and flooding. The city of Portsmouth is at risk of inundation from rising sea levels and the city has recent experience of flooding. A simple local and global public good framework is used to organize the understanding of reported attitudes and their determinants. The findings show that it is not always the same individuals who express concern about both climate change and flooding. Investigation into perceptions of helplessness in tackling climate change indicates that individuals more often perceived themselves to be helpless in tackling climate but perceived local collective action to be more effective. Individuals considered local collective action to be more effective in tackling climate change. Perceptions of individual helplessness are in turn related to reported concern. Several socioeconomic characteristics of individuals are shown to be useful in explaining the determinants of concern and perceptions of helplessness among respondents. As other cities face climate change-related challenges, the empirical findings, based upon attitudes from an alert urban population, are informative to policy design.

  7. Concern and Helplessness: Citizens' Assessments of Individual and Collective Action on the Provision of Environmental Public Goods in a Coastal City at Risk of Inundation.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, Sabrina; Collins, Alan; Duffy, David

    2016-09-01

    Survey data from a representative sample of 1005 households in the UK coastal city of Portsmouth are examined to discern commonalities and contrasts in their assessment of actions to address the related environmental threats of climate change and flooding. The city of Portsmouth is at risk of inundation from rising sea levels and the city has recent experience of flooding. A simple local and global public good framework is used to organize the understanding of reported attitudes and their determinants. The findings show that it is not always the same individuals who express concern about both climate change and flooding. Investigation into perceptions of helplessness in tackling climate change indicates that individuals more often perceived themselves to be helpless in tackling climate but perceived local collective action to be more effective. Individuals considered local collective action to be more effective in tackling climate change. Perceptions of individual helplessness are in turn related to reported concern. Several socioeconomic characteristics of individuals are shown to be useful in explaining the determinants of concern and perceptions of helplessness among respondents. As other cities face climate change-related challenges, the empirical findings, based upon attitudes from an alert urban population, are informative to policy design. PMID:27357807

  8. Concern and Helplessness: Citizens' Assessments of Individual and Collective Action on the Provision of Environmental Public Goods in a Coastal City at Risk of Inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyan, Sabrina; Collins, Alan; Duffy, David

    2016-09-01

    Survey data from a representative sample of 1005 households in the UK coastal city of Portsmouth are examined to discern commonalities and contrasts in their assessment of actions to address the related environmental threats of climate change and flooding. The city of Portsmouth is at risk of inundation from rising sea levels and the city has recent experience of flooding. A simple local and global public good framework is used to organize the understanding of reported attitudes and their determinants. The findings show that it is not always the same individuals who express concern about both climate change and flooding. Investigation into perceptions of helplessness in tackling climate change indicates that individuals more often perceived themselves to be helpless in tackling climate but perceived local collective action to be more effective. Individuals considered local collective action to be more effective in tackling climate change. Perceptions of individual helplessness are in turn related to reported concern. Several socioeconomic characteristics of individuals are shown to be useful in explaining the determinants of concern and perceptions of helplessness among respondents. As other cities face climate change-related challenges, the empirical findings, based upon attitudes from an alert urban population, are informative to policy design.

  9. Gastrointestinal microbiota of wild and inbred individuals of two house mouse subspecies assessed using high-throughput parallel pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Kreisinger, Jakub; Cížková, Dagmar; Vohánka, Jaroslav; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM) on host physiology and health have been the subject of considerable interest in recent years. While a variety of captive bred species have been used in experiments, the extent to which GTM of captive and/or inbred individuals resembles natural composition and variation in wild populations is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we performed 16S rDNA GTM barcoding for 30 wild house mice (Mus musculus) and wild-derived inbred strain mice belonging to two subspecies (M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus). Sequenced individuals were selected according to a 2 × 2 experimental design: wild (14) vs. inbred origin (16) and M. m. musculus (15) vs. M. m. domesticus (15). We compared alpha diversity (i.e. number of operational taxonomic units - OTUs), beta diversity (i.e. interindividual variability) and microbiota composition across the four groups. We found no difference between M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus subspecies, suggesting low effect of genetic differentiation between these two subspecies on GTM structure. Both inbred and wild populations showed the same level of microbial alpha and beta diversity; however, we found strong differentiation in microbiota composition between wild and inbred populations. Relative abundance of ~ 16% of OTUs differed significantly between wild and inbred individuals. As laboratory mice represent the most abundant model for studying the effects of gut microbiota on host metabolism, immunity and neurology, we suggest that the distinctness of laboratory-kept mouse microbiota, which differs from wild mouse microbiota, needs to be considered in future biomedical research. PMID:25204516

  10. Gastrointestinal microbiota of wild and inbred individuals of two house mouse subspecies assessed using high-throughput parallel pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Kreisinger, Jakub; Cížková, Dagmar; Vohánka, Jaroslav; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM) on host physiology and health have been the subject of considerable interest in recent years. While a variety of captive bred species have been used in experiments, the extent to which GTM of captive and/or inbred individuals resembles natural composition and variation in wild populations is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we performed 16S rDNA GTM barcoding for 30 wild house mice (Mus musculus) and wild-derived inbred strain mice belonging to two subspecies (M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus). Sequenced individuals were selected according to a 2 × 2 experimental design: wild (14) vs. inbred origin (16) and M. m. musculus (15) vs. M. m. domesticus (15). We compared alpha diversity (i.e. number of operational taxonomic units - OTUs), beta diversity (i.e. interindividual variability) and microbiota composition across the four groups. We found no difference between M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus subspecies, suggesting low effect of genetic differentiation between these two subspecies on GTM structure. Both inbred and wild populations showed the same level of microbial alpha and beta diversity; however, we found strong differentiation in microbiota composition between wild and inbred populations. Relative abundance of ~ 16% of OTUs differed significantly between wild and inbred individuals. As laboratory mice represent the most abundant model for studying the effects of gut microbiota on host metabolism, immunity and neurology, we suggest that the distinctness of laboratory-kept mouse microbiota, which differs from wild mouse microbiota, needs to be considered in future biomedical research.

  11. Disease, predation and demography: Assessing the impacts of bovine tuberculosis on African buffalo by monitoring at individual and population levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, P.C.; Heisey, D.M.; Bowers, J.A.; Hay, C.T.; Wolhuter, J.; Buss, P.; Hofmeyr, M.; Michel, A.L.; Bengis, Roy G.; Bird, T.L.F.; Du Toit, J.T.; Getz, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    1. Understanding the effects of disease is critical to determining appropriate management responses, but estimating those effects in wildlife species is challenging. We used bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the African buffalo Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, South Africa, as a case study to highlight the issues associated with estimating chronic disease effects in a long-lived host. 2. We used known and radiocollared buffalo, aerial census data, and a natural gradient in pathogen prevalence to investigate if: (i) at the individual level, BTB infection reduces reproduction; (ii) BTB infection increases vulnerability to predation; and (iii) at the population level, increased BTB prevalence causes reduced population growth. 3. There was only a marginal reduction in calving success associated with BTB infection, as indexed by the probability of sighting a known adult female with or without a calf (P = 0??065). 4. Since 1991, BTB prevalence increased from 27 to 45% in the southern region and from 4 to 28% in the central region of Kruger National Park. The prevalence in the northern regions was only 1??5% in 1998. Buffalo population growth rates, however, were neither statistically different among regions nor declining over time. 5. Lions Panthera leo did not appear to preferentially kill test-positive buffalo. The best (Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size) AICc model with BTB as a covariate [exp(??) = 0??49; 95% CI = (0??24-1??02)] suggested that the mortality hazard for positive individuals was no greater than for test-negative individuals. 6. Synthesis and applications. Test accuracy, time-varying disease status, and movement among populations are some of the issues that make the detection of chronic disease impacts challenging. For these reasons, the demographic impacts of bovine tuberculosis in the Kruger National Park remain undetectable despite 6 years of study on known individuals and 40 years of population counts

  12. 14 CFR 13.16 - Civil Penalties: Administrative assessment against a person other than an individual acting as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... chapter 51 or a regulation prescribed or order issued under that chapter, under 49 U.S.C. 5123 and 49 CFR... Administrator under 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), 47531, and 5123, and 49 CFR 1.47(k) to initiate and assess civil.... 5123, 49 CFR 1.47(k), 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), and 49 U.S.C. 46305 to refer cases to the Attorney General...

  13. 14 CFR 13.16 - Civil Penalties: Administrative assessment against a person other than an individual acting as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... chapter 51 or a regulation prescribed or order issued under that chapter, under 49 U.S.C. 5123 and 49 CFR... Administrator under 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), 47531, and 5123, and 49 CFR 1.47(k) to initiate and assess civil.... 5123, 49 CFR 1.47(k), 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), and 49 U.S.C. 46305 to refer cases to the Attorney General...

  14. 14 CFR 13.16 - Civil Penalties: Administrative assessment against a person other than an individual acting as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... chapter 51 or a regulation prescribed or order issued under that chapter, under 49 U.S.C. 5123 and 49 CFR... Administrator under 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), 47531, and 5123, and 49 CFR 1.47(k) to initiate and assess civil.... 5123, 49 CFR 1.47(k), 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), and 49 U.S.C. 46305 to refer cases to the Attorney General...

  15. 14 CFR 13.16 - Civil Penalties: Administrative assessment against a person other than an individual acting as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... chapter 51 or a regulation prescribed or order issued under that chapter, under 49 U.S.C. 5123 and 49 CFR... Administrator under 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), 47531, and 5123, and 49 CFR 1.47(k) to initiate and assess civil.... 5123, 49 CFR 1.47(k), 49 U.S.C. 46301(d), and 49 U.S.C. 46305 to refer cases to the Attorney General...

  16. A method to assess the influence of individual player performance distribution on match outcome in team sports.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sam; Gupta, Ritu; McIntosh, Sam

    2016-10-01

    This study developed a method to determine whether the distribution of individual player performances can be modelled to explain match outcome in team sports, using Australian Rules football as an example. Player-recorded values (converted to a percentage of team total) in 11 commonly reported performance indicators were obtained for all regular season matches played during the 2014 Australian Football League season, with team totals also recorded. Multiple features relating to heuristically determined percentiles for each performance indicator were then extracted for each team and match, along with the outcome (win/loss). A generalised estimating equation model comprising eight key features was developed, explaining match outcome at a median accuracy of 63.9% under 10-fold cross-validation. Lower 75th, 90th and 95th percentile values for team goals and higher 25th and 50th percentile values for disposals were linked with winning. Lower 95th and higher 25th percentile values for Inside 50s and Marks, respectively, were also important contributors. These results provide evidence supporting team strategies which aim to obtain an even spread of goal scorers in Australian Rules football. The method developed in this investigation could be used to quantify the importance of individual contributions to overall team performance in team sports.

  17. Assessment of micronuclei frequency in individuals with a habit of tobacco by means of exfoliated oral buccal cells

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Tanvi; Gupta, Dhaman; Hazari, Alka; Rajput, Rajan; Chauhan, Prabhav; Rajapuri, Anushri S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To study the genotoxic effects of tobacco on the exfoliated buccal epithelial cells in patients with oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) and Patients with tobacco habit but without oral precancerous lesion(habit controls) by using micronucleus assay as well as the quantification and detection of the biomarkers in these premalignant lesions which will be helpful in finding those patients who are at higher risk for malignant transformation. Materials and Methods: Forty samples were collected from the right and left side of buccal epithelial cells obtained from 20 individuals, i.e., 10 patients with habit control and 10 patients with OPLs. Statistical analysis was performed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 Unpaired t-test was performed to determine the micronucleated cell (MNC) and micronuclei (MN) frequencies in individuals; significance was set at P > 0.05. Results: There was an increase in both the MNC and MN frequency from habit controls to OPLs, indicating that the number of cells with chromosomal damage and extent of chromosomal damage in each cell was high in OPLs. Conclusion: The MN count can be used as a noninvasive tool for early detection, educating patients, screening a large population, and to check the risk for malignancy, which in turn may help in treatment planning. PMID:27652247

  18. Assessment of micronuclei frequency in individuals with a habit of tobacco by means of exfoliated oral buccal cells

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Tanvi; Gupta, Dhaman; Hazari, Alka; Rajput, Rajan; Chauhan, Prabhav; Rajapuri, Anushri S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To study the genotoxic effects of tobacco on the exfoliated buccal epithelial cells in patients with oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) and Patients with tobacco habit but without oral precancerous lesion(habit controls) by using micronucleus assay as well as the quantification and detection of the biomarkers in these premalignant lesions which will be helpful in finding those patients who are at higher risk for malignant transformation. Materials and Methods: Forty samples were collected from the right and left side of buccal epithelial cells obtained from 20 individuals, i.e., 10 patients with habit control and 10 patients with OPLs. Statistical analysis was performed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 Unpaired t-test was performed to determine the micronucleated cell (MNC) and micronuclei (MN) frequencies in individuals; significance was set at P > 0.05. Results: There was an increase in both the MNC and MN frequency from habit controls to OPLs, indicating that the number of cells with chromosomal damage and extent of chromosomal damage in each cell was high in OPLs. Conclusion: The MN count can be used as a noninvasive tool for early detection, educating patients, screening a large population, and to check the risk for malignancy, which in turn may help in treatment planning.

  19. Assessing maternal effects on metabolic rate dynamics along early development in brown trout (Salmo trutta): an individual-based approach.

    PubMed

    Régnier, Thomas; Bolliet, Valérie; Labonne, Jacques; Gaudin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Routine metabolic rate (oxygen consumption) of individual eggs and larvae of brown trout (Salmo trutta) originating from different families were monitored from fertilisation to the onset of emergence by means of flow through micro-respirometry. This measuring system revealed an accurate tool to measure oxygen consumption on small organisms at the individual level, and daily consumption proved to be very stable. The mass-specific metabolic rate remained low from fertilisation to hatching, and then increased quickly until the age of emergence. A Bayesian modelling approach was used to adequately infer maternal effects on metabolic rate dynamics all along the development period. Substantial differences were found between families, affecting average metabolic rate as well as intra-family variance. That is, offspring originating from different females may have different energetic needs at emergence from gravel. Moreover, between siblings, variability in metabolic rate is also under the influence of maternal effects. Implications of this metabolic rate variability are discussed with regard to life history strategies and early behaviours.

  20. The Hirsch-index: a simple, new tool for the assessment of scientific output of individual scientists

    PubMed Central

    Opthof, T.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this brief paper we explore the Hirsch-index together with a couple of other bibliometric parameters for the assessment of the scientific output of 29 Dutch professors in clinical cardiology. It appears that even within such a homogeneous group there is large interindividual variability. Although the differences are quite remarkable, it remains undetermined what they mean; at least it is premature to interpret them as differences in scientific quality. It goes without saying that even more prudence is required when different fields of medicine and life sciences are compared (for example within University Medical Centres). Recent efforts to produce an amalgam of scientific ‘productivity’, ‘relevance’ and ‘viability’ as a surrogate parameter for the assessment of scientific quality, as for example performed in the AMC in Amsterdam, should be discouraged in the absence of a firm scientific base. Unfortunately for politicians and ‘managers of science’ only reading papers and studying are suitable for quality assessment of scientific output. Citations analyses can't substitute that. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:145-54.19421360) PMID:19421360

  1. Therapist adherence in individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for binge-eating disorder: assessment, course, and predictors.

    PubMed

    Brauhardt, Anne; de Zwaan, Martina; Herpertz, Stephan; Zipfel, Stephan; Svaldi, Jennifer; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Hilbert, Anja

    2014-10-01

    While cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most well-established treatment for binge-eating disorder (BED), little is known about process factors influencing its outcome. The present study sought to explore the assessment of therapist adherence, its course over treatment, and its associations with patient and therapist characteristics, and the therapeutic alliance. In a prospective multicenter randomized-controlled trial comparing CBT to internet-based guided self-help (INTERBED-study), therapist adherence using the newly developed Adherence Control Form (ACF) was determined by trained raters in randomly selected 418 audio-taped CBT sessions of 89 patients (25% of all sessions). Observer-rated therapeutic alliance, interview-based and self-reported patient and therapist characteristics were assessed. Three-level multilevel modeling was applied. The ACF showed adequate psychometric properties. Therapist adherence was excellent. While significant between-therapist variability in therapist adherence was found, within-therapist variability was non-significant. Patient and therapist characteristics did not predict the therapist adherence. The therapist adherence positively predicted the therapeutic alliance. The ACF demonstrated its utility to assess therapist adherence in CBT for BED. The excellent levels of therapist adherence point to the internal validity of the CBT within the INTERBED-study serving as a prerequisite for empirical comparisons between treatments. Variability between therapists should be addressed in therapist trainings and dissemination trials.

  2. The Dynamic Risk Assessment and Management System: An Assessment of Immediate Risk of Violence for Individuals with Offending and Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Murphy, Lesley; Smith, Gordon; Murphy, Daniel; Edwards, Zoe; Chittock, Chris; Grieve, Alan; Young, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Research on dynamic risk assessment has developed over the last 10 years and a number of variables have emerged as being possible predictors of future sexual and violent offences. These variables include hostile attitude/anger and compliance with routine. In 2002, Thornton ("Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research & Treatment" 14, 139)…

  3. Attitudes of Special Education Teachers and School Psychologists toward Individualized Education Plan IEPs Developed Using Traditional Assessments versus IEPs Developed Using a Multiple Intelligence Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhajri, Meshari A SH A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the usefulness of Multiple Intelligence for educational planning for students in special education. More specifically, this study applied the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS) to a sample of students receiving special education services who had IEPs developed using…

  4. Assessment of PCR in the detection of Leishmania spp in experimentally infected individual phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Erika M; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo L; Pimenta, Paulo F P; Secundino, Nágila F C; Dias, Edelberto S

    2002-01-01

    DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied in the investigation of the presence of Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) parasites in single phlebotomine sandflies. Three phlebotomine/parasite pairs were used: Lutzomyia longipalpis/Leishmania chagasi, Lutzomyia migonei/Leishmania amazonensis and Lutzomyia migonei/Leishmania braziliensis, all of them incriminated in the transmission of visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis. DNA extraction was performed with whole insects, with no need of previous digestive tract dissection or pooling specimens. The presence of either mouse blood in the digestive tract of the sandflies or the digestive tract itself did not interfere in the PCR. Infection by as few as 10 Leishmania sp. per individual were sufficient for DNA amplification with genus-specific primers. Using primers for L. braziliensis and L. mexicana complexes, respectively, it was possible to discriminate between L. braziliensis and L. amazonensis in experimentally infected vectors (L. migonei).

  5. Assessment of the 3 D Pore Structure and Individual Components of Preshaped Catalyst Bodies by X-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Julio C; Mader, Kevin; Holler, Mirko; Haberthür, David; Diaz, Ana; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Cheng, Wu-Cheng; Shu, Yuying; Raabe, Jörg; Menzel, Andreas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Porosity in catalyst particles is essential because it enables reactants to reach the active sites and it enables products to leave the catalyst. The engineering of composite-particle catalysts through the tuning of pore-size distribution and connectivity is hampered by the inability to visualize structure and porosity at critical-length scales. Herein, it is shown that the combination of phase-contrast X-ray microtomography and high-resolution ptychographic X-ray tomography allows the visualization and characterization of the interparticle pores at micro- and nanometer-length scales. Furthermore, individual components in preshaped catalyst bodies used in fluid catalytic cracking, one of the most used catalysts, could be visualized and identified. The distribution of pore sizes, as well as enclosed pores, which cannot be probed by traditional methods, such as nitrogen physisorption and isotherm analysis, were determined. PMID:26191088

  6. Angels and demons are among us: assessing individual differences in belief in pure evil and belief in pure good.

    PubMed

    Webster, Russell J; Saucier, Donald A

    2013-11-01

    We conducted five studies to demonstrate that individuals' beliefs in pure evil (BPE) and in pure good (BPG) are valid and important psychological constructs. First, these studies together demonstrated that BPE and BPG are reliable, unitary, and stable constructs each composed of eight theoretically interdependent dimensions. Second, these studies showed that across a wide variety of different measures, higher BPE consistently related to greater intergroup aggression (e.g., supporting the death penalty and preemptive military aggression) and less intergroup prosociality (e.g., opposing criminal rehabilitation, proracial policies, and beneficial social programs), while higher BPG consistently related to less intergroup aggression (e.g., opposing proviolent foreign relations and torture) and greater intergroup prosociality (e.g., supporting criminal rehabilitation and support for diplomacy). In sum, these studies evidence that BPE and BPG relate to aggressive and prosocial orientations toward others and have strong potential to advance current theories on prejudice, aggression, and prosociality.

  7. Angels and demons are among us: assessing individual differences in belief in pure evil and belief in pure good.

    PubMed

    Webster, Russell J; Saucier, Donald A

    2013-11-01

    We conducted five studies to demonstrate that individuals' beliefs in pure evil (BPE) and in pure good (BPG) are valid and important psychological constructs. First, these studies together demonstrated that BPE and BPG are reliable, unitary, and stable constructs each composed of eight theoretically interdependent dimensions. Second, these studies showed that across a wide variety of different measures, higher BPE consistently related to greater intergroup aggression (e.g., supporting the death penalty and preemptive military aggression) and less intergroup prosociality (e.g., opposing criminal rehabilitation, proracial policies, and beneficial social programs), while higher BPG consistently related to less intergroup aggression (e.g., opposing proviolent foreign relations and torture) and greater intergroup prosociality (e.g., supporting criminal rehabilitation and support for diplomacy). In sum, these studies evidence that BPE and BPG relate to aggressive and prosocial orientations toward others and have strong potential to advance current theories on prejudice, aggression, and prosociality. PMID:23885037

  8. Assessing the Ecological Response of Dung Beetles in an Agricultural Landscape Using Number of Individuals and Biomass in Diversity Measures.

    PubMed

    Cultid-Medina, C A; Escobar, F

    2016-04-01

    The global increase in demand for productive land requires us to increase our knowledge of the value of agricultural landscapes for the management and conservation of biodiversity, particularly in tropical regions. Thus, comparative studies of how different community attributes respond to changes in land use under different levels of deforestation intensity would be useful. We analyzed patterns of dung beetle diversity in an Andean region dominated by sun-grown coffee. Diversity was estimated using two measures of species abundance (the number of individuals and biomass) and was compared among four types of vegetation cover (forest, riparian forest, sun-grown coffee, and pastures) in three landscape plots with different degrees of deforestation intensity (low, intermediate, and high). We found that dung beetle diversity patterns differed between types of vegetation cover and degree of deforestation, depending on whether the number of individuals or biomass was used. Based on biomass, inequality in the dung beetle community was lowest in the forest, and increased in the sun-grown coffee and pastures across all levels of deforestation, particularly for the increasing dominance of large species. The number of beetles and biomass indicate that the spatial dominance of sun-grown coffee does not necessarily imply the drastic impoverishment of dung beetle diversity. In fact, for these beetles, it would seem that the landscape studied has not yet crossed "a point of no return." This system offers a starting point for exploring biodiversity management and conservation options in the sun-grown coffee landscapes of the Colombian Andes. PMID:26803806

  9. New salivary anti-haemostatics containing protective epitopes from Ornithodoros moubata ticks: Assessment of their individual and combined vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Martín, Verónica; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2015-09-15

    Ornithodoros moubata is the main vector of the pathogens causing African swine fever and human relapsing fever in Africa. The development of an efficient vaccine against this tick would facilitate its control and the prevention of the diseases it transmits to a considerable extent. Previous efforts to identify vaccine target candidates led us to the discovery of novel salivary proteins that probably act as anti-haemostatics at the host-tick interface, including a secreted phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a 7DB-like protein (7DB-like), a riboprotein 60S L10 (RP-60S), an apyrase (APY), and a new platelet aggregation inhibitor peptide, designated mougrin (MOU). In this work, the corresponding recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and their individual vaccine efficacy was tested in rabbit vaccination trials. All of them, except the less immunogenic RP-60S, induced strong humoral responses that reduced tick feeding and survival, providing vaccine efficacies of 44.2%, 43.2% and 27.2%, 19.9% and 17.3% for PLA2, APY, MOU, RP-60S and 7DB-like, respectively. In the case of the more protective recombinant antigens (PLA2, APY and MOU), the immunodominant protective linear B-cell epitopes were identified and their combined vaccine efficacy was tested in a second vaccine trial using different adjuvants. In comparison with the best efficacy of individual antigens, the multicomponent vaccine increased vaccine efficacy by 13.6%, indicating additive protective effects rather than a synergistic effect. Tick saliva inoculated during natural tick-host contacts had a boosting effect on vaccinated animals, increasing specific antibody levels and protection. PMID:26293586

  10. Histomorphometric Assessment of Cancellous and Cortical Bone Material Distribution in the Proximal Humerus of Normal and Osteoporotic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Christoph M.; Schmidutz, Florian; Helfen, Tobias; Richards, R. Geoff; Blauth, Michael; Milz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteoporosis is a systemic disorder predominantly affecting postmenopausal women but also men at an advanced age. Both genders may suffer from low-energy fractures of, for example, the proximal humerus when reduction of the bone stock or/and quality has occurred. The aim of the current study was to compare the amount of bone in typical fracture zones of the proximal humerus in osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic individuals. The amount of bone in the proximal humerus was determined histomorphometrically in frontal plane sections. The donor bones were allocated to normal and osteoporotic groups using the T-score from distal radius DXA measurements of the same extremities. The T-score evaluation was done according to WHO criteria. Regional thickness of the subchondral plate and the metaphyseal cortical bone were measured using interactive image analysis. At all measured locations the amount of cancellous bone was significantly lower in individuals from the osteoporotic group compared to the non-osteoporotic one. The osteoporotic group showed more significant differences between regions of the same bone than the non-osteoporotic group. In both groups the subchondral cancellous bone and the subchondral plate were least affected by bone loss. In contrast, the medial metaphyseal region in the osteoporotic group exhibited higher bone loss in comparison to the lateral side. This observation may explain prevailing fracture patterns, which frequently involve compression fractures and certainly has an influence on the stability of implants placed in this medial region. It should be considered when planning the anchoring of osteosynthesis materials in osteoporotic patients with fractures of the proximal humerus. PMID:26705200

  11. A newly developed tool for intra-tracheal temperature and humidity assessment in laryngectomized individuals: the Airway Climate Explorer (ACE).

    PubMed

    Zuur, J K; Muller, S H; de Jongh, F H C; van der Horst, M J; Shehata, M; van Leeuwen, J; Sinaasappel, M; Hilgers, F J M

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a postlaryngectomy airway climate explorer (ACE) for assessment of intratracheal temperature and humidity and of influence of heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs). Engineering goals were within-device condensation prevention and fast response time characteristics. The ACE consists of a small diameter, heated air-sampling catheter connected to a heated sensor house, containing a humidity sensor. Air is sucked through the catheter by a controlled-flow pump. Validation was performed in a climate chamber using a calibrated reference sensor and in a two-flow system. Additionally, the analyser was tested in vivo. Over the clinically relevant range of humidity values (5-42 mg H2O/l air) the sensor output highly correlates with the reference sensor readings (R2 > 0.99). The 1-1/e response times are all <0.5 s. A first in vivo pilot measurement was successful. The newly developed, verified, fast-responding ACE is suitable for postlaryngectomy airway climate assessment.

  12. DNA Damage Signaling Assessed in Individual Cells in Relation to the Cell Cycle Phase and Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H. Dorota; Rybak, Paulina; Dobrucki, Jurek; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Reviewed are the phosphorylation events reporting activation of protein kinases and the key substrates critical for the DNA damage signaling (DDS). These DDS events are detected immunocytochemically using phospho-specific Abs; flow cytometry or image-assisted cytometry provide the means to quantitatively assess them on a cell by cell basis. The multiparameter analysis of the data is used to correlate these events with each other and relate to the cell cycle phase, DNA replication and induction of apoptosis. Expression of γH2AX as a possible marker of induction of DNA double strand breaks is the most widely studied event of DDS. Reviewed are applications of this multiparameter approach to investigate constitutive DDS reporting DNA damage by endogenous oxidants byproducts of oxidative phosphorylation. Also reviewed are its applications to detect and explore mechanisms of DDS induced by variety of exogenous agents targeting DNA such as exogenous oxidants, ionizing radiation, radiomimetic drugs, UV light, DNA topoisomerase I and II inhibitors, DNA crosslinking drugs and variety of environmental genotoxins. Analysis of DDS induced by these agents provides often a wealth of information about mechanism of induction and the type of DNA damage (lesion) and is reviewed in the context of cell cycle phase specificity, DNA replication, and induction of apoptosis or cell senescence. Critically assessed is interpretation of the data as to whether the observed DDS events report induction of a particular type of DNA lesion. PMID:23137030

  13. The mental health of individuals referred for assessment of autism spectrum disorder in adulthood: A clinic report.

    PubMed

    Russell, Ailsa J; Murphy, Clodagh M; Wilson, Ellie; Gillan, Nicola; Brown, Cordelia; Robertson, Dene M; Craig, Michael C; Deeley, Quinton; Zinkstok, Janneke; Johnston, Kate; McAlonan, Grainne M; Spain, Deborah; Murphy, Declan Gm

    2016-07-01

    Growing awareness of autism spectrum disorders has increased the demand for diagnostic services in adulthood. High rates of mental health problems have been reported in young people and adults with autism spectrum disorder. However, sampling and methodological issues mean prevalence estimates and conclusions about specificity in psychiatric co-morbidity in autism spectrum disorder remain unclear. A retrospective case review of 859 adults referred for assessment of autism spectrum disorder compares International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision diagnoses in those that met criteria for autism spectrum disorder (n = 474) with those that did not (n = 385). Rates of psychiatric diagnosis (>57%) were equivalent across both groups and exceeded general population rates for a number of conditions. The prevalence of anxiety disorders, particularly obsessive compulsive disorder, was significantly higher in adults with autism spectrum disorder than adults without autism spectrum disorder. Limitations of this observational clinic study, which may impact generalisability of the findings, include the lack of standardised structured psychiatric diagnostic assessments by assessors blind to autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and inter-rater reliability. The implications of this study highlight the need for careful consideration of mental health needs in all adults referred for autism spectrum disorder diagnosis.

  14. Radiation risk models for all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring individual assessments after a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In the assessment of health risks after nuclear accidents, some health consequences require special attention. For example, in their 2013 report on health risk assessment after the Fukushima nuclear accident, the World Health Organisation (WHO) panel of experts considered risks of breast cancer, thyroid cancer and leukaemia. For these specific cancer types, use was made of already published excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models for radiation-related cancer incidence fitted to the epidemiological data from the Japanese A-bomb Life Span Study (LSS). However, it was also considered important to assess all other types of solid cancer together and the WHO, in their above-mentioned report, stated "No model to calculate the risk for all other solid cancer excluding breast and thyroid cancer risks is available from the LSS data". Applying the LSS models for all solid cancers along with the models for the specific sites means that some cancers have an overlap in the risk evaluations. Thus, calculating the total solid cancer risk plus the breast cancer risk plus the thyroid cancer risk can overestimate the total risk by several per cent. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to publish the required models for all other solid cancers, i.e. all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring special attention after a nuclear accident. The new models presented here have been fitted to the same LSS data set from which the risks provided by the WHO were derived. Although it is known already that the EAR and ERR effect modifications by sex are statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer", it is shown here that sex modification is not statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer other than thyroid and breast cancer". It is also shown here that the sex-averaged solid cancer risks with and without the sex modification are very similar once breast and thyroid cancers are factored out. Some other notable model

  15. Radiation risk models for all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring individual assessments after a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In the assessment of health risks after nuclear accidents, some health consequences require special attention. For example, in their 2013 report on health risk assessment after the Fukushima nuclear accident, the World Health Organisation (WHO) panel of experts considered risks of breast cancer, thyroid cancer and leukaemia. For these specific cancer types, use was made of already published excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models for radiation-related cancer incidence fitted to the epidemiological data from the Japanese A-bomb Life Span Study (LSS). However, it was also considered important to assess all other types of solid cancer together and the WHO, in their above-mentioned report, stated "No model to calculate the risk for all other solid cancer excluding breast and thyroid cancer risks is available from the LSS data". Applying the LSS models for all solid cancers along with the models for the specific sites means that some cancers have an overlap in the risk evaluations. Thus, calculating the total solid cancer risk plus the breast cancer risk plus the thyroid cancer risk can overestimate the total risk by several per cent. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to publish the required models for all other solid cancers, i.e. all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring special attention after a nuclear accident. The new models presented here have been fitted to the same LSS data set from which the risks provided by the WHO were derived. Although it is known already that the EAR and ERR effect modifications by sex are statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer", it is shown here that sex modification is not statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer other than thyroid and breast cancer". It is also shown here that the sex-averaged solid cancer risks with and without the sex modification are very similar once breast and thyroid cancers are factored out. Some other notable model

  16. Clinical Applicability of Assessment of Jugular Flow over the Individual Cardiac Cycle Compared with Current Ultrasound Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sisini, Francesco; Tessari, Mirko; Menegatti, Erica; Vannini, Maria Elena; Gianesini, Sergio; Tavoni, Valentina; Gadda, Giacomo; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo; Zamboni, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in measuring cerebral venous outflow with ultrasound (US). However, results obtained with the current US Doppler methodology, which uses just a single value of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the vessel, are highly variable and inconclusive. The product of CSA and time-averaged velocity in the case of pulsatile vessels may be a possible source of error, particularly for a pulsatile vein like the internal jugular vein (IJV), where the cardiac pump transmits a sequence of well-established waves along the conduit. We herein propose a novel technique for US IJV flow assessment that accurately accounts for IJV CSA variations during the cardiac cycle. Five subjects were investigated with a high-resolution real-time B-mode video, synchronized with an electrocardiography trace. In this approach, CSA variations representing the pulsatility of the IJV are overlapped with the velocity curve obtained by the usual spectral Doppler trace. The overlap is then phased point by point using the electrocardiography pacemaker. This allows us to experimentally measure the velocity variation in relation to the change in CSA precisely, ultimately enabling calculation of IJV flow. (i) The sequence of CSA variation with respect to the electrocardiography waves corresponds exactly to the jugular venous pulse as measured in physiology. (ii) The methodology permits us to phase the velocity and CSA, which is ultimately what is currently lacking to precisely calculate the flow in the IJV with US. (iii) The time-averaged flow, calculated with the described technique, is very close to that calculated assuming a constant IJV CSA, whereas the time-dependent flow shows differs as much as 40%. (iv) Finally, we tested the accuracy of the technique with a methodology that may allow for universal assessment of the accuracy of each personal US-based evaluation of flow rate. PMID:27108038

  17. Assessment of Physical Activity Level among Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at Cheras Health Clinic, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Nor Shazwani, M N; Suzana, S; Hanis Mastura, Y; Lim, C J; Teh, S C; Mohd Fauzee, M Z; Lim, H C; Dahlia, S; Norliza, M

    2010-04-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the physical activity levels among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) at Cheras Health Clinic in Kuala Lumpur. A total of 132 subjects (62 men and 70 women) aged 30 years and above participated in this study. Data was collected using an interview based questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and health profile information. Physical activity was assessed using a shortened version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Anthropometric measurements and body fat were also taken. Glycaemic status, that is, HbA1c, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and 2 hours post-prandial (2-HPP) were obtained from medical records. Results showed that the mean age of the patients was 51.9 + 5.8 years. The majority of patients had poor glycaemic control based on HbA1c (70.7%), FBS (71.9%) and 2HPP (85.4%). Patients who were unmarried and aged(60 years and above had a lower physical activity level (p< 0.05). In the older age group, low physical activity was associated with poor glycaemic control (p< 0.05). Patients in the moderate and high physical activity level were motivated to perform physical activity so as to be healthy (68.1%). Low physical activity level among patients was due to lack of time (54.5%) and lack of energy (21.2%). In conclusion, physical activity levels of the patients were unsatisfactory and associated with poor glycaemic control, especially in the elderly. There is a need to encourage diabetic patients to undertake regular physical activity in order to achieve optimal glycaemic control. PMID:22691857

  18. An assessment of fixed interval timing in free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): an analysis of individual performance.

    PubMed

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A; Sokolowski, Michel B C; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no "scalloped" or "break-and-run" patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules.

  19. Pb-Pb dating of individual chondrules from the CBa chondrite Gujba: Assessment of the impact plume formation model

    PubMed Central

    Bollard, Jean; Connelly, James N.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The CB chondrites are metal-rich meteorites with characteristics that sharply distinguish them from other chondrite groups. Their unusual chemical and petrologic features and a young formation age of bulk chondrules dated from the CBa chondrite Gujba are interpreted to reflect a single-stage impact origin. Here, we report high-precision internal isochrons for four individual chondrules of the Gujba chondrite to probe the formation history of CB chondrites and evaluate the concordancy of relevant short-lived radionuclide chronometers. All four chondrules define a brief formation interval with a weighted mean age of 4562.49 ± 0.21 Myr, consistent with its origin from the vapor-melt impact plume generated by colliding planetesimals. Formation in a debris disk mostly devoid of nebular gas and dust sets an upper limit for the solar protoplanetary disk lifetime at 4.8 ± 0.3 Myr. Finally, given the well-behaved Pb-Pb systematics of all four chondrules, a precise formation age and the concordancy of the Mn-Cr, Hf-W, and I-Xe short-lived radionuclide relative chronometers, we propose that Gujba may serve as a suitable time anchor for these systems. PMID:27429545

  20. An Assessment of Fixed Interval Timing in Free-Flying Honey Bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): An Analysis of Individual Performance

    PubMed Central

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A.; Sokolowski, Michel B. C.; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I.

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no “scalloped” or “break-and-run” patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules. PMID:24983960

  1. An assessment of fixed interval timing in free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): an analysis of individual performance.

    PubMed

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A; Sokolowski, Michel B C; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no "scalloped" or "break-and-run" patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules. PMID:24983960

  2. Assessment of Oral Conditions and Quality of Life in Morbid Obese and Normal Weight Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Joselene Martinelli; Moura-Grec, Patrícia Garcia de; Freitas, Adriana Rodrigues de; Sales-Peres, Arsênio; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the impact of oral disease on the quality of life of morbid obese and normal weight individuals. Cohort was composed of 100 morbid-obese and 50 normal-weight subjects. Dental caries, community periodontal index, gingival bleeding on probing (BOP), calculus, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, dental wear, stimulated salivary flow, and salivary pH were used to evaluate oral diseases. Socioeconomic and the oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) questionnaires showed the quality of life in both groups. Unpaired Student, Fisher's Exact, Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney, and Multiple Regression tests were used (p<0.05). Obese showed lower socio-economic level than control group, but no differences were found considering OIDP. No significant differences were observed between groups considering the number of absent teeth, bruxism, difficult mastication, calculus, initial caries lesion, and caries. However, saliva flow was low, and the salivary pH was changed in the obese group. Enamel wear was lower and dentine wear was higher in obese. More BOP, insertion loss, and periodontal pocket, especially the deeper ones, were found in obese subjects. The regression model showed gender, smoking, salivary pH, socio-economic level, periodontal pocket, and periodontal insertion loss significantly associated to obesity. However, both OIDP and BOP did not show significant contribution to the model. The quality of life of morbid obese was more negatively influenced by oral disease and socio-economic factors than in normal weight subjects. PMID:26177268

  3. Assessing frequency effects on verb inflection use by Spanish-speaking individuals with agrammatism: theoretical and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Centeno, José G; Cairns, Helen Smith

    2010-02-01

    The resistance of high-frequency linguistic elements to aphasic impairment suggests that frequency of occurrence may be implicated in verb use differences in agrammatic aphasia. The highly-inflected Spanish verb system allows for the examination of frequency of occurrence along two main metrics, daily usage frequency and paradigmatic frequency. In this study, we explored the role of those two frequency dimensions in verb repetition by Spanish speakers with agrammatism. Six native Spanish-speaking individuals with agrammatic oral expression were matched for age, education and Spanish dialect with six speakers with typical language. The speakers participated in a sentence repetition task involving simple verb tenses. Results revealed that high frequency in daily usage can have a stronger facilitating effect on verb repetition than paradigmatic frequency. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed to highlight some plausible repercussions of typical discourse patterns in providing a socio-cognitive dimension to agrammatism theory and in supporting the use of frequency-based linguistic features in agrammatism therapy.

  4. Assessing Individual Intellectual Output in Scientific Research: Mexico's National System for Evaluating Scholars Performance in the Humanities and the Behavioral Sciences.

    PubMed

    Frixione, Eugenio; Ruiz-Zamarripa, Lourdes; Hernández, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the research of individual scholars is currently a matter of serious concern and worldwide debate. In order to gauge the long-term efficacy and efficiency of this practice, we carried out a limited survey of the operation and outcome of Mexico's 30-year old National System of Investigators or SNI, the country's main instrument for stimulating competitive research in science and technology. A statistical random sample of researchers listed in the area of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences-one of SNI's first and better consolidated academic divisions comprising a wide range of research disciplines, from philosophy to pedagogy to archaeology to experimental brain research-was screened comparing individual ranks or "Levels of distinction" to actual compliance with the SNI's own evaluation criteria, as reflected in major public databases of scholarly production. The same analysis was applied to members of a recent Review Committee, integrated by top-level researchers belonging to that general area of knowledge, who have been in charge of assessing and ranking their colleagues. Our results for both sets of scholars show wide disparity of individual productivity within the same SNI Level, according to all key indicators officially required (books issued by prestigious publishers, research articles appeared in indexed journals, and formation of new scientists), as well as in impact estimated by numbers of citations. Statistical calculation from the data indicates that 36% of members in the Review Committee and 53% of researchers in the random sample do not satisfy the official criteria requested for their appointed SNI Levels. The findings are discussed in terms of possible methodological errors in our study, of relevance for the SNI at large in relation to independent appraisals, of the cost-benefit balance of the organization as a research policy tool, and of possible alternatives for its thorough restructuring. As it currently stands SNI is not a model for

  5. Assessing Individual Intellectual Output in Scientific Research: Mexico’s National System for Evaluating Scholars Performance in the Humanities and the Behavioral Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Frixione, Eugenio; Ruiz-Zamarripa, Lourdes; Hernández, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the research of individual scholars is currently a matter of serious concern and worldwide debate. In order to gauge the long-term efficacy and efficiency of this practice, we carried out a limited survey of the operation and outcome of Mexico’s 30-year old National System of Investigators or SNI, the country’s main instrument for stimulating competitive research in science and technology. A statistical random sample of researchers listed in the area of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences—one of SNI’s first and better consolidated academic divisions comprising a wide range of research disciplines, from philosophy to pedagogy to archaeology to experimental brain research—was screened comparing individual ranks or "Levels of distinction" to actual compliance with the SNI’s own evaluation criteria, as reflected in major public databases of scholarly production. The same analysis was applied to members of a recent Review Committee, integrated by top-level researchers belonging to that general area of knowledge, who have been in charge of assessing and ranking their colleagues. Our results for both sets of scholars show wide disparity of individual productivity within the same SNI Level, according to all key indicators officially required (books issued by prestigious publishers, research articles appeared in indexed journals, and formation of new scientists), as well as in impact estimated by numbers of citations. Statistical calculation from the data indicates that 36% of members in the Review Committee and 53% of researchers in the random sample do not satisfy the official criteria requested for their appointed SNI Levels. The findings are discussed in terms of possible methodological errors in our study, of relevance for the SNI at large in relation to independent appraisals, of the cost-benefit balance of the organization as a research policy tool, and of possible alternatives for its thorough restructuring. As it currently stands SNI is not a

  6. Teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: conveying empathy to performing a suicide assessment: a primer for individual role-playing and scripted group role-playing.

    PubMed

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Barney, Christine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a useful introduction to the art of role-playing in both the individual format and the group format using scripted group role-playing (SGRP). Role-playing can provide powerful learning opportunities, but to do so it must be done well. This article imparts guidance toward this goal. SGRP may greatly enhance the acquisition of critical complex interviewing skills, such as suicide assessment and uncovering domestic violence, in health care providers across all disciplines, an educational goal that has not been achievable to date. Although research is at an early stage of development, the hope represented by SGRP is tangible.

  7. Teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: conveying empathy to performing a suicide assessment: a primer for individual role-playing and scripted group role-playing.

    PubMed

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Barney, Christine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a useful introduction to the art of role-playing in both the individual format and the group format using scripted group role-playing (SGRP). Role-playing can provide powerful learning opportunities, but to do so it must be done well. This article imparts guidance toward this goal. SGRP may greatly enhance the acquisition of critical complex interviewing skills, such as suicide assessment and uncovering domestic violence, in health care providers across all disciplines, an educational goal that has not been achievable to date. Although research is at an early stage of development, the hope represented by SGRP is tangible. PMID:25725575

  8. Inadequacy of 3-month Oswestry Disability Index outcome for assessing individual longer-term patient experience after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Asher, Anthony L; Chotai, Silky; Devin, Clinton J; Speroff, Theodore; Harrell, Frank E; Nian, Hui; Dittus, Robert S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Knightly, John J; Glassman, Steven D; Bydon, Mohamad; Archer, Kristin R; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    MCID at 3 and 12 months. The discordance rates of achieving or not achieving MCID for ODI were in the range of 19% to 27% for all diagnoses and treatments (decompression with and without fusion). The positive and negative predictive value of 3-months ODI to predict 12-month ODI was 86% and 60% for MCID and 82% and 67% for SCB. CONCLUSIONS Based on their findings, the authors conclude the following: 1) Predictive methods for functional outcome based on early patient experience (i.e., baseline and/or 3-month data) should be used to help evaluate the effectiveness of procedures in patient populations, rather than serving as a proxy for long-term individual patient experience. 2) Prospective longitudinal registries need to span at least 12 months to determine the effectiveness of spine care at the individual patient and practitioner level.

  9. Inadequacy of 3-month Oswestry Disability Index outcome for assessing individual longer-term patient experience after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Asher, Anthony L; Chotai, Silky; Devin, Clinton J; Speroff, Theodore; Harrell, Frank E; Nian, Hui; Dittus, Robert S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Knightly, John J; Glassman, Steven D; Bydon, Mohamad; Archer, Kristin R; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    MCID at 3 and 12 months. The discordance rates of achieving or not achieving MCID for ODI were in the range of 19% to 27% for all diagnoses and treatments (decompression with and without fusion). The positive and negative predictive value of 3-months ODI to predict 12-month ODI was 86% and 60% for MCID and 82% and 67% for SCB. CONCLUSIONS Based on their findings, the authors conclude the following: 1) Predictive methods for functional outcome based on early patient experience (i.e., baseline and/or 3-month data) should be used to help evaluate the effectiveness of procedures in patient populations, rather than serving as a proxy for long-term individual patient experience. 2) Prospective longitudinal registries need to span at least 12 months to determine the effectiveness of spine care at the individual patient and practitioner level. PMID:26989974

  10. Assessment of Oral Conditions and Quality of Life in Morbid Obese and Normal Weight Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Adriana Rodrigues; Sales-Peres, Arsênio; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the impact of oral disease on the quality of life of morbid obese and normal weight individuals. Cohort was composed of 100 morbid-obese and 50 normal-weight subjects. Dental caries, community periodontal index, gingival bleeding on probing (BOP), calculus, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, dental wear, stimulated salivary flow, and salivary pH were used to evaluate oral diseases. Socioeconomic and the oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) questionnaires showed the quality of life in both groups. Unpaired Student, Fisher’s Exact, Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney, and Multiple Regression tests were used (p<0.05). Obese showed lower socio-economic level than control group, but no differences were found considering OIDP. No significant differences were observed between groups considering the number of absent teeth, bruxism, difficult mastication, calculus, initial caries lesion, and caries. However, saliva flow was low, and the salivary pH was changed in the obese group. Enamel wear was lower and dentine wear was higher in obese. More BOP, insertion loss, and periodontal pocket, especially the deeper ones, were found in obese subjects. The regression model showed gender, smoking, salivary pH, socio-economic level, periodontal pocket, and periodontal insertion loss significantly associated to obesity. However, both OIDP and BOP did not show significant contribution to the model. The quality of life of morbid obese was more negatively influenced by oral disease and socio-economic factors than in normal weight subjects. PMID:26177268

  11. Individual and combined developmental toxicity assessment of bisphenol A and genistein using the embryonic stem cell test in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dan; Xing, Lina; Liu, Ran; Jiang, Jianjun; Wang, Wanyi; Shang, Lanqin; Wei, Xuetao; Hao, Weidong

    2013-10-01

    The potential developmental toxicity of environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptors have become a great concern in recent years. In this study, two typical environmental oestrogen, namely, bisphenol A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) were investigated for potential embryotoxicity using the embryonic stem cell test model. Afterwards, a 4×4 full factorial design and the estimated marginal means plot were performed to assess the combined effects of these two compounds. According to the linear discriminant functions and classification criteria, bisphenol A and genistein were classified as weakly embryotoxic and strongly embryotoxic respectively. As for combined effects, the overall interaction between BPA and GEN on embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation was synergistic at low dosages, however, on ESCs and 3T3 cell proliferation, the predominate action was additive. Considering the actual daily intake of these chemicals, it is concluded that BPA alone might not have adverse reproductive or developmental effects on human being. However, given that BPA and GEN do have synergistic effect at low concentration, they may disturb normal embryo development together, which could result in birth defect and behavioral alterations later in life.

  12. Toward the development of transcriptional biodosimetry for the identification of irradiated individuals and assessment of absorbed radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Kamil; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    The most frequently used and the best established method of biological dosimetry at present is the dicentric chromosome assay, which is poorly suitable for a mass casualties scenario. This gives rise to the need for the development of new, high-throughput assays for rapid identification of the subjects exposed to ionizing radiation. In the present study, we tested the usefulness of gene expression analysis in blood cells for biological dosimetry. Human peripheral blood from three healthy donors was X-irradiated with doses of 0 (control), 0.6, and 2 Gy. The mRNA level of 16 genes (ATF3, BAX, BBC3, BCL2, CDKN1A, DDB2, FDXR, GADD45A, GDF15, MDM2, PLK3, SERPINE1, SESN2, TNFRSF10B, TNFSF4, and VWCE) was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after exposure with ITFG1 and DPM1 used as a reference genes. The panel of radiation-responsive genes was selected comprising GADD45A, CDKN1A, BAX, BBC3, DDB2, TNFSF4, GDF15, and FDXR. Cluster analysis showed that ΔC t values of the selected genes contained sufficient information to allow discrimination between irradiated and non-irradiated blood samples. The samples were clearly grouped according to the absorbed doses of radiation and not to the time interval after irradiation or to the blood donor. PMID:25972268

  13. Social Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Harrigan, John

    Relationships between individuals and society have often been presented from the perspective of the social institution. Social psychology has addressed the variables that affect the individual in relationships with larger groups. Social individualism is a conceptual framework that explores the relationship of the individual and society from the…

  14. Genetic variability of glutathione S-transferase enzymes in human populations: functional inter-ethnic differences in detoxification systems.

    PubMed

    Polimanti, Renato; Carboni, Cinzia; Baesso, Ilenia; Piacentini, Sara; Iorio, Andrea; De Stefano, Gian Franco; Fuciarelli, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-Transferase enzymes (GSTs) constitute the principal Phase II superfamily which plays a key role in cellular detoxification and in other biological processes. Studies of GSTs have revealed that genetic polymorphisms are present in these enzymes and that some of these are Loss-of-Function (LoF) variants, which affect enzymatic functions and are related to different aspects of human health. The aim of this study was to analyze functional genetic differences in GST enzymes among human populations. Attention was focused on LoF polymorphisms of GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTO1, GSTO2, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes. These LoF variants were analyzed in 668 individuals belonging to six human groups with different ethnic backgrounds: Amhara and Oromo from Ethiopia; Colorado and Cayapa Amerindians and African Ecuadorians from Ecuador; and one sample from central Italy. The HapMap database was used to compare our data with reference populations and to analyze the haplotype and Linkage Disequilibrium diversity in different ethnic groups. Our results highlighted that ethnicity strongly affects the genetic variability of GST enzymes. In particular, GST haplotypes/variants with functional impact showed significant differences in human populations, according to their ethnic background. These data underline that human populations have different structures in detoxification genes, suggesting that these ethnic differences influence disease risk or response to drugs and therefore have implications for genetic association studies involving GST enzymes. In conclusion, our investigation provides data about the distribution of important LoF variants in GST genes in human populations. This information may be useful for designing and interpreting genetic association studies.

  15. Interethnic Differences in Antigen-Presenting Cell Activation and TLR Responses in Malian Children during Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Stéphanie; Dara, Victor; Traore, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Varani, Stefania; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2011-01-01

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be

  16. Interethnic differences in antigen-presenting cell activation and TLR responses in Malian children during Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Arama, Charles; Giusti, Pablo; Boström, Stéphanie; Dara, Victor; Traore, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Varani, Stefania; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2011-03-31

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be

  17. An Efficient Operant Choice Procedure for Assessing Delay Discounting in Humans: Initial Validation in Cocaine-Dependent and Control Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    Delay discounting is the decline in a consequence's control of behavior as a function of its delay, and may be a fundamental behavioral process in drug dependence. Human delay-discounting studies have usually relied on choices between hypothetical rewards. Some human tasks have assessed delay discounting using operant procedures with consequences provided during the task, as in nonhuman animal studies. However, these tasks have limitations such as long duration, potentially indeterminate data, or confounding the effect of delay with probability. A study in 20 cocaine-dependent volunteers and 20 demographically matched non-cocaine-dependent volunteers was designed to investigate a novel operant delay-discounting task providing monetary reinforcement by coin delivery throughout the task (Quick Discounting Operant Task; QDOT). Participants completed a hypothetical delay-discounting procedure, a potentially real reward delay-discounting procedure, and an existing operant delay-discounting task: the Experiential Discounting Task (EDT). The QDOT resulted in complete data for all participants, showed systematic effects of delay that were well described by a hyperbolic function, had a maximum duration of 17 min, and resulted in relatively little variability in session earnings. QDOT performance was significantly, positively correlated with performance on the EDT but not the other tasks. The QDOT resulted in an effect size between the groups that was similar to most other delay discounting tasks examined, and showed the cocaine-dependent participants to delay discount significantly more than the control participants. The QDOT is an efficient operant human delay-discounting task that may be useful in a variety of experimental settings. PMID:22329554

  18. The Children's Social Understanding Scale: construction and validation of a parent-report measure for assessing individual differences in children's theories of mind.

    PubMed

    Tahiroglu, Deniz; Moses, Louis J; Carlson, Stephanie M; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Olofson, Eric L; Sabbagh, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Children's theory of mind (ToM) is typically measured with laboratory assessments of performance. Although these measures have generated a wealth of informative data concerning developmental progressions in ToM, they may be less useful as the sole source of information about individual differences in ToM and their relation to other facets of development. In the current research, we aimed to expand the repertoire of methods available for measuring ToM by developing and validating a parent-report ToM measure: the Children's Social Understanding Scale (CSUS). We present 3 studies assessing the psychometric properties of the CSUS. Study 1 describes item analysis, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and relation of the scale to children's performance on laboratory ToM tasks. Study 2 presents cross-validation data for the scale in a different sample of preschool children with a different set of ToM tasks. Study 3 presents further validation data for the scale with a slightly older age group and a more advanced ToM task, while controlling for several other relevant cognitive abilities. The findings indicate that the CSUS is a reliable and valid measure of individual differences in children's ToM that may be of great value as a complement to standard ToM tasks in many different research contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Assessment of the individual and mixture toxicity of cadmium, copper and oxytetracycline, on the embryo-larval development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Gharred, Tahar; Jebali, Jamel; Belgacem, Mariem; Mannai, Rabeb; Achour, Sami

    2016-09-01

    Multiple pollutions by trace metals and pharmaceuticals have become one of the most important problems in marine coastal areas because of its excessive toxicity on organisms living in this area. This study aimed to assess the individual and mixture toxicity of Cu, Cd, and oxytetracycline frequently existing in the contaminated marine areas and the embryo-larval development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The individual contamination of the spermatozoid for 1 h with the increasing concentrations of Cd, Cu, and OTC decreases the fertility rate and increases larvae anomalies in the order Cu > Cd > OTC. Moreover, the normal larva frequency and the length of spicules were more sensitive than the fertilization rate and normal gastrula frequency endpoints. The mixture toxicity assessed by multiple experimental designs showed clearly that concentrations of Cd, Cu, and OTC superior to 338 μg/L, 0.56 μg/L, and 0.83 mg/L, respectively, cause significant larva malformations. PMID:27259955

  20. Estimating central tendency from a single spot measure: A closed-form solution for lognormally distributed biomarker data for risk assessment at the individual level.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Sobus, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure-based risk assessment employs large cross-sectional data sets of environmental and biomarker measurements to predict population statistics for adverse health outcomes. The underlying assumption is that long-term (many years) latency health problems including cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and asthma are triggered by lifetime exposures to environmental stressors that interact with the genome. The aim of this study was to develop a specific predictive method that provides the statistical parameters for chronic exposure at the individual level based upon a single spot measurement and knowledge of global summary statistics as derived from large data sets. This is a profound shift in exposure and health statistics in that it begins to answer the question "How large is my personal risk?" rather than just providing an overall population-based estimate. This approach also holds value for interpreting exposure-based risks for small groups of individuals within a community in comparison to random individuals from the general population. PMID:27587289

  1. Mobile phone tracking: in support of modelling traffic-related air pollution contribution to individual exposure and its implications for public health impact assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new approach to assess the impact of traffic-related air pollution on public health by mapping personal trajectories using mobile phone tracking technology in an urban environment. Although this approach is not based on any empirical studies, we believe that this method has great potential and deserves serious attention. Mobile phone tracking technology makes it feasible to generate millions of personal trajectories and thereby cover a large fraction of an urban population. Through analysis, personal trajectories are not only associated to persons, but it can also be associated with vehicles, vehicle type, vehicle speed, vehicle emission rates, and sources of vehicle emissions. Pollution levels can be estimated by dispersion models from calculated traffic emissions. Traffic pollution exposure to individuals can be estimated based on the exposure along the individual human trajectories in the estimated pollution concentration fields by utilizing modelling tools. By data integration, one may identify trajectory patterns of particularly exposed human groups. The approach of personal trajectories may open a new paradigm in understanding urban dynamics and new perspectives in population-wide empirical public health research. This new approach can be further applied to individual commuter route planning, land use planning, urban traffic network planning, and used by authorities to formulate air pollution mitigation policies and regulations. PMID:24188173

  2. Mobile phone tracking: in support of modelling traffic-related air pollution contribution to individual exposure and its implications for public health impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Ying; Skjetne, Erik; Kobernus, Mike

    2013-11-04

    We propose a new approach to assess the impact of traffic-related air pollution on public health by mapping personal trajectories using mobile phone tracking technology in an urban environment. Although this approach is not based on any empirical studies, we believe that this method has great potential and deserves serious attention. Mobile phone tracking technology makes it feasible to generate millions of personal trajectories and thereby cover a large fraction of an urban population. Through analysis, personal trajectories are not only associated to persons, but it can also be associated with vehicles, vehicle type, vehicle speed, vehicle emission rates, and sources of vehicle emissions. Pollution levels can be estimated by dispersion models from calculated traffic emissions. Traffic pollution exposure to individuals can be estimated based on the exposure along the individual human trajectories in the estimated pollution concentration fields by utilizing modelling tools. By data integration, one may identify trajectory patterns of particularly exposed human groups. The approach of personal trajectories may open a new paradigm in understanding urban dynamics and new perspectives in population-wide empirical public health research. This new approach can be further applied to individual commuter route planning, land use planning, urban traffic network planning, and used by authorities to formulate air pollution mitigation policies and regulations.

  3. Fatigue, pain and patient global assessment responses to biological treatment are unpredictable, and poorly inter-connected in individual rheumatoid arthritis patients followed in the daily clinic.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Egsmose, Eva Marie

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate relations on group level and agreements on the individual patient level between changes in fatigue, pain and patient global assessment (PaGl) assessed on visual analogue scales (VAS) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after initiating or switching biological treatment. Associations with other disease measures were also examined. Traditional disease activity data on 177 patients with RA registered before and after 6-month treatment were extracted from the Danish DANBIO registry. Associations were examined using multiple regression analysis. Agreement between the VAS score changes (∆) was expressed as the bias (mean difference) and the 95 % lower and upper limits of agreement (LoA). All disease measures improved significantly. ∆fatigue, ∆pain and ∆PaGl were independently associated with each other (r partial range 0.38-0.81, p < 0.0001), but not to a significant degree with changes in other measures. Lower and upper LoA [bias] for ∆fatigue versus ∆pain was -44.0 and 51.8 [3.9], for ∆fatigue versus ∆PaGl -38.2 and 52.4 [4.2], and for ∆PaGl versus ∆pain -34.3 and 34.3 [0.0]. ∆fatigue, ∆pain and ∆PaGl were independently but weakly predicted by their own baseline values (r partial range -0.30 to -0.46, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, changes in fatigue, pain and PaGl were independently associated and nearly identical on group level but agreements were poor in individual patients. The changes were poorly explained by other potential predictor variables and by baseline values. The results expose the unpredictable nature of patient-reported VAS scores in individual patients with RA. PMID:27449345

  4. Skin barrier function in healthy volunteers as assessed by transepidermal water loss and vascular response to hexyl nicotinate: intra- and inter-individual variability.

    PubMed

    Oestmann, E; Lavrijsen, A P; Hermans, J; Ponec, M

    1993-02-01

    This study assesses the variability of two non-invasive methods of measuring stratum corneum barrier function in vivo. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the vascular response to hexyl nicotinate (HN) penetration as determined by laser-Doppler flowmetry, were measured in a group of 21 healthy volunteers. Each time profile of the vascular response to HN penetration was analysed using the following parameters: the baseline cutaneous blood flow, the lag-time between application and initial response (t0), the time between application and maximum response (tmax), the maximum response, and the slope of the curve. TEWL measured on the left volar forearm showed a normal range of 3.9-7.6 g/m2h and a small inter-individual variability [coefficient of variation (CV) 19.4%]. TEWL values at three other forearm sites did not show differences of clinical importance compared with the left volar forearm. The parameters of the vascular response to HN penetration spanned a wider normal range than the TEWL values (CV between 33 and 52%). Repeat measurements after a 1-2 month interval showed highly reproducible individual TEWL values. The mean difference between first and second measurements was only 0.03 g/m2h; the relative difference 0.6%. The intra-individual reproducibility of t0 and tmax. for HN penetration was also high (relative differences of 2.8 and 3.1%, respectively). The other vascular response parameters were less reproducible (relative differences of 6.9-18.6%). We conclude that TEWL and selected parameters of HN penetration, as non-invasive tests of the stratum corneum barrier function, yield reproducible results and are hence useful for investigations assessing the skin barrier function in various disorders.

  5. Evaluating the Cognition, Behavior, and Social Profile of an Adolescent With Learning Disabilities and Assessing the Effectiveness of an Individualized Educational Program

    PubMed Central

    Tabitha Louis, Preeti; Arnold Emerson, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study seeks to outline a holistic assessment method that was used in understanding problems experienced by an adolescent boy and in designing and implementing an individualized educational program. Methods: An adolescent child referred for concerns in learning was screened for learning disability using standardized inventories and test batteries. The Connors Parent and Teacher Rating Scales (short forms), Wechsler's Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), the Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS), and the Kinetic Family Drawing (KFD) test were used to assess the behavior, cognition, and social profile of the child. An individualized educational program was designed and this intervention was provided for 6 months by using parents as co-therapists. Participant and parent interview schedules were used in identifying underlying issues of concern. The child was reassessed 6 months after the intervention was provided. Results: Findings on the Connors Parent Rating Scale revealed scores that were greater than the 50th percentile on the domains of inattention and cognitive problems. On the Connors Teacher Rating Scale, we observed scores greater than the 50th percentile on the hyperactivity, cognitive problems, and the inattention domains. The WISC revealed that the child had a "Dull Normal" Intellectual functioning and there was also a deficit of 2 years on the social skills as tested by the Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS). The Kinetic Family Drawing Test revealed negative emotions within the child. Post intervention, we noticed a remarkable improvement in the scores across all domains of behavior, social, and cognitive functioning. Conclusion: Designing an individualized education program that is tailored to the specific needs of the child and using parents as co-therapists proved to be an effective intervention. PMID:25053954

  6. Interethnic differences in the accuracy of anthropometric indicators of obesity in screening for high risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, VM; Casas, JP; Miranda, JJ; Perel, P; Pichardo, R; González, A; Sanchez, JR; Ferreccio, C; Aguilera, X; Silva, E; Oróstegui, M; Gómez, LF; Chirinos, JA; Medina-Lezama, J; Pérez, CM; Suárez, E; Ortiz, AP; Rosero, L; Schapochnik, N; Ortiz, Z; Ferrante, D; Diaz, M; Bautista, LE

    2009-01-01

    Background Cut points for defining obesity have been derived from mortality data among Whites from Europe and the United States and their accuracy to screen for high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in other ethnic groups has been questioned. Objective To compare the accuracy and to define ethnic and gender-specific optimal cut points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) when they are used in screening for high risk of CHD in the Latin-American and the US populations. Methods We estimated the accuracy and optimal cut points for BMI, WC and WHR to screen for CHD risk in Latin Americans (n=18 976), non-Hispanic Whites (Whites; n=8956), non-Hispanic Blacks (Blacks; n=5205) and Hispanics (n=5803). High risk of CHD was defined as a 10-year risk ≥20% (Framingham equation). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and the misclassification-cost term were used to assess accuracy and to identify optimal cut points. Results WHR had the highest AUC in all ethnic groups (from 0.75 to 0.82) and BMI had the lowest (from 0.50 to 0.59). Optimal cut point for BMI was similar across ethnic/gender groups (27 kg/m2). In women, cut points for WC (94 cm) and WHR (0.91) were consistent by ethnicity. In men, cut points for WC and WHR varied significantly with ethnicity: from 91 cm in Latin Americans to 102 cm in Whites, and from 0.94 in Latin Americans to 0.99 in Hispanics, respectively. Conclusion WHR is the most accurate anthropometric indicator to screen for high risk of CHD, whereas BMI is almost uninformative. The same BMI cut point should be used in all men and women. Unique cut points for WC and WHR should be used in all women, but ethnic-specific cut points seem warranted among men. PMID:19238159

  7. An individually-tailored multifactorial intervention program for older fallers in a middle-income developing country: Malaysian Falls Assessment and Intervention Trial (MyFAIT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In line with a rapidly ageing global population, the rise in the frequency of falls will lead to increased healthcare and social care costs. This study will be one of the few randomized controlled trials evaluating a multifaceted falls intervention in a low-middle income, culturally-diverse older Asian community. The primary objective of our paper is to evaluate whether individually tailored multifactorial interventions will successfully reduce the number of falls among older adults. Methods Three hundred community-dwelling older Malaysian adults with a history of (i) two or more falls, or (ii) one injurious fall in the past 12 months will be recruited. Baseline assessment will include cardiovascular, frailty, fracture risk, psychological factors, gait and balance, activities of daily living and visual assessments. Fallers will be randomized into 2 groups: to receive tailored multifactorial interventions (intervention group); or given lifestyle advice with continued conventional care (control group). Multifactorial interventions will target 6 specific risk factors. All participants will be re-assessed after 12 months. The primary outcome measure will be fall recurrence, measured with monthly falls diaries. Secondary outcomes include falls risk factors; and psychological measures including fear of falling, and quality of life. Discussion Previous studies evaluating multifactorial interventions in falls have reported variable outcomes. Given likely cultural, personal, lifestyle and health service differences in Asian countries, it is vital that individually-tailored multifaceted interventions are evaluated in an Asian population to determine applicability of these interventions in our setting. If successful, these approaches have the potential for widespread application in geriatric healthcare services, will reduce the projected escalation of falls and fall-related injuries, and improve the quality of life of our older community. Trial registration

  8. Assessment of individual adaptation to microgravity during long term space flight based on stepwise discriminant analysis of heart rate variability parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, Roman M.; Chernikova, Anna G.; Funtova, Irina I.; Tank, Jens

    2011-12-01

    Optimization of the cardiovascular system under conditions of long term space flight is provided by individual changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is an easy to use method under these extreme conditions. We tested the hypothesis that individual HRV analysis provides important information for crew health monitoring. HRV data from 14 Russian cosmonauts measured during long term space flights are presented (two times before and after flight, monthly in flight). HRV characteristics in the time and in the frequency domain were calculated. Predefined discriminant function equations obtained in reference groups (L1=-0.112*HR-1.006*SI-0.047*pNN50-0.086*HF; L2=0.140*HR-0.165*SI-1.293*pNN50+0.623*HF) were used to define four functional states. (1) Physiological normal, (2) prenosological, (3) premorbid and (4) pathological. Geometric mean values for the ISS cosmonauts based on L1 and L2 remained within normal ranges. A shift from the physiological normal state to the prenosological functional state during space flight was detected. The functional state assessed by HRV improved during space flight if compared to pre-flight and early post-flight functional states. Analysis of individual cosmonauts showed distinct patterns depending on the pre-flight functional state. Using the developed classification a transition process from the state of physiological normal into a prenosological state or premorbid state during different stages of space flight can be detected for individual Russian cosmonauts. Our approach to an estimation of HR regulatory pattern can be useful for prognostic purposes.

  9. A systematic review of instruments for the assessment of work-related psychosocial factors (Blue Flags) in individuals with non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gray, Heather; Adefolarin, Abiodun T; Howe, Tracey E

    2011-12-01

    In individuals with low back pain (LBP) psychosocial factors can act as obstacles to return to work. A coloured Flags Framework has been conceptualised, in which Blue Flags represent work-related psychosocial issues. This systematic review was conducted to appraise available instruments for the assessment of Blue Flags in working age adults with non-specific LBP. The Ovid versions of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED and CINAHL databases were searched from inception until the first week of March 2010; additionally, experts and study authors were contacted. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Eight studies (recruiting 5630 participants) met the review inclusion criteria, reporting six instruments: the Back Disability Risk Questionnaire (BDRQ); Occupational Role Questionnaire (ORQ); Obstacles to Return to Work Questionnaire (ORTWQ); Psychosocial Aspects of Work Questionnaire (PAWQ); Vermont Disability Prediction Questionnaire (VDPQ); and Modified Work Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection and Resolve. Limited psychometric testing had been performed on the instruments, and solely by the original developers. None of the instruments, in their current stage of development, can be recommended as Blue Flags assessment instruments. The ORTWQ was the only instrument that showed adequate psychometric properties but was not considered clinically feasible in its present format. Future research should focus on further psychometric development of the ORTWQ.

  10. A Novel Eye-Tracking Method to Assess Attention Allocation in Individuals with and without Aphasia Using a Dual-Task Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Sabine; Hallowell, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Numerous authors report that people with aphasia have greater difficulty allocating attention than people without neurological disorders. Studying how attention deficits contribute to language deficits is important. However, existing methods for indexing attention allocation in people with aphasia pose serious methodological challenges. Eye-tracking methods have great potential to address such challenges. We developed and assessed the validity of a new dual-task method incorporating eye tracking to assess attention allocation. Twenty-six adults with aphasia and 33 control participants completed auditory sentence comprehension and visual search tasks. To test whether the new method validly indexes well-documented patterns in attention allocation, demands were manipulated by varying task complexity in single- and dual-task conditions. Differences in attention allocation were indexed via eye-tracking measures. For all participants significant increases in attention allocation demands were observed from single- to dual-task conditions and from simple to complex stimuli. Individuals with aphasia had greater difficulty allocating attention with greater task demands. Relationships between eye-tracking indices of comprehension during single and dual tasks and standardized testing were examined. Results support the validity of the novel eye-tracking method for assessing attention allocation in people with and without aphasia. Clinical and research implications are discussed. PMID:25913549

  11. Assessment of Cognitive Scales to Examine Memory, Executive Function and Language in Individuals with Down Syndrome: Implications of a 6-month Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Liogier d'Ardhuy, Xavier; Edgin, Jamie O; Bouis, Charles; de Sola, Susana; Goeldner, Celia; Kishnani, Priya; Nöldeke, Jana; Rice, Sydney; Sacco, Silvia; Squassante, Lisa; Spiridigliozzi, Gail; Visootsak, Jeannie; Heller, James; Khwaja, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identifiable genetic form of intellectual disability. Individuals with DS have considerable deficits in intellectual functioning (i.e., low intellectual quotient, delayed learning and/or impaired language development) and adaptive behavior. Previous pharmacological studies in this population have been limited by a lack of appropriate endpoints that accurately measured change in cognitive and functional abilities. Therefore, the current longitudinal observational study assessed the suitability and reliability of existing cognitive scales to determine which tools would be the most effective in future interventional clinical studies. Subtests of the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), and Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool-2 (CELF-P-2), and the Observer Memory Questionnaire-Parent Form (OMQ-PF), Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function®-Preschool Version (BRIEF-P) and Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised were assessed. The results reported here have contributed to the optimization of trial design and endpoint selection for the Phase 2 study of a new selective negative allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor α5-subtype (Basmisanil), and can be applied to other studies in the DS population. PMID:26635554

  12. Assessment of Cognitive Scales to Examine Memory, Executive Function and Language in Individuals with Down Syndrome: Implications of a 6-month Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liogier d'Ardhuy, Xavier; Edgin, Jamie O.; Bouis, Charles; de Sola, Susana; Goeldner, Celia; Kishnani, Priya; Nöldeke, Jana; Rice, Sydney; Sacco, Silvia; Squassante, Lisa; Spiridigliozzi, Gail; Visootsak, Jeannie; Heller, James; Khwaja, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identifiable genetic form of intellectual disability. Individuals with DS have considerable deficits in intellectual functioning (i.e., low intellectual quotient, delayed learning and/or impaired language development) and adaptive behavior. Previous pharmacological studies in this population have been limited by a lack of appropriate endpoints that accurately measured change in cognitive and functional abilities. Therefore, the current longitudinal observational study assessed the suitability and reliability of existing cognitive scales to determine which tools would be the most effective in future interventional clinical studies. Subtests of the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), and Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool-2 (CELF-P-2), and the Observer Memory Questionnaire-Parent Form (OMQ-PF), Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function®–Preschool Version (BRIEF-P) and Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised were assessed. The results reported here have contributed to the optimization of trial design and endpoint selection for the Phase 2 study of a new selective negative allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor α5-subtype (Basmisanil), and can be applied to other studies in the DS population. PMID:26635554

  13. Sociometric and ethological approach to the assessment of individual and group behavior in extra long-term isolation during simulated interplanetary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushin, Vadim; Tafforin, Carole; Kuznetsova, Polina; Vinokhodova, Alla; Chekalina, Angelina

    Several factors, such as hazard to life, reduced social communications, isolation, high workload, monotony, etc., can cause deconditioning of individual status and group dynamics in long-term spaceflight. New approaches to the assessment of group behavior are being developed in order to create necessary counter-measures and to keep optimal psychological climate in the crew. Psychological methods combined with ethological approach to dynamic monitoring of the isolated crew had been tested and validated in Mars-500 experiment. The experiment (duration of 520 days) was designed to simulate the living and working conditions of a piloted mission to Mars. The Mars-500 crew was composed of three Russians, two Europeans and one Chinese. We used psychological tests: sociometric questionnaire to assess group status (popularity) of the crewmembers (monthly), color choice test to assess the level of frustration and anxiety (twice a month). We performed observations from video recordings of group discussions (monthly) and during breakfast time (twice a month). The video analysis was supplied with a software based-solution: The Observer XT®. The results showed that occurrence of collateral acts may indicate psychological stress and fatigue in crewmembers under isolation and that facial expressions may indicate less anxiety. The data of psychological tests allowed to define two subgroups in the crew. The first one consisted of the subjects with high group status and lower level of frustration (not anxious), the second one consisted of less popular subjects, having respectively higher anxiety level. The video analysis showed two times more manifestations of facial expressions and interpersonal communications for the first subgroup. We also identified the subgroups on the basis of their verbal expressions in Russian and in English. Video observation of individual and group behavior, combined with other psychological tests gives opportunity to emphasize more objectively the signs

  14. Heart rate and heart rate variability assessment identifies individual differences in fear response magnitudes to earthquake, free fall, and air puff in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wei, Wei; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z; Zhao, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Fear behaviors and fear memories in rodents have been traditionally assessed by the amount of freezing upon the presentation of conditioned cues or unconditioned stimuli. However, many experiences, such as encountering earthquakes or accidental fall from tree branches, may produce long-lasting fear memories but are behaviorally difficult to measure using freezing parameters. Here, we have examined changes in heartbeat interval dynamics as physiological readout for assessing fearful reactions as mice were subjected to sudden air puff, free-fall drop inside a small elevator, and a laboratory-version earthquake. We showed that these fearful events rapidly increased heart rate (HR) with simultaneous reduction of heart rate variability (HRV). Cardiac changes can be further analyzed in details by measuring three distinct phases: namely, the rapid rising phase in HR, the maximum plateau phase during which HRV is greatly decreased, and the recovery phase during which HR gradually recovers to baseline values. We showed that durations of the maximum plateau phase and HR recovery speed were quite sensitive to habituation over repeated trials. Moreover, we have developed the fear resistance index based on specific cardiac response features. We demonstrated that the fear resistance index remained largely consistent across distinct fearful events in a given animal, thereby enabling us to compare and rank individual mouse's fear responsiveness among the group. Therefore, the fear resistance index described here can represent a useful parameter for measuring personality traits or individual differences in stress-susceptibility in both wild-type mice and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) models.

  15. Ex vivo study for the assessment of behavioral factor and gene polymorphisms in individual susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage metals-induced.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Angela; Baluce, Barbara; Visalli, Giuseppa; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Micale, Rosanna; Izzotti, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Transition metals in fine particulate matter generated by combustion induce oxidative DNA damage and inflammation. However, there is remarkable inter-individual variability in susceptibility to these damages. To assess this variability, an ex vivo study was performed using lymphocytes of 47 Caucasian healthy subjects. Cell samples were exposed to a water solution of oil fly ash (OFA). This was formed by the distinctive transition metals vanadium, iron, and nickel. Oxidative DNA damage was evaluated by testing cell viability, intracellular ROS production and 8-oxo-dG. DNA fragmentation and DNA repair capacity were assessed by using the Alkaline-Halo assay. GSTM1, GSTT1, hOGG1, and C677T and A1298C MTHFR gene polymorphisms were tested. Demographic and behavioral factors, collected by questionnaire, were also considered. OFA induced damages showed: (a) a 20-fold variation in range among different subjects in ROS production, (b) a 7-fold variation in range of 8-oxo-dG, and (c) a 25-fold variation in range in DNA repair capacity. A significant increase in DNA damage was detected in GSTT1-deficent subjects compared with wild type genotype carriers. Increases in cytoplasmic ROS and decreases in DNA repair capacity (P<0.05) were observed in C677T and A1298C variants of MTHFR. A remarkable protective effect of high fruits and vegetable intake was observed for ROS production and DNA damage. Conversely, an adverse effect of meat intake was observed on ROS increase, DNA damage and repair capacity, probably due to the increased intake of bioavailable iron. Smoking decreased DNA repair capacity, while age increased OFA-induced DNA damage. The wide comparative analysis of the complex interactions network, between genetic and behavioral factors provides evidence of the remarkable role of several lifestyle factors. In comparison to genetic polymorphisms they seem to have a higher weight in determining individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of airborne pollutants as

  16. Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability Assessment Identifies Individual Differences in Fear Response Magnitudes to Earthquake, Free Fall, and Air Puff in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z.; Zhao, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Fear behaviors and fear memories in rodents have been traditionally assessed by the amount of freezing upon the presentation of conditioned cues or unconditioned stimuli. However, many experiences, such as encountering earthquakes or accidental fall from tree branches, may produce long-lasting fear memories but are behaviorally difficult to measure using freezing parameters. Here, we have examined changes in heartbeat interval dynamics as physiological readout for assessing fearful reactions as mice were subjected to sudden air puff, free-fall drop inside a small elevator, and a laboratory-version earthquake. We showed that these fearful events rapidly increased heart rate (HR) with simultaneous reduction of heart rate variability (HRV). Cardiac changes can be further analyzed in details by measuring three distinct phases: namely, the rapid rising phase in HR, the maximum plateau phase during which HRV is greatly decreased, and the recovery phase during which HR gradually recovers to baseline values. We showed that durations of the maximum plateau phase and HR recovery speed were quite sensitive to habituation over repeated trials. Moreover, we have developed the fear resistance index based on specific cardiac response features. We demonstrated that the fear resistance index remained largely consistent across distinct fearful events in a given animal, thereby enabling us to compare and rank individual mouse’s fear responsiveness among the group. Therefore, the fear resistance index described here can represent a useful parameter for measuring personality traits or individual differences in stress-susceptibility in both wild-type mice and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) models. PMID:24667366

  17. Individual classification of ADHD children by right prefrontal hemodynamic responses during a go/no-go task as assessed by fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yukifumi; Dan, Ippeita; Nagashima, Masako; Dan, Haruka; Uga, Minako; Ikeda, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Gunji, Yuji; Hirano, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Takamichi; Shimoizumi, Hideo; Watanabe, Eiju; Yamagata, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    While a growing body of neurocognitive research has explored the neural substrates associated with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), an objective biomarker for diagnosis has not been established. The advent of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which is a noninvasive and unrestrictive method of functional neuroimaging, raised the possibility of introducing functional neuroimaging diagnosis in young ADHD children. Previously, our fNIRS-based measurements successfully visualized the hypoactivation pattern in the right prefrontal cortex during a go/no-go task in ADHD children compared with typically developing control children at a group level. The current study aimed to explore a method of individual differentiation between ADHD and typically developing control children using multichannel fNIRS, emphasizing how spatial distribution and amplitude of hemodynamic response are associated with inhibition-related right prefrontal dysfunction. Thirty ADHD and thirty typically developing control children underwent a go/no-go task, and their cortical hemodynamics were assessed using fNIRS. We explored specific regions of interest (ROIs) and cut-off amplitudes for cortical activation to distinguish ADHD children from control children. The ROI located on the border of inferior and middle frontal gyri yielded the most accurate discrimination. Furthermore, we adapted well-formed formulae for the constituent channels of the optimized ROI, leading to improved classification accuracy with an area under the curve value of 85% and with 90% sensitivity. Thus, the right prefrontal hypoactivation assessed by fNIRS would serve as a potentially effective biomarker for classifying ADHD children at the individual level. PMID:26266096

  18. GPS-based microenvironment tracker (MicroTrac) model to estimate time-location of individuals for air pollution exposure assessments: model evaluation in central North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Long, Thomas C; Schultz, Bradley D; Crooks, James; Breen, Miyuki; Langstaff, John E; Isaacs, Kristin K; Tan, Yu-Mei; Williams, Ronald W; Cao, Ye; Geller, Andrew M; Devlin, Robert B; Batterman, Stuart A; Buckley, Timothy J

    2014-07-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared with 24-h diary data from nine participants, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time-location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies.

  19. Pain and Associated Substance Use among Opioid Dependent Individuals Seeking Office-Based Treatment with Buprenorphine-Naloxone: A Needs Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Declan T.; Savant, Jonathan D.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Moore, Brent A.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives A paucity of studies has examined the pain experiences of opioid dependent individuals seeking office-based buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (BNT). We set out to examine, among those seeking BNT: (a) the prevalence of pain types (i.e., recent pain, chronic pain), (b) the characteristics of pain (intensity, frequency, duration, interference, location, and genesis), and (c) substance use to alleviate pain. Methods We surveyed 244 consecutive individuals seeking office-based buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (BNT) for opioid dependence about physical pain and associated substance use. Results Thirty-six percent of respondents reported chronic pain (CP) (i.e., pain lasting at least 3 months) and 36% reported “some pain” (SP) (i.e., past week pain not meeting the threshold for CP). In comparison to SP respondents, those with CP were, on average, older; reported greater current pain intensity, pain frequency, typical pain duration, typical pain intensity, and typical pain interference; were more likely to report shoulder or pelvis and less likely to report stomach or arms as their most bothersome pain location; and were more likely to report accident or nerve damage and less likely to report opioid withdrawal as the genesis of their pain. Both pain subgroups reported similarly high rates of past-week substance use to alleviate pain. Conclusions and Scientific Significance The high rates of pain and self-reported substance use to manage pain suggest the importance of assessing and addressing pain in BNT patients. PMID:23617861

  20. Assessment of the radiographic visibility of the periodontal ligament in the lower third molars for the purpose of forensic age estimation in living individuals.

    PubMed

    Olze, Andreas; Solheim, Tore; Schulz, Ronald; Kupfer, Michael; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Schmeling, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The main criterion for dental age estimation in living individuals is the mineralisation of third molars. However, the mineralisation of third molars can be completed before the forensically relevant age of 18 years has been attained. In a material of 1,198 orthopantomograms from 629 females and 569 males aged between 15 and 40 years, the radiographic visibility of the periodontal membrane of fully mineralised third molars was assessed according to stages 0, 1, 2 and 3. Stage 0 first appeared at the age of 17.2 years in females and at the age of 17.6 years in males. Stage 1 was first achieved by females between 18.9 and 20.0 years and by males between 20.1 and 20.2 years. The earliest appearance of stage 2 was between 22.5 and 23.1 years in females and at 22.3 years in males. The occurrence of stage 3 was first found between 24.6 and 25.2 years in females and between 25.4 and 26.2 years in males. If stage 1 is determined, it is, therefore, possible to prove that an individual has already attained the legally relevant age of 18 years. For stages 2 and 3, it can be stated beyond reasonable doubt that a person is over 21 years of age.

  1. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median = 4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (∼30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  2. Interethnic Relations between ESL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2006-01-01

    This study is part of a larger investigation into Japanese students' use of English and friendship buildup inside and outside Canadian English as a second language (ESL) institutes. Both qualitative and quantitative data were garnered primarily from formal in-depth interviews with nine Japanese students and questionnaire surveys with 216 students.…

  3. LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE EURADOS SURVEY ON INDIVIDUAL MONITORING DATA AND INTERNAL DOSE ASSESSMENTS OF FOREIGNERS EXPOSED IN JAPAN FOLLOWING THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NPP ACCIDENT.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Fojtik, P; Franck, D; Osko, J; Gerstmann, U; Scholl, C; Lebacq, A L; Breustedt, B; Del Risco Norrlid, L

    2016-09-01

    European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V. (EURADOS) survey on individual monitoring data and dose assessment has been carried out for 550 foreigners returning home after being exposed in Japan to intakes of radionuclides (mainly (131)I, (132)I, (132)Te, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) as a consequence of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. In vivo and in vitro measurements were performed in their respective countries at an early stage after that accident. Intakes of radionuclides were detected in 208 persons from Europe and Canada, but the committed effective dose E(50) was below the annual dose limit for the public (<1 mSv) in all the cases. Lessons learned from this EURADOS survey are presented here regarding not only internal dosimetry issues, but also the management of the emergency situation, the perception of the risk of health effects due to radiation and the communication with exposed persons who showed anxiety and lack of trust in monitoring data and dose assessments. PMID:26705360

  4. 'IntraCell' plugin for assessment of intracellular localization of nano-delivery systems and their targeting to the individual organelles.

    PubMed

    Sneh-Edri, Hadas; Stepensky, David

    2011-02-11

    Efficient intracellular targeting of drugs and drug delivery systems (DDSs) is a major challenge that should be overcome to enhance the therapeutic efficiency of biopharmaceuticals and other intracellularly-acting drugs. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiency of intracellular drug delivery are required to determine the therapeutic potential of intracellular targeting of nano-delivery systems. In this study we report development and application of a novel 'IntraCell' plugin for ImageJ that is useful for quantitative assessment of uptake and intracellular localization of the drug/DDS and estimation of targeting efficiency. The developed plugin is based on threshold-based identification of borders of cell and of the individual organelles on confocal images and pixel-by-pixel analysis of fluorescence intensities. We applied the developed 'IntraCell' plugin to investigate uptake and intracellular targeting of novel endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted delivery system based on PLGA nanoparticles decorated with ER-targeting or control peptides and encapsulating antigenic peptide and fluorescent marker. Decoration of the nanoparticles with peptidic residues affected their uptake and intracellular trafficking in HeLa cells, indicating that the targeting peptide was identified as ER-targeting signal by the intracellular trafficking mechanisms in HeLa cells and that these mechanisms can handle nano-DDS of the size comparable to some intracellular vesicles (hundreds of nanometers in diameter). We conclude that decoration of nanoparticles with peptidic residues affects their intracellular localization and trafficking and can be potentially used for intracellularly-targeted drug delivery. 'IntraCell' plugin is an useful tool for quantitative assessment of efficiency of uptake and intracellular drug targeting. In combination with other experimental approaches, it will be useful for the development of intracellularly-targeted formulations with

  5. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  6. Assessing Sexual Orientation-Related Obsessions and Compulsions in Italian Heterosexual Individuals: Development and Validation of the Sexual Orientation Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (SO-OCS).

    PubMed

    Melli, Gabriele; Moulding, Richard; Gelli, Simona; Chiorri, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Sexual Orientation-Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (SO-OCD) is characterized by intrusive thoughts, images, and urges related to one's sexual orientation, and by consequent avoidance, reassurance seeking, and overt and covert compulsions. Currently there is no short self-report measure that assesses SO-OCD symptoms. The current article describes two studies that develop and evaluate the first version of the Sexual Orientation Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (SO-OCS), a 14-item Italian self-report measure targeted towards heterosexual individuals. In Study 1, the SO-OCS was developed and refined through item analysis and exploratory factor analysis from an initial pool of 33 items administered to 732 Italian nonclinical participants. The SO-OCS showed a unidimensional structure and an acceptable internal consistency. In Study 2, the factor structure, internal consistency, temporal stability, construct and criterion validity, and diagnostic sensitivity of the SO-OCS were investigated in three samples of Italian participants (294 from the general population, 52 OCD patients who reported sexual orientation-related symptoms or concerns as a primary complaint, and 51 OCD patients who did not report these symptoms as primary complaint). The SO-OCS was again found to have a unidimensional structure and good internal consistency, as well as to exhibit strong construct validity. Specifically, the SO-OCS showed an excellent criterion validity and diagnostic sensitivity, as it successfully discriminated between those with SO-OCD and all other groups of participants. Finally, evidence of temporal stability of the SO-OCS in a nonclinical subsample was found. The SO-OCS holds promise as a measure of SO-OCD symptoms in heterosexual individuals. PMID:27423161

  7. Novel slanted incidence air-coupled ultrasound method for delamination assessment in individual bonding planes of structural multi-layered glued timber laminates.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Furrer, Roman; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs

    2013-09-01

    Non-destructive assessment of delaminations in glued laminated timber structures is required during their full life cycle. A novel air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) method has been developed, which is able to separately detect delaminations in individual bonding planes of arbitrarily high and long laminated stacks and typically 200 mm wide. The 120 kHz ACU transmitter-receiver pair is positioned at two opposite lateral faces of the sample, with a small inclination with respect to the inspected bonding planes, so that an ultrasound beam is excited at a user-defined refraction angle within the sample, interacting with defects in a limited height portion of the stack. The attenuation of the ultrasound beam transmitted across the defect (negative detection) provided better sensitivity to defects than the scattered fields (positive detection), which are masked by spurious fields. Dedicated finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations provided understanding on the wave propagation and defect detectability limits, with respect to the heterogeneous anisotropic material structure introduced by the curvature of the annual rings in individual timber lamellas. A simplified analytical expression was derived to calculate refraction angles in timber in function of insonification angle and ring angle. Experimental results show that the method is able to detect >20% wide defects in both isotropic material and in glulam with straight year rings, and >50% wide and 100mm long defects in commercial glulam beams. The discrimination of defects from background variability is optimized by normalizing the images with respect to reference defect-free sample sections (normalization) or previous measurements (difference imaging), and by combining readings obtained with distinct ultrasound beam refraction angles (spatial diversity). Future work aims at the development of a tomographic defect inspection by combining the described theoretical and experimental methods. PMID:23664378

  8. Novel Method for Recruiting Representative At-Risk Individuals into Cancer Prevention Trials: Online Health Risk Assessment in Employee Wellness Programs.

    PubMed

    Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor; Miller, Suzanne M; Hazuda, Leah; Engelman, Kimberly; Ellerbeck, Edward F

    2016-09-01

    Participation in cancer prevention trials (CPT) is lower than 3 % among high-risk healthy individuals, and racial/ethnic minorities are the most under-represented. Novel recruitment strategies are therefore needed. Online health risk assessment (HRA) serves as a gateway component of nearly all employee wellness programs (EWPs) and may be a missed opportunity. This study aimed to explore employees' interest, willingness, motivators, and barriers of releasing their HRA responses to an external secure research database for recruitment purpose. We used qualitative research methods (focus group and individual interviews) to examine employees' interest and willingness in releasing their online HRA responses to an external, secure database to register as potential CPT participants. Fifteen structured interviews (40 % of study participants were of racial/ethnic minority) were conducted, and responses reached saturation after four interviews. All employees showed interest and willingness to release their online HRA responses to register as a potential CPT participant. Content analyses revealed that 91 % of participants were motivated to do so, and the major motivators were to (1) obtain help in finding personally relevant prevention trials, (2) help people they know who are affected by cancer, and/or (3) increase knowledge about CPT. A subset of participants (45 %) expressed barriers of releasing their HRA responses due to concerns about credibility and security of the external database. Online HRA may be a feasible but underutilized recruitment method for cancer prevention trials. EWP-sponsored HRA shows promise for the development of a large, centralized registry of racially/ethnically representative CPT potential participants. PMID:26507744

  9. Temporal Intra-Individual Variation of Immunological Biomarkers in Type 1 Diabetes Patients: Implications for Future Use in Cross-Sectional Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Pettus, Jeremy; Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Phatak, Sonal; Miller, Jacqueline F.; Ganesan, Lakshmi; Chae, Ji; Mallios, Ronna; Edelman, Steve; Peters, Bjoern; von Herrath, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Multiple immune parameters such as frequencies of autoreactive CD4+, CD8+ T-cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-cells have been explored as biomarkers in human T1D. However, intra-individual temporal variation of these parameters has not been assessed systematically over time. We determined the variation in each of these parameters in a cohort of T1D and healthy donors (HDs), at monthly intervals for one year. Despite low intra- and inter-assay co-efficient of variation (CV), mean CVs for each of the immune parameters were 119.1% for CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-γ, 50.44% for autoreactive CD8+ T-cells, and 31.24% for CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-cells. Further, both HDs and T1D donors had similar CVs. The variation neither correlated with BMI, age, disease duration or insulin usage, nor were there detectable cyclical patterns of variation. However, averaging results from multiple visits for an individual provided a better estimate of the CV between visits. Based on our data we predict that by averaging values from three visits a treatment effect on these parameters with a 50% effect size could be detected with the same power using 1.8–4-fold fewer patients within a trial compared to using values from a single visit. Thus, our present data contribute to a more robust, accurate endpoint design for future clinical trials in T1D and aid in the identification of truly efficacious therapies. PMID:24223938

  10. Protocol for the development and validation of a questionnaire to assess concerning behaviours and mental health in individuals with autism spectrum disorders: the Assessment of Concerning Behaviour (ACB) scale

    PubMed Central

    Santosh, Paramala; Tarver, Joanne; Gibbons, Felicity; Vitoratou, Silia; Simonoff, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Co-occurring psychiatric conditions and concerning behaviours are prevalent in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and are likely to be detrimental to functioning and long-term outcomes. The cognitive rigidity and deficits in emotional literacy and verbal behaviour that commonly occur in ASD can adversely affect clinicians’ confidence to identify concerning behaviours and mental health problems. There is a need to develop a measure that is tailored towards individuals with ASD, and differentiates between symptoms of psychopathology and core ASD symptoms. Furthermore, it should be modified to capture internalising symptoms that individuals with ASD may find difficult or be unable to verbalise. This protocol describes the intended development and validation of the Assessment of Concerning Behaviour (ACB) scale. The ACB will aim to be a multidimensional measure of concerning behaviours in ASD incorporating self-report, parent/carer, teacher/employer and clinician report versions that can be used across the lifespan and spectrum of intellectual ability. Methods and analysis This study will be guided by the methods described in the US Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry Patient-reported Outcome Measures. A literature review, cognitive interviews and focus groups with individuals who have experience of working or living with ASDs will be used for item generation. A sample of children and adults with ASD will complete the ACB, in addition to other gold standard measures of concerning behaviour in order to establish the initial psychometric properties of the scale. Ethics and dissemination This study has received ethical approval from the NHS Research Ethics Committee: London-Camden and King's Cross (ref: 15/LO/0085). Study findings will be disseminated to healthcare professionals and scientists in the field through publication in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. PMID:27006345

  11. Assessment of the Microbial Constituents of the Home Environment of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and Their Association with Lower Airways Infections

    PubMed Central

    Heirali, Alya; McKeon, Suzanne; Purighalla, Swathi; Storey, Douglas G.; Rossi, Laura; Costilhes, Geoffrey; Drews, Steven J.; Rabin, Harvey R.; Surette, Michael G.; Parkins, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways are colonized by a polymicrobial community of organisms, termed the CF microbiota. We sought to define the microbial constituents of the home environment of individuals with CF and determine if it may serve as a latent reservoir for infection. Methods Six patients with newly identified CF pathogens were included. An investigator collected repeat sputum and multiple environmental samples from their homes. Bacteria were cultured under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Morphologically distinct colonies were selected, purified and identified to the genus and species level through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. When concordant organisms were identified in sputum and environment, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine relatedness. Culture-independent bacterial profiling of each sample was carried out by Illumina sequencing of the V3 region of the 16s RNA gene. Results New respiratory pathogens prompting investigation included: Mycobacterium abscessus(2), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(3), Pseudomonas fluorescens(1), Nocardia spp.(1), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans(1). A median 25 organisms/patient were cultured from sputum. A median 125 organisms/home were cultured from environmental sites. Several organisms commonly found in the CF lung microbiome were identified within the home environments of these patients. Concordant species included members of the following genera: Brevibacterium(1), Microbacterium(1), Staphylococcus(3), Stenotrophomonas(2), Streptococcus(2), Sphingomonas(1), and Pseudomonas(4). PFGE confirmed related strains (one episode each of Sphinogomonas and P. aeruginosa) from the environment and airways were identified in two patients. Culture-independent assessment confirmed that many organisms were not identified using culture-dependent techniques. Conclusions Members of the CF microbiota can be found as constituents of the home environment in individuals with

  12. School Age Effects of the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program for Medically Low-Risk Preterm Infants: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    McAnulty, Gloria; Duffy, Frank H.; Kosta, Sandra; Weisenfeld, Neil I.; Warfield, Simon K.; Butler, Samantha C.; Bernstein, Jane Holmes; Zurakowski, David; Als, Heidelise

    2012-01-01

    Background: By school-age, even low-risk moderately preterm-born children show more neuro-cognitive deficits, motor impairments, academic underachievement, behavioral problems, and poor social adaptation than full-term peers. Aim: To evaluate the outcomes at school-age for moderately preterm-born children (29-33 weeks gestational age), appropriate in growth for gestational age (AGA) and medically at low-risk, randomized to Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) or standard care in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit. At school-age, the experimental (E) group will show better neuropsychological and neuro-electrophysiological function, as well as improved brain structure than the control (C) group. Materials and Methods: The original sample consisted of 30 moderately preterm-born infants (29 to 33 weeks), 23 (8C and 15E) of them were evaluated at 8 years of age, corrected-for-prematurity with neuropsychological, EEG spectral coherence, and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) measures. Results: E-performed significantly better than C-group children on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II) and trended towards better scores on the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. They also showed more mature frontal and parietal brain connectivities, and more mature fiber tracts involving the internal capsule and the cingulum. Neurobehavioral results in the newborn period successfully predicted neuropsychological functioning at 8 years corrected age. Conclusion: Moderately preterm infants cared for with the NIDCAP intervention showed improved neuropsychological and neuro-electrophysiological function as well as improved brain structure at school-age. PMID:23951557

  13. Internal dose assessment of natural uranium from drinking water based on biokinetic modeling and individual bioassay monitoring: a study of a Finnish family.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Bo; Salonen, Laina; Muikku, Maarit; Wahl, Wolfgang; Höllriegl, Vera; Oeh, Uwe; Roth, Paul; Rahola, Tua

    2006-06-01

    Since the later 1960's, a nationwide survey on natural radionuclides in drinking water showed high concentrations of natural uranium (U) in Finland, especially in uraniferous granite areas. In order to assess the radiation dose from the natural uranium to individuals, the concentrations of natural uranium in drinking water of the drilled wells were determined by radiochemical and alpha spectrometric methods. Uranium contents were measured in the urinary samples of five members of a Finnish family by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Correspondingly, theoretical biokinetic modeling of natural uranium incorporated for the same persons were performed with the aid of follow-up interviews. The ICRP biokinetic compartmental model and the age-dependent transfer rates for uranium were used to model the intake, transfer, distribution, retention, and excretion of (234)U and (238)U, respectively, from the drinking water for each person of the family. The organ absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose were evaluated for each family member at time intervals using specific effective energy values calculated by the SEECAL program and compared with recommended values. The modeled urinary excretion rates were found to be mostly higher than the measured values by a factor of three. The mean annual effective dose for this family is 8 muSv y(-1). By comparing the measured and calculated data, estimation of retrospective radiation exposure based on biokinetic modeling and bioassay method is enhanced and, vice versa, the biokinetic and dosimetric models are tested and verified.

  14. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds.

  15. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds. PMID:10915458

  16. [Individualizing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, William J.

    The individually guided education (IGE) program developed by the Kettering Foundation was implemented in September of 1973 at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Junior High School in Woburn, Massachusetts. The components of the program described in this speech include pupil and teacher scheduling, physical layout, pupil selection and adjustment,…

  17. Prospective Dynamic Assessment of Risk of Sexual Reoffending in Individuals with an Intellectual Disability and a History of Sexual Offending Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofthouse, Rachael E.; Lindsay, William R.; Totsika, Vasiliki; Hastings, Richard P.; Boer, Douglas P.; Haaven, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to add to the literature on the predictive accuracy of a dynamic intellectual disability specific risk assessment tool. Method: A dynamic risk assessment for sexual reoffending (ARMIDILO-S), a static risk assessment for sexual offending (STATIC-99), and a static risk assessment for violence…

  18. A clinical study of the efficacy of a single session of individual exercise for depressive patients, assessed by the change in saliva free cortisol level

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficacy of physical exercise as an augmentation to pharmacotherapy with antidepressants for depressive patients has been documented. However, to clarify the effectiveness of exercise in the treatment of depression, it is necessary to distinguish the effect of the exercise itself from the effect of group dynamics. Furthermore, an objective measurement for estimation of the effect is needed. Previous reports adopted a series of group exercises as the exercise intervention and mainly psychometric instruments for the measurement of effectiveness. Therefore, this clinical study was done to examine the effectiveness of a single session of individual exercise on depressive symptoms by assessing the change in saliva free cortisol level, which reflects hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis function that is disturbed in depressive patients. Method Eighteen medicated patients, who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria for major depressive disorder, were examined for the change in saliva free cortisol levels and the change in subjective depressive symptoms before and after pedaling a bicycle ergometer for fifteen minutes. Within a month after the exercise session, participants conducted a non-exercise control session, which was sitting quietly at the same time of day as the exercise session. Results Depressed patients who participated in this study were in remission or in mild depressive state. However, they suffered chronic depression and had disturbed quality of life. The saliva free cortisol level and subjective depressive symptoms significantly decreased after the exercise session. Moreover, the changes in these variables were significantly, positively correlated. On the other hand, although the subjective depressive symptoms improved in the control session, the saliva free cortisol level did not change. Conclusion For the first time in depressive patients, we were able to show a decrease in the saliva free cortisol level due to physical exercise, accompanied by

  19. Dopaminergic modulation of effort-related choice behavior as assessed by a progressive ratio chow feeding choice task: pharmacological studies and the role of individual differences.

    PubMed

    Randall, Patrick A; Pardo, Marta; Nunes, Eric J; López Cruz, Laura; Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, Alex; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2012-01-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is involved in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. In the present study, the effects of several drug treatments were assessed using a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding concurrent choice task. With this task, rats can lever press on a PROG schedule reinforced by a preferred high-carbohydrate food pellet, or alternatively approach and consume the less-preferred but concurrently available laboratory chow. Rats pass through each ratio level 15 times, after which the ratio requirement is incremented by one additional response. The DA D(2) antagonist haloperidol (0.025-0.1 mg/kg) reduced number of lever presses and highest ratio achieved but did not reduce chow intake. In contrast, the adenosine A(2A) antagonist MSX-3 increased lever presses and highest ratio achieved, but decreased chow consumption. The cannabinoid CB1 inverse agonist and putative appetite suppressant AM251 decreased lever presses, highest ratio achieved, and chow intake; this effect was similar to that produced by pre-feeding. Furthermore, DA-related signal transduction activity (pDARPP-32(Thr34) expression) was greater in nucleus accumbens core of high responders (rats with high lever pressing output) compared to low responders. Thus, the effects of DA antagonism differed greatly from those produced by pre-feeding or reduced CB1 transmission, and it appears unlikely that haloperidol reduces PROG responding because of a general reduction in primary food motivation or the unconditioned reinforcing properties of food. Furthermore, accumbens core signal transduction activity is related to individual differences in work output.

  20. Individual venom profiling of Crotalus durissus terrificus specimens from a geographically limited region: crotamine assessment and captivity evaluation on the biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Airton; Zorzella Creste, Camila Fernanda; de Barros, Luciana Curtolo; Delazari dos Santos, Lucilene; Pimenta, Daniel C; Barraviera, Benedito; Ferreira, Rui Seabra

    2013-07-01

    Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt) venom major components comprise crotoxin, crotamine, gyroxin and convulxin. Crotamine exerts a myotoxic action, among others, but its expression varies even amid snakes from the same region. Biochemical, enzymatic and pharmacological variations of venoms may be associated with the geography, climate, gender, age, and diet, as well as captivity time and venom extraction intervals. The present study aimed to characterize the Cdt venom from the Botucatu region, (SP, Brazil), by assessing its biochemical, pharmacological and enzymatic properties. Venoms from newly captured snakes and already-captured animals were characterized comparatively to verify the sexual, environmental (length of captivity) and ontogenetic variations that could influence the venom composition. Protein concentration, SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC were performed and the coagulant, toxic (LD50) and crotamine activities were assayed. Individual SDS-PAGE analyses (315 samples) were performed and the biological activities of the venom of 60 adults (captive and newly captured males and females) and 18 newborns were compared with the Brazilian Reference Venom. Crotamine was found in 39.7% (125/315) of the samples, as determined by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC. Protein concentration differed significantly between adults (75%) and newborns (60%). RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE analyses showed highly variable protein concentration and copious crotoxin isoforms; however, the LD50 values decreased during the captivity time. Cdt venom biological activities were similar among adult groups, but diminished during the captivity period. The current findings demonstrate that venoms vary significantly in terms activity and protein concentration, despite originating from the same specie and region.

  1. Individualized Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  2. Assessing Cortisol Reactivity to a Linguistic Task as a Marker of Stress in Individuals with Left-Hemisphere Stroke and Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laures-Gore, Jacqueline; Heim, Christine M.; Hsu, Yu-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors explore a method of measuring physiologic and perceived stress in individuals with aphasia by investigating salivary cortisol reactivity and subjectively perceived stress in response to a standardized linguistic task. Method: Fifteen individuals with aphasia and 15 age-matched healthy controls participated in a…

  3. Defining and Assessing Individual Differences in Attachment Relationships: Q-Methodology and the Organization of Behavior in Infancy and Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Everett; Deane, Kathleen E.

    1985-01-01

    Argues that none of the conventional methods for assessing attachment meet all criteria. Describes development of a 100-item sort for assessing secure attachment in toddlers, closely tied to Bowlby's control systems model of attachment. Evaluates the Q-sort in terms of criteria for valid thoery-based assessments that have applicability beyond this…

  4. The Children's Social Understanding Scale: Construction and Validation of a Parent-Report Measure for Assessing Individual Differences in Children's Theories of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tahiroglu, Deniz; Moses, Louis J.; Carlson, Stephanie M.; Mahy, Caitlin E. V.; Olofson, Eric L.; Sabbagh, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Children's theory of mind (ToM) is typically measured with laboratory assessments of performance. Although these measures have generated a wealth of informative data concerning developmental progressions in ToM, they may be less useful as the sole source of information about individual differences in ToM and their relation to other facets of…

  5. Histomorphometric Assessment of Cancellous and Cortical Bone Material Distribution in the Proximal Humerus of Normal and Osteoporotic Individuals: Significantly Reduced Bone Stock in the Metaphyseal and Subcapital Regions of Osteoporotic Individuals.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Christoph M; Schmidutz, Florian; Helfen, Tobias; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael; Milz, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disorder predominantly affecting postmenopausal women but also men at an advanced age. Both genders may suffer from low-energy fractures of, for example, the proximal humerus when reduction of the bone stock or/and quality has occurred.The aim of the current study was to compare the amount of bone in typical fracture zones of the proximal humerus in osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic individuals.The amount of bone in the proximal humerus was determined histomorphometrically in frontal plane sections. The donor bones were allocated to normal and osteoporotic groups using the T-score from distal radius DXA measurements of the same extremities. The T-score evaluation was done according to WHO criteria. Regional thickness of the subchondral plate and the metaphyseal cortical bone were measured using interactive image analysis.At all measured locations the amount of cancellous bone was significantly lower in individuals from the osteoporotic group compared to the non-osteoporotic one. The osteoporotic group showed more significant differences between regions of the same bone than the non-osteoporotic group. In both groups the subchondral cancellous bone and the subchondral plate were least affected by bone loss. In contrast, the medial metaphyseal region in the osteoporotic group exhibited higher bone loss in comparison to the lateral side.This observation may explain prevailing fracture patterns, which frequently involve compression fractures and certainly has an influence on the stability of implants placed in this medial region. It should be considered when planning the anchoring of osteosynthesis materials in osteoporotic patients with fractures of the proximal humerus.

  6. A Comparison of Experimental Functional Analysis and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF) in the Assessment of Challenging Behavior of Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Olive; Brett, Denise; Leader, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    We compared two functional behavioral assessment methods: the Questions About Behavioral Function (QABF; a standardized test) and experimental functional analysis (EFA) to identify behavioral functions of aggressive/destructive behavior, self-injurious behavior and stereotypy in 32 people diagnosed with autism. Both assessments found that self…

  7. Cognitive-affective processing system analysis of intra-individual dynamics in collaborative therapeutic assessment: translating basic theory and research into clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Yuichi; Wilson, Nicole L; Chen, Jessica; Gilmore, Amanda K; Smith, Ronald E

    2013-12-01

    According to the cognitive-affective processing system (CAPS) model, behavior is a function of how the distinctive cognitive-affective system of the individual responds to one's subjective experience of the situation encountered. Thus an individual's maladaptive coping processes may be understood by identifying the nature of the situations that a client experiences as highly stressful and the psychological reactions they trigger. An initial study established the feasibility and utility of an Internet-based CAPS daily diary program; it was then used to facilitate a clinical stress-management intervention. The daily diary enabled researchers and clinicians to gather Highly-Repeated Within-Persons (HRWP) data on the situational features, cognitions, affect, and coping behaviors associated with daily life stress, which were then analyzed separately for each participant to identify each individual's unique and distinctive pattern of intra-individual dynamics. Results suggested that individuals differed reliably in the features of psychological situations that triggered stress and maladaptive coping behaviors. HRWP analysis of daily diary data enhanced the efficacy of clinical intervention, and clients' self-regulatory capabilities and life satisfaction were shown to increase over the course of the intervention. We discuss how our program of research fits into the larger goals of translational science and current NIMH clinical research priorities. PMID:23072471

  8. Assessment of Bet v 1-specific CD4+ T cell responses in allergic and nonallergic individuals using MHC class II peptide tetramers.

    PubMed

    Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Wambre, Erik; Maillère, Bernard; von Hofe, Eric; Louise, Anne; Balazuc, Anne Marie; Bohle, Barbara; Ebo, Didier; Leboulaire, Christophe; Garcia, Gilles; Moingeon, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we used HLA-DRB1*0101, DRB1*0401, and DRB1*1501 peptide tetramers combined with cytokine surface capture assays to characterize CD4(+) T cell responses against the immunodominant T cell epitope (peptide 141-155) from the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, in both healthy and allergic individuals. We could detect Bet v 1-specific T cells in the PBMC of 20 birch pollen allergic patients, but also in 9 of 9 healthy individuals tested. Analysis at a single-cell level revealed that allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells from healthy individuals secrete IFN-gamma and IL-10 in response to the allergen, whereas cells from allergic patients are bona fide Th2 cells (producing mostly IL-5, some IL-10, but no IFN-gamma), as corroborated by patterns of cytokines produced by T cell clones. A fraction of Bet v 1-specific cells isolated from healthy, but not allergic, individuals also expresses CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor, and Foxp 3, indicating that they represent regulatory T cells. In this model of seasonal exposure to allergen, we also demonstrate the tremendous dynamics of T cell responses in both allergic and nonallergic individuals during the peak pollen season, with an expansion of Bet v 1-specific precursors from 10(-6) to 10(-3) among circulating CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Allergy vaccines should be designed to recapitulate such naturally protective Th1/regulatory T cell responses observed in healthy individuals.

  9. Use of PIT tags to assess individual heterogeneity of laboratory-reared juveniles of the endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) in a mark–recapture study

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Dan; Jiao, Yan; Neves, Richard; Jones, Jess

    2015-01-01

    The federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) was propagated and reared to taggable size (5–10 mm), and released to the Powell River, Tennessee, to augment a relict population. Methodology using passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags on these mussels greatly facilitated the detection process. The overall mean detection probability and survival rate of released individuals reached 97.8 to 98.4% and 99.7 to 99.9% (per month), respectively, during nine successive recapture occasions in the 2-year study period, regardless of seasonality. Nonhierarchical models and hierarchical models incorporating individual and seasonal variations through a Bayesian approach were compared and resulted in similar performance of prediction for detection probability and survival rate of mussels. This is the first study to apply the mark–recapture method to laboratory-reared mussels using PIT tags and stochastic models. Quantitative analyses for individual heterogeneity allowed examination of demographic variance and effects of heterogeneity on population dynamics, although the individual and seasonal variations were small in this study. Our results provide useful information in implementing conservation strategies of this faunal group and a framework for other species or similar studies. PMID:25798225

  10. Use of PIT tags to assess individual heterogeneity of laboratory-reared juveniles of the endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) in a mark-recapture study.

    PubMed

    Hua, Dan; Jiao, Yan; Neves, Richard; Jones, Jess

    2015-03-01

    The federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) was propagated and reared to taggable size (5-10 mm), and released to the Powell River, Tennessee, to augment a relict population. Methodology using passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags on these mussels greatly facilitated the detection process. The overall mean detection probability and survival rate of released individuals reached 97.8 to 98.4% and 99.7 to 99.9% (per month), respectively, during nine successive recapture occasions in the 2-year study period, regardless of seasonality. Nonhierarchical models and hierarchical models incorporating individual and seasonal variations through a Bayesian approach were compared and resulted in similar performance of prediction for detection probability and survival rate of mussels. This is the first study to apply the mark-recapture method to laboratory-reared mussels using PIT tags and stochastic models. Quantitative analyses for individual heterogeneity allowed examination of demographic variance and effects of heterogeneity on population dynamics, although the individual and seasonal variations were small in this study. Our results provide useful information in implementing conservation strategies of this faunal group and a framework for other species or similar studies. PMID:25798225

  11. Use of PIT tags to assess individual heterogeneity of laboratory-reared juveniles of the endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) in a mark-recapture study.

    PubMed

    Hua, Dan; Jiao, Yan; Neves, Richard; Jones, Jess

    2015-03-01

    The federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) was propagated and reared to taggable size (5-10 mm), and released to the Powell River, Tennessee, to augment a relict population. Methodology using passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags on these mussels greatly facilitated the detection process. The overall mean detection probability and survival rate of released individuals reached 97.8 to 98.4% and 99.7 to 99.9% (per month), respectively, during nine successive recapture occasions in the 2-year study period, regardless of seasonality. Nonhierarchical models and hierarchical models incorporating individual and seasonal variations through a Bayesian approach were compared and resulted in similar performance of prediction for detection probability and survival rate of mussels. This is the first study to apply the mark-recapture method to laboratory-reared mussels using PIT tags and stochastic models. Quantitative analyses for individual heterogeneity allowed examination of demographic variance and effects of heterogeneity on population dynamics, although the individual and seasonal variations were small in this study. Our results provide useful information in implementing conservation strategies of this faunal group and a framework for other species or similar studies.

  12. Project HAPI (Handicapped Achievement Program Improvement): Assessment plus Intervention equals IEP. A Handbook on How to Write an Individualized Education Program for the Visually Impaired. Book Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabot, Michele; Chapman, Jean

    The fourth of five handbooks developed by Project HAPI (Handicapped Achievement Program Improvement), a multimedia staff development program to help teachers and specialists write effective individualized education programs (IEPs), is in looseleaf workbook format and focuses on children with visual impairments. It is reported that students who…

  13. Evaluating the Relationship between Individualized Education Program Compliance for Middle School Students with Specific Learning Disabilities and Academic Achievement Based upon State Reading Summative Assessment Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Donnita

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 37 years, the Individualized Education Program (IEP) has been the guiding document that outlines the needs of a student who receives special education services. Washington State utilizes an IEP Review form as the means to determine if an IEP has been properly written and formulated. This information partially fulfills the Federal…

  14. A psychometric assessment of the GAIN individual severity scale (GAIN-GISS) and short screeners (GAIN-SS) among adolescents in outpatient treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Stucky, Brian D; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Ramchand, Rajeev

    2014-02-01

    The global appraisal of individual needs (GAIN)-general individual severity scale (GAIN-GISS), and GAIN-short screener (GAIN-SS) are widely used diagnostic measures of internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders, substance abuse, and criminal and violent behavior. Although prevalent in clinical and research settings, there is only limited psychometric evidence of the dimensional structure of these scales. Our investigation used intake data from 6,909 adolescents presenting to outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States. Our analytic approach used exploratory and item factor analyses to evaluate the underlying factor structure. Multi- and unidimensional item response theory models were employed to evaluate the utility of the scales at providing precise score estimates at various locations of severity. Most scales were confirmed as unidimensional; scales with evidence of multidimensionality, identified as having a weak general dimension and strong specific dimensions using a bifactor IRT model, include the Crime and Violence Scale and the GAIN-SS.

  15. A Psychometric Assessment of the GAIN General Individual Severity Scale (GAIN-GISS) and Short Screeners (GAIN-SS) Among Adolescents in Outpatient Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Stucky, Brian D.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Ramchand, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    The Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) - General Individual Severity Scale (GAIN-GISS), and GAIN-Short Screener (GAIN-SS) are widely used diagnostic measures of internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders, substance abuse, and criminal and violent behavior. Though prevalent in clinical and research settings, there is only limited psychometric evidence of the dimensional structure of these scales. Our investigation used intake data from 6,909 adolescents presenting to outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States. Our analytic approach used exploratory and item factor analyses to evaluate the underlying factor structure. Multi- and unidimensional item response theory models were employed to evaluate the utility of the scales at providing precise score estimates at various locations of severity. Most scales were confirmed as unidimensional; scales with evidence of multidimensionality, identified as having a weak general dimension and strong specific dimensions using a bifactor IRT model, include the Crime Violence Scale and the GAIN-SS. PMID:23994048

  16. Improving Language Arts Assessment of Language Minority Students in Cooperative Learning Settings. Project 2.1. Designs for Assessing Individual and Group Problem Solving. Report of Preliminary Study on Cultural and Linguistic Influences on Group Interaction during Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Richard; Szymanski, Margaret

    Ensuring that new forms of assessment are fair and valid for language minority students is essential for research on assessing the performance of Latino language minority elementary school students engaged in a cooperative learning language arts curriculum in Spanish and English. Strategies for developing performance assessments are described, and…

  17. Intra-Individual Response Variability Assessed by Ex-Gaussian Analysis may be a New Endophenotype for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez-Henríquez, Marcela Patricia; Billeke, Pablo; Henríquez, Hugo; Zamorano, Francisco Javier; Rothhammer, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intra-individual variability of response times (RTisv) is considered as potential endophenotype for attentional deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Traditional methods for estimating RTisv lose information regarding response times (RTs) distribution along the task, with eventual effects on statistical power. Ex-Gaussian analysis captures the dynamic nature of RTisv, estimating normal and exponential components for RT distribution, with specific phenomenological correlates. Here, we applied ex-Gaussian analysis to explore whether intra-individual variability of RTs agrees with criteria proposed by Gottesman and Gould for endophenotypes. Specifically, we evaluated if normal and/or exponential components of RTs may (a) present the stair-like distribution expected for endophenotypes (ADHD > siblings > typically developing children (TD) without familiar history of ADHD) and (b) represent a phenotypic correlate for previously described genetic risk variants. This is a pilot study including 55 subjects (20 ADHD-discordant sibling-pairs and 15 TD children), all aged between 8 and 13 years. Participants resolved a visual Go/Nogo with 10% Nogo probability. Ex-Gaussian distributions were fitted to individual RT data and compared among the three samples. In order to test whether intra-individual variability may represent a correlate for previously described genetic risk variants, VNTRs at DRD4 and SLC6A3 were identified in all sibling-pairs following standard protocols. Groups were compared adjusting independent general linear models for the exponential and normal components from the ex-Gaussian analysis. Identified trends were confirmed by the non-parametric Jonckheere–Terpstra test. Stair-like distributions were observed for μ (p = 0.036) and σ (p = 0.009). An additional “DRD4-genotype” × “clinical status” interaction was present for τ (p = 0.014) reflecting a possible severity factor. Thus, normal and exponential RTisv components

  18. Alcohol Consumption, Craving, and Craving Control Efforts Assessed Daily in the Context of Readiness to Change Among Individuals with Alcohol Dependence and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Browne, Kendall C; Wray, Tyler B; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A; Krenek, Marketa; Simpson, Tracy L

    2016-02-01

    Research has demonstrated the positive association between alcohol craving and alcohol use and has identified craving as a central component of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Despite potential clinical implications, few studies have examined the relationship between craving and alcohol use in individuals with AUD and common psychiatric comorbidities or explored possible moderators of the craving-alcohol use relationship. The current study used daily monitoring data to: 1) replicate previous findings detecting a positive relationship between craving and alcohol use in individuals with AUD and co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 2) extend these findings by examining the influence of initial change motivation on the craving-use relationship and within-day associations among craving, efforts to control craving, and alcohol consumption. Participants were 84 individuals with alcohol dependence and PTSD enrolled in an intervention study. Generalized estimating equations using pre-treatment baseline daily data revealed significant main effects for craving, craving control, and motivation to change alcohol use. Daily craving was positively related to alcohol use. Greater change motivation and craving control (i.e., efforts to resist craving, avoidance of thoughts and feelings related to craving) were negatively related to alcohol use. A significant interaction was detected between baseline change motivation and daily craving indicating that the association between craving and alcohol use was significantly stronger for those with low baseline change motivation. A significant interaction was also detected between craving control and daily craving, suggesting that participants were more likely to consume alcohol when experiencing high levels of craving if they reported low levels of craving control. Findings bolster the idea that efforts to prevent or ameliorate craving are critical to treatment success for individuals with AUD and PTSD who are seeking to

  19. Using Distractor-Driven Standards-Based Multiple-Choice Assessments and Rasch Modeling to Investigate Hierarchies of Chemistry Misconceptions and Detect Structural Problems with Individual Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann-Abell, Cari F.; DeBoer, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Distractor-driven multiple-choice assessment items and Rasch modeling were used as diagnostic tools to investigate students' understanding of middle school chemistry ideas. Ninety-one items were developed according to a procedure that ensured content alignment to the targeted standards and construct validity. The items were administered to 13360…

  20. Relationship between Pre-Intervention Data and Post-Intervention Reading Fluency and Growth: A Meta-Analysis of Assessment Data for Individual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholin, Sarah E.; Burns, Matthew K.

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement is commonly used within a response-to-intervention framework to assess the effectiveness of intervention and to triage students into intervention tiers (e.g., the lowest 10% receive a Tier 3 intervention, and those in the 11th to 25th percentiles receive a Tier 2 intervention). We conducted a meta-analysis of 18…