Science.gov

Sample records for assessment center phased

  1. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    SciTech Connect

    C. Riland; D. R. Bowman; R. Lambert; R. Tighe

    1999-09-30

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions.

  2. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  3. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  4. Risk assessment pilot study. Phase 3. Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Rogers, B.A.; Benyi, S.; Cayula, S.

    1993-12-01

    To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to determine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. Allen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was closed to shellfishing by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management because of suspected hazardous waste contamination from a landfill and disposal area adjacent to the harbor. NCBC Davisville was added to the National Priority List in November 1989. Between 1946 and 1972, the 15-acre landfill received a wide variety of wastes, including sewage sludge, solvents, paints, chromic acid, PCB-contaminated waste oils, preservatives, blasting grit, and other municipal and industrial wastes generated at NCBC Davisville and at the Naval Air Station Quonset Point. Another site, also adjacent to Allen Harbor on Calf Pasture Point, was used for disposal of calcium hypochlorite decontaminating solution and chlorides.

  5. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  6. Marine Ecological Risk Assessment at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    on Fertilization, Survival, and Development of the Sea Urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ," in Biological Monitoring of Marine Pollutants (F... developed for each proposed study. Funding by NAVOCEANSYSCEN and EPA-ERL is subject to the U. S . Government appropriation process. No responsibility is...ecological risk assessment is developed . Exposure to and the effects of contamination are measured at both subtidal and intertidal s . %tions. A T-shaped

  7. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  8. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  9. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374.

  10. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  11. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  12. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  13. Comprehensive assessment of chronic pain management in primary care: a first phase of a quality improvement initiative at a multisite Community Health Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Daren; Wang, Sissi; Zlateva, Ianita

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive formative assessment of chronic pain management in a large, multisite community health centre and use the results to design a quality improvement initiative based on an evidence-based practice model developed by the Veterans Health Administration. Improving quality and safety by incorporating evidence-based practices (EBP) is challenging, particularly in busy clinical practices such as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). FQHCs grapple with financial constraints, lack of resources and complex patient populations. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) Framework served as a basis for the comprehensive assessment. We used a range of measures and tools to examine pain care from a variety of perspectives. Patients with chronic pain were identified using self-reported pain scores and opioid prescription records. We employed multiple data collection strategies, including querying our electronic health records system, manual chart reviews and staff surveys. We found that patients with chronic pain had extremely high primary care utilisation rates while referral rates to pain-related specialties were low for these patients. Large gaps existed in primary care provider adherence to standards for pain care documentation and practice. There was wide provider variability in the prescription of opioids to treat pain. Staff surveys found substantial variation in both pain care knowledge and readiness to change, as well as low confidence in providers' ability to manage pain, and dissatisfaction with the resources available to support chronic pain care. Improving chronic pain management at this Community Health Center requires a multifaceted intervention aimed at addressing many of the problems identified during the assessment phase. During the intervention we will put a greater emphasis on increasing options for behavioural health and complementary medicine support, increasing

  14. Lunar phases and crisis center telephone calls.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J E; Tobacyk, J J

    1990-02-01

    The lunar hypothesis, that is, the notion that lunar phases can directly affect human behavior, was tested by time-series analysis of 4,575 crisis center telephone calls (all calls recorded for a 6-month interval). As expected, the lunar hypothesis was not supported. The 28-day lunar cycle accounted for less than 1% of the variance of the frequency of crisis center calls. Also, as hypothesized from an attribution theory framework, crisis center workers reported significantly greater belief in lunar effects than a non-crisis-center-worker comparison group.

  15. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS

  16. The phase center of a monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, G.

    1982-04-01

    A phase center is calculated for the idealized model of a monopole antenna with an infinitely large, perfectly conducting ground plane. The boundary integral method is used to determine the surface current density on the conducting parts of the configuration. The value of the input admittance is calculated for a monopole antenna with a flat top and for a monopole antenna with a hemispherical cap, and results are compared with experimental results of Sandor and Holly (1969), showing excellent agreement.

  17. Phase Correction for GPS Antenna with Nonunique Phase Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin

    2005-01-01

    A method of determining the position and attitude of a body equipped with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver includes an accounting for the location of the nonunique phase center of a distributed or wraparound GPS antenna. The method applies, more specifically, to the case in which (1) the GPS receiver utilizes measurements of the phases of GPS carrier signals in its position and attitude computations and (2) the body is axisymmetric (e.g., spherical or round cylindrical) and wrapped at its equator with a single- or multiple-element antenna, the radiation pattern of which is also axisymmetric with the same axis of symmetry as that of the body.

  18. Development and assessment of a biotechnology workforce development center model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxley, Mary Pat

    Life science and biotechnology companies are the fastest growing industries in the nation, with more than 30% of these companies and close to 50% of the nation's life science workers located in California. The need for well-trained biotechnology workers continues to grow. Educational institutions and industry professionals have attempted to create the training and the workforce for the bioscience and biotechnology industry. Many have concluded that one way would be to create a multiuse training center where trainees from high school age through late adulthood could receive up-to-date training. This case study had 2 unique phases. Phase 1 consisted of examining representative stakeholder interview data for characteristics of an ideal biotechnology shared-use regional education (B-SURE) center, which served as the basis for an assessment tool, with 107 characteristics in 8 categories. This represented what an ideal center model should include. Phase 2 consisted of using this assessment tool to gather data from 6 current biotechnology regional centers to determine how these centers compared to the ideal model. Results indicated that each center was unique. Although no center met all ideal model characteristics, the 6 centers could clearly be ranked. Recommendations include refining the core characteristics, further assessing the existing and planned centers; evaluating and refining the interview instrument in Phase 1 and the assessment tool in Phase 2 by including additional stakeholders in both phases and by adding reviewers of Phase 1 transcripts; and determining a method to demonstrate a clear return on investment in a B-SURE center.

  19. An Introduction to the Assessment Center Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendel, Frederick C.

    This document defines the standards and characteristics of an assessment center. An assessment center consists of a standardized evaluation of behavior based on multiple inputs. Multiple trained observers and techniques are used. Judgments about behavior are made, in part, from specially developed assessment simulations. These judgments are pooled…

  20. AAFES Shopping Center Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    AFB, Montana. February. _________. 2006c. Malmstrom Air Force Base Runoff Curve Numbers, Time of Concentration, Peak Discharge. Report Prepared...The existing Base Exchange was constructed in 1957 and the building suffers from dated design features that limit retail merchandising...proposes to construct a new Shopping Center at Malmstrom Air Force Base (AFB), Montana. The Shopping Center would feature retail and food

  1. Phase Zero Insurgency Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    62 The area knew a series of violent cycles before Nigeria’s 1960 independence. These cycles related primarily to slavery and rivalry over palm oil ...makers in creating or modifying United States policy to affected areas. Context of the Study The Council on Foreign Relations fixes the number of ongoing...Civilian Surge: Key to Complex Operations (Washington, DC: Published for the Center for Technology and National Security Policy by National Defense

  2. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  3. This Administrator Assessment Center Aims for Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Larry W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the assessment center of the Leadership Academy in the Houston (Texas) schools system. It is used to evaluate the management capability of current principals and potential administrator candidates. The center uses simulation exercises as part of the evaluation process. Includes outline of areas to be considered when developing a program.…

  4. Psychiatric Disorder in a Juvenile Assessment Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynolds, Larkin S.; Wasserman, Gail A.; DeComo, Robert E.; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M.; Nolen, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile assessment centers (JACs) were developed to address service fragmentation and promote the sharing of information among agencies providing services to youth involved with the juvenile justice system. To date, there are no reports that describe the diagnostic profiles of the youth served by such centers. The authors hypothesize that the…

  5. Psychiatric Disorder in a Juvenile Assessment Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynolds, Larkin S.; Wasserman, Gail A.; DeComo, Robert E.; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M.; Nolen, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile assessment centers (JACs) were developed to address service fragmentation and promote the sharing of information among agencies providing services to youth involved with the juvenile justice system. To date, there are no reports that describe the diagnostic profiles of the youth served by such centers. The authors hypothesize that the…

  6. Using Assessment Centers in Smaller Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Seymour

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the assessment center approach for selecting managerial personnel and notes some special considerations for smaller organizations in deciding whether to use such selection procedures: selection tests and techniques, their predictive validity, assessors, and time constraints. (MF)

  7. Developing and Scoring Assessment Center Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Larry; Stilley, Lori Rittenhouse

    The Assessment Development Laboratory for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards is developing a certification process with the three components of school site documentation, a content knowledge examination, and assessment center exercises. Activities involved in the development of the exercises and their scoring are described. The…

  8. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  9. Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at Lehigh University

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhakar Neti and Alparslan Oztekin

    2007-07-10

    During the period September, 2001, through August, 2006, the Lehigh University Industrial Assessment Center provided assessments for 147 companies in the Eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. In reports sent to the companies, a total of 1,079 assessment recommendations were suggested, with an annual cost savings of $22,980,654, to save energy, reduce waste, and improve productivity. The energy saved if all ARs were implemented would be 1,843,202 MMBtu.

  10. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University's College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor's assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  11. Eastern forest environmental threat assessment center

    Treesearch

    Southern Research Station. USDA Forest Service

    2010-01-01

    The Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center (EFETAC) provides the latest research and expertise concerning threats to healthy forests – such as insects and disease, wildland loss, invasive species, wildland fire, and climate change – to assist forest landowners, managers and scientists throughout the East. Established in 2005, EFETAC is a joint effort of...

  12. Comprehensive Needs Assessment: Gila River Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicino, F. L.; DeGracie, J. S.

    An indepth needs assessment was conducted to identify and prioritize institutional goals specified in terms of the vocational needs of the clientele that the training center is committed to serve. Following a task workshop to develop a list of institutional program areas of concern, a survey instrument was designed to determine the extent and…

  13. The Pilot Phase of the NIH Chemical Genomics Center

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Craig J.; Auld, Douglas S.; Huang, Ruili; Huang, Wenwei; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Leister, William; Maloney, David J.; Marugan, Juan J.; Michael, Sam; Simeonov, Anton; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    The NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) was the inaugural center of the Molecular Libraries and Screening Center Network (MLSCN). Along with the nine other research centers of the MLSCN, the NCGC was established with a primary goal of bringing industrial technology and experience to empower the scientific community with small molecule compounds for use in their research. We intend this review to serve as 1) an introduction to the NCGC standard operating procedures, 2) an overview of several of the lessons learned during the pilot phase and 3) a review of several of the innovative discoveries reported during the pilot phase of the MLSCN. PMID:19807664

  14. University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Asfour, Shihab, S.

    2007-01-29

    This report documents all activity of the University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center (MIIAC) grant awarded by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP). This grant was coordinated through a collaborative effort with the Center for Advanced Energy Systems (CAES) located at Rutgers University in New Jersey (www.caes.rutgers.edu) which acted as the program’s Field Manager. The grant’s duration included fiscal years 2003-2006 (September 2002 – August 2006), and operated under the direction of Dr. Shihab Asfour, Director (MIIAC). MIIAC’s main goal was to provide energy assessments for local manufacturing firms. Energy consumption, productivity enhancement, and waste management were the focus of each assessment. Energy savings, cost savings, implementation costs, and simple payback periods were quantified using scientific methodologies and techniques. Over the four-year period of the grant, the total number of industrial assessments conducted was 91, resulting in 604 assessment recommendations and the following savings: 73,519,747 kWh, 435,722 MMBTU, and $10,024,453 in cost savings. A total of 16 undergraduate and graduate students were trained on energy assessment. Companies in over 40 different zip codes were assessed.

  15. Phase Centers of Subapertures in a Tapered Aperture Array.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-11-01

    Antenna apertures that are tapered for sidelobe control can also be parsed into subapertures for Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. However, the aperture tapering complicates phase center location for the subapertures, knowledge of which is critical for proper DOA calculation. In addition, tapering affects subaperture gains, making gain dependent on subaperture position. Techniques are presented to calculate subaperture phase center locations, and algorithms are given for equalizing subapertures’ gains. Sidelobe characteristics and mitigation are also discussed.

  16. Guidelines and Ethical Considerations for Assessment Center Operations: International Task Force on Assessment Center Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Personnel Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This update of the International Personnel Management Association's guidelines for organizational psychologists, human resource management specialists, and others addresses elements of assessment centers, policy statements, assessor training, informed participation, and participants' rights. (SK)

  17. Guidelines and Ethical Considerations for Assessment Center Operations: International Task Force on Assessment Center Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Personnel Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This update of the International Personnel Management Association's guidelines for organizational psychologists, human resource management specialists, and others addresses elements of assessment centers, policy statements, assessor training, informed participation, and participants' rights. (SK)

  18. Measuring perceptual centers using the phase correction response.

    PubMed

    Villing, Rudi C; Repp, Bruno H; Ward, Tomas E; Timoney, Joseph M

    2011-07-01

    The perceptual center (P-center) is fundamental to the timing of heterogeneous event sequences, including music and speech. Unfortunately, there is currently no comprehensive and reliable model of P-centers in acoustic events, so P-centers must instead be measured empirically. This study reviews existing measurement methods and evaluates two methods in detail-the rhythm adjustment method and a new method based on the phase correction response (PCR) in a synchronous tapping task. The two methods yielded consistent P-center estimates and showed no evidence of P-center context dependence. The PCR method appears promising because it is accurate and efficient and does not require explicit perceptual judgments. As a secondary result, the magnitude of the PCR is shown to vary systematically with the onset complexity of speech sounds, which presumably reflects the perceived clarity of a sound's P-center.

  19. Doppler Radar Profiler for Launch Winds at the Kennedy Space Center (Phase 1a)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request from the, NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics at Langley Research Center (LaRC), to develop a database from multiple Doppler radar wind profiler (DRWP) sources and develop data processing algorithms to construct high temporal resolution DRWP wind profiles for day-of-launch (DOL) vehicle assessment. This document contains the outcome of Phase 1a of the assessment including Findings, Observations, NESC Recommendations, and Lessons Learned.

  20. An Overview of Assessment Centers. Technical Report l.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Donald W.

    This overview examines the historical growth of industrial assessment centers; describes the techniques involved in assessment; discusses the role of management in staff development; and suggests new uses for assessment centers. (CKJ)

  1. Reparative therapy for acute ischemic stroke with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue: a safety assessment: a phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center, pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Lara, Manuel Lara; Gimeno, Blanca Fuentes

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the possible beneficial effect of the administration of stem cells in the early stages of stroke. Intravenous administration of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue in patients with acute stroke could be a safe therapy for promoting neurovascular unit repair, consequently supporting better functional recovery. We aim to assess the safety and efficacy of MSC administration and evaluate its potential as a treatment for cerebral protection and repair. A Phase IIa, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center, pilot clinical trial. Twenty patients presenting acute ischemic stroke will be randomized in a 1:1 proportion to treatment with allogeneic MSCs from adipose tissue or to placebo (or vehicle) administered as a single intravenous dose within the first 2 weeks after the onset of stroke symptoms. The patients will be followed up for 2 years. Primary outcomes for safety analysis: adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs; neurologic and systemic complications, and tumor development. Secondary outcomes for efficacy analysis: modified Rankin Scale; NIHSS; infarct size; and biochemical markers of brain repair (vascular endothelial growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and matrix metalloproteinases 9). To our knowledge, this is the first, phase II, pilot clinical trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of intravenous administration of allogeneic MSCs from adipose tissue within the first 2 weeks of stroke. In addition, its results will help us define the best criteria for a future phase III study. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. L.; Neely, M. A.; Curran, F. M.; Christensen, E. R.; Escher, D.; Lovell, N.; Morris, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) has developed a flexible systems analysis framework to identify long-term technology needs, quantify payoffs for technology investments, and assess the progress of ASTP-sponsored technology programs in the hypersonics area. For this, ITAC has assembled an experienced team representing a broad sector of the aerospace community and developed a systematic assessment process complete with supporting tools. Concepts for transportation systems are selected based on relevance to the ASTP and integrated concept models (ICM) of these concepts are developed. Key technologies of interest are identified and projections are made of their characteristics with respect to their impacts on key aspects of the specific concepts of interest. Both the models and technology projections are then fed into the ITAC's probabilistic systems analysis framework in ModelCenter. This framework permits rapid sensitivity analysis, single point design assessment, and a full probabilistic assessment of each concept with respect to both embedded and enhancing technologies. Probabilistic outputs are weighed against metrics of interest to ASTP using a multivariate decision making process to provide inputs for technology prioritization within the ASTP. ITAC program is currently finishing the assessment of a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO), rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) concept and a TSTO turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) concept developed by the team with inputs from NASA. A baseline all rocket TSTO concept is also being developed for comparison. Boeing has recently submitted a performance model for their Flexible Aerospace System Solution for Tomorrow (FASST) concept and the ISAT program will provide inputs for a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) TBCC based concept in the near-term. Both of these latter concepts will be analyzed within the ITAC framework over the summer. This paper provides a status update of the ITAC program.

  3. Industrial waste needs assessment. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Radel, R.J.; Willis, M.P.

    1993-10-01

    In January of 1992 a team was put together to begin the process of assessing the industrial waste needs of the Tennessee Valley. The team consisted of representatives from the various TVA Resource Group organizations. This initial team recommended as a starting point in the process a two-phase market research effort. A second team was then commissioned to conduct the first phase of this market research effort. The first phase of that marketing effort is now complete. This report contains an analysis of the data obtained through interviews of more than 168 individuals representing a similar number of organizations. A total of 37 TVA Resource Group employees were involved in the contact process from various organizations. In addition, the appendices provide summaries of the data used in designing the process and the reports of the Contact Coordinators (who were responsible for a series of visits). As a result of the data analysis, the Review Team makes the following recommendations: 1. Publish this report and distribute to the new management within TVA Resource Group as well as to all those participating as contacts, visitors, and contact coordinators. 2. The Resource Group management team, or management teams within each of the respective organizations within Resource Group, appoint Phase 2 assessement teams for as many of the problem areas listed in Table III as seem appropriate. We further recommend that, where possible, cross-organizational teams be used to examine individual problem areas. 3. Make this report available within Generating and Customer Groups, especially to the Customer Service Centers. 4. Establish a process to continue follow up with each of the contacts made in this assessment.

  4. Driving topological phases by spatially inhomogeneous pairing centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezicki, Wojciech; Oleś, Andrzej M.; Cuoco, Mario

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the effect of periodic and disordered distributions of pairing centers in a one-dimensional itinerant system to obtain the microscopic conditions required to achieve an end Majorana mode and the topological phase diagram. Remarkably, the topological invariant can be generally expressed in terms of the physical parameters for any pairing center configuration. Such a fundamental relation allows us to unveil hidden local symmetries and to identify trajectories in the parameter space that preserve the nontrivial topological character of the ground state. We identify the phase diagram with topologically nontrivial domains where Majorana modes are completely unaffected by the spatial distribution of the pairing centers. These results are general and apply to several systems where inhomogeneous perturbations generate stable Majorana modes.

  5. Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit Guide and Specification

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-26

    A portable and temporary wireless mesh assessment kit can be used to speed up and reduce the costs of a data center energy use assessment and overcome the issues with respect to shutdowns. The assessment kit is comprised of temperature, relative humidity, and pressure sensors. Also included are power meters that can be installed on computer room air conditioners (CRACs) without intrusive interruption of data center operations. The assessment kit produces data required for a detailed energy assessment of the data center.

  6. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. Power demand, load center assessment and transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Thaik, A.; Pingel, P.

    1982-02-01

    This document constitutes a segment of a feasibility study investigating the ramification of constructing a nuclear energy center in an arid western region. In this phase of the study. The projected power demands and load center locations were reviewed and assessed. Alternative transmission systems were analysed and a conceptual transmission for bulk power transportation is proposed with potential line routes. Environmental impacts of the proposed transmission were also identified.

  7. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  8. Assessment Centers: A Technique for Selecting Academic Library Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nancy L.; McQuown, Eloise

    1985-01-01

    This essay proposes the use of assessment centers, designed to simulate real-life situations and identify managerial skills, as a possible solution to dilemmas of current administrative personnel selection practices in academic libraries. Background, setting up the assessment center, obtaining assessment expertise, and legal implications are…

  9. Naval Space Surveillance Center uses of time, frequency, and phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Carroll C.; Knowles, Stephen H.

    1992-01-01

    The Naval Space Surveillance Center (NAVSPASUR) is an operational naval command that has the mission of determining the location of all manmade objects in space and transmitting information on objects of interest to the fleet. NAVSPASUR operates a 217 MHz radar fence that has 9 transmitting and receiving stations deployed in a line across southern Continental United States (CONUS). This surveillance fence provides unalerted detection of satellites overflying CONUS. NAVSPASUR also maintains a space catalog of all orbiting space objects. NAVSPASUR plays an important role as operational alternate to the primary national Space Surveillance Center (SSC) and Space Defence Operations Center (SPADOC). In executing these responsibilities, NAVSPASUR needs precise and/or standardized time and frequency in a number of applications. These include maintenance of the radar fence references to specification, and coordination with other commands and agencies for data receipt and dissemination. Precise time and frequency must be maintained within each site to enable proper operation of the interferometry phasing technique used. Precise time-of-day clocking must exist between sites for proper intersite coordination. Phase may be considered a derivative of time and frequency. Its control within each transmitter or receiver site is of great importance to NAVSPASUR because of the operation of the sensor as an interferometer system, with source direction angles as the primary observable. Determination of the angular position of a satellite is directly dependent on the accuracy with which the differential phase between spaced subarrays can be measured at each receiver site. Various aspects of the NAVSPASUR are discussed with respect to time, frequency, and phase.

  10. Naval Space Surveillance Center uses of time, frequency, and phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Carroll C.; Knowles, Stephen H.

    1992-07-01

    The Naval Space Surveillance Center (NAVSPASUR) is an operational naval command that has the mission of determining the location of all manmade objects in space and transmitting information on objects of interest to the fleet. NAVSPASUR operates a 217 MHz radar fence that has 9 transmitting and receiving stations deployed in a line across southern Continental United States (CONUS). This surveillance fence provides unalerted detection of satellites overflying CONUS. NAVSPASUR also maintains a space catalog of all orbiting space objects. NAVSPASUR plays an important role as operational alternate to the primary national Space Surveillance Center (SSC) and Space Defence Operations Center (SPADOC). In executing these responsibilities, NAVSPASUR needs precise and/or standardized time and frequency in a number of applications. These include maintenance of the radar fence references to specification, and coordination with other commands and agencies for data receipt and dissemination. Precise time and frequency must be maintained within each site to enable proper operation of the interferometry phasing technique used. Precise time-of-day clocking must exist between sites for proper intersite coordination. Phase may be considered a derivative of time and frequency. Its control within each transmitter or receiver site is of great importance to NAVSPASUR because of the operation of the sensor as an interferometer system, with source direction angles as the primary observable. Determination of the angular position of a satellite is directly dependent on the accuracy with which the differential phase between spaced subarrays can be measured at each receiver site. Various aspects of the NAVSPASUR are discussed with respect to time, frequency, and phase.

  11. Naval Space Surveillance Center uses of time, frequency, and phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Carroll C.; Knowles, Stephen H.

    1992-01-01

    The Naval Space Surveillance Center (NAVSPASUR) is an operational naval command that has the mission of determining the location of all manmade objects in space and transmitting information on objects of interest to the fleet. NAVSPASUR operates a 217 MHz radar fence that has 9 transmitting and receiving stations deployed in a line across southern Continental United States (CONUS). This surveillance fence provides unalerted detection of satellites overflying CONUS. NAVSPASUR also maintains a space catalog of all orbiting space objects. NAVSPASUR plays an important role as operational alternate to the primary national Space Surveillance Center (SSC) and Space Defence Operations Center (SPADOC). In executing these responsibilities, NAVSPASUR needs precise and/or standardized time and frequency in a number of applications. These include maintenance of the radar fence references to specification, and coordination with other commands and agencies for data receipt and dissemination. Precise time and frequency must be maintained within each site to enable proper operation of the interferometry phasing technique used. Precise time-of-day clocking must exist between sites for proper intersite coordination. Phase may be considered a derivative of time and frequency. Its control within each transmitter or receiver site is of great importance to NAVSPASUR because of the operation of the sensor as an interferometer system, with source direction angles as the primary observable. Determination of the angular position of a satellite is directly dependent on the accuracy with which the differential phase between spaced subarrays can be measured at each receiver site. Various aspects of the NAVSPASUR are discussed with respect to time, frequency, and phase.

  12. Technology Assessments within NASA's Integrated Technology Assessment Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. L.; Neely, M. A.; Curran, F. M.; Christensen, E. R.; Escher, D.; Lovell, N.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) founded the Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) to provide a comprehensive, systematic approach to identify long-term technology needs, to quantify payoffs for technology investments, and to assess the progress of ASTP-sponsored technology programs in the hypersonics/Earth-to-orbit area. To accomplish these goals, the ITAC has assembled an experienced team representing a broad sector of the aerospace community and developed a systematic assessment process complete with supporting tools. In the ITAC approach, concepts for transportation systems are first selected based on relevance to the ASTP. Models of these concepts are then developed and data on advanced technologies are collected. Projections of key technology characteristics with respect to the specific concepts of interest are made. Both the models and technology projections are then fed into the ITAC's probabilistic systems analysis framework. The probabilistic outputs are weighed against metrics of interest to ASTP and a multivariate decision making process is used to provide inputs for technology prioritization within the ASTP. At present, the ITAC program is working to evaluate a variety of technologies for three two-stage hypersonic vehicle concepts. Concepts include an all rocket, vertical take off-horizontal landing (VTHL) system, a horizontal takeoff-horizontal landing (HTHL) RBCC-propelled first stage/all rocket second stage system, and an HTHL turbine-based first stage/all rocket second stage system. This paper will provide a status update of the ITAC program including current results and plans.

  13. Technology Assessments within NASA's Integrated Technology Assessment Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. L.; Neely, M. A.; Curran, F. M.; Christensen, E. R.; Escher, D.; Lovell, N.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) founded the Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) to provide a comprehensive, systematic approach to identify long-term technology needs, to quantify payoffs for technology investments, and to assess the progress of ASTP-sponsored technology programs in the hypersonics/Earth-to-orbit area. To accomplish these goals, the ITAC has assembled an experienced team representing a broad sector of the aerospace community and developed a systematic assessment process complete with supporting tools. In the ITAC approach, concepts for transportation systems are first selected based on relevance to the ASTP. Models of these concepts are then developed and data on advanced technologies are collected. Projections of key technology characteristics with respect to the specific concepts of interest are made. Both the models and technology projections are then fed into the ITAC's probabilistic systems analysis framework. The probabilistic outputs are weighed against metrics of interest to ASTP and a multivariate decision making process is used to provide inputs for technology prioritization within the ASTP. At present, the ITAC program is working to evaluate a variety of technologies for three two-stage hypersonic vehicle concepts. Concepts include an all rocket, vertical take off-horizontal landing (VTHL) system, a horizontal take-off-horizontal landing (HTHL) RBCC-propelled first stage/all rocket second stage system, and an HTHL turbine-based first stage/all rocket second stage system. This paper will provide a status update of the ITAC program including current results and plans.

  14. Critical Inquiry and Writing Centers: A Methodology of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Diana Calhoun; Frost, Alanna

    2012-01-01

    By examining one writing center's role in student success, this project offers two examples of the way writing centers impact student engagement. This analysis models a methodology that writing and learning center directors can utilize in order to foster effective communication with stakeholders. By conducting data-driven assessment, directors can…

  15. GMTI Direction of Arrival Measurements from Multiple Phase Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-03-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar attempts to detect and locate targets with unknown motion. Very slow-moving targets are difficult to locate in the presence of surrounding clutter. This necessitates multiple antenna phase centers (or equivalent) to offer independent Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. DOA accuracy and precision generally remains dependent on target Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Clutter-toNoise Ratio (CNR), scene topography, interfering signals, and a number of antenna parameters. This is true even for adaptive techniques like Space-Time-AdaptiveProcessing (STAP) algorithms.

  16. Preliminary Assessment, Army Reserve Center, Pewaukee, Wisconsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-14

    U.S. ARMY ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER INSTALLATION RESTORATION DIVISION BLDG. E4480 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MARYLAND 21010I - PREPARED BY: PEER CONSULTANTS...Reserve Center in Pewaukee, Wisconsin Pamela A. Lemme; John W. Tucker, Jr. 7. PIERFOnminG ORGANIZATiON KA*6S AND A002=15E) I ~IOI"OGNETO PEER Consultants...environment and provide the infomation necessary to reevaluate the facility’s status on the Federal Facility Docket. PEER Consultants, P.C. was retained to

  17. Assessment and the School Library Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Carol Collier, Ed.

    Assessment of student learning, the measuring of students' progress and performance, is an important concern for library media specialists. Twelve articles are presented which address the issue of assessment of library media services. The titles are: "The Growth of Assessment" (George F. Madaus, Ann G. A. Tan); "Library Information…

  18. The Michigan Institute for Educational Management Assessment Center Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Inst. for Educational Management, Ann Arbor.

    This paper delineates the organizational structure and operational procedures of the Michigan Institute for Educational Management (MIEM) Assessment Center Program for prospective school principals and assistant principals. The program is part of the Assessment Center Project of the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). The…

  19. The Michigan Institute for Educational Management Assessment Center Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Inst. for Educational Management, Ann Arbor.

    This paper delineates the organizational structure and operational procedures of the Michigan Institute for Educational Management (MIEM) Assessment Center Program for prospective school principals and assistant principals. The program is part of the Assessment Center Project of the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). The…

  20. The Status and Potential for Administrative Assessment Centers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstein, Mike; Fiedler, Celia Karen

    Higher demands on administrators have rendered traditional selection methods less adequate. Many schools have responded by adopting assessment centers to identify administrator qualifications. Previous research and contact with assessment centers through letters, phone calls, and a survey furnished the information for this study. Twenty-five of…

  1. Consultants' Showcase: Applying the Assessment Center Method to Selection Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapra, Richard A.; Byham, William C.

    1978-01-01

    Targeted selection applies the five elements of the assessment-center method to selection interviewing of job applicants. Discusses the five reasons for the validity of the assessment-center method along with a parallel list of reasons for the validity of Targeted Selection. (EM)

  2. Program Description for the Phoenix Reception and Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datema, Thea; And Others

    Phoenix Reception and Assessment Center (PRAC) is a non-secure detention and assessment center for up to 15 Wayne County delinquent, adolescent males who have been committed to the Michigan Department of Social Services for care, treatment and supervision. Adolescents, ages 12 through 18, are eligible for placement at Phoenix according to the…

  3. The Utility of Assessment Centers for Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleenor, John W.; And Others

    During the past 30 years, assessment centers have become an increasingly popular method for evaluating employees and potential employees in work organizations. This study was conducted to evaluate an assessment center which was part of a management development program for state government employees. The study examined: (1) whether assessment…

  4. The North American Astronomical Photographic Plate Center: Phase I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. D.; Castelaz, M. W.; Crowley, T.; Griffin, E.; Osborn, W.

    2004-05-01

    Astronomical photographic plates constitute an important and, for the large part, unrepeatable resource for research. International pressure is mounting to preserve and catalog scientifically valuable plate collections and capture their information through digitization. At the same time, many institutions holding plates now lack the space, funds and expertise to adequately preserve this important material. In response, the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute has established the North American Photographic Plate Center (NAPPC). NAPPC is intended as a long-term repository for direct and objective prism plate collections currently stored in North America. PARI is a natural location for such a center. It offers physically secure and abundant environmentally controlled space for plate storage as well as Internet 2 infrastructure and instrument space necessary for the eventual digitization and Internet distribution of images. Phase I of this initiative is to collect unwanted plate collections, store them in an appropriate manner, prepare catalogues of their relevant information and establish a laboratory for on-site examination or measurement of the plates. This is currently underway. Phase II will be the eventual digitization and development of a public web accessible database of images. We will describe the procedures for placing plate collections in NAPPC, the infrastructure in place for plate storage and measurement, and our preliminary plans for making the plate archive a public image library with Internet access.

  5. Estimation of satellite antenna phase center offsets for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Fritsche, M.; Dach, R.; Schmid, R.; Montenbruck, O.; Uhlemann, M.; Prange, L.

    2016-08-01

    Satellite antenna phase center offsets for the Galileo In-Orbit Validation (IOV) and Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites are estimated by two different analysis centers based on tracking data of a global GNSS network. The mean x- and y-offsets could be determined with a precision of a few centimeters. However, daily estimates of the x-offsets of the IOV satellites show pronounced systematic effects with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to 70 cm that depend on the orbit model and the elevation of the Sun above the orbital plane. For the IOV y-offsets, no dependence on the orbit model exists but the scatter strongly depends on the elevation of the Sun above the orbital plane. In general, these systematic effects are significantly smaller for the FOC satellites. The z-offsets of the two analysis centers agree within the 10-15 cm level, and the time series do not show systematic effects. The application of an averaged Galileo satellite antenna model obtained from the two solutions results in a reduction of orbit day boundary discontinuities by up to one third—even if an independent software package is used.

  6. Environmental Assessment: Construct a Youth Center Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    AFB,DE,19902 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11...younger children, and would allow separate restroom facilities for adults and children. The benefit 10 on the new center is primarily to meet existing...o -. .,.. ’ c;:. ~ ; ’·’· ’: .. ’\\ •• .. ~- 10 ( .·’ . - ~~! ~ . ~- .... . ·. 0 0 .·.· ..0 v

  7. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  8. Rethinking the Health Center: Assessing Your Health Center and Setting Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Nancy S.

    2001-01-01

    Camp health center management begins with assessing the population served, camp areas impacted, and the contract of care with parents. That information is used to plan the size of the center; its location in the camp; the type of equipment; and considerations such as medication management, infectious disease control, size of in- and out-patient…

  9. Rethinking the Health Center: Assessing Your Health Center and Setting Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Nancy S.

    2001-01-01

    Camp health center management begins with assessing the population served, camp areas impacted, and the contract of care with parents. That information is used to plan the size of the center; its location in the camp; the type of equipment; and considerations such as medication management, infectious disease control, size of in- and out-patient…

  10. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  11. Program Assessments: Success Strategies for Three Canadian Teaching Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonwetter, Dieter J.; Dawson, Debra L.; Britnell, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Program assessments are an essential part of the ongoing survival of teaching centers performed by faculty development personnel at institutions of higher education. Little research is available to guide developers in performing these assessments. In this article we describe assessments conducted at three Canadian universities and highlight the…

  12. A Child Abuse Assessment Center: Alternative Investigative Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiester, Douglas S.

    A child abuse assessment center was created in Dade County, Florida, and was funded by state and local government sources. Staff includes a project director, two clinical social workers, a follow-up case monitor, clerical support, and a psychologist. The center attempts to minimize trauma to the child victim of sexual and physical abuse by a…

  13. Management assessment center technique: an evaluation of the literature.

    PubMed

    Myers, L

    1978-01-01

    In this article Lee Myers, manager, Medical Records, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, reviews the literature, mainly in the manpower development area, to provide an evaluative insight into the use of management assessment centers as a part of an organization's overall manpower planning and organizational development.

  14. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  15. Using Assessment Centers to Train Elected Officials and Community Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Nikki L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Through Project EXCEL (Excellence in Community Elected and Appointed Leadership), 63 participants (Ohio county commissioners) completed simulation exercises in 7 assessment centers. Participants received personalized feedback on 15 behavioral dimensions. (SK)

  16. The Regional Assessment Center Meets the Principal Preparation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Claire G.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a plan to assess 27 administrator candidates, drawing on a partnership between the Southwest Virginia Regional Assessment Center Leadership Academy and Virginia Tech's principal preparation program. Participants completed a reduced-item inbasket exercise, participated in leaderless-group and fact-finding exercises, and submitted a…

  17. Instruments for assessing Person Centered Care in Gerontology.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Teresa; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Yanguas, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of Person Centered Care (PCC) is internationally recognised as an approach of great interest for improving the quality of care of the elderly. The aim of this research is to review the procedures and instruments used in the assessment of services using this approach. The measurement instruments designed to assess elderly care services from PCC were reviewed, particularly residential services, day centers and home help. The main databases, research articles, and specialized websites were consulted. Four observational instruments for the assessment of Person Centered Care are described; five for the assessment of physical space; six aimed at discovering users’ opinions; one which records family opinions, and five aimed at professionals, as well as several qualitative tools for self-assessment of centers. Due to the diversity of instruments available for assessing PCC, and in order to avoid partial evaluations of attention, a combined strategy of assessment is recommended as well as integrating these measures into a broader service evaluation which includes the different strands related to care quality.

  18. Domestic Violence Assessments in the Child Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Jonathan D.; Scribano, Philip V.; Rhoda, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the frequency, methods, and practices of universal assessments for domestic violence (DV) within child advocacy centers (CACs) and determine which factors are associated with CACs that conduct universal DV assessments. Methods: The study design was a cross-sectional, web-based survey distributed to…

  19. Domestic Violence Assessments in the Child Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Jonathan D.; Scribano, Philip V.; Rhoda, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the frequency, methods, and practices of universal assessments for domestic violence (DV) within child advocacy centers (CACs) and determine which factors are associated with CACs that conduct universal DV assessments. Methods: The study design was a cross-sectional, web-based survey distributed to…

  20. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  1. Design for efficient Suburban Activity Centers. Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-19

    The advent of Suburban Activity Centers has had a radical effect on the shape and function of regions throughout the country. These centers are typically made up of large concentrations of office space, retail uses, and more recently, light industrial and manufacturing facilities. Very few Suburban Activity Centers include significant residential components, much less parks, schools, and other civic buildings. While SACs come in many sizes and shapes, there appear to be a number of distinctive common characteristics. The overall purpose of the study is to identify methods for designing Activity Centers so that they minimize traffic congestion, improve pedestrian, bicycle, and transit model shares and contribute to healthy regions.

  2. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  3. Assessment of indoor environment in Paris child day care centers.

    PubMed

    Roda, Célina; Barral, Sophie; Ravelomanantsoa, Hanitriniala; Dusséaux, Murielle; Tribout, Martin; Le Moullec, Yvon; Momas, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Children are sensitive to indoor environmental pollution. Up until now there has been a lack of data on air quality in child day care centers. The aim of this study is to document the indoor environment quality of Paris child day care centers by repeated measurements, and to compare pollutant levels in child day care centers with levels in Paris dwellings. We selected 28 child day care centers frequented by a random sample of babies who participated in the PARIS birth cohort environmental investigation, and visited the child day care centers for one week twice in one year. Biological contaminants assessed were fungi, endotoxin, dust mite allergens, and chemical pollutants: aldehydes, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Relative humidity, temperature, and carbon dioxide levels were measured simultaneously. A standardized questionnaire was used to gather information about the buildings and their inhabitants. Airborne endotoxin levels in child day care centers were higher than those found in Paris dwellings. Dust mite allergens in child day care centers were below the threshold level for sensitization in the majority of samples, and in common with dwelling samples. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most commonly identified genera fungi. The child day care center indoor/outdoor ratio for most chemical pollutants was above unity except for NO2, the levels for NO2 being significantly higher than those measured in homes. Chemical and biological contamination in child day care centers appears to be low, apart from endotoxin and NO2. Failure to take child exposure in child day care centers into account could result in an overestimation of children's exposure to other pollutants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Two-Phase Technology at NASA/Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Since the baseline International Space Station (ISS) External Active Thermal Control System (EATCS) was changed from a two-phase mechanically pumped system to a single phase cascade system in the fall of 1993, two-phase EATCS research has continued at a low level at JSC. One of-the lessons of the ISS EATCS selection was that two-phase thermal control systems must have significantly lower power than comparable single phase systems to overcome their larger radiator area, larger line and fluid mass, and perceived higher technical risk. Therefore, research at JSC has concentrated on low power mechanically pumped two-phase EATCSs. In the presentation, the results of a study investigating the trade of single and two-phase mechanically pumped EATCSs for space vehicles will be summarized. The low power two-phase mechanically pumped EATCS system under development at JSC will be described in detail and the current design status of the subscale test unit will be reviewed. Also, performance predictions for a full size EATCS will be presented. In addition to the discussion of two-phase mechanically pumped EATCS development at JSC, two-phase technologies under development for biological water processing will be discussed. These biological water processor technologies are being prepared for a 2001 flight experiment and subsequent usage on the TransHab module on the International Space Station.

  5. The Miami-Dade Juvenile Assessment Center National Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Wansley; Dembo, Richard; Beaulaurier, Richard; Cocozza, Joseph; De La Rosa, Mario; Poythress, Norman; Skowyra, Kathy; Veysey, Bonita M.

    2005-01-01

    The Miami-Dade Juvenile Assessment Center National Demonstration Project (NDP) is serving as a national model for the transformation of front end services in the juvenile justice system in a unique sociocultural setting.We discuss the background and vision of the NDP, its implementation and accomplishments in six major program areas: (1)…

  6. ASSESSMENT CENTER SIMULATION: A University Training Program for Business Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuer, Eckhard

    1992-01-01

    Describes Assessment Center (AC) programs that are used in Germany to prepare university business graduates making job applications to large companies. The simulation of real-life application procedures is explained, problems associated with the validity of the AC are addressed, and the roles and attitudes of students and experts are discussed.…

  7. Our Assessment Center Benefits the Entire Management Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    At the Dade County Public Schools Management Assessment Center, Florida, a selection procedure for principals and assistant principals incorporates performance measures into the screening process. The would-be principals participate in simulations of a principal's office, a parent conference, and a teacher observation exercise. (MLF)

  8. The Utility of the Assessment Center as a Selection Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascio, Wayne F.; Silbey, Val

    Psychometric evaluations of the assessment center method of personnel selection have consistently shown positive results. However, this approach ignores certain external parameters (e.g., selection ratio, cost of the procedure) which largely determine the overall utility of a selection device. Moreover, the psychometric evaluation approach ignores…

  9. The Evaluation of the Management Assessment Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Joseph J.

    The Management Assessment Center (MAC) of the Dade County (Florida) Public Schools is a unique project, employing multiple techniques to evaluate behavior for school-level administrator personnel selection. This final report of an evaluation deals primarily with issues of the validity and the utility of the MAC. To ascertain validity of the MAC,…

  10. An Assessment of Illinois Area Vocational Centers, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James A. G.

    This 1976 study presents an update of a 1971 assessment of Illinois Area Vocational Centers (AVCs). The following topics are discussed in sections of this report: (1) methodology of the study which included meetings with an advisory committee of AVC directors, interviews at each of twenty-nine operating AVCs, distribution of 2,000 of eleven…

  11. An Assessment of Illinois Area Vocational Centers, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James A. G.

    This 1976 study presents an update of a 1971 assessment of Illinois Area Vocational Centers (AVCs). The following topics are discussed in sections of this report: (1) methodology of the study which included meetings with an advisory committee of AVC directors, interviews at each of twenty-nine operating AVCs, distribution of 2,000 of eleven…

  12. Assessing the Impact of New Student Campus Recreation Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zizzi, Samuel; Ayers, Suzan F.; Watson II, Jack C.; Keeler, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The student recreation center (SRC) at many colleges and universities has evolved from being a place to lift weights and take aerobics classes to becoming a high-powered recruitment tool (Colleges use recreation, 2002). The present study included the development of an instrument to assess the use and impact of SRCs. Students (N = 655; users = 537,…

  13. The Community Assessment Center Concept. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldenettel, Debra; Wordes, Madeline

    This bulletin is intended to inform juvenile justice practitioners and other youth service providers about the work of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in developing and demonstrating a Community Assessment Center (CAC) model, and to increase awareness about some of the challenges associated with its…

  14. The Assessment Center: Do Assessor Characteristics Affect Scores?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Phillip E.

    The effects of 9 assessor characteristics on scores given by 49 assessors to 111 assessees in 3 police and 6 fire service assessment centers for local governments were investigated. Assessors included those who had and who did not have experience in the job under consideration, and who differed on several other characteristics, including the…

  15. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - USDA BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed during the spring of 1991 which identified areas for waste reduction at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland. he areas selected for this joint E...

  16. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - USDA BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed during the spring of 1991 which identified areas for waste reduction at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland. he areas selected for this joint E...

  17. Mechanism of the body-centered cubic--hexagonal close-packed phase transition in iron.

    PubMed

    Bassett, W A; Huang, E

    1987-11-06

    The transition from body-centered cubic to hexagonal close-packed phase in iron has been studied in a diamond anvil cell with synchrotron radiation. The hexagonal close-packed phase, when it first appears, has a ratio of lattice parameters that is significantly larger than normal. This is attributed to a displacive mechanism that causes a distortion of the hexagonal close-packed structure in a body-centered cubic matrix. The hexagonal close-packed phase adjacent to a boundary with the body-centered cubic phase is stretched in the c direction and compressed in the a direction when it first forms.

  18. Evidence-centered design for simulation-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Mislevy, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Simulations provide opportunities for people to learn and to develop skills for situations that are expensive, time-consuming, or dangerous. Careful design can support their learning by tailoring the features of situations to their levels of skill, allowing repeated attempts, and providing timely feedback. The same environments provide opportunities for assessing people's capabilities to act in these situations. This article describes an assessment design framework that can help projects develop effective simulation-based assessments. It reviews the rationale and terminology of the "evidence-centered" assessment design framework, discusses how it aligns with the principles of simulation design, and illustrates ideas with examples from engineering and medicine. Advice is offered for designing a new simulation-based assessment and for adapting an existing simulation system for assessment purposes.

  19. Ambiguity resolution in SAR interferometry by use of three phase centers

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Thompson, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    In a typical interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) system employed for terrain elevation mapping, terrain height is estimated from phase difference data obtained from two phase centers separated spatially in the cross-track direction. In this paper we show how the judicious design of a three phase center IFSAR renders phase unwrapping, i.e., the process of estimating true continuous phases from principal values of phase (wrapped modulo 2{pi}), a much simpler process than that inherent in traditional algorithms. With three phase centers, one IFSAR baseline can be chosen to be relatively small (two of the phase centers close together) so that all of the scene`s terrain relief causes less than one cycle of phase difference. This allows computation of a coarse height map without use of any form of phase unwrapping. The cycle number ambiguities in the phase data derived from the other baseline, chosen to be relatively large (two of the phase centers far apart), can then be resolved by reference to the heights computed from the small baseline data. This basic concept of combining phase data from one small and one large baseline to accomplish phase unwrapping has been previously employed in other interferometric problems, e.g., laser interferometry and direction-of-arrival determination from multiple element arrays, The new algorithm is shown to possess a certain form of immunity to corrupted interferometric phase data that is not inherent in traditional two-dimensional path-following phase unwrappers. This is because path-following algorithms must estimate, either implicity or explicity, those portions of the IFSAR fringe data where discontinuities in phase occur. Such discontinuties typically arise from noisy phase measurements derived from low radar return areas of the SAR imagery, e.g., shadows, or from areas of steep terrain slope.

  20. Leveraging Benefits Attributable to Centers within the Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2002-04-03

    The purpose of the research reported here was to assess the leveraging benefits attributable to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The term leveraging as used in this study refers to any additional support received by a university-based, IAC-sponsored center that the center would not have received had the IAC Program not been in place. Twenty-two IACs provided information about 120 leveraging activities over the 1997-2001 period. IAC directors indicated that the support for 115 of these projects was linked to the existence of DOE's IAC Program and the experience gained from their participation in the program. Ninety-three of the IAC-influenced projects were quantified, for a monetary value of $5,948,931. The average annual leveraged support was $1,189,786 over the time frame examined. Typical contributors of leveraged support were state governments, utilities, industry, universities, and other DOE and federal agencies. Most of the support was provided to conduct assessments outside of IAC Program criteria (e.g., assessments of government buildings or large manufacturing plants). Significant leveraged support was also provided to IACs for educational activities--such as workshops, seminars, and training--and for miscellaneous energy-related technical projects.

  1. Lead Paint Exposure Assessment in High Bays of Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanch, Penney; Plaza, Angel; Keprta, Sean

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to assess the possibility of lead paint exposure in the high bays of some of the Johnson Space Center buildings. Some of the buildings in the Manned Space Flight Center (MSC) were built in 1962 and predate any considerations to reduce lead in paints and coatings. There are many of these older buildings that contain open shops and work areas that have open ceilings, These shops include those that had operations that use leaded gasoline, batteries, and lead based paints. Test were planned to be conducted in three phases: (1) Surface Dust sampling, (2) personal exposure montioring, and (3) Ceiling paint Sampling. The results of the first two phases were reviewed. After considering the results of the first two phases, and the problems associated with the retrieval of samples from high ceilings, it was determined that the evaluation of ceiling coatings would be done on a project by project and in response to a complaint.

  2. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  3. The NASA Lewis Research Center SBIR program: An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Hubert H.; Metzger, Marie E.; Kim, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    An assessment was made of the NASA Lewis Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program for the years 1983 to 1989. The assessment was based on the study of 99 Phase 1 contracts and 39 Phase 2 contracts. The overall impact of SBIR was found to be very positive, contributing strongly to many NASA programs. In addition, many successful efforts were commercialized benefiting the small business, federal agencies, and the aerospace industry. The program was evaluated in terms of contract quality, innovativeness, comparison to the state-of-the-art, achievement of goals, difficulty, and impact. Program difficulties were also identified, which could suggest possible program improvements. Much of the information gained in this assessment provided a basis for a SBIR data base which will be updated every year. This data base is computerized and will provide an excellent source of information about past SBIR efforts and company capabilities.

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas.

  5. Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center).

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-12-01

    The %E2%80%9Clocation%E2%80%9D of the radar is the reference location to which the radar measures range. This is typically the antenna's %E2%80%9Cphase center.%E2%80%9D However, the antenna's phase center is not generally obvious, and may not correspond to any seemingly obvious physical location, such as the focal point of a dish reflector. This report calculates the phase center of an offset-fed dish reflector antenna.

  6. Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of electrical load centers

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrucko, R.J.; Thomas, T.M.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers electrical load centers. Raw materials, including coiled sheet steel and coiled copper strips, polystyrene pellets, and miscellaneous fasteners, are used in metal-working, injection molding, painting, and assembly operations. The team`s report, detailed findings and recommendations, indicated that a large quantity of waste overflow rinse water is generated and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing valves that will allow operators to turn off the flow during periods of nonuse. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  7. Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center--Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Theodore A. Kozman

    2007-10-17

    This is the Final Report for the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center for the period of 9/1/2002 through 11/30/2006, although we were still gathering data through 02/16/2007. During this period, our Industrial Assessment Center completed 109 energy assessments for manufacturing firms in our area, offered 3 Save Energy Workshops, taught 26 students (9 graduate and 17 undergraduate) energy management savings techniques and offered an Energy Management Graduate class three times. These 109 energy assessments made a total of 738 energy savings recommendations, 33 waste reduction recommendations, and 108 productivity improvement recommendations. These combined recommendations would save client companies more than $87,741,221.16, annually at the then current energy costs. If all of these recommendations were implemented separately, the implementation cost would have been $34,113,482.10 or a Simple Payback Period, SPP=4.7 months. Between 9 months and 12 months after the assessment, we surveyed the manufacturing firms to find out what they implemented. They had implemented approximately 50 percent of our recommendations at an annual saving of $25,867,613.18. The three Save Energy Workshops had an average attendance of twelve individuals. The three graduate Energy Management courses had an average attendance of eleven students.

  8. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  9. Environmental assessment of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared to determine if the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (the Center), or its alternatives would have significant environmental impacts that must be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Statement. DOE`s proposed action is to continue funding the Center. While DOE is not funding construction of the planned Center facility, operation of that facility is dependent upon continued funding. To implement the proposed action, the Center would initially construct a facility of approximately 2,300 square meters (25,000 square feet). The Phase 1 laboratory facilities and parking lot will occupy approximately 1.2 hectares (3 acres) of approximately 8.9 hectares (22 acres) of land which were donated to New Mexico State University (NMSU) for this purpose. The facility would contain laboratories to analyze chemical and radioactive materials typical of potential contaminants that could occur in the environment in the vicinity of the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site or other locations. The facility also would have bioassay facilities to measure radionuclide levels in the general population and in employees of the WIPP. Operation of the Center would meet the DOE requirement for independent monitoring and assessment of environmental impacts associated with the planned disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP.

  10. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communication, employee commitment to ETEC, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, and overall job satisfaction. A description of each of the scales used to assess these subjects is discussed below. The primary purpose of administering the survey was to attempt to measure, in a more quantitative and objective way the notion of organizational culture,'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In particular, those aspects of the working environment which are believed to be important influences on the operations of a facility and on the safety issues relevant to the organization were assessed. This document describes the results of this survey. 9 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. An Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCA also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture; '' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCA also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can than be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Photosynthetic Reaction Centers as Active Molecular Electronic Components. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-13

    notation for (n, p+1) to (n)*. Nanoscale Tunneling Junctions C C’ Coloumb Blockade U= e/Cg E (U= O) 1=0 - (-1) 0)(0 E•• (0) .-. .. .... ........... ...I...In the case e/Cg no current can flow through the device: this is the Coloumb blockade. 17 Biological Components Corporation Phase I Final Report... Coloumb energy, given by E = e2/2CE e2/2(C + C’ + C ). We assume that eV << E in order to simplify the discussion. g When the control gate voltage, U, is

  14. Incorrect support and missing center tolerances of phasing algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2010-01-01

    In x-ray diffraction microscopy, iterative algorithms retrieve reciprocal space phase information, and a real space image, from an object's coherent diffraction intensities through the use of a priori information such as a finite support constraint. In many experiments, the object's shape or support is not well known, and the diffraction pattern is incompletely measured. We describe here computer simulations to look at the effects of both of these possible errors when using several common reconstruction algorithms. Overly tight object supports prevent successful convergence; however, we show that this can often be recognized through pathological behavior of the phase retrieval transfermore » function. Dynamic range limitations often make it difficult to record the central speckles of the diffraction pattern. We show that this leads to increasing artifacts in the image when the number of missing central speckles exceeds about 10, and that the removal of unconstrained modes from the reconstructed image is helpful only when the number of missing central speckles is less than about 50. In conclusion, this simulation study helps in judging the reconstructability of experimentally recorded coherent diffraction patterns.« less

  15. Incorrect support and missing center tolerances of phasing algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Steinbrener, Jan; Kirz, Janos; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In x-ray diffraction microscopy, iterative algorithms retrieve reciprocal space phase information, and a real space image, from an object's coherent diffraction intensities through the use of a priori information such as a finite support constraint. In many experiments, the object's shape or support is not well known, and the diffraction pattern is incompletely measured. We describe here computer simulations to look at the effects of both of these possible errors when using several common reconstruction algorithms. Overly tight object supports prevent successful convergence; however, we show that this can often be recognized through pathological behavior of the phase retrieval transfer function. Dynamic range limitations often make it difficult to record the central speckles of the diffraction pattern. We show that this leads to increasing artifacts in the image when the number of missing central speckles exceeds about 10, and that the removal of unconstrained modes from the reconstructed image is helpful only when the number of missing central speckles is less than about 50. In conclusion, this simulation study helps in judging the reconstructability of experimentally recorded coherent diffraction patterns.

  16. Animal Telemetry Network Data Assembly Center: Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    information that is used to support the management of marine fisheries and endangered and protected species , to assess the potential effects of...archival tags (already deployed and recovered). Currently, 48 different species are represented in the ATN DAC (with datasets), with deployment...these live acoustic receiver buoys at the DAC, there are currently 7 species reporting daily which complements the 4-5 species reporting through the

  17. Adventures in Assessment: Learner-Centered Approaches to Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Literacy, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This journal presents the following articles: "Introduction: Volume 14--Examining Performance" (Marie Cora) "Fair Assessment Practices: Giving Students Equitable Opportunities to Demonstrate Learning" (Linda Suskie); "Assessing Oral Communication at the Community Learning Center Development of the OPT (Oral Proficiency Test)" (JoAnne Hartel and…

  18. Assessment as a Team Effort: The Pearce Center Assessment Research Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovitt, Carl R.

    Clemson University is addressing the related issues of: (1) how to integrate writing in courses throughout the curriculum; and (2) how to assess students' writing ability as well as the impact of assessment programs on that ability. Since 1990, the responsibility for addressing these two goals has been assumed by the Pearce Center for Professional…

  19. Assessment as a Team Effort: The Pearce Center Assessment Research Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovitt, Carl R.

    Clemson University is addressing the related issues of: (1) how to integrate writing in courses throughout the curriculum; and (2) how to assess students' writing ability as well as the impact of assessment programs on that ability. Since 1990, the responsibility for addressing these two goals has been assumed by the Pearce Center for Professional…

  20. Educational assessment center techniques for entrance selection in medical school.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Olle; Smal, Ko

    2002-07-01

    Dutch higher education is freely accessible for those who have proper high school qualifications. However, admission to medical schools has been limited by government to regulate manpower planning. Selection has been carried out by a national lottery approach since 1972, but in 2000, the Dutch government asked medical schools to experiment with qualitative selection procedures at their own institutions. The University Medical Center Utrecht School of Medical Sciences has used a technique derived from assessment-center approaches to assist in the medical school admission process. Dutch assessment centers use observation procedures in which candidates act in simulated activities that are characteristic of the vacant position. In April 2001, 61 candidates for 23 places were invited for selection days. After a selection interview, candidates were asked to perform activities that are characteristic of course requirements: (1) studying a three-to-five page text about diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of disease A during one hour; (2) explaining the studied procedures to another candidate and receiving information about disease B, studied by this other candidate, during one hour; (3) answering the questions of a standardized patient about disease A in 15 minutes; and (4) answering the questions of a standardized patient about disease B in 15 minutes. A three-person selection committee behind a one-way screen observed the two 15-minute interviews with the standardized patients. The selection committee independently scored content quality of the information that was given to the standardized patients as well as the quality of attitude towards and communication with both patients. The average scores for these three criteria were weighted equally to arrive at a total score. In addition, each candidate received a score resulting from the interview with the other candidate who explained disease B. This score was combined with the other three to a final score. The Utrecht

  1. Lifetime suicide attempts in juvenile assessment center youth.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Scott; McReynolds, Larkin S; DeComo, Robert E; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M; Wasserman, Gail A

    2008-01-01

    To describe suicide risk in youth seen at a Juvenile Assessment Center (JAC), we examined relationships among self-reported lifetime attempts and demographic, justice, and psychiatric data via logistic regression. Similar to other settings, youth reporting lifetime attempts were more likely to be older, female, not living with both parents and currently arrested for a violent or felony crime. Mood, substance use, and behavior disorder each increased prediction substantially. Anxiety Disorder was associated with elevated attempt rates for boys only. JACs need to develop protocols for identifying suicide risk; further, since suicide history predicts future attempts, Anxiety Disordered boys may be at particular risk.

  2. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  3. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  4. Absolute IGS antenna phase center model igs08.atx: status and potential improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, R.; Dach, R.; Collilieux, X.; Jäggi, A.; Schmitz, M.; Dilssner, F.

    2016-04-01

    On 17 April 2011, all analysis centers (ACs) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) adopted the reference frame realization IGS08 and the corresponding absolute antenna phase center model igs08.atx for their routine analyses. The latter consists of an updated set of receiver and satellite antenna phase center offsets and variations (PCOs and PCVs). An update of the model was necessary due to the difference of about 1 ppb in the terrestrial scale between two consecutive realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2008 vs. ITRF2005), as that parameter is highly correlated with the GNSS satellite antenna PCO components in the radial direction.

  5. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  6. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  7. Aluminum-centered tetrahedron-octahedron transition in advancing Al-Sb-Te phase change properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-02-24

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology.

  8. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  9. Patient-Centered Communication and Health Assessment with Youth

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Michelle L.; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia S.; Ronis, David L.; Villarruel, Antonia M.; Pardee, Michelle; Faleer, Hannah; Fava, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-centered communication is the hallmark of care that incorporates the perspective of patients to provide tailored care that meets their needs and desires. However, at this time there has been limited evaluation of patient-provider communication involving youth. Objectives This manuscript will report on results from secondary analysis of data obtained during a participatory research-based randomized control trial designed to test a sexual risk event history calendar intervention with youth to address the following research questions: (a) Based on the event history calendar’s (EHC) inclusion of contextual factors, does the EHC demonstrate improved communication outcomes (i.e., amount, satisfaction, mutuality, client involvement, client satisfaction, patient-provider interaction, and patient-centeredness) when compared to the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) tool? and (b) How do patients and providers describe the characteristics of each tool in regards to patient-centered communication? Method This report will utilize a sequential explanatory mixed methods approach to evaluate communication. A split plot design with one between factor (i.e., communication structure between EHC and GAPS) and one within factor (i.e., time between pretest and posttest) was used for analyses of data collection from male and female youth (n=186) and providers (n=9). Quantitative analysis of survey data evaluated changes in communication from pre-test to post-test. Qualitative data collected from open-ended questions, audio-taped visits, and exit interviews was employed to enhance interpretation of quantitative findings. Results Patient-centered communication using assessment tools (EHC and GAPS) with youth demonstrated improved communication outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. Additional analyses with subgroups of males and Arab-Americans demonstrated better post-intervention scores among the EHC group in certain aspects of communication

  10. Interplay between vortex matter phases and arrays of pinning centers in low temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicent, Jose L.; Del Valle, Javier; Gomez, Alicia; Rodriguez, Manuel; Granados, Daniel; Galvez, Fernando; Gonzalez, Elvira M.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied vortex matter phases in Nb films grown on Si substrates with arrays of Cu nanodots. The symmetry of the pinning arrays rules the presence of vortex matter phases. Four-fold symmetry arrays enhance the vortex glass transition temperature, at matching fields, in comparison with plain Nb films. This is a similar effect that obtained using arrays of magnetic pinning centers (Villegas et al. PRB72, 174512). Breaking the symmetry of the pinning array, such that the array mimic a smectic crystal, leads to a new phase, in a very narrow temperature window between the liquid and glassy phases, which can be identified with a vortex smectic phase. Remarkably, the smectic vortex phase is enhanced increasing the array symmetry. Increasing the number of vortices vanishes this smectic phase. (H,T) phase diagrams will be presented for different types of arrays. We thank Spanish MINECO and CM.

  11. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES&H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES&H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment.

  12. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment.

  13. The Evolution of the Federal Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement System

    2012-07-31

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal emergency response asset whose assistance may be requested by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. It is an interagency organization with representation from the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and other federal agencies. FRMAC, in its present form, was created in 1987 when the radiological support mission was assigned to the DOE’s Nevada Operations Office by DOE Headquarters. The FRMAC asset, including its predecessor entities, was created, grew, and evolved to function as a response to radiological incidents. Radiological emergency response exercises showed the need for a coordinated approach to managing federal emergency monitoring and assessment activities. The mission of FRMAC is to coordinate and manage all federal radiological environmental monitoring and assessment activities during a nuclear or radiological incident within the United States in support of state,local, tribal governments, DHS, and the federal coordinating agency. Radiological emergency response professionals with the DOE’s national laboratories support the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), the Aerial MeasuringSystem (AMS), and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS). These teams support the FRMAC to provide: Atmospheric transport modeling; Radiation monitoring; Radiological analysis and data assessments; and Medical advice for radiation injuries In support of field operations, the FRMAC provides geographic

  14. An organizational cultural assessment of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various species of communication, employee commitment to ETEC, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, and overall job satisfaction. A description of each of the scales used to assess these subjects is discussed. The primary purpose of administering the survey was to attempt to measure, in a more quantitative and objective way the notion of organizational culture, '' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In particular, those aspects of the working environment which are believed to be important influences on the operations of a facility and on the safety issues relevant to the organization were assessed. In addition, by conducting a survey, a broad sampling of the individuals in the organization can be obtained. This is especially important when the survey is utilized in conjunction with an assessment or inspection team which typically has only a limited amount of resources to address many issues. The OCS provides a broad, but more comprehensive picture of the organization by querying a much larger number of individuals than could be reached through the assessment team alone. Finally, the OCS provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time. This profile can then can be used as a baseline point against which comparisons of other points in time can be made. Such comparisons may prove valuable and would help to assess changes in the organizational culture. Comparisons of the profiles can also be made across similar facilities. 9 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Pre-Packaged vs. Tailor-Made: The Assessment Center Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stephen L.

    1980-01-01

    The difficulties of over-reliance on prepackaged assessment center programs are discussed, along with pointers for determining whether a company should use prepackaged or custom-designed assessment centers. (JOW)

  16. Seizure frequency and patient-centered outcome assessment in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmi; Hamberger, Marla J; Munger Clary, Heidi; Loeb, Rebecca; Onchiri, Frankline M; Baker, Gus; Hauser, W Allen; Wong, John B

    2014-08-01

    Seizure frequency represents a commonly assessed epilepsy status, but in the context of the growing trend toward patient-centered care, we examined the adequacy of seizure frequency as a measure of epilepsy status as perceived by the patient. Between 2006 and 2008, we assessed seizure frequency, mood, and preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measured with the visual analog scale metric in 182 adult patients sampled consecutively. Using nonparametric tests and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we analyzed the relationship between preference-based HRQOL and seizure frequency, and using regression analyses, we tested for significant predictors of preference-based HRQOL. Only patients who had been seizure-free for >1 year had significantly higher preference-based HRQOL (p < 0.0001) than those who experienced any recurrent seizure, regardless of their seizure frequency. Among patients with recurrent seizures, preference-based HRQOL and seizure frequency were not monotonically, linearly related. For patients with similar seizure frequency, preference-based HRQOL varied substantially with large overlaps in preference-based HRQOL across different seizure frequency categories. The Monte Carlo simulation found that seizure frequency was a poor predictor of preference-based HRQOL about one third of the time. The presence of depressive symptoms was an independent predictor of preference-based HRQOL measure, accounting for 33.5% of the variation in scores between patients. Our findings highlight the importance of attaining complete seizure freedom and the substantial variation in preference-based HRQOL among patients with similar seizure frequencies. To improve assessment of patient-centered outcomes in epilepsy, we encourage adding direct measurement of preference-based HRQOL into clinical care. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Patient-centered communication and health assessment with youth.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Kristy K; Munro, Michelle L; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia S; Ronis, David L; Villarruel, Antonia M; Pardee, Michelle; Faleer, Hannah E; Fava, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centered communication is fundamental to individualizing healthcare, but there has been limited evaluation of provider communication with youth. The aim was to compare communication outcomes after use of an event history calendar (EHC) and Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) to structure interactions during a clinic visit. Patient and provider descriptions of EHC and GAPS communication experiences were also obtained. This is a secondary analysis of data obtained during a randomized controlled trial. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods approach was used. A split-plot design with one between factor (EHC, GAPS) and one within factor (pretest, posttest) was used for the quantitative portion. Qualitative data were collected from open-ended questions, audiotaped visits, and exit interviews. Providers (n = 9) at three clinics were assigned at random and trained to implement either the EHC or GAPS protocol. Male and female youth (n = 186) were randomly assigned to the EHC or GAPS intervention. Before their clinic visit, youth completed assessments of past communication experiences with healthcare providers (pretest); communication during the current visit was assessed immediately after the visit (posttest). Communication outcomes from pretest to posttest improved for youth in both the EHC and GAPS groups. Post hoc subgroup analysis suggested that men and Arab Americans derived more benefit from the EHC intervention in some aspects of communication. Qualitatively, the EHC group identified improved outcomes in validating patient perspective, being viewed in context, reaching a shared understanding of needs and preferences, and being helped to share power in the healthcare interaction. EHC and GAPS provided effective frameworks for structuring communication during a clinic visit. Compared with GAPS, the integrated time-linked assessment captured by the EHC enhanced patient-centered communication in select groups.

  18. A new Automatic Phase Picker for the National Earthquake Information Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, P. S.; Buland, R.

    2002-12-01

    The increasing need for rapid accurate earthquake locations for timely notification and damage assessment has placed greater demands on automatic phase picking technology. We are developing a new automatic phase picker for use by the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC). Since the NEIC provides rapid notification for all felt earthquakes in the US and significant events worldwide, the picking algorithm must provide accurate arrival times for the wide range of waveforms generated by local, regional, and teleseismic events. The current picker applies a Short-Term-Average over Long-Term-Average algorithm (STA/LTA) to vertical-component records that have been narrow band filtered into two data streams with peaks at 1.5 Hz and 3.0 Hz. The use of this relatively high-frequency narrow-band data provides accurate arrival-time estimates. The travel-time residuals for 10,000 teleseismic P-wave picks have a spread (scaled median average deviation) of 1.3 seconds; this is similar to the spread of human made picks. Additionally, at these high-frequencies teleseismic picks are generally limited to compressional waves. This aids identification of arrival type and therefore simplifies the association of picks to events. Although the current picker works well, plans to improve the accuracy, reliability, and detection threshold of automatic locations require the picking of secondary phases and analysis of a larger frequency band. Several previous studies have presented picking methods but few published studies test them on numerous seismograms selected from a wide range of distances and magnitudes. Published techniques include: STA/LTA, auto-regressive, cross-correlation, and neural networks. We will present comparisons of several methods and discuss their fitness for implementation on our realtime system. Preference will be given to methods that provide the most reliable and accurate earthquake locations, not necessarily those which best reproduce human picks.

  19. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficklen, Carter B.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) completed at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars Program. This project was performed to determine levels of electromagnetic fields, determine the significance of the levels present, and determine a plan to reduce electromagnetic field exposure, if necessary. This report also describes the properties of electromagnetic fields and their interaction with humans. The results of three major occupational epidemiological studies is presented to determine risks posed to humans by EMF exposure. The data for this report came from peer-reviewed journal articles and government publications pertaining to the health effects of electromagnetic fields.

  20. [Assessing the Brazilian network of poison control centers].

    PubMed

    Marques, M B; Bortoletto, M E; Bezerra, M C; de Santana, R A

    1995-01-01

    General concern about increasing reports of emergencies caused by or attributed to the exposure of human beings to various toxic agents has created demand for assessing the informational performance of a Brazilian network of 34 poison control centers (PCCs), located in different regions of the country and pertaining to the National Poison Information System (SINITOX). The primary purpose of these PCCs is to inform the public, prevent cases of poisoning, and provide medical care. This paper analyzes the available resources for identifying cases of poisoning, preventing new occurrences, and monitoring the consequences of toxic agents. This paper also analyzes data recorded front 1990 to 1992. The objective is to identify the main constraints to using health-data and management information as decision-making tools at the local level.

  1. Personality Profiles of Effective Leadership Performance in Assessment Centers

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Alissa D.; Lanza, Stephanie T.; Bernthal, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most research examining the relationship between effective leadership and personality has focused on individual personality traits. However, profiles of personality traits more fully describe individuals, and these profiles may be important as they relate to leadership. This study used latent class analysis to examine how personality traits combine and interact to form subpopulations of leaders, and how these subpopulations relate to performance criteria. Using a sample of 2,461 executive-level leaders, six personality profiles were identified: Unpredictable Leaders with Low Diligence (7.3%); Conscientious, Backend Leaders (3.6%); Unpredictable Leaders (8.6%); Creative Communicators (20.8%); Power Players (32.4%); and Protocol Followers (27.1%). One profile performed well on all criteria in an assessment center; remaining profiles exhibited strengths and weaknesses across criteria. Implications and future directions for research are highlighted. PMID:27746587

  2. Personality Profiles of Effective Leadership Performance in Assessment Centers.

    PubMed

    Parr, Alissa D; Lanza, Stephanie T; Bernthal, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most research examining the relationship between effective leadership and personality has focused on individual personality traits. However, profiles of personality traits more fully describe individuals, and these profiles may be important as they relate to leadership. This study used latent class analysis to examine how personality traits combine and interact to form subpopulations of leaders, and how these subpopulations relate to performance criteria. Using a sample of 2,461 executive-level leaders, six personality profiles were identified: Unpredictable Leaders with Low Diligence (7.3%); Conscientious, Backend Leaders (3.6%); Unpredictable Leaders (8.6%); Creative Communicators (20.8%); Power Players (32.4%); and Protocol Followers (27.1%). One profile performed well on all criteria in an assessment center; remaining profiles exhibited strengths and weaknesses across criteria. Implications and future directions for research are highlighted.

  3. Technical Overview of Ecological Risk Assessment - Analysis Phase: Exposure Characterization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure Characterization is the second major component of the analysis phase of a risk assessment. For a pesticide risk assessment, the exposure characterization describes the potential or actual contact of a pesticide with a plant, animal, or media.

  4. Sacramento City College Assessment Center Research Report: Assessment Procedures, Fall 1983 - Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, M.; Caffrey, Patrick

    Studies and analyses conducted by the Assessment Center at Sacramento City College (SCC) between fall 1983 and fall 1984 provided the data on SCC's students and services which are presented in this report. Following an overview of the significant findings of the year's research efforts, part I sets forth the purpose of the report and part II…

  5. Determination of the Phase Centers of Millimeter-Wave Horn Antennas Using a Holographic Interference Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, Ian; Murphy, J. Anthony; McCarthy, Darragh; Gradziel, Marcin; Mahon, Ronan; O'Sullivan, Creidhe; Trappe, Neil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss how a holographic interference technique can be applied in the experimental determination of the phase centers of non-standard horn antennas in the millimeter-waveband. The phase center is the point inside the horn from which the radiation appears to emanate when viewed from the far-field, and knowing its location is necessary for optimizing coupling efficiencies to quasi-optical systems. For non-standard horn designs, and other feed structures, the phase center may be difficult to reliably predict by simulation, in which case, before committing to antenna manufacture, there is a requirement for it to be determined experimentally. Although the phase center can be recovered by direct phase measurement of the far-field beam pattern, this usually involves expensive instrumentation such as a vector network analyzer for millimeter wave horn antennas. In this paper, we describe one inexpensive alternative, which is based on measuring the interference pattern in intensity between the radiation from the horn of interest and a reference beam derived from the same coherent source in an off-axis holography setup. The accuracy of the approach is improved by comparison with the interference pattern of a well-understood standard horn (such as a corrugated conical horn) in the same experimental setup. We present an example of the technique applied to a profiled smooth-walled horn antenna, which has been especially designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments.

  6. Radiological dose assessments at the Kennedy Space Center

    SciTech Connect

    Firstenberg, H.; Jubach, R.; Bartram, B.; Vaughan, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for launch window and safety risk assessment studies in support of the Galileo (which is scheduled for the October/November 1989 period) and Ulysses (scheduled for {approximately}1 yr after Galileo) missions at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The model is resident in the EMERGE software system developed by NUS Corporation and modified for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide real-time and safety analyses report support for the launches. The application is unique in that the model accommodates the varied amount of meteorological data at KSC and Cape Canaveral and includes a site-specific algorithm to account for local-scale circulations. This paper focuses on the Galileo mission application, including discussions of the use of the meteorological data available at KSC, integration of the EMERGE sea-breeze algorithm, and examples of real-time and safety analyses report assessments. The Galileo spacecraft is to be launched toward Jupiter using the space shuttle.

  7. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  8. An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2003-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5

  9. NASSP's Assessment Center: Practitioners Speak Out. Lee County, Fla., School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, Weaver

    1980-01-01

    The fourth in a series of articles on the NASSP Assessment Center for administrator evaluation and selection, this article sets forth the experiences administrators from Lee County, Florida, had with the center and their opinions of it. (JM)

  10. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Custer Training Center, Installation 26035, Augusta, Michigan. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Michigan Army National Guard property near Augusta, Michigan. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Custer Training Center, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are (1) storage of hazardous materials and hazardous waste, (2) storage and dispensing of fuel, (3) washing of vehicles and equipment, and (4) weapons training ranges that may have accumulated lead.

  11. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  12. Education Research: Education Should Improve Assessments of R&D Centers, Regional Labs, and Comprehensive Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    the R&D Centers’ research agenda. For example, in spelling out the priorities for the R&D Center for enhancing young children’s development and learning ... Education identified topics, theories, and research areas that the Center should address. Similarly in spelling out the priorities for the R&D

  13. Socioeconomic Impact Assessment. Communications Industry. Phase IV. Impact Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-21

    cminI~auo W" - ŕI 00 7.Twulmal C Iatso’m 3d 441 000-033 ,0 ACUMENICS TitI 6 am 40" * ,-0- ;4-0 I~* O~o w - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A Im0 fam 1Wa0 ~-~- W~~ "ttMmq4w...Comparison Year NAS Stage A Model 3d 1976 Upgraded 3rd, Phase I 1980 Upgraded 3rd, Phase II 1985 I ACUMENICS 62 (7 The above comparisons are picked on...Upgraded 3rd, Phase I a. Flight Plan Error Correction by Source b. Automatic Clearance Coordination c. Conflict-Free Clearances, including 2D/ 3D RNAV d

  14. Robust phase-waves in chains of half-center oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Calvin; Lewis, Timothy J

    2016-10-13

    Many neuronal circuits driving coordinated locomotion are composed of chains of half-center oscillators (HCOs) of various lengths. The HCO is a common motif in central pattern generating circuits (CPGs); an HCO consists of two neurons, or two neuronal populations, connected by reciprocal inhibition. To maintain appropriate motor coordination for effective locomotion over a broad range of frequencies, chains of CPGs must produce approximately constant phase-differences in a robust manner. In this article, we study phase-locking in chains of nearest-neighbor coupled HCOs and examine how the circuit architecture can promote phase-constancy, i.e., inter-HCO phase-differences that are frequency-invariant. We use two models with different levels of abstraction: (1) a conductance-based model in which each neuron is modeled by the Morris-Lecar equations (the ML-HCO model); and (2) a coupled phase model in which the state of each HCO is captured by its phase (the phase-HCO model). We show that one of four phase-waves with inter-HCO phase-differences at approximately 0, 25, 50 or 75 % arises robustly as a result of the inter-HCO connection topology, and its robust existence is not affected by the number of HCOs in the chain, the difference in strength between the ascending and descending nearest-neighbor connections, or the number of nearest-neighbor connections. Our results show that the internal anti-phase structure of the HCO and an appropriate inter-HCO connection topology together can provide a mechanism for robust (i.e., frequency-independent) limb coordination in segmented animals, such as the 50 % interlimb phase-differences in the tripod gate of stick insects and cockroaches, and the 25 % interlimb phase-differences in crayfish and other long-tailed crustaceans during forward swimming.

  15. Establishing Construct Validity and Reliability for the NAESP Professional Development Inventory: Simplifying Assessment Center Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Donald G.; Areglado, Ron; Adams, R. C.

    This report documents the construct validity and reliability of the Professional Development Inventory (PDI), an assessment center sponsored by the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). The assessment center provides a means for assessing participants in situations simulating those confronted by principals on the job. The…

  16. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  17. Belief network-based situation assessment for air operations centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Call, Catherine; Gonsalves, Paul

    2006-05-01

    In dynamic environments (e.g. an Air Operations Center (AOC)), effective real-time monitoring of mission execution is highly dependent on situation awareness (SA). But whereas an individual's perception of mission progress is biased by his or her immediate tasks and environment, the combined perspectives of key individuals provides an effects-based assessment of the mission overall. Belief networks (BNs) are an ideal tool for modeling and meeting the requirements of SA: at the individual level BNs emulate a skilled human's information fusion and reasoning process in a multi-task environment in the presence of uncertainty. At the mission level, BNs are intelligently combined to yield a common operating picture. While belief networks offer significant advantages for SA in this manner, the work of defining and combining the models is difficult due to factors such as multiple-counting and conflicting reports. To address these issues, we develop a system consisting of three distinct functional elements: an off-line mechanism for rapid construction of a BN library of SA models tailored to different air combat operation situations and derived from knowledge elicitation with subject matter experts; an off-line mechanism to adapt and combine BN models that supports the ability to adjust the SA models over time and in response to novel situations not initially available or anticipated during model construction; and an on-line combination of SA models to support an enhanced SA and the ability to monitor execution status in real time and informed by and responsive to the individuals and situations involved.

  18. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  19. Superionic-Superionic Phase Transitions in Body-Centered Cubic H2O Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Jean-Alexis; Caracas, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    From first-principles molecular dynamics, we investigate the relation between the superionic proton conduction and the behavior of the O - H ⋯O bond (ice VII' to ice X transition) in body-centered-cubic (bcc) H2O ice between 1300 and 2000 K and up to 300 GPa. We bring evidence that there are three distinct phases in the superionic bcc stability field. A first superionic phase characterized by extremely fast diffusion of highly delocalized protons (denoted VII'' hereinafter) is stable at low pressures. A first-order transition separates this phase from a superionic VII' , characterized by a finite degree of localization of protons along the nonsymmetric O - H ⋯O bonds. The transition is identified in structural, energetic, and elastic analysis. Upon further compression a second-order phase transition leads to the superionic ice X with symmetric O - H - O bonds.

  20. Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers. Final Report for Phase I Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Suprotim; Raje, Sanyukta; Kumar, Satish; Sartor, Dale; Greenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of the “Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers” initiative to support the development of an energy efficiency policy framework for Indian data centers. The initiative is being led by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)-U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and under the guidance of Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). It is also part of the larger Power and Energy Efficiency Working Group of the US-India Bilateral Energy Dialogue. The initiative consists of two phases: Phase 1 (November 2014 – September 2015) and Phase 2 (October 2015 – September 2016).

  1. Superionic-Superionic Phase Transitions in Body-Centered Cubic H_{2}O Ice.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jean-Alexis; Caracas, Razvan

    2016-09-23

    From first-principles molecular dynamics, we investigate the relation between the superionic proton conduction and the behavior of the O─H⋯O bond (ice VII^{'} to ice X transition) in body-centered-cubic (bcc) H_{2}O ice between 1300 and 2000 K and up to 300 GPa. We bring evidence that there are three distinct phases in the superionic bcc stability field. A first superionic phase characterized by extremely fast diffusion of highly delocalized protons (denoted VII^{''}  hereinafter) is stable at low pressures. A first-order transition separates this phase from a superionic VII^{'}, characterized by a finite degree of localization of protons along the nonsymmetric O─H⋯O bonds. The transition is identified in structural, energetic, and elastic analysis. Upon further compression a second-order phase transition leads to the superionic ice X with symmetric O─H─O bonds.

  2. Structure of the body-centered cubic phase of lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Saludjian, P; Reiss-Husson, F

    1980-12-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure of the body-centered cubic phase of lipid systems. Infinite rods of polar groups (and water) are arranged with axes parallel to the four cubic [unk]1 1 1[unk] directions. The hydrocarbon chains fill the space between the rods to form a continuous matrix. With this unified topology, the model explains satisfactorily the x-ray diffraction patterns of strontium soaps, lecithin, galactolipids, potassium soaps, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and explains the transition between cubic/H(II) phases. The paradoxical thermal effects on the lipid cubic phase, in particular the decrease of unit cell dimensions with increasing temperature, can be explained with the proposed model by mechanisms similar to those used for the monodimensional and bidimensional (mesomorphic) phases.

  3. The hydrogen technology assessment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Addison

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this phase 1 report is to begin to form the information base of the economics and energy uses of hydrogen-related technologies on which the members of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) can build a hydrogen vision of the future. The secondary goal of this report is the development of NHA positions on national research, development, and demonstration opportunities. The third goal, with the aid of the established hydrogen vision and NHA positions, is to evaluate ongoing federal research goals and activities. The evaluations will be performed in a manner that compares the costs associated with using systems that achieve those goals against the cost of performing those tasks today with fossil fuels. From this ongoing activity should emerge an NHA information base, one or more hydrogen visions of the future, and cost and performance targets for hydrogen applications to complete in the market place.

  4. Body-centered superhard BC2N phases from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaoguang; Guo, Xiaoju; Xu, Bo; Wu, Qinghua; Hu, Qianku; Liu, Zhongyuan; He, Julong; Yu, Dongli; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2007-09-01

    Body-centered BC2N deduced from the unit cell of the recently predicted body-centered carbon [F. J. Ribeiro , Phys. Rev. B 74, 172101 (2006)] are studied with first-principles pseudopotential density functional method. The structural, electronic, and mechanical properties are investigated for 11 possible atomic configurations of body-centered BC2N . Our results show that the sp3 -bonded body-centered BC2N phases have lower density than the previously investigated sp3 -bonded zinc-blende BC2N , wurtzite BC2N , and chalcopyrite BC2N . The struc-A and struc-B composed of the maximum numbers of C-C and B-N bonds have the lowest total energy among the investigated body-centered BC2N structures. Their calculated bulk moduli are 305 and 309GPa , respectively. The theoretical Vickers hardness of the body-centered BC2N is over 60GPa , indicating that it is a potential superhard material with the hardness comparable to cubic boron nitride.

  5. Assessing uncertainty in outsourcing clinical services at tertiary health centers.

    PubMed

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2007-01-01

    When tertiary health centers face capacity constraint, one feasible strategy to meet service demand is outsourcing clinical services to qualified community providers. Clinical outsourcing enables tertiary health centers to meet the expectations of service timeliness and provides good opportunities to collaborate with other health care providers. However, outsourcing may result in dependence and loss of control for the tertiary health centers. Other parties involved in clinical outsourcing such as local partners, patients, and payers may also encounter potential risks as well as enjoy benefits in an outsourcing arrangement. Recommendations on selecting potential outsourcing partners are given to minimize the risks associated with an outsourcing contract.

  6. Impact of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Variations and Modified Sidereal Filtering on Reference Frame Determination.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.

    2005-12-01

    Errors in the satellite and ground station antenna phase center variations are among the limiting sources of error in high precision GPS positioning. Recent determinations of phase-center variations (PCV) for both the transmitting satellite and receiving ground station antennas have shown promise for improving geodetic estimates of reference frame parameters, such as scale. While the PCV for the transmitting antennas is reasonably well determined and includes some variation from satellite to satellite, the apparent PCV at ground station antennas are likely to be site specific and dominated by local environmental effects, such as signal multipath. To mitigate these effects, we implement a modified sidereal filter (MSF). The MSF is applied as a correction to the phase and range data. The correction is based on stacking several days of phase and range residuals where each day is shifted by the actual orbital period of each satellite, rather than sidereal time. We will evaluate the effect of stacking several days to 1 month of residuals on such metrics as phase rms and point positioning repeatability. We will present an evaluation the impact of these PCV and MSF corrections on reference frame parameters. The corrections will be applied to several years of observations from a global set of IGS stations.

  7. Assessing Intelligence Operation/Fusion/Coordination Centers for Efficiency Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-28

    sgp/crs/intel/R41295.pdf. 15 ODNI Fact Sheet, accessed 30 Jan 2013, http://www.dni.gov/files/documents/ODNI%20Fact%20Sheet_2011.pdf. 11...Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University, 2009), 14. 37 National Counterterrorism Center, accessed 26 Jan 2013, http...40 ODNI IARPA homepage, accessed 26 Jan 2013, http://www.iarpa.gov/whatis.html 41 ODNI ISE homepage

  8. DORIS Satellite Phase Center Determination and Consequences on the Derived Scale of the Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal R.; Haines, Bruce; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the analysis of several years of Delft Object-oriented Radar Interferometric Software (Doris) data undertaken to estimate daily determination of satellite antenna phase center corrections. This was done on a satellite by satellite basis. For each DORIS satellite, we considered long-term time series of such individual estimations, looking for possible biases, discontinuities, trends or annual signals. The analysis compared DORIS to GPS estimates for common satellites (Jason and TOPEX/Poseidon).

  9. DORIS Satellite Phase Center Determination and Consequences on the Derived Scale of the Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal R.; Haines, Bruce; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the analysis of several years of Delft Object-oriented Radar Interferometric Software (Doris) data undertaken to estimate daily determination of satellite antenna phase center corrections. This was done on a satellite by satellite basis. For each DORIS satellite, we considered long-term time series of such individual estimations, looking for possible biases, discontinuities, trends or annual signals. The analysis compared DORIS to GPS estimates for common satellites (Jason and TOPEX/Poseidon).

  10. Industrial Assessment Center Helps Boost Efficiency for Small and Medium Manufacturers

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Mark; Friedman, David

    2017-01-06

    The Industrial Assessment Center program helps small and medium manufacturers boost efficiency and save energy. It pairs companies with universities as students perform energy assessments and provide recommendations to improve their facilities.

  11. Industrial Assessment Center Helps Boost Efficiency for Small and Medium Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Mark; Friedman, David

    2016-12-15

    The Industrial Assessment Center program helps small and medium manufacturers boost efficiency and save energy. It pairs companies with universities as students perform energy assessments and provide recommendations to improve their facilities.

  12. Science Outcomes Assessment Plan (SOAP): Design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Gurkas, P.; Shaw, K.

    2009-01-01

    Columbus State University is under pressure to reduce the number of "unproductive grades” in its introductory science classes, to increase the number of STEM majors, and to assess the level of attainment of science outcomes in its general education courses for accreditation documentation. The authors designed a study to examine affective, cognitive, social, and classroom factors as predictors of success in science while also attempting to document the link between introductory "gateway to science major” course outcomes and the general education program. One of the factors probed is the match between students’ understanding of important learning outcomes of the course and the instructor's stated priorities. A very real risk in content focused courses (e.g., astronomy) is the mismatch between the university's stated outcomes for a general education science course (e.g., critical thinking) and the instructor's content related outcomes. This mismatch may become a barrier for students taking `required’ courses as they may not comprehend the rationale for the requirement, fail to engage in the course, and consequently receive a failing grade. Another possible factor affecting student success in science is the student reasoning level. Students who are concrete thinkers may not be as successful in introductory science classes that require advanced logical thinking about unfamiliar concepts. The authors hope to use the results of this study to help inform university practices such as placement into introductory science courses and for future faculty development.

  13. The first 24 hours of the World Trade Center attacks of 2001--the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention emergency phase response.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Miguel A; Burger, Ronald; Keim, Mark

    2007-01-01

    On 11 September 2001, terrorists hijacked two passenger planes and crashed them into the two towers of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City. These synchronized attacks were the largest act of terrorism ever committed on US soil. The impacts, fires, and subsequent collapse of the towers killed and injured thousands of people. Within minutes after the first plane crashed into the WTC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, initiated one of the largest public health responses in its history. Staff of the CDC provided technical assistance on several key public health issues. During the acute phase of the event, CDC personnel assisted with: (1) assessing hospital capacity; (2) establishing injury and disease surveillance activities; (3) deploying emergency coordinators/liaisons to facilitate inter-agency coordination with the affected jurisdictions; and (4) arranging rapid delivery of emergency medical supplies, therapeutics, and personal protective equipment. This incident highlighted the need for adequate planning for all potential hazards and the importance of interagency and interdepartmental coordination in preparing for and responding to public health emergencies.

  14. High pressure-induced distortion in face-centered cubic phase of thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Li, Bing; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Luo, Wei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-10-01

    The complex and unusual high-pressure phase transition of III-A (i.e. Al, Ga, and In) metals have been investigated in the last several decades because of their interesting periodic table position between the elements having metallic and covalent bonding. Our present first principles-based electronic structure calculations and experimental investigation have revealed the unusual distortion in face-centered cubic (f.c.c.) phase of the heavy element thallium (Tl) induced by the high pressure. We have predicted body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t) phase at 83 GPa using an evolutionary algorithm coupled with ab initio calculations, and this prediction has been confirmed with a slightly distorted parameter (2 × a - c)/c lowered by 1% using an angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. The density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations suggest that s-p mixing states and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states play the most important roles for the phase transitions along the pathway h.c.p→b.c.t.

  15. High pressure-induced distortion in face-centered cubic phase of thallium

    PubMed Central

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Li, Bing; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Luo, Wei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    The complex and unusual high-pressure phase transition of III-A (i.e. Al, Ga, and In) metals have been investigated in the last several decades because of their interesting periodic table position between the elements having metallic and covalent bonding. Our present first principles-based electronic structure calculations and experimental investigation have revealed the unusual distortion in face-centered cubic (f.c.c.) phase of the heavy element thallium (Tl) induced by the high pressure. We have predicted body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t) phase at 83 GPa using an evolutionary algorithm coupled with ab initio calculations, and this prediction has been confirmed with a slightly distorted parameter (2 × a − c)/c lowered by 1% using an angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. The density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations suggest that s–p mixing states and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states play the most important roles for the phase transitions along the pathway h.c.p→f.c.c.→b.c.t. PMID:27655891

  16. High pressure-induced distortion in face-centered cubic phase of thallium.

    PubMed

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Li, Bing; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Luo, Wei; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-10-04

    The complex and unusual high-pressure phase transition of III-A (i.e. Al, Ga, and In) metals have been investigated in the last several decades because of their interesting periodic table position between the elements having metallic and covalent bonding. Our present first principles-based electronic structure calculations and experimental investigation have revealed the unusual distortion in face-centered cubic (f.c.c.) phase of the heavy element thallium (Tl) induced by the high pressure. We have predicted body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t) phase at 83 GPa using an evolutionary algorithm coupled with ab initio calculations, and this prediction has been confirmed with a slightly distorted parameter ([Formula: see text] × a - c)/c lowered by 1% using an angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. The density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations suggest that s-p mixing states and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states play the most important roles for the phase transitions along the pathway h.c.p[Formula: see text]f.c.c.[Formula: see text]b.c.t.

  17. Comprehensive assessment of long-term effects of reducing intake of energy phase 2 (CALERIE Phase 2) screening and recruitment: Methods and results

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Comprehensive Assessment of the Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy Phase 2 (CALERIE) study is a systematic investigation of sustained 25% calorie restriction (CR) in non-obese humans. CALERIE is a multicenter (3 clinical sites, one coordinating center), parallel group, randomized con...

  18. Development of Risk Assessment Matrix for NASA Engineering and Safety Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W., Jr.; Moses, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a study, which had as its principal goal the development of a sufficiently detailed 5 x 5 Risk Matrix Scorecard. The purpose of this scorecard is to outline the criteria by which technical issues can be qualitatively and initially prioritized. The tool using this score card has been proposed to be one of the information resources the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) takes into consideration when making decisions with respect to incoming information on safety concerns across the entire NASA agency. The contents of this paper discuss in detail each element of the risk matrix scorecard, definitions for those elements and the rationale behind the development of those definitions. This scorecard development was performed in parallel with the tailoring of the existing Futron Corporation Integrated Risk Management Application (IRMA) software tool. IRMA was tailored to fit NESC needs for evaluating incoming safety concerns and was renamed NESC Assessment Risk Management Application (NAFMA) which is still in developmental phase.

  19. Putting Students at the Center of Statewide Assessment Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, James L.

    In a review of statewide plans for assessing student learning at institutions of higher education, this paper argues that assessment, carefully planned to focus on students, can lead to an improvement in the communication and understanding between the academy and the polity. A brief section on the role of statewide assessment places it in a…

  20. How Are We Doing? A Review of Assessments within Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gofine, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Today, nearly forty years after writing centers first began to proliferate, it is worthwhile to reflect on the themes that emerge from empirical material surrounding writing center assessments, for reflecting on these themes may help administrators to refine current assessment practices and scholars to redirect their research. The goal of this…

  1. 78 FR 47271 - Draft Environmental Assessment for the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Agricultural Research Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Draft Environmental Assessment for the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Agricultural Research Center Land Transfer AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of the Draft Environmental Assessment for the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Agricultural Research Center Land Transfer...

  2. An Analysis of the Effects of Untranslated Behavioral Checklists on the Psychometric Properties of Assessment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Lisa M.; And Others

    A field study with 178 candidates for a police promotional examination was conducted to investigate the effects of "untranslated" behavioral checklists on certain psychometric properties of an assessment center. The untranslated checklist used all behavioral responses elicited by the assessment center exercises, not just those that met a…

  3. Convergent Validity and Work Applications of Communication Apprehension: An Applied Analysis in an Assessment Center Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandelman, Harriet A.

    Concerned with providing managerial assessment centers with oral communication criteria against which communication apprehension may be measured, the convergent validity of the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension--Organization Form (PRCA-OF) was tested against 23 raters' scores in five one-day developmental assessment centers. The…

  4. How Are We Doing? A Review of Assessments within Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gofine, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Today, nearly forty years after writing centers first began to proliferate, it is worthwhile to reflect on the themes that emerge from empirical material surrounding writing center assessments, for reflecting on these themes may help administrators to refine current assessment practices and scholars to redirect their research. The goal of this…

  5. Relationship between Assessment Center Performance and Psychological Types of Cooperative Extension Agents in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishaya, Joseph B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Inventory was completed by 135 cooperative extension agents who attended an assessment center. The majority were extroverts with sensing, thinking, and judging preferences. Those in administration or community/natural resources or with more experience had higher assessment center scores. Perceiving-oriented agents had lower…

  6. Measuring the value of process improvement initiatives in a preoperative assessment center using time-driven activity-based costing.

    PubMed

    French, Katy E; Albright, Heidi W; Frenzel, John C; Incalcaterra, James R; Rubio, Augustin C; Jones, Jessica F; Feeley, Thomas W

    2013-12-01

    The value and impact of process improvement initiatives are difficult to quantify. We describe the use of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in a clinical setting to quantify the value of process improvements in terms of cost, time and personnel resources. Difficulty in identifying and measuring the cost savings of process improvement initiatives in a Preoperative Assessment Center (PAC). Use TDABC to measure the value of process improvement initiatives that reduce the costs of performing a preoperative assessment while maintaining the quality of the assessment. Apply the principles of TDABC in a PAC to measure the value, from baseline, of two phases of performance improvement initiatives and determine the impact of each implementation in terms of cost, time and efficiency. Through two rounds of performance improvements, we quantified an overall reduction in time spent by patient and personnel of 33% that resulted in a 46% reduction in the costs of providing care in the center. The performance improvements resulted in a 17% decrease in the total number of full time equivalents (FTE's) needed to staff the center and a 19% increase in the numbers of patients assessed in the center. Quality of care, as assessed by the rate of cancellations on the day of surgery, was not adversely impacted by the process improvements. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Quantitative Measures for Assessing Learning Centers: An Agenda and Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkopes, Kevin; Abshire, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The national trend of requiring all college students to engage with tertiary-level mathematics has created the need to rethink how students can be supported at this level. Current trends in higher education show a decreased reliance on remedial developmental education courses and expanded reliance on learning centers. It is important to look at…

  8. Quantitative Measures for Assessing Learning Centers: An Agenda and Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkopes, Kevin; Abshire, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The national trend of requiring all college students to engage with tertiary-level mathematics has created the need to rethink how students can be supported at this level. Current trends in higher education show a decreased reliance on remedial developmental education courses and expanded reliance on learning centers. It is important to look at…

  9. Assessing the Effectiveness of a Student-Centered College Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Robert; Johnson, Bruce; Jackson, David

    Faculty members at St. Mary's University of Minnesota have been engaged in a process to develop a more student-centered curriculum. Administration and faculty taking the lead in this endeavor have begun to embrace much of the literature in the area of constructivism as a philosophical foundation for guiding this change. The result is the near…

  10. Assessment of Tutoring Laboratories in a Learning Assistance Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullmer, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Resource Center at Lincoln University, Pennsylvania, provides tutoring laboratories that are required for developmental reading, writing, and math courses. This article reviews the processes used to plan and determine the effectiveness of the tutoring laboratories, including logic models, student learning outcomes, and the results of…

  11. Patient-centered needs assessment: rationale for a psychometric measure for assessing needs in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Cockburn, Jill; Daly, John; Sanson Fisher, Rob

    2004-01-01

    Determining an individual's unique perspective of an illness experience remains a challenge for clinicians, administrators, and researchers. A range of concepts and psychometric measures have been developed and evaluated to capture this information. These include patient satisfaction, quality of life, and utility measures. Needs assessment as a tool for evaluating perceptions of health status and determining patient satisfaction and treatment plans has been explored in oncology. Studies have demonstrated that a high proportion of patients have unmet needs in relation to activities of daily living, information sources, and comfort. Heart failure (HF), a condition with significant individual and societal burden, mirrors the illness of experience of cancer, as individuals process issues related to prognosis, treatment regimens, and decreased functional status. A needs-based assessment of health status, expectations, and perceptions is patient-centered and has the capacity to not only evaluate current health status but also plan and project care plans. Needs assessment is a dynamic construct rather than a point in time consistent with other assessment modalities, such as quality of life. Multidimensional needs assessment allows for planning and projection of needs, not only on an individual but also a population basis. Implicit in the exploration of needs is an expectation of level of care to be provided, from both the provider and recipient of care. In many instances a misalignment may exist between services and resources available to the individual. This article seeks to provide a theoretical justification for the development of a needs assessment instrument for patients with HF and to discuss the rationale of this method of assessment to create better alignment and resources with patients needs and expectations.

  12. Ethnic and gender subgroup differences in assessment center ratings: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Michelle A; Roth, Philip L; Bobko, Philip

    2008-05-01

    Assessment centers are widely believed to have relatively small standardized subgroup differences (d). However, no meta-analytic review to date has examined ds for assessment centers. The authors conducted a meta-analysis of available data and found an overall Black-White d of 0.52, an overall Hispanic-White d of 0.28, and an overall male-female d of -0.19. Consistent with our expectations, results suggest that Black-White ds in assessment center data may be larger than was previously thought. Hispanic-White comparisons were smaller than were Black-White comparisons. Females, on average, scored higher than did males in assessment centers. As such, assessment centers may be associated with more adverse impact against Blacks than is portrayed in the literature, but the predictor may have less adverse impact and be more "diversity friendly" for Hispanics and females. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. How to Improve SBIR Phase 3 Technology Commercialization Effectiveness: A NASA Glenn Internal Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsham, Gary A. P.

    1999-01-01

    Governmental departments and agencies with responsibilities for implementing the Small Business Innovative Research program under the auspices of the Small Business Administration, are now required to be more accountable for phase 3 performance. At NASA Glenn Research Center, internal, one-on-one interviews were conducted with seven contracting officer technical representatives who have managed one or more SBIR contracts through completion of phase 2. A questionnaire consisting of nineteen questions was formulated and used for the above purpose. This self-assessment produced several comments, conclusions, and recommendations for consideration and potential application.

  14. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Neurobehavioral Assessments | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Neurobehavioral Research Assessments As part of the clinical trials investigating new treatments or natural history studies exploring the effects of diseases, such as cancer and neurofibromatosis type 1, we conduct comprehensive assessments of children, adolescents, and adults to identify strengths and weaknesses in neuropsychological functioning and to monitor changes in these areas over time. Such neurobehavioral outcome measures may be used to assess toxicities and/or benefits of treatment

  15. Assessment of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Technology at the MSFC ECLS Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomes, Kristin; Long, David; Carter, Layne; Flynn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia. Removal (VPCAR) technology has been previously discussed as a viable option for. the Exploration Water Recovery System. This technology integrates a phase change process with catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase to produce potable water from exploration mission wastewaters. A developmental prototype VPCAR was designed, built and tested under funding provided by a National Research. Announcement (NRA) project. The core technology, a Wiped Film Rotating Device (WFRD) was provided by Water Reuse Technologies under the NRA, whereas Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International performed the hardware integration and acceptance test. of the system. Personnel at the-Ames Research Center performed initial systems test of the VPCAR using ersatz solutions. To assess the viability of this hardware for Exploration. Life Support (ELS) applications, the hardware has been modified and tested at the MSFC ECLS Test facility. This paper summarizes the hardware modifications and test results and provides an assessment of this technology for the ELS application.

  16. Thermal instability as a tool to search two-phase regions in centers of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanska, Agata; Kunneriath, Devaky; Prasad Adhikari, Tek; Czerny, Bozena; Karas, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    We show hard radiation, produces in the centers of galaxies, can provide strong clumpiness of the material on distances up to several pc from the black hole. Depending on the shape of this radiation and gas density, thermal instability (TI) can efficiently form two-phase medium, where hot plasma coexists with cold material. Recently, we have made calculations for the conditions appropriate for our Galactic Center considering in particular Minispiral region for which we have studied parameter ranges where the TI may operate.We found that the TI does not operate at the present very low level of the Sgr A* activity. However, Sgr A* was much more luminous in the past.For the highest luminosity states the two-phase medium can be created up to 1.4 pc from the centre, and the cooling/heating timescales are long enough to preserve later the past multi-phase structure. The instability enhances the clumpiness of the mini-spiral medium and creates cold clumps of the order of 1-102 MEarth which may accrete towards Sgr A*.We discuss this mechanism in general case of active galaxies with dense environment.

  17. Air Force Materiel Command Readiness Training Center Final Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed...and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of...IMPACI’ (FONSI) After a review of the EA by the Air Armament Center, Environmental hnpact Analysis Process Committee, it has been concluded that the

  18. [Clinical profile in subjects with acquired brain injury in chronic phase in a social and health care center].

    PubMed

    Rubial-Álvarez, Sandra; Veiga-Suárez, María

    2012-10-01

    There are few resources for acquired brain injury (ABI) in post-hospitalary phase in our country. At this level of carefulness, Personal Autonomy Promotion Center in Bergondo contemplates like a social and health care resource in order to facilitate community integration in subjects with ABI. AIMS. To describe clinical profile in the subjects admitted in our unit, and to assess intervention possibilities with clinico-functional recovery goals in the chronic phases in ABI. . Sample of 105 subjects admitted in our center until December 2010. 86 men and 19 women, with a mean age of 32.16 years old and a most frequent evolution time of less than 5 years (64.76%). Variables collected were: sex, age, etiology, evolution time, personality changes diagnosis, admission FIM, previous participation in rehabilitation programmes and have recovery goals. The main etiology was traumatic brain injury (62.5%). The 54.28% of the subjects was taking physical rehabilitation at the moment of admission, while the 49.52% had participated in neuropsychological interventions. Physical recovery goals were identified in the 42.85% of the subjects and the 78.09% had goals in neuropsychology field. The clinical profile observed was young man with sequelae caused by a traumatic brain injury suffered in last five years, who has received poor neuropsychological care and that still takes physiotherapy treatment.

  19. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuming; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C2-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What's more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  20. NCC Simulation Model: Simulating the operations of the network control center, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Paul, Arthur S.; Gill, Tepper L.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation of the network control center (NCC) is in the second phase of development. This phase seeks to further develop the work performed in phase one. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network. The focus of phase two will be the implementation of the network message dialogues and the resources controlled by the NCC. These resources are requested, initiated, monitored and analyzed via network messages. In the NCC network messages are presented in the form of packets that are routed across the network. These packets are generated, encoded, decoded and processed by the network host processors that generate and service the message traffic on the network that connects these hosts. As a result, the message traffic is used to characterize the work done by the NCC and the connected network. Phase one of the model development represented the NCC as a network of bi-directional single server queues and message generating sources. The generators represented the external segment processors. The served based queues represented the host processors. The NCC model consists of the internal and external processors which generate message traffic on the network that links these hosts. To fully realize the objective of phase two it is necessary to identify and model the processes in each internal processor. These processes live in the operating system of the internal host computers and handle tasks such as high speed message exchanging, ISN and NFE interface, event monitoring, network monitoring, and message logging. Inter process communication is achieved through the operating system facilities. The overall performance of the host is determined by its ability to service messages generated by both internal and external processors.

  1. Normative Data from Rorschach (Exner) and MMPI Tests for Students Assessed in an Alberta Government Youth Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Laurence E.

    This study was intended to provide descriptive data of the students in the Medicine Hat Youth Assessment Center, (YAC) in terms of psychological variables obtained from the Rorschach and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The adolescent subjects were 55 males assessed by the MMPI and 63 males and females assessed by the…

  2. Normative Data from Rorschach (Exner) and MMPI Tests for Students Assessed in an Alberta Government Youth Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Laurence E.

    This study was intended to provide descriptive data of the students in the Medicine Hat Youth Assessment Center, (YAC) in terms of psychological variables obtained from the Rorschach and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The adolescent subjects were 55 males assessed by the MMPI and 63 males and females assessed by the…

  3. Fast magnetic field manipulations and nonadiabatic geometric phases of nitrogen-vacancy center spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2017-09-01

    Fast quantum spin manipulation is needed to design spin-based quantum logic gates and other quantum applications. Here, we construct the exact evolution operator of the nitrogen-vacancy-center (NV) spin in diamond under external magnetic fields, and investigate the nonadiabatic geometric phases—both cyclic and non-cyclic—in these fast-manipulated NV spin systems. It is believed that the nonadiabatic geometric phases can be measured in future experiments, and that these fast quantum manipulations can be useful in designing spin-based quantum applications.

  4. Consistent Long-Time Series of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Schmid, R.; Rothacher, M.

    2004-12-01

    The current IGS processing strategy disregards satellite antenna phase center variations (pcvs) depending on the nadir angle and applies block-specific phase center offsets only. However, the transition from relative to absolute receiver antenna corrections presently under discussion necessitates the consideration of satellite antenna pcvs. Moreover, studies of several groups have shown that the offsets are not homogeneous within a satellite block. Manufacturer specifications seem to confirm this assumption. In order to get best possible antenna corrections, consistent ten-year time series (1994-2004) of satellite-specific pcvs and offsets were generated. This challenging effort became possible as part of the reprocessing of a global GPS network currently performed by the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden. The data of about 160 stations since the official start of the IGS in 1994 have been reprocessed, as today's GPS time series are mostly inhomogeneous and inconsistent due to continuous improvements in the processing strategies and modeling of global GPS solutions. An analysis of the signals contained in the time series of the phase center offsets demonstrates amplitudes on the decimeter level, at least one order of magnitude worse than the desired accuracy. The periods partly arise from the GPS orbit configuration, as the orientation of the orbit planes with regard to the inertial system repeats after about 350 days due to the rotation of the ascending nodes. In addition, the rms values of the X- and Y-offsets show a high correlation with the angle between the orbit plane and the direction to the sun. The time series of the pcvs mainly point at the correlation with the global terrestrial scale. Solutions with relative and absolute phase center corrections, with block- and satellite-specific satellite antenna corrections demonstrate the effect of this parameter group on other global GPS parameters such as the terrestrial scale, station velocities, the

  5. Assessment of interpersonal communication skills among sari health centers' staff.

    PubMed

    Siamian, Hasan; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nia, Roobabe Darvish; Nezhad, Fereshteh Reza; Akbari, Hadise; Balaghafari, Azita; Vahdei, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    Ability to communicate correctly has been one of the life's basic social skills and its significance in human life is to some extent that some of the experts attribute the human growth foundation owners of the leading personal injuries and progress to human relationship. Purpose of this study was to evaluate the interpersonal communication skills among the health care centers staff. This study was a descriptive-cross sectional study was done among 85 staff in 12 metropolitan and 9 urban health centers in 2013. According to Kerejsi and Morgan's table, 70 employees were determined as samples. Seventy questionnaires were distributed at the mentioned centers and 60 measurable health questionnaires were examined. Demographic data and measure of communication skills: is a 36-items consisting of seven domains: (general Communication, speaking, listening, interpretation and clarification, asking, feedback, and reward and punishment), obtained data were analyzed by inferential statistical tests (Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and correlation coefficient). Most respondents 38 (63.3%) were women, 57 (95%) married and 17 (28.1 %) age means of 43-47 years. In the study status of the communication skills status of employees employed in health centres, Sari, "Punish and encourage skills" with mean and total standard deviation of 4.11±37.0 assigned the highest score and "feedback" skill with mean and total standard deviation of 3.68±045 assigned the less score. Findings showed that public relation skill, listening, reward and punishment in good scope and other skills were in the average scope. No need for training skills of empowerment of staff and their mental health. These results could be used for developing similar instruments in other health workers.

  6. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial

  7. Shiqaq Hai Musalla Primary Healthcare Center, Kirkuk, Iraq: Sustainment Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-13

    Distribution 26 E. Project Assessment Team Members 28 1 Introduction Objective of the Project Assessment The objective of this project...fragile state following over 20 years of conflict and sanctions. Specifically, the Iraqi health care system previously suffered from being... old porcelain tiles from 4 the front of the PHC building, which were considered a safety hazard. The contractor was required to clean the area

  8. Assessing Research Interest and Capacity in Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiya, Nazmim; Pernice, Joan; Khan, Sami M.; Sequist, Thomas D.; Tendulkar, Shalini A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Community health centers (CHCs) have great potential to participate in the development of evidence‐based primary care but face obstacles to engagement in clinical translational research. Methods To understand factors associated with CHC interest in building research infrastructure, Harvard Catalyst and the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers conducted an online survey of medical directors in all 50 Massachusetts CHC networks. Results Thirty‐two (64%) medical directors completed the survey representing 126 clinical sites. Over 80% reported that their primary care providers (PCPs) were slightly to very interested in future clinical research and that they were interested in building research infrastructure at their CHC. Frequently cited barriers to participation in research included financial issues, lack of research skills, and lack of research infrastructure. In bivariate analyses, PCP interest in future clinical research and a belief that involvement in research contributed to PCP retention were significantly associated with interest in building research infrastructure. Conclusion CHCs critical role in caring for vulnerable populations ideally positions them to raise relevant research questions and translate evidence into practice. Our findings suggest a high interest in engagement in research among CHC leadership. CTSAs have a unique opportunity to support local CHCs in this endeavor. PMID:24127928

  9. A Longitudinal Assessment of Sleep Timing, Circadian Phase, and Phase Angle of Entrainment across Human Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Stephanie J.; Van Reen, Eliza; LeBourgeois, Monique K.; Acebo, Christine; Tarokh, Leila; Seifer, Ronald; Barker, David H.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive analysis was to examine sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across adolescence in a longitudinal study design. Ninety-four adolescents participated; 38 (21 boys) were 9–10 years (“younger cohort”) and 56 (30 boys) were 15–16 years (“older cohort”) at the baseline assessment. Participants completed a baseline and then follow-up assessments approximately every six months for 2.5 years. At each assessment, participants wore a wrist actigraph for at least one week at home to measure self-selected sleep timing before salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase – a marker of the circadian timing system – was measured in the laboratory. Weekday and weekend sleep onset and offset and weekend-weekday differences were derived from actigraphy. Phase angles were the time durations from DLMO to weekday sleep onset and offset times. Each cohort showed later sleep onset (weekend and weekday), later weekend sleep offset, and later DLMO with age. Weekday sleep offset shifted earlier with age in the younger cohort and later in the older cohort after age 17. Weekend-weekday sleep offset differences increased with age in the younger cohort and decreased in the older cohort after age 17. DLMO to sleep offset phase angle narrowed with age in the younger cohort and became broader in the older cohort. The older cohort had a wider sleep onset phase angle compared to the younger cohort; however, an age-related phase angle increase was seen in the younger cohort only. Individual differences were seen in these developmental trajectories. This descriptive study indicated that circadian phase and self-selected sleep delayed across adolescence, though school-day sleep offset advanced until no longer in high school, whereupon offset was later. Phase angle changes are described as an interaction of developmental changes in sleep regulation interacting with psychosocial factors (e.g., bedtime autonomy). PMID:25380248

  10. A longitudinal assessment of sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across human adolescence.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Van Reen, Eliza; LeBourgeois, Monique K; Acebo, Christine; Tarokh, Leila; Seifer, Ronald; Barker, David H; Carskadon, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive analysis was to examine sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across adolescence in a longitudinal study design. Ninety-four adolescents participated; 38 (21 boys) were 9-10 years ("younger cohort") and 56 (30 boys) were 15-16 years ("older cohort") at the baseline assessment. Participants completed a baseline and then follow-up assessments approximately every six months for 2.5 years. At each assessment, participants wore a wrist actigraph for at least one week at home to measure self-selected sleep timing before salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase - a marker of the circadian timing system - was measured in the laboratory. Weekday and weekend sleep onset and offset and weekend-weekday differences were derived from actigraphy. Phase angles were the time durations from DLMO to weekday sleep onset and offset times. Each cohort showed later sleep onset (weekend and weekday), later weekend sleep offset, and later DLMO with age. Weekday sleep offset shifted earlier with age in the younger cohort and later in the older cohort after age 17. Weekend-weekday sleep offset differences increased with age in the younger cohort and decreased in the older cohort after age 17. DLMO to sleep offset phase angle narrowed with age in the younger cohort and became broader in the older cohort. The older cohort had a wider sleep onset phase angle compared to the younger cohort; however, an age-related phase angle increase was seen in the younger cohort only. Individual differences were seen in these developmental trajectories. This descriptive study indicated that circadian phase and self-selected sleep delayed across adolescence, though school-day sleep offset advanced until no longer in high school, whereupon offset was later. Phase angle changes are described as an interaction of developmental changes in sleep regulation interacting with psychosocial factors (e.g., bedtime autonomy).

  11. Assessing the financial health of the endoscopy center.

    PubMed

    Deas, Thomas M

    2002-04-01

    Just as a trend of a patient's physiologic vital signs is more informative than a single assessment, the most reliable measure of EASC financial health is achieved over a continuum of time. The earliest estimate of prognosis is accomplished with a business plan that is based on an analysis of practice history, strategic planning, and carefully derived assumptions. Periodic assessments of financial performance with benchmarking data provide a current assessment of health and allow trending of performance improvements or decline. Assurance of future financial health is derived from focusing on customer needs, developing EASC core competence, and creating value through innovation. Following these guidelines helps to ensure a strong, productive, and long-lasting EASC.

  12. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  13. Creative Exercises in General Chemistry: A Student-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Scott E.; Shaw, Janet L.; Freeman, Kathryn A.

    2010-01-01

    Creative exercises (CEs) are a form of assessment in which students are given a prompt and asked to write down as many distinct, correct, and relevant facts about the prompt as they can. Students receive credit for each fact that they include that is related to the prompt and distinct from the other facts they list. With CEs, students have an…

  14. Assessment Center Methodology as a Tool for Leadership Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Marilyn R.; And Others

    Project EXCEL (Excellence in Community Elected and Appointed Leadership) was created in 1990 to provide opportunities for assessing job training and personal development needs of public officials in small and midsized communities, as well as to develop a continuing education program to assist public leaders in professional growth and problem…

  15. Assessment Center Methodology as a Tool for Leadership Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Marilyn R.; And Others

    Project EXCEL (Excellence in Community Elected and Appointed Leadership) was created in 1990 to provide opportunities for assessing job training and personal development needs of public officials in small and midsized communities, as well as to develop a continuing education program to assist public leaders in professional growth and problem…

  16. Hampden District Regional Skills Center. Orientation & Assessment. Description & Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden District Regional Skills Center, Springfield, MA.

    This booklet describes a 5-day orientation and assessment program (for economically disadvantaged people who are unemployed and have no marketable skill) designed (1) To determine the trainees' level of learning, his aptitudes, attitudes, abilities, behaviors and interests in the employment field; and (2) to introduce the trainee to the world of…

  17. Creative Exercises in General Chemistry: A Student-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Scott E.; Shaw, Janet L.; Freeman, Kathryn A.

    2010-01-01

    Creative exercises (CEs) are a form of assessment in which students are given a prompt and asked to write down as many distinct, correct, and relevant facts about the prompt as they can. Students receive credit for each fact that they include that is related to the prompt and distinct from the other facts they list. With CEs, students have an…

  18. Assessment and Screening. A Center Quick Training Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    Efficient and accurate screening and assessment strategies are essential for matching students with the programs and interventions to address their current needs and prevent problems from getting bigger. This process calls for screening tools that range from descriptions by referrers, through surveys to identify unrecognized problems, to analysis…

  19. [HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF WORKING CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYEES OF BROADCASTING CENTER].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A V; Brusentsova, A V; Sokhoshko, I A; Rostikov, V P

    2015-01-01

    Hygienic assessment of working conditions of employees of the Omsk Regional Broadcasting Centre was performed on data of the analysis of materials of certification of workplaces. There were examined materials concerning 65 core profile workplaces, where 130 persons, including 35 women work. There was determined health risk for personnel in dependence on working conditions. The staff was noted to be exposed to the adverse impact of the following factors: chemical, physical (noise, general and local vibration, non-ionizing radiation, microclimate, lighting), severity and intensity ofwork. Class working conditions for 13,5% of workplaces on noise, 35.4% on non-ionizing radiation was assessed as a harmful of the first degree. Lightness indices at 78.5% of the workplaces did not meet the requirements of sanitary norms. At 7.7% of the workplaces levels of hardness of labor were assessed as harmful. The impact of such factors as biological, infrasound, ultrasound, ionizing radiation, aerosols with mainly fibrogenic action, was absent, their assessment was not carried out. Working conditions at 83.1% of workplaces were characterized as hazardous, including at 52.3% of the workplaces where there was established hazard class 3.1, at 30.7% of workplaces--Class 3.2. Among all the factors of occupational environment the largest contribution into the overall assessment of working conditions was made by the lightness factor (50.9%) and non-ionizing radiation (20.6%). The most harmful working conditions have been identified for workplaces of the operator of masthead antenna, engineer of radiocommunications, broadcasting and television, electromechanician of television (radiocommunication), (broadcasting), car driver.

  20. An Investigation of Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Change in Developmental Assessment Center Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodersen, D. Apryl; Thornton, George C., III

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread application of developmental assessment centers (DACs), little is known about the impact of the process on participants' understanding of the assessed performance dimensions. This study explores this issue by applying Golembiewski, Billingsley, and Yeager's (1976) tripartite model of change to assess the presence of alpha, beta,…

  1. An Investigation of Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Change in Developmental Assessment Center Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodersen, D. Apryl; Thornton, George C., III

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread application of developmental assessment centers (DACs), little is known about the impact of the process on participants' understanding of the assessed performance dimensions. This study explores this issue by applying Golembiewski, Billingsley, and Yeager's (1976) tripartite model of change to assess the presence of alpha, beta,…

  2. Reality Therapy at the Maine Youth Center: Assessment of Youth. Interim Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Robert J.

    Reality Therapy is a system which stresses that individuals are responsible for their own behavior, and that excuses based on environment, heredity, or the past are not acceptable as explanations for behavior. To assess the impact of training in Reality Therapy on youth at the Maine Youth Center, subjects (all students at the Center) were asked to…

  3. Description, Evaluation, and Validation of a Pilot Developmental Assessment Center in a Military-Educational Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Richard P.; And Others

    The purpose of this report is to describe, evaluate, and validate a pilot assessment center (AC) established in the Center for Leadership and Personal Development at the U.S. Military Academy to develop cadets on job skills needed by newly commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. The AC programs employ a leadership evaluation development method…

  4. Assessing Community Informatics: A Review of Methodological Approaches for Evaluating Community Networks and Community Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Dara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. The study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital;…

  5. Assessing Implementation of Learner-Centered Teaching While Providing Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Phyllis

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study of 58 faculty members using a practical method for assessing the prevalence of learner-centered practices through individual interviews and rating their described practices with published rubrics. Analysis of the interviews found that the same faculty member might use more learner-centered practices in one course and…

  6. Assessing Community Informatics: A Review of Methodological Approaches for Evaluating Community Networks and Community Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Dara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. The study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital;…

  7. An Analysis of Writing Tutoring Assessment in Four Community College Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantoja, Maria Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Writing centers in American institutions of higher education have existed in one form or another since the late 1800s and early 1900s, providing individualized writing tutoring and support for students. As writing centers evolved, questions arose regarding the effects of writing tutoring on student writing. Some assessment studies on writing…

  8. Implementation of Language Assessments for Staff Interpreters in Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    de Jaimes, Fatima Nunez; Batts, Felicia; Noguera, Christine; Guerrero, Lourdes; Moreno, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bilingual staff is used to provide interpreter services in community health centers. Little is known about the language proficiency of dual-role staff interpreters. Golden Valley Health Centers implemented a formal language assessment program to improve the number of qualified dual-role staff interpreters and ultimately improve the quality of patient care. PMID:23974375

  9. An Analysis of Writing Tutoring Assessment in Four Community College Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantoja, Maria Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Writing centers in American institutions of higher education have existed in one form or another since the late 1800s and early 1900s, providing individualized writing tutoring and support for students. As writing centers evolved, questions arose regarding the effects of writing tutoring on student writing. Some assessment studies on writing…

  10. Development of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Benjamin D.; Buzolitz, Johanna Soet; Lei, Pui-Wa; Boswell, James F.; McAleavey, Andrew A.; Sevig, Todd D.; Dowis, Jerome D.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Few instruments have been designed specifically to address the needs of college counseling centers. This article reviews existing instruments and presents 4 studies that describe the development and psychometric properties of a new instrument, the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62). Study 1 describes the initial…

  11. Reality Therapy at the Maine Youth Center: Assessment of Youth. Interim Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Robert J.

    Reality Therapy is a system which stresses that individuals are responsible for their own behavior, and that excuses based on environment, heredity, or the past are not acceptable as explanations for behavior. To assess the impact of training in Reality Therapy on youth at the Maine Youth Center, subjects (all students at the Center) were asked to…

  12. Impact of Reality Therapy on the Maine Youth Center. Fourth Assessment of Youth, Winter 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Robert J.

    The Maine Youth Center was established to rehabilitate juvenile offenders. The primary treatment philosophy at the Center is Reality Therapy, which stresses that individuals are responsible for their own behavior. To test the effectiveness of the therapy, major assessments of the youths were conducted at 6-month intervals in 1980 and 1981. The…

  13. Frequency domain mediolateral balance assessment using a center of pressure tracking task.

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, N Peter; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-11-15

    Since impaired mediolateral balance can increase fall risk, especially in the elderly, its quantification and training might be a powerful preventive tool. We propose a visual tracking task (VTT) with increasing frequencies (.3-2.0Hz) and with center of pressure as visual feedback as an assessment method. This mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) consists of two tasks, tracking a predictable target signal to determine physical capacity and tracking an unpredictable target signal to determine sensorimotor integration limitations. Within and between sessions learning effects and reliability in balance performance descriptors in both tasks were studied in 20 young adults. Balance performance was expressed as the phase-shift (PS) and gain (G) between the target and CoP in the frequency domain and cut-off frequencies at which the performance dropped. Results showed significant differences between the MELBA tasks in PS and G indicating a lower delay and higher accuracy in tracking the predictable target. Significant within and between sessions learning effects for the same measures were found only for the unpredictable task. Reliability of the cut-off frequencies at which PS and G performance declined and the average values within cut-off frequencies was fair to good (ICC .46-.66) for the unpredictable task and fair to excellent for the predictable task (ICC .68-.87). In conclusion, MELBA can reliably quantify balance performance using a predictable VTT. Additionally, the unpredictable tasks can give insight into the visuomotor integration mechanisms controlling balance and highlights MELBA's potential as a training tool.

  14. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - U.S. COAST GUARD AVIATION TRAINING CENTER - MOBILE, AL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assessment of pollution prevention opportunities at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Training Center in Mobile, AL, identified waste reduction opportunities in five major processing areas: flight simulator operation, aircraft maintenance, aircraft fueling, aircraft washing, and...

  15. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - U.S. COAST GUARD AVIATION TRAINING CENTER - MOBILE, AL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assessment of pollution prevention opportunities at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Training Center in Mobile, AL, identified waste reduction opportunities in five major processing areas: flight simulator operation, aircraft maintenance, aircraft fueling, aircraft washing, and...

  16. Using Simulated Job Samples for Skills Evaluation: Learning from the Assessment Center Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, Joseph D.; Robinson, Linda E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the assessment center approach to employee selection and describes its background, history and use, methodology (including simulation and observation), and possible applications, including its use in a professional certification program for instructional/training designers. (MBR)

  17. Using Simulated Job Samples for Skills Evaluation: Learning from the Assessment Center Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, Joseph D.; Robinson, Linda E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the assessment center approach to employee selection and describes its background, history and use, methodology (including simulation and observation), and possible applications, including its use in a professional certification program for instructional/training designers. (MBR)

  18. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  19. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  20. Congenital Heart Surgery Case Mix Across North American Centers and Impact on Performance Assessment.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Marshall L; O'Brien, Sean M; Hill, Kevin D; Gaies, Michael G; Romano, Jennifer C; Shahian, David M; Mayer, John E; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2016-11-01

    Performance assessment in congenital heart surgery is challenging due to the wide heterogeneity of disease. We describe current case mix across centers, evaluate methodology inclusive of all cardiac operations versus the more homogeneous subset of Society of Thoracic Surgeons benchmark operations, and describe implications regarding performance assessment. Centers (n = 119) participating in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2010 through 2014) were included. Index operation type and frequency across centers were described. Center performance (risk-adjusted operative mortality) was evaluated and classified when including the benchmark versus all eligible operations. Overall, 207 types of operations were performed during the study period (112,140 total cases). Few operations were performed across all centers; only 25% were performed at least once by 75% or more of centers. There was 7.9-fold variation across centers in the proportion of total cases comprising high-complexity cases (STAT 5). In contrast, the benchmark operations made up 36% of cases, and all but 2 were performed by at least 90% of centers. When evaluating performance based on benchmark versus all operations, 15% of centers changed performance classification; 85% remained unchanged. Benchmark versus all operation methodology was associated with lower power, with 35% versus 78% of centers meeting sample size thresholds. There is wide variation in congenital heart surgery case mix across centers. Metrics based on benchmark versus all operations are associated with strengths (less heterogeneity) and weaknesses (lower power), and lead to differing performance classification for some centers. These findings have implications for ongoing efforts to optimize performance assessment, including choice of target population and appropriate interpretation of reported metrics. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. External Quality Assessment beyond the analytical phase: an Australian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Stephanie; McCaughey, Euan J.; Georgiou, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    External Quality Assessment (EQA) is the verification, on a recurring basis, that laboratory results conform to expectations for the quality required for patient care. It is now widely recognised that both the pre- and post-laboratory phase of testing, termed the diagnostic phases, are a significant source of laboratory errors. These errors have a direct impact on both the effectiveness of the laboratory and patient safety. Despite this, Australian laboratories tend to be focussed on very narrow concepts of EQA, primarily surrounding test accuracy, with little in the way of EQA programs for the diagnostic phases. There is a wide range of possibilities for the development of EQA for the diagnostic phases in Australia, such as the utilisation of scenarios and health informatics. Such programs can also be supported through advances in health information and communications technology, including electronic test ordering and clinical decision support systems. While the development of such programs will require consultation and support from the referring doctors, and their format will need careful construction to ensure that the data collected is de-identified and provides education as well as useful and informative data, we believe that there is high value in the development of such programs. Therefore, it is our opinion that all pathology laboratories should strive to be involved in an EQA program in the diagnostic phases to both monitor the diagnostic process and to identify, learn from and reduce errors and near misses in these phases in a timely fashion. PMID:28392728

  2. Phase Center Stabilization of a Horn Antenna and its Application in a Luneburg Lens Feed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakauskas, Brian H.

    With any reflecting or refracting structure, such as a parabolic reflector or lens antenna, the knowledge of the focal point is critical in the design as it determines the point at which a feeding signal should originate for proper operation. Spherically symmetrical lenses have a distinct advantage over other structure types in that there exists an infinite number of focal points surrounding the lens. Due to this feature, a spherical lens can remain in a fixed position while a beam can be steered to any direction by movement of the feed only. Unlike phased arrays that beam-steer electronically, a spherical lens exhibits no beam deterioration at wide angles. The lens that accomplishes this is in practice called the Luneburg lens which has been studied since the 1940s. Due to the electromechanical properties of the horn antenna, it is often used to feed the above mentioned configurations. In the focusing of any feed antenna, its phase center is an approximate point in space that should be coincident with a reflector or lens's focal point to minimize phase error over the radiating aperture. Although this is often easily accomplished over a narrow bandwidth, over wide bandwidths some antennas have phase centers that vary significantly, making their focusing a challenge. This thesis seeks to explain the problem with focusing a Luneburg lens with a canonical horn antenna and offers a modified horn design that remains nearly focused over a frequency band of 18 -- 45 GHz. In addition to simulating the feed / lens configurations, the lens and feed horn will be fabricated and mounted for far field measurements to be taken in an anechoic antenna range. A final feed design will be implemented in an array configuration with the Luneburg lens, capable of transmitting and receiving multiple beams without requiring any moving parts or complex electronic beam-forming networks. As a tradeoff, a separate receiver or switching network is required to accommodate each feed antenna. This

  3. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Steiner, Jörg M; Algül, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25133018

  4. Bifurcation Diagram and Pattern Formation of Phase Slip Centers in Superconducting Wires Driven with Electric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J.; Sternberg, P.; Ma, Q.

    2007-10-01

    We provide here new insights into the classical problem of a one-dimensional superconducting wire exposed to an applied electric current using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model. The most striking feature of this system is the well-known appearance of oscillatory solutions exhibiting phase slip centers (PSC’s) where the order parameter vanishes. Retaining temperature and applied current as parameters, we present a simple yet definitive explanation of the mechanism within this nonlinear model that leads to the PSC phenomenon and we establish where in parameter space these oscillatory solutions can be found. One of the most interesting features of the analysis is the evident collision of real eigenvalues of the associated PT-symmetric linearization, leading as it does to the emergence of complex elements of the spectrum.

  5. Topological Phases in Graphene Nanoribbons: Junction States, Spin Centers, and Quantum Spin Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ting; Zhao, Fangzhou; Louie, Steven G.

    2017-08-01

    We show that semiconducting graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) of different width, edge, and end termination (synthesizable from molecular precursors with atomic precision) belong to different electronic topological classes. The topological phase of GNRs is protected by spatial symmetries and dictated by the terminating unit cell. We have derived explicit formulas for their topological invariants and shown that localized junction states developed between two GNRs of distinct topology may be tuned by lateral junction geometry. The topology of a GNR can be further modified by dopants, such as a periodic array of boron atoms. In a superlattice consisting of segments of doped and pristine GNRs, the junction states are stable spin centers, forming a Heisenberg antiferromagnetic spin 1 /2 chain with tunable exchange interaction. The discoveries here not only are of scientific interest for studies of quasi-one-dimensional systems, but also open a new path for design principles of future GNR-based devices through their topological characters.

  6. [Nutritional assessment of the students from two European university centers].

    PubMed

    Miere, Doina; Filip, Lorena; Indrei, L L; Soriano, J M; Molto, J C; Manes, J

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparative study between the diets of the students from the University of Valencia and the diets of the students from the School of Pharmacy within Cluj-Napoca "I. Haţieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy. The study focused on the analysis of Body Mass Index (BMI) of the students from the two universities, on the assessment of the calorie and nutrients intake per sexes, on the determination of the calorie and nutrient distribution per main courses and snacks, on the determination of the consumption per foodstuff groups at the main courses and snacks. All these parameters have been analysed and interpreted in a unitary form and according to the Spanish standards. No significant differences have been noticed between Spanish and Romanian students regarding the BMI. The food intake was adequate, but in case of Romanian students the timetable for meals is irregular and in the menu structure potatoes and bread are present in large amount. Additional nutritional education is required in order to eliminate the errors and miss-conception related with the food intake.

  7. Aerospace Robotic Implementations: An Assessment and Forecast. Phase 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    IMPLEMENTATIONS: An Assessment and Forecast SEPTEMBER 1986 Rpproved fc-, Pubi .AEROSPACE IDSRA "’" MODERNIZATION OFFICE Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...0111, Deilvery Order 0001) to the Aerospace Industrial Modernization (AIM) Office of the Air Force Systems command. The Project Manager for this effort...a two-phased investigation was initiated to determine the potential for modernizing selective portions of the industrial sector through the

  8. First among Equals: Hybridization of Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment and Evidence-Centered Game Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Chu, Man-Wai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to explore differences and similarities between cognitive diagnostic assessment (CDA) and evidence-centered game design (ECgD) in the service of intentional hybridization. Although some testing specialists might argue that both are essentially the same given their origins in principled assessment design and…

  9. First among Equals: Hybridization of Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment and Evidence-Centered Game Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Chu, Man-Wai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to explore differences and similarities between cognitive diagnostic assessment (CDA) and evidence-centered game design (ECgD) in the service of intentional hybridization. Although some testing specialists might argue that both are essentially the same given their origins in principled assessment design and…

  10. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment in US Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Over a decade ago, Barr and Tagg ("Change Mag" 27(6):12-25, 1995) declared that a shift had occurred in higher education from an instruction paradigm to a learning paradigm. A central element in this new paradigm is learner-centered assessment. While a growing body of literature suggests that this approach to assessment is a best…

  11. Assessment Centers: Decision-Making Information from Non-Test-Based Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehoff, Marilee S.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the function of an assessment center, which consists of a standardized evaluation of behavior based on multiple inputs. Judgments are made in part by means of specially developed assessment simulations based on a thorough job analysis. Such judgments are used for management decision-making and career development. (JAC)

  12. Assessment Center Construct-Related Validity: Stepping beyond the MTMM Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Mark C.; Woehr, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Monte Carlo research has illustrated that the traditional method for assessing the construct-related validity of assessment center (AC) post-exercise dimension ratings (PEDRs), an application of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to a multitrait-multimethod matrix, produces inconsistent results [Lance, C. E., Woehr, D. J., & Meade, A. W.…

  13. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment in US Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Over a decade ago, Barr and Tagg ("Change Mag" 27(6):12-25, 1995) declared that a shift had occurred in higher education from an instruction paradigm to a learning paradigm. A central element in this new paradigm is learner-centered assessment. While a growing body of literature suggests that this approach to assessment is a best…

  14. Faculty Perception and Use of Learning-Centered Strategies to Assess Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the researcher explored collegiate faculty use and perception of learning- centered strategies to assess student performance on various learning tasks. Through this study, the researcher identified the assessment strategies that faculty participants most frequently used, as well as the strategies that they perceived to be most…

  15. Assessment of Microphone Phased Array for Measuring Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The specific purpose of the present work was to demonstrate the suitability of a microphone phased array for launch acoustics applications via participation in selected firings of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test is a part of the discontinued Constellation Program Ares I Project, but the basic understanding gained from this test is expected to help development of the Space Launch System vehicles. Correct identification of sources not only improves the predictive ability, but provides guidance for a quieter design of the launch pad and optimization of the water suppression system. This document contains the results of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment.

  16. Estimation of GRACE K-Band antenna phase center coordinates using an error-in-variables approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, Matthias; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    In the course of computing the ITSG-Grace2014 and ITSG-Grace2016 monthly potential time series from L1B data at the range rate level, the K-Band antenna phase center coordinates of both GRACE-A and GRACE-B were co-estimated. In the resulting time series of antenna phase center coordinates, two effects could be observed: 1. The length of the phase center vector shows a large standard deviation of around 15cm to 20cm. This can be adequately explained by the unfavorable measurement configuration, where the opening angle between the respective phase center vectors and the baseline between the satellites' centers of mass is very small, on the order of a few milliradians. 2. The phase center vectors show a strong bias toward zero. Where, by knowledge of the construction of the satellites, it is known that the vector should have a length of approximately 1.5m, the mean of the estimates is approximately 1.2m. This suggests that there must be a systematic effect that is not sufficiently modeled. Where the large standard deviation of the phase center estimate must be accepted, the bias must not. Investigations revealed that this bias is due to non-consideration of the stochastic characteristics of the star camera measurements providing the satellite orientation parameters in our adjustment. In a simulated scenario, proper consideration of both the range rate noise and star camera noise in an error-in-variables adjustment model eliminates this bias. In this contribution, we outline the adjustment approach we followed in our simulations, and give an outlook towards integrating the error-in-variables approach into our real data processing chain.

  17. Course evaluation and assessment: examples of a learner-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Eva M; Hu, Anne C; Bachrach, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Teaching in higher education increasingly requires greater accountability, the utilization of contemporary learner-focused teaching models, and transparent grading methods for nonstandardized learning products. This article describes learner-centered evaluation and assessment strategies and illustrates how these approaches emphasize learners' responsibility for their own learning, foster students' commitment to learning and provide useful information for continuous curriculum improvement. In addition, the article discusses the components of learner-centered assessment models including the course assessment and enhancement model, the Personal Action Plan, and the Gedanken Experiment. Further, a rubric is presented as a tool for systematic and transparent grading of learner-centered assessment products. The need for further validation of these strategies is being discussed.

  18. WIND-TUNNEL SIMULATIONS TO ASSESS DISPERSION AROUND THE WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted of dispersion from the site of the destroyed World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City. A scale model of lower Manhattan, including a scaled representation of the rubble pile, was constructed. The first phases of the study involved smoke visua...

  19. WIND-TUNNEL SIMULATIONS TO ASSESS DISPERSION AROUND THE WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted of dispersion from the site of the destroyed World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City. A scale model of lower Manhattan, including a scaled representation of the rubble pile, was constructed. The first phases of the study involved smoke visua...

  20. Assessment techniques for a learning-centered curriculum: evaluation design for adventures in supercomputing

    SciTech Connect

    Helland, B.; Summers, B.G.

    1996-09-01

    As the classroom paradigm shifts from being teacher-centered to being learner-centered, student assessments are evolving from typical paper and pencil testing to other methods of evaluation. Students should be probed for understanding, reasoning, and critical thinking abilities rather than their ability to return memorized facts. The assessment of the Department of Energy`s pilot program, Adventures in Supercomputing (AiS), offers one example of assessment techniques developed for learner-centered curricula. This assessment has employed a variety of methods to collect student data. Methods of assessment used were traditional testing, performance testing, interviews, short questionnaires via email, and student presentations of projects. The data obtained from these sources have been analyzed by a professional assessment team at the Center for Children and Technology. The results have been used to improve the AiS curriculum and establish the quality of the overall AiS program. This paper will discuss the various methods of assessment used and the results.

  1. Parents' and professionals' perceptions of the implementation of family-centered practices in child assessments.

    PubMed

    Crais, Elizabeth R; Roy, Vicky Poston; Free, Karen

    2006-11-01

    To determine the degree to which early intervention professionals and families agreed on whether specific family-centered practices were implemented in specific child assessments and which practices were viewed as important to include in future child assessments. A self-rating instrument was used to survey 134 early intervention professionals (across a variety of disciplines) and 58 family members in triads (2 professionals and 1 family member for each assessment) after they had participated together in a child assessment. Participants were asked to identify across 41 family-centered practices whether the practice was implemented (actual practice) and would be important to include in future assessments (ideal practice). Agreement between families and professionals and between professionals was high for both actual practices (69% and 78%, respectively) and ideal practices (82% and 84%, respectively). Some practices were frequently implemented, whereas others were seldom implemented. Both professionals and families viewed most of the practices as ideal. However, an implementation gap was seen on almost half of the practices between what families and professionals viewed as actually implemented and what was ideal implementation. Although a number of family-centered practices were implemented in the child assessments studied, the results pinpointed specific practices that professionals and families agreed should be changed. The results can serve as a guide for enhancing the implementation of, and continued investigation into, family-centered practices in child assessment and can add key information toward the identification of evidence-based practices.

  2. Early phase Technology Assessment of nanotechnology in oncology.

    PubMed

    Retèl, Valesca P; Hummel, Marjan J M; van Harten, Willem H

    2008-01-01

    To perform early Technology Assessment (TA) of nanotechnology in oncology. The possibilities of nanotechnology for detection (imaging), diagnosis and treatment of cancer are subject of different research programs where major investments are concerned. As a range of bio- nanotechnologies is expected to enter the oncology field it is relevant to consider the various aspects involved in especially early TA. This article provides two cases of early assessment of (predecessors of) nanotechnologies: Microarray Analysis and Photodynamic Therapy implementation, which methodology can be extrapolated to other nanotechnologies in oncology. Constructive Technology Assessment (CTA) is used for the introduction of technologies that are still in a dynamic phase of development or in an early stage of diffusion. The selection of studied aspects in CTA is based on: clinical aspects (safety, efficacy, and effectiveness), economic (cost-effectiveness), patient related (QoL, ethical/juridical and psychosocial), organizational aspects (diffusion and adoption) and scenario drafting. The features of the technology and the phase of implementation are decisive for choices and timing of the specific aspects to be studied. A framework was drafted to decide on the relevant aspects. In the first case, early implementation of Microarray Analysis; clinical effectiveness, logistics, patient centeredness and scenario drafting were given priority. Related to the diffusion-phase of Photodynamic Therapy however other aspects were evaluated, such as early cost-effectiveness analysis for possible reimbursement. Often CTA will result in a mixed method design. Especially scenario drafting is a powerful instrument to predict possible developments that can be anticipated upon in the assessment. CTA is appropriate for the study of early implementation of new technologies in oncology. In early TA small series often necessitate a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. The features of nanotechnology

  3. The Israeli Rett Syndrome Center. Evaluation and transdisciplinary play-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Meir; Manor-Binyamini, Iris; Elefant, Cochavit; Wine, Judy; Saraf, Einat; Yoshei, Yael

    2006-10-10

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neuro-developmental syndrome of genetic origin, which mainly affects women. Individuals diagnosed with RS exhibit a variety of functional difficulties, which impair their quality of life. The variety of impairments and the differences between each child makes it necessary to administer skilled treatment, individually tailored to each client. Since the foundation of proper treatment is based on a structured, well administered, insightful assessment, the individual with RS with her complex array of difficulties should benefit from such a procedure. This notion has led to the establishment of the Israel Rett Syndrome Center. The center includes a medical branch located at the Safra Shildren's Medical Center at Tel Hashomer and an education/rehabilitation team, who performs assessments in special education facilities and residential settings throughout Israel. The assessment team works by means of arena assessment according to the concept of play-based assessment. This article presents the working model used by the education/rehabilitation team at the Israeli Rett Syndrome Center. The principles and working characteristics of the Israel Rett Syndrome Center team are suggested here as a potential model for establishing additional teams, presenting similar evaluation services for other individuals with RS as well as for analogous populations.

  4. Executive summary. Conceptual studies nuclear energy center Lake Hartwell, S. C. , Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a specific site in the SSEB region. The site selected for this conceptual study is at Lake Hartwell, South Carolina. The conceptual NEC at Lake Hartwell consists of twelve 1250-MW(e) LWRs arranged on the site in four cluster of three units each, know as triads. The nominal distance between triads was selected as 2-1/2 miles. The total electric output of 15,000 MWe to be generated by the NEC would be transmitted to five major utilities in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. Objective of the study was to assess the technical, socioeconomic, environmental, and institutional issues relating to the NEC at the conceptual study site. The basic finding was that the concept of a NEC on the Lake Hartwell site is feasible, but further analysis of institutional issues and possible legislation would be required.

  5. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study.

    PubMed

    Chalavi, Sima; Simmons, Andrew; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Barker, Gareth J; Reinders, A A T Simone

    2012-08-06

    Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s), which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within-center reproducibility for all protocols, but lower

  6. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  7. Applicability of assessment center concepts and techniques for managerial selection and development in human service organizations.

    PubMed

    McGee, G W; Crow, R T

    1982-01-01

    The Assessment Center technique has been used widely throughout private industry over the past twenty-five years for selection and promotion of supervisory and managerial personnel. It has been acclaimed as a fair and valid method and has been successful in identifying individuals who possess the greatest potential to achieve in a particular position. A growing interest in the field of human services administration is the need to find the best person to select or promote into a supervisory or administrative position. The Assessment Center can be used to address this need, and the authors discuss the applicability of the technique to the human service organization.

  8. Phase transitions in two-dimensional monolayer films on the (110) face-centered-cubic crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrykiejew, A.; Sokołowski, S.; Zientarski, T.; Binder, K.

    1998-03-01

    The results of Monte Carlo simulation of two-dimensional films formed on the (110) face of a face-centered-cubic crystal are presented. Systems with different corrugation of the gas-solid potential and different size of adsorbed atoms are discussed. It is demonstrated that even small changes in the gas-solid potential corrugation considerably affect the inner structure of the low-temperature ordered phases and the location of the order-disorder phase transition.

  9. Dynamical stabilization of the body centered cubic phase in lanthanum and thorium by phonon-phonon interaction.

    PubMed

    Souvatzis, P; Björkman, T; Eriksson, O; Andersson, P; Katsnelson, M I; Rudin, S P

    2009-04-29

    A recently developed self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamical method has been applied to the high temperature body centered cubic (bcc) phase of La and Th, which are dynamically unstable at low temperatures. The bcc phase of these metals is found to be stabilized by phonon-phonon interactions. The calculated high temperature phonon frequencies for La are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  10. Using Think Aloud Interviews in Evidence-Centered Assessment Design for the AP World History Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliski, Pamela; France, Megan; Huff, Kristen; Thurber, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Developing a cognitive model of task performance is an important and often overlooked phase in assessment design; failing to establish such a model can threaten the validity of the inferences made from the scores produced by an assessment (e.g., Leighton, 2004). Conducting think aloud interviews (TAIs), where students think aloud while completing…

  11. A psychometric assessment of the Circadian Amplitude and Phase Scale.

    PubMed

    Di Milia, Lee; Folkard, Simon; Hill, Joanne; Walker, Curtis

    2011-02-01

    The Circadian Amplitude and Phase Scale (CAPS) is a new self-report tool that aims to assess amplitude and phase. The CAPS consists of three factors made up of 38 items. Amplitude is posited to be assessed via two of these factors: time awareness (TA) and/or strength of preference (SOP). The remaining factor, phase, is assessed via the existing Preferences Scale (PS). Given there is no published research using this measure, the authors undertook two studies to examine its psychometric properties and construct validity. In a sample of 351 North American students, the authors identified a three-factor 34-item model using principal components analysis. The components explained 39% of the variance, and scale reliability ranged from 0.73 (SOP) to 0.88 (PS). The correlations between the components were small, suggesting they are each assessing different constructs. Thus, it is unlikely TA and SOP may both be indicators of amplitude. The distributions for each scale were divided into two groups (≤ 25th and ≥ 75th percentiles), and these groups were used to assess construct validity using alertness ratings by time-of-day. The results from a multivariate general linear model indicated a significant difference (p < .001) in sleepiness ratings by time-of-day for the PS scale only. In the second study, the authors applied confirmatory factor analysis in an attempt to replicate the factor structure identified in the student sample in a working sample (n = 388). The results suggested the model fit was not optimal. Subsequent analysis suggested a 26-item model was a better fit, but it also was not optimal. The intercorrelations between the factors were larger than in the student sample but again small, indicating the constructs are independent measures. The inability to replicate the factor structure is most likely explained by the differences in the sample characteristics of age, sex, and perhaps difficulty in interpreting the items. The limitations of these studies

  12. Measuring trauma center injury prevention activity: an assessment and reporting tool.

    PubMed

    Sise, Michael J; Sise, Carol Beth

    2006-02-01

    To develop an assessment and reporting tool for a trauma center's community partnership strategy to deliver injury prevention programs in a large metropolitan area. The tool was designed to track prevention activity and serve as a reporting format for the parent health system, county designating agency, and the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Center Verification Process. The tool collected data including trauma center paid and volunteer personnel time, equipment, resource, and financial costs, community group and public agency contributions, number of community members receiving prevention material or presentations, impact on public policy, and print and broadcast media coverage. These measurements were incorporated in a reporting grid format. Six youth injury prevention programs were evaluated over a recent 2-year interval to demonstrate the tool's usefulness. Of six programs, three focused on motor vehicle injuries, one on teen suicide, one on firearm injuries, and one on drug and alcohol abuse. Trauma Center personnel asset allocation included 3% full-time equivalent by the Trauma Medical Director, 30% by the Injury Prevention and Community Outreach Coordinator, and 473 person hours (both work and volunteer) by physicians, nurses, and other personnel. Trauma Center equipment and fixed asset expenses totaled $3,950 and monetary contribution totaled $4,430. Community groups and public agencies contributed 20,400 person hours with estimated in-kind costs exceeding $750,000. Five of the six programs continued during the 2-year period. A gun-lock giveaway program was suspended because of a product recall. A total of over 29,000 youth received prevention material and presentations. Four public policy initiatives and 18 Trauma Center media stories with over 50 mentions and 37 new community partnerships resulted. The reports generated were easily incorporated in the trauma center's reports to local and national organizations and agencies. This assessment tool

  13. Impact of GPS antenna phase center variations on precise orbits of the GOCE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, H.; Jäggi, A.; Meyer, U.; Dach, R.; Beutler, G.

    2011-06-01

    The first European Space Agency Earth explorer core mission GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) has been launched on March 17, 2009. The 12-channel dual-frequency Global Positioning System receiver delivers 1 Hz data and provides the basis for precise orbit determination (POD) on the few cm-level for such a very low orbiting satellite (254.9 km). As a member of the European GOCE Gravity Consortium, which is responsible for the GOCE High-level Processing Facility (HPF), the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) provides the Precise Science Orbit (PSO) product for the GOCE satellite. The mission requirement for 1-dimensional POD accuracy is 2 cm. The use of in-flight determined antenna phase center variations (PCVs) is necessary to meet this requirement. The PCVs are determined from 154 days of data and the magnitude is up to 3-4 cm. The impact of the PCVs on the orbit determination is significant. The cross-track direction benefits most of the PCVs. The improvement is clearly seen in the orbit overlap analysis and in the validation with independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements. It is the first time that SLR could validate the cross-track component of a LEO orbit.

  14. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  15. Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response

    SciTech Connect

    E. C. Nielsen

    2006-01-01

    During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

  16. Adventures in Assessment: Learner-Centered Approaches to Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Literacy, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Maria, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Articles in this volume include the following: "Assessment Challenges in Supported Distance Learning: How the ABE Distance Learning Project Is Implementing the Massachusetts ABE Assessment Policies and Procedures" (Roger Hooper); "The NIFL LINCS Assessment Special Collection" (Dianna Baycich, Tim Ponder); "Making Sense of…

  17. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  18. Scatterer size estimation using the center frequency assessed from ultrasound time domain data.

    PubMed

    Erlöv, Tobias; Jansson, Tomas; Persson, Hans W; Cinthio, Magnus

    2016-10-01

    Scatterer size estimation is useful when characterizing tissue using ultrasound. In all previous studies on scatterer size, the estimations are performed in the frequency domain and are thus subjected to a trade off in time-frequency resolution. This study focused on the feasibility of estimating scatterer size in the time domain using only the ultrasound center frequency, assuming a Gaussian-shaped pulse. A model for frequency normalization was derived and the frequency-dependent attenuation was compensated. Five phantoms with well-defined sizes of spherical glass beads were made and scanned with two different linear array transducers with variable center frequencies. A strong correlation (r = 0.99, p < 10(-19)) between the backscattered center frequency and the product between the wave number and scatterer radius was demonstrated. On average the scatterer diameter was underestimated by 6% ± 24%. These results suggest that estimation of scatterer size is possible using only the center frequency assessed in the time domain.

  19. Development of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62).

    PubMed

    Locke, Benjamin D; Buzolitz, Johanna Soet; Lei, Pui-Wa; Boswell, James F; McAleavey, Andrew A; Sevig, Todd D; Dowis, Jerome D; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Few instruments have been designed specifically to address the needs of college counseling centers. This article reviews existing instruments and presents 4 studies that describe the development and psychometric properties of a new instrument, the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62). Study 1 describes the initial item development, factor analysis, and preliminary scale development steps. Study 2 describes the results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses using data from more than 22,000 clients pooled via a national practice-research network of counseling centers. Studies 3 and 4 provide preliminary evidence of subscales' convergent validity and retest reliability. Results from these 4 studies provide support for the instrument's factor structure, construct validity, and subscale reliabilities for both the total sample and subgroups. Clinical and methodological issues pertaining to the future development of the CCAPS are discussed in the context of a national practice-research network of college counseling centers.

  20. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias towards the plasma cell (PC) fate,...

  1. An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns by Patrick Debroux...Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns Patrick Debroux and Berenice Verdin Survivability/Lethality Analysis... Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  2. Organ assessment and repair centers: The future of transplantation is near

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Bryan A; Black, Sylvester M

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is limited by suitable donor organ availability and the geographic limitations that lead to prolonged ischemic times. Ex vivo organ perfusion is an evolving technology that enables assessment of organ function prior to transplantation. As a byproduct, overall out of body organ times are able to be extended. The future implications organ assessment and repair centers utilizing this technology are discussed. PMID:25032094

  3. Moderators of Psychological and Physical Health in a Military Assessment Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    effects . Indeed, a multitude of different stressors may manifest during the course of the assessment center (e.g., role stressors). Stressors, of...course, are not without their consequences in terms of adverse health effects , psychological and physical (e.g., Beehr, 1995; Jex, 1998). As such...applied researchers are always searching for the often-elusive buffer effect (Cohen & Wills, 1985). In the present study, the Advanced Camp assessment

  4. Assessing the ecosystem services provided by urban green spaces along urban center-edge gradients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jie; Qu, Zelong; Xu, Ronghua; Pan, Kaixuan; Xu, Bin; Min, Yong; Ren, Yuan; Yang, Guofu; Ge, Ying

    2017-09-11

    Urban green spaces provide various ecosystem services, especially cultural services. Previous assessment methods depend either on hypothetic payments for ecosystems or real payments not directly related to ecosystems. In this paper, we established a method for assessing the cultural ecosystem services in any location in urban area using only two variables, green space (ecosystem) and land rent (real payment). We integrated the cultural and the regulating services into the total ecosystem services because urban green spaces provide almost no provisioning services. Results showed that the same area of green spaces near the center provided much higher cultural services than that near the urban edge; the regulating services accounted for 5% to 40% of the total ecosystem services from the center to the edge of urban area; along the center-edge gradient, there was a threshold out which the ecosystem services were lower than the maintenance cost of green spaces.

  5. Environmental Assessment for the California Space Center at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-08

    Botta’s pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae). 3.2.4 Special Status Species Table 3-4 lists federal and state threatened and endangered species and...2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Draft Environmental Assessment for the California Space Center at Vandenberg...3-7  3.2.2  Vegetation Types .................................................................................................3

  6. 2007 accomplishment report for the Eastern and Western forest environmental threat assessment centers

    Treesearch

    Danny C. Lee; Jerome S. Beatty

    2008-01-01

    As chance would have it, the Eastern Forest and Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Centers were created the same year (2005) that the Forest Service celebrated its centennial anniversary as an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The historic birth of the Forest Service provides a nice backdrop to view our own more modest beginnings. Both events...

  7. Design and Discovery in Educational Assessment: Evidence-Centered Design, Psychometrics, and Educational Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Behrens, John T.; Dicerbo, Kristen E.; Levy, Roy

    2012-01-01

    "Evidence-centered design" (ECD) is a comprehensive framework for describing the conceptual, computational and inferential elements of educational assessment. It emphasizes the importance of articulating inferences one wants to make and the evidence needed to support those inferences. At first blush, ECD and "educational data…

  8. Injecting Warm Fuzzies into Cold Systems: Defining, Benchmarking, and Assessing Holistic, Person-Centered Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Holly Brooke

    2010-01-01

    This study examines if and how holistic, person-centered academic advising, based on an integrative framework of educational psychology (Bronfenbrenner), sociology (Weber), and counseling (Rogers) theories, can be fostered, implemented, and assessed at a research university. The study design uses the coding of qualitative data and its translation…

  9. Evidence-Centered Assessment Design and the Advanced Placement Program[R]: A Psychometrician's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of evidence-centered assessment design (ECD) and some general information about of the Advanced Placement (AP[R]) Program. Then the papers in this special issue are discussed, as they relate to the use of ECD in the revision of various AP tests. This paper concludes with some observations about the need to validate…

  10. An Assessment Center for Librarians? What Do Library Managers in the California State University Think?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Henry

    A survey of library directors and assistant/associate directors at the 19 campuses of California State University (CSU) revealed a number of factors mitigating against the implementation of assessment center programs for the development of academic library managers. Respondents were asked in a questionnaire to describe their attitudes toward…

  11. Harrison County Teacher Education Center Needs Assessment Survey: A Second Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, John

    This paper contains an analysis of the data gathered from the 1975-76 Harrison County Teacher Education Center (HCTEC) needs assessment survey. The orginial study analyzed the opinions of 13 client groups concerning the HCTEC. The study concentrated on two major questions: (1) what are the opinions of the 13 client groups about the perceived needs…

  12. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... data analyses, applications, assessments, and interpretations to meet their particular requirements... experiment design, data analysis, and data management support to project managers and produces merged... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.7 Center for...

  13. Estimating the Reliability of Aggregated and Within-Person Centered Scores in Ecological Momentary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Weng, Li-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A procedure for estimating the reliability of test scores in the context of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was proposed to take into account the characteristics of EMA measures. Two commonly used test scores in EMA were considered: the aggregated score (AGGS) and the within-person centered score (WPCS). Conceptually, AGGS and WPCS represent…

  14. Food Sanitation and Safety Self-assessment Instrument for Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1990

    This self-assessment instrument for day care center staff is designed to help caregivers provide safe food to children. The nine sections of the instrument, presented in checklist format, concern: (1) personal hygiene; (2) purchasing, receiving, and inspecting of food; (3) food storage; (4) food service equipment; (5) food preparation; (6) infant…

  15. 34 CFR 668.152 - Administration of tests by assessment centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of tests by assessment centers. 668.152 Section 668.152 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Approval of Independently...

  16. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Services (CEAS). 950.7 Section 950.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.7 Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS). EDIS assists National decisionmakers in solving problems by...

  17. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS). 950.7 Section 950.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  18. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS). 950.7 Section 950.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  19. Development and Initial Validation of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Benjamin D.; McAleavey, Andrew A.; Zhao, Yu; Lei, Pui-Wa; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Li, Hongli; Tate, Robin; Lin, Yu-Chu

    2012-01-01

    A short version of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62) was created via three studies. The final short version (CCAPS-34), which contains 34 items and 7 subscales, demonstrated good discrimination power, support for the proposed factor structure, strong initial convergent validity, and adequate test-retest…

  20. Estimating the Reliability of Aggregated and Within-Person Centered Scores in Ecological Momentary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Weng, Li-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A procedure for estimating the reliability of test scores in the context of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was proposed to take into account the characteristics of EMA measures. Two commonly used test scores in EMA were considered: the aggregated score (AGGS) and the within-person centered score (WPCS). Conceptually, AGGS and WPCS represent…

  1. Using the ACRL Framework to Develop a Student-Centered Model for Program-Level Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammons, Rachel Wilder; Inge, Lindsay Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Information literacy instruction presents a difficult balance between quantity and quality, particularly for large-scale general education courses. This paper discusses the overhaul of the freshman composition instruction program at the University of Maryland Libraries, focusing on the transition from survey assessments to a student-centered and…

  2. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Analysis of World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter for Use in Toxicological Assessment
    John K. McGee1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Glen R. Chee2, Colette M. Prophete2, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Shirley J. Wasson3, Teri L. Conner4, Daniel L. Costa1, and Steph...

  3. Truancy Assessment and Service Centers (TASC): Engaging Elementary School Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Judith L. F.; Thomas, Johanna M.; Lemieux, Catherine M.; Cain, Daphne S.; Guin, Cecile C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews literature describing truancy and its correlates, and it analyzes the current research on truancy prevention programs. Few truancy prevention programs exist in elementary school settings. This article describes Truancy Assessment and Service Centers, a theory-driven program providing case management services to children in 85…

  4. Assessment of Dementia Patients and Their Families: An Ecological-Family-Centered Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Deborah J.

    1993-01-01

    Guides social work practice in assessment of dementia patients and their families using ecological-family-centered (EFC) model of practice. Case presentation illustrates how to apply ECF model while incorporating ethnically sensitive practice principles. Reviews literature on families of dementia patients, outlines intervention plan for family…

  5. Formative Assessment as Educational and Administrative Adhesive: Establishing an Elementary School Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Brad; Black, Sharon; Anstead, Marcia Howell

    1997-01-01

    Describes the collaboration between a university and an elementary school to establish a writing center at the elementary school, staffed by university students (preservice teachers). Describes the crucial role of ongoing formative assessment activity for both elementary students and the university preservice teachers. (SR)

  6. Practicing Learner-Centered Teaching: Pedagogical Design and Assessment of a Second Life Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Shu Z.

    2009-01-01

    Guided by the principles of learner-centered teaching methodology, a Second Life project is designed to engage students in active learning of virtual commerce through hands-on experiences and teamwork in a virtual environment. More importantly, an assessment framework is proposed to evaluate the learning objectives and learning process of the…

  7. Food Sanitation and Safety Self-assessment Instrument for Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1990

    This self-assessment instrument for day care center staff is designed to help caregivers provide safe food to children. The nine sections of the instrument, presented in checklist format, concern: (1) personal hygiene; (2) purchasing, receiving, and inspecting of food; (3) food storage; (4) food service equipment; (5) food preparation; (6) infant…

  8. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Analysis of World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter for Use in Toxicological Assessment
    John K. McGee1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Glen R. Chee2, Colette M. Prophete2, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Shirley J. Wasson3, Teri L. Conner4, Daniel L. Costa1, and Steph...

  9. Truancy Assessment and Service Centers (TASC): Engaging Elementary School Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Judith L. F.; Thomas, Johanna M.; Lemieux, Catherine M.; Cain, Daphne S.; Guin, Cecile C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews literature describing truancy and its correlates, and it analyzes the current research on truancy prevention programs. Few truancy prevention programs exist in elementary school settings. This article describes Truancy Assessment and Service Centers, a theory-driven program providing case management services to children in 85…

  10. Development and Initial Validation of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Benjamin D.; McAleavey, Andrew A.; Zhao, Yu; Lei, Pui-Wa; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Li, Hongli; Tate, Robin; Lin, Yu-Chu

    2012-01-01

    A short version of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62) was created via three studies. The final short version (CCAPS-34), which contains 34 items and 7 subscales, demonstrated good discrimination power, support for the proposed factor structure, strong initial convergent validity, and adequate test-retest…

  11. Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

  12. Current standards of neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Viola Lara; Äikiä, Marja; Del Barrio, Antonio; Boon, Paul; Borbély, Csaba; Bran, Ema; Braun, Kees; Carette, Evelien; Clark, Maria; Cross, Judith Helen; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Francione, Stefano; Gersamia, Anna; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Guekht, Alla; Harrison, Sue; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Heminghyt, Einar; Hirsch, Edouard; Javurkova, Alena; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Kavan, Nicole; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Kirschner, Margarita; Kleitz, Catherine; Kobulashvili, Teia; Kosmidis, Mary H; Kurtish, Selin Yagci; Lesourd, Mathieu; Ljunggren, Sofia; Lossius, Morten Ingvar; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiené, Ruta; Martin-Sanfilippo, Patricia; Marusic, Petr; Miatton, Marijke; Özkara, Çiğdem; Pelle, Federica; Rubboli, Guido; Rudebeck, Sarah; Ryvlin, Philippe; van Schooneveld, Monique; Schmid, Elisabeth; Schmidt, Pia-Magdalena; Seeck, Margitta; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Viggedal, Gerd; Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Witt, Juri-Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    We explored the current practice with respect to the neuropsychological assessment of surgical epilepsy patients in European epilepsy centers, with the aim of harmonizing and establishing common standards. Twenty-six epilepsy centers and members of "E-PILEPSY" (a European pilot network of reference centers in refractory epilepsy and epilepsy surgery), were asked to report the status of neuropsychological assessment in adults and children via two different surveys. There was a consensus among these centers regarding the role of neuropsychology in the presurgical workup. Strong agreement was found on indications (localization, epileptic dysfunctions, adverse drugs effects, and postoperative monitoring) and the domains to be evaluated (memory, attention, executive functions, language, visuospatial skills, intelligence, depression, anxiety, and quality of life). Although 186 different tests are in use throughout these European centers, a core group of tests reflecting a moderate level of agreement could be discerned. Variability exists with regard to indications, protocols, and paradigms for the assessment of hemispheric language dominance. For the tests in use, little published evidence of clinical validity in epilepsy was provided. Participants in the survey reported a need for improvement concerning the validity of the tests, tools for the assessment of everyday functioning and accelerated forgetting, national norms, and test co-normalization. Based on the present survey, we documented a consensus regarding the indications and principles of neuropsychological testing. Despite the variety of tests in use, the survey indicated that there may be a core set of tests chosen based on experience, as well as on published evidence. By combining these findings with the results of an ongoing systematic literature review, we aim for a battery that can be recommended for the use across epilepsy surgical centers in Europe.

  13. Deriving theoretical phase locking values of a coupled cortico-thalamic neural mass model using center manifold reduction.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yutaro; Yamaguchi, Ikuhiro; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2017-02-24

    Cognitive functions such as sensory processing and memory processes lead to phase synchronization in the electroencephalogram or local field potential between different brain regions. There are a lot of computational researches deriving phase locking values (PLVs), which are an index of phase synchronization intensity, from neural models. However, these researches derive PLVs numerically. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on the derivation of a theoretical PLV. In this study, we propose an analytical method for deriving theoretical PLVs from a cortico-thalamic neural mass model described by a delay differential equation. First, the model for generating neural signals is transformed into a normal form of the Hopf bifurcation using center manifold reduction. Second, the normal form is transformed into a phase model that is suitable for analyzing synchronization phenomena. Third, the Fokker-Planck equation of the phase model is derived and the phase difference distribution is obtained. Finally, the PLVs are calculated from the stationary distribution of the phase difference. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed via numerical simulations. Furthermore, we apply the proposed method to a working memory process, and discuss the neurophysiological basis behind the phase synchronization phenomenon. The results demonstrate the importance of decreasing the intensity of independent noise during the working memory process. The proposed method will be of great use in various experimental studies and simulations relevant to phase synchronization, because it enables the effect of neurophysiological changes on PLVs to be analyzed from a mathematical perspective.

  14. Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center, Juneau, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, James; LoVullo, David; Kandt, Alicen

    2016-01-21

    This report summarizes results from the energy efficiency, water efficiency, and renewable energy site assessment of the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center and site in Juneau, Alaska. The assessment is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers Level 2 audit and meets Energy Independence and Security Act requirements. A team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted the assessment with U.S. Forest Service personnel August 19-20, 2015, as part of ongoing efforts by USFS to reduce energy and water use.

  15. MULTI-CENTER PRECISION OF CORTICAL AND TRABECULAR BONE QUALITY MEASURES ASSESSED BY HR-PQCT

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Andrew J.; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Kazakia, Galateia J.; Boutroy, Stephanie; Engelke, Klaus; Patsch, Janina M.; Valentinitsch, Alexander; Liu, Danmei; Szabo, Eva; Bogado, Cesar E.; Zanchetta, Maria Belen; McKay, Heather A.; Shane, Elizabeth; Boyd, Steven K.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Chapurlat, Roland; Khosla, Sundeep; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has recently been introduced as a clinical research tool for in vivo assessment of bone quality. The utility of this technique to address important skeletal health questions requires translation to standardized multi-center data pools. Our goal was to evaluate the feasibility of pooling data in multi-center HR-pQCT imaging trials. Reproducibility imaging experiments were performed using structure and composition-realistic phantoms constructed from cadaveric radii. Single-center precision was determined by repeat scanning over short (<72hrs), intermediate (3–5mo), and long-term intervals (28mo). Multi-center precision was determined by imaging the phantoms at nine different HR-pQCT centers. Least significant change (LSC) and root mean squared coefficient of variation (RMSCV) for each interval and across centers was calculated for bone density, geometry, microstructure, and biomechanical parameters. Single-center short-term RMSCVs were <1% for all parameters except Ct.Th (1.1%), Ct.Th.SD (2.6%), Tb.Sp.SD (1.8%), and porosity measures (6–8%). Intermediate-term RMSCVs were generally not statistically different from short-term values. Long-term variability was significantly greater for all density measures (0.7–2.0%; p < 0.05 vs. short-term) and several structure measures: Ct.Th (3.4%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term), Ct.Po (15.4%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term), and Tb.Th (2.2%; p < 0.01 vs. short-term). Multi-center RMSCVs were also significantly higher than short-term values: 2–4% for density and µFE measures (p < 0.0001), 2.6–5.3% for morphometric measures (p < 0.001), while Ct.Po was 16.2% (p < 0.001). In the absence of subject motion, multi-center precision errors for HR-pQCT parameters were generally less than 5%. Phantom-based multi-center precision was comparable to previously reported in vivo single-center precision errors, although this was approximately 2–5 times worse than ex vivo short

  16. A Review and Evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of Phase IV--Knowledge and Attitudes Survey, Academic and Industrial Personnel. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; And Others

    As Phase IV of a comprehensive evaluation of the NASA-affiliated Langley Research Center's (LaRC) scientific and technical information (STI) program, a study was conducted to assess the usage, importance, and perceived quality of Langley-generated STI among academic and industrial research personnel, and to determine ways in which that information…

  17. Protocol for the China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) Million Persons Project pilot

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiapeng; Xuan, Si; Downing, Nicholas S; Wu, Chaoqun; Li, Li; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Collection of high-quality data from large populations is considered essential to generate knowledge that is critical to an era of precision medicine. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in China and is a suitable focus of an initiative to discover factors that would improve our ability to assess and modify individual risk. Methods and analysis The pilot phase of China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) Million Persons Project is being conducted during 2014–2015 in four provinces across China to demonstrate the feasibility of a population-based assessment. It is designed to screen 0.4 million community-dwelling residents aged 40–75 years with measurements of blood pressure, height and weight, a lipid blood test, and a questionnaire on cardiovascular-related health status. Participants identified at high risk of CVD receive further health assessments, including ECG, ultrasound scan, blood and urine analysis, and a questionnaire on lifestyle and medical history. Collection of blood and urine samples is used to establish a biobank. High-risk subjects are also counselled with suggestions regarding potential lifestyle changes. In addition, high-risk subjects are followed-up either in a return clinic visit or by telephone interview, with measurement of blood pressure, weight, ECG, and a questionnaire on survival status, hospitalisations and lifestyle. The first 0.1 million participants screened were used to conduct a preliminary analysis, with information on baseline characteristics, health-related behaviours, anthropometric variables, medical history, and prevalence of high-risk subjects. Ethics and dissemination The central ethics committee at the China National Center for Cardiovascular Disease (NCCD) approved the pilot. Written informed consent is obtained from all participants on entry into the project. Findings will be disseminated in future peer-reviewed papers and will inform strategies

  18. Consumer phase risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in deli meats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Mokhtari, Amirhossein; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Morales, Roberta A; Cates, Sheryl C; Cowen, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The foodborne disease risk associated with the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has been the subject of recent efforts in quantitative microbial risk assessment. Building upon one of these efforts undertaken jointly by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the purpose of this work was to expand on the consumer phase of the risk assessment to focus on handling practices in the home. One-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation was used to model variability in growth and cross-contamination of L. monocytogenes during food storage and preparation of deli meats. Simulations approximated that 0.3% of the servings were contaminated with >10(4) CFU/g of L. monocytogenes at the time of consumption. The estimated mean risk associated with the consumption of deli meats for the intermediate-age population was approximately 7 deaths per 10(11) servings. Food handling in homes increased the estimated mean mortality by 10(6)-fold. Of all the home food-handling practices modeled, inadequate storage, particularly refrigeration temperatures, provided the greatest contribution to increased risk. The impact of cross-contamination in the home was considerably less. Adherence to USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service recommendations for consumer handling of ready-to-eat foods substantially reduces the risk of listeriosis.

  19. Liquid versus solid phase bioassays for dredged material toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martínez, M C; Fernández, N; Forja, J M; DelValls, T A

    2007-05-01

    Since 1994 the results of the analyses of key chemical compounds (trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and the comparison with the corresponding sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) are used in decision-making for dredged material management in Spain. Nonetheless in the last decades a tiered testing approach is promoted for assessing the physical and chemical characteristics of dredged sediments and their potential biological effects in the environment. Bioassays have been used for sediment toxicity assessment in Spain but few or no experiences are reported on harbour sediments. We studied the incidence of toxicity in the 7 d bioassay using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) and the 48 h bioassay using sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) embryos over a series of experiments employing 22 different elutriates. The relative performance of this exposure phase was not comparable to data on the 10-d acute toxicity test using the burrowing amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina, carried out on the whole sediments. These results evidence the importance of the exposure route and the test selected in decision-making, as the toxicity registered for the undiluted elutriates was largely due to the different solubility of sediment-bound contaminants. This work and other studies indicate that for many sediments, a complete battery of test is recommended together with physico-chemical analyses to decide whether dredged sediments are suitable for open water disposal or not.

  20. New Operational Phase of KOERI-Regional Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necmioǧlu, Öcal; Özer Sözdinler, Ceren; Yılmazer, Mehmet; Köseoǧlu, Ayşegül; Turhan, Fatih; Çomoǧlu, Mustafa; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Pınar, Ali; Kekovalı, Kıvanç

    2017-04-01

    This presentation provides a status update on the tsunami warning related activities of the Bogazici University - Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute - Regional Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring Center (KOERI-RETMC). RETMC is providing services in the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas since 1 July 2012 and has been accredited as a Tsunami Service Provider of ICG/NEAMTWS at its 13th session during 26-28 September 2016 in Bucharest, Romania. Second radar-type tide-gauge has been installed in Bozcaada-Çanakkale within the framework of "Inexpensive Device for Sea-Level Measurement" (IDSL) initiative offered as donation by the EC-JRC and planning is in progress for the possible installation of two more IDSLs in the Aegean Sea coast of Turkey. The work towards the creation of Tsunami Inundation Maps at 38 Tsunami Forecast Points in Turkey has been finalized. Early-Est (Lomax and Michelini) has been installed at the RETMC and its operational testing has begun. This work is partially funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839. We would like to thank the Ministry of Development (of Republic of Turkey) for its support to on-going activities of RETMC. We also would like to thank to EC-JRC and Dr. Alessandro Annunziato for their continuous support in the operational activities of RETMC and IDSL initiative, and to Anthony Lomax for his cooperation and support in the operationalization of Early-Est.

  1. Center for Molecular Electronics, University of Missouri, St. Louis. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Missouri, St. Louis to proceed with the detailed design and construction of the proposed Center for Molecular Electronics. The proposed Center would consist of laboratories and offices housed in a three-story building on the University campus. The proposed modular laboratories would be adaptable for research activities principally related to physics, chemistry, and electrical engineering. Proposed research would include the development and application of thin-film materials, semi-conductors, electronic sensors and devices, and high-performance polymers. Specific research for the proposed Center has not yet been formulated, therefore, specific procedures for any particular process or study cannot be described at this time. The proposed construction site is an uncontaminated panel of land located on the University campus. This report contains information about the environmental assessment that was performed in accordance with this project.

  2. Video calls from lay bystanders to dispatch centers - risk assessment of information security

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Video calls from mobile phones can improve communication during medical emergencies. Lay bystanders can be instructed and supervised by health professionals at Emergency Medical Communication Centers. Before implementation of video mobile calls in emergencies, issues of information security should be addressed. Methods Information security was assessed for risk, based on the information security standard ISO/IEC 27005:2008. A multi-professional team used structured brainstorming to find threats to the information security aspects confidentiality, quality, integrity, and availability. Results Twenty security threats of different risk levels were identified and analyzed. Solutions were proposed to reduce the risk level. Conclusions Given proper implementation, we found no risks to information security that would advocate against the use of video calls between lay bystanders and Emergency Medical Communication Centers. The identified threats should be used as input to formal requirements when planning and implementing video calls from mobile phones for these call centers. PMID:21958387

  3. Video calls from lay bystanders to dispatch centers - risk assessment of information security.

    PubMed

    Bolle, Stein R; Hasvold, Per; Henriksen, Eva

    2011-09-30

    Video calls from mobile phones can improve communication during medical emergencies. Lay bystanders can be instructed and supervised by health professionals at Emergency Medical Communication Centers. Before implementation of video mobile calls in emergencies, issues of information security should be addressed. Information security was assessed for risk, based on the information security standard ISO/IEC 27005:2008. A multi-professional team used structured brainstorming to find threats to the information security aspects confidentiality, quality, integrity, and availability. Twenty security threats of different risk levels were identified and analyzed. Solutions were proposed to reduce the risk level. Given proper implementation, we found no risks to information security that would advocate against the use of video calls between lay bystanders and Emergency Medical Communication Centers. The identified threats should be used as input to formal requirements when planning and implementing video calls from mobile phones for these call centers.

  4. Effect of SLM pixelation on two-photon fluorescence by applying an off-centered quadratic spectral phase mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, R. J.; Siqueira, J. P.; Mendonça, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) have become a valuable tool to shape ultrashort laser pulses, which have found innumerous applications in different areas of ultrafast science. Despite the fact that this family of devices can be used to produce almost any arbitrary pulse shape, as long as enough bandwidth is available, there are limitations related to their discrete nature that may lead to distortions in the expected pulse shape. Here we investigate such collateral temporal distortions by quantifying the effect imposed by the discrete nature (pixelation) of liquid-crystal-based SLMs on the two-photon excited fluorescence signal of a conjugated polymer, when the central position of a quadratic spectral phase mask is scanned across the laser bandwidth. We conclude that the observed temporal distortions are related to replica pulses generated by an interplay between the additional linear phase resultant of an off-centered quadratic phase mask and pixelation of the applied phase mask.

  5. Assessing readiness for establishing a farmers' market at a community health center.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Darcy A; Whiteside, Y Omar; Brandt, Heather M; Young, Vicki; Friedman, Daniela B; Hébert, James R

    2012-02-01

    Farmers' markets are community health promotion interventions that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. As farmers' markets continue to develop, it is important to strategically locate them in settings that are accessible to populations disparately affected by health disparities. One potential setting is a community health center. The goal of this analysis is to extend existing research on community readiness to identify indicators of preparedness among community health centers for establishing onsite farmers' markets. The sampling frame for the readiness assessment included all community health centers in South Carolina (N = 20) representing 163 practice sites. Data collection included two brief online surveys, in-depth key informant interviews, and secondary analysis of contextual data. Five themes related to readiness for establishing a farmers market at a community health center were identified: capacity, social capital, awareness of health problems and solutions, logistical factors, and sustainability. Findings from this study provide guidance to researchers and community health center staff as they explore the development of environmental interventions focused on reducing diet-related health conditions by improving access to healthy foods.

  6. The Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS): Merging clinical practice, training, and research.

    PubMed

    Youn, Soo Jeong; Castonguay, Louis G; Xiao, Henry; Janis, Rebecca; McAleavey, Andrew A; Lockard, Allison J; Locke, Benjamin D; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this article is to present information about a standardized multidimensional measure of psychological symptoms, the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS; Locke et al., 2011; Locke, McAleavey, et al., 2012; McAleavey, Nordberg, Hayes, et al., 2012), developed to assess difficulties specific to college students' mental health. We provide (a) a brief review and summary of the psychometric and research support for the CCAPS; (b) examples of the use of the CCAPS for various purposes, including clinical, training, policy, and counseling center advocacy; and (c) implications of the integration of routine outcome monitoring and feedback for the future of training, research, and clinical practice. In particular, the article emphasizes how the assimilation of and symbiotic relationship between research and practice can address the scientist-practitioner gap.

  7. Conceptual Changes and Their Implications for Performance Assessment. Recent Developments in Methodology for Administrator Assessment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Dale L.

    Theory and implications for methods of assessing administrative performance in simulated exercises are presented. The rationale is given for the following: (1) developing simulated exercises; (2) measuring behaviors exhibited during the exercises; (3) training evaluators; (4) combining information across exercises; and (5) storing and retrieving…

  8. A Rationale for Competency-Based Assessment Using the Assessment Center Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyrs, Thomas E., Jr.; Grussing, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of commonly used forms of measurement are reviewed, and an approach for assessing overall competence of the pharmacy student is discussed conceptually, based on a multiple-measurement method involving review of student performance in real practice contexts and observation in simulations of practice. (Author/LBH)

  9. Using Self-Assessment to Assess the Effectiveness of Learner Centered Instructional Design and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary research in pedagogy provides evidence for use of active learning strategies in the classroom. It is important that faculty demonstrate effectiveness across the spectrum of teaching activities, as well as effectiveness in meeting the learning goals of students. This paper illustrates how self-assessment can be used to evaluate the…

  10. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-04-03

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

  11. Integrated Assessments and Policy Evaluation group and Center for International Energy Development. Program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes programmatic accomplishments since 1981 in two staff groups of the Energy and Environmental Systems Division: the Integrated Assessments and Policy Evaluation (IAPE) group and the Center for International Energy Development (CIED). This summary, presented in Sections 2-4, provides background information on major accomplishments. The introduction presents an overview of staffing and programs, and Section 5 lists recent publications. 38 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Healthy caregivers-healthy children (HC2) phase 2: Integrating culturally sensitive childhood obesity prevention strategies into childcare center policies.

    PubMed

    Messiah, Sarah E; Lebron, Cynthia; Moise, Rhoda; Sunil Mathew, M; Sardinas, Krystal; Chang, Catherina; Palenzuela, Joanne; Walsh, Jennifer; Shelnutt, Karla P; Spector, Rachel; Altare, Fiorella; Natale, Ruby

    2017-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of obesity among preschool-aged children, most states lack childcare center (CCC) nutrition and physical activity policies. The Healthy Caregivers, Healthy Children (HC) Phase 2 project is examining the relationship between the CCC nutrition and physical activity environment and child dietary intake/physical activity patterns and body mass index (BMI). A total of 24 "Quality Counts" (Miami Dade County, Florida's Quality Rating Improvement System [QRIS)]) CCCs serving low resource families with ≥50 2-to-5year olds attending have been randomized to either intervention (n=12) or control (n=12). The HC2 intervention arm CCCs receive implementation of a daily curricula for (1) teachers/parents; (2) children; (3) snack, beverage, physical activity, and screen time policies; and (4) technical assistance with menu modifications. Control arm schools receive an attention control safety curriculum. HC2 is delivered once a month in year 1, quarterly in year 2 and will be disseminated throughout the Quality Counts network in year 3. Primary outcome measures include the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation tool (EPAO), standardized dietary intake and physical activity patterns surveys, and child BMI. The 'Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM)' framework will guide the interpretation of outcome measures. CCCs are in need of evidence-based standardized nutrition and physical activity policies. The intersection of RE-AIM and early childhood obesity prevention in the childcare setting could generate robust and new information to the field about potential barriers, facilitators, adoption, and sustainability in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment team report on flight-critical systems research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewiorek, Daniel P. (Compiler); Dunham, Janet R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The quality, coverage, and distribution of effort of the flight-critical systems research program at NASA Langley Research Center was assessed. Within the scope of the Assessment Team's review, the research program was found to be very sound. All tasks under the current research program were at least partially addressing the industry needs. General recommendations made were to expand the program resources to provide additional coverage of high priority industry needs, including operations and maintenance, and to focus the program on an actual hardware and software system that is under development.

  14. Clinical Validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62): Further Evaluation and Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavey, Andrew A.; Nordberg, Samuel S.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Lockard, Allison J.

    2012-01-01

    Self-report instruments of psychological symptoms are increasingly used in counseling centers but rely on rigorous evaluation of their clinical validity. Three studies reported here (total N = 26,886) investigated the validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62; Locke et al., 2011) as an assessment and…

  15. The development of a clinical outcomes survey research application: Assessment CenterSM

    PubMed Central

    Rothrock, Nan E.; Hanrahan, Rachel T.; Jansky, Liz J.; Harniss, Mark; Riley, William

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The National Institutes of Health sponsored Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aimed to create item banks and computerized adaptive tests (CATs) across multiple domains for individuals with a range of chronic diseases. Purpose Web-based software was created to enable a researcher to create study-specific Websites that could administer PROMIS CATs and other instruments to research participants or clinical samples. This paper outlines the process used to develop a user-friendly, free, Web-based resource (Assessment CenterSM) for storage, retrieval, organization, sharing, and administration of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments. Methods Joint Application Design (JAD) sessions were conducted with representatives from numerous institutions in order to supply a general wish list of features. Use Cases were then written to ensure that end user expectations matched programmer specifications. Program development included daily programmer “scrum” sessions, weekly Usability Acceptability Testing (UAT) and continuous Quality Assurance (QA) activities pre- and post-release. Results Assessment Center includes features that promote instrument development including item histories, data management, and storage of statistical analysis results. Conclusions This case study of software development highlights the collection and incorporation of user input throughout the development process. Potential future applications of Assessment Center in clinical research are discussed. PMID:20306332

  16. The development of a clinical outcomes survey research application: Assessment Center.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard; Rothrock, Nan E; Hanrahan, Rachel T; Jansky, Liz J; Harniss, Mark; Riley, William

    2010-06-01

    The National Institutes of Health sponsored Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aimed to create item banks and computerized adaptive tests (CATs) across multiple domains for individuals with a range of chronic diseases. Web-based software was created to enable a researcher to create study-specific Websites that could administer PROMIS CATs and other instruments to research participants or clinical samples. This paper outlines the process used to develop a user-friendly, free, Web-based resource (Assessment Center) for storage, retrieval, organization, sharing, and administration of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments. Joint Application Design (JAD) sessions were conducted with representatives from numerous institutions in order to supply a general wish list of features. Use Cases were then written to ensure that end user expectations matched programmer specifications. Program development included daily programmer "scrum" sessions, weekly Usability Acceptability Testing (UAT) and continuous Quality Assurance (QA) activities pre- and post-release. Assessment Center includes features that promote instrument development including item histories, data management, and storage of statistical analysis results. This case study of software development highlights the collection and incorporation of user input throughout the development process. Potential future applications of Assessment Center in clinical research are discussed.

  17. A community-centered model of the academic health department and implications for assessment.

    PubMed

    Livingood, William C; Goldhagen, Jeff; Bryant, Thomas; Wood, David; Winterbauer, Nancy; Woodhouse, Lynn D

    2007-01-01

    The academic health department, also referred to as the teaching health department, is receiving increased attention as an organizational structure to enhance public health workforce development. Traditionally, academic institutions have been viewed by major funders, and reported in the literature, to be the innovators of these partnerships, in part to extend the academic institution's education role in the workplace. However, the role of the local health department as innovator is emerging with implications beyond workforce development. This report illustrates how a local agency-initiated community-centered approach to an academic health department enhances the core public health function of assessment, a frequently underdeveloped function at the local level. This agency-initiated, community-centered academic health department model builds assessment capacity through a partnership that integrates academic research and public health surveillance capacity to provide comprehensive assessment, including community assessment, community-based participatory research, data analysis, and program evaluation. This organizational structure, focused on systems approaches to building community capacity rather than focusing on disease categories or high-risk populations, illustrates how a local health department can substantially enhance its assessment capacity using available resources.

  18. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  19. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  20. Geochronology of Mount Morning, Antarctica: two-phase evolution of a long-lived trachyte-basanite-phonolite eruptive center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Adam P.; Cooper, Alan F.; Dunlap, W. James

    2010-04-01

    Mount Morning is a Cenozoic, alkaline eruptive center in the south-west Ross Sea, Antarctica. New ages on 17 Mount Morning volcanic rocks (combined with 34 existing ages) allows division of Mount Morning volcanism into two phases, erupted between at least 18.7 Ma and 11.4 Ma, and 6.13 and 0.02 Ma. The position of Mount Morning on the active West Antarctic Rift System within the stationary Antarctic plate is a key factor in the eruptive center’s longevity. The earliest, mildly alkaline, Phase I volcanism comprises predominantly trachytic rocks produced by combined assimilation and fractional crystallization processes over 7.3 m.y. Strongly alkaline Phase II volcanism is dominated by a basanite - phonolite lineage, with the youngest (post last glacial maximum) activity dominated by small volume primitive basanite eruptions. The evolution from mildly to strongly alkaline chemistry between phases reflects magma residence time in the crust, the degree of mantle melting, or the degree of magma—country-rock interaction. Phase I magmatism occurred over a comparable area to the present-day, Phase II shield. The 5.2 m.y. volcanic hiatus separating Phase I and II coincides with a cycle of eruption and glacial erosion at the nearby Minna Bluff eruptive center. Mount Morning is the likely source of volcanic detritus in Cape Roberts drill-core (about 24.1 to 18.4 Ma) and in ANDRILL drill-hole 1B (about 13.6 Ma), located 170 km north and 105 km north-east respectively, of Mount Morning. Based upon the timing of eruptions and high heat-flow, Mount Morning should be considered a dormant volcano.

  1. Control of oscillation periods and phase durations in half-center central pattern generators: a comparative mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Daun, Silvia; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2009-08-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) consisting of interacting groups of neurons drive a variety of repetitive, rhythmic behaviors in invertebrates and vertebrates, such as arise in locomotion, respiration, mastication, scratching, and so on. These CPGs are able to generate rhythmic activity in the absence of afferent feedback or rhythmic inputs. However, functionally relevant CPGs must adaptively respond to changing demands, manifested as changes in oscillation period or in relative phase durations in response to variations in non-patterned inputs or drives. Although many half-center CPG models, composed of symmetric units linked by reciprocal inhibition yet varying in their intrinsic cellular properties, have been proposed, the precise oscillatory mechanisms operating in most biological CPGs remain unknown. Using numerical simulations and phase-plane analysis, we comparatively investigated how the intrinsic cellular features incorporated in different CPG models, such as subthreshold activation based on a slowly inactivating persistent sodium current, adaptation based on slowly activating calcium-dependent potassium current, or post-inhibitory rebound excitation, can contribute to the control of oscillation period and phase durations in response to changes in excitatory external drive to one or both half-centers. Our analysis shows that both the sensitivity of oscillation period to alterations of excitatory drive and the degree to which the duration of each phase can be separately controlled depend strongly on the intrinsic cellular mechanisms involved in rhythm generation and phase transitions. In particular, the CPG formed from units incorporating a slowly inactivating persistent sodium current shows the greatest range of oscillation periods and the greatest degree of independence in phase duration control by asymmetric inputs. These results are explained based on geometric analysis of the phase plane structures corresponding to the dynamics for each CPG type

  2. Assessment of global phase uncertainty in case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2009-01-01

    Background In haplotype-based candidate gene studies a problem is that the genotype data are unphased, which results in haplotype ambiguity. The measure [1] quantifies haplotype predictability from genotype data. It is computed for each individual haplotype, and for a measure of global relative efficiency a minimum value is suggested. Alternatively, we developed methods directly based on the information content of haplotype frequency estimates to obtain global relative efficiency measures: and based on A- and D-optimality, respectively. All three methods are designed for single populations; they can be applied in cases only, controls only or the whole data. Therefore they are not necessarily optimal for haplotype testing in case-control studies. Results A new global relative efficiency measure was derived to maximize power of a simple test statistic that compares haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Application to real data showed that our proposed method gave a clear and summarizing measure for the case-control study conducted. Additionally this measure might be used for selection of individuals, who have the highest potential for improving power by resolving phase ambiguity. Conclusion Instead of using relative efficiency measure for cases only, controls only or their combined data, we link uncertainty measure to case-control studies directly. Hence, our global efficiency measure might be useful to assess whether data are informative or have enough power for estimation of a specific haplotype risk. PMID:19751505

  3. Assessment of global phase uncertainty in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2009-09-14

    In haplotype-based candidate gene studies a problem is that the genotype data are unphased, which results in haplotype ambiguity. The R(h)(2) measure 1 quantifies haplotype predictability from genotype data. It is computed for each individual haplotype, and for a measure of global relative efficiency a minimum R(h)(2) value is suggested. Alternatively, we developed methods directly based on the information content of haplotype frequency estimates to obtain global relative efficiency measures: R(A)(2) and R(D)(2) based on A- and D-optimality, respectively. All three methods are designed for single populations; they can be applied in cases only, controls only or the whole data. Therefore they are not necessarily optimal for haplotype testing in case-control studies. A new global relative efficiency measure R(T)(2) was derived to maximize power of a simple test statistic that compares haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Application to real data showed that our proposed method R(T)(2) gave a clear and summarizing measure for the case-control study conducted. Additionally this measure might be used for selection of individuals, who have the highest potential for improving power by resolving phase ambiguity. Instead of using relative efficiency measure for cases only, controls only or their combined data, we link uncertainty measure to case-control studies directly. Hence, our global efficiency measure might be useful to assess whether data are informative or have enough power for estimation of a specific haplotype risk.

  4. Earth Observations to Assess Impact of Hurricane Katrina on John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, William D.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2007-01-01

    The peril from hurricanes to Space Operations Centers is real and is forecast to continue; Katrina, Rita, and Wilma of 2005 and Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne of 2004 are sufficient motivation for NASA to develop a multi-Center plan for preparedness and response. As was demonstrated at SSC (Stennis Space Center) in response to Hurricane Katrina, NASA Centers are efficiently activated as local command centers, playing host to Federal and State agencies and first responders to coordinate and provide evacuation, relocation, response, and recovery activities. Remote sensing decision support provides critical insight for managing NASA infrastructure and for assisting Center decision makers. Managers require geospatial information to manage the federal city. Immediately following Katrina, SSC s power and network connections were disabled, hardware was inoperative, technical staff was displaced and/or out of contact, and graphical decision support tools were non-existent or less than fully effective. Despite this circumstance, SSC EOC (Emergency Operations Center) implemented response operations to assess damage and to activate recovery plans. To assist Center Managers, the NASA ASP (Applied Sciences Program) made its archive of high-resolution data over the site available. In the weeks and months after the immediate crisis, NASA supplemented this data with high-resolution, post-Katrina imagery over SSC and much of the affected coastal areas. Much of the high-resolution imagery was made available through the Department of Defense Clear View contract and was distributed through U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science "Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response" Web site. By integrating multiple image data types with other information sources, ASP applied an all-source solutions approach to develop decision support tools that enabled managers to respond to critical issues, such as expedient access to infrastructure and deployment of resources

  5. Earth Observations to Assess Impact of Hurricane Katrina on John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, William D.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2007-01-01

    The peril from hurricanes to Space Operations Centers is real and is forecast to continue; Katrina, Rita, and Wilma of 2005 and Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne of 2004 are sufficient motivation for NASA to develop a multi-Center plan for preparedness and response. As was demonstrated at SSC (Stennis Space Center) in response to Hurricane Katrina, NASA Centers are efficiently activated as local command centers, playing host to Federal and State agencies and first responders to coordinate and provide evacuation, relocation, response, and recovery activities. Remote sensing decision support provides critical insight for managing NASA infrastructure and for assisting Center decision makers. Managers require geospatial information to manage the federal city. Immediately following Katrina, SSC s power and network connections were disabled, hardware was inoperative, technical staff was displaced and/or out of contact, and graphical decision support tools were non-existent or less than fully effective. Despite this circumstance, SSC EOC (Emergency Operations Center) implemented response operations to assess damage and to activate recovery plans. To assist Center Managers, the NASA ASP (Applied Sciences Program) made its archive of high-resolution data over the site available. In the weeks and months after the immediate crisis, NASA supplemented this data with high-resolution, post-Katrina imagery over SSC and much of the affected coastal areas. Much of the high-resolution imagery was made available through the Department of Defense Clear View contract and was distributed through U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science "Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response" Web site. By integrating multiple image data types with other information sources, ASP applied an all-source solutions approach to develop decision support tools that enabled managers to respond to critical issues, such as expedient access to infrastructure and deployment of resources

  6. Installation Restoration at Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Phase I. Detailed Survey and Alternatives Assessment - Environmental Impact Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    PROJECT MANAGER FOR CHEMICAL DEMILITARIZATION AND INSTALLATION RESTORATION INSTALLATION RESTORATION AT FRANKFORD ARSENAL PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA PHASE 1...Frankford Arsenal Caretaker Activity Chemical Demilitarization and Installation Restoration SUMMARY SHEET INSTALLATION RESTORATION AT FRANKFORD... ARSENAL PHILADELPHIA, PENNYSLVANIA PHASE 1 - DETAILED SURVEY AND ALTERNATIVES ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Contact for additional information

  7. Construction of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action of granting a site use permit to construct and operate a conference center on an approximately 70-acre tract of land on the Savannah River Site (SRS). While the proposed action requires an administrative decision by DOE, this EA reviews the linked action of physically constructing and operating a conference center. The SRS is a DOE-owned nuclear production facility encompassing approximately 200,000 acres in southwestern South Carolina. The proposed conference center would have an area of approximately 4,000 square feet, and would infrequently accommodate as many as 150 people, with the average being about 20 people per day. In addition to the No-Action alternative, under which the Research Foundation would not require the 70-acre tract of SRS land for a conference center, this EA considers site preservation. Under Site Preservation only minimal activities necessary to the SRS mission would occur, thereby establishing the lower limits of environmental consequences. A review conducted under the SRS permitting process identified no other forms of possible site development. Similarly, SRS areas identified in the Nuclear Complex Reconfiguration Site Proposal (DOE, 199la) do not include the conference center site area in proposed weapons complex reconfiguration activities. As a consequence, this EA does not consider other forms of possible site development as alternatives. The potential environmental consequences associated with the action of constructing and operating a conference center include impacts to cultural resources and impacts from construction activities, primarily related to land clearing (5 to 10 acres) and providing access to the site.

  8. Assessing patient-centered care: one approach to health disparities education.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, LuAnn; Fung, Cha-Chi; May, Win; Elliott, Donna

    2010-05-01

    Patient-centered care has been described as one approach to cultural competency education that could reduce racial and ethnic health disparities by preparing providers to deliver care that is respectful and responsive to the preferences of each patient. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of a curriculum in teaching patient-centered care (PCC) behaviors to medical students, we drew on the work of Kleinman, Eisenberg, and Good to develop a scale that could be embedded across cases in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). To compare the reliability, validity, and feasibility of an embedded patient-centered care scale with the use of a single culturally challenging case in measuring students' use of PCC behaviors as part of a comprehensive OSCE. A total of 322 students from two California medical schools participated in the OSCE as beginning seniors. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess the internal consistency of each approach. Construct validity was addressed by establishing convergent and divergent validity using the cultural challenge case total score and OSCE component scores. Feasibility assessment considered cost and training needs for the standardized patients (SPs). Medical students demonstrated a moderate level of patient-centered skill (mean = 63%, SD = 11%). The PCC Scale demonstrated an acceptable level of internal consistency (alpha = 0.68) over the single case scale (alpha = 0.60). Both convergent and divergent validities were established through low to moderate correlation coefficients. The insertion of PCC items across multiple cases in a comprehensive OSCE can provide a reliable estimate of students' use of PCC behaviors without incurring extra costs associated with implementing a special cross-cultural OSCE. This approach is particularly feasible when an OSCE is already part of the standard assessment of clinical skills. Reliability may be increased with an additional investment in SP training.

  9. A Human-Centered Design Methodology to Enhance the Usability, Human Factors, and User Experience of Connected Health Systems: A Three-Phase Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Harte, Richard; Glynn, Liam; Rodríguez-Molinero, Alejandro; Baker, Paul MA; Scharf, Thomas; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2017-01-01

    Background Design processes such as human-centered design, which involve the end user throughout the product development and testing process, can be crucial in ensuring that the product meets the needs and capabilities of the user, particularly in terms of safety and user experience. The structured and iterative nature of human-centered design can often present a challenge when design teams are faced with the necessary, rapid, product development life cycles associated with the competitive connected health industry. Objective We wanted to derive a structured methodology that followed the principles of human-centered design that would allow designers and developers to ensure that the needs of the user are taken into account throughout the design process, while maintaining a rapid pace of development. In this paper, we present the methodology and its rationale before outlining how it was applied to assess and enhance the usability, human factors, and user experience of a connected health system known as the Wireless Insole for Independent and Safe Elderly Living (WIISEL) system, a system designed to continuously assess fall risk by measuring gait and balance parameters associated with fall risk. Methods We derived a three-phase methodology. In Phase 1 we emphasized the construction of a use case document. This document can be used to detail the context of use of the system by utilizing storyboarding, paper prototypes, and mock-ups in conjunction with user interviews to gather insightful user feedback on different proposed concepts. In Phase 2 we emphasized the use of expert usability inspections such as heuristic evaluations and cognitive walkthroughs with small multidisciplinary groups to review the prototypes born out of the Phase 1 feedback. Finally, in Phase 3 we emphasized classical user testing with target end users, using various metrics to measure the user experience and improve the final prototypes. Results We report a successful implementation of the

  10. A Human-Centered Design Methodology to Enhance the Usability, Human Factors, and User Experience of Connected Health Systems: A Three-Phase Methodology.

    PubMed

    Harte, Richard; Glynn, Liam; Rodríguez-Molinero, Alejandro; Baker, Paul Ma; Scharf, Thomas; Quinlan, Leo R; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2017-03-16

    Design processes such as human-centered design, which involve the end user throughout the product development and testing process, can be crucial in ensuring that the product meets the needs and capabilities of the user, particularly in terms of safety and user experience. The structured and iterative nature of human-centered design can often present a challenge when design teams are faced with the necessary, rapid, product development life cycles associated with the competitive connected health industry. We wanted to derive a structured methodology that followed the principles of human-centered design that would allow designers and developers to ensure that the needs of the user are taken into account throughout the design process, while maintaining a rapid pace of development. In this paper, we present the methodology and its rationale before outlining how it was applied to assess and enhance the usability, human factors, and user experience of a connected health system known as the Wireless Insole for Independent and Safe Elderly Living (WIISEL) system, a system designed to continuously assess fall risk by measuring gait and balance parameters associated with fall risk. We derived a three-phase methodology. In Phase 1 we emphasized the construction of a use case document. This document can be used to detail the context of use of the system by utilizing storyboarding, paper prototypes, and mock-ups in conjunction with user interviews to gather insightful user feedback on different proposed concepts. In Phase 2 we emphasized the use of expert usability inspections such as heuristic evaluations and cognitive walkthroughs with small multidisciplinary groups to review the prototypes born out of the Phase 1 feedback. Finally, in Phase 3 we emphasized classical user testing with target end users, using various metrics to measure the user experience and improve the final prototypes. We report a successful implementation of the methodology for the design and development

  11. Simple metal binary phases based on the body centered cubic structure: Electronic origin of distortions and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, Valentina F.; Afonikova, Nataliya S.

    2013-01-01

    Binary alloy phases of the noble metals with the main group elements are analyzed in relation to the body centered cubic structure with distortions, vacancies and superlattices. The stability of these distorted phases is studied in terms of the Fermi sphere-Brillouin-Jones zone interaction within the nearly free-electron model in order to understand the importance of the band structure energy contribution to the overall crystal energy. Examination of Brillouin-Jones zone configurations with respect to the Fermi sphere for several representative phases has shown how significant the electron energy contribution is in forming the distorted structures with superlattices and ordered vacancies. This approach may be useful for understanding the complex structures recently found in compressed simple alkali metals.

  12. NCC simulation model. Phase 2: Simulating the operations of the Network Control Center and NCC message manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Gill, Tepper; Charles, Mary

    1994-01-01

    The network control center (NCC) provides scheduling, monitoring, and control of services to the NASA space network. The space network provides tracking and data acquisition services to many low-earth orbiting spacecraft. This report describes the second phase in the development of simulation models for the FCC. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network.Phase two focuses on the implementation of the network message dialogs and the resources controlled by the NCC. Performance measures were developed along with selected indicators of the NCC's operational effectiveness.The NCC performance indicators were defined in terms of the following: (1) transfer rate, (2) network delay, (3) channel establishment time, (4) line turn around time, (5) availability, (6) reliability, (7) accuracy, (8) maintainability, and (9) security. An NCC internal and external message manual is appended to this report.

  13. Formation of prismatic loops from C15 Laves phase interstitial clusters in body-centered cubic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-03-01

    This Letter reports the transition of C15 phase self-interstitial clusters to loops in body-centered-cubic Iron. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the relative stabilities of difference interstitial cluster configurations including C15 phase structure and <100> and <111>/2 loops. Within a certain size range, C15 cluster are found more stable than loops, and the relative stabilities are reversed beyond that range. In accordance to the crossover in relative stabilities, C15 clusters may grow by absorbing individual interstitials at small sizes and transitions into loops eventually. The transition takes place by nucleation and reaction of <111>/2 loop segments. These observations explain the absence of C15 phase interstitial clusters predicted by density-functional-theory calculations in previous experimental observations. More importantly, the current results provide a new formation mechanism of <100> loops which requires no interaction of loops.

  14. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-03-06

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the

  15. Characterization of anthropometric assessment studies of Brazilian children attending daycare centers

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; de Menezes, Tarciana Nobre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To obtain an overview of available information on the anthropometric assessment of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. Data source: A literature search was carried out in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases of studies published from 1990 to 2013 in Portuguese and English languages. The following search strategy was used: (nutritional status OR anthropometrics OR malnutrition OR overweight) AND daycare centers, as well as the equivalent terms in Portuguese. In the case of MEDLINE search, the descriptor Brazil was also used. Data synthesis: It was verified that the 33 studies included in the review were comparable from a methodological point of view. The studies, in general, were characterized by their restrictive nature, geographical concentration and dispersion of results in relation to time. Considering the studies published from 2010 onwards, low prevalence of acute malnutrition and significant rates of stunting and overweight were observed. Conclusions: Despite the limitations, considering the most recent studies that used the WHO growth curves (2006), it is suggested that the anthropometric profile of Brazilian children attending daycare centers is characterized by a nutritional transition process, with significant prevalence of overweight and short stature. We emphasize the need to develop a multicenter survey that will more accurately define the current anthropometric nutritional status of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. PMID:26553574

  16. [Characterization of anthropometric assessment studies of Brazilian children attending daycare centers].

    PubMed

    Figueroa Pedraza, Dixis; Menezes, Tarciana Nobre de

    2016-06-01

    To obatin an overview of available information on the anthropometric assessment of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. A literature search was carried out in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases of studies published from 1990 to 2013 in Portuguese and English languages. The following search strategy was used: (nutritional status OR anthropometrics OR malnutrition OR overweight) AND daycare centers, as well as the equivalent terms in Portuguese. In the case of MEDLINE search, the descriptor Brazil was also used. It was verified that the 33 studies included in the review were comparable from a methodological point of view. The studies, in general, were characterized by their restrictive nature, geographical concentration and dispersion of results in relation to time. Considering the studies published from 2010 onwards, low prevalence of acute malnutrition and significant rates of stunting and overweight were observed. Despite the limitations, considering the most recent studies that used the WHO growth curves (2006), it is suggested that the anthropometric profile of Brazilian children attending daycare centers is characterized by a nutritional transition process, with significant prevalence of overweight and short stature. We emphasize the need to develop a multicenter survey that will more accurately define the current anthropometric nutritional status of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  18. Climate research in the former Soviet Union. FASAC: Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center technical assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.; Ellsaesser, H.W.; Harshvardhan; Hoffert, M.I.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report assesses the state of the art in several areas of climate research in the former Soviet Union. This assessment was performed by a group of six internationally recognized US experts in related fields. The areas chosen for review are: large-scale circulation processes in the atmosphere and oceans; atmospheric radiative processes; cloud formation processes; climate effects of natural atmospheric disturbances; and the carbon cycle, paleoclimates, and general circulation model validation. The study found an active research community in each of the above areas. Overall, the quality of climate research in the former Soviet Union is mixed, although the best Soviet work is as good as the best corresponding work in the West. The best Soviet efforts have principally been in theoretical studies or data analysis. However, an apparent lack of access to modern computing facilities has severely hampered the Soviet research. Most of the issues considered in the Soviet literature are known, and have been discussed in the Western literature, although some extraordinary research in paleoclimatology was noted. Little unusual and exceptionally creative material was found in the other areas during the study period (1985 through 1992). Scientists in the former Soviet Union have closely followed the Western literature and technology. Given their strengths in theoretical and analytical methods, as well as their possession of simplified versions of detailed computer models being used in the West, researchers in the former Soviet Union have the potential to make significant contributions if supercomputers, workstations, and software become available. However, given the current state of the economy in the former Soviet Union, it is not clear that the computer gap will be bridged in the foreseeable future.

  19. Phase III of construction of University Fitness Center and Human Performance Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, James

    2009-09-30

    This grant did not include administrative expenses/legal expenses, land or rights-of-way purchases or relocation expenses. The construction funds for the Fitness Center $932,100 and the Performance Lab $23,900 totaled $956,000. Actual dollars expended totaled, $956,509.22, $932,609.22 for the Fitness Center and $23,900 for the Performance Lab. The University contributed $509.22. The projects are completed and in use. All inspections and occupancy permits have been obtained. All contractors have released all construction leans.

  20. Operation of the Pinellas Plant Child Development Center/Partnership School: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    The US Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL), through the DOE Pinellas Area Office (PAO) and GE Neutron Devices (GEND), is proposing a joint venture to operate a Partnership School and Child Development Center at the Pinellas Plant. The Child Development Center/Partnership School proposal has been developed. The building has been constructed, teachers and staff selected, and the building made ready for immediate occupancy. The proposed action addressed by this environmental assessment is the operation and utilization of the school as a Partnership School, a preschool Child Development Center, and a before- and after-hours child care facility. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, the potential impacts from the operation of the proposed action are assessed. Additionally, since the proposed school is located next to an industrial facility, impacts on the school population from routine plant operations, as well as abnormal events, are analyzed, and changes in plant operation that may be prudent are considered. 25 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Conducting a user-centered information needs assessment: the Via Christi Libraries' experience*

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Cathy M.; Gentry, Camillia A.; Fleming, A. Sue; Sen, Kristin M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The research sought to provide evidence to support the development of a long-term strategy for the Via Christi Regional Medical Center Libraries. Methods: An information needs assessment was conducted in a large medical center serving approximately 5,900 physicians, clinicians, and nonclinical staff in 4 sites in 1 Midwestern city. Quantitative and qualitative data from 1,295 self-reporting surveys, 75 telephone interviews, and 2 focus groups were collected and analyzed to address 2 questions: how could the libraries best serve their patrons, given realistic limitations on time, resources, and personnel, and how could the libraries best help their institution improve patient care and outcomes? Results: Clinicians emphasized the need for “just in time” information accessible at the point of care. Library nonusers emphasized the need to market library services and resources. Both clinical and nonclinical respondents emphasized the need for information services customized to their professional information needs, preferences, and patterns of use. Specific information needs in the organization were identified. Discussion/Conclusions: The results of this three-part, user-centered information needs assessment were used to develop an evidence-based strategic plan. The findings confirmed the importance of promoting library services in the organization and suggested expanded, collaborative roles for hospital librarians. PMID:17443250

  2. Preliminary assessment of energy conservation opportunities at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, L.; Parker, G.B.

    1993-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is encouraging energy efficiency in its buildings and facilities as part of an overall strategy to meet the requirements of the Executive Order on Energy Efficiency and the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992. NASA requested technical assistance from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a site visit, examine selected buildings and facilities, and suggest appropriate and economically acceptable energy efficiency measures and future actions at NASA`s Goddard Space Flight Center. PNL was also tasked to investigate the current and future demand-side management (DSM) programs offered by the servicing electric utility that would be applicable for the site. The information for this assessment was collected during site visits to the Goddard Space Flight Center during September and October 1992. The assessment addresses energy supply and cost, estimated energy distribution and use, and cost-effective options to reduce energy consumption at the center. Applicable utility DSM programs are also identified. A recommended strategy is identified to undertake a more comprehensive long-term energy reduction program at the site. A model approach is also given for the site to develop a partnership with the serving electric utility to implement a ``custom`` site-wide DSM program incorporating the several incentives offered by the utility to governmental agencies.

  3. User-centered virtual environment assessment and design for cognitive rehabilitation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidopiastis, Cali Michael

    Virtual environment (VE) design for cognitive rehabilitation necessitates a new methodology to ensure the validity of the resulting rehabilitation assessment. We propose that benchmarking the VE system technology utilizing a user-centered approach should precede the VE construction. Further, user performance baselines should be measured throughout testing as a control for adaptive effects that may confound the metrics chosen to evaluate the rehabilitation treatment. To support these claims we present data obtained from two modules of a user-centered head-mounted display (HMD) assessment battery, specifically resolution visual acuity and stereoacuity. Resolution visual acuity and stereoacuity assessments provide information about the image quality achieved by an HMD based upon its unique system parameters. When applying a user-centered approach, we were able to quantify limitations in the VE system components (e.g., low microdisplay resolution) and separately point to user characteristics (e.g., changes in dark focus) that may introduce error in the evaluation of VE based rehabilitation protocols. Based on these results, we provide guidelines for calibrating and benchmarking HMDs. In addition, we discuss potential extensions of the assessment to address higher level usability issues. We intend to test the proposed framework within the Human Experience Modeler (HEM), a testbed created at the University of Central Florida to evaluate technologies that may enhance cognitive rehabilitation effectiveness. Preliminary results of a feasibility pilot study conducted with a memory impaired participant showed that the HEM provides the control and repeatability needed to conduct such technology comparisons. Further, the HEM affords the opportunity to integrate new brain imaging technologies (i.e., functional Near Infrared Imaging) to evaluate brain plasticity associated with VE based cognitive rehabilitation.

  4. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  5. Northeast Academic Science Information Center (NASIC), Phase I Report (March 1973-February 1974). Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Board of Higher Education, Wellesley, MA. Northeast Academic Science Information Center.

    In this fourth volume of a four-volume report on the activities of the Northeast Academic Science Information Center (NASIC), two studies are reported. The first was a study of the feasibility of marketing bibliographic and census data base products and services via NASIC. It represented an attempt to build a profile of the potential market for…

  6. Keldysh research center's experimental facility for studying of thermal control systems with two-phase coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednov, Sergey M.; Vezhnevets, Petr D.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Tsikhotsky, Yury M.; Prokhorov, Yury. M.; Kopiatkevich, R.; Gorbenko, Gennady; Diev, M.

    1997-01-01

    This Paper presents a brief description of the experimental facility which was developed in the Keldysh Research Center (KeRC) for studying and working out the thermal control system (TCS) for the Russian segment of the International space station ``Alpha'' (ISSA). The list of scientific and design problems which will be studied during ground testing is given.

  7. Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

  8. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 1. Cloud tracking and phase space description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-01

    We study the evolution of warm convective cloud fields using large eddy simulations of continental and trade cumulus. Individual clouds are tracked a posteriori from formation to dissipation using a 3-D cloud-tracking algorithm, and results are presented in the phase space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space). The CvM space is shown to contain rich information on cloud field characteristics, cloud morphology, and common cloud development pathways, together facilitating a comprehensive understanding of the cloud field. In this part we show how the meteorological (thermodynamic) conditions that determine the cloud properties are projected on the CvM phase space and how changes in the initial conditions affect the clouds' trajectories in this space. This part sets the stage for a detailed microphysical analysis that will be shown in part II.

  9. Alterations in knee contact forces and centers in stance phase of gait: A detailed lower extremity musculoskeletal model.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Adouni, M

    2016-01-25

    Evaluation of contact forces-centers of the tibiofemoral joint in gait has crucial biomechanical and pathological consequences. It involves however difficulties and limitations in in vitro cadaver and in vivo imaging studies. The goal is to estimate total contact forces (CF) and location of contact centers (CC) on the medial and lateral plateaus using results computed by a validated finite element model simulating the stance phase of gait for normal as well as osteoarthritis, varus-valgus and posterior tibial slope altered subjects. Using foregoing contact results, six methods commonly used in the literature are also applied to estimate and compare locations of CC at 6 periods of stance phase (0%, 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%). TF joint contact forces are greater on the lateral plateau very early in stance and on the medial plateau thereafter during 25-100% stance periods. Large excursions in the location of CC (>17mm), especially on the medial plateau in the mediolateral direction, are computed. Various reported models estimate quite different CCs with much greater variations (~15mm) in the mediolateral direction on both plateaus. Compared to our accurately computed CCs taken as the gold standard, the centroid of contact area algorithm yielded least differences (except in the mediolateral direction on the medial plateau at ~5mm) whereas the contact point and weighted center of proximity algorithms resulted overall in greatest differences. Large movements in the location of CC should be considered when attempting to estimate TF compartmental contact forces in gait.

  10. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 1. Cloud tracking and phase space description: CENTER OF GRAVITY VERSUS WATER MASS 1

    SciTech Connect

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-07

    We study the evolution of warm convective cloud fields using large eddy simulations of continental and trade cumulus. Individual clouds are tracked a posteriori from formation to dissipation using a 3D cloud tracking algorithm and results are presented in the phase- space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space). The CvM space is shown to contain rich information on cloud field characteristics, cloud morphology, and common cloud development pathways, together facilitating a comprehensive understanding of the cloud field. In this part we show how the meteorological (thermodynamic) conditions that determine the cloud properties are projected on the CvM phase space and how changes in the initial conditions affect the clouds' trajectories in this space. This part sets the stage for a detailed microphysical analysis that will be shown in part II.

  12. AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PHASE I STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I studies were sponsored by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) to address critical information needs for assessing human exposures to multiple chemicals from multiple pathways and media. These studies were...

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PHASE I STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I studies were sponsored by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) to address critical information needs for assessing human exposures to multiple chemicals from multiple pathways and media. These studies were...

  14. Superfluid helium 2 liquid-vapor phase separation: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A literature survey of helium 2 liquid vapor phase separation is presented. Currently, two types of He 2 phase separators are being investigated: porous, sintered metal plugs and the active phase separator. The permeability K(P) shows consistency in porous plug geometric characterization. Both the heat and mass fluxes increase with K(P). Downstream pressure regulation to adjust for varying heat loads and both temperatures is possible. For large dynamic heat loads, the active phase separator shows a maximum heat rejection rate of up to 2 W and bath temperature stability of 0.1 mK. Porous plug phase separation performance should be investigated for application to SIRTF and, in particular, that plugs of from 10 to the minus ninth square centimeters to 10 to the minus eighth square centimeters in conjunction with downstream pressure regulation be studied.

  15. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  16. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2010-01-01

    The AMU created new logistic regression equations in an effort to increase the skill of the Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II (Lambert 2007). One equation was created for each of five sub-seasons based on the daily lightning climatology instead of by month as was done in Phase II. The assumption was that these equations would capture the physical attributes that contribute to thunderstorm formation more so than monthly equations. However, the SS values in Section 5.3.2 showed that the Phase III equations had worse skill than the Phase II equations and, therefore, will not be transitioned into operations. The current Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II will continue to be used operationally in MIDDS. Three warm seasons were added to the Phase II dataset to increase the POR from 17 to 20 years (1989-2008), and data for October were included since the daily climatology showed lightning occurrence extending into that month. None of the three methods tested to determine the start of the subseason in each individual year were able to discern the start dates with consistent accuracy. Therefore, the start dates were determined by the daily climatology shown in Figure 10 and were the same in every year. The procedures used to create the predictors and develop the equations were identical to those in Phase II. The equations were made up of one to three predictors. TI and the flow regime probabilities were the top predictors followed by 1-day persistence, then VT and Ll. Each equation outperformed four other forecast methods by 7-57% using the verification dataset, but the new equations were outperformed by the Phase II equations in every sub-season. The reason for the degradation may be due to the fact that the same sub-season start dates were used in every year. It is likely there was overlap of sub-season days at the beginning and end of each defined sub-season in each individual year, which could very well affect equation

  17. A Review of Phase-Only Sidelobe Nulling Investigations at RADC (Rome Air Development Center).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    IC.ntno ,1 reon nir-. ’I0P0ITAd Ident~y by blocknonbI FIEL GRUP SB G Linear Arrays-, Pattern Synthesis, 093 10 Phase-Only Weight Control,. Adaptive Nulling...Obtaining the phase perturbations that satisfy the null equations (1) subject 4. to minimizing the objective function F, given by Eq. (2), is a nonlinear...dnum) 0 m 1, 2. M , N even n=l (N-)/2 an cos(on ++ + d )+ a m 1, 2, M nflI N odd and the objective function , Eq. (2), as N/2 c 8 sin2 n , N evenF = 8

  18. Non-Publication Is Common among Phase 1, Single-Center, Not Prospectively Registered, or Early Terminated Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Cornelis A; Souverein, Patrick C; Brekelmans, Cecile T M; Janssen, Susan W J; Koëter, Gerard H; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Bouter, Lex M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and determinants of non-publication of clinical drug trials in the Netherlands.All clinical drug trials reviewed by the 28 Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) in the Netherlands in 2007 were followed-up from approval to publication. Candidate determinants were the sponsor, phase, applicant, centers, therapeutic effect expected, type of trial, approval status of the drug(s), drug type, participant category, oncology or other disease area, prospective registration, and early termination. The main outcome was publication as peer reviewed article. The percentage of trials that were published, crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to quantify the associations between determinants and publication. In 2007, 622 clinical drug trials were reviewed by IRBs in the Netherlands. By the end of follow-up, 19 of these were rejected by the IRB, another 19 never started inclusion, and 10 were still running. Of the 574 trials remaining in the analysis, 334 (58%) were published as peer-reviewed article. The multivariable logistic regression model identified the following determinants with a robust, statistically significant association with publication: phase 2 (60% published; adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-5.9), phase 3 (73% published; adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7-10.0), and trials not belonging to phase 1-4 (60% published; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 6.5) compared to phase 1 trials (35% published); trials with a company or investigator as applicant (63% published) compared to trials with a Contract Research Organization (CRO) as applicant (50% published; adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1-2.8); and multicenter trials also conducted in other EU countries (68% published; adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4) or also outside the European Union (72% published; adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-4.0) compared to single-center trials (45% published). Trials that were not prospectively registered (48

  19. The interplay of elicitation and evaluation of trait-expressive behavior: Evidence in assessment center exercises.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Filip; Schollaert, Eveline; Keen, Gert

    2015-07-01

    In assessment centers (ACs), research on eliciting candidate behavior and evaluating candidate behavior have largely followed independent paths. This study integrates trait activation and trait rating models to posit hypotheses about the effects of behavior elicitation via situational cues on key assessor observation and rating variables. To test the hypotheses, a series of experimental and field studies are conducted. Only when trait-expressive behavior activation and evaluation models work in conjunction, increases in observability are coupled with increases in the interrater reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and accuracy of AC ratings. Implications of these findings for AC theory and practice are formulated.

  20. Installation, Maintenance, Operation, and Development Support for a Prototype Seismic Data Center. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-15

    Berkeley Laboratories ( LBL ), S-CUBED, ENSCO, and Teledyne Geotech were also in attendance. The guests heard a series of lectures describing the Center’s...Randall Godfrey, Frank Pilotte, and George Rothe. Peter Farkas, John Fergus, David Lehmertz, and G.M. Leies represented HQ AFTAC. Barry Hansen from DIA...J. Hannon (LLNL), Dr. David Harkrider (Cal Tech), Dr. Eugene Herrin (SMU), Dr. Thomas Jordan (MIT), Dr. Paul Richards (ACDA), Dr. Sean Solomon (MIT

  1. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1: Records Search, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee, midway between Chattanooga and Nashville.3 The entire AEDC reservation encompasses some 39,000 acres, of which...Geological Survey, Water Resources Division o University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) (AEDC Site) o Coffee Co. - Manchester - Tullahoma Landfill...INSTALLATION DESCRIPTION LOCATION, SIZE, AND BOUNDARIES Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is located in southern-middle Tennessee ( Coffee and

  2. Magnetic excitations in a bond-centered stripe phase: spin waves far from the semiclassical limit.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Matthias; Ulbricht, Tobias

    2004-09-17

    Using a spin-only model, we compute spin excitation spectra in a bond-centered stripe state with long-range magnetic order. We employ a bond operator formalism, which naturally captures both dimerization and broken spin symmetry in a unified framework. At low energies, the spin excitations resemble spin waves, but at higher energies they are very similar to spin-one excitations of isolated spin ladders. Our theory does well describe neutron scattering data [Nature (London) 429, 534 (2004)

  3. Learning at the Center: A Proposal for Dynamic Assessment in a Combined University and Community Adult Learning Center Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Lisa; Pauchulo, Ana Laura; Brooke, Auralia; Corrigan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    We ask the reader to consider a proposal for cooperative renewal in the evaluation of a course (OurU) offered in partnership between a university and community-based adult learning center. This proposal's aim is to enhance adult learners' ability to evaluate their learning experiences, with the goal of adopting more learner-directed content into…

  4. Phase based method for location of the centers of side bands in spatial frequency domain in off-axis digital holographic microcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Zhao; Li, Jiansu; Gao, Jianmin; Huang, Junhui

    2016-11-01

    The digital holography (DH) off-axis geometry in microscope configuration introduces the tilt phase aberration in construction, resulting in the reconstructed image distortion. The two typical methods of the tilt aberration compensation, digital reference wavefront method and spectrum centering method, all require the hologram spectrum's centering judgment of side band as a precondition. However, it is difficult to judge the center location of side band by the spectral amplitude maximum due to the presence of the quadratic phase aberration, thus producing the residual tilt phase aberration. Therefore, the method for location of the center of side band based on the unwrapped phase in spatial frequency domain is proposed in the pre-magnification configuration. The Fourier spectrum of the hologram is a complex function and its unwrapped phase distribution always appears the extremum corresponding to the carrier frequency. The correct hologram spectrum's center location of side band can be obtained by judging its unwrapped phase maximum, which makes assure of the tilt aberration compensation in the pre-magnification configuration. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by applying it to the phase imaging of the micro-hole array, phase grating and phase steps.

  5. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the lightning probability forecast equations developed in Phase I. In the time since the Phase I equations were developed, new ideas regarding certain predictors were formulated and a desire to make the tool more automated was expressed by 45 WS forecasters. Five modifications were made to the data: 1) increased the period of record from 15 to 17 years, 2) modified the valid area to match the lighting warning areas, 3) added the 1000 UTC CCAFS sounding to the other soundings in determining the flow regime, 4) used a different smoothing function for the daily climatology, and 5) determined the optimal relative humidity (RH) layer to use as a predictor. The new equations outperformed the Phase I equations in several tests, and improved the skill of the forecast over the Phase I equations by 8%. A graphical user interface (GUI) was created in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) that gathers the predictor values for the equations automatically. The GUI was transitioned to operations in May 2007 for the 2007 warm season.

  6. Data Center IT Equipment Energy Assessment Tools: Current State of Commercial Tools, Proposal for a Future Set of Assessment Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Ben D.

    2012-06-30

    This research project, which was conducted during the Summer and Fall of 2011, investigated some commercially available assessment tools with a focus on IT equipment to see if such tools could round out the DC Pro tool suite. In this research, the assessment capabilities of the various tools were compiled to help make “non-biased” information available to the public. This research should not be considered to be exhaustive on all existing vendor tools although a number of vendors were contacted. Large IT equipment OEM’s like IBM and Dell provide their proprietary internal automated software which does not work on any other IT equipment. However, found two companies with products that showed promise in performing automated assessments for IT equipment from different OEM vendors. This report documents the research and provides a list of software products reviewed, contacts and websites, product details, discussions with specific companies, a set of recommendations, and next steps. As a result of this research, a simple 3-level approach to an IT assessment tool is proposed along with an example of an assessment using a simple IT equipment data collection tool (Level 1, spreadsheet). The tool has been reviewed with the Green Grid and LBNL staff. The initial feedback has been positive although further refinement to the tool will be necessary. Proposed next steps include a field trial of at least two vendors’ software in two different data centers with an objective to prove the concept, ascertain the extent of energy and computational assessment, ease of installation and opportunities for continuous improvement. Based on the discussions, field trials (or case studies) are proposed with two vendors – JouleX (expected to be completed in 2012) and Sentilla.

  7. Integrating knowledge exchange and the assessment of dryland management alternatives - A learning-centered participatory approach.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Susana; Llovet, Joan; Ocampo-Melgar, Anahí; Vilagrosa, Alberto; Mayor, Ángeles G; Murias, Cristina; Vallejo, V Ramón; Orr, Barron J

    2016-12-08

    The adoption of sustainable land management strategies and practices that respond to current climate and human pressures requires both assessment tools that can lead to better informed decision-making and effective knowledge-exchange mechanisms that facilitate new learning and behavior change. We propose a learning-centered participatory approach that links land management assessment and knowledge exchange and integrates science-based data and stakeholder perspectives on both biophysical and socio-economic attributes. We outline a structured procedure for a transparent assessment of land management alternatives, tailored to dryland management, that is based on (1) principles of constructivism and social learning, (2) the participation of stakeholders throughout the whole assessment process, from design to implementation, and (3) the combination of site-specific indicators, identified by local stakeholders as relevant to their particular objectives and context conditions, and science-based indicators that represent ecosystem services of drylands worldwide. The proposed procedure follows a pattern of eliciting, challenging, and self-reviewing stakeholder perspectives that aims to facilitate learning. The difference between the initial baseline perspectives and the final self-reviewed stakeholder perspectives is used as a proxy of learning. We illustrate the potential of this methodology by its application to the assessment of land uses in a Mediterranean fire-prone area in East Spain. The approach may be applied to a variety of socio-ecological systems and decision-making and governance scales.

  8. ECO Exposure Assessment Tools by Phases of ERA - References

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Eco-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  9. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. METC is currently a research and development facility, managed by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. Its goal is to focus energy research and development to develop engineered fossil fuel systems, that are economically viable and environmentally sound, for commercial application. There is clear evidence that, since the 1991 Tiger Team Assessment, substantial progress has been made by both FE and METC in most aspects of their ES&H program. The array of new and restructured organizations, systems, and programs at FE and METC; increased assignments of staff to support these initiatives; extensive training activities; and the maturing planning processes, all reflect a discernable, continuous improvement in the quality of the ES&H performance.

  10. A Person-Centered Approach to Financial Capacity Assessment: Preliminary Development of a New Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Stoltman, Jonathan; Ficker, Lisa J.; Iris, Madelyn; Mast, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Financial exploitation and financial capacity issues often overlap when a gerontologist assesses whether an older adult’s financial decision is an autonomous, capable choice. Our goal is to describe a new conceptual model for assessing financial decisions using principles of person-centered approaches and to introduce a new instrument, the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Rating Scale (LFDRS). We created a conceptual model, convened meetings of experts from various disciplines to critique the model and provide input on content and structure, and select final items. We then videotaped administration of the LFDRS to five older adults and had 10 experts provide independent ratings. The LFDRS demonstrated good to excellent inter-rater agreement. The LFDRS is a new tool that allows gerontologists to systematically gather information about a specific financial decision and the decisional abilities in question. PMID:25866438

  11. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) overview of FRMAC operations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the designated Lead Federal Agency (LFA) and the state(s) that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. The mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Operations describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas. These off-site areas may include one or more affected states.

  12. Coordinatively unsaturated Al3+ centers as binding sites for active catalyst phases on γ-Al2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Z.; Mei, Donghai; Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Kim, Do Heui; Peden, Charles HF; Allard, Larry; Szanyi, Janos

    2009-09-24

    A combination of ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy and microscopy techniques (ultrahigh magnetic field solid state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM)) coupled with first principles DFT calculations reveal the nature of anchoring sites of a catalytically active phase onto the surface of γ-Al2O3. The results obtained unambiguously prove that coordinatively unsaturated penta-coordinate Al3+ (Al3+penta) centers present on the (100) facets of the γ-Al2O3 surface are the sites where the anchoring of Pt occurs. At low loadings, the active catalytic phase is atomically dispersed on the support surface (Pt/ Al3+penta=1), while two dimensional Pt rafts form at higher coverages.

  13. High level waste storage tanks 242-A evaporator S/RID phase II assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Biebesheimer, E.

    1996-09-27

    This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) Phase 2 Assessment Report for the subject facility, represents the results of a Performance Assessment to determine whether procedures containing S/RID requirements are fully implemented by field personnel in the field. It contains a summary report and three attachments; an assessment schedule, performance objectives, and assessments for selected functional areas.

  14. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II-Preliminary assessment and...—Preliminary assessment and initiation of action. (a) The OSC is responsible for promptly initiating a preliminary assessment. (b) The preliminary assessment shall be conducted using available information...

  15. Assessment of Landscape Fragmentation Associated With Urban Centers Using ASTER Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, W. L.

    2002-12-01

    and landscape fragmentation are assessed for 9 urban centers (Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; Baghdad, Iraq; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Lisbon, Portugal; Madrid, Spain; San Francisco, California, USA; Tokyo, Japan; and Vancouver, Canada). These data provide a useful baseline for comparison of human-dominated ecosystem land cover and associated regional landscape fragmentation. Continued collection of ASTER data throughout the duration of the Terra mission will enable further investigation of urban ecosystem trends.

  16. The Vital Role of Patient Feedback in the Critical Assessment of a Patient-Centered Care Objective Structured Clinical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentfro, Allison Carothers

    2011-01-01

    Priorities in medical education have increasingly emphasized teaching skills and fostering attitudes related to patient-centered care (Beckman & Frankel, 2003; Haidet & Paterniti, 2003). The challenge for academic medical centers is to implement these competencies into their curriculum and assess the outcomes. Using a qualitative single…

  17. Rotorcraft aeromechanical stability-methodology assessment. Phase 2: Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1990-01-01

    Helicopter rotor aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability predictions for four data sets were made using industry and government stability analyses and compared with data at a workshop held at Ames Research Center, August 2-3, 1988. The present report contains the workshop comparisons.

  18. Assessing Parental Knowledge About Thalassemia in a Thalassemia Center of Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Maheen, Humaira; Malik, Farrukh; Siddique, Barera; Qidwai, Asim

    2015-12-01

    Thalassemia is the leading haemoglobinopathy after sickle cell anemia that accounts for 1.5 % of the global population. In Pakistan, every 1-4 per 1000 infants suffers from Thalassemia. Regardless of being a population "at high risk" for Thalassemia major, evidence suggest that Pakistanis possess poor knowledge of the disease. The present study aimed to assess parents' accurate knowledge about Thalassemia disease at Afzaal Memorial Thalassemia Foundation in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 172 parents of existing patients who were receiving regular blood transfusion from the center were included in the study. Parents' knowledge was assessed via a pre-tested and validated Thalassemia knowledge questionnaire. Findings show that 40 % of the sample showed lower knowledge scores about Thalassemia. Among different ethnic origins, Urdu speaking respondents showed a higher average score of correct knowledge about Thalassemia major (21.6 ± 4.41) as compared to the Siraiki (17.9 ± 4.48) and the Pathans (17.2 ± 4.34). These latter two ethnic groups also showed poor knowledge about Thalassemia minor. Generally parents provided correct answers about treatment of Thalassemia major. The findings suggest targeted interventions are required for high risk ethnic groups. Thalassemia education programs should be offered to extended family members of existing patients by all Thalassemia centers. High risk ethnic groups (Siraiki and Pathan) need rigorous interventions, and Thalassemia worker program should be introduced nationwide.

  19. A Work Sampling Assessment of the Nursing Delivery of Palliative Care in Ambulatory Cancer Centers.

    PubMed

    Davison, Jennifer; Schenker, Yael; Donovan, Heidi; Rosenzweig, Margaret

    2016-08-01

    Most cancer care occurs within infusion rooms at ambulatory cancer centers, which are staffed by RNs administering chemotherapies and other cancer care medications. Many patients receiving these therapies have basic palliative care needs that could be addressed by the RNs. However, the extent to which these RNs spend their time on basic, or "primary," palliative care is unknown. The aim of this project was to conduct a work sampling assessment of infusion room RNs' work activities and provision of primary palliative care. A single observer conducted direct observation work sampling at three academic cancer center infusion rooms. Nursing tasks were recorded via freehand text and later assigned an appropriate task code. Observed infusion room RNs spent about 1% of their time on direct care palliative care tasks, primarily symptom assessment. The remainder of their time was divided among direct (28%) and indirect (56%) nonpalliative care activities, unit-related activities (7%), and personal time (9%). Infusion room RNs spent less than a third of their time on administering direct patient care and very minimal time on performing palliative care activities.

  20. Environmental Assessment for Youth Center and Recreational Vehicle Parking Lot Expansion Project, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    garter snake ( Thamnophis radix ), the prairie Final Environmental Assessment Youth Center and RV Lot Expansion Project Affected Environment...Sceloporas undulates Northern Prairie Lizard Spea bombi frons Plains Spadefoot Thamnophis radix Plains Ribbon Snake Amphibians Bufo cognatus Plains

  1. Large-scale investigation of the role of trait activation theory for understanding assessment center convergent and discriminant validity.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Filip; Chasteen, Christopher S; Day, Eric Anthony; Christiansen, Neil D

    2006-03-01

    This study used trait activation theory as a theoretical framework to conduct a large-scale test of the interactionist explanation of the convergent and discriminant validity findings obtained in assessment centers. Trait activation theory specifies the conditions in which cross-situationally consistent and inconsistent candidate performances are likely to occur. Results obtained by aggregating correlations across 30 multitrait-multimethod matrices supported the propositions of trait activation theory, shedding a more positive light on the construct validity puzzle in assessment centers. Overall, convergence among assessment center ratings was better between exercises that provided an opportunity to observe behavior related to the same trait, and discrimination among ratings within exercises was generally better for dimensions that were not expressions of the same underlying traits. Implications for assessment center research and practice are discussed.

  2. Carbon monoxide protonation in condensed phases and bonding to surface superacidic Brønsted centers.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Evgenii S; Malykhin, Sergei E

    2016-02-14

    Using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, interaction of CO with the strongest known pure Brønsted carborane superacids, H(CHB11Hal11) (Hal = F, Cl), was studied. CO readily interacted at room temperature with H(CHB11F11) acid, forming a mixture of bulk salts of formyl and isoformyl cations, which were in equilibrium An(-)H(+)CO COH(+)An(-). The bonding of CO to the surface Brønsted centers of the weaker acid, H(CHB11Cl11), resulted in breaking of the bridged H-bonds of the acid polymers without proton transfer (PT) to CO. The binding occurred via the C atom (blue shift ΔνCO up to +155-167 cm(-1), without PT) or via O atom (red shift ΔνCO up to -110 cm(-1), without PT) always simultaneously, regardless of whether H(+) is transferred to CO. IR spectra of all species were interpreted by B3LYP/cc-pVQZ calculations of the simple models, which adequately mimic the ability of carborane acids to form LH(+)CO, LH(+)CO, COH(+)L, and COH(+)L compounds (L = bases). The CO bond in all compounds was triple. Acidic strength of the Brønsted centers of commonly used acid catalysts, even so-called superacidic catalysts, is not sufficient for the formation of the compounds studied.

  3. An Evaluation of Elderly Patients (≥70 years old) enrolled in Phase I Clinical Trials at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio-Cancer Therapy Research Center from 2009-2011

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Julie; Patel, Sukeshi; Mazo-Canola, Marcela; Parra, Alberto; Goros, Martin; Michalek, Joel; Kelly, Kevin; Weitman, Steve; Karnad, Anand

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Elderly patients with cancer are under-represented in clinical trials, and there is especially scant data on their participation in early-phase trials. In an effort to provide more data, we reviewed our Phase I experience. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 461 patients enrolled in Phase I clinical trials at the Cancer Therapy Research Center (CTRC) from 2009 to 2011 to determine the rate of completion of at least 12 weeks of treatment, incidence of adverse events, prevalence of co-morbidities, functional status, and survival. Elderly (E) was defined as ≥ 70 years; non-elderly (NE) was defined as ≤ 69 years. RESULTS: The elderly represented 15% (69/461) of enrolled patients. The most common malignancies were colon (20%), hematologic (18%), lung (15%), and breast (8%). The median age of E was 72 years (range 70-85, SD 3.15), and 49% of the E was female. Co-morbidities (E vs. NE) include diabetes (28% vs. 23%), hypertension (65% vs. 44%), and chronic kidney disease (91% vs. 48%). Thirty-two percent of E vs. 37% of NE completed at least 12 weeks of treatment. Reasons for not completing in E vs. NE respectively were progression of disease (43% vs. 61%), toxicity (28% vs. 9%), and self-withdrawal (11% vs. 7%). Reasons for not completing the protocol was significantly associated with being elderly (p=0.005). There were non-significant differences in toxicity in E vs. NE. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients have a higher likelihood of not completing trials for reasons including toxicity. This highlights the need for better Phase I trial-designs incorporating ideal geriatric assessment tools. PMID:24484720

  4. Dynamic assessment of center of pressure measurements from an instrumented AMTI treadmill with controlled precision.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Crenshaw, Jeremy; Lugade, Vipul; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing use of instrumented force treadmills in biomechanical research, it is imperative that the validity of center of pressure (COP) measurements is established. The study aims were to compare an instrumented treadmill's static-belt COP accuracy to that of a floor-embedded platform, develop a novel method to quantify dynamic-belt COP accuracy with controlled precision and perform an initial investigation of how dynamic COP accuracy changes with weight and velocity. Static COP accuracy was assessed by applying a force while moving a rigid rod in a circular clockwise motion at nine positions of interest on the two treadmill and two ground-embedded force plates. Dynamic COP accuracy was assessed for weights (68.0, 102.1, and 136.1kg), applied through a ball bearing of 2.54cm circumference, with peak treadmill belt speeds of 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0m/s. COP accuracy was assessed relative to motion capture marker trajectories. Statically, treadmill COP error was similar to that of the ground-embedded force plates and that reported for other treadmills. Dynamically, COP error appeared to vary systematically with weight and velocity and in the case of anteroposterior COP error, shear force, although testing with a larger number of weights and velocities is needed to fully define the relationship. This novel method can be used to assess any instrumented treadmill's dynamic COP accuracy with controlled precision.

  5. Technology assessment of portable energy RDT and P, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spraul, J. R. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    A technological assessment of portable energy research, development, technology, and production was undertaken to assess the technical, economic, environmental, and sociopolitical issues associated with portable energy options. Those courses of action are discussed which would impact aviation and air transportation research and technology. Technology assessment workshops were held to develop problem statements. The eighteen portable energy problem statements are discussed in detail along with each program's objective, approach, task description, and estimates of time and costs.

  6. Payload operations control center network (POCCNET) systems definition phase study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the studies performed during the systems definition phase of POCCNET are presented. The concept of POCCNET as a system of standard POCCs is described and an analysis of system requirements is also included. Alternative systems concepts were evaluated as well as various methods for development of reliable reusable software. A number of POCC application areas, such as command management, on board computer support, and simulation were also studied. Other areas of investigation included the operation of POCCNET systems, the facility requirements and usage.

  7. Final report. Conceptual studies nuclear energy center Lake Hartwell, S. C. , Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a specific site in the SSEB region. The site selected for this conceptual study is at Lake Hartwell, South Carolina. The conceptual NEC at Lake Hartwell consists of twelve nuclear electric generating units, arranged on the site in four clusters of three units each, known as triads. The nominal distance between triads was selected as 2-1/2 miles. Each unit was assumed to be a 1250 MW(e). The total electric output of 15,000 MWe would be transmitted to five major utilities in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. The basic finding was that the concept of a NEC on the Lake Hartwell site is feasible, but further analysis of institutional issues and possible legislation would be required.

  8. Leading Formative Assessment Change: A 3-Phase Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    If you are seeking greater student engagement and growth, you need to integrate high-impact formative assessment practices into daily instruction. Read the final article in our five-part series to find advice aimed at leaders determined to bring classroom formative assessment practices district wide. Learn: (1) what you MUST consider when…

  9. Retention behavior of amino acids and peptides on protoporphyrin-silica stationary phases with varying metal ion centers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Meyerhoff, M E

    1996-09-01

    Various metalloprotoporphyrins (MProP) covalently linked to silica supports are examined as novel immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) stationary phases for separations of amino acids/peptides. Under reversed-phase HPLC conditions, the MProP-silicas exhibit high affinity toward L-histidine via metal-nitrogen axial ligation interactions, with an increasing degree of histidine retention highly dependent on the specific metal ion (M) in the center of the protoporphyrin (ProP) structure: Fe(III) > Ni(II) > Cu(II) > Zn (II) approximately Cd(II). Aromatic amino acids (i.e., L-trytophan and L-phenylalanine) are also retained on MProP columns through pi-pi interactions with the immobilized porphyrins, with the greatest affinity for L-trytophan observed on CuProP-silica columns. Peptides rich in L-histidine and L-tryptophan residues are selectively retained on most of the MProP-silica phases examined; however, the addition of an organic modifier and/or lowering the pH of the mobile phase can be used independently to attenuate the pi-pi and metal ion-nitrogen ligation interactions, respectively. Reproducible separations of His-Phe and trytophan releasing hormone are achieved on a FeProP-silica column even after extensive washing with 50 mM EDTA, demonstrating a fundamental advantage of the new MProP-silica over existing IMAC stationary phases, in which the metal ion is anchored weakly to the support via immobilized iminodiacetate and related ligands.

  10. Quantitative phase imaging technologies to assess neuronal activity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Active neurons tends to have a different dynamical behavior compared to resting ones. Non-exhaustively, vesicular transport towards the synapses is increased, since axonal growth becomes slower. Previous studies also reported small phase variations occurring simultaneously with the action potential. Such changes exhibit times scales ranging from milliseconds to several seconds on spatial scales smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, QPI systems are of particular interest to measure neuronal activity without labels. Here, we report the development of two new QPI systems that should enable the detection of such activity. Both systems can acquire full field phase images with a sub nanometer sensitivity at a few hundreds of frames per second. The first setup is a synchronous combination of Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) and Fluorescence wide field imaging. The latter modality enables the measurement of neurons electrical activity using calcium indicators. In cultures, FF-OCT exhibits similar features to Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), except from complex computational reconstruction. However, FF-OCT is of particular interest in order to measure phase variations in tissues. The second setup is based on a Quantitative Differential Interference Contrast setup mounted in an epi-illumination configuration with a spectrally incoherent illumination. Such a common path interferometer exhibits a very good mechanical stability, and thus enables the measurement of phase images during hours. Additionally, such setup can not only measure a height change, but also an optical index change for both polarization. Hence, one can measure simultaneously a phase change and a birefringence change.

  11. Assessment of radionuclide vapor-phase transport in unsaturated tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Updegraff, C.D.; Bonano, E.J.; Randall, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    This report describes bounding calculations performed to investigate the possibility of radionuclide migration in a vapor phase associated with the emplacement of high-level waste canister in unsaturated tuff formations. Two potential radionuclide transport mechanisms in the vapor phase were examined: aerosol migration and convection/diffusion of volatile species. The former may have significant impact on the release of radionuclides to the accessible environment as the concentration in the aerosols will be equal to that in the ground water. A conservative analysis of air diffusion in a stagnant liquid film indicated that for all expected repository conditions, aerosol formation is not possible. The migration of volatile species was examined both in the vicinity of a waste canister and outside the thermally disturbed zone. Two-dimensional (radial) and three-dimensional (radial-vertical) coupled heat transfer-gas flow-liquid flow simulations were performed using the TOUGH computer code. The gas flow rate relative to the liquid flow rate predicted from the simulations allowed calculations of mobility ratios due to convection which led to the conclusion that, except for the immediate region near the canister, transport in the liquid phase will be dominant for radionuclides heavier than radon. Near the waste canister, iodine transport may also be important in the vapor phase. Bounding calculations for vertical mobility ratios were carried out as a function of saturation. These calculations are conservative and agree well with the two-dimensional simulations. Based on this analysis, it is clear that vapor-phase transport will not be important for radionuclides such as cesium and heavier species. Vapor transport for iodine may play a role in the overall release scenario depending on the particular repository conditions.

  12. The Langley Research Center CSI phase-0 evolutionary model testbed-design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Horta, Lucas G.; Elliott, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is described. The design philosophy, capabilities, and early experimental results are presented to introduce some of the ongoing CSI research at NASA-Langley. The testbed, referred to as the Phase 0 version of the CSI Evolutionary model (CEM), is the first stage of model complexity designed to show the benefits of CSI technology and to identify weaknesses in current capabilities. Early closed loop test results have shown non-model based controllers can provide an order of magnitude increase in damping in the first few flexible vibration modes. Model based controllers for higher performance will need to be robust to model uncertainty as verified by System ID tests. Data are presented that show finite element model predictions of frequency differ from those obtained from tests. Plans are also presented for evolution of the CEM to study integrated controller and structure design as well as multiple payload dynamics.

  13. The Chicago Center for Green Technology: life-cycle assessment of a brownfield redevelopment project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecheisen, Thomas; Theis, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The sustainable development of brownfields reflects a fundamental, yet logical, shift in thinking and policymaking regarding pollution prevention. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool that can be used to assist in determining the conformity of brownfield development projects to the sustainability paradigm. LCA was applied to the process of a real brownfield redevelopment project, now known as the Chicago Center for Green Technology, to determine the cumulative energy required to complete the following redevelopment stages: (1) brownfield assessment and remediation, (2) building rehabilitation and site development and (3) ten years of operation. The results of the LCA have shown that operational energy is the dominant life-cycle stage after ten years of operation. The preservation and rehabilitation of the existing building, the installation of renewable energy systems (geothermal and photovoltaic) on-site and the use of more sustainable building products resulted in 72 terajoules (TJ) of avoided energy impacts, which would provide 14 years of operational energy for the site. Methodological note: data for this life-cycle assessment were obtained from project reports, construction blueprints and utility bills.

  14. Phase I Clinical Trials in 85 Patients with Gynecologic Cancer: The M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moroney, John; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald; Bodurka, Diane; Coleman, Robert; Lu, Karen; Xiao, Lianchun; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disseminated gynecologic cancers are usually fatal due to chemoresistance. Recently, rationally-developed, targeted agents are entering the early clinical trials setting. We assessed patients with metastatic gynecologic cancers in a dedicated Phase I clinical trials clinic in order to determine their outcome. Methods We reviewed records for 89 consecutive patients with gynecologic cancers referred to the Phase I Clinical Trials Program, 85 (96%) of whom were treated on ≥1 trial. Results Cancer diagnoses were: ovarian (N = 43), uterine (N = 19), cervix (N = 17), and other. Median age was 58 years; median number of prior cytotoxic regimens, five. Two patients (2.4%) achieved a CR, four (4.7%), a PR, and eight (9.4%), SD ≥ six months (total CR/PR/SD ≥ six months = 16.5%) for the first phase I trial. Twenty-five patients enrolled on a second trial and three on a third (N = 113 trials total). Combining response data for all trials, of the 85 patients, two achieved CR (2.4%), nine achieved PR (10.6%), and 12 (14%) had SD for ≥ six months. One-year survival was 30% (95% C.I., 21% to 44%). There was no difference in time-to-treatment failure (TTF) on Phase I versus the patient's last standard treatment. Conclusion Twenty-three of 85 patients (27%) with advanced, heavily-pretreated, gynecologic cancers achieved CR/PR/SD ≥ six months on a phase I trial, and overall TTF on phase I was comparable to that of last conventional therapy, suggesting that participation in a phase I trial is a reasonable option for these patients. PMID:20347123

  15. Phase I clinical trials in 85 patients with gynecologic cancer: the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Moroney, John; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald; Bodurka, Diane; Coleman, Robert; Lu, Karen; Xiao, Lianchun; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2010-06-01

    Disseminated gynecologic cancers are usually fatal due to chemoresistance. Recently, rationally developed, targeted agents are entering the early clinical trials setting. We assessed patients with metastatic gynecologic cancers in a dedicated phase I clinical trials clinic in order to determine their outcome. We reviewed records for 89 consecutive patients with gynecologic cancers referred to the Phase I Clinical Trials Program, 85 (96%) of whom were treated on > or = 1 trial. Cancer diagnoses were ovarian (N=43), uterine (N=19), cervix (N=17), and other. Median age was 58 years; median number of prior cytotoxic regimens, five. Two patients (2.4%) achieved a CR; four (4.7%), a PR; and eight (9.4%), SD > or = 6 months (total CR/PR/SD > or = 6 months=16.5%) for the first phase I trial. Twenty-five patients enrolled on a second trial and three, on a third (N=113 trials total). Combining response data for all trials, of the 85 patients, two achieved CR (2.4%), nine achieved PR (10.6%), and 12 (14%) had SD for > or = 6 months. One-year survival was 30% (95% CI, 21% to 44%). There was no difference in time-to-treatment failure (TTF) on phase I versus the patient's last standard treatment. Twenty-three of 85 patients (27%) with advanced, heavily pretreated, gynecologic cancers achieved CR/PR/SD > or = 6 months on a phase I trial, and overall TTF on phase I was comparable to that of last conventional therapy, suggesting that participation in a phase I trial is a reasonable option for these patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  17. Artificial recharge for subsidence abatement at the NASA-Johnson Space Center, Phase I

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garza, Sergio

    1977-01-01

    Regional decline of aquifer head due to ground-water withdrawal in the Houston area has caused extensive land-surface subsidence. The NASA-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) in southeastern Harris County, Texas, was about 13 to 19 feet above mean sea level in 1974 and sinking at a rate of more than 0.2 foot per year. NASA-JSC officials, concerned about the hurricane flooding hazard, requested the U.S. Geological Survey to study the feasibility of artificially recharging the aquifers for subsidence abatement. Hydrologic digital models were developed for theoretical determinations of quantities of water needed, under various well-array plans, for artificial recharge of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in order to halt the local subsidence at NASA-JSC. The programs for the models were developed for analysis of three-dimensional ground-water flow. Total injection rates of between 2,000 and 14,000 gallons per minute under three general well-array plans were determined for a range of residual clay pore pressures of 10 to 70 feet of hydraulic head. The space distributions of the resultant hydraulic heads, illustrated for injection rates of 3,600 and 8 ,400 gallons per minute, indicated that, for the same rate, increasing the number and spread of the injection locations reduces the head gradients within NASA-JSC. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Spanish validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT).

    PubMed

    Martínez, Teresa; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Yanguas, Javier; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered Care (PCC) is an innovative approach which seeks to improve the quality of care services given to the care-dependent elderly. At present there are no Spanish language instruments for the evaluation of PCC delivered by elderly care services. The aim of this work is the adaptation and validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT) for a Spanish population. The P-CAT was translated and adapted into Spanish, then given to a sample of 1339 front-line care professionals from 56 residential elderly care homes. The reliability and validity of the P-CAT were analyzed, within the frameworks of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory models. The Spanish P-CAT demonstrated good reliability, with an alpha coefficient of .88 and a test-retest reliability coefficient of .79. The P-CAT information function indicates that the test measures with good precision for the majority of levels of the measured variables (θ values between -2 and +1). The factorial structure of the test is essentially one-dimensional and the item discrimination indices are high, with values between .26 and .61. In terms of predictive validity, the correlations which stand out are between the P-CAT and organizational climate (r = .689), and the burnout factors; personal accomplishment (r = .382), and emotional exhaustion (r = - .510). The Spanish version of the P-CAT demonstrates good psychometric properties for its use in the evaluation of elderly care homes both professionally and in research.

  19. Assessment of diabetic teleretinal imaging program at the Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Tsan, Grace L; Hoban, Keely L; Jun, Weon; Riedel, Kevin J; Pedersen, Amy L; Hayes, John

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective chart review of 200 diabetic patients who had teleretinal imaging performed between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, at Portland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics to assess the effectiveness of the diabetic teleretinal imaging program. Twenty patients (10%) had diabetic retinopathy. Ninety percent of the available teleretinal imaging studies were of adequate quality for interpretation. In accordance with local VA policy at that time, all teleretinal imaging patients should have been referred for a dilated retinal examination the following year. Image readers referred 97.5% of the patients to eye clinics for subsequent eye examinations, but the imagers scheduled appointments for only 80% of these patients. The redundancy rate, i.e., patients who had an eye examination within the past 6 mo, was 11%; the duplicate recall rate, i.e., patients who had a second teleretinal imaging performed within 1 yr of the eye examination, was 37%. Rates of timely diabetic eye examinations at clinics with teleretinal imaging programs, particularly when teleretinal imaging and eye clinics were colocated at the same community-based outpatient clinic, were higher than those without a teleretinal imaging program. We concluded that the Portland VA Medical Center's teleretinal imaging program was successful in increasing the screening rate for diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Final Technical Report for Industrial Assessment Center at West Virginia University

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran

    2008-01-09

    The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program at West Virginia University (WVU), which is funded by the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has provided a unique opportunity to enhance efficient energy utilization in small to medium-sized manufacturers. It has also provided training to engineering students in the identification and analysis of efficient energy use in each aspect of the manufacturing process and associated supporting elements. The outcomes of the IAC Program at WVU have assisted the manufacturers and the students in having a heightened sensitivity to industrial energy conservation, waste reduction, and productivity improvement, as well as a better understanding of the technical aspects of manufacturing processes and the supporting elements through which efficient energy utilization can be enhanced. The IAC at WVU has conducted 101 energy assessments from 2002 until 2006. The focus of the industrial assessments has been on energy savings. It has been the IAC’s interest to strongly focus on energy savings and on waste minimization and productivity improvements that strictly have an impact on energy. The IAC at WVU was selected as the Center of the year in 2005 from amongst 26 centers and has obtained a ranking within the top 5 in the previous few years. From 2002 to 2006, the total recommended energy savings produced by the IAC at WVU is 1,214,414 MMBtu, of which the electricity accounts for 93,826,067 kWh (equivalent to 320,226 MMBtu) and natural gas for 871,743 MMBtu. The balance is accounted for in savings in other fuels, mainly coal and wood. This results in an average recommended energy savings of 928,971 kWh from electricity and 8,631 MMBtu from natural gas per facility. The total CO2 emissions saved from 2002 to 2006 is 154,462 tons, with an average of 1,529.3 tons per facility. The average recommended energy cost savings per facility is

  1. Assessing research productivity in an oncology research institute: the role of the documentation center.

    PubMed Central

    Ugolini, D; Bogliolo, A; Parodi, S; Casilli, C; Santi, L

    1997-01-01

    An evaluation method used to assess the quality of research productivity and to provide priorities for budget allocation purposes is presented. This method, developed by a working group of the National Institute for Research on Cancer (IST), Genoa, Italy, is based on the partitioning of categories of the Science Citation Index and Journal Citation Reports (SCI-JCR) into deciles, which normalizes journal impact factors in order to gauge the quality of the productivity. A second parameter related to the number of staff of each institute department co-authoring a given paper has been introduced in order to guide departmental budget allocations. The information scientists of the IST Documentation Center who participated in the working group played a pivotal role in developing the computerized database of publications, providing and analyzing data, supplying and evaluating literature on the topic, and placing international bibliographic databases at the working group's disposal. PMID:9028569

  2. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit southwestern Mississippi on August 29, 2005, at 9:45 a.m. CDT as a category 3 storm with surges up to approx. 9 m and sustained winds of approx. 120 mph. The hurricane's wind, rain, and flooding devastated several coastal towns, from New Orleans through Mobile. The storm also caused significant damage to infrastructure and vegetation of NASA's SSC (Stennis Space Center). Storm recovery at SSC involved not only repairs of critical infrastructure but also forest damage mitigation (via timber harvests and control burns to reduce fire risk). This presentation discusses an effort to use commercially available high spatial resolution multispectral IKONOS data for vegetation damage assessment, based on data collected over SSC on September 2, 2005.

  3. Assessment of Translational and Interdisciplinary Clinical Research at an Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

    PubMed

    Dao, Hanh Dung; Kota, Pravina; James, Judith A; Stoner, Julie A; Akins, Darrin R

    2015-03-01

    In response to National Institutes of Health initiatives to improve translation of basic science discoveries we surveyed faculty to assess patterns of and barriers to translational research in Oklahoma. An online survey was administered to University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Medicine faculty, which included demographic and research questions. Results: Responses were received from 126 faculty members (24%). Two-thirds spent ≥ 20%time on research; among these, 90% conduct clinical and translational research. Identifying funding; recruiting research staff and participants; preparing reports and agreements; and protecting research time were commonly perceived as at least moderate barriers to conducting research. While respondents largely collaborated within their discipline, clinical investigators were more likely than basic science investigators to engage in interdisciplinary research. While engagement in translational research is common, specific barriers impact the research process. This could be improved through an expanded interdisciplinary collaboration and research support structure.

  4. Assessment of Translational and Interdisciplinary Clinical Research at an Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Hanh Dung; Kota, Pravina; James, Judith A.; Stoner, Julie A.; Akins, Darrin R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In response to National Institutes of Health initiatives to improve translation of basic science discoveries we surveyed faculty to assess patterns of and barriers to translational research in Oklahoma. Methods An online survey was administered to University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Medicine faculty, which included demographic and research questions. Results Responses were received from 126 faculty members (24%). Two-thirds spent ≥20% time on research; among these, 90% conduct clinical and translational research. Identifying funding; recruiting research staff and participants; preparing reports and agreements; and protecting research time were commonly perceived as at least moderate barriers to conducting research. While respondents largely collaborated within their discipline, clinical investigators were more likely than basic science investigators to engage in interdisciplinary research. Conclusion While engagement in translational research is common, specific barriers impact the research process. This could be improved through an expanded interdisciplinary collaboration and research support structure. PMID:26242016

  5. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH.

  6. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Materials and Methods: Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes and behavior by an e-mail invitation with a link to the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory survey that was sent to all 1802 students with Kuwait University Health Sciences Center e-mail addresses. The data were analyzed for frequency distributions, and differences among the groups were assessed using the Mann–Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Kruskal–Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Results: The results of this study indicated that dental students achieved better oral health attitudes and behavior than that of their nondental professional fellow students (P < 0.05). Students in advanced academic levels and female students demonstrated better oral health attitudes and behavior. Conclusion: Dental students and students who were in advanced levels of their training along with female students demonstrated better oral health practices and perceptions than students in lower academic levels and male students, respectively. Additional studies for investigating the effectiveness and identifying areas requiring modification within the dental curriculum at KUHSC may be warranted. PMID:27891310

  7. Hysteresis in Center of Mass Velocity Control during the Stance Phase of Treadmill Walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Hyun; Chong, Raymond K

    2017-01-01

    Achieving a soft landing during walking can be quantified by analyzing changes in the vertical velocity of the body center of mass (CoM) just prior to the landing of the swing limb. Previous research suggests that walking speed and step length may predictably influence the extent of this CoM control. Here we ask how stable this control is. We altered treadmill walking speed by systematically increasing or decreasing it at fixed intervals. We then reversed direction. We hypothesized that the control of the CoM vertical velocity during the late stance of the walking gait may serve as an order parameter which has an attribute of hysteresis. The presence of hysteresis implies that the CoM control is not based on simply knowing the current input conditions to predict the output response. Instead, there is also the influence of previous speed conditions on the ongoing responses. We found that the magnitudes of CoM control were different depending on whether the treadmill speed (as the control parameter) was ramped up or down. Changes in step length also influenced CoM control. A stronger effect was observed when the treadmill speed was speeded up compared to down. However, the effect of speed direction remained significant after controlling for step length. The hysteresis effect of CoM control as a function of speed history demonstrated in the current study suggests that the regulation of CoM vertical velocity during late stance is influenced by previous external conditions and constraints which combine to influence the desired behavioral outcome.

  8. Comparing Test Anxiety Levels between Assessment Center Students Who Have Participated in an Orientation Session and Those Who Have Not.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joan

    A study was conducted at Oxnard College to assess the effectiveness of a multimodal orientation program designed by the college's Assessment Center to reduce test anxiety traumas by explaining theories of stress and techniques for stress reduction, self-help breathing, muscle relaxation, and creative visualization. The Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI)…

  9. Assessing Beaked Whale Reproduction and Stress Response Relative to Sonar Activity at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Assessing Beaked Whale Reproduction and Stress Response...both groups of animals to investigate whether there is a relationship between sonar activity, stress measures, and reproductive rates, to assess... Reproduction and Stress Response Relative to Sonar Activity at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  10. Learner-Centered Assessment: A Comparison of Faculty Practices in US Colleges and Universities 1993 to 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.; Tschepikow, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Over a decade ago, Barr and Tagg (1995) declared that a shift had occurred in higher education from an instruction paradigm to a learning paradigm. A central element in this new paradigm is learner-centered assessment. While a growing body of literature suggests that this approach to assessment is a best practice in higher education pedagogy, it…

  11. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment Practices in the United States: The Influence of Individual and Institutional Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carrie B.; Myers, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the contexts that influence the use of learner-centered assessment (LCA) practices in undergraduate courses has not kept pace with those focusing on teaching practices. Such research is needed given that conceptualizations of effective pedagogy generally include both teaching and assessment. The authors examined a range of…

  12. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment Practices in the United States: The Influence of Individual and Institutional Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carrie B.; Myers, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the contexts that influence the use of learner-centered assessment (LCA) practices in undergraduate courses has not kept pace with those focusing on teaching practices. Such research is needed given that conceptualizations of effective pedagogy generally include both teaching and assessment. The authors examined a range of…

  13. Unconventional Luminescent Centers in Metastable Phases Created by Topochemical Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Kai; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Yu, Hui-Mei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Li-Rong; Li, Li-Na; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Yong-Zheng; Hou, Jing-Shan; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Sun, Hong-Tao

    2016-04-11

    A low-temperature topochemical reduction strategy is used herein to prepare unconventional phosphors with luminescence covering the biological and/or telecommunications optical windows. This approach is demonstrated by using Bi(III)-doped Y2O3 (Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3) as a model system. Experimental results suggest that topochemical treatment of Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3 using CaH2 creates randomly distributed oxygen vacancies in the matrix, resulting in the change of the oxidation states of Bi to lower oxidation states. The change of the Bi coordination environments from the [BiO6] octahedra in Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3 to the oxygen-deficient [BiO(6-z)] polyhedra in reduced phases leads to a shift of the emission maximum from the visible to the near-infrared region. The generality of this approach was further demonstrated with other phosphors. Our findings suggest that this strategy can be used to explore Bi-doped or other classes of luminescent systems, thus opening up new avenues to develop novel optical materials.

  14. Non-Publication Is Common among Phase 1, Single-Center, Not Prospectively Registered, or Early Terminated Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Souverein, Patrick C.; Brekelmans, Cecile T. M.; Janssen, Susan W. J.; Koëter, Gerard H.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and determinants of non-publication of clinical drug trials in the Netherlands.All clinical drug trials reviewed by the 28 Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) in the Netherlands in 2007 were followed-up from approval to publication. Candidate determinants were the sponsor, phase, applicant, centers, therapeutic effect expected, type of trial, approval status of the drug(s), drug type, participant category, oncology or other disease area, prospective registration, and early termination. The main outcome was publication as peer reviewed article. The percentage of trials that were published, crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to quantify the associations between determinants and publication. In 2007, 622 clinical drug trials were reviewed by IRBs in the Netherlands. By the end of follow-up, 19 of these were rejected by the IRB, another 19 never started inclusion, and 10 were still running. Of the 574 trials remaining in the analysis, 334 (58%) were published as peer-reviewed article. The multivariable logistic regression model identified the following determinants with a robust, statistically significant association with publication: phase 2 (60% published; adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–5.9), phase 3 (73% published; adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7–10.0), and trials not belonging to phase 1–4 (60% published; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 6.5) compared to phase 1 trials (35% published); trials with a company or investigator as applicant (63% published) compared to trials with a Contract Research Organization (CRO) as applicant (50% published; adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8); and multicenter trials also conducted in other EU countries (68% published; adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4) or also outside the European Union (72% published; adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–4.0) compared to single-center trials (45% published). Trials that were not prospectively registered

  15. Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of NIH's programs for increasing the participation in biomedical science of individuals from underrepresented minority groups. The report examines, using available data and the results of a survey of NIH trainees, the characteristics and outcomes of programs at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and…

  16. Phase II Assessment; Richmond Virginia Career Opportunities Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessent, Hattie; Cage, B. N.

    The Career Opportunities Program (COP) in Richmond, Virginia, which trained teachers from disadvantaged areas to return to the classrooms in these areas, was assessed. Fifty COP aides and 50 control students were administered opinionnaires, semantic differentials, and How I See Myself Self Concept Scale, and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Five…

  17. Anisotropy in electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of superhard body-centered tetragonal C4 phase of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. Y.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X.-Q.; Li, D. Z.; Li, Y. Y.

    2010-08-01

    By hybrid density functional theory, we have investigated anisotropies in the electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of the body centered tetragonal C4 phase of carbon. We predict a strong electronic anisotropy associated with the in-plane carbon-carbon covalent bonds and the zigzag carbon chains along the c-direction (out-of-plane), which results in a state-resolved directional distribution of valence electrons at the top of the valence band. The calculated adsorption spectra display highly anisotropic features which are already manifested at ambient pressure by a substantial difference (2 eV) for the absorption edges between the in-plane and out-of-plane components of the tetragonal cell. Similar anisotropic features in the elastic compressibility are also discussed.

  18. Central and peripheral pain generators in women with chronic pelvic pain: patient centered assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) often present without obvious cause on imaging studies, laboratory values or physical exam. Dysfunctional sensory processing in the central nervous system (CNS) may explain pain of unclear origin. Central sensitization (CS), a mechanism of centrally mediated pain, describes this abnormal processing of sensory information. Women with CPP often present with several seemingly unrelated symptoms. This can be explained by co-existing chronic pain syndromes occurring in the same patient. Central sensitization occurs in all of these pain syndromes, also described as dysfunctional pain syndromes, and thus may explain why several often occur in the same patient. Six of the most common pain disorders that co-exist in CPP include endometriosis, painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cysitis, vulvodynia, myofascial pain/ pelvic floor hypertonus, irritable bowel syndrome, and primary dysmenorrhea. Central pain generators, (pain originating from CS) and peripheral pain generators, (pain from local tissue damage), can both occur in each of these six conditions. These pain generators will be described. Chronic pain, specifically dysfunctional sensory processing, is recognized as a systemic disease process like diabetes to be managed as opposed to a local problem to be "fixed" or cured. A multi-disciplinary approach to assessment and treatment with a focus on improving emotional, physical and social functioning instead of focusing strictly on pain reduction is more effective in decreasing disability. This is best achieved by determining the patient's needs and perspective through a patient-centered approach. Algorithms for such an approach to assessment and treatment are outlined.

  19. Parental Satisfaction With Pediatric Preoperative Assessment and Education in a Presurgical Care Center.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Dolores; Bayley, Elizabeth W; Olszewsky, Patricia; Gallagher, Jean

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate parental satisfaction with preoperative assessment and education in a pediatric presurgical care center (PSCC) as well as parental use of a computer instructional video, EMMI, which is a product of Emmi Solutions (Chicago, IL), a health information company for patients. A prospective, exploratory, comparative, and correlational descriptive design was implemented. A 23-item questionnaire was completed by 542 parents or legal guardians at the end of their child's PSCC visit. Very high overall satisfaction was seen with the visit. Highest overall satisfaction was seen related to nurse practitioner and registered nurse behaviors and lowest satisfaction to operational aspects. This study validates parents' perceptions of the high value of nurses' explanations, respect shown, and response to questions during preoperative assessment of the child and education of the family anticipating surgery. Identification of less satisfying aspects of the presurgical experience provides opportunities for improvement. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina inflicted widespread damage to vegetation in southwestern coastal Mississippi upon landfall on August 29, 2005. Storm damage to surface vegetation types at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) was mapped and quantified using IKONOS data originally acquired on September 2, 2005, and later obtained via a Department of Defense ClearView contract. NASA SSC management required an assessment of the hurricane s impact to the 125,000-acre buffer zone used to mitigate rocket engine testing noise and vibration impacts and to manage forestry and fire risk. This study employed ERDAS IMAGINE software to apply traditional classification techniques to the IKONOS data. Spectral signatures were collected from multiple ISODATA classifications of subset areas across the entire region and then appended to a master file representative of major targeted cover type conditions. The master file was subsequently used with the IKONOS data and with a maximum likelihood algorithm to produce a supervised classification later refined using GIS-based editing. The final results enabled mapped, quantitative areal estimates of hurricane-induced damage according to general surface cover type. The IKONOS classification accuracy was assessed using higher resolution aerial imagery and field survey data. In-situ data and GIS analysis indicate that the results compare well to FEMA maps of flooding extent. The IKONOS classification also mapped open areas with woody storm debris. The detection of such storm damage categories is potentially useful for government officials responsible for hurricane disaster mitigation.

  1. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  2. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina inflicted widespread damage to vegetation in southwestern coastal Mississippi upon landfall on August 29, 2005. Storm damage to surface vegetation types at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) was mapped and quantified using IKONOS data originally acquired on September 2, 2005, and later obtained via a Department of Defense ClearView contract. NASA SSC management required an assessment of the hurricane s impact to the 125,000-acre buffer zone used to mitigate rocket engine testing noise and vibration impacts and to manage forestry and fire risk. This study employed ERDAS IMAGINE software to apply traditional classification techniques to the IKONOS data. Spectral signatures were collected from multiple ISODATA classifications of subset areas across the entire region and then appended to a master file representative of major targeted cover type conditions. The master file was subsequently used with the IKONOS data and with a maximum likelihood algorithm to produce a supervised classification later refined using GIS-based editing. The final results enabled mapped, quantitative areal estimates of hurricane-induced damage according to general surface cover type. The IKONOS classification accuracy was assessed using higher resolution aerial imagery and field survey data. In-situ data and GIS analysis indicate that the results compare well to FEMA maps of flooding extent. The IKONOS classification also mapped open areas with woody storm debris. The detection of such storm damage categories is potentially useful for government officials responsible for hurricane disaster mitigation.

  3. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook.

  4. The Link Between Reproductive Life Plan Assessment And Provision of Preconception Care At Publicly Funded Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Cheryl L; Gavin, Loretta; Carter, Marion W; Moskosky, Susan B

    2017-09-01

    Federal and clinical guidelines recommend integrating reproductive life plan assessments into routine family planning encounters to increase provision of preconception care. Yet, the prevalence of clinical protocols and of relevant practices at publicly funded health centers is unknown. Administrators and providers at a nationally representative sample of publicly funded health centers that provide family planning services were surveyed in 2013-2014; data from 1,039 linked pairs were used to explore the reported prevalence of reproductive life plan protocols, frequent assessment of patients' reproductive life plan and frequent provision of preconception care. Chi-square tests and multivariable general linear models were used to examine differences in reports of protocols and related practices. Overall, 58% of centers reported having reproductive life plan assessment protocols, 87% reported frequently assessing reproductive life plans and 55% reported frequently providing preconception care. The proportions reporting protocols were lower in community health centers than in other center types (32% vs. 52-91%), in primary care centers than in those with another focus (33% vs. 77-80%) and in centers not receiving Title X funding than in those with such support (36% vs. 77%). Reported existence of a written protocol was positively associated with reported frequent assessment (prevalence ratio, 1.1), and the latter was positively associated with reported frequent preconception care (1.4). Further research is needed on associations between written protocols and clinical practice, and to elucidate the preconception care services that may be associated with reproductive life plan assessment. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  5. Prevention of MSD by means of ergonomic risk assessment (tools) in all phases of the vehicle development process.

    PubMed

    Karlheinz, Schaub; Michaela, Kugler; Max, Bierwirth; Andrea, Sinn-Behrendt; Ralph, Bruder

    2012-01-01

    In industrialized countries musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) play an import role and are often responsible for almost one third of the total sick leave. The changes in the demographic profiles, i.e. aging work forces might even worsen this situation in the future. For a highly productive and sustainable use of human resources in production systems, ergonomics offers high potentials. In the recent years the authors have developed several ergonomic risk assessment tools, especially for the use in automotive industries. These methods may be used during the planning phases in the Tech Centers as well as during the production phase at shop floor level. The tools might also be used for a standardized communication in between the Tech Center and the plants to improve the effects of "lessons learned" for the design and layout of workstations and processes and the optimization of vehicle components. This paper describes suitable risk assessment tools as well as the integration of these tools into the vehicle development process. It introduces a comprehensive management approach for the integration of ergonomics into the management of production systems.

  6. Assessing the phase retardation in corneal tissues using a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, William; Weiblinger, Richard; Beylin, Alexander; Ilev, Ilko K.

    2013-08-01

    We developed and validated a versatile test method for precise quantification of phase retardation in corneal tissues using a femtosecond laser. It is based on an experimental system for direct measurement of corneal phase rotation due to corneal birefringence effects using a dual-polarizer, computer-controlled, femtosecond laser design. It also includes a comprehensive analytical model using Jones matrices. The test method presented is used for quantification of phase retardation in corneal tissues by employing the experimental data obtained from corneal phase rotation measurements and using analytical model assessments. The experimental and theoretical results obtained, and thus, the system's high accuracy and repeatability potential for assessing the corneal phase retardation are validated using control phase retardation evaluation.

  7. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  8. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  9. Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

  10. Quantitative transportation assessment in curved canals prepared with an off-centered rectangular design system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Vieira, Vania Cristina Gomes; Tameirão, Michele Dias Nunes; Belladonna, Felipe Gonçalves; Neves, Aline de Almeida; Souza, Erick Miranda; DE-Deus, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of an off-centered rectangular design system [ProTaper Next (PTN)] to maintain the original profile of the root canal anatomy. To this end, ProTaper Universal (PTU), Reciproc (R) and WaveOne (WO) systems were used as reference techniques for comparison. Forty clear resin blocks with simulated curved root canals were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 10) according to the instrumentation system used: PTN, PTU, R and WO. Color stereomicroscopic images of each block were taken before and after instrumentation. All image processing and data analysis were performed with an open source program (Fiji v.1.47n). Evaluation of canal transportation was obtained for two independent regions: straight and curved portions. Univariate analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test were performed, and a cut-off for significance was set at α = 5%. Instrumentation systems significantly influenced canal transportation (p = 0.000). Overall, R induced significantly lower canal transportation compared with WO, PTN and PTU (p = 0.000). The curved portion displayed superior canal transportation compared to the straight one (p = 0.000). The significance of the difference among instrumentation systems varied according to the canal level evaluated (p = 0.000). In its straight portion, R and WO exhibited significantly lower transportation than PTN; whereas in the curved portion, R produced the lowest deviation. PTU exhibited the highest canal transportation at both levels. It can be concluded that PTN produced less canal transportation than PTU and WO; however, R exhibited better centering ability than PTN.

  11. Assessment of Different Quit Smoking Methods Selected by Patients in Tobacco Cessation Centers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Gholamreza; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Ahmady, Arezoo Ebn; Leischow, Scott J.; Harry, A. Lando; Shadmehr, Mohammad B.; Fadaizadeh, Lida

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health systems play key roles in identifying tobacco users and providing evidence-based care to help them quit. This treatment includes different methods such as simple medical consultation, medication, and telephone counseling. To assess different quit smoking methods selected by patients in tobacco cessation centers in Iran in order to identify those that are most appropriate for the country health system. Methods: In this cross-sectional and descriptive study, a random sample of all quit centers at the country level was used to obtain a representative sample. Patients completed the self-administered questionnaire which contained 10 questions regarding the quality, cost, effect, side effects and the results of quitting methods using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Percentages, frequencies, mean, T-test, and variance analyses were computed for all study variables. Results: A total of 1063 smokers returned completed survey questionnaires. The most frequently used methods were Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and combination therapy (NRT and Counseling) with 228 and 163 individuals reporting these respectively. The least used methods were hypnotism (n = 8) and the quit and win (n = 17). The methods which gained the maximum scores were respectively the combined method, personal and Champix with means of 21.4, 20.4 and 18.4. The minimum scores were for e-cigarettes, hypnotism and education with means of 12.8, 11 and 10.8, respectively. There were significant differences in mean scores based on different cities and different methods. Conclusions: According to smokers’ selection the combined therapy, personal methods and Champix are the most effective methods for quit smoking and these methods could be much more considered in the country health system. PMID:26442750

  12. Multipurpose contrast enhancement on epiphyseal plates and ossification centers for bone age assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The high variations of background luminance, low contrast and excessively enhanced contrast of hand bone radiograph often impede the bone age assessment rating system in evaluating the degree of epiphyseal plates and ossification centers development. The Global Histogram equalization (GHE) has been the most frequently adopted image contrast enhancement technique but the performance is not satisfying. A brightness and detail preserving histogram equalization method with good contrast enhancement effect has been a goal of much recent research in histogram equalization. Nevertheless, producing a well-balanced histogram equalized radiograph in terms of its brightness preservation, detail preservation and contrast enhancement is deemed to be a daunting task. Method In this paper, we propose a novel framework of histogram equalization with the aim of taking several desirable properties into account, namely the Multipurpose Beta Optimized Bi-Histogram Equalization (MBOBHE). This method performs the histogram optimization separately in both sub-histograms after the segmentation of histogram using an optimized separating point determined based on the regularization function constituted by three components. The result is then assessed by the qualitative and quantitative analysis to evaluate the essential aspects of histogram equalized image using a total of 160 hand radiographs that are implemented in testing and analyses which are acquired from hand bone online database. Result From the qualitative analysis, we found that basic bi-histogram equalizations are not capable of displaying the small features in image due to incorrect selection of separating point by focusing on only certain metric without considering the contrast enhancement and detail preservation. From the quantitative analysis, we found that MBOBHE correlates well with human visual perception, and this improvement shortens the evaluation time taken by inspector in assessing the bone age. Conclusions

  13. Three-dimensional phase-field model of dislocations for a heterogeneous face-centered cubic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Antoine; Le Bouar, Yann; Finel, Alphonse

    2017-08-01

    A central aim of current materials studies is to develop a predictive modeling that incorporates dislocation-based plastic activity and microstructural evolution. Phase-field method has emerged as a powerful tool for addressing this issue, providing us with a versatile variational framework able to describe the movement of dislocations in interaction with underlying microstructures. In this article, a three-dimensional phase-field model of dislocations (PFMD) is developed with a discretization scheme that explicitly captures the face-centered cubic (FCC) geometry. Within this framework, continuous fields are discretized in a way that allows to consider strongly heterogeneous materials and sharp interfaces (free surfaces, stiffer precipitates, pores...) without generating numerical artifacts. The PFMD exposed in this work reproduces dislocation activity in FCC geometry, their reactions, and a particular attention is devoted to the dislocation core behaviors in order to remove effects present in prior generic PFMDs that can appear to be spurious for micron-scale applications. This allows us to rigorously reproduce the dislocation's velocity with respect to experimental friction coefficients. The model is discussed and illustrated by applications standing at different space-scales that show how dislocations operate with microstructural heterogeneities such as free-surfaces (cylindrical nanopillar) and voids (pore under isostatic pressure).

  14. Collective dynamics and self-diffusion in a diblock copolymer melt in the body-centered cubic phase.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, C M; Rittig, F; Almdal, K; Mortensen, K; Stĕpánek, P

    2004-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of a strongly asymmetric poly(ethylene propylene)-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PEP-PDMS) diblock copolymer in the melt have been studied over a wide temperature range. Small-angle neutron scattering reveals that the sample exhibits two stable phases in this temperature range: Above the order-to-disorder transition temperature, it is disordered, whereas the domain structure is body-centered cubic (bcc) below, being stable down to the lowest temperatures measured. In the disordered state, dynamic light scattering (DLS) in the polarized geometry reveals the heterogeneity mode and the cluster mode. In the bcc phase, the PEP and the PDMS blocks form the micellar cores and the matrix, respectively. Here, two modes are observed in DLS, and the diffusion coefficients measured using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR are broadly distributed with the most probable diffusion coefficient coinciding with the slow DLS mode. We attribute the fast process in the bcc state to concentration fluctuations of the micellar cores (PEP), relaxing by mutual diffusion of the micelles with copolymers dissolved in the PDMS matrix. The slower process in the bcc state is ascribed to activated long-range self-diffusion of single copolymers from micelle to micelle through the PDMS matrix. This assignment is corroborated by the good coincidence of the reduced diffusivities with the ones from the literature. However, this mode may also be assigned to the rearrangement of entire micelles.

  15. Phase transitions, magnetism and surface adsorptions assessed by meta-GGA functionals and random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing

    The meta-GGA functionals and random phase approximation are tested for phase transitions and a strongly correlated transition metal oxide in this dissertation. One of the latest meta-GGA functionals is also employed to study the van der Waals bound system in surface science. Our main purpose is to reveal the performance of new exchange-correlation functionals on various properties and systems. We are also interested in seeking the possible relationship between the performance of a semilocal functional and its exchange enhancement factor. We have studied the structural phase transitions in crystalline Si (insulator to metal), SiO2 (insulator to insulator) and Zr (metal to metal) systems, as a test of exchange energy semilocal functionals on Jacob's ladder. Our results confirm the energy-geometry delimma of GGAs in three systems. The most sophisticated non-empirical meta-generalized gradient approximations (meta-GGAs) such as TPSS (Tao-Perdew-Staroveov-Scuseria) and revTPSS (revised TPSS) give better lattice constants than PBE, but the phase transition parameters (energy difference and transition pressure) are smaller and less realistic than those from the latter GGA. However, the recent functionals of meta-GGA made simple family (MGGA_MS) behave differently to those previous meta-GGAs, predicting larger and more realistic phase transition parameters. Meanwhile, MGGA_MS also delivers the equilibrium geometry of crystalline materials similar to previous non-empirical meta-GGAs. In contrast to semilocal functionals, the nonlocal functionals such as the range-separated hybrid functional HSE06 (Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof) and non-self consistent random phase approximation (RPA) are not only able to give the accurate equilibrium geometry , but also predict the realistic phase transition parameters for Si and SiO2 systems. The ground state of rutile-type vanadium dioxide (R-VO2) represents a great challenge to the current density functional theory. In this dissertation, we

  16. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  17. Hybrid vehicle assessment. Phase 1: Petroleum savings analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, R.; Liddle, S.; Deshpande, G.; Trummel, M.; Vivian, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive analysis of near term electric hybrid vehicles are presented, with emphasis on their potential to save significant amounts of petroleum on a national scale in the 1990s. Performance requirements and expected annual usage patterns of these vehicles are first modeled. The projected U.S. fleet composition is estimated, and conceptual hybrid vehicle designs are conceived and analyzed for petroleum use when driven in the expected annual patterns. These petroleum consumption estimates are then compared to similar estimates for projected 1990 conventional vehicles having the same performance and driven in the same patterns. Results are presented in the form of three utility functions and comparisons of sevral conceptual designs are made. The Hybrid Vehicle (HV) design and assessment techniques are discussed and a general method is explained for selecting the optimum energy management strategy for any vehicle mission battery combination. Conclusions and recommendations are presented, and development recommendations are identified.

  18. Understanding preferences for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-management support through a patient-centered approach: a 2-phase mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Janice M S; Katic, Bozena J; Fitz-Randolph, Marcy; Jackson, Richard A; Chow, Wing; Mullins, C Daniel

    2016-07-18

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who participate in diabetes management programs have been shown to have better glycemic control and slower disease progression, although program participation remains low. In the USA, increasing participation in diabetes management support programs may also directly impact provider reimbursement, as payments are increasingly based on patient-centered measures. However, little is known about factors that may enhance patient participation. This study aimed at further understanding what is important in diabetes management support from the patients' perspective and at assessing the utilization of various types of diabetes-management programs. A two-phase mixed-methods study was conducted of adult US members of PatientsLikeMe®, an online research network of patients. Phase 1 comprised qualitative interviews with 10 individuals to inform the online survey's contents, aided by literature review. During phase 2, this online survey was completed by 294 participants who reported on their diabetes goals and preferences for T2DM self-management support programs. The majority of the respondents were not participating in any program (65 %), but most had goals of improving diet (77 %), weight loss (71 %), and achieving stable blood glucose levels (71 %). Among those currently participating in programs, clinic, hospital-based, or other health-care professional programs were the most commonly used (51 %). The most preferred type of support was diet/weight-loss support (62 %), while doctors or nurses (61 %) and dietitians (55 %) were the most preferred sources of diabetes support. The low participation in diabetes self-management programs revealed in this study underscores the need for strategies to improve patient engagement. The results revealed support types and formats that patients with T2DM prefer and need. These findings may help improve patient engagement by guiding the future design of more effective diabetes management

  19. Hanford Tank Farm interim storage phase probabilistic risk assessment outline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-19

    This report is the second in a series examining the risks for the high level waste (HLW) storage facilities at the Hanford Site. The first phase of the HTF PSA effort addressed risks from Tank 101-SY, only. Tank 101-SY was selected as the initial focus of the PSA because of its propensity to periodically release (burp) a mixture of flammable and toxic gases. This report expands the evaluation of Tank 101-SY to all 177 storage tanks. The 177 tanks are arranged into 18 farms and contain the HLW accumulated over 50 years of weapons material production work. A centerpiece of the remediation activity is the effort toward developing a permanent method for disposing of the HLW tank`s highly radioactive contents. One approach to risk based prioritization is to perform a PSA for the whole HLW tank farm complex to identify the highest risk tanks so that remediation planners and managers will have a more rational basis for allocating limited funds to the more critical areas. Section 3 presents the qualitative identification of generic initiators that could threaten to produce releases from one or more tanks. In section 4 a detailed accident sequence model is developed for each initiating event group. Section 5 defines the release categories to which the scenarios are assigned in the accident sequence model and presents analyses of the airborne and liquid source terms resulting from different release scenarios. The conditional consequences measured by worker or public exposure to radionuclides or hazardous chemicals and economic costs of cleanup and repair are analyzed in section 6. The results from all the previous sections are integrated to produce unconditional risk curves in frequency of exceedance format.

  20. Phase 1A safety assessment of intravenous amitriptyline

    PubMed Central

    Fridrich, Peter; Colvin, Hans Peter; Zizza, Anthony; Wasan, Ajay D.; Lukanich, Jean; Lirk, Philipp; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald; Hamp, Thomas; Gerner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The antidepressant amitriptyline is used as an adjuvant in the treatment of chronic pain. Among its many actions, amitriptyline blocks Na+ channels and nerves in several animal and human models. As perioperative intravenous lidocaine has been suggested to decrease post-operative pain, amitriptyline, because of its longer half-life time, might be more useful than lidocaine. However, the use of intravenous amitriptyline is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We therefore investigated the adverse effects of preoperative intravenous amitriptyline in a typical phase 1A trial. After obtaining written Food and Drug Administration and institutional review board approval, we obtained written consent for preoperative infusion of amitriptyline in an open-label, dose-escalating design (25, 50, and 100 mg, n=5 per group). Plasma levels of amitriptyline/nortriptyline were determined, and adverse effects were recorded in a predetermined symptom list. Infusion of 25 and 50 mg amitriptyline appears to be well tolerated; however, the study was terminated when one subject in the 100-mg group developed severe bradycardia. Intravenous infusion of amitriptyline (25 - 50 mg over 1 hour) did not create side effects beyond dry mouth and drowsiness, or dizziness, in 2 of our 10 otherwise healthy participants receiving the 25-50 mg dose. An appropriately powered future trial is necessary to determine a potential role of amitriptyline in decreasing postoperative pain. Perspective Amitriptyline potently blocks the persistently open Na+ channels, which are known to be instrumental in various pain states. As this occurs at very low plasma concentrations, a single preoperative intravenous infusion of amitriptyline could provide long-lasting pain relief and decrease the incidence of chronic pain. PMID:17512256

  1. Bismuth doping strategies in GeTe nanowires to promote high-temperature phase transition from rhombohedral to face-centered cubic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Huang, Rong; Wei, Fenfen; Cheng, Guosheng; Kong, Tao

    2014-11-17

    The phase transition of Bi-doped (∼3 at. %) GeTe nanowires from a rhombohedral (R) to a face-centered cubic (C) structure was observed in in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The promotion of high-temperature R-C phase transition by a doping approach was revealed. Ab initio energy calculations of doped GeTe at various Bi doping concentrations were performed to interpret the promoted temperature-induced phase transitions. Those results indicated that the total energy differences between R and C structures of doped GeTe decreased as Bi doping concentrations increased, which facilitated R-C phase transitions.

  2. Assessing Sea Level Rise Impacts on the Surficial Aquifer in the Kennedy Space Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Wang, D.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Warnock, A. M.; Hall, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global sea level rise in the past century due to climate change has been seen at an average rate of approximately 1.7-2.2 mm per year, with an increasing rate over the next century. The increasing SLR rate poses a severe threat to the low-lying land surface and the shallow groundwater system in the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, resulting in saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding. A three-dimensional groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented to investigate and evaluate the extent of floods due to rising water table as well as saltwater intrusion. The SEAWAT model is chosen to solve the variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport governing equations and simulate the regional-scale spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater level and chloride concentration. The horizontal resolution of the model is 50 m, and the vertical domain includes both the Surficial Aquifer and the Floridan Aquifer. The numerical model is calibrated based on the observed hydraulic head and chloride concentration. The potential impacts of sea level rise on saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding are assessed under various sea level rise scenarios. Based on the simulation results, the potential landward movement of saltwater and freshwater fringe is projected. The existing water supply wells are examined overlaid with the projected salinity distribution map. The projected Surficial Aquifer water tables are overlaid with data of high resolution land surface elevation, land use and land cover, and infrastructure to assess the potential impacts of sea level rise. This study provides useful tools for decision making on ecosystem management, water supply planning, and facility management.

  3. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Carroll Training Center, Installation 02045, Anchorage, Alaska. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krokosz, M.; Sefano, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Alaska Army National Guard property known as Camp Carroll Training Center, located on the Fort Richardson Army facility near Anchorage, Alaska. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for the completion of preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing, corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances used, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The primary environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) the Alaska Air National Guard storage area behind Building S57112 (Organizational Maintenance Shop [OMS] 6); (2) the state of Alaska maintenance facility and the soil/tar-type spill north of the state of Alaska maintenance facility; (3) the waste storage area adjacent to OMS 6; (4) the contaminated area from leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) and the oil-water separator; and (5) soil staining in the parking area at the Camp Carroll Headquarters Building. Camp Carroll appears to be in excellent condition from an environmental standpoint, and current practices are satisfactory. Argonne recommends that the Alaska Department of Military Affairs consider remediation of soil contamination associated with all storage areas, as well as reviewing the practices of other residents of the facility. Argonne also recommends that the current methods of storing waste material behind Building S57112 (OMS 6) be reviewed for alternatives.

  4. Assessment of inpatient multimodal cardiac imaging appropriateness at large academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Remfry, Andrew; Abrams, Howard; Dudzinski, David M; Weiner, Rory B; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2015-11-14

    Responding to concerns regarding the growth of cardiac testing, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) published Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for various cardiac imaging modalities. Single modality cardiac imaging appropriateness has been reported but there have been no studies assessing the appropriateness of multiple imaging modalities in an inpatient environment. A retrospective study of the appropriateness of cardiac tests ordered by the inpatient General Internal Medicine (GIM) and Cardiology services at three Canadian academic hospitals was conducted over two one-month periods. Cardiac tests characterized were transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), single-photon emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT), and diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Overall, 553 tests were assessed, of which 99.8% were classifiable by AUC. 91% of all studies were categorized as appropriate, 4% may be appropriate and 5% were rarely appropriate. There were high rates of appropriate use of all modalities by GIM and Cardiology throughout. Significantly more appropriate diagnostic catheterizations were ordered by Cardiology than GIM (93% vs. 82%, p = <0.01). Cardiology ordered more appropriate studies overall (94% vs. 88%, p = 0.03) but there was no difference in the rate of rarely appropriate studies (3% vs. 6%, p = 0.23). The ACCF AUC captured the vast majority of clinical scenarios for multiple cardiac imaging modalities in this multi-centered study on Cardiology and GIM inpatients in the acute care setting. The rate of appropriate ordering was high across all imaging modalities. We recommend further work towards improving appropriate utilization of cardiac imaging resources focus on the out-patient setting.

  5. A bioelectrical impedance phase angle measuring system for assessment of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanghao; Huo, Xiaolin; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Cheng; Duan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance phase angle has been recommended as a tool to assess nutrition state, but there are no measuring devices have been specially designed for hospital residents. In this study, a system was established for the measurement of bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The electrical composition, calculation method and measuring method of this system are presented in this paper. Experiments showed excellent performance of this system in measuring impedance made of resistors and capacitors. The designed system was also used to measure the bioelectrical impedance phase angle of both healthy subjects and patients with malnutrition, and the results demonstrated that the phase angle of patients with malnutrition is lower than that of healthy subjects (P < 0.01 for male and P < 0.05 for female). These results suggest that phase angle has the potential to be a useful tool for the quantitative assessment of nutritional status.

  6. Analysis of complex wind regimes at Kennedy Space Center for radiological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.E.; Parks, C.R.; Atchison, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Galileo and Ulysses will be launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during October 1989 and October 1990, respectively. These deep-space probes will contain a radioactive thermoelectric generator as a power source. An accidental breach of the containment vessel housing the generator could cause a leak of radioactive material to the atmosphere. If this occurred, the radioactive cloud would move with the prevailing wind flow pattern and pose a serious health threat to all in its path. Since the KSC/Cape Canaveral (KSC/CC) area of Florida is located in a coastal environment with several different land/water interfaces, complex low-level wind circulation patterns exist throughout the year. Thus, if any transport and diffusion model is to correctly predict the movement of effluent near KSC, it must be able to accurately portray the characteristics of the land/sea breeze flow pattern. To evaluate models used at KSC, the KSC Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (KABLE) has been designed to provide a data set to better define the characteristics of these mesoscale circulations. Data collection for KABLE occurred from November 1, 1988, to October 31, 1989. This paper presents analyses for 1 day during November 1988 that demonstrate the complexity of the local meteorological conditions at KSC/CC. The NUS Corporation has used these data and empirical sea breeze parameters to evaluate their Emergency Dose Assessment System, EMERGE.

  7. Assessing community health center (CHC) assets and capabilities for recruiting physicians: the CHC Community Apgar Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Baker, E T; Schmitz, D F; Wasden, S A; MacKenzie, L A; Epperly, T

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends suggest that community health centers (CHCs) may experience a shortage of qualified physicians required to meet current and future demand. The purpose of this study was to develop an evaluation instrument, the CHC Community Apgar Questionnaire (CHC CAQ) for Idaho CHCs to use in physician recruitment. The instrument was developed based on the Critical Access Hospital Community Apgar Questionnaire (CAH CAQ). The CHC CAQ was customized for CHC use and 12 new factors were identified for substitution in the CHC instrument. All 13 CHCs in Idaho participated in this study. One site was chosen per CHC if the CHC had multiple service locations. In each community, the administrator of the CHC and the physician with recruiting responsibilities participated individually in a structured interview. A total of 11 physicians and 11 administrators participated in the study. Differences were found across and within classes of factors associated with success in physician recruitment. Alpha communities, those historically having more success in physician recruitment, scored higher on CAQ metrics than less successful beta communities. No material differences were noted across physician and administrator ratings. Cumulative mean Community Apgar scores (CHC CAQ) were mostly higher in alpha communities. The CHC CAQ, like the CAH CAQ, seems to discriminate between communities with differing assets and capabilities based on historical community-specific workforce trends. This assessment may suggest which factors are most important for a community to address with limited available resources and which factors are useful in marketing their CHC to prospective physicians.

  8. Expansion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Research Center: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to expand and upgrade facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Research Center (IRC) by constructing a research laboratory addition on the northeast corner of existing laboratory building; upgrading the fume hood system in the existing laboratory building; and constructing a hazardous waste handling facility and a chemical storage building. The DOE also proposes to expand the capabilities of biotechnology research programs by increasing use of radiolabeled compounds to levels in excess of current facility limits for three radionuclides (carbon-14, sulfur-35, and phosphorus-32). This Environmental assessment identifies the need for the new facilities, describes the proposed projects and environmental setting, and evaluates the potential environmental effects. Impacts associated with current operation are discussed and established as a baseline. Impacts associated with the proposed action and cumulative impacts are described against this background. Alternatives to the proposed action (No action; Locating proposed facilities at a different site) are discussed and a list of applicable regulations is provided. The no action alternative is continuation of existing operations at existing levels as described in Section 4 of this EA. Proposed facilities could be constructed at a different location, but these facilities would not be useful or practical since they are needed to provide a support function for IRC operations. Further, the potential environmental impacts would not be reduced if a different site was selected.

  9. Measuring Success: Evaluation Designs and Approaches to Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gold, Melanie A; Heitel, Jennifer; Martin, Kathryn; Fisher, Deborah A; Santelli, John

    2016-01-01

    Since the founding of the first school-based health centers (SBHCs) >45 years ago, researchers have attempted to measure their impact on child and adolescent physical and mental health and academic outcomes. A review of the literature finds that SBHC evaluation studies have been diverse, encompassing different outcomes and varying target populations, study periods, methodological designs, and scales. A complex picture emerges of the impact of SBHCs on health outcomes, which may be a function of the specific health outcomes examined, the health needs of specific communities and schools, the characteristics of the individuals assessed, and/or the specific constellation of SBHC services. SBHC evaluations face numerous challenges that affect the interpretation of evaluation findings, including maturation, self-selection, low statistical power, and displacement effects. Using novel approaches such as implementing a multipronged approach to maximize participation, entering-class proxy-baseline design, propensity score methods, data set linkage, and multisite collaboration may mitigate documented challenges in SBHC evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrating Balloon and Satellite Operation Data Centers for Technology Readiness Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Fernandes, Jose Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric balloon-borne experiments have been one of the most effective ways to validate innovative space technology, taking the advantage of reduced development cycles and low cost in launching and operation. In Brazil, the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) has balloon and satellite ground infrastructures since the 1970´s and the 1990´s, respectively. In the recent past, a strategic approach was adopted on the modernization of balloon ground operation facilities for supporting the protoMIRAX experiment, an X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The strategic target was to reuse the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software framework developed to control and monitor INPÉs satellites, for balloon operation. This paper presents the results of that effort and the new ongoing project, a computer-based framework named I2Bso, which strategic target is to Integrate INPÉs Balloon and Satellite Operation data centers. The I2Bso major purpose is to support the continuous assessment of an innovative technology after different qualification flights either on board balloons or satellites in order to acquire growing evidence for the technology maturity.

  11. Measuring Success: Evaluation Designs and Approaches to Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Samantha; Gold, Melanie A.; Heitel, Jennifer; Martin, Kathryn; Fisher, Deborah A.; Santelli, John

    2015-01-01

    Since the founding of the first School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs) over 45 years ago, researchers have attempted to measure their impact on child and adolescent physical and mental health and academic outcomes. A review of the literature finds that SBHC evaluation studies have been diverse, encompassing different outcomes and varying target populations, study periods, methodological designs, and scales. A complex picture emerges of the impact of SBHCs on health outcomes, which may be a function of the specific health outcomes examined, the health needs of specific communities and schools, the characteristics of the individuals assessed, and/or the specific constellation of SBHC services. SBHC evaluations face numerous challenges that affect the interpretation of evaluation findings, including maturation, self-selection, low statistical power, and displacement effects. Utilizing novel approaches such as implementing a multipronged approach to maximize participation, entering-class proxy baseline design, propensity score methods, dataset linkage, and multisite collaboration may mitigate documented challenges in SBHC evaluation. PMID:26707224

  12. Hybrid vehicle assessment. Phase I. Petroleum savings analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, R.; Liddle, S.; Deshpande, G.; Trummel, M.; Vivian, H.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive analysis of near-term electric-hybrid vehicles. Its purpose was to estimate their potential to save significant amounts of petroleum on a national scale in the 1990s. Performance requirements and expected annual usage patterns of these vehicles were first modeled. The projected US fleet composition was estimated, and conceptual hybrid vehicle designs were conceived and analyzed for petroleum use when driven in the expected annual patterns. These petroleum consumption estimates were then compared to similar estimates for projected 1990 conventional vehicles having the same performance and driven in the same patterns. Results are presented in the form of three utility functions and comparisons of several conceptual designs are made. The Hybrid Vehicle (HV) design and assessment techniques are discussed and a general method is explained for selecting the optimum energy management strategy for any vehicle-mission-battery combination. A discussion of lessons learned during the construction and test of the General Electric Hybrid Test Vehicle is also presented. Conclusions and recommendations are presented, and development recommendations are identified.

  13. Eastern gas shales mineback report: site assessment - Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K.; Sawyer, W.K.; Shuck, K.Z.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The technology development and demonstration program herein described resulted from an assessment of the state-of-the-art problems of gas recovery, from the Eastern Devonian Shales. After ten years of Devonian Shale research, the remaining major issues for developing the shale resource have been defined and this project was formulated to address those specific recovery problems. This document provides the rationale and criteria for selecting and evaluating a site for a mineback type project and the experimental results obtained from a one hundred and twenty day on-site testing and evaluation plan. The site selected as the best overall candidate for on-site testing was Sugarloaf Mountain, which is located about six miles off the Interstate I-64 exit at Morehead, Kentucky. The on-site testing included obtaining a core through the Ohio shale interval, core analysis, in-situ stress measurements from five boreholes, gas pressure buildup, natural fracture and joint mapping, hydraulic fracture orientation mapping, photogeology and a thorough study of the geology and gas shale reservoir history in the area. Results of the site evaluation data obtained to date indicate the site to be a very favorable one for conducting the planned mineback experiments and future development, testing and demonstration of Devonian Gas shales recovery technology.

  14. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  15. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  16. Assessing Transplant Education Practices in Dialysis Centers: Comparing Educator Reported and Medicare Data.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Amy D; Peipert, John D; Goalby, Christina J; Dinkel, Katrina M; Xiao, Huiling; Lentine, Krista L

    2015-09-04

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requires that dialysis centers inform new patients of their transplant options and document compliance using the CMS-2728 Medical Evidence Form (Form-2728). This study compared reports of transplant education for new dialysis patients reported to CMS with descriptions from transplant educators (predominantly dialysis nurses and social workers) of their centers' quantity of and specific educational practices. The goal was to determine what specific transplant education occurred and whether provision of transplant education was associated with center-level variation in transplant wait-listing rates. Form-2728 data were drawn for 1558 incident dialysis patients at 170 centers in the Heartland Kidney Network (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska) in 2009-2011; educators at these centers completed a survey describing their transplant educational practices. Educators' own survey responses were compared with Form-2728 reports for patients at each corresponding center. The association of quantity of transplant education practices used with wait-listing rates across dialysis centers was examined using multivariable negative binomial regression. According to Form-2728, 77% of patients (n=1203) were informed of their transplant options within 45 days. Educators, who reported low levels of transplant knowledge themselves (six of 12 questions answered correctly), most commonly reported giving oral recommendations to begin transplant evaluation (988 informed patients educated, 81% of centers) and referrals to external transplant education programs (959 informed patients educated, 81% of centers). Only 18% reported having detailed discussions about transplant with their patients. Compared with others, centers that used more than three educational activities (incident rate ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.73) had higher transplant wait-listing rates. While most educators inform new patients that transplant is an

  17. Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Seneca Rocks Discovery Center, Seneca Rocks, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, Kosol; Salasovich, James; Kandt, Alicen

    2016-03-22

    As part of ongoing efforts by the U.S. Forest Service to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies into its facilities, the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory performed an energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment of the Seneca Rocks Discovery Center in Seneca Rocks, West Virginia. This report documents the findings of this assessment, and provides site-specific information for the implementation of energy and water conservation measures, and renewable energy measures.

  18. Implementation of the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability over two phases.

    PubMed

    Kroppan, Erik; Nonstad, Kåre; Iversen, Runar Busch; Søndenaa, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) has provided a strong evidence base to predict a range of problem behaviors. The implementation of START and adaptation of the services to the use of START have so far been sparsely described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the continuation and the interdisciplinarity of risk assessments through the two phases. Over a period of 10 years, the forensic mental health services at Brøset has implemented START in two phases: initially with implementing the instrument (2005-2009) and secondarily by customizing the instrument to everyday treatment and planning (since 2009). This implementation was based on data from 887 START assessments for 181 patients over a decade (2005-2015). The results showed that the number of START assessments has been stable throughout the past 10 years and the interval between the ratings has decreased significantly (p<0.05). The involvement by diversity of professionals has increased significantly over the two implementation phases. This study also addressed the continuity and organization of the implementation process and presented an overview of how START has been widespread in the service through treatment. The results showed an increased multidisciplinary participation and a continuing rate of assessments as the implementation progressed from assessment to a combined assessment-treatment phase.

  19. Assessing the Pedagogical Impact of the VaNTH Engineering Research Center on Faculty and Postdoctoral Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Monica; Cawthorne, James; McNeill, Nathan; Cekic, Osman; Frye, Matthew; Stacer, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    From 1999 to 2007, the Vanderbilt-Northwestern-Texas-Harvard/MIT (VaNTH) Engineering Research Center focused on improving bioengineering education through the applications of learning science, learning technology, and assessment and evaluation within the domain of bioengineering. This paper discusses results from a survey to explore the impact of…

  20. The Life-Centered Career Education (LCCE) Inventory: A Curriculum-Based, Criterion-Related Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Dale E.; Brolin, Donn E.

    1987-01-01

    The article describes the development of a Knowledge Battery to assess the competency level of secondary special education students receiving instruction in the Life-Centered Career Education Curriculum. The Battery consists of 89 subcompetency tests with items selected, validity, reliability, cutting scores determined, and standardization…

  1. Evaluation of the FOCUS (Feedback on Counseling Using Simulation) Instrument for Assessment of Client-Centered Nutrition Counseling Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Beverly W.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop an instrument to assess client-centered counseling behaviors (skills) of student-counselors in a standardized patient (SP) exercise. Methods: Descriptive study of the accuracy and utility of a newly developed counseling evaluation instrument. Study participants included 11 female student-counselors at a Midwestern…

  2. Evaluation of the FOCUS (Feedback on Counseling Using Simulation) Instrument for Assessment of Client-Centered Nutrition Counseling Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Beverly W.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop an instrument to assess client-centered counseling behaviors (skills) of student-counselors in a standardized patient (SP) exercise. Methods: Descriptive study of the accuracy and utility of a newly developed counseling evaluation instrument. Study participants included 11 female student-counselors at a Midwestern…

  3. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  4. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  5. Assessment of the Citrus tristeza virus isolates detected in spring 2007 at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center, Exeter, California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus was detected in at least 50 trees at the 71 ha Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) near Exeter, Calif. in spring 2007. The purpose of this research was to assess genetic diversity and aphid transmissibility of these isolates. Nine representative trees were sampled o...

  6. Validating Assessment Techniques in an Outcome-Centered Liberal Arts Curriculum: Integrated Competence Seminar. Final Report, Research Report Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentkowski, Marcia; Doherty, Austin

    The Integrated Competence Seminar (ICS), An Alverno College assessment technique used in the outcome-centered liberal arts curriculum, is discussed. The ICS technique allows students to demonstrate integration and transfer of learning in three situations: oral presentation, group discussion, and the In-Basket exercise (decision-making problems).…

  7. Large-Scale Investigation of the Role of Trait Activation Theory for Understanding Assessment Center Convergent and Discriminant Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievens, Filip; Chasteen, Christopher S.; Day, Eric Anthony; Christiansen, Neil D.

    2006-01-01

    This study used trait activation theory as a theoretical framework to conduct a large-scale test of the interactionist explanation of the convergent and discriminant validity findings obtained in assessment centers. Trait activation theory specifies the conditions in which cross-situationally consistent and inconsistent candidate performances are…

  8. Environmental Assessment: Proposed Construction of a New Entry Control Facility and Visitors Center Adjacent to the Bell Street Gate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Cannon Street, Building 1060 Maxwell AFB, AL 36112 Tel.: 334-953-5260 • 334-3964004 L E C Maxwell Support Division March 17, 2005 Mr. David Rabon ...Facility (ECF) and Visitors Center Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama Dear Mr. Rabon , The United States Air Force is preparing an Environmental Assessment

  9. Assessing Transplant Education Practices in Dialysis Centers: Comparing Educator Reported and Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Peipert, John D.; Goalby, Christina J.; Dinkel, Katrina M.; Xiao, Huiling; Lentine, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requires that dialysis centers inform new patients of their transplant options and document compliance using the CMS-2728 Medical Evidence Form (Form-2728). This study compared reports of transplant education for new dialysis patients reported to CMS with descriptions from transplant educators (predominantly dialysis nurses and social workers) of their centers’ quantity of and specific educational practices. The goal was to determine what specific transplant education occurred and whether provision of transplant education was associated with center-level variation in transplant wait-listing rates. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Form-2728 data were drawn for 1558 incident dialysis patients at 170 centers in the Heartland Kidney Network (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska) in 2009–2011; educators at these centers completed a survey describing their transplant educational practices. Educators’ own survey responses were compared with Form-2728 reports for patients at each corresponding center. The association of quantity of transplant education practices used with wait-listing rates across dialysis centers was examined using multivariable negative binomial regression. Results According to Form-2728, 77% of patients (n=1203) were informed of their transplant options within 45 days. Educators, who reported low levels of transplant knowledge themselves (six of 12 questions answered correctly), most commonly reported giving oral recommendations to begin transplant evaluation (988 informed patients educated, 81% of centers) and referrals to external transplant education programs (959 informed patients educated, 81% of centers). Only 18% reported having detailed discussions about transplant with their patients. Compared with others, centers that used more than three educational activities (incident rate ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.73) had higher transplant

  10. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of 3,3'-diaryloxindoles as triarylmethanes with a chiral all-carbon quaternary center: phase-transfer-catalyzed S(N)Ar reaction.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Koga, Kenta; Tokuda, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Maruoka, Keiji

    2014-06-10

    Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of unsymmetrical triarylmethanes with a chiral all-carbon quaternary center was achieved by using a chiral bifunctional quaternary phosphonium bromide catalyst in the S(N)Ar reaction of 3-aryloxindoles under phase-transfer conditions. The presence of a urea moiety in the chiral phase-transfer catalyst was important for obtaining high enantioselectivity in this reaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Differences in stress-related ratings between research center and home environments in dementia caregivers using ecological momentary assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonareva, Irina; Amen, Alexandra M; Ellingson, Roger M; Oken, Barry S

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians and researchers working with dementia caregivers typically assess caregiver stress in a clinic or research center, but caregivers' stress is rooted at home where they provide care. This study aimed to compare ratings of stress-related measures obtained in research settings and in the home using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). EMA of 18 caregivers (mean age 66.4 years ±7.8; 89% females) and 23 non-caregivers (mean age 66.4 years ±7.9; 87% females) was implemented using a personal digital assistant. Subjects rated their perceived stress, fatigue, coping with current situation, mindfulness, and situational demand once in the research center and again at 3-4 semi-random points during a day at home. The data from several assessments conducted at home were averaged for statistical analyses and compared with the data collected in the research center. The testing environment had a differential effect on caregivers and non-caregivers for the ratings of perceived stress (p < 0.01) and situational demand (p = 0.01). When tested in the research center, ratings for all measures were similar between groups, but when tested at home, caregivers rated their perceived stress as higher than non-caregivers (p = 0.02). Overall, caregivers reported higher perceived stress at home than in the research center (p = 0.02), and non-caregivers reported greater situational demand in the research center than at home (p < 0.01). The assessment method and environment affect stress-related outcomes. Evaluating participants in their natural environment provides a more sensitive measure of stress-related outcomes. EMA provides a convenient way to gather data when evaluating dementia caregivers.

  12. Discarding the Saber: An Assessment of the Utility of the Phasing Construct in Operational Campaign Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    promulgated strategic military objectives, and General Franks’ identified operational objectives. Rooted in a series of plans called the “INFINITE RESOLVE...of Operational Net Assessment (Norfolk VA: Joint Warfighting Center Doctrinal Pamphlet Series 4, February 2004), 4. 39... series phenomena, and the complexity of its representations are only limited literally by the observer’s ability to understand them. Critical

  13. A 727 airplane center duct inlet low speed performance confirmation model test for refanned JT8D engines, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaldschmidt, G.; Syltebo, B. E.; Ting, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    The results from testing of a 0.3 scale model center duct inlet (S duct) for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 engines are presented. The objective of this test was to demonstrate that the required airflow of the JT8D-100 engine (480 lb/sec as compared to 334 lb/sec for JT8D-15) can be achieved with minimum modifications to the existing 727 airplane structure at acceptable levels of total pressure recovery and distortion. Steady-state pressure recovery, steady-state pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure measurements were taken at the engine face station. Surface static pressure measurements were taken along the duct. Test results indicated that the required airflow was achieved with acceptable pressure recovery (comparable to the current 727-200 S duct). Inlet inflow angle variation within the 727 airplane operating regime (minus 5 to 5 degrees) had no effect on the inlet performance. Pressure distortion at static and forward speed at takeoff airflow conditions are within P and WA limits for the Phase II duct when equipped with vortex generators. Static crosswind operation between 10 knots and 25 knots appears feasible at full takeoff power.

  14. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin-Shu; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Xiangying, Deng; Zuan, Lim Yok; Jones, Leigh Ann; Ramakrishna, Lakshmi; de Vries, Victor C.; Dolpady, Jayashree; Aina, Hoi; Joseph, Sabrina; Narayanan, Sriram; Subramaniam, Sharrada; Puthia, Manoj; Wong, Glenn; Xiong, Huizhong; Poidinger, Michael; Urban, Joseph F.; Lafaille, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE+ B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias toward the plasma cell (PC) fate, and dependence on sequential switching for the production of high-affinity IgE. We show here that IgE+ GC B cells are unfit to undergo the conventional GC differentiation program due to impaired B cell receptor function and increased apoptosis. IgE+ GC cells fail to populate the GC light zone and are unable to contribute to the memory and long-lived PC compartments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that direct and sequential switching are linked to distinct B cell differentiation fates: direct switching generates IgE+ GC cells, whereas sequential switching gives rise to IgE+ PCs. We propose a comprehensive model for the generation and memory of IgE responses. PMID:24218137

  15. In situ X-ray data collection and structure phasing of protein crystals at Structural Biology Center 19-ID.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Karolina; Tan, Kemin; Chang, Changsoo; Li, Hui; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Molitsky, Michael; Alkire, Randy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    A prototype of a 96-well plate scanner for in situ data collection has been developed at the Structural Biology Center (SBC) beamline 19-ID, located at the Advanced Photon Source, USA. The applicability of this instrument for protein crystal diffraction screening and data collection at ambient temperature has been demonstrated. Several different protein crystals, including selenium-labeled, were used for data collection and successful SAD phasing. Without the common procedure of crystal handling and subsequent cryo-cooling for data collection at T = 100 K, crystals in a crystallization buffer show remarkably low mosaicity (<0.1°) until deterioration by radiation damage occurs. Data presented here show that cryo-cooling can cause some unexpected structural changes. Based on the results of this study, the integration of the plate scanner into the 19-ID end-station with automated controls is being prepared. With improvement of hardware and software, in situ data collection will become available for the SBC user program including remote access.

  16. In situ X-ray data collection and structure phasing of protein crystals at Structural Biology Center 19-ID

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Karolina; Tan, Kemin; Chang, Changsoo; Li, Hui; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Molitsky, Michael; Alkire, Randy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of a 96-well plate scanner for in situ data collection has been developed at the Structural Biology Center (SBC) beamline 19-ID, located at the Advanced Photon Source, USA. The applicability of this instrument for protein crystal diffraction screening and data collection at ambient temperature has been demonstrated. Several different protein crystals, including selenium-labeled, were used for data collection and successful SAD phasing. Without the common procedure of crystal handling and subsequent cryo-cooling for data collection at T = 100 K, crystals in a crystallization buffer show remarkably low mosaicity (<0.1°) until deterioration by radiation damage occurs. Data presented here show that cryo-cooling can cause some unexpected structural changes. Based on the results of this study, the integration of the plate scanner into the 19-ID end-station with automated controls is being prepared. With improvement of hardware and software, in situ data collection will become available for the SBC user program including remote access. PMID:26524303

  17. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of BPH: results of a multi-center phase III study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, N.; Gardner, T.; Koch, M.; Bihrle, R.; Foster, R.; Resnick, M.; Seftel, A.; Grunberger, I.; Stiedle, C.; Corchan, J.

    2003-04-01

    The five centers phase III trial was to show that HIFU can treat prostate tissue thermally for symptomatic relief of BPH and improve flow rates. At five sites, 68 BPH patients were treated with the Sonablate device (Focus Surgery, Inc. Indianapolis, IN). A urethral Foley catheter was inserted into the urethra to aid in positioning and was kept in-situ during the treatment. A cooling device was used to cool the rectal wall. The patients returned home within a few hours after the procedure. The Foley catheter was kept electively to avoid any incidence of acute urinary retention following the therapy. The catheter was removed after 4-5 days. The average treatment time was 38 minutes. The patients were treated without pain, blood loss or complications. At 90 days post treatment, average Qmax and AUA Symptom Scores improved from 8.7 ml/s to 12.66 ml/s (48%) and 23.06 to 11.62 (52%), respectively. Significant prostate tissue changes took place before and after the treatment. 80% of the patients had cavity formation at the site of treatment at the bladder neck and prostate. Nonsurgical HIFU therapy is safe and effective for providing symptomatic relief of BPH symptoms and the treatment can be performed as an outpatient procedure.

  18. Impact of GPS antenna phase center and code residual variation maps on orbit and baseline determination of GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; van den IJssel, J.

    2017-06-01

    Precision Orbit Determination (POD) is a prerequisite for the success of many Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellite missions. With high-quality, dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, typically precisions of the order of a few cm are possible for single-satellite POD, and of a few mm for relative POD of formation flying spacecraft with baselines up to hundreds of km. To achieve the best precision, the use of Phase Center Variation (PCV) maps is indispensable. For LEO GPS receivers, often a-priori PCV maps are obtained by a pre-launch ground campaign, which is not able to represent the real space-borne environment of satellites. Therefore, in-flight calibration of the GPS antenna is more widely conducted. This paper shows that a further improvement is possible by including the so-called Code Residual Variation (CRV) maps in absolute/undifferenced and relative/Double-differenced (DD) POD schemes. Orbit solutions are produced for the GRACE satellite formation for a four months test period (August-November, 2014), demonstrating enhanced orbit precision after first using the in-flight PCV maps and a further improvement after including the CRV maps. The application of antenna maps leads to a better consistency with independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and K-band Ranging (KBR) low-low Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (ll-SST) observations. The inclusion of the CRV maps results also in a much better consistency between reduced-dynamic and kinematic orbit solutions for especially the cross-track direction. The improvements are largest for GRACE-B, where a cross-talk between the GPS main antenna and the occultation antenna yields higher systematic observation residuals. For high-precision relative POD which necessitates DD carrier-phase ambiguity fixing, in principle frequency-dependent PCV maps would be required. To this aim, use is made of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) that is capable of optimizing relative spacecraft dynamics and iteratively fixing

  19. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the…

  20. Health Manpower Assessment Within the Framework of Area Health Education Center Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Daniel E.; And Others

    The Eastern Virginia Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program provides the organization and funding for implementing substantial linkages among the Eastern Virginia Medical School, affiliated institutions, and health-care professions; and establishing a center in the adjacent geographic services areas. The Bureau of Health Manpower contract…