Science.gov

Sample records for assessment center phased

  1. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  2. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  3. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  4. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  5. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  6. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  7. The Validity of Assessment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, George C., III

    This paper summarizes a review of the recent literature in search of evidence for the validity of industrial assessment centers. The topic is divided into two parts: (1) the evidence regarding the validity of several of the individual assessment techniques that are used in industrial assessment centers; and (2) the evidence concerning the validity…

  8. Assessment/Advisement Center Handbook for Community College Testing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgendorf, Erik

    Developed by the Assessment/Advisement Center (AAC) at Missouri's Crowder College (CC), this handbook is designed as a model for other community college testing and advisement centers in establishing assessment policies and practices. First, an introduction is provided, describing changes in the role of assessment since the advent of on-line…

  9. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS

  10. The phase center of a monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, G.

    1982-04-01

    A phase center is calculated for the idealized model of a monopole antenna with an infinitely large, perfectly conducting ground plane. The boundary integral method is used to determine the surface current density on the conducting parts of the configuration. The value of the input admittance is calculated for a monopole antenna with a flat top and for a monopole antenna with a hemispherical cap, and results are compared with experimental results of Sandor and Holly (1969), showing excellent agreement.

  11. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  12. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  13. Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at Lehigh University

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhakar Neti and Alparslan Oztekin

    2007-07-10

    During the period September, 2001, through August, 2006, the Lehigh University Industrial Assessment Center provided assessments for 147 companies in the Eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. In reports sent to the companies, a total of 1,079 assessment recommendations were suggested, with an annual cost savings of $22,980,654, to save energy, reduce waste, and improve productivity. The energy saved if all ARs were implemented would be 1,843,202 MMBtu.

  14. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University's College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor's assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  15. University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Asfour, Shihab, S.

    2007-01-29

    This report documents all activity of the University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center (MIIAC) grant awarded by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP). This grant was coordinated through a collaborative effort with the Center for Advanced Energy Systems (CAES) located at Rutgers University in New Jersey (www.caes.rutgers.edu) which acted as the program’s Field Manager. The grant’s duration included fiscal years 2003-2006 (September 2002 – August 2006), and operated under the direction of Dr. Shihab Asfour, Director (MIIAC). MIIAC’s main goal was to provide energy assessments for local manufacturing firms. Energy consumption, productivity enhancement, and waste management were the focus of each assessment. Energy savings, cost savings, implementation costs, and simple payback periods were quantified using scientific methodologies and techniques. Over the four-year period of the grant, the total number of industrial assessments conducted was 91, resulting in 604 assessment recommendations and the following savings: 73,519,747 kWh, 435,722 MMBTU, and $10,024,453 in cost savings. A total of 16 undergraduate and graduate students were trained on energy assessment. Companies in over 40 different zip codes were assessed.

  16. Impact Differences in Ground Reaction Force and Center of Mass Between the First and Second Landing Phases of a Drop Vertical Jump and their Implications for Injury Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with ACL injury risk in athletes. Previous investigations have solely assessed the first landing phase. We examined the first and second landings of a DVJ for differences in the magnitude of vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and position of center of mass (CoM). A cohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes completed a series of DVJ tasks from an initial box height of 31 cm. Dual force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. There was no difference in peak vGRF between landings (p = 0.445), but side-to-side differences increased from the first to second landing (p = 0.007). Participants demonstrated a lower minimum CoM during stance in the first landing than the second landing (p < 0.001). The results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. Greater side-to-side asymmetry in vGRF and higher CoM during impact indicate the second landing of a DVJ may exhibit greater perturbation and better represent in-game mechanics associated with ACL injury risk. PMID:23538000

  17. Impact differences in ground reaction force and center of mass between the first and second landing phases of a drop vertical jump and their implications for injury risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2013-04-26

    The drop vertical jump (DVJ) task is commonly used to assess biomechanical performance measures that are associated with ACL injury risk in athletes. Previous investigations have solely assessed the first landing phase. We examined the first and second landings of a DVJ for differences in the magnitude of vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and position of center of mass (CoM). A cohort of 239 adolescent female basketball athletes completed a series of DVJ tasks from an initial box height of 31 cm. Dual force platforms and a three dimensional motion capture system recorded force and positional data for each trial. There was no difference in peak vGRF between landings (p=0.445), but side-to-side differences increased from the first to second landing (p=0.007). Participants demonstrated a lower minimum CoM during stance in the first landing than the second landing (p<0.001). The results have important implications for the future assessment of ACL injury risk behaviors in adolescent female athletes. Greater side-to-side asymmetry in vGRF and higher CoM during impact indicate the second landing of a DVJ may exhibit greater perturbation and better represent in-game mechanics associated with ACL injury risk.

  18. Antenna phase center locations in tapered aperture subarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.; Bickel, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    Antenna apertures are often parsed into subapertures for Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. However, when the overall aperture is tapered for sidelobe control, the locations of phase centers for the individual subapertures are shifted due to the local taper of individual subapertures. Furthermore, individual subaperture gains are also affected. These non-uniform perturbations complicate DOA calculations. Techniques are presented to calculate subaperture phase center locations, and algorithms are given for equalizing subapertures' gains.

  19. Doppler Radar Profiler for Launch Winds at the Kennedy Space Center (Phase 1a)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request from the, NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics at Langley Research Center (LaRC), to develop a database from multiple Doppler radar wind profiler (DRWP) sources and develop data processing algorithms to construct high temporal resolution DRWP wind profiles for day-of-launch (DOL) vehicle assessment. This document contains the outcome of Phase 1a of the assessment including Findings, Observations, NESC Recommendations, and Lessons Learned.

  20. Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. L.; Neely, M. A.; Curran, F. M.; Christensen, E. R.; Escher, D.; Lovell, N.; Morris, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) has developed a flexible systems analysis framework to identify long-term technology needs, quantify payoffs for technology investments, and assess the progress of ASTP-sponsored technology programs in the hypersonics area. For this, ITAC has assembled an experienced team representing a broad sector of the aerospace community and developed a systematic assessment process complete with supporting tools. Concepts for transportation systems are selected based on relevance to the ASTP and integrated concept models (ICM) of these concepts are developed. Key technologies of interest are identified and projections are made of their characteristics with respect to their impacts on key aspects of the specific concepts of interest. Both the models and technology projections are then fed into the ITAC's probabilistic systems analysis framework in ModelCenter. This framework permits rapid sensitivity analysis, single point design assessment, and a full probabilistic assessment of each concept with respect to both embedded and enhancing technologies. Probabilistic outputs are weighed against metrics of interest to ASTP using a multivariate decision making process to provide inputs for technology prioritization within the ASTP. ITAC program is currently finishing the assessment of a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO), rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) concept and a TSTO turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) concept developed by the team with inputs from NASA. A baseline all rocket TSTO concept is also being developed for comparison. Boeing has recently submitted a performance model for their Flexible Aerospace System Solution for Tomorrow (FASST) concept and the ISAT program will provide inputs for a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) TBCC based concept in the near-term. Both of these latter concepts will be analyzed within the ITAC framework over the summer. This paper provides a status update of the ITAC program.

  1. Influence of Assessment Center Methods on Assessor Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, William H.; And Others

    One potential source of variation in assessment center ratings may be the way the assessor organizes and processes information. To examine how assessment center methods affect the way assessors organize and process assessment center information and the ratings they make, independent groups of assessors (N=24) used one of two models for integrating…

  2. Industrial waste needs assessment. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Radel, R.J.; Willis, M.P.

    1993-10-01

    In January of 1992 a team was put together to begin the process of assessing the industrial waste needs of the Tennessee Valley. The team consisted of representatives from the various TVA Resource Group organizations. This initial team recommended as a starting point in the process a two-phase market research effort. A second team was then commissioned to conduct the first phase of this market research effort. The first phase of that marketing effort is now complete. This report contains an analysis of the data obtained through interviews of more than 168 individuals representing a similar number of organizations. A total of 37 TVA Resource Group employees were involved in the contact process from various organizations. In addition, the appendices provide summaries of the data used in designing the process and the reports of the Contact Coordinators (who were responsible for a series of visits). As a result of the data analysis, the Review Team makes the following recommendations: 1. Publish this report and distribute to the new management within TVA Resource Group as well as to all those participating as contacts, visitors, and contact coordinators. 2. The Resource Group management team, or management teams within each of the respective organizations within Resource Group, appoint Phase 2 assessement teams for as many of the problem areas listed in Table III as seem appropriate. We further recommend that, where possible, cross-organizational teams be used to examine individual problem areas. 3. Make this report available within Generating and Customer Groups, especially to the Customer Service Centers. 4. Establish a process to continue follow up with each of the contacts made in this assessment.

  3. Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit Guide and Specification

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-26

    A portable and temporary wireless mesh assessment kit can be used to speed up and reduce the costs of a data center energy use assessment and overcome the issues with respect to shutdowns. The assessment kit is comprised of temperature, relative humidity, and pressure sensors. Also included are power meters that can be installed on computer room air conditioners (CRACs) without intrusive interruption of data center operations. The assessment kit produces data required for a detailed energy assessment of the data center.

  4. QCD Phase Diagram According to the Center Group

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado Mercado, Ydalia; Gattringer, Christof; Evertz, Hans Gerd

    2011-06-03

    We study an effective theory for QCD at finite temperature and density which contains the leading center symmetric and center symmetry breaking terms. The effective theory is studied in a flux representation where the complex phase problem is absent and the model becomes accessible to Monte Carlo techniques also at finite chemical potential. We simulate the system by using a generalized Prokof'ev-Svistunov worm algorithm and compare the results to a low temperature expansion. The phase diagram is determined as a function of temperature, chemical potential, and quark mass. The shape and quark mass dependence of the phase boundaries are as expected for QCD. The transition into the deconfined phase is smooth throughout, without any discontinuities or critical points.

  5. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  6. Coordinating Educational Assessment Across College Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Ruth; And Others

    An operational model developed as a result of a systematic analysis of three distinctly different Antioch centers--Juarez Lincoln University, Philadelphia Graduate Center, and Antioch-New England (the Keene Center)--is presented. Juarez Lincoln offers a 15-month program leading to the Master of Education degree. Many of the students are Mexican…

  7. Critical Inquiry and Writing Centers: A Methodology of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Diana Calhoun; Frost, Alanna

    2012-01-01

    By examining one writing center's role in student success, this project offers two examples of the way writing centers impact student engagement. This analysis models a methodology that writing and learning center directors can utilize in order to foster effective communication with stakeholders. By conducting data-driven assessment, directors can…

  8. Program Description for the Phoenix Reception and Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datema, Thea; And Others

    Phoenix Reception and Assessment Center (PRAC) is a non-secure detention and assessment center for up to 15 Wayne County delinquent, adolescent males who have been committed to the Michigan Department of Social Services for care, treatment and supervision. Adolescents, ages 12 through 18, are eligible for placement at Phoenix according to the…

  9. Assessment and the School Library Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Carol Collier, Ed.

    Assessment of student learning, the measuring of students' progress and performance, is an important concern for library media specialists. Twelve articles are presented which address the issue of assessment of library media services. The titles are: "The Growth of Assessment" (George F. Madaus, Ann G. A. Tan); "Library Information Skills and…

  10. Phases of non-extremal multi-centered bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Borun D.; Mayerson, Daniel R.; Vercnocke, Bert

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the phase space of multi-centered near-extremal configurations previously studied in arXiv:1108.5821 [1] and arXiv:1110.5641 [2] in the probe limit. We confirm that in general the energetically favored ground state of the multi-center potential, which can be a single or multi-center configuration, has the most entropy and is thus thermodynamically stable. However, we find the surprising result that for a subset of configurations, even though a single center black hole seems to be energetically favored, it is entropically not allowed (the resulting black hole would violate cosmic censorship). This disproves classical intuition that everything would just fall into the black hole if energetically favored. Along the way we highlight a shortcoming in the literature regarding the computation of the angular momentum coming from electromagnetic interaction in the probe limit and rectify it. We also demonstrate that static supertubes can exist inside ergoregions where ordinary point particles would be frame dragged.

  11. GMTI Direction of Arrival Measurements from Multiple Phase Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-03-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar attempts to detect and locate targets with unknown motion. Very slow-moving targets are difficult to locate in the presence of surrounding clutter. This necessitates multiple antenna phase centers (or equivalent) to offer independent Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. DOA accuracy and precision generally remains dependent on target Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Clutter-toNoise Ratio (CNR), scene topography, interfering signals, and a number of antenna parameters. This is true even for adaptive techniques like Space-Time-AdaptiveProcessing (STAP) algorithms.

  12. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  13. The North American Astronomical Photographic Plate Center: Phase I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. D.; Castelaz, M. W.; Crowley, T.; Griffin, E.; Osborn, W.

    2004-05-01

    Astronomical photographic plates constitute an important and, for the large part, unrepeatable resource for research. International pressure is mounting to preserve and catalog scientifically valuable plate collections and capture their information through digitization. At the same time, many institutions holding plates now lack the space, funds and expertise to adequately preserve this important material. In response, the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute has established the North American Photographic Plate Center (NAPPC). NAPPC is intended as a long-term repository for direct and objective prism plate collections currently stored in North America. PARI is a natural location for such a center. It offers physically secure and abundant environmentally controlled space for plate storage as well as Internet 2 infrastructure and instrument space necessary for the eventual digitization and Internet distribution of images. Phase I of this initiative is to collect unwanted plate collections, store them in an appropriate manner, prepare catalogues of their relevant information and establish a laboratory for on-site examination or measurement of the plates. This is currently underway. Phase II will be the eventual digitization and development of a public web accessible database of images. We will describe the procedures for placing plate collections in NAPPC, the infrastructure in place for plate storage and measurement, and our preliminary plans for making the plate archive a public image library with Internet access.

  14. Estimation of satellite antenna phase center offsets for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Fritsche, M.; Dach, R.; Schmid, R.; Montenbruck, O.; Uhlemann, M.; Prange, L.

    2016-08-01

    Satellite antenna phase center offsets for the Galileo In-Orbit Validation (IOV) and Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites are estimated by two different analysis centers based on tracking data of a global GNSS network. The mean x- and y-offsets could be determined with a precision of a few centimeters. However, daily estimates of the x-offsets of the IOV satellites show pronounced systematic effects with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to 70 cm that depend on the orbit model and the elevation of the Sun above the orbital plane. For the IOV y-offsets, no dependence on the orbit model exists but the scatter strongly depends on the elevation of the Sun above the orbital plane. In general, these systematic effects are significantly smaller for the FOC satellites. The z-offsets of the two analysis centers agree within the 10-15 cm level, and the time series do not show systematic effects. The application of an averaged Galileo satellite antenna model obtained from the two solutions results in a reduction of orbit day boundary discontinuities by up to one third—even if an independent software package is used.

  15. Program Assessments: Success Strategies for Three Canadian Teaching Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonwetter, Dieter J.; Dawson, Debra L.; Britnell, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Program assessments are an essential part of the ongoing survival of teaching centers performed by faculty development personnel at institutions of higher education. Little research is available to guide developers in performing these assessments. In this article we describe assessments conducted at three Canadian universities and highlight the…

  16. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  17. Rethinking the Health Center: Assessing Your Health Center and Setting Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Nancy S.

    2001-01-01

    Camp health center management begins with assessing the population served, camp areas impacted, and the contract of care with parents. That information is used to plan the size of the center; its location in the camp; the type of equipment; and considerations such as medication management, infectious disease control, size of in- and out-patient…

  18. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  19. Domestic Violence Assessments in the Child Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Jonathan D.; Scribano, Philip V.; Rhoda, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the frequency, methods, and practices of universal assessments for domestic violence (DV) within child advocacy centers (CACs) and determine which factors are associated with CACs that conduct universal DV assessments. Methods: The study design was a cross-sectional, web-based survey distributed to…

  20. An Assessment Center for Mid-Career and Middle Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1977

    This symposium describes the development and initial use of an assessment center for men in mid-career and middle life. This assessment was designed for use in the Management Progress Study, the long-term research started 20 years ago using subjects who were men entering telephone company management. (AT and T). These same subjects were assessed…

  1. Phase center modeling for LEO GPS receiver antennas and its impact on precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Dach, R.; Montenbruck, O.; Hugentobler, U.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.

    2009-12-01

    Most satellites in a low-Earth orbit (LEO) with demanding requirements on precise orbit determination (POD) are equipped with on-board receivers to collect the observations from Global Navigation Satellite systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Limiting factors for LEO POD are nowadays mainly encountered with the modeling of the carrier phase observations, where a precise knowledge of the phase center location of the GNSS antennas is a prerequisite for high-precision orbit analyses. Since 5 November 2006 (GPS week 1400), absolute instead of relative values for the phase center location of GNSS receiver and transmitter antennas are adopted in the processing standards of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The absolute phase center modeling is based on robot calibrations for a number of terrestrial receiver antennas, whereas compatible antenna models were subsequently derived for the remaining terrestrial receiver antennas by conversion (from relative corrections), and for the GNSS transmitter antennas by estimation. However, consistent receiver antenna models for space missions such as GRACE and TerraSAR-X, which are equipped with non-geodetic receiver antennas, are only available since a short time from robot calibrations. We use GPS data of the aforementioned LEOs of the year 2007 together with the absolute antenna modeling to assess the presently achieved accuracy from state-of-the-art reduced-dynamic LEO POD strategies for absolute and relative navigation. Near-field multipath and cross-talk with active GPS occultation antennas turn out to be important and significant sources for systematic carrier phase measurement errors that are encountered in the actual spacecraft environments. We assess different methodologies for the in-flight determination of empirical phase pattern corrections for LEO receiver antennas and discuss their impact on POD. By means of independent K-band measurements, we show that zero-difference GRACE orbits can be

  2. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  3. 76 FR 39811 - International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed Status of Kentucky Bluegrass Genetically Engineered... engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate should not be listed as a Federal noxious weed and... noxious weeds. Our decision is based on our analysis of available scientific data, our weed...

  4. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  5. Assessing the Impact of New Student Campus Recreation Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zizzi, Samuel; Ayers, Suzan F.; Watson II, Jack C.; Keeler, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The student recreation center (SRC) at many colleges and universities has evolved from being a place to lift weights and take aerobics classes to becoming a high-powered recruitment tool (Colleges use recreation, 2002). The present study included the development of an instrument to assess the use and impact of SRCs. Students (N = 655; users = 537,…

  6. The Community Assessment Center Concept. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldenettel, Debra; Wordes, Madeline

    This bulletin is intended to inform juvenile justice practitioners and other youth service providers about the work of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in developing and demonstrating a Community Assessment Center (CAC) model, and to increase awareness about some of the challenges associated with its…

  7. The Evaluation of the Management Assessment Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Joseph J.

    The Management Assessment Center (MAC) of the Dade County (Florida) Public Schools is a unique project, employing multiple techniques to evaluate behavior for school-level administrator personnel selection. This final report of an evaluation deals primarily with issues of the validity and the utility of the MAC. To ascertain validity of the MAC,…

  8. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - USDA BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed during the spring of 1991 which identified areas for waste reduction at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland. he areas selected for this joint E...

  9. Evidence-centered design for simulation-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Mislevy, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Simulations provide opportunities for people to learn and to develop skills for situations that are expensive, time-consuming, or dangerous. Careful design can support their learning by tailoring the features of situations to their levels of skill, allowing repeated attempts, and providing timely feedback. The same environments provide opportunities for assessing people's capabilities to act in these situations. This article describes an assessment design framework that can help projects develop effective simulation-based assessments. It reviews the rationale and terminology of the "evidence-centered" assessment design framework, discusses how it aligns with the principles of simulation design, and illustrates ideas with examples from engineering and medicine. Advice is offered for designing a new simulation-based assessment and for adapting an existing simulation system for assessment purposes.

  10. Lead Paint Exposure Assessment in High Bays of Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanch, Penney; Plaza, Angel; Keprta, Sean

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to assess the possibility of lead paint exposure in the high bays of some of the Johnson Space Center buildings. Some of the buildings in the Manned Space Flight Center (MSC) were built in 1962 and predate any considerations to reduce lead in paints and coatings. There are many of these older buildings that contain open shops and work areas that have open ceilings, These shops include those that had operations that use leaded gasoline, batteries, and lead based paints. Test were planned to be conducted in three phases: (1) Surface Dust sampling, (2) personal exposure montioring, and (3) Ceiling paint Sampling. The results of the first two phases were reviewed. After considering the results of the first two phases, and the problems associated with the retrieval of samples from high ceilings, it was determined that the evaluation of ceiling coatings would be done on a project by project and in response to a complaint.

  11. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  12. Ambiguity resolution in SAR interferometry by use of three phase centers

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Thompson, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    In a typical interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) system employed for terrain elevation mapping, terrain height is estimated from phase difference data obtained from two phase centers separated spatially in the cross-track direction. In this paper we show how the judicious design of a three phase center IFSAR renders phase unwrapping, i.e., the process of estimating true continuous phases from principal values of phase (wrapped modulo 2{pi}), a much simpler process than that inherent in traditional algorithms. With three phase centers, one IFSAR baseline can be chosen to be relatively small (two of the phase centers close together) so that all of the scene`s terrain relief causes less than one cycle of phase difference. This allows computation of a coarse height map without use of any form of phase unwrapping. The cycle number ambiguities in the phase data derived from the other baseline, chosen to be relatively large (two of the phase centers far apart), can then be resolved by reference to the heights computed from the small baseline data. This basic concept of combining phase data from one small and one large baseline to accomplish phase unwrapping has been previously employed in other interferometric problems, e.g., laser interferometry and direction-of-arrival determination from multiple element arrays, The new algorithm is shown to possess a certain form of immunity to corrupted interferometric phase data that is not inherent in traditional two-dimensional path-following phase unwrappers. This is because path-following algorithms must estimate, either implicity or explicity, those portions of the IFSAR fringe data where discontinuities in phase occur. Such discontinuties typically arise from noisy phase measurements derived from low radar return areas of the SAR imagery, e.g., shadows, or from areas of steep terrain slope.

  13. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas.

  14. Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of electrical load centers

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrucko, R.J.; Thomas, T.M.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers electrical load centers. Raw materials, including coiled sheet steel and coiled copper strips, polystyrene pellets, and miscellaneous fasteners, are used in metal-working, injection molding, painting, and assembly operations. The team`s report, detailed findings and recommendations, indicated that a large quantity of waste overflow rinse water is generated and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing valves that will allow operators to turn off the flow during periods of nonuse. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  15. Environmental assessment of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared to determine if the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (the Center), or its alternatives would have significant environmental impacts that must be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Statement. DOE`s proposed action is to continue funding the Center. While DOE is not funding construction of the planned Center facility, operation of that facility is dependent upon continued funding. To implement the proposed action, the Center would initially construct a facility of approximately 2,300 square meters (25,000 square feet). The Phase 1 laboratory facilities and parking lot will occupy approximately 1.2 hectares (3 acres) of approximately 8.9 hectares (22 acres) of land which were donated to New Mexico State University (NMSU) for this purpose. The facility would contain laboratories to analyze chemical and radioactive materials typical of potential contaminants that could occur in the environment in the vicinity of the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site or other locations. The facility also would have bioassay facilities to measure radionuclide levels in the general population and in employees of the WIPP. Operation of the Center would meet the DOE requirement for independent monitoring and assessment of environmental impacts associated with the planned disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP.

  16. The NASA Lewis Research Center SBIR program: An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Hubert H.; Metzger, Marie E.; Kim, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    An assessment was made of the NASA Lewis Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program for the years 1983 to 1989. The assessment was based on the study of 99 Phase 1 contracts and 39 Phase 2 contracts. The overall impact of SBIR was found to be very positive, contributing strongly to many NASA programs. In addition, many successful efforts were commercialized benefiting the small business, federal agencies, and the aerospace industry. The program was evaluated in terms of contract quality, innovativeness, comparison to the state-of-the-art, achievement of goals, difficulty, and impact. Program difficulties were also identified, which could suggest possible program improvements. Much of the information gained in this assessment provided a basis for a SBIR data base which will be updated every year. This data base is computerized and will provide an excellent source of information about past SBIR efforts and company capabilities.

  17. Phase I of a National Phenological Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, J. L.; Henebry, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    Phenology is the gateway to climatic effects on both managed and unmanaged ecosystems. Adaptation to climatic variability and change will require integration of phenological data and models with climatic forecasts at seasonal to decadal timescales. We propose a scoping study to identify, formulate, and refine approaches to the first National Phenological Assessment (NPA) for the U.S. The NPA should be viewed as a data product of the USA-National Phenology Network that will help guide future phenological monitoring and research at the national level. We envision three main objectives for the first NPA: 1) Establish a suite of indicators of phenological change (IPCs) at regional to continental scales, following the Heinz Center model for such national assessments; 2) Using sufficiently long and broad-scale time series of IPCs and legacy phenological data, assess phenological responses to what many scientists are calling the early stages of anthropogenic climate change, specifically the abrupt advance in spring onset in the late 1970’s/early 1980’s 3) Project large-scale phenological changes into 21st Century using GCM and RCM model realizations. Toward this end we see the following tasks as critical preliminary work to plan the first NPA: a) Identify, evaluate, and refine IPCs based on indices developed from standard weather observations, streamflow and other hydrological observations (e.g., center of mass, lake freeze/thaw, etc.), plant and animal phenology observations from legacy datasets, remote sensing datastreams, flux tower observations, and GCM and RCM model realizations; b) Evaluate covariability between IPCs, legacy phenological data, and large-scale modes of climate variability to help detection and attribution of supposed secular trends and development of short and long-lead forecasts for phenological variations; c) identify, evaluate, and refine optimal methods for quantifying what constitutes significant statistical and ecological change in

  18. Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center).

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-12-01

    The %E2%80%9Clocation%E2%80%9D of the radar is the reference location to which the radar measures range. This is typically the antenna's %E2%80%9Cphase center.%E2%80%9D However, the antenna's phase center is not generally obvious, and may not correspond to any seemingly obvious physical location, such as the focal point of a dish reflector. This report calculates the phase center of an offset-fed dish reflector antenna.

  19. An Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCA also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communication, employee commitment to ETEC, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, and overall job satisfaction. A description of each of the scales used to assess these subjects is discussed below. The primary purpose of administering the survey was to attempt to measure, in a more quantitative and objective way the notion of organizational culture,'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In particular, those aspects of the working environment which are believed to be important influences on the operations of a facility and on the safety issues relevant to the organization were assessed. This document describes the results of this survey. 9 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture; '' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCA also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can than be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Adventures in Assessment: Learner-Centered Approaches to Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Literacy, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This journal presents the following articles: "Introduction: Volume 14--Examining Performance" (Marie Cora) "Fair Assessment Practices: Giving Students Equitable Opportunities to Demonstrate Learning" (Linda Suskie); "Assessing Oral Communication at the Community Learning Center Development of the OPT (Oral Proficiency Test)" (JoAnne Hartel and…

  3. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  4. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  5. Stability of the face-centered-cubic phase of heavy rare gas solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, F.H.; Choi, Yumi

    1993-07-01

    Our recent perturbation theory is applied to show that heavy rare gases solidify into a face-centered-cubic phase over a large temperature range near the melting lines. We have investigated the static, harmonic, and anharmonic contributions to the excess Helmholtz free energy and the stability to the face-centered-cubic phase. The observed stability is due to thermal contributions in the Helmholtz free energy.

  6. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  7. Incorrect support and missing center tolerances of phasing algorithms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Steinbrener, Jan; Kirz, Janos; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In x-ray diffraction microscopy, iterative algorithms retrieve reciprocal space phase information, and a real space image, from an object's coherent diffraction intensities through the use of a priori information such as a finite support constraint. In many experiments, the object's shape or support is not well known, and the diffraction pattern is incompletely measured. We describe here computer simulations to look at the effects of both of these possible errors when using several common reconstruction algorithms. Overly tight object supports prevent successful convergence; however, we show that this can often be recognized through pathological behavior of the phase retrieval transfermore » function. Dynamic range limitations often make it difficult to record the central speckles of the diffraction pattern. We show that this leads to increasing artifacts in the image when the number of missing central speckles exceeds about 10, and that the removal of unconstrained modes from the reconstructed image is helpful only when the number of missing central speckles is less than about 50. In conclusion, this simulation study helps in judging the reconstructability of experimentally recorded coherent diffraction patterns.« less

  8. Incorrect support and missing center tolerances of phasing algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Steinbrener, Jan; Kirz, Janos; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In x-ray diffraction microscopy, iterative algorithms retrieve reciprocal space phase information, and a real space image, from an object's coherent diffraction intensities through the use of a priori information such as a finite support constraint. In many experiments, the object's shape or support is not well known, and the diffraction pattern is incompletely measured. We describe here computer simulations to look at the effects of both of these possible errors when using several common reconstruction algorithms. Overly tight object supports prevent successful convergence; however, we show that this can often be recognized through pathological behavior of the phase retrieval transfer function. Dynamic range limitations often make it difficult to record the central speckles of the diffraction pattern. We show that this leads to increasing artifacts in the image when the number of missing central speckles exceeds about 10, and that the removal of unconstrained modes from the reconstructed image is helpful only when the number of missing central speckles is less than about 50. In conclusion, this simulation study helps in judging the reconstructability of experimentally recorded coherent diffraction patterns.

  9. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment.

  10. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES&H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES&H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment.

  11. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  12. The Evolution of the Federal Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement System

    2012-07-31

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal emergency response asset whose assistance may be requested by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. It is an interagency organization with representation from the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and other federal agencies. FRMAC, in its present form, was created in 1987 when the radiological support mission was assigned to the DOE’s Nevada Operations Office by DOE Headquarters. The FRMAC asset, including its predecessor entities, was created, grew, and evolved to function as a response to radiological incidents. Radiological emergency response exercises showed the need for a coordinated approach to managing federal emergency monitoring and assessment activities. The mission of FRMAC is to coordinate and manage all federal radiological environmental monitoring and assessment activities during a nuclear or radiological incident within the United States in support of state,local, tribal governments, DHS, and the federal coordinating agency. Radiological emergency response professionals with the DOE’s national laboratories support the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), the Aerial MeasuringSystem (AMS), and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS). These teams support the FRMAC to provide: Atmospheric transport modeling; Radiation monitoring; Radiological analysis and data assessments; and Medical advice for radiation injuries In support of field operations, the FRMAC provides geographic

  13. Absolute IGS antenna phase center model igs08.atx: status and potential improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, R.; Dach, R.; Collilieux, X.; Jäggi, A.; Schmitz, M.; Dilssner, F.

    2016-04-01

    On 17 April 2011, all analysis centers (ACs) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) adopted the reference frame realization IGS08 and the corresponding absolute antenna phase center model igs08.atx for their routine analyses. The latter consists of an updated set of receiver and satellite antenna phase center offsets and variations (PCOs and PCVs). An update of the model was necessary due to the difference of about 1 ppb in the terrestrial scale between two consecutive realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2008 vs. ITRF2005), as that parameter is highly correlated with the GNSS satellite antenna PCO components in the radial direction.

  14. An organizational cultural assessment of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various species of communication, employee commitment to ETEC, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, and overall job satisfaction. A description of each of the scales used to assess these subjects is discussed. The primary purpose of administering the survey was to attempt to measure, in a more quantitative and objective way the notion of organizational culture, '' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In particular, those aspects of the working environment which are believed to be important influences on the operations of a facility and on the safety issues relevant to the organization were assessed. In addition, by conducting a survey, a broad sampling of the individuals in the organization can be obtained. This is especially important when the survey is utilized in conjunction with an assessment or inspection team which typically has only a limited amount of resources to address many issues. The OCS provides a broad, but more comprehensive picture of the organization by querying a much larger number of individuals than could be reached through the assessment team alone. Finally, the OCS provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time. This profile can then can be used as a baseline point against which comparisons of other points in time can be made. Such comparisons may prove valuable and would help to assess changes in the organizational culture. Comparisons of the profiles can also be made across similar facilities. 9 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  16. Aluminum-centered tetrahedron-octahedron transition in advancing Al-Sb-Te phase change properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-02-24

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology.

  17. Aluminum-Centered Tetrahedron-Octahedron Transition in Advancing Al-Sb-Te Phase Change Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-01-01

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25709082

  18. Development and Evaluation of Gold-Centered Monolayer Protected Nanoparticle Stationary Phases for Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Gwen M.; Grate, Jay W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2004-12-10

    The current status for the development of novel open-tubular gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases consists of thin films of gold-centered monolayer protected nanoparticles (MPNs) is reported. Dodecanethiol MPNs, in which the monolayer is dodecanethiol linked to the gold nanoparticle, have shown great promise as a GC stationary phase with efficient columns having been produced in a variety of capillary i.d.'s with stationary phase film depths ranging from 10-60 nm, +/- 2 nm at a given film depth. Stationary phase operational parameters are discussed including maximum operating temperature, sample capacity, and stationary phase lifetime and robustness.

  19. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficklen, Carter B.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) completed at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars Program. This project was performed to determine levels of electromagnetic fields, determine the significance of the levels present, and determine a plan to reduce electromagnetic field exposure, if necessary. This report also describes the properties of electromagnetic fields and their interaction with humans. The results of three major occupational epidemiological studies is presented to determine risks posed to humans by EMF exposure. The data for this report came from peer-reviewed journal articles and government publications pertaining to the health effects of electromagnetic fields.

  20. Sacramento City College Assessment Center Research Report: Assessment Procedures, Fall 1983 - Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, M.; Caffrey, Patrick

    Studies and analyses conducted by the Assessment Center at Sacramento City College (SCC) between fall 1983 and fall 1984 provided the data on SCC's students and services which are presented in this report. Following an overview of the significant findings of the year's research efforts, part I sets forth the purpose of the report and part II…

  1. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  2. An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2003-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5

  3. Determination of the Phase Centers of Millimeter-Wave Horn Antennas Using a Holographic Interference Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, Ian; Murphy, J. Anthony; McCarthy, Darragh; Gradziel, Marcin; Mahon, Ronan; O'Sullivan, Creidhe; Trappe, Neil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss how a holographic interference technique can be applied in the experimental determination of the phase centers of non-standard horn antennas in the millimeter-waveband. The phase center is the point inside the horn from which the radiation appears to emanate when viewed from the far-field, and knowing its location is necessary for optimizing coupling efficiencies to quasi-optical systems. For non-standard horn designs, and other feed structures, the phase center may be difficult to reliably predict by simulation, in which case, before committing to antenna manufacture, there is a requirement for it to be determined experimentally. Although the phase center can be recovered by direct phase measurement of the far-field beam pattern, this usually involves expensive instrumentation such as a vector network analyzer for millimeter wave horn antennas. In this paper, we describe one inexpensive alternative, which is based on measuring the interference pattern in intensity between the radiation from the horn of interest and a reference beam derived from the same coherent source in an off-axis holography setup. The accuracy of the approach is improved by comparison with the interference pattern of a well-understood standard horn (such as a corrugated conical horn) in the same experimental setup. We present an example of the technique applied to a profiled smooth-walled horn antenna, which has been especially designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments.

  4. Phase shifter technology assessment - Prospects and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    Capabilities and limitations of MMIC phase shifter technology at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies are reviewed. MMIC-based phase arrays make it possible to integrate active elements at the array face, i.e., to incorporate transmit power amplifiers and/or low noise amplifiers at each antenna element. Active elements make it possible to increase power efficiency and reliability and provide graceful degradation. Monolithic integration of the various transmit/receive functions including phase shifting is considered to be feasible through at least the lower millimeter-wave frequency range (about 30-100 GHz). MMIC integration also allows more flexibility in array design including those that are intended for airborne conformal applications.

  5. Fungal contamination assessment in Portuguese elderly care centers.

    PubMed

    Viegas, C; Almeida-Silva, M; Gomes, A Quintal; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend 80-90% of their day indoors and elderly subjects are likely to spend even a greater amount of time indoors. Thus, indoor air pollutants such as bioaerosols may exert a significant impact on this age group. The aim of this study was to characterize fungal contamination within Portuguese elderly care centers. Fungi were measured using conventional as well as molecular methods in bedrooms, living rooms, canteens, storage areas, and outdoors. Bioaerosols were evaluated before and after the microenvironments' occupancy in order to understand the role played by occupancy in fungal contamination. Fungal load results varied from 32 colony-forming units CFU m(-3) in bedrooms to 228 CFU m(-3) in storage areas. Penicillium sp. was the most frequently isolated (38.1%), followed by Aspergillus sp. (16.3%) and Chrysonilia sp. (4.2%). With respect to Aspergillus genus, three different fungal species in indoor air were detected, with A. candidus (62.5%) the most prevalent. On surfaces, 40 different fungal species were isolated and the most frequent was Penicillium sp. (22.2%), followed by Aspergillus sp. (17.3%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction did not detect the presence of A. fumigatus complex. Species from Penicillium and Aspergillus genera were the most abundant in air and surfaces. The species A. fumigatus was present in 12.5% of all indoor microenvironments assessed. The living room was the indoor microenvironment with lowest fungal concentration and the storage area was highest.

  6. Safety assessment: Pinellas Plant Child Development Center/Partnership School

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-21

    This document describes the Child Development Center/Partnership School and its unique relationship to the Pinellas Plant. The school and its operation are described in detail, along with the administrative and engineering controls in place to ensure the safety of the facility. Special emphasis is placed on the analyses of potential risks to school operations and personnel which may be posed by their close proximity to the plant. A recent Safety Systems Management Assay (SSMA) was used as a guide in describing both routine operations and potential credible accident scenarios at the Pinellas Plant site. The Safety Assessment concluded that, although potential accidents at the Pinellas Plant could result in injury to personnel on the school site, the low probability of these incidents would make operation of the school an acceptable risk. The risks associated with routine operations at the plant are similar to those encountered at a large-scale electronics manufacturing plant. Numerous safeguards are in place to limit the effects of any credible accident on the Pinellas Plant and school site. 32 refs., 18 figs., 33 tabs.

  7. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Custer Training Center, Installation 26035, Augusta, Michigan. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Michigan Army National Guard property near Augusta, Michigan. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Custer Training Center, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are (1) storage of hazardous materials and hazardous waste, (2) storage and dispensing of fuel, (3) washing of vehicles and equipment, and (4) weapons training ranges that may have accumulated lead.

  8. BNL ALARA Center`s development of a computerized radiological assessment and design system (RADS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Masciulli, S.; Connelly, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation of DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of good-practice documents will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analyses, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative rating of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results.

  9. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  10. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  11. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  12. 78 FR 47271 - Draft Environmental Assessment for the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Agricultural Research Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Research Center Land Transfer AGENCY: Agricultural Research Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of the Draft Environmental Assessment for the Kika de la Garza Subtropical Agricultural Research Center Land Transfer... Research Center (KSARC) from the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Weslaco, Texas, to The Texas...

  13. Assessing uncertainty in outsourcing clinical services at tertiary health centers.

    PubMed

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2007-01-01

    When tertiary health centers face capacity constraint, one feasible strategy to meet service demand is outsourcing clinical services to qualified community providers. Clinical outsourcing enables tertiary health centers to meet the expectations of service timeliness and provides good opportunities to collaborate with other health care providers. However, outsourcing may result in dependence and loss of control for the tertiary health centers. Other parties involved in clinical outsourcing such as local partners, patients, and payers may also encounter potential risks as well as enjoy benefits in an outsourcing arrangement. Recommendations on selecting potential outsourcing partners are given to minimize the risks associated with an outsourcing contract.

  14. The hydrogen technology assessment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Addison

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this phase 1 report is to begin to form the information base of the economics and energy uses of hydrogen-related technologies on which the members of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) can build a hydrogen vision of the future. The secondary goal of this report is the development of NHA positions on national research, development, and demonstration opportunities. The third goal, with the aid of the established hydrogen vision and NHA positions, is to evaluate ongoing federal research goals and activities. The evaluations will be performed in a manner that compares the costs associated with using systems that achieve those goals against the cost of performing those tasks today with fossil fuels. From this ongoing activity should emerge an NHA information base, one or more hydrogen visions of the future, and cost and performance targets for hydrogen applications to complete in the market place.

  15. How Are We Doing? A Review of Assessments within Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gofine, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Today, nearly forty years after writing centers first began to proliferate, it is worthwhile to reflect on the themes that emerge from empirical material surrounding writing center assessments, for reflecting on these themes may help administrators to refine current assessment practices and scholars to redirect their research. The goal of this…

  16. Relationship between Assessment Center Performance and Psychological Types of Cooperative Extension Agents in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishaya, Joseph B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Inventory was completed by 135 cooperative extension agents who attended an assessment center. The majority were extroverts with sensing, thinking, and judging preferences. Those in administration or community/natural resources or with more experience had higher assessment center scores. Perceiving-oriented agents had lower…

  17. Structure of the body-centered cubic phase of lipid systems

    PubMed Central

    Saludjian, Pedro; Reiss-Husson, Françoise

    1980-01-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure of the body-centered cubic phase of lipid systems. Infinite rods of polar groups (and water) are arranged with axes parallel to the four cubic [unk]1 1 1[unk] directions. The hydrocarbon chains fill the space between the rods to form a continuous matrix. With this unified topology, the model explains satisfactorily the x-ray diffraction patterns of strontium soaps, lecithin, galactolipids, potassium soaps, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and explains the transition between cubic/HII phases. The paradoxical thermal effects on the lipid cubic phase, in particular the decrease of unit cell dimensions with increasing temperature, can be explained with the proposed model by mechanisms similar to those used for the monodimensional and bidimensional (mesomorphic) phases. Images PMID:16592934

  18. Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers. Final Report for Phase I Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Suprotim; Raje, Sanyukta; Kumar, Satish; Sartor, Dale; Greenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of the “Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers” initiative to support the development of an energy efficiency policy framework for Indian data centers. The initiative is being led by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)-U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and under the guidance of Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). It is also part of the larger Power and Energy Efficiency Working Group of the US-India Bilateral Energy Dialogue. The initiative consists of two phases: Phase 1 (November 2014 – September 2015) and Phase 2 (October 2015 – September 2016).

  19. Phased Array Antenna Testbed Development at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Kevin M.; Kubat, Gregory; Johnson, Sandra K.; Anzic, Godfrey

    2003-01-01

    Ideal phased array antennas offer advantages for communication systems, such as wide-angle scanning and multibeam operation, which can be utilized in certain NASA applications. However, physically realizable, electronically steered, phased array antennas introduce additional system performance parameters, which must be included in the evaluation of the system. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently conducting research to identify these parameters and to develop the tools necessary to measure them. One of these tools is a testbed where phased array antennas may be operated in an environment that simulates their use. This paper describes the development of the testbed and its use in characterizing a particular K-Band, phased array antenna.

  20. Superionic-Superionic Phase Transitions in Body-Centered Cubic H2O Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Jean-Alexis; Caracas, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    From first-principles molecular dynamics, we investigate the relation between the superionic proton conduction and the behavior of the O - H ⋯O bond (ice VII' to ice X transition) in body-centered-cubic (bcc) H2O ice between 1300 and 2000 K and up to 300 GPa. We bring evidence that there are three distinct phases in the superionic bcc stability field. A first superionic phase characterized by extremely fast diffusion of highly delocalized protons (denoted VII'' hereinafter) is stable at low pressures. A first-order transition separates this phase from a superionic VII' , characterized by a finite degree of localization of protons along the nonsymmetric O - H ⋯O bonds. The transition is identified in structural, energetic, and elastic analysis. Upon further compression a second-order phase transition leads to the superionic ice X with symmetric O - H - O bonds.

  1. Impact of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Variations and Modified Sidereal Filtering on Reference Frame Determination.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.

    2005-12-01

    Errors in the satellite and ground station antenna phase center variations are among the limiting sources of error in high precision GPS positioning. Recent determinations of phase-center variations (PCV) for both the transmitting satellite and receiving ground station antennas have shown promise for improving geodetic estimates of reference frame parameters, such as scale. While the PCV for the transmitting antennas is reasonably well determined and includes some variation from satellite to satellite, the apparent PCV at ground station antennas are likely to be site specific and dominated by local environmental effects, such as signal multipath. To mitigate these effects, we implement a modified sidereal filter (MSF). The MSF is applied as a correction to the phase and range data. The correction is based on stacking several days of phase and range residuals where each day is shifted by the actual orbital period of each satellite, rather than sidereal time. We will evaluate the effect of stacking several days to 1 month of residuals on such metrics as phase rms and point positioning repeatability. We will present an evaluation the impact of these PCV and MSF corrections on reference frame parameters. The corrections will be applied to several years of observations from a global set of IGS stations.

  2. Development of Risk Assessment Matrix for NASA Engineering and Safety Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W., Jr.; Moses, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a study, which had as its principal goal the development of a sufficiently detailed 5 x 5 Risk Matrix Scorecard. The purpose of this scorecard is to outline the criteria by which technical issues can be qualitatively and initially prioritized. The tool using this score card has been proposed to be one of the information resources the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) takes into consideration when making decisions with respect to incoming information on safety concerns across the entire NASA agency. The contents of this paper discuss in detail each element of the risk matrix scorecard, definitions for those elements and the rationale behind the development of those definitions. This scorecard development was performed in parallel with the tailoring of the existing Futron Corporation Integrated Risk Management Application (IRMA) software tool. IRMA was tailored to fit NESC needs for evaluating incoming safety concerns and was renamed NESC Assessment Risk Management Application (NAFMA) which is still in developmental phase.

  3. Science Outcomes Assessment Plan (SOAP): Design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Gurkas, P.; Shaw, K.

    2009-01-01

    Columbus State University is under pressure to reduce the number of "unproductive grades” in its introductory science classes, to increase the number of STEM majors, and to assess the level of attainment of science outcomes in its general education courses for accreditation documentation. The authors designed a study to examine affective, cognitive, social, and classroom factors as predictors of success in science while also attempting to document the link between introductory "gateway to science major” course outcomes and the general education program. One of the factors probed is the match between students’ understanding of important learning outcomes of the course and the instructor's stated priorities. A very real risk in content focused courses (e.g., astronomy) is the mismatch between the university's stated outcomes for a general education science course (e.g., critical thinking) and the instructor's content related outcomes. This mismatch may become a barrier for students taking `required’ courses as they may not comprehend the rationale for the requirement, fail to engage in the course, and consequently receive a failing grade. Another possible factor affecting student success in science is the student reasoning level. Students who are concrete thinkers may not be as successful in introductory science classes that require advanced logical thinking about unfamiliar concepts. The authors hope to use the results of this study to help inform university practices such as placement into introductory science courses and for future faculty development.

  4. Assessing Progress toward Becoming a Patient-Centered Medical Home: An Assessment Tool for Practice Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Donna M; Wagner, Edward H; Coleman, Katie; Schaefer, Judith K; Austin, Brian T; Abrams, Melinda K; Phillips, Kathryn E; Sugarman, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe the properties of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Assessment (PCMH-A) as a tool to stimulate and monitor progress among primary care practices interested in transforming to patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). Study Setting. Sixty-five safety net practices from five states participating in a national demonstration program for PCMH transformation. Study Design. Longitudinal analyses of PCMH-A scores were performed. Scores were reviewed for agreement and sites were categorized over time into one of five categories by external facilitators. Comparisons to key activity completion rates and NCQA PCMH recognition status were completed. Data Collection/Extraction Methods. Multidisciplinary teams at each practice completed the 33-item self-assessment tool every 6 months between March 2010 and September 2012. Principal Findings. Mean overall PCMH-A scores increased (7.2, March 2010, to 9.1, September 2012; [p < .01]). Increases were statistically significant for each of the change concepts (p < .05). Facilitators agreed with scores 82% of the time. NCQA-recognized sites had higher PCMH-A scores than sites that were not yet recognized. Sites that completed more transformation activities and progressed over defined tiers reported higher PCMH-A scores. Scores improved most in areas where technical assistance was provided. Conclusions. The PCMH-A was sensitive to change over time and provided an accurate reflection of practice transformation. PMID:24138593

  5. How to Improve SBIR Phase 3 Technology Commercialization Effectiveness: A NASA Glenn Internal Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsham, Gary A. P.

    1999-01-01

    Governmental departments and agencies with responsibilities for implementing the Small Business Innovative Research program under the auspices of the Small Business Administration, are now required to be more accountable for phase 3 performance. At NASA Glenn Research Center, internal, one-on-one interviews were conducted with seven contracting officer technical representatives who have managed one or more SBIR contracts through completion of phase 2. A questionnaire consisting of nineteen questions was formulated and used for the above purpose. This self-assessment produced several comments, conclusions, and recommendations for consideration and potential application.

  6. Office of Probation - Richmond College: Reading Center Assessment. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James M.

    This program serves a population of disaffected, underachieving inner-city youth of junior high and high school age who are known to the Family and/or Criminal courts and are at least two years retarded in reading. In most cases, the first efforts of the center are said to be directed to the provision of remedial reading services, and toward…

  7. Who Wants What? Lifelong Learning Centers Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donsky, Aaron P.; And Others

    To examine characteristics and needs of participants and potential participants of nineteen lifelong learning centers in Lake County, Ohio, a study was conducted. Because of the great variety of agency offerings, no attempt was made to summarize or analyze results. A descriptive format was used, and agencies were encouraged to examine performance…

  8. Assessment of Tutoring Laboratories in a Learning Assistance Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullmer, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Resource Center at Lincoln University, Pennsylvania, provides tutoring laboratories that are required for developmental reading, writing, and math courses. This article reviews the processes used to plan and determine the effectiveness of the tutoring laboratories, including logic models, student learning outcomes, and the results of…

  9. Quantitative Measures for Assessing Learning Centers: An Agenda and Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkopes, Kevin; Abshire, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The national trend of requiring all college students to engage with tertiary-level mathematics has created the need to rethink how students can be supported at this level. Current trends in higher education show a decreased reliance on remedial developmental education courses and expanded reliance on learning centers. It is important to look at…

  10. Normative Data from Rorschach (Exner) and MMPI Tests for Students Assessed in an Alberta Government Youth Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Laurence E.

    This study was intended to provide descriptive data of the students in the Medicine Hat Youth Assessment Center, (YAC) in terms of psychological variables obtained from the Rorschach and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The adolescent subjects were 55 males assessed by the MMPI and 63 males and females assessed by the…

  11. Assessment of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Technology at the MSFC ECLS Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomes, Kristin; Long, David; Carter, Layne; Flynn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia. Removal (VPCAR) technology has been previously discussed as a viable option for. the Exploration Water Recovery System. This technology integrates a phase change process with catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase to produce potable water from exploration mission wastewaters. A developmental prototype VPCAR was designed, built and tested under funding provided by a National Research. Announcement (NRA) project. The core technology, a Wiped Film Rotating Device (WFRD) was provided by Water Reuse Technologies under the NRA, whereas Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International performed the hardware integration and acceptance test. of the system. Personnel at the-Ames Research Center performed initial systems test of the VPCAR using ersatz solutions. To assess the viability of this hardware for Exploration. Life Support (ELS) applications, the hardware has been modified and tested at the MSFC ECLS Test facility. This paper summarizes the hardware modifications and test results and provides an assessment of this technology for the ELS application.

  12. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial

  13. Hybrid methodology for situation assessment model development within an air operations center domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Stephen; Gonsalves, Paul; Call, Catherine

    2007-04-01

    Within the dynamic environment of an Air Operations Center (AOC), effective decision-making is highly dependent on timely and accurate situation assessment. In previous research efforts the capabilities and potential of a Bayesian belief network (BN) model-based approach to support situation assessment have been demonstrated. In our own prior research, we have presented and formalized a hybrid process for situation assessment model development that seeks to ameliorate specific concerns and drawbacks associated with using a BN-based model construct. Specifically, our hybrid methodology addresses the significant knowledge acquisition requirements and the associated subjective nature of using subject matter experts (SMEs) for model development. Our methodology consists of two distinct functional elements: an off-line mechanism for rapid construction of a Bayesian belief network (BN) library of situation assessment models tailored to different situations and derived from knowledge elicitation with SMEs; and an on-line machine-learning-based mechanism to learn, tune, or adapt BN model parameters and structure. The adaptation supports the ability to adjust the models over time to respond to novel situations not initially available or anticipated during initial model construction, thus ensuring that the models continue to meet the dynamic requirements of performing the situation assessment function within dynamic application environments such as an AOC. In this paper, we apply and demonstrate the hybrid approach within the specific context of an AOC-based air campaign monitoring scenario. We detail both the initial knowledge elicitation and subsequent machine learning phases of the model development process, as well as demonstrate model performance within an operational context.

  14. An Investigation of Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Change in Developmental Assessment Center Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodersen, D. Apryl; Thornton, George C., III

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread application of developmental assessment centers (DACs), little is known about the impact of the process on participants' understanding of the assessed performance dimensions. This study explores this issue by applying Golembiewski, Billingsley, and Yeager's (1976) tripartite model of change to assess the presence of alpha, beta,…

  15. Development of a Donor-Centered Approach to Risk Assessment: Rebalancing Nonmaleficence and Autonomy.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, C; Gordon, E J; Reese, P P; Kulkarni, S

    2015-09-01

    Living kidney donors are often excluded from the shared decision making and patient-centered models that are advocated in medical practice. Thresholds for acceptable risk vary between transplant centers, and between clinicians and donors. Although donor selection committees commonly focus on medical risks, potential donors also consider nonmedical risks and burdens, which may alter their assessment of an acceptable level of medical risk. Thus, transplant centers may encounter ethical tensions between nonmaleficence and respect for donor autonomy. A donor-centered model of risk assessment and risk reconciliation would integrate the donor's values and preferences in a shared decision about their eligibility to donate. This paper argues for shifting to a donor-centered model of risk assessment, and presents a research agenda to facilitate the greater participation of donors in their own evaluation and approval processes. PMID:25868787

  16. The peripheral visual cue assessment facility at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Peripheral Visual Cue Assessment Facility was established to study various responses to controlled dynamic stimuli that could be considered as visual analogs of some real world counterparts such as the horizon. Careful stimulus control permits specific responses to be traced to specific stimulus dynamics. The ability of the visual system to assess various kinds of stimulus motion is examined. A major emphasis is placed upon the peripheral vision field, which plays an important role in a pilot's assessment of where he is in space, where he is going, how fast he is travelling, and what angular and linear rates of movement is taking place. The facility was designed to be able to carry out carefully controlled psychophysical vision research over a wide angular range.

  17. Observation-centered approach to ASD assessment in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ashley J; Zimak, Eric H; Sheinkopf, Stephen J; Manji, Karim P; Morrow, Eric M

    2014-10-01

    Abstract In many lower-income countries, there is a paucity of assessment services for autism spectrum disorders (ASD)., Guidelines will be provided for conducting cross-cultural assessments in the context of limited validated resources in Tanzania. By examining behavioral, social, and adaptive differences we were able to provide differential diagnostic evaluations aligning with best practice standards for 41 children in Tanzania age 2-21 years. We describe the utility of a flexible, behavioral observation instrument, the Childhood Autism Rating Scales, Second Edition (CARS2), to gather diagnostic information in a culturally sensitive manner. We observed that the ASD group was characterized by significantly higher scores on the CARS2, F  =  21.09, p < .001, η(2)  =  .37, than the general delay comparison group. Additional recommendations are provided for making cultural adaptations to current assessment instruments for use in a country without normed instruments, such as Tanzania. PMID:25247726

  18. Assessing Community Informatics: A Review of Methodological Approaches for Evaluating Community Networks and Community Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Dara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. The study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital;…

  19. Description, Evaluation, and Validation of a Pilot Developmental Assessment Center in a Military-Educational Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Richard P.; And Others

    The purpose of this report is to describe, evaluate, and validate a pilot assessment center (AC) established in the Center for Leadership and Personal Development at the U.S. Military Academy to develop cadets on job skills needed by newly commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. The AC programs employ a leadership evaluation development method…

  20. An Analysis of Writing Tutoring Assessment in Four Community College Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantoja, Maria Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Writing centers in American institutions of higher education have existed in one form or another since the late 1800s and early 1900s, providing individualized writing tutoring and support for students. As writing centers evolved, questions arose regarding the effects of writing tutoring on student writing. Some assessment studies on writing…

  1. 75 FR 13318 - Nextera Energy Duane Arnold, LLC; Duane Arnold Energy Center; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... COMMISSION Nextera Energy Duane Arnold, LLC; Duane Arnold Energy Center; Environmental Assessment and Finding... Operating License No. DPR-49, issued to NextEra Energy Duane Arnold, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Duane Arnold Energy Center, located in Palo, Iowa. In accordance with 10 CFR 51.21, the...

  2. NCC Simulation Model: Simulating the operations of the network control center, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Paul, Arthur S.; Gill, Tepper L.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation of the network control center (NCC) is in the second phase of development. This phase seeks to further develop the work performed in phase one. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network. The focus of phase two will be the implementation of the network message dialogues and the resources controlled by the NCC. These resources are requested, initiated, monitored and analyzed via network messages. In the NCC network messages are presented in the form of packets that are routed across the network. These packets are generated, encoded, decoded and processed by the network host processors that generate and service the message traffic on the network that connects these hosts. As a result, the message traffic is used to characterize the work done by the NCC and the connected network. Phase one of the model development represented the NCC as a network of bi-directional single server queues and message generating sources. The generators represented the external segment processors. The served based queues represented the host processors. The NCC model consists of the internal and external processors which generate message traffic on the network that links these hosts. To fully realize the objective of phase two it is necessary to identify and model the processes in each internal processor. These processes live in the operating system of the internal host computers and handle tasks such as high speed message exchanging, ISN and NFE interface, event monitoring, network monitoring, and message logging. Inter process communication is achieved through the operating system facilities. The overall performance of the host is determined by its ability to service messages generated by both internal and external processors.

  3. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  4. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - U.S. COAST GUARD AVIATION TRAINING CENTER - MOBILE, AL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assessment of pollution prevention opportunities at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Training Center in Mobile, AL, identified waste reduction opportunities in five major processing areas: flight simulator operation, aircraft maintenance, aircraft fueling, aircraft washing, and...

  5. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., validated multidisciplinary data sets for international and national study (such undertakings as the recent... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.7 Center for... data analyses, applications, assessments, and interpretations to meet their particular...

  6. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., validated multidisciplinary data sets for international and national study (such undertakings as the recent... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.7 Center for... data analyses, applications, assessments, and interpretations to meet their particular...

  7. 15 CFR 950.7 - Center for Environmental Assessment Services (CEAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., validated multidisciplinary data sets for international and national study (such undertakings as the recent... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.7 Center for... data analyses, applications, assessments, and interpretations to meet their particular...

  8. Consistent Long-Time Series of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Schmid, R.; Rothacher, M.

    2004-12-01

    The current IGS processing strategy disregards satellite antenna phase center variations (pcvs) depending on the nadir angle and applies block-specific phase center offsets only. However, the transition from relative to absolute receiver antenna corrections presently under discussion necessitates the consideration of satellite antenna pcvs. Moreover, studies of several groups have shown that the offsets are not homogeneous within a satellite block. Manufacturer specifications seem to confirm this assumption. In order to get best possible antenna corrections, consistent ten-year time series (1994-2004) of satellite-specific pcvs and offsets were generated. This challenging effort became possible as part of the reprocessing of a global GPS network currently performed by the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden. The data of about 160 stations since the official start of the IGS in 1994 have been reprocessed, as today's GPS time series are mostly inhomogeneous and inconsistent due to continuous improvements in the processing strategies and modeling of global GPS solutions. An analysis of the signals contained in the time series of the phase center offsets demonstrates amplitudes on the decimeter level, at least one order of magnitude worse than the desired accuracy. The periods partly arise from the GPS orbit configuration, as the orientation of the orbit planes with regard to the inertial system repeats after about 350 days due to the rotation of the ascending nodes. In addition, the rms values of the X- and Y-offsets show a high correlation with the angle between the orbit plane and the direction to the sun. The time series of the pcvs mainly point at the correlation with the global terrestrial scale. Solutions with relative and absolute phase center corrections, with block- and satellite-specific satellite antenna corrections demonstrate the effect of this parameter group on other global GPS parameters such as the terrestrial scale, station velocities, the

  9. Creative Exercises in General Chemistry: A Student-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Scott E.; Shaw, Janet L.; Freeman, Kathryn A.

    2010-01-01

    Creative exercises (CEs) are a form of assessment in which students are given a prompt and asked to write down as many distinct, correct, and relevant facts about the prompt as they can. Students receive credit for each fact that they include that is related to the prompt and distinct from the other facts they list. With CEs, students have an…

  10. [HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF WORKING CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYEES OF BROADCASTING CENTER].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A V; Brusentsova, A V; Sokhoshko, I A; Rostikov, V P

    2015-01-01

    Hygienic assessment of working conditions of employees of the Omsk Regional Broadcasting Centre was performed on data of the analysis of materials of certification of workplaces. There were examined materials concerning 65 core profile workplaces, where 130 persons, including 35 women work. There was determined health risk for personnel in dependence on working conditions. The staff was noted to be exposed to the adverse impact of the following factors: chemical, physical (noise, general and local vibration, non-ionizing radiation, microclimate, lighting), severity and intensity ofwork. Class working conditions for 13,5% of workplaces on noise, 35.4% on non-ionizing radiation was assessed as a harmful of the first degree. Lightness indices at 78.5% of the workplaces did not meet the requirements of sanitary norms. At 7.7% of the workplaces levels of hardness of labor were assessed as harmful. The impact of such factors as biological, infrasound, ultrasound, ionizing radiation, aerosols with mainly fibrogenic action, was absent, their assessment was not carried out. Working conditions at 83.1% of workplaces were characterized as hazardous, including at 52.3% of the workplaces where there was established hazard class 3.1, at 30.7% of workplaces--Class 3.2. Among all the factors of occupational environment the largest contribution into the overall assessment of working conditions was made by the lightness factor (50.9%) and non-ionizing radiation (20.6%). The most harmful working conditions have been identified for workplaces of the operator of masthead antenna, engineer of radiocommunications, broadcasting and television, electromechanician of television (radiocommunication), (broadcasting), car driver. PMID:26856168

  11. [HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF WORKING CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYEES OF BROADCASTING CENTER].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A V; Brusentsova, A V; Sokhoshko, I A; Rostikov, V P

    2015-01-01

    Hygienic assessment of working conditions of employees of the Omsk Regional Broadcasting Centre was performed on data of the analysis of materials of certification of workplaces. There were examined materials concerning 65 core profile workplaces, where 130 persons, including 35 women work. There was determined health risk for personnel in dependence on working conditions. The staff was noted to be exposed to the adverse impact of the following factors: chemical, physical (noise, general and local vibration, non-ionizing radiation, microclimate, lighting), severity and intensity ofwork. Class working conditions for 13,5% of workplaces on noise, 35.4% on non-ionizing radiation was assessed as a harmful of the first degree. Lightness indices at 78.5% of the workplaces did not meet the requirements of sanitary norms. At 7.7% of the workplaces levels of hardness of labor were assessed as harmful. The impact of such factors as biological, infrasound, ultrasound, ionizing radiation, aerosols with mainly fibrogenic action, was absent, their assessment was not carried out. Working conditions at 83.1% of workplaces were characterized as hazardous, including at 52.3% of the workplaces where there was established hazard class 3.1, at 30.7% of workplaces--Class 3.2. Among all the factors of occupational environment the largest contribution into the overall assessment of working conditions was made by the lightness factor (50.9%) and non-ionizing radiation (20.6%). The most harmful working conditions have been identified for workplaces of the operator of masthead antenna, engineer of radiocommunications, broadcasting and television, electromechanician of television (radiocommunication), (broadcasting), car driver.

  12. Frequency domain mediolateral balance assessment using a center of pressure tracking task.

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, N Peter; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-11-15

    Since impaired mediolateral balance can increase fall risk, especially in the elderly, its quantification and training might be a powerful preventive tool. We propose a visual tracking task (VTT) with increasing frequencies (.3-2.0Hz) and with center of pressure as visual feedback as an assessment method. This mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) consists of two tasks, tracking a predictable target signal to determine physical capacity and tracking an unpredictable target signal to determine sensorimotor integration limitations. Within and between sessions learning effects and reliability in balance performance descriptors in both tasks were studied in 20 young adults. Balance performance was expressed as the phase-shift (PS) and gain (G) between the target and CoP in the frequency domain and cut-off frequencies at which the performance dropped. Results showed significant differences between the MELBA tasks in PS and G indicating a lower delay and higher accuracy in tracking the predictable target. Significant within and between sessions learning effects for the same measures were found only for the unpredictable task. Reliability of the cut-off frequencies at which PS and G performance declined and the average values within cut-off frequencies was fair to good (ICC .46-.66) for the unpredictable task and fair to excellent for the predictable task (ICC .68-.87). In conclusion, MELBA can reliably quantify balance performance using a predictable VTT. Additionally, the unpredictable tasks can give insight into the visuomotor integration mechanisms controlling balance and highlights MELBA's potential as a training tool.

  13. Review on distorted face-centered cubic phase in yttrium via genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    We present two distorted face-centered cubic (dfcc) structures of yttrium under high pressure, which have been found by a first-principles genetic algorithm technique. The structures are a tetragonal P43 (dfcc-I) and a triclinic P1¯ (dfcc-II), formed by slight distortions from a trigonal R3¯m structure reported as the dfcc phase earlier. The enthalpy difference between the two dfcc structures is less than 0.2 mRy/atom, and dfcc-I is marginally more stable than dfcc-II in lower pressure region. The enthalpy comparison among candidate structures indicates the structural phase transitions into dfcc-I at 41 GPa, into dfcc-II at 81 GPa, and into an orthorhombic Fddd structure at 106 GPa. This paper was presented at the LIIth European High Pressure Research Group (EHPRG 52) Meeting in Lyon (France), 7-12 September 2014.

  14. Estimating GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Variations Using Data from the Jason-1 and GRACE Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, S. D.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Bertiger, W.; Haines, B.; Nerem, S.; Morken, D.

    2004-12-01

    Reducing the uncertainty in locating the phase centers on both GPS transmitter and receiver antennas has emerged as an area of active research in the GPS geodetic community. We have used on-orbit data from the Jason-1 (2001-) and GRACE (2002-) missions to develop estimates of GPS satellite antenna phase-center variations (PCV). These missions offer a number of advantages for this exercise. The heights of the Jason-1 and GRACE satellites are well-determined at the 1-2 cm level, and there is no troposphere signal to confound interpretation of the measurements. The multipath environments are also favorable, particularly for the GRACE mission. We discuss several strategies for determining the GPS satellite PCV estimates from these data, and describe evaluations of the candidate solutions using independent data from terrestrial GPS stations. We also compare our GPS satellite PCV estimates with those determined independently from a terrestrial network. These estimates have potential benefits for wide-ranging geodetic applications.

  15. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  16. Faculty Perception and Use of Learning-Centered Strategies to Assess Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the researcher explored collegiate faculty use and perception of learning- centered strategies to assess student performance on various learning tasks. Through this study, the researcher identified the assessment strategies that faculty participants most frequently used, as well as the strategies that they perceived to be most…

  17. Assessment Center Construct-Related Validity: Stepping beyond the MTMM Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Mark C.; Woehr, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Monte Carlo research has illustrated that the traditional method for assessing the construct-related validity of assessment center (AC) post-exercise dimension ratings (PEDRs), an application of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to a multitrait-multimethod matrix, produces inconsistent results [Lance, C. E., Woehr, D. J., & Meade, A. W.…

  18. First among Equals: Hybridization of Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment and Evidence-Centered Game Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Chu, Man-Wai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to explore differences and similarities between cognitive diagnostic assessment (CDA) and evidence-centered game design (ECgD) in the service of intentional hybridization. Although some testing specialists might argue that both are essentially the same given their origins in principled assessment design and…

  19. Aerothermal modeling, phase 1. Volume 1: Model assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenworthy, M. J.; Correa, S. M.; Burrus, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Phase 1 was conducted as part of the overall NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) Program. The purpose of this effort was to determine the predictive accuracy of and the deficiencies within the various analytical modules comprising the overall combustor aerothermal model used at General Electric, as well as to formulate recommendations for improvement where needed. This effort involved the assembly of a benchmark quality data base from selected available literature, and from General Electric engine and combustor component test data. This data base was supplemented with additional definitive data obtained from an experimental test program conducted as part of the Phase 1 effort. Using selections from this data base, assessment studies were conducted to evaluate the various modules. Assessment of the internal flow module was conducted using 2-D parabolic and ellipitic, as well as 3-D elliptic internal flow calculations of definitive test data selected from the assembled data base. The 2-D assessment provided methodical examination of the mathematical techniques and the physical submodules, while the 3-D assessment focused on usefulness as a design tool. Calculations of combustor linear metal temperatures, pressure loss performance, and airflow distribution were performed using aerothermal modules which were in general use for many years at General Electric. The results of these assessment provided for the identification of deficiencies within the modules. The deficiencies were addressed in some detail providing a foundation on which to formulate a prioritized list of recommendations for improvement.

  20. Direct observation of titanium-centered octahedra in titanium-antimony-tellurium phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xiaosong; Xia, Mengjiao; Li, Wei; Ding, Keyuan; Feng, Xuefei; Zhu, Min; Feng, Songlin

    2015-11-27

    Phase-change memory based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material has one order of magnitude faster Set speed and as low as one-fifth of the Reset energy compared with the conventional Ge2Sb2Te5 based device. However, the phase-transition mechanism of the Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here we report a direct atom-by-atom chemical identification of titanium-centered octahedra in crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material with a state-of-the-art atomic mapping technology. Further, by using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density function theory simulations, we identify in amorphous Ti0.4Sb2Te3 the titanium atoms preferably maintain the octahedral configuration. Our work may pave the way to more thorough understanding and tailoring of the nature of the Ti-Sb-Te material, for promoting the development of dynamic random access memory-like phase-change memory as an emerging storage-class memory to reform current memory hierarchy.

  1. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Steiner, Jörg M; Algül, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25133018

  2. Assessment of Microphone Phased Array for Measuring Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The specific purpose of the present work was to demonstrate the suitability of a microphone phased array for launch acoustics applications via participation in selected firings of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test is a part of the discontinued Constellation Program Ares I Project, but the basic understanding gained from this test is expected to help development of the Space Launch System vehicles. Correct identification of sources not only improves the predictive ability, but provides guidance for a quieter design of the launch pad and optimization of the water suppression system. This document contains the results of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment.

  3. A Phased Approach for Assessing Combined Effects from Multiple Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Menzie, Charles A.; MacDonell, Margaret M.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2007-01-01

    We present a phased approach for evaluating the effects of physical, biological, chemical, and psychosocial stressors that may act in combination. Although a phased concept is common to many risk-based approaches, it has not been explicitly outlined for the assessment of combined effects of multiple stressors. The approach begins with the development of appropriate conceptual models and assessment end points. The approach then proceeds through a screening stage wherein stressors are evaluated with respect to their potential importance as contributors to risk. Stressors are considered individually or as a combination of independent factors with respect to one or more common assessment end points. As necessary, the approach then proceeds to consider interactions among stressors. We make a distinction between applications that begin with effects of concern (effects based) or with specific stressors (stressor based). We describe a number of tools for use within the phased approach. The methods profiled are ones that have been applied to yield results that can be communicated to a wide audience. The latter characteristic is considered especially important because multiple stressor problems usually involve exposures to communities or to ecologic regions with many stakeholders. PMID:17520072

  4. DX Deep Centers in AlxGa1-xAs Grown by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Masami; Mizuta, Masashi; Kukimoto, Hiroshi

    1984-12-01

    Deep levels, the so-called DX centers, in the AlxGa1-xAs alloy system grown by liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) were investigated by junction-capacitance spectroscopy. The dependence of the activation energy of the DX center in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs on the alloy composition was determined by DLTS. This dependence seems to reflect the change in the nature of the conduction bands in this alloy system. The other donor species studied: Si, Te and Se, were also found to form DX centers. An anomalously high concentration of DX centers was determined using low-temperature C-V techniques.

  5. Assessment techniques for a learning-centered curriculum: evaluation design for adventures in supercomputing

    SciTech Connect

    Helland, B.; Summers, B.G.

    1996-09-01

    As the classroom paradigm shifts from being teacher-centered to being learner-centered, student assessments are evolving from typical paper and pencil testing to other methods of evaluation. Students should be probed for understanding, reasoning, and critical thinking abilities rather than their ability to return memorized facts. The assessment of the Department of Energy`s pilot program, Adventures in Supercomputing (AiS), offers one example of assessment techniques developed for learner-centered curricula. This assessment has employed a variety of methods to collect student data. Methods of assessment used were traditional testing, performance testing, interviews, short questionnaires via email, and student presentations of projects. The data obtained from these sources have been analyzed by a professional assessment team at the Center for Children and Technology. The results have been used to improve the AiS curriculum and establish the quality of the overall AiS program. This paper will discuss the various methods of assessment used and the results.

  6. Phase Center Stabilization of a Horn Antenna and its Application in a Luneburg Lens Feed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakauskas, Brian H.

    With any reflecting or refracting structure, such as a parabolic reflector or lens antenna, the knowledge of the focal point is critical in the design as it determines the point at which a feeding signal should originate for proper operation. Spherically symmetrical lenses have a distinct advantage over other structure types in that there exists an infinite number of focal points surrounding the lens. Due to this feature, a spherical lens can remain in a fixed position while a beam can be steered to any direction by movement of the feed only. Unlike phased arrays that beam-steer electronically, a spherical lens exhibits no beam deterioration at wide angles. The lens that accomplishes this is in practice called the Luneburg lens which has been studied since the 1940s. Due to the electromechanical properties of the horn antenna, it is often used to feed the above mentioned configurations. In the focusing of any feed antenna, its phase center is an approximate point in space that should be coincident with a reflector or lens's focal point to minimize phase error over the radiating aperture. Although this is often easily accomplished over a narrow bandwidth, over wide bandwidths some antennas have phase centers that vary significantly, making their focusing a challenge. This thesis seeks to explain the problem with focusing a Luneburg lens with a canonical horn antenna and offers a modified horn design that remains nearly focused over a frequency band of 18 -- 45 GHz. In addition to simulating the feed / lens configurations, the lens and feed horn will be fabricated and mounted for far field measurements to be taken in an anechoic antenna range. A final feed design will be implemented in an array configuration with the Luneburg lens, capable of transmitting and receiving multiple beams without requiring any moving parts or complex electronic beam-forming networks. As a tradeoff, a separate receiver or switching network is required to accommodate each feed antenna. This

  7. WIND-TUNNEL SIMULATIONS TO ASSESS DISPERSION AROUND THE WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted of dispersion from the site of the destroyed World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City. A scale model of lower Manhattan, including a scaled representation of the rubble pile, was constructed. The first phases of the study involved smoke visua...

  8. Using Think Aloud Interviews in Evidence-Centered Assessment Design for the AP World History Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliski, Pamela; France, Megan; Huff, Kristen; Thurber, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Developing a cognitive model of task performance is an important and often overlooked phase in assessment design; failing to establish such a model can threaten the validity of the inferences made from the scores produced by an assessment (e.g., Leighton, 2004). Conducting think aloud interviews (TAIs), where students think aloud while completing…

  9. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  10. Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response

    SciTech Connect

    E. C. Nielsen

    2006-01-01

    During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

  11. Interactions of the IGS reprocessing and the IGS antenna phase center model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, R.; Steigenberger, P.; Dach, R.; Schmitz, M.; Dilssner, F.; Hugentobler, U.

    2009-12-01

    Since November 2006 an absolute phase center correction model for GNSS satellite and receiver antennas has been used within the International GNSS Service (IGS). This model, called igs05.atx, comprises consistent phase center offset (PCO) and variation (PCV) values given in ANTEX format. Generally, these correction values have not been changed in the meantime.For most of the receiver antenna types dominating the IGS network, absolute robot calibrations provided by Geo++ GmbH are available. Those comprise azimuth- and zenith-dependent PCVs down to the horizon. For the remaining antenna types converted field calibrations from the National Geodetic Survey are applied that are purely zenith-dependent. The impact of radomes is taken into account, if calibration results are available. So far, igs05.atx only contains calibrations for the GPS frequencies.The GPS satellite antenna corrections contained in igs05.atx were estimated by Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum and by TUM by reprocessing more than ten years of IGS data. The corresponding GLONASS corrections were provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) after processing more than one year of data. Although azimuth-dependent PCVs are present, the igs05.atx model is limited to block-specific purely nadir-dependent PCVs. In contrast, satellite-specific z-offsets are given.At the time the satellite antenna corrections were estimated, the solutions could only be aligned to IGb00, the IGS realization of ITRF2000, that was based on relative receiver antenna corrections. Moreover, the impact of radomes had to be ignored, as calibration results were not available. So, the IGS reprocessing campaign is an excellent possibility to improve the consistency between both satellite and receiver antenna corrections and the terrestrial reference frame.Several analysis centers (ACs) of the IGS provide z-offset estimates within their weekly SINEX files. By back-solving those files with selected station coordinates fixed

  12. Organ assessment and repair centers: The future of transplantation is near

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Bryan A; Black, Sylvester M

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is limited by suitable donor organ availability and the geographic limitations that lead to prolonged ischemic times. Ex vivo organ perfusion is an evolving technology that enables assessment of organ function prior to transplantation. As a byproduct, overall out of body organ times are able to be extended. The future implications organ assessment and repair centers utilizing this technology are discussed. PMID:25032094

  13. Reliability and validity of center of pressure measures for balance assessment in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Liang, Yan-Yi; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Jing; Ma, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to assess the reliability and validity of center of pressure-based parameters for balance assessment. [Subjects and Methods] Two hundred and forty older adults were evaluated using a force platform and the Berg Balance Scale at 1-week intervals. The intra-class correlation coefficient and the Pearson correlation coefficient were used to test reliability and validity respectively. [Results] The reliability of the 12 selected center of pressure measures was satisfactory (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.75–0.99) and the validity between the parameters and the Berg Balance Scale was moderate to good (r = −0.62 to −0.88). [Conclusion] Center of pressure-based parameters are reliable and valid measures in older adults. PMID:27190484

  14. Estimating the Reliability of Aggregated and Within-Person Centered Scores in Ecological Momentary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Weng, Li-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A procedure for estimating the reliability of test scores in the context of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was proposed to take into account the characteristics of EMA measures. Two commonly used test scores in EMA were considered: the aggregated score (AGGS) and the within-person centered score (WPCS). Conceptually, AGGS and WPCS represent…

  15. Practicing Learner-Centered Teaching: Pedagogical Design and Assessment of a Second Life Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Shu Z.

    2009-01-01

    Guided by the principles of learner-centered teaching methodology, a Second Life project is designed to engage students in active learning of virtual commerce through hands-on experiences and teamwork in a virtual environment. More importantly, an assessment framework is proposed to evaluate the learning objectives and learning process of the…

  16. Truancy Assessment and Service Centers (TASC): Engaging Elementary School Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Judith L. F.; Thomas, Johanna M.; Lemieux, Catherine M.; Cain, Daphne S.; Guin, Cecile C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews literature describing truancy and its correlates, and it analyzes the current research on truancy prevention programs. Few truancy prevention programs exist in elementary school settings. This article describes Truancy Assessment and Service Centers, a theory-driven program providing case management services to children in 85…

  17. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Analysis of World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter for Use in Toxicological Assessment
    John K. McGee1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Glen R. Chee2, Colette M. Prophete2, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Shirley J. Wasson3, Teri L. Conner4, Daniel L. Costa1, and Steph...

  18. Development and Initial Validation of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Benjamin D.; McAleavey, Andrew A.; Zhao, Yu; Lei, Pui-Wa; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Li, Hongli; Tate, Robin; Lin, Yu-Chu

    2012-01-01

    A short version of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62) was created via three studies. The final short version (CCAPS-34), which contains 34 items and 7 subscales, demonstrated good discrimination power, support for the proposed factor structure, strong initial convergent validity, and adequate test-retest…

  19. FAIJU: An Assessment Center for Developing the Skills of Volunteers Working in International Youth Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The three non-profit student exchange organizations AFS, Experiment and YFU, have been running a special assessment center for the development of skills necessary for volunteers working in international student exchange. This paper presents the goals and intentions behind this tool and also discusses the use of human resource development tools in…

  20. Harrison County Teacher Education Center Needs Assessment Survey: A Second Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, John

    This paper contains an analysis of the data gathered from the 1975-76 Harrison County Teacher Education Center (HCTEC) needs assessment survey. The orginial study analyzed the opinions of 13 client groups concerning the HCTEC. The study concentrated on two major questions: (1) what are the opinions of the 13 client groups about the perceived needs…

  1. Sharing Psycho-Educational Assessment Results: A Person-Centered Collaborative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buettner, Edwin G.

    2010-01-01

    Sharing assessment data in schools typically takes the form of a short meeting to report results and give recommendations to school staff and parents. Such meetings are often dominated by a one-way flow of communication; i.e., from the clinician to the child's caregivers. Drawing on the theory and practice of Person-centered Planning and…

  2. Injecting Warm Fuzzies into Cold Systems: Defining, Benchmarking, and Assessing Holistic, Person-Centered Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Holly Brooke

    2010-01-01

    This study examines if and how holistic, person-centered academic advising, based on an integrative framework of educational psychology (Bronfenbrenner), sociology (Weber), and counseling (Rogers) theories, can be fostered, implemented, and assessed at a research university. The study design uses the coding of qualitative data and its translation…

  3. Formative Assessment as Educational and Administrative Adhesive: Establishing an Elementary School Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Brad; Black, Sharon; Anstead, Marcia Howell

    1997-01-01

    Describes the collaboration between a university and an elementary school to establish a writing center at the elementary school, staffed by university students (preservice teachers). Describes the crucial role of ongoing formative assessment activity for both elementary students and the university preservice teachers. (SR)

  4. Design and Discovery in Educational Assessment: Evidence-Centered Design, Psychometrics, and Educational Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Behrens, John T.; Dicerbo, Kristen E.; Levy, Roy

    2012-01-01

    "Evidence-centered design" (ECD) is a comprehensive framework for describing the conceptual, computational and inferential elements of educational assessment. It emphasizes the importance of articulating inferences one wants to make and the evidence needed to support those inferences. At first blush, ECD and "educational data…

  5. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  6. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  7. Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

  8. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias towards the plasma cell (PC) fate,...

  9. Protocol for the China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) Million Persons Project pilot

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiapeng; Xuan, Si; Downing, Nicholas S; Wu, Chaoqun; Li, Li; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Collection of high-quality data from large populations is considered essential to generate knowledge that is critical to an era of precision medicine. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in China and is a suitable focus of an initiative to discover factors that would improve our ability to assess and modify individual risk. Methods and analysis The pilot phase of China PEACE (Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events) Million Persons Project is being conducted during 2014–2015 in four provinces across China to demonstrate the feasibility of a population-based assessment. It is designed to screen 0.4 million community-dwelling residents aged 40–75 years with measurements of blood pressure, height and weight, a lipid blood test, and a questionnaire on cardiovascular-related health status. Participants identified at high risk of CVD receive further health assessments, including ECG, ultrasound scan, blood and urine analysis, and a questionnaire on lifestyle and medical history. Collection of blood and urine samples is used to establish a biobank. High-risk subjects are also counselled with suggestions regarding potential lifestyle changes. In addition, high-risk subjects are followed-up either in a return clinic visit or by telephone interview, with measurement of blood pressure, weight, ECG, and a questionnaire on survival status, hospitalisations and lifestyle. The first 0.1 million participants screened were used to conduct a preliminary analysis, with information on baseline characteristics, health-related behaviours, anthropometric variables, medical history, and prevalence of high-risk subjects. Ethics and dissemination The central ethics committee at the China National Center for Cardiovascular Disease (NCCD) approved the pilot. Written informed consent is obtained from all participants on entry into the project. Findings will be disseminated in future peer-reviewed papers and will inform strategies

  10. 43 CFR 11.93 - Post-assessment phase-restoration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Post-assessment phase-restoration plan. 11... DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment Phase § 11.93 Post-assessment phase—restoration plan. (a) Upon... Restoration Plan as provided in section 111(i) of CERCLA. The plan shall be based upon the Restoration...

  11. 43 CFR 11.93 - Post-assessment phase-restoration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Post-assessment phase-restoration plan. 11... DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment Phase § 11.93 Post-assessment phase—restoration plan. (a) Upon... Restoration Plan as provided in section 111(i) of CERCLA. The plan shall be based upon the Restoration...

  12. 43 CFR 11.93 - Post-assessment phase-restoration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Post-assessment phase-restoration plan. 11... DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment Phase § 11.93 Post-assessment phase—restoration plan. (a) Upon... Restoration Plan as provided in section 111(i) of CERCLA. The plan shall be based upon the Restoration...

  13. 43 CFR 11.92 - Post-assessment phase-restoration account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Post-assessment phase-restoration account... DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment Phase § 11.92 Post-assessment phase—restoration account. (a... restoration, rehabilitation, replacement, and/or acquisition of equivalent resources. (2) In order to make...

  14. 43 CFR 11.92 - Post-assessment phase-restoration account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Post-assessment phase-restoration account... DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment Phase § 11.92 Post-assessment phase—restoration account. (a... restoration, rehabilitation, replacement, and/or acquisition of equivalent resources. (2) In order to make...

  15. 43 CFR 11.93 - Post-assessment phase-restoration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Post-assessment phase-restoration plan. 11... DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Post-Assessment Phase § 11.93 Post-assessment phase—restoration plan. (a) Upon... Restoration Plan as provided in section 111(i) of CERCLA. The plan shall be based upon the Restoration...

  16. Center for Molecular Electronics, University of Missouri, St. Louis. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Missouri, St. Louis to proceed with the detailed design and construction of the proposed Center for Molecular Electronics. The proposed Center would consist of laboratories and offices housed in a three-story building on the University campus. The proposed modular laboratories would be adaptable for research activities principally related to physics, chemistry, and electrical engineering. Proposed research would include the development and application of thin-film materials, semi-conductors, electronic sensors and devices, and high-performance polymers. Specific research for the proposed Center has not yet been formulated, therefore, specific procedures for any particular process or study cannot be described at this time. The proposed construction site is an uncontaminated panel of land located on the University campus. This report contains information about the environmental assessment that was performed in accordance with this project.

  17. Liquid versus solid phase bioassays for dredged material toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martínez, M C; Fernández, N; Forja, J M; DelValls, T A

    2007-05-01

    Since 1994 the results of the analyses of key chemical compounds (trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and the comparison with the corresponding sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) are used in decision-making for dredged material management in Spain. Nonetheless in the last decades a tiered testing approach is promoted for assessing the physical and chemical characteristics of dredged sediments and their potential biological effects in the environment. Bioassays have been used for sediment toxicity assessment in Spain but few or no experiences are reported on harbour sediments. We studied the incidence of toxicity in the 7 d bioassay using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) and the 48 h bioassay using sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) embryos over a series of experiments employing 22 different elutriates. The relative performance of this exposure phase was not comparable to data on the 10-d acute toxicity test using the burrowing amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina, carried out on the whole sediments. These results evidence the importance of the exposure route and the test selected in decision-making, as the toxicity registered for the undiluted elutriates was largely due to the different solubility of sediment-bound contaminants. This work and other studies indicate that for many sediments, a complete battery of test is recommended together with physico-chemical analyses to decide whether dredged sediments are suitable for open water disposal or not. PMID:17174396

  18. Clinical Validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62): Further Evaluation and Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavey, Andrew A.; Nordberg, Samuel S.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Lockard, Allison J.

    2012-01-01

    Self-report instruments of psychological symptoms are increasingly used in counseling centers but rely on rigorous evaluation of their clinical validity. Three studies reported here (total N = 26,886) investigated the validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62; Locke et al., 2011) as an assessment and…

  19. A construct-driven investigation of gender differences in a leadership-role assessment center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil; Lievens, Filip; van Dam, Karen; Born, Marise

    2006-05-01

    This study examined gender differences in a large-scale assessment center for officer entry in the British Army. Subgroup differences were investigated for a sample of 1,857 candidates: 1,594 men and 263 women. A construct-driven approach was chosen (a) by examining gender differences at the construct level, (b) by formulating a priori hypotheses about which constructs would be susceptible to gender effects, and (c) by using both effect size statistics and latent mean analyses to investigate gender differences in assessment center ratings. Results showed that female candidates were rated notably higher on constructs reflecting an interpersonally oriented leadership style (i.e., oral communication and interaction) and on drive and determination. These results are discussed in light of role congruity theory and of the advantages of using latent mean analyses.

  20. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-04-03

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

  1. Assessing Readiness for Establishing a Farmers’ Market at a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Y. Omar; Brandt, Heather M.; Young, Vicki; Friedman, Daniela B.; Hébert, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Farmers’ markets are community health promotion interventions that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. As farmers’ markets continue to develop, it is important to strategically locate them in settings that are accessible to populations disparately affected by health disparities. One potential setting is a community health center. The goal of this analysis is to extend existing research on community readiness to identify indicators of preparedness among community health centers for establishing onsite farmers’ markets. The sampling frame for the readiness assessment included all community health centers in South Carolina (N = 20) representing 163 practice sites. Data collection included two brief online surveys, in-depth key informant interviews, and secondary analysis of contextual data. Five themes related to readiness for establishing a farmers market at a community health center were identified: capacity, social capital, awareness of health problems and solutions, logistical factors, and sustainability. Findings from this study provide guidance to researchers and community health center staff as they explore the development of environmental interventions focused on reducing diet-related health conditions by improving access to healthy foods. PMID:21643822

  2. Assessment team report on flight-critical systems research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewiorek, Daniel P. (Compiler); Dunham, Janet R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The quality, coverage, and distribution of effort of the flight-critical systems research program at NASA Langley Research Center was assessed. Within the scope of the Assessment Team's review, the research program was found to be very sound. All tasks under the current research program were at least partially addressing the industry needs. General recommendations made were to expand the program resources to provide additional coverage of high priority industry needs, including operations and maintenance, and to focus the program on an actual hardware and software system that is under development.

  3. The development of a clinical outcomes survey research application: Assessment CenterSM

    PubMed Central

    Rothrock, Nan E.; Hanrahan, Rachel T.; Jansky, Liz J.; Harniss, Mark; Riley, William

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The National Institutes of Health sponsored Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aimed to create item banks and computerized adaptive tests (CATs) across multiple domains for individuals with a range of chronic diseases. Purpose Web-based software was created to enable a researcher to create study-specific Websites that could administer PROMIS CATs and other instruments to research participants or clinical samples. This paper outlines the process used to develop a user-friendly, free, Web-based resource (Assessment CenterSM) for storage, retrieval, organization, sharing, and administration of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments. Methods Joint Application Design (JAD) sessions were conducted with representatives from numerous institutions in order to supply a general wish list of features. Use Cases were then written to ensure that end user expectations matched programmer specifications. Program development included daily programmer “scrum” sessions, weekly Usability Acceptability Testing (UAT) and continuous Quality Assurance (QA) activities pre- and post-release. Results Assessment Center includes features that promote instrument development including item histories, data management, and storage of statistical analysis results. Conclusions This case study of software development highlights the collection and incorporation of user input throughout the development process. Potential future applications of Assessment Center in clinical research are discussed. PMID:20306332

  4. Using Self-Assessment to Assess the Effectiveness of Learner Centered Instructional Design and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary research in pedagogy provides evidence for use of active learning strategies in the classroom. It is important that faculty demonstrate effectiveness across the spectrum of teaching activities, as well as effectiveness in meeting the learning goals of students. This paper illustrates how self-assessment can be used to evaluate the…

  5. Centering or Not Centering in Multilevel Models? The Role of the Group Mean and the Assessment of Group Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paccagnella, Omar

    2006-01-01

    In multilevel regression, centering the model variables produces effects that are different and sometimes unexpected compared with those in traditional regression analysis. In this article, the main contributions in terms of meaning, assumptions, and effects underlying a multilevel centering solution are reviewed, emphasizing advantages and…

  6. Earth Observations to Assess Impact of Hurricane Katrina on John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, William D.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2007-01-01

    The peril from hurricanes to Space Operations Centers is real and is forecast to continue; Katrina, Rita, and Wilma of 2005 and Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne of 2004 are sufficient motivation for NASA to develop a multi-Center plan for preparedness and response. As was demonstrated at SSC (Stennis Space Center) in response to Hurricane Katrina, NASA Centers are efficiently activated as local command centers, playing host to Federal and State agencies and first responders to coordinate and provide evacuation, relocation, response, and recovery activities. Remote sensing decision support provides critical insight for managing NASA infrastructure and for assisting Center decision makers. Managers require geospatial information to manage the federal city. Immediately following Katrina, SSC s power and network connections were disabled, hardware was inoperative, technical staff was displaced and/or out of contact, and graphical decision support tools were non-existent or less than fully effective. Despite this circumstance, SSC EOC (Emergency Operations Center) implemented response operations to assess damage and to activate recovery plans. To assist Center Managers, the NASA ASP (Applied Sciences Program) made its archive of high-resolution data over the site available. In the weeks and months after the immediate crisis, NASA supplemented this data with high-resolution, post-Katrina imagery over SSC and much of the affected coastal areas. Much of the high-resolution imagery was made available through the Department of Defense Clear View contract and was distributed through U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science "Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response" Web site. By integrating multiple image data types with other information sources, ASP applied an all-source solutions approach to develop decision support tools that enabled managers to respond to critical issues, such as expedient access to infrastructure and deployment of resources

  7. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  8. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  9. Construction of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action of granting a site use permit to construct and operate a conference center on an approximately 70-acre tract of land on the Savannah River Site (SRS). While the proposed action requires an administrative decision by DOE, this EA reviews the linked action of physically constructing and operating a conference center. The SRS is a DOE-owned nuclear production facility encompassing approximately 200,000 acres in southwestern South Carolina. The proposed conference center would have an area of approximately 4,000 square feet, and would infrequently accommodate as many as 150 people, with the average being about 20 people per day. In addition to the No-Action alternative, under which the Research Foundation would not require the 70-acre tract of SRS land for a conference center, this EA considers site preservation. Under Site Preservation only minimal activities necessary to the SRS mission would occur, thereby establishing the lower limits of environmental consequences. A review conducted under the SRS permitting process identified no other forms of possible site development. Similarly, SRS areas identified in the Nuclear Complex Reconfiguration Site Proposal (DOE, 199la) do not include the conference center site area in proposed weapons complex reconfiguration activities. As a consequence, this EA does not consider other forms of possible site development as alternatives. The potential environmental consequences associated with the action of constructing and operating a conference center include impacts to cultural resources and impacts from construction activities, primarily related to land clearing (5 to 10 acres) and providing access to the site.

  10. Characterization of anthropometric assessment studies of Brazilian children attending daycare centers

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; de Menezes, Tarciana Nobre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To obtain an overview of available information on the anthropometric assessment of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. Data source: A literature search was carried out in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases of studies published from 1990 to 2013 in Portuguese and English languages. The following search strategy was used: (nutritional status OR anthropometrics OR malnutrition OR overweight) AND daycare centers, as well as the equivalent terms in Portuguese. In the case of MEDLINE search, the descriptor Brazil was also used. Data synthesis: It was verified that the 33 studies included in the review were comparable from a methodological point of view. The studies, in general, were characterized by their restrictive nature, geographical concentration and dispersion of results in relation to time. Considering the studies published from 2010 onwards, low prevalence of acute malnutrition and significant rates of stunting and overweight were observed. Conclusions: Despite the limitations, considering the most recent studies that used the WHO growth curves (2006), it is suggested that the anthropometric profile of Brazilian children attending daycare centers is characterized by a nutritional transition process, with significant prevalence of overweight and short stature. We emphasize the need to develop a multicenter survey that will more accurately define the current anthropometric nutritional status of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. PMID:26553574

  11. Operation of the Pinellas Plant Child Development Center/Partnership School: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    The US Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL), through the DOE Pinellas Area Office (PAO) and GE Neutron Devices (GEND), is proposing a joint venture to operate a Partnership School and Child Development Center at the Pinellas Plant. The Child Development Center/Partnership School proposal has been developed. The building has been constructed, teachers and staff selected, and the building made ready for immediate occupancy. The proposed action addressed by this environmental assessment is the operation and utilization of the school as a Partnership School, a preschool Child Development Center, and a before- and after-hours child care facility. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, the potential impacts from the operation of the proposed action are assessed. Additionally, since the proposed school is located next to an industrial facility, impacts on the school population from routine plant operations, as well as abnormal events, are analyzed, and changes in plant operation that may be prudent are considered. 25 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Preliminary assessment of energy conservation opportunities at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, L.; Parker, G.B.

    1993-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is encouraging energy efficiency in its buildings and facilities as part of an overall strategy to meet the requirements of the Executive Order on Energy Efficiency and the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992. NASA requested technical assistance from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a site visit, examine selected buildings and facilities, and suggest appropriate and economically acceptable energy efficiency measures and future actions at NASA`s Goddard Space Flight Center. PNL was also tasked to investigate the current and future demand-side management (DSM) programs offered by the servicing electric utility that would be applicable for the site. The information for this assessment was collected during site visits to the Goddard Space Flight Center during September and October 1992. The assessment addresses energy supply and cost, estimated energy distribution and use, and cost-effective options to reduce energy consumption at the center. Applicable utility DSM programs are also identified. A recommended strategy is identified to undertake a more comprehensive long-term energy reduction program at the site. A model approach is also given for the site to develop a partnership with the serving electric utility to implement a ``custom`` site-wide DSM program incorporating the several incentives offered by the utility to governmental agencies.

  13. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  14. Climate research in the former Soviet Union. FASAC: Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center technical assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.; Ellsaesser, H.W.; Harshvardhan; Hoffert, M.I.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report assesses the state of the art in several areas of climate research in the former Soviet Union. This assessment was performed by a group of six internationally recognized US experts in related fields. The areas chosen for review are: large-scale circulation processes in the atmosphere and oceans; atmospheric radiative processes; cloud formation processes; climate effects of natural atmospheric disturbances; and the carbon cycle, paleoclimates, and general circulation model validation. The study found an active research community in each of the above areas. Overall, the quality of climate research in the former Soviet Union is mixed, although the best Soviet work is as good as the best corresponding work in the West. The best Soviet efforts have principally been in theoretical studies or data analysis. However, an apparent lack of access to modern computing facilities has severely hampered the Soviet research. Most of the issues considered in the Soviet literature are known, and have been discussed in the Western literature, although some extraordinary research in paleoclimatology was noted. Little unusual and exceptionally creative material was found in the other areas during the study period (1985 through 1992). Scientists in the former Soviet Union have closely followed the Western literature and technology. Given their strengths in theoretical and analytical methods, as well as their possession of simplified versions of detailed computer models being used in the West, researchers in the former Soviet Union have the potential to make significant contributions if supercomputers, workstations, and software become available. However, given the current state of the economy in the former Soviet Union, it is not clear that the computer gap will be bridged in the foreseeable future.

  15. Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

  16. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-03-06

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the

  17. Assessment of quality of life indicators among selected patients in a community cancer center.

    PubMed

    Frazer, G H; Brown, C H; Graves, T K

    1998-01-01

    Quality of life and outcome assessments are particularly critical for nurses in assessing clinical care for diseases such as cancer because of potential mortality and the exacting modalities of treatment. The 278 study participants were patients at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando. The respondents were assessed with the Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ; D. M. Radosevich, H. Wetzler, & S. M. Wilson, 1995). Prostate cancer patients scored higher (had a higher quality of life) on average (6.08%) than breast cancer patients on all subscales except Physical Functioning. The diagnostic center patients scored higher (9.68%) than breast cancer patients and prostate cancer patients (3.47%). Breast cancer respondents scored 16.61% lower than the normative values for individuals less than 65 years of age, whereas prostate cancer respondents scored 10.91% higher than the normative values for those older than 65. The data analysis confirmed that breast cancer and prostate cancer patients have statistically different scores on the HSQ, implying different quality of life concerns for each group.

  18. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.

  19. AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PHASE I STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I studies were sponsored by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) to address critical information needs for assessing human exposures to multiple chemicals from multiple pathways and media. These studies were...

  20. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  1. NCC simulation model. Phase 2: Simulating the operations of the Network Control Center and NCC message manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Gill, Tepper; Charles, Mary

    1994-01-01

    The network control center (NCC) provides scheduling, monitoring, and control of services to the NASA space network. The space network provides tracking and data acquisition services to many low-earth orbiting spacecraft. This report describes the second phase in the development of simulation models for the FCC. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network.Phase two focuses on the implementation of the network message dialogs and the resources controlled by the NCC. Performance measures were developed along with selected indicators of the NCC's operational effectiveness.The NCC performance indicators were defined in terms of the following: (1) transfer rate, (2) network delay, (3) channel establishment time, (4) line turn around time, (5) availability, (6) reliability, (7) accuracy, (8) maintainability, and (9) security. An NCC internal and external message manual is appended to this report.

  2. Formation of prismatic loops from C15 Laves phase interstitial clusters in body-centered cubic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-03-01

    This Letter reports the transition of C15 phase self-interstitial clusters to loops in body-centered-cubic Iron. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the relative stabilities of difference interstitial cluster configurations including C15 phase structure and <100> and <111>/2 loops. Within a certain size range, C15 cluster are found more stable than loops, and the relative stabilities are reversed beyond that range. In accordance to the crossover in relative stabilities, C15 clusters may grow by absorbing individual interstitials at small sizes and transitions into loops eventually. The transition takes place by nucleation and reaction of <111>/2 loop segments. These observations explain the absence of C15 phase interstitial clusters predicted by density-functional-theory calculations in previous experimental observations. More importantly, the current results provide a new formation mechanism of <100> loops which requires no interaction of loops.

  3. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  4. Phase III of construction of University Fitness Center and Human Performance Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, James

    2009-09-30

    This grant did not include administrative expenses/legal expenses, land or rights-of-way purchases or relocation expenses. The construction funds for the Fitness Center $932,100 and the Performance Lab $23,900 totaled $956,000. Actual dollars expended totaled, $956,509.22, $932,609.22 for the Fitness Center and $23,900 for the Performance Lab. The University contributed $509.22. The projects are completed and in use. All inspections and occupancy permits have been obtained. All contractors have released all construction leans.

  5. The Vital Role of Patient Feedback in the Critical Assessment of a Patient-Centered Care Objective Structured Clinical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentfro, Allison Carothers

    2011-01-01

    Priorities in medical education have increasingly emphasized teaching skills and fostering attitudes related to patient-centered care (Beckman & Frankel, 2003; Haidet & Paterniti, 2003). The challenge for academic medical centers is to implement these competencies into their curriculum and assess the outcomes. Using a qualitative single…

  6. High level waste storage tanks 242-A evaporator S/RID phase II assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Biebesheimer, E.

    1996-09-27

    This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) Phase 2 Assessment Report for the subject facility, represents the results of a Performance Assessment to determine whether procedures containing S/RID requirements are fully implemented by field personnel in the field. It contains a summary report and three attachments; an assessment schedule, performance objectives, and assessments for selected functional areas.

  7. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M&A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M&A and the content and preparation of the manual.

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) overview of FRMAC operations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the designated Lead Federal Agency (LFA) and the state(s) that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. The mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Operations describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas. These off-site areas may include one or more affected states.

  9. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. METC is currently a research and development facility, managed by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. Its goal is to focus energy research and development to develop engineered fossil fuel systems, that are economically viable and environmentally sound, for commercial application. There is clear evidence that, since the 1991 Tiger Team Assessment, substantial progress has been made by both FE and METC in most aspects of their ES&H program. The array of new and restructured organizations, systems, and programs at FE and METC; increased assignments of staff to support these initiatives; extensive training activities; and the maturing planning processes, all reflect a discernable, continuous improvement in the quality of the ES&H performance.

  10. A Person-Centered Approach to Financial Capacity Assessment: Preliminary Development of a New Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Stoltman, Jonathan; Ficker, Lisa J.; Iris, Madelyn; Mast, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Financial exploitation and financial capacity issues often overlap when a gerontologist assesses whether an older adult’s financial decision is an autonomous, capable choice. Our goal is to describe a new conceptual model for assessing financial decisions using principles of person-centered approaches and to introduce a new instrument, the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Rating Scale (LFDRS). We created a conceptual model, convened meetings of experts from various disciplines to critique the model and provide input on content and structure, and select final items. We then videotaped administration of the LFDRS to five older adults and had 10 experts provide independent ratings. The LFDRS demonstrated good to excellent inter-rater agreement. The LFDRS is a new tool that allows gerontologists to systematically gather information about a specific financial decision and the decisional abilities in question. PMID:25866438

  11. Alterations in knee contact forces and centers in stance phase of gait: A detailed lower extremity musculoskeletal model.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Adouni, M

    2016-01-25

    Evaluation of contact forces-centers of the tibiofemoral joint in gait has crucial biomechanical and pathological consequences. It involves however difficulties and limitations in in vitro cadaver and in vivo imaging studies. The goal is to estimate total contact forces (CF) and location of contact centers (CC) on the medial and lateral plateaus using results computed by a validated finite element model simulating the stance phase of gait for normal as well as osteoarthritis, varus-valgus and posterior tibial slope altered subjects. Using foregoing contact results, six methods commonly used in the literature are also applied to estimate and compare locations of CC at 6 periods of stance phase (0%, 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%). TF joint contact forces are greater on the lateral plateau very early in stance and on the medial plateau thereafter during 25-100% stance periods. Large excursions in the location of CC (>17mm), especially on the medial plateau in the mediolateral direction, are computed. Various reported models estimate quite different CCs with much greater variations (~15mm) in the mediolateral direction on both plateaus. Compared to our accurately computed CCs taken as the gold standard, the centroid of contact area algorithm yielded least differences (except in the mediolateral direction on the medial plateau at ~5mm) whereas the contact point and weighted center of proximity algorithms resulted overall in greatest differences. Large movements in the location of CC should be considered when attempting to estimate TF compartmental contact forces in gait. PMID:26708962

  12. Superfluid helium 2 liquid-vapor phase separation: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A literature survey of helium 2 liquid vapor phase separation is presented. Currently, two types of He 2 phase separators are being investigated: porous, sintered metal plugs and the active phase separator. The permeability K(P) shows consistency in porous plug geometric characterization. Both the heat and mass fluxes increase with K(P). Downstream pressure regulation to adjust for varying heat loads and both temperatures is possible. For large dynamic heat loads, the active phase separator shows a maximum heat rejection rate of up to 2 W and bath temperature stability of 0.1 mK. Porous plug phase separation performance should be investigated for application to SIRTF and, in particular, that plugs of from 10 to the minus ninth square centimeters to 10 to the minus eighth square centimeters in conjunction with downstream pressure regulation be studied.

  13. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 1. Cloud tracking and phase space description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-01

    We study the evolution of warm convective cloud fields using large eddy simulations of continental and trade cumulus. Individual clouds are tracked a posteriori from formation to dissipation using a 3-D cloud-tracking algorithm, and results are presented in the phase space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space). The CvM space is shown to contain rich information on cloud field characteristics, cloud morphology, and common cloud development pathways, together facilitating a comprehensive understanding of the cloud field. In this part we show how the meteorological (thermodynamic) conditions that determine the cloud properties are projected on the CvM phase space and how changes in the initial conditions affect the clouds' trajectories in this space. This part sets the stage for a detailed microphysical analysis that will be shown in part II.

  14. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Albert; Legowski, Elizabeth; Chakka, Anish; Chandran, Uma R; Barmada, M Michael; LaFramboise, William A; Berg, Jeremy; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1) how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2) research objectives and goals for NGS, (3) workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4) storage capacity and unmet needs, (5) available and anticipated funding resources, and (6) future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs.

  15. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Geskin, Albert; Legowski, Elizabeth; Chakka, Anish; Chandran, Uma R; Barmada, M. Michael; LaFramboise, William A.; Berg, Jeremy; Jacobson, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1) how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2) research objectives and goals for NGS, (3) workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4) storage capacity and unmet needs, (5) available and anticipated funding resources, and (6) future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs. PMID:26115441

  16. Environmental and ventilation assessment in Child Day Care Centers in Porto: the ENVIRH Project.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana; Aelenei, Daniel; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Aguiar, Lívia; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Azevedo, Susana; Cano, Manuela; Proença, Carmo; Viegas, João; Silva, Susana; Mendes, Diana; Neuparth, Nuno; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Children attending day care centers (CDCC) have been reported to be more prone to infectious diseases when compared with those cared for at home, and are exposed to conditions that may increase the risk of allergies and asthma. Several studies revealed that consequences of poor ventilation conditions include high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and many other indoor pollutants commonly detected in schools. Nine child day care centers were selected randomly to participate in this study. Fifty-two classrooms were assessed for chemical, biological, physical, and allergen parameters in spring and winter seasons in these nine CDCC located in Porto, Portugal. Outdoor measurements were also conducted for comparison. Our results indicated that (i) particulate matter (PM10) median levels were above the national reference levels, both by classroom type and by season; (ii) TVOC kindergarten peak values may raise some concern; (iii) CO2 was present at high median and maximum levels during spring and winter assessment in both nurseries and kindergartens classrooms; (iv) total bacteria concentrations were 57- and 52-fold higher in the nursery and kindergarten than outdoors, respectively, for the spring season; (v) winter and spring median predicted mean vote (PMV) indices were between "neutral" (0) and "slightly cool" (≤ -1) in the thermal sensation scale for comfort situations (-2 to 2) for both types of classrooms; (vi) there were significant differences for both PMV and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD) indices by season; and (vii) CO2, total bacteria, and gram-negative bacteria were associated with low airflow rates. These data will help to evaluate the effectiveness of current building operation practices in child day care centers regarding indoor air quality and respiratory health.

  17. Age assessment by rib phase analysis in Turks.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, M F; Işcan, M Y; Cöloğlu, A S

    1998-11-30

    The Işcan's phase method for the estimation of adult age at death from the sternal extremity of the fourth rib was introduced in 1983. Over the years, numerous tests have confirmed the reliability of this technique on varied samples. However, no large scale study has been conducted to test the application of this method on a modern white sample geographically, genetically, and culturally diverse from the American white database. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to apply rib phase standards to a Turkish sample to test if the progression of morphological changes follow the same age sequence. Using a sample of 150 males and 144 females of known age at death, each rib was phased using the standards developed by Işcan and associates in 1984 and 1985. The phase estimations were then subject to an analysis of variance. The results of the study indicated that Turkish ribs show the same morphological characteristics that define the phases at nearly identical ages. Variation as measured by the standard deviation increased from phase 5 on in both sexes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the rib phase standards can be accurately applied to Turks. Investigations of this nature are vital because one cannot assume that a method developed from one group is applicable to a distant population, especially in medicolegal proceedings.

  18. Rotorcraft aeromechanical stability-methodology assessment. Phase 2: Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1990-01-01

    Helicopter rotor aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability predictions for four data sets were made using industry and government stability analyses and compared with data at a workshop held at Ames Research Center, August 2-3, 1988. The present report contains the workshop comparisons.

  19. Phase based method for location of the centers of side bands in spatial frequency domain in off-axis digital holographic microcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Zhao; Li, Jiansu; Gao, Jianmin; Huang, Junhui

    2016-11-01

    The digital holography (DH) off-axis geometry in microscope configuration introduces the tilt phase aberration in construction, resulting in the reconstructed image distortion. The two typical methods of the tilt aberration compensation, digital reference wavefront method and spectrum centering method, all require the hologram spectrum's centering judgment of side band as a precondition. However, it is difficult to judge the center location of side band by the spectral amplitude maximum due to the presence of the quadratic phase aberration, thus producing the residual tilt phase aberration. Therefore, the method for location of the center of side band based on the unwrapped phase in spatial frequency domain is proposed in the pre-magnification configuration. The Fourier spectrum of the hologram is a complex function and its unwrapped phase distribution always appears the extremum corresponding to the carrier frequency. The correct hologram spectrum's center location of side band can be obtained by judging its unwrapped phase maximum, which makes assure of the tilt aberration compensation in the pre-magnification configuration. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by applying it to the phase imaging of the micro-hole array, phase grating and phase steps.

  20. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2010-01-01

    The AMU created new logistic regression equations in an effort to increase the skill of the Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II (Lambert 2007). One equation was created for each of five sub-seasons based on the daily lightning climatology instead of by month as was done in Phase II. The assumption was that these equations would capture the physical attributes that contribute to thunderstorm formation more so than monthly equations. However, the SS values in Section 5.3.2 showed that the Phase III equations had worse skill than the Phase II equations and, therefore, will not be transitioned into operations. The current Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II will continue to be used operationally in MIDDS. Three warm seasons were added to the Phase II dataset to increase the POR from 17 to 20 years (1989-2008), and data for October were included since the daily climatology showed lightning occurrence extending into that month. None of the three methods tested to determine the start of the subseason in each individual year were able to discern the start dates with consistent accuracy. Therefore, the start dates were determined by the daily climatology shown in Figure 10 and were the same in every year. The procedures used to create the predictors and develop the equations were identical to those in Phase II. The equations were made up of one to three predictors. TI and the flow regime probabilities were the top predictors followed by 1-day persistence, then VT and Ll. Each equation outperformed four other forecast methods by 7-57% using the verification dataset, but the new equations were outperformed by the Phase II equations in every sub-season. The reason for the degradation may be due to the fact that the same sub-season start dates were used in every year. It is likely there was overlap of sub-season days at the beginning and end of each defined sub-season in each individual year, which could very well affect equation

  1. A Pilot Assessment of Relapse Prevention for Heroin Addicts in a Chinese Rehabilitation Center

    PubMed Central

    Min, Zhao; Xu, Li; Chen, Hanhui; Ding, Xu; Yi, Zhang; Mingyuang, Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a pilot assessment of Relapse Prevention group therapy (RP) for heroin-dependent patients in a drug rehabilitation center in China. Methods A randomized, case-control study was conducted to assess the efficacy of RP delivered over a 2-month period to male heroin addicts (n=50, RP group) in the Shanghai Labor Drug Rehabilitation Center (LDRC), compared to an equal number of participants (n=50, LR group) in the LDRC program receiving standard of care treatment. Outcomes were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Self-efficacy Scale (SE), and the Self-esteem Scale (SES) after completion of RP, and by the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and abstinence rates of heroin use at 3-months follow-up post release from the LDRC for both groups. Results Significant improvements in scores on SAS, SE, and SES were found in the RP group after completion of the 2-month RP group therapy, compared to the LR group (SAS 7.85±6.20 vs 1.07±5.42, SE 3.88±3.60 vs 0.08±2.89, and SES 3.83±3.31 vs 0.78±2.55). At 3-month follow-up, the RP group participants had more improvements on ASI scores in most domains, and had higher abstinence rates than that in the LR group (37.2% vs 16.7%). Conclusions An RP component can be effective in increasing abstinence rates among post-program heroin-dependent individuals and may help reduce anxiety and improve self-esteem and self-efficacy during and following treatment. Scientific Significance This study suggests RP as a potentially effective component of treatment for heroin addicts. PMID:21438799

  2. Technology assessment of portable energy RDT and P, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spraul, J. R. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    A technological assessment of portable energy research, development, technology, and production was undertaken to assess the technical, economic, environmental, and sociopolitical issues associated with portable energy options. Those courses of action are discussed which would impact aviation and air transportation research and technology. Technology assessment workshops were held to develop problem statements. The eighteen portable energy problem statements are discussed in detail along with each program's objective, approach, task description, and estimates of time and costs.

  3. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the lightning probability forecast equations developed in Phase I. In the time since the Phase I equations were developed, new ideas regarding certain predictors were formulated and a desire to make the tool more automated was expressed by 45 WS forecasters. Five modifications were made to the data: 1) increased the period of record from 15 to 17 years, 2) modified the valid area to match the lighting warning areas, 3) added the 1000 UTC CCAFS sounding to the other soundings in determining the flow regime, 4) used a different smoothing function for the daily climatology, and 5) determined the optimal relative humidity (RH) layer to use as a predictor. The new equations outperformed the Phase I equations in several tests, and improved the skill of the forecast over the Phase I equations by 8%. A graphical user interface (GUI) was created in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) that gathers the predictor values for the equations automatically. The GUI was transitioned to operations in May 2007 for the 2007 warm season.

  4. The Chicago Center for Green Technology: life-cycle assessment of a brownfield redevelopment project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecheisen, Thomas; Theis, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The sustainable development of brownfields reflects a fundamental, yet logical, shift in thinking and policymaking regarding pollution prevention. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool that can be used to assist in determining the conformity of brownfield development projects to the sustainability paradigm. LCA was applied to the process of a real brownfield redevelopment project, now known as the Chicago Center for Green Technology, to determine the cumulative energy required to complete the following redevelopment stages: (1) brownfield assessment and remediation, (2) building rehabilitation and site development and (3) ten years of operation. The results of the LCA have shown that operational energy is the dominant life-cycle stage after ten years of operation. The preservation and rehabilitation of the existing building, the installation of renewable energy systems (geothermal and photovoltaic) on-site and the use of more sustainable building products resulted in 72 terajoules (TJ) of avoided energy impacts, which would provide 14 years of operational energy for the site. Methodological note: data for this life-cycle assessment were obtained from project reports, construction blueprints and utility bills.

  5. The Use of Learner-Centered Assessment Practices in the United States: The Influence of Individual and Institutional Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carrie B.; Myers, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the contexts that influence the use of learner-centered assessment (LCA) practices in undergraduate courses has not kept pace with those focusing on teaching practices. Such research is needed given that conceptualizations of effective pedagogy generally include both teaching and assessment. The authors examined a range of…

  6. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  7. Final Technical Report for Industrial Assessment Center at West Virginia University

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran

    2008-01-09

    The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program at West Virginia University (WVU), which is funded by the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has provided a unique opportunity to enhance efficient energy utilization in small to medium-sized manufacturers. It has also provided training to engineering students in the identification and analysis of efficient energy use in each aspect of the manufacturing process and associated supporting elements. The outcomes of the IAC Program at WVU have assisted the manufacturers and the students in having a heightened sensitivity to industrial energy conservation, waste reduction, and productivity improvement, as well as a better understanding of the technical aspects of manufacturing processes and the supporting elements through which efficient energy utilization can be enhanced. The IAC at WVU has conducted 101 energy assessments from 2002 until 2006. The focus of the industrial assessments has been on energy savings. It has been the IAC’s interest to strongly focus on energy savings and on waste minimization and productivity improvements that strictly have an impact on energy. The IAC at WVU was selected as the Center of the year in 2005 from amongst 26 centers and has obtained a ranking within the top 5 in the previous few years. From 2002 to 2006, the total recommended energy savings produced by the IAC at WVU is 1,214,414 MMBtu, of which the electricity accounts for 93,826,067 kWh (equivalent to 320,226 MMBtu) and natural gas for 871,743 MMBtu. The balance is accounted for in savings in other fuels, mainly coal and wood. This results in an average recommended energy savings of 928,971 kWh from electricity and 8,631 MMBtu from natural gas per facility. The total CO2 emissions saved from 2002 to 2006 is 154,462 tons, with an average of 1,529.3 tons per facility. The average recommended energy cost savings per facility is

  8. Assessment of diabetic teleretinal imaging program at the Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Tsan, Grace L; Hoban, Keely L; Jun, Weon; Riedel, Kevin J; Pedersen, Amy L; Hayes, John

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective chart review of 200 diabetic patients who had teleretinal imaging performed between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, at Portland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics to assess the effectiveness of the diabetic teleretinal imaging program. Twenty patients (10%) had diabetic retinopathy. Ninety percent of the available teleretinal imaging studies were of adequate quality for interpretation. In accordance with local VA policy at that time, all teleretinal imaging patients should have been referred for a dilated retinal examination the following year. Image readers referred 97.5% of the patients to eye clinics for subsequent eye examinations, but the imagers scheduled appointments for only 80% of these patients. The redundancy rate, i.e., patients who had an eye examination within the past 6 mo, was 11%; the duplicate recall rate, i.e., patients who had a second teleretinal imaging performed within 1 yr of the eye examination, was 37%. Rates of timely diabetic eye examinations at clinics with teleretinal imaging programs, particularly when teleretinal imaging and eye clinics were colocated at the same community-based outpatient clinic, were higher than those without a teleretinal imaging program. We concluded that the Portland VA Medical Center's teleretinal imaging program was successful in increasing the screening rate for diabetic retinopathy.

  9. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit southwestern Mississippi on August 29, 2005, at 9:45 a.m. CDT as a category 3 storm with surges up to approx. 9 m and sustained winds of approx. 120 mph. The hurricane's wind, rain, and flooding devastated several coastal towns, from New Orleans through Mobile. The storm also caused significant damage to infrastructure and vegetation of NASA's SSC (Stennis Space Center). Storm recovery at SSC involved not only repairs of critical infrastructure but also forest damage mitigation (via timber harvests and control burns to reduce fire risk). This presentation discusses an effort to use commercially available high spatial resolution multispectral IKONOS data for vegetation damage assessment, based on data collected over SSC on September 2, 2005.

  10. Measuring Success: Evaluation Designs and Approaches to Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gold, Melanie A; Heitel, Jennifer; Martin, Kathryn; Fisher, Deborah A; Santelli, John

    2016-01-01

    Since the founding of the first school-based health centers (SBHCs) >45 years ago, researchers have attempted to measure their impact on child and adolescent physical and mental health and academic outcomes. A review of the literature finds that SBHC evaluation studies have been diverse, encompassing different outcomes and varying target populations, study periods, methodological designs, and scales. A complex picture emerges of the impact of SBHCs on health outcomes, which may be a function of the specific health outcomes examined, the health needs of specific communities and schools, the characteristics of the individuals assessed, and/or the specific constellation of SBHC services. SBHC evaluations face numerous challenges that affect the interpretation of evaluation findings, including maturation, self-selection, low statistical power, and displacement effects. Using novel approaches such as implementing a multipronged approach to maximize participation, entering-class proxy-baseline design, propensity score methods, data set linkage, and multisite collaboration may mitigate documented challenges in SBHC evaluation.

  11. Payload operations control center network (POCCNET) systems definition phase study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, R.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the studies performed during the systems definition phase of POCCNET are presented. The concept of POCCNET as a system of standard POCCs is described and an analysis of system requirements is also included. Alternative systems concepts were evaluated as well as various methods for development of reliable reusable software. A number of POCC application areas, such as command management, on board computer support, and simulation were also studied. Other areas of investigation included the operation of POCCNET systems, the facility requirements and usage.

  12. Central and peripheral pain generators in women with chronic pelvic pain: patient centered assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) often present without obvious cause on imaging studies, laboratory values or physical exam. Dysfunctional sensory processing in the central nervous system (CNS) may explain pain of unclear origin. Central sensitization (CS), a mechanism of centrally mediated pain, describes this abnormal processing of sensory information. Women with CPP often present with several seemingly unrelated symptoms. This can be explained by co-existing chronic pain syndromes occurring in the same patient. Central sensitization occurs in all of these pain syndromes, also described as dysfunctional pain syndromes, and thus may explain why several often occur in the same patient. Six of the most common pain disorders that co-exist in CPP include endometriosis, painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cysitis, vulvodynia, myofascial pain/ pelvic floor hypertonus, irritable bowel syndrome, and primary dysmenorrhea. Central pain generators, (pain originating from CS) and peripheral pain generators, (pain from local tissue damage), can both occur in each of these six conditions. These pain generators will be described. Chronic pain, specifically dysfunctional sensory processing, is recognized as a systemic disease process like diabetes to be managed as opposed to a local problem to be "fixed" or cured. A multi-disciplinary approach to assessment and treatment with a focus on improving emotional, physical and social functioning instead of focusing strictly on pain reduction is more effective in decreasing disability. This is best achieved by determining the patient's needs and perspective through a patient-centered approach. Algorithms for such an approach to assessment and treatment are outlined.

  13. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina inflicted widespread damage to vegetation in southwestern coastal Mississippi upon landfall on August 29, 2005. Storm damage to surface vegetation types at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) was mapped and quantified using IKONOS data originally acquired on September 2, 2005, and later obtained via a Department of Defense ClearView contract. NASA SSC management required an assessment of the hurricane s impact to the 125,000-acre buffer zone used to mitigate rocket engine testing noise and vibration impacts and to manage forestry and fire risk. This study employed ERDAS IMAGINE software to apply traditional classification techniques to the IKONOS data. Spectral signatures were collected from multiple ISODATA classifications of subset areas across the entire region and then appended to a master file representative of major targeted cover type conditions. The master file was subsequently used with the IKONOS data and with a maximum likelihood algorithm to produce a supervised classification later refined using GIS-based editing. The final results enabled mapped, quantitative areal estimates of hurricane-induced damage according to general surface cover type. The IKONOS classification accuracy was assessed using higher resolution aerial imagery and field survey data. In-situ data and GIS analysis indicate that the results compare well to FEMA maps of flooding extent. The IKONOS classification also mapped open areas with woody storm debris. The detection of such storm damage categories is potentially useful for government officials responsible for hurricane disaster mitigation.

  14. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  15. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook.

  16. Artificial recharge for subsidence abatement at the NASA-Johnson Space Center, Phase I

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garza, Sergio

    1977-01-01

    Regional decline of aquifer head due to ground-water withdrawal in the Houston area has caused extensive land-surface subsidence. The NASA-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) in southeastern Harris County, Texas, was about 13 to 19 feet above mean sea level in 1974 and sinking at a rate of more than 0.2 foot per year. NASA-JSC officials, concerned about the hurricane flooding hazard, requested the U.S. Geological Survey to study the feasibility of artificially recharging the aquifers for subsidence abatement. Hydrologic digital models were developed for theoretical determinations of quantities of water needed, under various well-array plans, for artificial recharge of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in order to halt the local subsidence at NASA-JSC. The programs for the models were developed for analysis of three-dimensional ground-water flow. Total injection rates of between 2,000 and 14,000 gallons per minute under three general well-array plans were determined for a range of residual clay pore pressures of 10 to 70 feet of hydraulic head. The space distributions of the resultant hydraulic heads, illustrated for injection rates of 3,600 and 8 ,400 gallons per minute, indicated that, for the same rate, increasing the number and spread of the injection locations reduces the head gradients within NASA-JSC. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. The Langley Research Center CSI phase-0 evolutionary model testbed-design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.; Horta, Lucas G.; Elliott, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is described. The design philosophy, capabilities, and early experimental results are presented to introduce some of the ongoing CSI research at NASA-Langley. The testbed, referred to as the Phase 0 version of the CSI Evolutionary model (CEM), is the first stage of model complexity designed to show the benefits of CSI technology and to identify weaknesses in current capabilities. Early closed loop test results have shown non-model based controllers can provide an order of magnitude increase in damping in the first few flexible vibration modes. Model based controllers for higher performance will need to be robust to model uncertainty as verified by System ID tests. Data are presented that show finite element model predictions of frequency differ from those obtained from tests. Plans are also presented for evolution of the CEM to study integrated controller and structure design as well as multiple payload dynamics.

  18. Experimental Determination of One-Atmosphere Phase Relations of Rhyodacite Pumice Erupted from Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, E. T.; Schwab, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    A series of one-atmosphere high-temperature anhydrous phase equilibrium melting experiments was performed on a natural rhyodacite pumice from the 1103±13 years BP pyroclastic flow from the Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California. The pumice (CCP) is the most silicic product known of the 1103 eruption of Chaos Crags. All experimental runs were performed in a Deltech VT-31 one-atmosphere gas-mixing furnace at the Experimental Petrology Lab, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California. Six ~90-99 hour runs were conducted at 35-55°C intervals, with target temperatures from 1000°C to 1200°C at the Ni-NiO buffer. The nominally anhydrous liquidus of the rhyodacite pumice is >1196°C and solidus is <998°C, outside the investigated temperature range. All experimental run products contain glass, plagioclase, quartz, and Fe-Ti oxides. Amphibole with breakdown textures is observed at temperatures ≤1159°C, and appears more stable in lower temperature runs. At 998°C, amphibole appears most stable, with only minor breakdown texture. Biotite, a major phase in starting material, is not observed in any run products. Based on comparison between experimental and natural phase assemblages and glass, plagioclase, and amphibole compositions, the Chaos Crags rhyodacite pumice erupted at a temperature <998°C, the lowest experimental run temperature investigated. Additional experimental runs at temperatures <998°C are currently being conducted.

  19. Composition design for Laves phase-related body-centered cubic V solid solution alloys with large hydrogen storage capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Yuan, L.; Xu, F.; Sun, L. X.

    2008-03-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of alloy compositions with large hydrogen storage capacities in Laves phase-related body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution alloy systems using the cluster line approach. Since a dense-packed icosahedral cluster A6B7 characterizes the local structure of AB2 Laves phases, in an A-B-C ternary system, such as Ti-Cr (Mn, Fe)-V, where A-B forms AB2 Laves phases while A-C and B-C tend to form solid solutions, a cluster line A6B7-C is constructed by linking A6B7 to C. The alloy compositions with large hydrogen storage capacities are generally located near this line and are approximately expressed with the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. The cluster line alloys (Ti6Cr7)100-xVx (x = 2.5-70 at.%) exhibit different structures and hence different hydrogen storage capacities with increasing V content. The alloys (Ti6Cr7)95V5 and Ti30Cr40V30 with bcc solid solution structure satisfy the cluster-plus-glue-atom model.

  20. Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of NIH's programs for increasing the participation in biomedical science of individuals from underrepresented minority groups. The report examines, using available data and the results of a survey of NIH trainees, the characteristics and outcomes of programs at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and…

  1. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  2. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Washburn, D A; Rumbaugh, D M; Richardson, W K

    1992-11-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  3. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  4. Assessing the phase retardation in corneal tissues using a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, William; Weiblinger, Richard; Beylin, Alexander; Ilev, Ilko K.

    2013-08-01

    We developed and validated a versatile test method for precise quantification of phase retardation in corneal tissues using a femtosecond laser. It is based on an experimental system for direct measurement of corneal phase rotation due to corneal birefringence effects using a dual-polarizer, computer-controlled, femtosecond laser design. It also includes a comprehensive analytical model using Jones matrices. The test method presented is used for quantification of phase retardation in corneal tissues by employing the experimental data obtained from corneal phase rotation measurements and using analytical model assessments. The experimental and theoretical results obtained, and thus, the system's high accuracy and repeatability potential for assessing the corneal phase retardation are validated using control phase retardation evaluation.

  5. Assessment of Different Quit Smoking Methods Selected by Patients in Tobacco Cessation Centers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Gholamreza; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Ahmady, Arezoo Ebn; Leischow, Scott J.; Harry, A. Lando; Shadmehr, Mohammad B.; Fadaizadeh, Lida

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health systems play key roles in identifying tobacco users and providing evidence-based care to help them quit. This treatment includes different methods such as simple medical consultation, medication, and telephone counseling. To assess different quit smoking methods selected by patients in tobacco cessation centers in Iran in order to identify those that are most appropriate for the country health system. Methods: In this cross-sectional and descriptive study, a random sample of all quit centers at the country level was used to obtain a representative sample. Patients completed the self-administered questionnaire which contained 10 questions regarding the quality, cost, effect, side effects and the results of quitting methods using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Percentages, frequencies, mean, T-test, and variance analyses were computed for all study variables. Results: A total of 1063 smokers returned completed survey questionnaires. The most frequently used methods were Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and combination therapy (NRT and Counseling) with 228 and 163 individuals reporting these respectively. The least used methods were hypnotism (n = 8) and the quit and win (n = 17). The methods which gained the maximum scores were respectively the combined method, personal and Champix with means of 21.4, 20.4 and 18.4. The minimum scores were for e-cigarettes, hypnotism and education with means of 12.8, 11 and 10.8, respectively. There were significant differences in mean scores based on different cities and different methods. Conclusions: According to smokers’ selection the combined therapy, personal methods and Champix are the most effective methods for quit smoking and these methods could be much more considered in the country health system. PMID:26442750

  6. Unconventional Luminescent Centers in Metastable Phases Created by Topochemical Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Kai; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Yu, Hui-Mei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Li-Rong; Li, Li-Na; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Yong-Zheng; Hou, Jing-Shan; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Sun, Hong-Tao

    2016-04-11

    A low-temperature topochemical reduction strategy is used herein to prepare unconventional phosphors with luminescence covering the biological and/or telecommunications optical windows. This approach is demonstrated by using Bi(III)-doped Y2O3 (Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3) as a model system. Experimental results suggest that topochemical treatment of Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3 using CaH2 creates randomly distributed oxygen vacancies in the matrix, resulting in the change of the oxidation states of Bi to lower oxidation states. The change of the Bi coordination environments from the [BiO6] octahedra in Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3 to the oxygen-deficient [BiO(6-z)] polyhedra in reduced phases leads to a shift of the emission maximum from the visible to the near-infrared region. The generality of this approach was further demonstrated with other phosphors. Our findings suggest that this strategy can be used to explore Bi-doped or other classes of luminescent systems, thus opening up new avenues to develop novel optical materials.

  7. Unconventional Luminescent Centers in Metastable Phases Created by Topochemical Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Kai; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Yu, Hui-Mei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Li-Rong; Li, Li-Na; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Yong-Zheng; Hou, Jing-Shan; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Sun, Hong-Tao

    2016-04-11

    A low-temperature topochemical reduction strategy is used herein to prepare unconventional phosphors with luminescence covering the biological and/or telecommunications optical windows. This approach is demonstrated by using Bi(III)-doped Y2O3 (Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3) as a model system. Experimental results suggest that topochemical treatment of Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3 using CaH2 creates randomly distributed oxygen vacancies in the matrix, resulting in the change of the oxidation states of Bi to lower oxidation states. The change of the Bi coordination environments from the [BiO6] octahedra in Y(2-x)Bi(x)O3 to the oxygen-deficient [BiO(6-z)] polyhedra in reduced phases leads to a shift of the emission maximum from the visible to the near-infrared region. The generality of this approach was further demonstrated with other phosphors. Our findings suggest that this strategy can be used to explore Bi-doped or other classes of luminescent systems, thus opening up new avenues to develop novel optical materials. PMID:26971863

  8. Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

  9. Assessment of the Patient-Centered and Family-Centered Care Experience of Total Joint Replacement Patients Using a Shadowing Technique.

    PubMed

    Marcus-Aiyeku, Ulanda; DeBari, Margaret; Salmond, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In 2030, when baby boomers reach 65 years of age and represent 18% of the population, it is anticipated that 67 million adults will have a diagnosis of arthritis increasing the demand for total hip and knee arthroplasty. With the growing emphasis on patient- and family-centered care, the aim of this project was to assess the patient experience of patients and families throughout the entire spectrum of the total joint replacement service line care at a university regional trauma hospital. A shadowing methodology as defined by the Institute for Health Improvement was utilized. Eight patient/family groups undergoing total joint replacements were shadowed. The mapped care experience included time, caregiver, activity, shadower observations, and impressions. Findings revealed inconsistencies in the delivery of patient- and family-centered care. Communication and interactions were predominantly provider-centric, with a focus on care routines versus the patient and family, and anticipation that care would be medically directed. PMID:26375835

  10. The Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care: Assessing Resident Perceptions of Internal Medicine Continuity Clinics and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, John M.; Chang, Barbara K.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Keitz, Sheri A.; Kaminetzky, Catherine P.; Aron, David C.; Baz, Sam; Cannon, Grant W.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Holland, Gloria J.; Kashner, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a national patient-centered care initiative that organized primary care into interdisciplinary teams of health care professionals to provide patient-centered, continuous, and coordinated care. Objective We assessed the discriminate validity of the Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care (LPS-PC), a tool designed to measure residents' perceptions about their primary and patient-centered care experiences. Methods Between October 2010 and June 2011, the LPS-PC was administered to Loma Linda University Medical Center internal medicine residents assigned to continuity clinics at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (VALLHCS), a university setting, or the county hospital. Adjusted differences in satisfaction ratings across settings and over domains (patient- and family-centered care, faculty and preceptors, learning, clinical, work and physical environments, and personal experience) were computed using a generalized linear model. Results Our response rate was 86% (77 of 90). Residents were more satisfied with patient- and family-centered care at the VALLHCS than at either the university or county (P < .001). However, faculty and preceptors (odds ratio [OR]  =  1.53), physical (OR  =  1.29), and learning (OR  =  1.28) environments had more impact on overall resident satisfaction than patient- and family-centered care (OR  =  1.08). Conclusions The LPS-PC demonstrated discriminate validity to assess residents' perceptions of their patient-centered clinical training experience across outpatient primary care settings at an internal medicine residency program. The largest difference in scores was the patient- and family-centered care domain, in which residents rated the VALLHCS much higher than the university or county sites. PMID:24455006

  11. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Carroll Training Center, Installation 02045, Anchorage, Alaska. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krokosz, M.; Sefano, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Alaska Army National Guard property known as Camp Carroll Training Center, located on the Fort Richardson Army facility near Anchorage, Alaska. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for the completion of preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing, corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances used, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The primary environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) the Alaska Air National Guard storage area behind Building S57112 (Organizational Maintenance Shop [OMS] 6); (2) the state of Alaska maintenance facility and the soil/tar-type spill north of the state of Alaska maintenance facility; (3) the waste storage area adjacent to OMS 6; (4) the contaminated area from leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) and the oil-water separator; and (5) soil staining in the parking area at the Camp Carroll Headquarters Building. Camp Carroll appears to be in excellent condition from an environmental standpoint, and current practices are satisfactory. Argonne recommends that the Alaska Department of Military Affairs consider remediation of soil contamination associated with all storage areas, as well as reviewing the practices of other residents of the facility. Argonne also recommends that the current methods of storing waste material behind Building S57112 (OMS 6) be reviewed for alternatives.

  13. Assessing Sea Level Rise Impacts on the Surficial Aquifer in the Kennedy Space Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Wang, D.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Warnock, A. M.; Hall, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global sea level rise in the past century due to climate change has been seen at an average rate of approximately 1.7-2.2 mm per year, with an increasing rate over the next century. The increasing SLR rate poses a severe threat to the low-lying land surface and the shallow groundwater system in the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, resulting in saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding. A three-dimensional groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented to investigate and evaluate the extent of floods due to rising water table as well as saltwater intrusion. The SEAWAT model is chosen to solve the variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport governing equations and simulate the regional-scale spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater level and chloride concentration. The horizontal resolution of the model is 50 m, and the vertical domain includes both the Surficial Aquifer and the Floridan Aquifer. The numerical model is calibrated based on the observed hydraulic head and chloride concentration. The potential impacts of sea level rise on saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding are assessed under various sea level rise scenarios. Based on the simulation results, the potential landward movement of saltwater and freshwater fringe is projected. The existing water supply wells are examined overlaid with the projected salinity distribution map. The projected Surficial Aquifer water tables are overlaid with data of high resolution land surface elevation, land use and land cover, and infrastructure to assess the potential impacts of sea level rise. This study provides useful tools for decision making on ecosystem management, water supply planning, and facility management.

  14. Assessing the Immunogenic Response of a Single Center's Pneumococcal Vaccination Protocol in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Myers, Leann; Kanter, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hematologic disorder in the United States. Patients with SCD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease and are reliant on both early penicillin prophylaxis and antipneumococcal vaccination for prevention of infection. Although studies examining vaccine response have demonstrated a drop-off of titer response after 3 years, an optimal vaccination regimen has not been identified. Our study sought to assess the immunogenicity of our center's pneumococcal vaccination strategy, which included Prevnar (PCV-7) (before the introduction of PCV-13) followed by Pneumovax (PPV-23) given routinely at 2 and 5 years of age and then every 5 years thereafter. Our goal was to assess vaccine response in a population of patients with SCD who had received vaccines according to this regimen using multiplex bead analysis. Our study demonstrated a significant percentage of persons with SCD do not maintain a sufficient vaccination response to PPV-23 for 5 years. Our study revealed that only 36% of patients had protective levels of antipneumococcal antibody titers at an average of 37 months after vaccination. Most alarmingly, within the group of patients with subtherapeutic titers, 64% demonstrated vaccine response to <25% of the tested serotypes. These findings were significantly associated with duration of time since last vaccine administration, but the mean age of lack of response was below the 3-year window where vaccine response was previously reported to wane. Our results indicate antipneumococcal immunity may not be optimally maintained using this vaccination strategy in patients with SCD leaving them vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease. Many pediatric hematologists stop prophylactic penicillin at 5 years of age making these results alarming. We recommend further investigation into an optimal vaccine schedule and monitoring of antipneumococcal titers in at-risk patients. PMID:26886376

  15. Assessing the Immunogenic Response of a Single Center's Pneumococcal Vaccination Protocol in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Myers, Leann; Kanter, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hematologic disorder in the United States. Patients with SCD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease and are reliant on both early penicillin prophylaxis and antipneumococcal vaccination for prevention of infection. Although studies examining vaccine response have demonstrated a drop-off of titer response after 3 years, an optimal vaccination regimen has not been identified. Our study sought to assess the immunogenicity of our center's pneumococcal vaccination strategy, which included Prevnar (PCV-7) (before the introduction of PCV-13) followed by Pneumovax (PPV-23) given routinely at 2 and 5 years of age and then every 5 years thereafter. Our goal was to assess vaccine response in a population of patients with SCD who had received vaccines according to this regimen using multiplex bead analysis. Our study demonstrated a significant percentage of persons with SCD do not maintain a sufficient vaccination response to PPV-23 for 5 years. Our study revealed that only 36% of patients had protective levels of antipneumococcal antibody titers at an average of 37 months after vaccination. Most alarmingly, within the group of patients with subtherapeutic titers, 64% demonstrated vaccine response to <25% of the tested serotypes. These findings were significantly associated with duration of time since last vaccine administration, but the mean age of lack of response was below the 3-year window where vaccine response was previously reported to wane. Our results indicate antipneumococcal immunity may not be optimally maintained using this vaccination strategy in patients with SCD leaving them vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease. Many pediatric hematologists stop prophylactic penicillin at 5 years of age making these results alarming. We recommend further investigation into an optimal vaccine schedule and monitoring of antipneumococcal titers in at-risk patients.

  16. Thrombotic risk assessment in 185 WHO-defined essential thrombocythemia patients: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Dambrauskiene, Ruta; Gerbutavicius, Rolandas; Juozaityte, Elona; Gerbutaviciene, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis risk in essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients can be assessed using different prognostic systems. Conventional risk factors include age more than 60 years and history of previous thrombosis. In addition, other factors such as JAK2 V617F mutations, cardiovascular risk factors, leukocytosis more than 11 × 10(9)/l, thrombophilic factors and platelet count more than 1500 × 10(9)/l are used in different hematology centers as high-risk features for thrombosis. Our study compared different risk model groups for thrombosis in 185 WHO-defined ET patients at the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kaunas Klinikos. We found that patient distribution in low, intermediate- and high-risk groups varies using different risk stratification models. The biggest difference in risk assignment is evident in patients who are older than 60 years and have no other risk factors and in patients who are younger than 60 years but have other risk factors. This observation suggests that new prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to better stratify patients at risk for thrombosis. PMID:26793025

  17. Measuring Success: Evaluation Designs and Approaches to Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gold, Melanie A; Heitel, Jennifer; Martin, Kathryn; Fisher, Deborah A; Santelli, John

    2016-01-01

    Since the founding of the first school-based health centers (SBHCs) >45 years ago, researchers have attempted to measure their impact on child and adolescent physical and mental health and academic outcomes. A review of the literature finds that SBHC evaluation studies have been diverse, encompassing different outcomes and varying target populations, study periods, methodological designs, and scales. A complex picture emerges of the impact of SBHCs on health outcomes, which may be a function of the specific health outcomes examined, the health needs of specific communities and schools, the characteristics of the individuals assessed, and/or the specific constellation of SBHC services. SBHC evaluations face numerous challenges that affect the interpretation of evaluation findings, including maturation, self-selection, low statistical power, and displacement effects. Using novel approaches such as implementing a multipronged approach to maximize participation, entering-class proxy-baseline design, propensity score methods, data set linkage, and multisite collaboration may mitigate documented challenges in SBHC evaluation. PMID:26707224

  18. Integrating Balloon and Satellite Operation Data Centers for Technology Readiness Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Fernandes, Jose Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric balloon-borne experiments have been one of the most effective ways to validate innovative space technology, taking the advantage of reduced development cycles and low cost in launching and operation. In Brazil, the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) has balloon and satellite ground infrastructures since the 1970´s and the 1990´s, respectively. In the recent past, a strategic approach was adopted on the modernization of balloon ground operation facilities for supporting the protoMIRAX experiment, an X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The strategic target was to reuse the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software framework developed to control and monitor INPÉs satellites, for balloon operation. This paper presents the results of that effort and the new ongoing project, a computer-based framework named I2Bso, which strategic target is to Integrate INPÉs Balloon and Satellite Operation data centers. The I2Bso major purpose is to support the continuous assessment of an innovative technology after different qualification flights either on board balloons or satellites in order to acquire growing evidence for the technology maturity.

  19. Phase transitions, magnetism and surface adsorptions assessed by meta-GGA functionals and random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing

    The meta-GGA functionals and random phase approximation are tested for phase transitions and a strongly correlated transition metal oxide in this dissertation. One of the latest meta-GGA functionals is also employed to study the van der Waals bound system in surface science. Our main purpose is to reveal the performance of new exchange-correlation functionals on various properties and systems. We are also interested in seeking the possible relationship between the performance of a semilocal functional and its exchange enhancement factor. We have studied the structural phase transitions in crystalline Si (insulator to metal), SiO2 (insulator to insulator) and Zr (metal to metal) systems, as a test of exchange energy semilocal functionals on Jacob's ladder. Our results confirm the energy-geometry delimma of GGAs in three systems. The most sophisticated non-empirical meta-generalized gradient approximations (meta-GGAs) such as TPSS (Tao-Perdew-Staroveov-Scuseria) and revTPSS (revised TPSS) give better lattice constants than PBE, but the phase transition parameters (energy difference and transition pressure) are smaller and less realistic than those from the latter GGA. However, the recent functionals of meta-GGA made simple family (MGGA_MS) behave differently to those previous meta-GGAs, predicting larger and more realistic phase transition parameters. Meanwhile, MGGA_MS also delivers the equilibrium geometry of crystalline materials similar to previous non-empirical meta-GGAs. In contrast to semilocal functionals, the nonlocal functionals such as the range-separated hybrid functional HSE06 (Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof) and non-self consistent random phase approximation (RPA) are not only able to give the accurate equilibrium geometry , but also predict the realistic phase transition parameters for Si and SiO2 systems. The ground state of rutile-type vanadium dioxide (R-VO2) represents a great challenge to the current density functional theory. In this dissertation, we

  20. Hybrid vehicle assessment. Phase 1: Petroleum savings analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, R.; Liddle, S.; Deshpande, G.; Trummel, M.; Vivian, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive analysis of near term electric hybrid vehicles are presented, with emphasis on their potential to save significant amounts of petroleum on a national scale in the 1990s. Performance requirements and expected annual usage patterns of these vehicles are first modeled. The projected U.S. fleet composition is estimated, and conceptual hybrid vehicle designs are conceived and analyzed for petroleum use when driven in the expected annual patterns. These petroleum consumption estimates are then compared to similar estimates for projected 1990 conventional vehicles having the same performance and driven in the same patterns. Results are presented in the form of three utility functions and comparisons of sevral conceptual designs are made. The Hybrid Vehicle (HV) design and assessment techniques are discussed and a general method is explained for selecting the optimum energy management strategy for any vehicle mission battery combination. Conclusions and recommendations are presented, and development recommendations are identified.

  1. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components: Phase 2, Motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Kassir, M.K.; Pepper, S.E.

    1987-12-01

    In Phase I of the Component Fragility Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a procedure to establish the seismic fragility of nuclear power plant equipment by use of existing test data and demonstrated its application by considering two equipment pieces. In Phase II of the program, BNL has collected additional test data, and has further advanced and is applying the methodology to determine the fragility levels of selected essential equipment categories. The data evaluation of four equipment families, namely, motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply has been completed. Fragility levels have been determined for various failure modes of each equipment class and the deterministic results are presented in terms of test response spectra. In addition, the test data have been analyzed for determination of the respective probabilistic fragility levels. To this end, a single g-value has been selected to approximately represent the test vibration level and a statistical analysis has been performed with the g-values corresponding to a particular failure mode. The zero period acceleration and the average spectral acceleration over a frequency range of interest are separately used as the single g-value. The resulting parameters are presented in terms of a median value, an uncertainty coefficient and a randomness coefficient. Ultimately, each fragility level is expressed in terms of a single descriptor called an HCLPF value corresponding to a high (95%) confidence of a low (5%) probability of failure. The important observations made in the process of data analysis are included in this report.

  2. A bioelectrical impedance phase angle measuring system for assessment of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanghao; Huo, Xiaolin; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Cheng; Duan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance phase angle has been recommended as a tool to assess nutrition state, but there are no measuring devices have been specially designed for hospital residents. In this study, a system was established for the measurement of bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The electrical composition, calculation method and measuring method of this system are presented in this paper. Experiments showed excellent performance of this system in measuring impedance made of resistors and capacitors. The designed system was also used to measure the bioelectrical impedance phase angle of both healthy subjects and patients with malnutrition, and the results demonstrated that the phase angle of patients with malnutrition is lower than that of healthy subjects (P < 0.01 for male and P < 0.05 for female). These results suggest that phase angle has the potential to be a useful tool for the quantitative assessment of nutritional status.

  3. The Illinois Regional Resource Center Diagnostic Teaching Model: A Systems Approach to Assessment and Programming for Children with Unexplained Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston-Hinsdale, Kirsten; And Others

    Presented is the Illinois Regional Resource Center's Manual for Diagnostic Teachers which is designed to provide a model for assessment, individualized educational planning, optimal placement, and short and long range follow-up of children (3-21 years old) with unexplained learning problems. Section 1 provides an introduction to the…

  4. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  5. Evaluation of the FOCUS (Feedback on Counseling Using Simulation) Instrument for Assessment of Client-Centered Nutrition Counseling Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Beverly W.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop an instrument to assess client-centered counseling behaviors (skills) of student-counselors in a standardized patient (SP) exercise. Methods: Descriptive study of the accuracy and utility of a newly developed counseling evaluation instrument. Study participants included 11 female student-counselors at a Midwestern…

  6. Hybrid vehicle assessment. Phase I. Petroleum savings analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, R.; Liddle, S.; Deshpande, G.; Trummel, M.; Vivian, H.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive analysis of near-term electric-hybrid vehicles. Its purpose was to estimate their potential to save significant amounts of petroleum on a national scale in the 1990s. Performance requirements and expected annual usage patterns of these vehicles were first modeled. The projected US fleet composition was estimated, and conceptual hybrid vehicle designs were conceived and analyzed for petroleum use when driven in the expected annual patterns. These petroleum consumption estimates were then compared to similar estimates for projected 1990 conventional vehicles having the same performance and driven in the same patterns. Results are presented in the form of three utility functions and comparisons of several conceptual designs are made. The Hybrid Vehicle (HV) design and assessment techniques are discussed and a general method is explained for selecting the optimum energy management strategy for any vehicle-mission-battery combination. A discussion of lessons learned during the construction and test of the General Electric Hybrid Test Vehicle is also presented. Conclusions and recommendations are presented, and development recommendations are identified.

  7. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-09-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  8. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  9. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  10. Assessment of mold concentrations in Singapore shopping centers using mold-specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) analysis.

    PubMed

    Yap, Jennifer; Toh, Zhen Ann; Goh, Vivien; Ng, Lee Chen; Vesper, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    Molds can pose a human health threat and may amplify in buildings in humid climates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mold growth in Singapore shopping centers based on the collection of 40 dust samples from 15 shopping centers, including one with a history of water damage. The dust was analyzed by a DNA-based technology called mold-specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR). In a water-damaged shopping center, most of the 26 water-damage indicator species were detected at some concentration and many were much more abundant than the average in the shopping centers. MSQPCR is a useful method for quantifying indoor molds in tropical climates.

  11. Bismuth doping strategies in GeTe nanowires to promote high-temperature phase transition from rhombohedral to face-centered cubic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Huang, Rong; Wei, Fenfen; Cheng, Guosheng; Kong, Tao

    2014-11-17

    The phase transition of Bi-doped (∼3 at. %) GeTe nanowires from a rhombohedral (R) to a face-centered cubic (C) structure was observed in in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The promotion of high-temperature R-C phase transition by a doping approach was revealed. Ab initio energy calculations of doped GeTe at various Bi doping concentrations were performed to interpret the promoted temperature-induced phase transitions. Those results indicated that the total energy differences between R and C structures of doped GeTe decreased as Bi doping concentrations increased, which facilitated R-C phase transitions.

  12. BNL ALARA Center's development of a computerized radiological assessment and design system (RADS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J. ); Masciulli, S. ); Connelly, J.M. . Office of Health)

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation of DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of good-practice documents will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analyses, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative rating of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results.

  13. DX centers in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy at T≥850 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, P. M.; Parker, B. D.; Cardone, F.; Gibart, P.; Portal, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    It was recently inferred from low-temperature transport measurements that DX centers are not formed in Sn-doped AlGaAs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy at T≥850 °C. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements reported here show that DX centers are present in this material. The high conductivity measured at low temperature comes from parallel conduction in the underlying GaAs due to Sn diffusion during growth at high temperature.

  14. Probabilistic assessment of contamination using the two-phase flow model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Zhi; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Cheng-Haw

    2003-08-01

    A physically motivated model is indispensable for a successful analysis of the impact of leaching from nuclear waste storage sites on the environment and public health. While most analyses use the single-phase flow model for modelling unsaturated flow and solute transport, the two-phase flow model considering the resistance of gas to water flow is a more realistic one. The effect of the two-phase flow model on the water content is theoretically investigated first in this study. Then, by combining a geostatistical generator using the turning bands method and a multi-phase transport code TOUGH2, an automatic process is used for Monte Carlo simulation of the solute transport. This stochastic approach is applied to a potentially polluted site by low-level nuclear waste in Taiwan. In the simulation, the saturated hydraulic conductivity is treated as the random variable. The stochastic approach provides a probabilistic assessment of contamination. The results show that even though water content from the two-phase flow model is only 1.5% less than the one from the single-phase flow model, the two-phase flow causes a slower movement but a wider lateral spreading of the plume in the unsaturated zone. The stochastic approach provides useful probability information which is not available from the deterministic approach. The probability assessment of groundwater contamination provides the basis for more informed waste management, better environmental assessment and improved evaluation of impact on public health.

  15. Evaluation of the Microvascular Research Center Training Program for Assessing Microsurgical Skills in Trainee Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Takara, Ayumi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Background We established the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP) to help trainee surgeons acquire and develop microsurgical skills. Medical students were recruited to undergo the MRCP to assess the effectiveness of the MRCP for trainee surgeons. Methods Twenty-two medical students with no prior microsurgical experience, who completed the course from 2005 to 2012, were included. The MRCP comprises 5 stages of training, each with specific passing requirements. Stages 1 and 2 involve anastomosing silicone tubes and blood vessels of chicken carcasses, respectively, within 20 minutes. Stage 3 involves anastomosing the femoral artery and vein of live rats with a 1-day patency rate of >80%. Stage 4 requires replantation of free superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps in rats with a 7-day success rate of >80%. Stage 5 involves successful completion of one case of rat replantation/transplantation. We calculated the passing rate for each stage and recorded the number of anastomoses required to pass stages 3 and 4. Results The passing rates were 100% (22/22) for stages 1 and 2, 86.4% (19/22) for stage 3, 59.1% (13/22) for stage 4, and 55.0% (11/20) for stage 5. The number of anastomoses performed was 17.2±12.2 in stage 3 and 11.3±8.1 in stage 4. Conclusions Majority of the medical students who undertook the MRCP acquired basic microsurgical skills. Thus, we conclude that the MRCP is an effective microsurgery training program for trainee surgeons. PMID:23730596

  16. Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy: Partnering with Decision-Makers in Climate Change Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D.; Trainor, S.; Walsh, J.; Gerlach, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP; www.uaf.edu/accap) is one of several, NOAA funded, Regional Integrated Science and Policy (RISA) programs nation-wide (http://www.climate.noaa.gov/cpo_pa/risa/). Our mission is to assess the socio-economic and biophysical impacts of climate variability in Alaska, make this information available to local and regional decision-makers, and improve the ability of Alaskans to adapt to a changing climate. We partner with the University of Alaska?s Scenario Network for Alaska Planning (SNAP; http://www.snap.uaf.edu/), state and local government, state and federal agencies, industry, and non-profit organizations to communicate accurate and up-to-date climate science and assist in formulating adaptation and mitigation plans. ACCAP and SNAP scientists are members of the Governor?s Climate Change Sub-Cabinet Adaptation and Mitigation Advisory and Technical Working Groups (http://www.climatechange.alaska.gov/), and apply their scientific expertise to provide down-scaled, state-wide maps of temperature and precipitation projections for these groups. An ACCAP scientist also serves as co-chair for the Fairbanks North Star Borough Climate Change Task Force, assisting this group as they work through the five-step model for climate change planning put forward by the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (http://www.investfairbanks.com/Taskforces/climate.php). ACCAP scientists work closely with federal resource managers in on a range of projects including: partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to analyze hydrologic changes associated with climate change and related ecological impacts and wildlife management and development issues on Alaska?s North Slope; partnering with members of the Alaska Interagency Wildland Fire Coordinating Group in statistical modeling to predict seasonal wildfire activity and coordinate fire suppression resources state-wide; and working with Alaska Native Elders and

  17. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the…

  18. An Assessment of the Client-Centered Planning Approach in Continuing Education for Public Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Ward H.; Stewart, Cynthia J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents essential elements and reviews the concept of client-centered planning as an approach to program development for continuing education in public health. Client-centered planning is aimed at the identification of individual practitioner needs and the development of educational interventions tailored to improve competency in selected areas.…

  19. Southeast Regional Assessment Project for the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Jones, Sonya A.

    2010-01-01

    expanded to address climate change-related impacts on all Department of the Interior (DOI) resources. The NCCWSC will establish a network of eight DOI Regional Climate Science Centers (RCSCs) that will work with a variety of partners to provide natural resource managers with tools and information that will help them anticipate and adapt conservation planning and design for projected climate change. The forecasting products produced by the RCSCs will aid fish, wildlife, and land managers in designing suitable adaptive management approaches for their programs. The DOI also is developing Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) as science and conservation action partnerships at subregional scales. The USGS is working with the Southeast Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to develop science collaboration between the future Southeast RCSC and future LCCs. The NCCWSC Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) will begin to develop regional downscaled climate models, land cover change models, regional ecological models, regional watershed models, and other science tools. Models and data produced by SERAP will be used in a collaborative process between the USGS, the FWS (LCCs), State and federal partners, nongovernmental organizations, and academia to produce science at appropriate scales to answer resource management questions. The SERAP will produce an assessment of climate change, and impacts on land cover, ecosystems, and priority species in the region. The predictive tools developed by the SERAP project team will allow end users to better understand potential impacts of climate change and sea level rise on terrestrial and aquatic populations in the Southeastern United States. The SERAP capitalizes on the integration of five existing projects: (1) the Multi-State Conservation Grants Program project "Designing Sustainable Landscapes," (2) the USGS multidisciplinary Science Thrust project "Water Availability for Ecological Needs," (3) the USGS Southeast Pilot

  20. Initial Assessment of Acoustic Source Visibility with a 24-Element Microphone Array in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of background noise were recently obtained with a 24-element phased microphone array in the test section of the Arnold Engineering Development Center 80- by120-Foot Wind Tunnel at speeds of 50 to 100 knots (27.5 to 51.4 m/s). The array was mounted in an aerodynamic fairing positioned with array center 1.2m from the floor and 16 m from the tunnel centerline, The array plate was mounted flush with the fairing surface as well as recessed in. (1.27 cm) behind a porous Kevlar screen. Wind-off speaker measurements were also acquired every 15 on a 10 m semicircular arc to assess directional resolution of the array with various processing algorithms, and to estimate minimum detectable source strengths for future wind tunnel aeroacoustic studies. The dominant background noise of the facility is from the six drive fans downstream of the test section and first set of turning vanes. Directional array response and processing methods such as background-noise cross-spectral-matrix subtraction suggest that sources 10-15 dB weaker than the background can be detected.

  1. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin-Shu; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Xiangying, Deng; Zuan, Lim Yok; Jones, Leigh Ann; Ramakrishna, Lakshmi; de Vries, Victor C.; Dolpady, Jayashree; Aina, Hoi; Joseph, Sabrina; Narayanan, Sriram; Subramaniam, Sharrada; Puthia, Manoj; Wong, Glenn; Xiong, Huizhong; Poidinger, Michael; Urban, Joseph F.; Lafaille, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE+ B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias toward the plasma cell (PC) fate, and dependence on sequential switching for the production of high-affinity IgE. We show here that IgE+ GC B cells are unfit to undergo the conventional GC differentiation program due to impaired B cell receptor function and increased apoptosis. IgE+ GC cells fail to populate the GC light zone and are unable to contribute to the memory and long-lived PC compartments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that direct and sequential switching are linked to distinct B cell differentiation fates: direct switching generates IgE+ GC cells, whereas sequential switching gives rise to IgE+ PCs. We propose a comprehensive model for the generation and memory of IgE responses. PMID:24218137

  2. A 727 airplane center duct inlet low speed performance confirmation model test for refanned JT8D engines, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaldschmidt, G.; Syltebo, B. E.; Ting, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    The results from testing of a 0.3 scale model center duct inlet (S duct) for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 engines are presented. The objective of this test was to demonstrate that the required airflow of the JT8D-100 engine (480 lb/sec as compared to 334 lb/sec for JT8D-15) can be achieved with minimum modifications to the existing 727 airplane structure at acceptable levels of total pressure recovery and distortion. Steady-state pressure recovery, steady-state pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure measurements were taken at the engine face station. Surface static pressure measurements were taken along the duct. Test results indicated that the required airflow was achieved with acceptable pressure recovery (comparable to the current 727-200 S duct). Inlet inflow angle variation within the 727 airplane operating regime (minus 5 to 5 degrees) had no effect on the inlet performance. Pressure distortion at static and forward speed at takeoff airflow conditions are within P and WA limits for the Phase II duct when equipped with vortex generators. Static crosswind operation between 10 knots and 25 knots appears feasible at full takeoff power.

  3. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of BPH: results of a multi-center phase III study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, N.; Gardner, T.; Koch, M.; Bihrle, R.; Foster, R.; Resnick, M.; Seftel, A.; Grunberger, I.; Stiedle, C.; Corchan, J.

    2003-04-01

    The five centers phase III trial was to show that HIFU can treat prostate tissue thermally for symptomatic relief of BPH and improve flow rates. At five sites, 68 BPH patients were treated with the Sonablate device (Focus Surgery, Inc. Indianapolis, IN). A urethral Foley catheter was inserted into the urethra to aid in positioning and was kept in-situ during the treatment. A cooling device was used to cool the rectal wall. The patients returned home within a few hours after the procedure. The Foley catheter was kept electively to avoid any incidence of acute urinary retention following the therapy. The catheter was removed after 4-5 days. The average treatment time was 38 minutes. The patients were treated without pain, blood loss or complications. At 90 days post treatment, average Qmax and AUA Symptom Scores improved from 8.7 ml/s to 12.66 ml/s (48%) and 23.06 to 11.62 (52%), respectively. Significant prostate tissue changes took place before and after the treatment. 80% of the patients had cavity formation at the site of treatment at the bladder neck and prostate. Nonsurgical HIFU therapy is safe and effective for providing symptomatic relief of BPH symptoms and the treatment can be performed as an outpatient procedure.

  4. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  5. Solar Cells from Plastics? Mission Possible at the PHaSE Energy Research Center, UMass Amherst (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Thomas P; Lahti, Paul M. (PHaSE - Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy); PHaSE Staff

    2016-07-12

    'Solar Cells from Plastics? Mission Possible at the PHaSE Energy Research Center, UMass Amherst' was submitted by the Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy (PHaSE) EFRC to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. PHaSE, an EFRC co-directed by Thomas P. Russell and Paul M. Lahti at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is a partnership of scientists from six institutions: UMass (lead), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pennyslvania State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  6. Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2013-09-01

    This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

  7. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W.; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. Methods. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints ‘absence of clinical BU specific features’ or ‘wound closure’ within 6 months (“primary cure”), and ‘absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month’ (“definite cure”). Results. Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm2. Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Conclusions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCT 72102977. PMID:26486698

  8. Assessing controls on perched saturated zones beneath the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Waste byproducts associated with operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) have the potential to contaminate the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Recharge to the ESRP aquifer is controlled largely by the alternating stratigraphy of fractured volcanic rocks and sedimentary interbeds within the overlying vadose zone and by the availability of water at the surface. Beneath the INTEC facilities, localized zones of saturation perched on the sedimentary interbeds are of particular concern because they may facilitate accelerated transport of contaminants. The sources and timing of natural and anthropogenic recharge to the perched zones are poorly understood. Simple approaches for quantitative characterization of this complex, variably saturated flow system are needed to assess potential scenarios for contaminant transport under alternative remediation strategies. During 2009-2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, employed data analysis and numerical simulations with a recently developed model of preferential flow to evaluate the sources and quantity of recharge to the perched zones. Piezometer, tensiometer, temperature, precipitation, and stream-discharge data were analyzed, with particular focus on the possibility of contributions to the perched zones from snowmelt and flow in the neighboring Big Lost River (BLR). Analysis of the timing and magnitude of subsurface dynamics indicate that streamflow provides local recharge to the shallow, intermediate, and deep perched saturated zones within 150 m of the BLR; at greater distances from the BLR the influence of streamflow on recharge is unclear. Perched water-level dynamics in most wells analyzed are consistent with findings from previous geochemical analyses, which suggest that a combination of annual snowmelt and anthropogenic sources (for example, leaky pipes and drainage ditches) contribute to recharge of shallow and

  9. Chemical analysis of World Trade Center fine particulate matter for use in toxicologic assessment.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, John K; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Chee, Glen R; Prophete, Colette M; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wasson, Shirley J; Conner, Teri L; Costa, Daniel L; Gavett, Stephen H

    2003-01-01

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 caused the release of high levels of airborne pollutants into the local environment. To assess the toxicity of fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)], which may adversely affect the health of workers and residents in the area, we collected fallen dust samples on 12 and 13 September 2001 from sites within a half-mile of Ground Zero. Samples of WTC dust were sieved, aerosolized, and size-separated, and the PM2.5 fraction was isolated on filters. Here we report the chemical and physical properties of PM2.5 derived from these samples and compare them with PM2.5 fractions of three reference materials that range in toxicity from relatively inert to acutely toxic (Mt. St. Helens PM; Washington, DC, ambient air PM; and residual oil fly ash). X-ray diffraction of very coarse sieved WTC PM (< 53 microm) identified calcium sulfate (gypsum) and calcium carbonate (calcite) as major components. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that calcium-sulfur and calcium-carbon particles were also present in the WTC PM2.5 fraction. Analysis of WTC PM2.5 using X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry showed high levels of calcium (range, 22-33%) and sulfur (37-43% as sulfate) and much lower levels of transition metals and other elements. Aqueous extracts of WTC PM2.5 were basic (pH range, 8.9-10.0) and had no evidence of significant bacterial contamination. Levels of carbon were relatively low, suggesting that combustion-derived particles did not form a significant fraction of these samples recovered in the immediate aftermath of the destruction of the towers. Because gypsum and calcite are known to cause irritation of the mucus membranes of the eyes and respiratory tract, inhalation of high doses of WTC PM2.5 could potentially cause toxic respiratory effects. PMID:12782501

  10. The Organization and Operation of Educational Media Selection Centers: Identification and Analysis of Current Practices and Guidelines for Model Centers. Interim Report Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, John; Heidbreder, M. Ann

    The aim of this project is to contribute to the development of quality education by improving the selection and use of educational media by students and educators. Questionnaires were used to screen all known facilities in the United States. Of those having one or more aspects of an educational media selection center program, 38 were selected for…

  11. Phase transitions in the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a body-centered cubic lattice with interactions between next-to-nearest neighbors

    SciTech Connect

    Murtazaev, A. K.; Ramazanov, M. K.; Kassan-Ogly, F. A.; Kurbanova, D. R.

    2015-01-15

    Phase transitions in the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a body-centered cubic lattice are studied on the basis of the replica algorithm by the Monte Carlo method and histogram analysis taking into account the interaction of next-to-nearest neighbors. The phase diagram of the dependence of the critical temperature on the intensity of interaction of the next-to-nearest neighbors is constructed. It is found that a second-order phase transition is realized in this model in the investigated interval of the intensities of interaction of next-to-nearest neighbors.

  12. Assessment of Unconscious Decision Aids Applied to Complex Patient-Centered Medical Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Manigault, Andrew Wilhelm; Whillock, Summer Rain

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve patient health, recent research urges for medical decision aids that are designed to enhance the effectiveness of specific medically related decisions. Many such decisions involve complex information, and decision aids that independently use deliberative (analytical and slower) or intuitive (more affective and automatic) cognitive processes for such decisions result in suboptimal decisions. Unconscious thought can arguably use both intuitive and deliberative (slow and analytic) processes, and this combination may further benefit complex patient (or practitioner) decisions as medical decision aids. Indeed, mounting research demonstrates that individuals render better decisions generally if they are distracted from thinking consciously about complex information after it is presented (but can think unconsciously), relative to thinking about that information consciously or not at all. Objective The current research tested whether the benefits of unconscious thought processes can be replicated using an Internet platform for a patient medical decision involving complex information. This research also explored the possibility that judgments reported after a period of unconscious thought are actually the result of a short period of conscious deliberation occurring during the decision report phase. Methods A total of 173 participants in a Web-based experiment received information about four medical treatments, the best (worst) associated with mostly positive (negative) side-effects/attributes and the others with equal positive-negative ratios. Next, participants were either distracted for 3 minutes (unconscious thought), instructed to think about the information for 3 minutes (conscious thought), or moved directly to the decision task (immediate decision). Finally, participants reported their choice of, and attitudes toward, the treatments while experiencing high, low, or no cognitive load, which varied their ability to think consciously while

  13. In vivo assessment of effect of phytotoxin tenuazonic acid on PSII reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Strasser, Reto Jörg; Qiang, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA), a phytotoxin produced by the fungus Alternaria alternata isolated from diseased croftonweed (Ageratina adenophora), exhibits a strong inhibition in photosystem II (PSII) activity. In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence transients of the host plant croftonweed, show that the dominant effect of TeA is not on the primary photochemical reaction but on the biochemical reaction after QA. The most important action site of TeA is the QB site on the PSII electron-acceptor side, blocking electron transport beyond QA(-) by occupying the QB site in the D1 protein. However, TeA does not affect the antenna pigments, the energy transfer from antenna pigment molecules to reaction centers (RCs), and the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) at the donor side of PSII. TeA severely inactivated PSII RCs. The fraction of non-QA reducing centers and non-QB reducing centers show a time- and concentration-dependent linear increase. Conversely, the amount of active QA or QB reducing centers declined sharply in a linear way. The fraction of non-QB reducing centers calculated from data of fluorescence transients is close to the number of PSII RCs with their QB site filled by TeA. An increase of the step-J level (VJ) in the OJIP fluorescence transients attributed to QA(-) accumulation due to TeA bound to the QB site is a typical characteristic response of the plants leaf with respect to TeA penetration.

  14. The Use of PROMIS and Assessment Center to Deliver Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Richard C.; Rothrock, Nan; Hanrahan, Rachel; Bass, Michael; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed as one of the first projects funded by the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research Initiative to re-engineer the clinical research enterprise. The primary goal of PROMIS is to build item banks and short forms that measure key health outcome domains that are manifested in a variety of chronic diseases which could be used as a “common currency” across research projects. To date, item banks, short forms and computerized adaptive tests (CAT) have been developed for 13 domains with relevance to pediatric and adult subjects. To enable easy delivery of these new instruments, PROMIS built a web-based resource (Assessment Center) for administering CATs and other self-report data, tracking item and instrument development, monitoring accrual, managing data, and storing statistical analysis results. Assessment Center can also be used to deliver custom researcher developed content, and has numerous features that support both simple and complicated accrual designs (branching, multiple arms, multiple time points, etc.). This paper provides an overview of the development of the PROMIS item banks and details Assessment Center functionality. PMID:20847477

  15. Final Pantex Report - 2006 [Phase 1 plan for assessment of Former Workers at the Pantex Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Ronna

    2013-07-18

    The purpose of this project was to develop a Phase 1 plan for assessment of Former Workers at the Pantex Facility in Amarillo, TX and to determine the suitability to start a medical surveillance program among former workers for this site.

  16. The Systematic Assessment of Leavers, Phase I. Final Report, 90-1045.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redovich, Dennis W.; Rodriguez, Manuel S.

    In July 1988, Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) initiated the Systematic Assessment of Leavers (SAL), a 2-year, 2-phase research activity to develop and implement a monitoring process to identify the personal, demographic, institutional, and environmental factors associated with leaving the college. The target populations of the study were…

  17. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    The material presented in this booklet represents a condensation of materials developed under the Post-Secondary Education Profile phase of the National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment. The final report of the study consisted of 16 volumes which are summarized. The following topics are covered: air, energy, noise, pesticides, potable…

  18. 76 FR 78016 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ....S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Phase I Early Restoration... Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the Framework Agreement for Early Restoration Addressing Injuries Resulting...) have prepared a Draft Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment (DERP/EA) describing...

  19. Phase IA market assessment, Advanced Energy System Program. Summary report, July-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Burgmeier, L.R.; Trester, K.D.

    1986-02-01

    To assess the market potential of a natural-gas-fired, highly-recuperated Brayton-cycle cogeneration system, the authors conducted surveys to characterize and quantify the cogeneration market and concluded that a substantial market exists for small systems, particularly in the range 40 to 60 kw. The studies also revealed the diversification of the overall market, with many strong specific markets such as fast-food and conventional restaurants, supermarkets, physical fitness centers, hospitals/nursing homes and hotels/motels.

  20. Waste-minimization opportunity assessment: US Coast Guard Support Center, Governors Island, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The report focuses on a waste minimization assessment of a U.S. Coast Guard facility located on Governors Island in New York. The assessment details both management initiatives and technical changes that can be made to minimize waste. The technical areas that were assessed were paint removal operations using blasting grit, buoy painting, and on-site solvent recovery.

  1. CRP at early follicular phase of menstrual cycle can cause misinterpretation for cardiovascular risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy, Asli Yarci; Caglar, Gamze Sinem; Kiseli, Mine; Pabuccu, Emre; Candar, Tuba; Demirtas, Selda

    2015-01-01

    Objective C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-known marker of inflammation and infection in clinical practice. This study is designed to evaluate CRP levels in different phases of menstrual cycle, which might end up with misleading conclusions especially when used for cardiovascular risk assessment. Methods Twenty-seven women were eligible for the cross-sectional study. Venous blood samples from each participant were collected twice during the menstrual cycle. The first sampling was held at 2nd to 5th days of the menstrual cycle for FSH, estradiol, CRP, and sedimentation, and the second was done at 21st to 24th days of the menstrual cycle for measurement of progesterone, CRP, and sedimentation values. Results CRP values were significantly higher in the early follicular phase compared to luteal phase (1.8 mg/L [0.3–7.67] vs. 0.7 mg/L [0.1–8.3], p < 0.001, respectively). In both phases of the menstrual cycle, sedimentation rate was similar (12.1 ± 6.7 vs. 12.3 ± 7.7; p = 0.717, respectively). Conclusions CRP levels in early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (menstruation) are significantly higher than CRP levels in luteal phase of the same cycle. In reproductive age women, detection of CRP for cardiovascular risk assessment during menstruation might not be appropriate. PMID:26767119

  2. Phase II Study of Dose-Adjusted EPOCH-Rituximab in Untreated Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma with Analysis of Germinal Center and Post-Germinal Center Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wyndham H.; Dunleavy, Kieron; Pittaluga, Stefania; Hegde, Upendra; Grant, Nicole; Steinberg, Seth M.; Raffeld, Mark; Gutierrez, Martin; Chabner, Bruce A.; Staudt, Louis; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Janik, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical outcome and the influence of biomarkers associated with apoptosis inhibition (Bcl-2), tumor proliferation (MIB-1) and cellular differentiation on the outcome with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab (DA-EPOCH-R) infusional therapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and analysis of germinal center B-cell (GCB) and post-GCB subtypes by immunohistochemistry. Patients and Methods Phase II study of 72 patients with untreated de novo DLBCL who were at least 18 years of age and stage II or higher. Radiation consolidation was not permitted. Results Patients had a median age of 50 (range: 19-85) years and 40% had a high-intermediate or high International Prognostic Index (IPI). At five-years, progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 79% and 80%, respectively, with a median potential follow-up of 54 months. PFS was 91%, 90%, 67% and 47%, and OS was 100%, 90%, 74% and 37%, for 0-1, 2, 3 and 4-5 IPI factors, respectively, at five-years. The Bcl-2 and MIB-1 biomarkers were not associated with PFS or OS. Based on DA-EPOCH historical controls, rituximab only benefited Bcl-2 positive tumors. Bcl-6 expression was associated with higher PFS whereas GCB exhibited a marginally significant higher PFS compared to post-GCB DLBCL. Conclusion DA-EPOCH-R outcome was not affected by tumor proliferation and rituximab appeared to overcome the adverse effect of Bcl-2. Bcl-6 may identify a biological program associated with a superior outcome. Overall, DA-EPOCH-R shows promising outcome in low and intermediate IPI groups. A molecular model of treatment outcome with rituximab and chemotherapy is presented. PMID:18378569

  3. Assessing the need for on-site eye care professionals in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Peter; Finnegan, Brad

    2009-02-01

    Poor vision health severely impacts school and work performance, quality of life, and life expectancy, and results in billions of dollars in medical expenditures each year. While eye and vision problems are often associated with age, low income and racial and ethnic minorities also have elevated risk of eye problems. Federally-funded community health centers, which are mandated to provide comprehensive primary care in underserved communities, are often the only option to improve vision health for low-income residents. With respect to certain chronic conditions, health centers are able to provide high quality care that meets or exceeds national benchmarks despite limited financial resources, a shortage of primary care providers, and greater health care demands. What is not well known, is the extent to which health centers are able to provide on-site professional vision care. Our analysis found that seven out of 10 health centers do not staff on-site eye care professionals to provide comprehensive eye exams. Rather, many health centers rely on referral arrangements with local optometrists and ophthalmologists for such services. Major barriers to providing on-site comprehensive eye care services include the inability to afford necessary space/equipment and the perceived lack of reimbursement or inadequate reimbursement from Medicaid, Medicare and private insurers. Health centers indicated also that they also need assistance in developing a business plan, designing space, and developing an inventory of eye care equipment. While the lack of health insurance coverage, differences in Medicaid coverage and benefits across states, and inadequate reimbursements are likely to limit capacity and access to vision care professionals, another challenge may be patient's general lack of understanding about the need for routine eye exams. Therefore, strategies to improve access to vision care must go beyond developing financial incentives and restoring eye care professionals for

  4. Cathodoluminescence study of luminescence centers in hexagonal and cubic phase GaN hetero-integrated on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Bayram, C.

    2016-07-01

    Hexagonal and cubic GaN—integrated on on-axis Si(100) substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition via selective epitaxy and hexagonal-to-cubic-phase transition, respectively—are studied by temperature- and injection-intensity-dependent cathodoluminescence to explore the origins of their respective luminescence centers. In hexagonal (cubic) GaN integrated on Si, we identify at room temperature the near band edge luminescence at 3.43 eV (3.22 eV), and a defect peak at 2.21 eV (2.72 eV). At low temperature, we report additional hexagonal (cubic) GaN bound exciton transition at 3.49 eV (3.28 eV), and a donor-to-acceptor transition at 3.31 eV (3.18 eV and 2.95 eV). In cubic GaN, two defect-related acceptor energies are identified as 110 and 360 meV. For hexagonal (cubic) GaN (using Debye Temperature ( β ) of 600 K), Varshni coefficients of α = 7.37 ± 0.13 × 10 - 4 ( 6.83 ± 0.22 × 10 - 4 ) eV / K and E 0 = 3.51 ± 0.01 ( 3.31 ± 0.01 ) eV are extracted. Hexagonal and cubic GaN integrated on CMOS compatible on-axis Si(100) are shown to be promising materials for next generation devices.

  5. Using FTE and RVU performance measures to assess financial viability of academic nurse-managed centers.

    PubMed

    Vonderheid, Susan; Pohl, Joanne; Schafer, Patricia; Forrest, Kathy; Poole, Michele; Barkauskas, Violet; Mackey, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    Financial performance measures are essential to improve the fiscal management of academic nurse-managed centers (ANMCs). Measures are compared among six ANMCs in a consortium and against an external, self-sustainable, profitable ANMC and national data for family practice physicians. Performance measures help identify a center's strengths and weaknesses facilitating the development of strategies aimed at a variety of targets (business practices related to revenue and costs) to improve financial viability. Using a variety of financial performance measures to inform decision making will aid ANMCs in keeping their doors open for business.

  6. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization.

  7. Assessments of Student-Teacher Relationships in Residential Treatment Center Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Gonshak, Amy B.; Pössel, Patrick; Nichols, Andrew; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Students in residential treatment center (RTC) schools are likely to have histories of extreme or ongoing relational trauma (e.g., abuse and neglect by primary caregivers), have substantial interpersonal and relationship problems, and exhibit many high-risk behaviors. Accordingly, these students may have particular difficulty forming positive…

  8. Evaluation of the Multiple Careers Magnet and Assessment Centers at William B. Carrell, 1978-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maples, Wayne; And Others

    The report evaluates Texas' Multiple Careers Magnet Center (MCMC), a part time program to provide special education secondary students with career training. It is explained that students enter one of six career education clusters: furniture repair and upholstery, general construction trades, building and grounds maintenance, laundry and dry…

  9. A Rapidly Prototyped Vegetation Dryness Index Developed for Wildfire Risk Assessment at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton; Graham, William D.; Prados, Donald; Spruce, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    A remote sensing index was developed to allow improved monitoring of vegetation dryness conditions on a regional basis. This remote sensing index was rapidly prototyped at Stennis Space Center in response to drought conditions in the local area in spring 2006.

  10. Implementing Electronic Portfolios for Performance Assessment: A Pilot Program Involving a College Writing Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Click, Ben A.; Magruder, Sarah C.

    2004-01-01

    In December 2001, as part of a Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Use Technology grant, the St. Mary's College writing center dedicated space, software, and trained personnel to assist students and teachers in the writing and development of electronic portfolios. They created a unified space for faculty and student development across disciplines.…

  11. A Construct-Centered Generalizability Model: Analyzing Underlying Constructs of Cognitively Complex Performance Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Ying Hong; Smith, Philip L.

    With a construct-centered reliability analytical approach the reliability analysis should crystallize the multi-traits or constructs that the test specialists developed to measure from student performance and then estimate the degree of fit between the theoretical expectations of test developers and the performance exhibited by students. This…

  12. Using a Pattern-Centered Approach to Assess Sexual Risk-Taking in Study Abroad Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcantonio, Tiffany; Angelone, D. J.; Sledjeski, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of several potential factors related to sexually risky behaviors in study abroad students. The authors utilized a pattern-centered analysis to identify specific groups that can be targeted for intervention. Participants: The sample consisted of 173 students who studied abroad in a…

  13. Need for recovery assessment among nursing professionals and call center operators.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Cristiane Shinohara; Trevizani, Taísa; de Fátima Carreira Moreira, Roberta; Januário, Letícia Bergamin; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Coury, Helenice Jane Cote Gil

    2012-01-01

    The present study descriptively compares the need for recovery (NFR) among 128 nursing professionals (nurses) and 223 call center operators according cutoff points in the literature (45 and 50) and by means of statistical tests, and verifies the association between NFR scores and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms. NFR was evaluated with the Need for Recovery Scale and musculoskeletal symptoms were evaluated with the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. At a 45 point cutoff, 22% of the call-center workers and 33% of the nurses were classified as fatigued; at a 50 point cutoff, 13% of the call center operators and 27% of the nurses were classified as fatigued. The nurses had higher fatigue levels than the call center workers (p=0.015). Significant correlations were found between NFR scores and musculoskeletal symptoms reported during the previous 12 months (r=0.299, p<0.001) and 7 days (r=0.314, p<0.001). Regarding cutoff points and statistical tests, the NFR scale identified higher fatigue levels among the nurses and was demonstrated to be a useful tool for evaluating worker well-being.

  14. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. At the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated ...

  15. Study of the Index System for Assessing Learner-Centered Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mei

    2015-01-01

    With the development of e-learning, the quality of web-based courses attracts extensive interest. This paper draws upon the results conducted amongst students enrolled in an online language course at a northern Chinese university. The design of the course aims to create the learner-centered environment: personalized learning environment,…

  16. Assessing Person-Centered Outcomes in Practice Research: A Latent Transition Profile Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Aaron M.; Macy, Rebecca J.; Fraser, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in statistics provide new methods for analyzing practice data. These advances include person-centered methods (PCMs) that identify subgroups of research participants with similar characteristics. PCMs derive from a frame of reference that is similar to the risk factor perspective in practice. In practice, the delivery of services is often…

  17. Assessing Limited English Proficient Students: A Study of the Development of the Welcome Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Phyllis I.

    Development of the Welcome Center for immigrants and refugees in the School District of Philadelphia is chronicled. The program emerged from dialogue between the Task Force for the Education of Asian Immigrants and Refugee Students and the Philadelphia School District, and began operation under the aegis of the Department of Foreign Language…

  18. An Instrument to Assess the Obesogenic Environment of Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dianne; Hales, Derek; Haverly, Katie; Marks, Julie; Benjamin, Sara; Ball, Sarah; Trost, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe protocol and interobserver agreements of an instrument to evaluate nutrition and physical activity environments at child care. Methods: Interobserver data were collected from 9 child care centers, through direct observation and document review (17 observer pairs). Results: Mean agreement between observer pairs was 87.26%…

  19. The Context of Creating Space: Assessing the Likelihood of College LGBT Center Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Leigh E.

    2012-01-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) resource centers are campus spaces dedicated to the success of sexual minority students. However, only a small handful of American colleges and universities have such spaces. Political opportunity and resource mobilization theory can provide a useful framework for understanding what contextual factors…

  20. Primary Trait Analysis to Assess a Learner-Centered, Upper-Level Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsardary, Salar; Pontiggia, Laura; Hamid, Mohammed; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a primary trait analysis of a learner-centered, discrete mathematics course based on student-to-student instruction. The authors developed a scoring rubric for the primary traits: conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, application of understanding, and mathematical communication skills. Eleven students took an exam…

  1. Clinical Assessment at College Counseling Centers: The Consultant-on-Duty Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Eva; McKelley, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The consultant-on-duty (COD) clinical consultation model maximizes efficient use of services, is distinct from other university counseling center (UCC) services, and precedes therapy. This model enables clinicians to ensure optimal fit between client need and type of UCC services provided, including brief therapy. The 4 objectives of the COD model…

  2. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

  3. Assessing students' genre knowledge in an engineering writing center: An analysis of sophomore lab reports in electrical and computer engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristin Wilds Davidson

    As discipline-specific writing centers continue to increase in number, writing center consultants must determine ways to help their clients acquire discipline-specific and course-specific literacy. One way to achieve this goal is through genre analysis. This study focuses on the genre of EECE 201 (Tools and Techniques for Electrical and Computer Engineers) lab reports and strategies writing center consultants can implement to teach students communication skills necessary for discipline-specific literacy. Beginning with a discussion of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Writing Center's history, the methodological foundations of this study, and an historical overview of genre theory from classical times to the present, this study surveys the history and debates surrounding teaching genres to students. The role of assessment in analyzing and teaching genre is discussed as well, with application specifically to the sophomore-level EECE 201 course within ECE at the University of South Carolina. The study itself consists of analyzing four students' lab reports written for the EECE 201 course. Using a list of eleven characteristics developed with experienced communicators within this discipline, I analyzed each report (there is a total of 14), determining to what extent the characteristics appeared in the reports. At the end of each student's analysis, a table summarizes the information gathered from the reports, and overall conclusions are drawn for each student. The end of the study chapter presents generic writing trends exhibited by the students during the semester, such as inability to show evidence of inductive/deductive reasoning and difficulties with conceptualizing audience and applying formatting skills. The study concludes by recommending strategies that ECE Writing Center consultants can implement to help the sophomore students acquire discipline-specific knowledge. Going beyond the ECE Writing Center's context, however, the study also suggests

  4. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  5. User-Centered Digital Library Project Phase 2: User Testing with Teachers and Students with Disabilities. Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, Babette

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the User-Centered Digital Library Project, conducted by the National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at WGBH, was to adapt the Teachers' Domain online digital library to enable teachers and students with disabilities to more readily use the resources in science classrooms. NCAM added accessibility features such as captions and audio…

  6. Assessing Learning-Centered Leadership: Connections to Research, Professional Standards, and Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Porter, Andrew; Murphy, Joseph; Elliott, Stephen N.; Cravens, Xiu

    2009-01-01

    Effective school leadership is key to students' academic success. But the development of effective school leadership has been seriously hampered by the lack of technically sound tools to assess and monitor leaders' performance. This article presents the research base and conceptual framework for a leadership assessment instrument under…

  7. Assessing Learning-Centered Leadership: Connections to Research, Professional Standards, and Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Porter, Andrew C.; Murphy, Joseph; Elliott, Stephen N.; Cravens, Xiu

    2007-01-01

    Effective school leadership is key to students' academic success. But the development of effective school leadership has been seriously hampered by the lack of technically sound tools to assess and monitor leaders' performance. With support from The Wallace Foundation, a team from Vanderbilt has been developing such an assessment system, and this…

  8. Applying Evidence-Centered Design for the Development of Game-Based Assessments in Physics Playground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yoon Jeon; Almond, Russell G.; Shute, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Game-based assessment (GBA) is a specific use of educational games that employs game activities to elicit evidence for educationally valuable skills and knowledge. While this approach can provide individualized and diagnostic information about students, the design and development of assessment mechanics for a GBA is a nontrivial task. In this…

  9. Comprehensive Assessment and Standardization of Solid Phase Multiplex-Bead Arrays for the Detection of Antibodies to HLA

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Elaine F.; Rao, Ping; Zhang, Zilu; Gebel, Howard; Bray, Robert A.; Guleria, Indira; Lunz, John; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Nickerson, Peter; Tambur, Anat R.; Zeevi, Adriana; Heeger, Peter S.; Gjertson, David

    2014-01-01

    Solid phase multiplex-bead arrays for the detection and characterization of HLA antibodies provide increased sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional lymphocyte-based assays. Assay variability due to inconsistencies in commercial kits and differences in standard operating procedures hamper comparison of results between laboratories. The Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation Antibody Core Laboratories investigated sources of assay variation and determined if reproducibility improved through utilization of standard operating procedures, common reagents and normalization algorithms. Ten commercial kits from two manufacturers were assessed in each of seven laboratories using 20 HLA reference sera. Implementation of a standardized (versus a non-standardized) operating procedure greatly reduced MFI variation from 62% to 25%. Although laboratory agreements exceeded 90% (R2), small systematic differences were observed suggesting center specific factors still contribute to variation. MFI varied according to manufacturer, kit, bead type and lot. ROC analyses showed excellent consistency in antibody assignments between manufacturers (AUC>0.9) and suggested optimal cutoffs from 1000–1500 MFI. Global normalization further reduced MFI variation to levels near 20%. Standardization and normalization of solid phase HLA antibody tests will enable comparison of data across laboratories for clinical trials and diagnostic testing. PMID:23763485

  10. Comprehensive assessment and standardization of solid phase multiplex-bead arrays for the detection of antibodies to HLA.

    PubMed

    Reed, E F; Rao, P; Zhang, Z; Gebel, H; Bray, R A; Guleria, I; Lunz, J; Mohanakumar, T; Nickerson, P; Tambur, A R; Zeevi, A; Heeger, P S; Gjertson, D

    2013-07-01

    Solid phase multiplex-bead arrays for the detection and characterization of HLA antibodies provide increased sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional lymphocyte-based assays. Assay variability due to inconsistencies in commercial kits and differences in standard operating procedures (SOP) hamper comparison of results between laboratories. The Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation Antibody Core Laboratories investigated sources of assay variation and determined if reproducibility improved through utilization of SOP, common reagents and normalization algorithms. Ten commercial kits from two manufacturers were assessed in each of seven laboratories using 20 HLA reference sera. Implementation of a standardized (vs. a nonstandardized) operating procedure greatly reduced MFI variation from 62% to 25%. Although laboratory agreements exceeded 90% (R(2) ), small systematic differences were observed suggesting center specific factors still contribute to variation. MFI varied according to manufacturer, kit, bead type and lot. ROC analyses showed excellent consistency in antibody assignments between manufacturers (AUC > 0.9) and suggested optimal cutoffs from 1000 to 1500 MFI. Global normalization further reduced MFI variation to levels near 20%. Standardization and normalization of solid phase HLA antibody tests will enable comparison of data across laboratories for clinical trials and diagnostic testing.

  11. The NASA broad-specification fuels combustion technology program: An assessment of phase 1 test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the results of Phase 1 screening testing of current and advanced combustion system concepts using several broadened-properties fuels. The severity of each of several fuels-properties effects on combustor performance or liner life is discussed, as well as design techniques with the potential to offset these adverse effects. The selection of concepts to be pursued in Phase 2 refinement testing is described. This selection takes into account the relative costs and complexities of the concepts, the current outlook on pollutant emissions control, and practical operational problems.

  12. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment United States Coast Guard Aviation Training Center, Mobile, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, B.; Memon, A.

    1994-09-01

    The report summarizes work conducted at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Aviation Training Center (ATC) in Mobile, Alabama under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Several waste generating processes were initially screened including flight simulators, aircraft maintenance, aircraft fuel management, and aircraft cleaning. Opportunities to reduce wastes in each area were identified and evaluated.

  13. Home Circadian Phase Assessments with Measures of Compliance Yield Accurate Dim Light Melatonin Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Wyatt, James K.; Park, Margaret; Fogg, Louis F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is a need for the accurate assessment of circadian phase outside of the clinic/laboratory, particularly with the gold standard dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). We tested a novel kit designed to assist in saliva sampling at home for later determination of the DLMO. The home kit includes objective measures of compliance to the requirements for dim light and half-hourly saliva sampling. Design: Participants were randomized to one of two 10-day protocols. Each protocol consisted of two back-to-back home and laboratory phase assessments in counterbalanced order, separated by a 5-day break. Setting: Laboratory or participants' homes. Participants: Thirty-five healthy adults, age 21–62 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Most participants received at least one 30-sec epoch of light > 50 lux during the home phase assessments (average light intensity 4.5 lux), but on average for < 9 min of the required 8.5 h. Most participants collected every saliva sample within 5 min of the scheduled time. Ninety-two percent of home DLMOs were not affected by light > 50 lux or sampling errors. There was no significant difference between the home and laboratory DLMOs (P > 0.05); on average the home DLMOs occurred 9.6 min before the laboratory DLMOs. The home DLMOs were highly correlated with the laboratory DLMOs (r = 0.91, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Participants were reasonably compliant to the home phase assessment procedures. The good agreement between the home and laboratory dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) demonstrates that including objective measures of light exposure and sample timing during home saliva sampling can lead to accurate home DLMOs. Clinical Trial Registration: Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Citation: Burgess HJ, Wyatt JK, Park M, Fogg LF. Home circadian phase assessments with measures of compliance yield accurate dim light melatonin onsets. SLEEP 2015;38(6):889–897

  14. Preliminary volcano hazard assessment for the Emmons Lake volcanic center, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher; Miller, Thomas P.; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2006-01-01

    The Emmons Lake volcanic center is a large stratovolcano complex on the Alaska Peninsula near Cold Bay, Alaska. The volcanic center includes several ice- and snow-clad volcanoes within a nested caldera structure that hosts Emmons Lake and truncates a shield-like ancestral Mount Emmons edifice. From northeast to southwest, the main stratovolcanoes of the center are: Pavlof Sister, Pavlof, Little Pavlof, Double Crater, Mount Hague, and Mount Emmons. Several small cinder cones and vents are located on the floor of the caldera and on the south flank of Pavlof Volcano. Pavlof Volcano, in the northeastern part of the center, is the most historically active volcano in Alaska (Miller and others, 1998) and eruptions of Pavlof pose the greatest hazards to the region. Historical eruptions of Pavlof Volcano have been small to moderate Strombolian eruptions that produced moderate amounts of near vent lapilli tephra fallout, and diffuse ash plumes that drifted several hundreds of kilometers from the vent. Cold Bay, King Cove, Nelson Lagoon, and Sand Point have reported ash fallout from Pavlof eruptions. Drifting clouds of volcanic ash produced by eruptions of Pavlof would be a major hazard to local aircraft and could interfere with trans-Pacific air travel if the ash plume achieved flight levels. During most historical eruptions of Pavlof, pyroclastic material erupted from the volcano has interacted with the snow and ice on the volcano producing volcanic mudflows or lahars. Lahars have inundated most of the drainages heading on the volcano and filled stream valleys with variable amounts of coarse sand, gravel, and boulders. The lahars are often hot and would alter or destroy stream habitat for many years following the eruption. Other stratocones and vents within the Emmons Lake volcanic center are not known to have erupted in the past 300 years. However, young appearing deposits and lava flows suggest there may have been small explosions and minor effusive eruptive activity

  15. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  16. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users' Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  17. Patient-Centered Technological Assessment and Monitoring of Depression for Low-Income Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shinyi; Vidyanti, Irene; Liu, Pai; Hawkins, Caitlin; Ramirez, Magaly; Guterman, Jeffrey; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Ell, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a significant challenge for ambulatory care because it worsens health status and outcomes, increases health care utilizations and costs, and elevates suicide risk. An automatic telephonic assessment (ATA) system that links with tasks and alerts to providers may improve quality of depression care and increase provider productivity. We used ATA system in a trial to assess and monitor depressive symptoms of 444 safety-net primary care patients with diabetes. We assessed system properties, evaluated preliminary clinical outcomes, and estimated cost savings. The ATA system is feasible, reliable, valid, safe, and likely cost-effective for depression screening and monitoring for low-income primary care population. PMID:24525531

  18. Phase Retrieval System for Assessing Diamond Turning and Optical Surface Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce; Maldonado, Alex; Bolcar, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    An optical design is presented for a measurement system used to assess the impact of surface errors originating from diamond turning artifacts. Diamond turning artifacts are common by-products of optical surface shaping using the diamond turning process (a diamond-tipped cutting tool used in a lathe configuration). Assessing and evaluating the errors imparted by diamond turning (including other surface errors attributed to optical manufacturing techniques) can be problematic and generally requires the use of an optical interferometer. Commercial interferometers can be expensive when compared to the simple optical setup developed here, which is used in combination with an image-based sensing technique (phase retrieval). Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to describe the estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations. This turnkey system uses only image-based data and has minimal hardware requirements. The system is straightforward to set up, easy to align, and can provide nanometer accuracy on the measurement of optical surface defects.

  19. Financial assessment of the Space Operations Center as a Private Business Venture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of private financing and operation of the Space Operations Center (SOC) is considered as an alternative to SOC development by the government. A hypothetical revenue model for SOC services is constructed and is compared with NASA estimates of SOC development and operating costs. A present value analysis based on a 1985 to 2000 investment horizon shows a potential for substantial profit in a private SOC venture, although the possibility of large losses is not discounted. Present value estimates range from $8.6 billion down to a low minus $3.3 billion.

  20. An assessment of the atmospheric centers of action in the northern hemisphere winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. J.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, J. X. L.

    2016-04-01

    In the northern hemisphere, there are six permanent or semi-permanent atmospheric activity centers, namely the Icelandic Low, Aleutian Low, India Low, Mongolia High, North Pacific High, and North Atlantic High. The first four are semi-permanent action centers and the last two are permanent circulation systems. The India Low exists only during the summer. By using 160 years (1850-2009) of monthly mean sea level pressure data from the Hadley Centre in the UK, we conduct a comprehensive study of the five boreal winter atmospheric centers of action (ACAs). Based on a unified definition and a method determined in previous studies, we calculate the indices of areal coverage (S), intensity (P), and position of action center (λ c, φ c) for each of these five ACAs. Through an in-depth analysis of these indices and their relationships with climate variables, we evaluate the indices by describing and explaining areal climate anomalies, particularly precipitation and temperature anomalies in China. We show that (1) ACAs significantly influence the climate anomalies of surrounding areas (2) the influences of oceanic ACAs are larger and the intensity anomalies of ACAs have a greater impact than their location displacement, and (3) ACAs exert more control on temperature than they do on precipitation. For the two ACAs over the north Atlantic, the impacts of their intensities on the anomalies of temperature and precipitation are similar. For the two ACAs over the north Pacific, their influences are almost the opposite. The most influential ACA for climate anomalies in China during the boreal winter is HMO. When HMO is stronger, China has a colder winter and it is wetter in the north. With stronger ACAs in the upstream, i.e., the Icelandic Low and North Atlantic High, northern China has a warmer winter. The ACAs over the north Pacific exert little influence on climate anomalies in China during winter. The analyses presented in this paper provide a set of useful indices for

  1. TCO optimization during design phase - assessment of bearing concepts by calculation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, Mark; Krome, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Energy efficiency has been a key issue for screw machines for many years. This article describes a new analytical procedure for determining rolling bearing friction and the use of the procedure for designing compressor bearing supports. Further analytical options for a calculative assessment of the overall efficiency of bearing support alternatives are presented in the design phase based on parameter analyses performed by the BearinX® calculation software, which includes the new friction calculation by means of a mechanical, tribological model.

  2. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  3. Recovery Act: High-Efficiency, Wideband Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier Management for Telecomm Central Office and Large Data Center Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Johnson

    2012-06-29

    Lineage Power and Verizon teamed up to address a DOE funding opportunity focused on improving the power conversion chain in telecommunications facilities and data centers. The project had three significant elements: the design and development of high efficiency and high power three-phase rectifiers by Lineage Power, design and development of software to optimize overall plant energy efficiency by Lineage Power, and a field trial in active Verizon telecommunications facilities where energy consumption was measured before and after efficiency upgrades.

  4. Waste minimization opportunity assessment, U.S. Coast Guard Support Center, Governors Island, New York. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    1991-02-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard facility at Governors Island, New York, was chosen for a waste reduction assessment under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. The Coast Guard mission on the Island, which serves as a support center for Coast Guard activities in the New York area, generates a substantial amount of hazardous waste (e.g., lead-acid batteries, lead-contaminated blast grit, paint, and paint-related materials). Opportunities to minimize waste through technology included substituting plastic for steel shot when removing paint and rust from buoys and using high volume/low pressure paint guns to reduce overspray.

  5. Assessment of liquid disposal originated by uranium enrichment at Aramar Experimental Center São Paulo--Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gerenutti, Marli; Gonçalves, Marcos Moisés; Rissato, Sandra Regina; de Oliveira, José Martins; dos Santos Reigota, Marco Antonio; Galhiane, Mário Sergio

    2012-07-01

    This work presents a liquid disposal monitoring originated from uranium enrichment process at Aramar Experimental Center from 1990 to 1998. Assessment of uranium, fluorides, ammoniacal nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand, and pH measurements were made in water samples and compared with results achieved in other countries, as North America and India. The liquid disposal evaluation, generated by uranium enrichment process, showed low levels, considering most parameters established by Federal and State Legislation, aiming environmental pollution control. However, uranium levels were above the limits established by Conselho Nacional do Meio Ambiente, Environment Protection Agency and mainly by the World Health Organization. PMID:21814717

  6. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric α-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  7. ASSESSING THE FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC TURBULENCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fatuzzo, M.; Melia, F. E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu

    2012-05-01

    The presence of relativistic particles at the center of our Galaxy is evidenced by the diffuse TeV emission detected from the inner {approx}2 Degree-Sign of the Galaxy. Although it is not yet entirely clear whether the origin of the TeV photons is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic ridge strongly points to a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In previous work, we concluded that point-source candidates, such as the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (identified with the High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source J1745-290) or the pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the Galactic plane, could not account for the observed diffuse TeV emission from this region. Motivated by this result, we consider here the feasibility that the cosmic rays populating the Galactic center region are accelerated in situ by magnetic turbulence. Our results indicate that even in a highly conductive environment, this mechanism is efficient enough to energize protons within the intercloud medium to the {approx}>TeV energies required to produce the HESS emission.

  8. Viability assessment of regional biomass pre-processing center based bioethanol value chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolan, Joseph E.

    Petroleum accounts for 94% of all liquid fuels and 36% of the total of all energy consumed in the United States. Petroleum dependence is problematic because global petroleum reserves are estimated to last only for 40 to 60 years at current consumption rates; global supplies are often located in politically unstable or unfriendly regions; and fossil fuels have negative environmental footprints. Domestic policies have aimed at promoting alternative, renewable liquid fuels, specifically bio-fuels derived from organic matter. Cellulosic bio-ethanol is one promising alternative fuel that has featured prominently in federal bio-fuel mandates under the Energy Independence and Security Act, 2007. However, the cellulosic bio-ethanol industry faces several technical, physical and industrial organization challenges. This dissertation examines the concept of a network of regional biomass pre-treatment centers (RBPC) that form an extended biomass supply chain feeding into a simplified biorefinery as a way to overcome these challenges. The analyses conducted address the structural and transactional issues facing bio-ethanol value chain establishment; the technical and financial feasibility of a stand alone pre-treatment center (RBPC); the impact of distributed pre-treatment on biomass transport costs; a comparative systems cost evaluation of the performance of the RBPC chain versus a fully integrated biorefinery (gIBRh), followed by application of the analytical framework to three case study regions.

  9. Phase-ratio technique as applied to the assessment of lunar surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaydash, Vadym; Videen, Gorden; Shkuratov, Yuriy

    crater wall terraces and floors. With phase-ratio imagery we suggested that in many cases the flows seen on the inner walls of the lunar craters can be regolith/debris taluses, and not impact melt flows [3,9]. Thus phase-ratio imagery allows for the identification of both natural surface structure anomalies and artificially altered regolith. We recommend the use of the phase-ratio technique to discriminate between the composition and structure factors only with lunar images acquired in a wide range of phase angles. Phase-ratio imaging of dark halos and rays seen near young natural and anthropogenic craters suggests that these features result from higher surface roughness [10]. Finally we conclude that phase-ratio imagery of the Moon is a very useful photometric tool, as it suggests an assessment of surface roughness. This tool can be used for identification of lunar areas with very recent alterations in their surface structure. This new approach also can be applied to any planetary surface, for which suitable photometric data are available. References: [1] Hapke B. Theory of reflectance and emittance spectroscopy. Cambridge Univ. Press; 1993, 450 p. [2] Shkuratov Y. et al. Planet. Space Sci. 2011; 59, 1326-71. [3] Kaydash V. et al. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 2012, 113, 2601-2607. [4] Shkuratov Y. et al. Icarus, 2010, 208, 20-30. [5] Kaydash V. et al. Icarus, 2011, 211, 89-96. [6] Kaydash V., Shkuratov Y. Solar Syst. Res., 2012, 46, 108-118. [7] Shkuratov Y. et al. Planet. Space Sci., 2013, 75, 28-36. [8] Kaydash V. et al. Planet. Space Sci., 2013, 89, 172-182. [9] Shkuratov Y. et al. Icarus, 2012, 218, 525-533. [10] Kaydash V. et al. Icarus, 2014, 231, 22-33.

  10. Validation of Using Fitness Center Attendance Electronic Records to Assess the Frequency of Moderate/Vigorous Leisure-Time Physical Activity among Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amireault, Steve; Godin, Gaston

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide three construct validity evidence for using fitness center attendance electronic records to objectively assess the frequency of leisure-time physical activity among adults. One hundred members of a fitness center (45 women and 55 men; aged 18 to 64 years) completed a self-report leisure-time physical…

  11. A Brief Note on Evidence-Centered Design as a Mechanism for Assessment Development and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Lloyd Bond comments here on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives". The Focus article is entitled: "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, and Valerie J. Shute). Bond…

  12. A Framework for Structuring Learning Assessment in a Online Educational Game: Experiment Centered Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Shawn; Clarke-Midura, Jody; Klopfer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Educational games offer an opportunity to engage and inspire students to take interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) subjects. Unobtrusive learning assessment techniques coupled with machine learning algorithms can be utilized to record students' in-game actions and formulate a model of the students' knowledge…

  13. An Evidence Centered Design for Learning and Assessment in the Digital World. CRESST Report 778

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, John T.; Mislevy, Robert J.; DiCerbo, Kristen E.; Levy, Roy

    2010-01-01

    The world in which learning and assessment must take place is rapidly changing. The digital revolution has created a vast space of interconnected information, communication, and interaction. Functioning effectively in this environment requires so-called 21st century skills such as technological fluency, complex problem solving, and the ability to…

  14. Social Validation of the New England Center for Children-Core Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Chata A.; MacDonald, Rebecca P. F.; Mansfield, Renee; Guilhardi, Paulo; Johnson, Cammarie; Ahearn, William H.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the social validity of the NECC Core Skills Assessment (NECC-CSA) with parents and professionals as participants. The NECC-CSA is a measurement tool consisting of direct and indirect measures of skills important to all individuals with autism, across the lifespan. Participants (N = 245) were provided with a list of 66 skills, 47 of…

  15. A quantitative microbial risk assessment for center pivot irrigation of dairy wastewaters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the western United States where livestock wastewaters are commonly land applied, there are concerns over individuals being exposed to airborne pathogens. In response, a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was performed to estimate infectious risks from inhaling pathogens aerosolized dur...

  16. The Evolution of Augmentative Communication at a Regional Center: Three Follow-Up Assessment Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Sara C.; Porter, Patricia B.

    1986-01-01

    The article describes three follow-up assessment models (community setting, residential setting, and check-up clinic) explored by an interdisciplinary augmentative communication team. Services offered and training provided to professionals, parents, and university-based students, as well as costs, advantages, and disadvantages, are summarized.…

  17. Assessment of Differences in Phase 1 and Phase 2 Test Observations for Waste Treatment Plant Pulse Jet Mixer Tests with Non-Cohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-10-27

    The purpose of this work was to assess the apparent discrepancy in critical suspension velocity (UCS) between M3 Phase 1 (Meyer et al. 2009) and Phase 2 testing conducted by Energy Solutions (ES) at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) and to address the applicability of Phase 1 scale-up laws to Phase 2 test results. Three Phase 2 test sequences were analyzed in detail. Several sources of discrepancy were identified including differences in nominal versus actual velocity, definition of model input parameters, and definition of UCS. A remaining discrepancy was shown to not be solely an artifact of Phase 1 data correlations, but was fundamental to the tests. The non-prototypic aspects of Phase 1 testing were reviewed and assessed. The effects of non-prototypic refill associated with the closed loop operation of the jets, previously known to affect cloud height, can be described in terms of a modified settling velocity. When the modified settling velocity is incorporated into the Phase 1 “new” physical model the adjusted new physical model does a better job of predicting the Phase 2 test results. The adjusted new physical model was bench marked with data taken during three prototypic drive tests. Scale-up behavior of the Phase 1 tests was reviewed. The applicability of the Phase 1 scale-up behavior to Phase 2 prototypic testing was analyzed. The effects of non-prototypic refill caused measured values of UCS to be somewhat reduced at larger scales. Hence the scale-up exponents are believed to be smaller than they would have been had there been prototypic refill. Estimated scale-up exponents for the Phase 2 testing are 0.40 for 8-tube tests and 0.36 for 12-tube tests.

  18. Activation and implementation of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.F. III

    1989-01-01

    The Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has been assigned the primary responsibility for responding to a major radiological emergency. The initial response to any radiological emergency, however, will probably be conducted under the DOE regional radiological assistance plan (RAP). If the dimensions of the crisis demand federal assistance, the following sequence of events may be anticipated: (1) DOE regional RAP response, (2) activation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assistance Center (FRMAC) requested, (3) aerial measuring systems and DOE/NV advance party respond, (4) FRMAC activated, (5) FRMAC responds to state(s) and cognizant federal agency (CFA), and (6) management of FRMAC transferred to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The paper discusses activation channels, authorization, notification, deployment, and interfaces.

  19. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  20. [Exposure to VHF and UHF electromagnetic fields among workers employed in radio and TV broadcast centers. I. Assessment of exposure].

    PubMed

    Zmyślony, M; Aniołczyk, H; Bortkiewicz, A

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, radio and television have become one of the areas of the human technical activity that develops most rapidly. Also ultra-short waves of VHF (30-300 MHz) and UHF (0.3-3 GHz) bands have proved to be the most important carriers of radio and TV-programs. In Poland, a network of radio and TV broadcast centers (RTCN) with high (over 200 m) masts was set up in the 1960s and 1970s. These centers concentrate the majority of stations broadcasting national and local programs (for areas within the RTCN range). At present, the RTCN established several decades ago are equally important. The assessment of the exposure to electromagnetic fields among workers of multi-program broadcast stations is complicated and feasible only to a certain degree of approximation because of changing conditions of exposure in individual stations during their long history, resulting from the changing numbers and types of transmitters installed. In this work, the method of retrospective estimation of exposure dose is described, and the results of the assessment carried out at three kinds of typical RTCN are discussed. The results of the analysis indicate that the workers of RTCN are exposed primarily to electromagnetic fields of VHF and UHF bands, but this exposure may be considered as admissible, hence it should not exert an adverse effect on the workers' health. PMID:11828845

  1. Difference in Postural Control during Quiet Standing between Young Children and Adults: Assessment with Center of Mass Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Naoko; Sasagawa, Shun; Yamamoto, Akio; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The development of upright postural control has often been investigated using time series of center of foot pressure (COP), which is proportional to the ankle joint torque (i.e., the motor output of a single joint). However, the center of body mass acceleration (COMacc), which can reflect joint motions throughout the body as well as multi-joint coordination, is useful for the assessment of the postural control strategy at the whole-body level. The purpose of the present study was to investigate children’s postural control during quiet standing by using the COMacc. Ten healthy children and 15 healthy young adults were instructed to stand upright quietly on a force platform with their eyes open or closed. The COMacc as well as the COP in the anterior–posterior direction was obtained from ground reaction force measurement. We found that both the COMacc and COP could clearly distinguish the difference between age groups and visual conditions. We also found that the sway frequency of COMacc in children was higher than that in adults, for which differences in biomechanical and/or neural factors between age groups may be responsible. Our results imply that the COMacc can be an alternative force platform measure for assessing developmental changes in upright postural control. PMID:26447883

  2. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. A Singular Perturbation Approach for Time-Domain Assessment of Phase Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. Jim; Yang, Xiaojing; Hodel, A Scottedward

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of time-domain assessment of the Phase Margin (PM) of a Single Input Single Output (SISO) Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) system using a singular perturbation approach, where a SISO LTI fast loop system, whose phase lag increases monotonically with frequency, is introduced into the loop as a singular perturbation with a singular perturbation (time-scale separation) parameter Epsilon. First, a bijective relationship between the Singular Perturbation Margin (SPM) max and the PM of the nominal (slow) system is established with an approximation error on the order of Epsilon(exp 2). In proving this result, relationships between the singular perturbation parameter Epsilon, PM of the perturbed system, PM and SPM of the nominal system, and the (monotonically increasing) phase of the fast system are also revealed. These results make it possible to assess the PM of the nominal system in the time-domain for SISO LTI systems using the SPM with a standardized testing system called "PM-gauge," as demonstrated by examples. PM is a widely used stability margin for LTI control system design and certification. Unfortunately, it is not applicable to Linear Time-Varying (LTV) and Nonlinear Time-Varying (NLTV) systems. The approach developed here can be used to establish a theoretical as well as practical metric of stability margin for LTV and NLTV systems using a standardized SPM that is backward compatible with PM.

  4. FLORA™: Phase I development of a functional vision assessment for prosthetic vision users

    PubMed Central

    Geruschat, Duane R; Flax, Marshall; Tanna, Nilima; Bianchi, Michelle; Fisher, Andy; Goldschmidt, Mira; Fisher, Lynne; Dagnelie, Gislin; Deremeik, Jim; Smith, Audrey; Anaflous, Fatima; Dorn, Jessy

    2014-01-01

    Background Research groups and funding agencies need a functional assessment suitable for an ultra-low vision population in order to evaluate the impact of new vision restoration treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop a pilot assessment to capture the functional vision ability and well-being of subjects whose vision has been partially restored with the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System. Methods The Functional Low-Vision Observer Rated Assessment (FLORA) pilot assessment involved a self-report section, a list of functional vision tasks for observation of performance, and a case narrative summary. Results were analyzed to determine whether the interview questions and functional vision tasks were appropriate for this ultra-low vision population and whether the ratings suffered from floor or ceiling effects. Thirty subjects with severe to profound retinitis pigmentosa (bare light perception or worse in both eyes) were enrolled in a clinical trial and implanted with the Argus II System. From this population, twenty-six subjects were assessed with the FLORA. Seven different evaluators administered the assessment. Results All 14 interview questions were asked. All 35 functional vision tasks were selected for evaluation at least once, with an average of 20 subjects being evaluated for each test item. All four rating options -- impossible (33%), difficult (23%), moderate (24%) and easy (19%) -- were used by the evaluators. Evaluators also judged the amount of vision they observed the subjects using to complete the various tasks, with vision only occurring 75% on average with the System ON, and 29% with the System OFF. Conclusion The first version of the FLORA was found to contain useful elements for evaluation and to avoid floor and ceiling effects. The next phase of development will be to refine the assessment and to establish reliability and validity to increase its value as a functional vision and well-being assessment tool. PMID:25675964

  5. Assessing exploitation experiences of girls and boys seen at a Child Advocacy Center

    PubMed Central

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Pape-Blabolil, Julie; Harpin, Scott B.; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the abuse experiences of sexually exploited runaway adolescents seen at a Child Advocacy Center (N = 62). We also sought to identify risk behaviors, attributes of resiliency, laboratory results for sexually transmitted infection (STI) screens, and genital injuries from colposcopic exams. We used retrospective mixed-methods with in-depth forensic interviews, together with self-report survey responses, physical exams and chart data. Forensic interviews were analyzed using interpretive description analytical methods along domains of experience and meaning of sexual exploitation events. Univariate descriptive statistics characterized trauma responses and health risks. The first sexual exploitation events for many victims occurred as part of seemingly random encounters with procurers. Older adolescent or adult women recruited some youth working for a pimp. However, half the youth did not report a trafficker involved in setting up their exchange of sex for money, substances, or other types of consideration. 78% scored positive on the UCLA PTSD tool; 57% reported DSM IV criteria for problem substance use; 71% reported cutting behaviors, 75% suicidal ideation, and 50% had attempted suicide. Contrary to common depictions, youth may be solicited relatively quickly as runaways, yet exploitation is not always linked to having a pimp. Avoidant coping does not appear effective, as most patients exhibited significant symptoms of trauma. Awareness of variations in youth’s sexual exploitation experiences may help researchers and clinicians understand potential differences in sequelae, design effective treatment plans, and develop community prevention programs. PMID:25982287

  6. Assessment of MSFC's supervisory training programs and courses. [marshall space flight center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Courses and special programs to train supervisors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) were to determine the adequacy of the present MSFC Supervisory Training Program and to recommend changes, if appropriate. The content, procedures, and student evaluations of the required Office of Personnel Management (OPM) 80 hours training for supervisors, the optional 120 hours, the MSFC Management Development Program (MDP), NASA's Management Education Program (MEP), various OPM and special contract programs, pertinent procedural guidelines, regulations, and letters, as well as various MSFC computer reports which indicate who took what training were analyzed. Various interviews with MSFC personnel involved in training are included. Recommendations consist of: (1) the choice of courses selected for the basic required OPM 80 hours be improved; (2) the optional 120 hours be discontinued and a shorter module be developed dealing with managerial decision making and human relations skills; (3) the MDP and MEP be continued as at present; and (4) that a broad array of developmental strategies be incorporated to provide a variety of opportunities for supervisory improvement.

  7. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists.

  8. Assessment of traumatic deaths in a level one trauma center in Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arslan, E D; Kaya, E; Sonmez, M; Kavalci, C; Solakoglu, A; Yilmaz, F; Durdu, T; Karakilic, E

    2015-06-01

    Trauma management shows significant progress in last decades. Determining the time and place of deaths indicate where to focus to improve our knowledge about trauma. We conducted this retrospective study from data of trauma victims who were brought to a major tertiary hospital which is a level one trauma center in Ankara, Turkey, and died even if during transport or in the hospital between 1 March 2010 and 1 March 2013. The patients' demographic characteristics, trauma mechanisms, time frames and causes of deaths determined by physicians were recorded. Traumas were grouped as "high energy trauma" (HET) and "low energy trauma" (LET). Falls from ground level were defined as LET. 209 traumatic deaths due to trauma or trauma-related conditions were found in the study period. 161 of 209 (78 %) patients suffered from HET. Motor vehicle collisions (MVC) (56 %) were the most common mechanism of trauma followed by burns (16 %), falls (11 %), gunshots (9 %) and stabs (6 %) in this group and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) (41 %) were the most common cause of death followed by circulatory collapse (22 %) and multi-organ failure (20 %). 36 % of deaths occurred before arrival at hospital, 25 % in the first 24 h of admission, 18 % between 2nd and 7th day and 21 % after first week. Trimodal distribution of traumatic deaths was not valid for all types of injuries and the most important factor to decrease traumatic deaths is still prevention. Also we have to keep on searching to improve our knowledge about trauma management. PMID:26037980

  9. Assessing exploitation experiences of girls and boys seen at a Child Advocacy Center.

    PubMed

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Pape-Blabolil, Julie; Harpin, Scott B; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the abuse experiences of sexually exploited runaway adolescents seen at a Child Advocacy Center (N=62). We also sought to identify risk behaviors, attributes of resiliency, laboratory results for sexually transmitted infection (STI) screens, and genital injuries from colposcopic exams. We used retrospective mixed-methods with in-depth forensic interviews, together with self-report survey responses, physical exams and chart data. Forensic interviews were analyzed using interpretive description analytical methods along domains of experience and meaning of sexual exploitation events. Univariate descriptive statistics characterized trauma responses and health risks. The first sexual exploitation events for many victims occurred as part of seemingly random encounters with procurers. Older adolescent or adult women recruited some youth working for a pimp. However, half the youth did not report a trafficker involved in setting up their exchange of sex for money, substances, or other types of consideration. 78% scored positive on the UCLA PTSD tool; 57% reported DSM IV criteria for problem substance use; 71% reported cutting behaviors, 75% suicidal ideation, and 50% had attempted suicide. Contrary to common depictions, youth may be solicited relatively quickly as runaways, yet exploitation is not always linked to having a pimp. Avoidant coping does not appear effective, as most patients exhibited significant symptoms of trauma. Awareness of variations in youth's sexual exploitation experiences may help researchers and clinicians understand potential differences in sequelae, design effective treatment plans, and develop community prevention programs.

  10. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists. PMID:23818923

  11. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  12. [Meningitis epidemic: assessment of surveillance and treatment of cases in the health centers of a Burkina Faso district].

    PubMed

    Yaméogo, T M; Kyelem, C G; Poda, G E A; Sombié, I; Ouédraogo, M S; Millogo, A

    2011-02-01

    Meningococcal meningitis remains a periodical threat in the African meningitis belt. The countries concerned, such as Burkina Faso, provided guidelines for its surveillance, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention during outbreaks. The objective of this study is to assess the quality of the surveillance system and case management during an outbreak in Fada N'Gourma district. A retrospective study of the meningitis outbreak in 2007 was conducted by literature review and interviews of health caretakers across 27 health centers (CSPS) and three units in the regional hospital in the district.We reported all data available about surveillance and case management, and then we compared it with the guidelines of the Ministry of Health. The case definition and notification forms were available in all centers and units. During the outbreak, 861 cases were recorded, but only 89% was notified at the upper level and 87% of notification forms were available. The age is marked on all the forms, while the interval between the onset of symptoms and consultation is noted only in 90.7%. The forms were distributed weekly at the district level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram coloration was performed for a limited number of cases (150/349 samples, 42.9%); it showed Gram-negative diplococcus in 86%. Culture was performed for a limited number of patients (7 cases). According to the results of a central level laboratory study, the outbreak was due to Group A Neisseria meningitidis. The case management guidelines were available in all the centers and units which were supervised during the outbreak. Anti-biotherapy was appropriate in 93.6% of the cases. A shortage of antibiotics (free prepositioning) was observed in 7 centers (23.3%). The mortality rate was 3.5%. This assessment shows an under-notification of cases, despite the existence of a surveillance system and supervision, a weak laboratory contribution in germ identification, appropriate case management, and shortage of antibiotics during

  13. Environmental assessment for Kelley Hot Spring geothermal project: Kelley Hot Spring Agricultural Center

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-04-01

    The environmental impacts of an integrated swine production unit are analyzed together with necessary ancillary operations deriving its primary energy from a known geothermal reservoir in accordance with policies established by the National Energy Conservation Act. This environmental assessment covers 6 areas designated as potentially feasible project sites, using as the basic criteria for selection ground, surface and geothermal water supplies. The six areas, comprising +- 150 acres each, are within a 2 mile radius of Kelley Hot Springs, a known geothermal resource of many centuries standing, located 16 miles west of Alturas, the county seat of Modoc County, California. The project consists of the construction and operation of a 1360 sow confined pork production complex expandable to 5440 sows. The farrow to finish system for 1360 sows consists of 2 breeding barns, 2 gestation barns, 1 farrowing and 1 nursery barn, 3 growing and 3 finishing barns, a feed mill, a methane generator for waste disposal and water storage ponds. Supporting this are one geothermal well and 1 or 2 cold water wells, all occupying approximately 12 acres. Environmental reconnaissance involving geology, hydrology, soils, vegetation, fauna, air and water quality, socioeconomic, archaelogical and historical, and land use aspects were carefully carried out, impacts assessed and mitigations evaluated.

  14. Assessment of nutritional status in cancer patients in Osijek health area center.

    PubMed

    Ebling, Barbara; Brumnić, Vesna; Rendić-Miocević, Zrinka; Gmajnić, Rudika; Pribić, Sanda; Juretić, Antonio; Ebling, Zdravko; Muha, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this research was to perform the nutritional screening and clinical assessment of malnutrition and of cachexia as well as the need for enteral nutritional support. We used an international questionnaire for nutrition screening and clinical assessment of malnutrition. 103 cancer patients participated in the research. The results indicate that 80patients (78%) have recently unintentionally lost weight in the last six months. Of those 80 patients 12 (15%) have lost more than 15 kilograms. Three patients (3%) suffer from hunger because of their inability to eat. Presence of multiple (3 or more) symptoms (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or anorexia) was reported by 11 patients (11%). Severe work dysfunction was found in 28 patients (27%). 14 patients (14%) experience significant loss of musculature (musculus quadriceps femoris, musculus deltoideus). The obtained results indicate that 15patients (14%) are severely, and 39 patients (38%) are moderately undernourished. This survey confirmed the significance of nutritional screening in cancer patients, as it detected 30 patients (29%) who required introduction of enteral nutrition.

  15. Food Consumption and Handling Survey for Quantitative Microbiological Consumer Phase Risk Assessments.

    PubMed

    Chardon, Jurgen; Swart, Arno

    2016-07-01

    In the consumer phase of a typical quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA), mathematical equations identify data gaps. To acquire useful data we designed a food consumption and food handling survey (2,226 respondents) for QMRA applications that is especially aimed at obtaining quantitative data. For a broad spectrum of food products, the survey covered the following topics: processing status at retail, consumer storage, preparation, and consumption. Questions were designed to facilitate distribution fitting. In the statistical analysis, special attention was given to the selection of the most adequate distribution to describe the data. Bootstrap procedures were used to describe uncertainty. The final result was a coherent quantitative consumer phase food survey and parameter estimates for food handling and consumption practices in The Netherlands, including variation over individuals and uncertainty estimates.

  16. Aging assessment of the boiling-water reactor (BWR) standby liquid control system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, R.D.; Johnson, A.B.; Buckley, G.D.; Larson, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of the standby liquid control (SLC) system used in boiling-water reactors. The study was based on detailed reviews of SLC system component and operating experience information obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Database System, the Nuclear Document System, Licensee Event Reports, and other databases. Sources dealing with sodium pentaborate, borates, boric acid, and the effects of environment and corrosion in the SLC system were reviewed to characterize chemical properties and corrosion characteristics of borated solutions. The leading aging degradation concern to date appears to be setpoint drift in relief valves, which has been discovered during routine surveillance and is thought to be caused by mechanical wear. Degradation was also observed in pump seals and internal valves. In general, however, the results of the Phase I study suggest that age-related degradation of SLC systems has not been serious.

  17. How Strong Is the Primary Care Safety Net? Assessing the Ability of Federally Qualified Health Centers to Serve as Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jamie; Riley, Pamela; Abrams, Melinda; Nocon, Robert

    2015-09-01

    By expanding access to affordable insurance coverage for millions of Americans, the Affordable Care Act will likely increase demand for the services provided by federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), which provide an important source of care in low-income communities. A pair of Commonwealth Fund surveys asked health center leaders about their ability to function as medical homes. Survey findings show that between 2009 and 2013, the percentage of centers exhibiting medium or high levels of medical home capability almost doubled, from 32 percent to 62 percent. The greatest improvement was reported in patient tracking and care management. Despite this increased capability, health centers reported diminished ability to coordinate care with providers outside of the practice, particularly specialists. Ongoing federal funding and technical support for medical home transformation will be needed to ensure that FQHCs can fulfill their mission of providing high-quality, comprehensive care to low-income and minority populations. PMID:26372972

  18. Unannounced standardized patients: a promising method of assessing patient-centered care in your health care system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While unannounced standardized patients (USPs) have been used to assess physicians’ clinical skills in the ambulatory setting, they can also provide valuable information on patients’ experience of the health care setting beyond the physician encounter. This paper explores the use of USPs as a methodology for evaluating patient-centered care in the health care system. Methods USPs were trained to complete a behaviorally-anchored assessment of core dimensions of patient-centered care delivered within the clinical microsystem, including: 1) Medical assistants’ safe practices, quality of care, and responsiveness to patients; 2) ease of clinic navigation; and 3) the patient-centeredness of care provided by the physician. Descriptive data is provided on these three levels of patient-centeredness within the targeted clinical microsystem. Chi-square analyses were used to signal whether variations by teams within the clinical microsystem were likely to be due to chance or might reflect true differences in patient-centeredness of specific teams. Results Sixty USP visits to 11 Primary Care teams were performed over an eight-month period (mean 5 visits/team; range 2–8). No medical assistants reported detecting an USP during the study period. USPs found the clinic easy to navigate and that teams were functioning well in 60% of visits. In 30% to 47% of visits, the physicians could have been more patient-centered. Medical assistants’ patient safety measures were poor: patient identity was confirmed in only 5% of visits and no USPs observed medical assistants wash their hands. Quality of care was relatively high for vital signs (e.g. blood pressure, weight and height), but low for depression screening, occurring in only 15% of visits. In most visits, medical assistants greeted the patient in a timely fashion but took time to fully explain matters in less than half of the visits and rarely introduced themselves. Physicians tried to help patients navigate the

  19. Multivariate assessment of lipophilicity scales-computational and reversed phase thin-layer chromatographic indices.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Bajusz, Dávid; Rácz, Anita; Šegan, Sandra; Héberger, Károly

    2016-08-01

    Needs for fast, yet reliable means of assessing the lipophilicities of diverse compounds resulted in the development of various in silico and chromatographic approaches that are faster, cheaper, and greener compared to the traditional shake-flask method. However, at present no accepted "standard" approach exists for their comparison and selection of the most appropriate one(s). This is of utmost importance when it comes to the development of new lipophilicity indices, or the assessment of the lipophilicity of newly synthesized compounds. In this study, 50 well-known, diverse compounds of significant pharmaceutical and environmental importance have been selected and examined. Octanol-water partition coefficients have been measured with the shake-flask method for most of them. Their retentions have been studied in typical reversed thin-layer chromatographic systems, involving the most frequently employed stationary phases (octadecyl- and cyano-modified silica), and acetonitrile and methanol as mobile phase constituents. Twelve computationally estimated logP-s and twenty chromatographic indices together with the shake-flask octanol-water partition coefficient have been investigated with classical chemometric approaches-such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Pearson's and Spearman's correlation matrices, as well as novel non-parametric methods: sum of ranking differences (SRD) and generalized pairwise correlation method (GPCM). Novel SRD and GPCM methods have been introduced based on the Comparisons with One VAriable (lipophilicity metric) at a Time (COVAT). For the visualization of COVAT results, a heatmap format was introduced. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to reveal the dominant factors between computational logPs and various chromatographic measures. In consensus-based comparisons, the shake-flask method performed the best, closely followed by computational estimates, while the chromatographic estimates often

  20. Multivariate assessment of lipophilicity scales-computational and reversed phase thin-layer chromatographic indices.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Bajusz, Dávid; Rácz, Anita; Šegan, Sandra; Héberger, Károly

    2016-08-01

    Needs for fast, yet reliable means of assessing the lipophilicities of diverse compounds resulted in the development of various in silico and chromatographic approaches that are faster, cheaper, and greener compared to the traditional shake-flask method. However, at present no accepted "standard" approach exists for their comparison and selection of the most appropriate one(s). This is of utmost importance when it comes to the development of new lipophilicity indices, or the assessment of the lipophilicity of newly synthesized compounds. In this study, 50 well-known, diverse compounds of significant pharmaceutical and environmental importance have been selected and examined. Octanol-water partition coefficients have been measured with the shake-flask method for most of them. Their retentions have been studied in typical reversed thin-layer chromatographic systems, involving the most frequently employed stationary phases (octadecyl- and cyano-modified silica), and acetonitrile and methanol as mobile phase constituents. Twelve computationally estimated logP-s and twenty chromatographic indices together with the shake-flask octanol-water partition coefficient have been investigated with classical chemometric approaches-such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Pearson's and Spearman's correlation matrices, as well as novel non-parametric methods: sum of ranking differences (SRD) and generalized pairwise correlation method (GPCM). Novel SRD and GPCM methods have been introduced based on the Comparisons with One VAriable (lipophilicity metric) at a Time (COVAT). For the visualization of COVAT results, a heatmap format was introduced. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to reveal the dominant factors between computational logPs and various chromatographic measures. In consensus-based comparisons, the shake-flask method performed the best, closely followed by computational estimates, while the chromatographic estimates often

  1. Assessing Knowledge and Attitudes of Diabetes in Zuni Indians Using a Culture-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ghahate, Donica M.; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Faber, Thomas; Shah, Vallabh O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Zuni Pueblo, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, have formed the Zuni Health Initiative (ZHI) engaged in community-based participatory research to plan and implement educational interventions to reduce health disparities. We conducted the first phase of ZHI study and identified barriers to healthcare. We concluded that the burden presented by these barriers ultimately translates into a lack of patient activation and engagement in their health care including for diabetes, effectively hindering adoption of healthy behaviors. Methods Community health representatives (CHRs) led 10 one-hour focus group sessions to elicit information on diabetes knowledge and self-management strategies at which a total of 84 people participated. Audiotapes were translated and transcribed by bilingual ZHI staff. We reduced the text to thematic categories, constructed a coding dictionary and inserted the text into NVivo 9 program. Results The focus groups revealed that despite extensive personal or family experiences with diabetes or complications, participants identified knowledge gaps in the disease progression and disease management. However, we gained insight into how many Zunis conceptualize the etiology of diabetes, risk factors associated with diabetes, sources of knowledge and self-management practices. Conclusion We concluded that many of the Zuni diabetics experience significant impacts on their life when they were diagnosed with diabetes and suffered the plight of stigmatization. We further concluded that developing Zuni culture specific diabetes care should focus on family involvement with continued education. PMID:24919064

  2. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mearns, L. O.; Arritt, R.; Biner, S.; Bukovsky, Melissa; McGinnis, Seth; Sain, Steve; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Flory, Dave; Gutowski, William; Takle, Gene; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; McDaniel, Larry; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, J.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

    2012-09-20

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program is an international effort designed to systematically investigate the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and produce high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) nested within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, with a common domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The program also includes an evaluation component (Phase I) wherein the participating RCMs are nested within 25 years of NCEP/DOE global reanalysis II. The grid spacing of the RCM simulations is 50 km.

  3. David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1993-04-01

    The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

  4. David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1993-04-01

    The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

  5. The Link between Unit Size and Performance Quality Assessments of Teaching and Administrative Faculty: A Case Study of the Ariel University Center of Samaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Soen, Dan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the association between faculty and department size at the Ariel University Center, and assessment scores granted by students to members of the administrative and teaching staff. The main research question relates to any link between unit size and assessment scores. Furthermore, this study seeks an answer to the question of…

  6. How Important Is the Local, Really? A Cross-Institutional Quantitative Assessment of Frequently Asked Questions in Writing Center Exit Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Pam; Northway, Kara; Schonberg, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Much writing center assessment literature focuses on the deep importance of local, institutional context. Still, a tension exists in the field more generally, and in assessment research specifically, between a reliance on local practice and a reliance on shared lore (Driscoll and Perdue; Thompson et al.). This tension can be fruitfully examined…

  7. Assessment of nutritional status in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: a single-center study from Iran.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Reza; Sanavi, Suzan; Izadi-Khah, Akram

    2007-09-01

    Malnutrition is a relatively common problem in patients on hemodialysis (HD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in affected patients. With the aid of subjective global assessment (SGA), a semi-quantitative scale for estimating nutritional status, the malnutrition score (MS), has been developed. The MS incorporates advantages of the SGA while extending the reliability and precision. This study was performed to assess the nutritional status in patients on HD at the Mostafa Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Based on the MS, which consists of seven components--weight change, dietary intake, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, functional capacity, comorbidity, subcutaneous fat, and muscle wasting--we conducted a cross-sectional descriptive-analytic study on 54 HD patients (35 males, 19 females) with age range of 18 to 82 years (mean 44.2 +/- 19.8 years). Each component of the MS has a score from one (normal) to five (very severe). Anthropometric measurements including triceps skin-fold thickness (TSF), mid-arm circumference (MAC) and mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) were taken on all patients. Also, the body mass index and TSF/MAC ratio were calculated. Relevant laboratory parameters were checked. The duration of HD of the study patients ranged between 5 and 36 months (mean 19.5 +/- 1.5 months). Data analysis was carried out using the SPSS, Pearson correlation, 't' test and regression. Based on the MS, 40.7% of patients had malnutrition (mean score 13.8 +/- 2.8). There were statistically significant correlations between TSF (p < 0.01), MAC (p = 0.02), MAMC (p = 0.01), TSF/MAC ratio (p < 0.001), BMI (p = 0.028), serum albumin concentration (p = 0.021) and MS. No statistically significant correlation was found between the MS and urea reduction ratio, protein catabolic rate, age, gender, or duration of dialysis. After 1 year, 20.4% of patients died because of dialysis-related complications. The mortality rate did not show significant correlation with

  8. China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events Prospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Dreyer, Rachel P; Li, Xi; Du, Xue; Downing, Nicholas S; Li, Li; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Feng, Fang; Guan, Wen-Chi; Xu, Xiao; Li, Shu-Xia; Lin, Zhen-Qiu; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the rapid growth in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in China, there is limited information about patients’ experiences after AMI hospitalization, especially on long-term adverse events and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Methods: The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE)-Prospective AMI Study will enroll 4000 consecutive AMI patients from 53 diverse hospitals across China and follow them longitudinally for 12 months to document their treatment, recovery, and outcomes. Details of patients’ medical history, treatment, and in-hospital outcomes are abstracted from medical charts. Comprehensive baseline interviews are being conducted to characterize patient demographics, risk factors, presentation, and healthcare utilization. As part of these interviews, validated instruments are administered to measure PROs, including quality of life, symptoms, mood, cognition, and sexual activity. Follow-up interviews, measuring PROs, medication adherence, risk factor control, and collecting hospitalization events are conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Supporting documents for potential outcomes are collected for adjudication by clinicians at the National Coordinating Center. Blood and urine samples are also obtained at baseline, 1- and 12-month follow-up. In addition, we are conducting a survey of participating hospitals to characterize their organizational characteristics. Conclusion: The China PEACE-Prospective AMI study will be uniquely positioned to generate new information regarding patient's experiences and outcomes after AMI in China and serve as a foundation for quality improvement activities. PMID:26712436

  9. [Assessment of Cyto- and Genotoxicity of Underground Waters from the Far Eastern Center on Radioactive Waste Treatment Site].

    PubMed

    Oudalova, A A; Pyatkova, S V; Geras'kin, S A; Kiselev, S M; Akhromeev, S V

    2016-01-01

    This study has been completed in the frames of activities on the environment assessment in the vicinity of the Far Eastern center (FEC) on radioactive waste treatment (a branch of Fokino, Sysoev Bay). Underground waters collected at the FEC technical site were surveyed both with instrumental techniques and bioassays. Concentrations of some chemicals (ranged to the third hazard category) in the samples collected are over the permitted limits. Activities of 137Cs and 90Sr in waters amount up to 3.8 and 16.2 Bq/l, correspondingly. The integral pollution index is over 1 in all the samples and could amount up to 165. The Allium-test application allows the detection of the sample points where underground waters have an enhanced mutagenic potential. Dependencies between biological effects and pollution levels are analyzed. The findings obtained could be used for the monitoring optimized and decision making on rehabilitation measures to decrease negative influence of the enterprise on the environment.

  10. A review of the content, criterion-related, and construct-related validity of assessment center exercises.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brian J; Kennedy, Colby L; LoPilato, Alexander C; Monahan, Elizabeth L; Lance, Charles E

    2015-07-01

    This study uses meta-analysis and a qualitative review of exercise descriptions to evaluate the content, criterion-related, construct, and incremental validity of 5 commonly used types of assessment center (AC) exercises. First, we present a meta-analysis of the relationship between 5 types of AC exercises with (a) the other exercise types, (b) the 5-factor model of personality, (c) general mental ability (GMA), and (d) relevant criterion variables. All 5 types of exercises were significantly related to criterion variables (ρ = .16-.19). The nomological network analyses suggested that the exercises tend to be modestly associated with GMA, Extraversion and, to a lesser extent, Openness to Experience but largely unrelated to Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Emotional Stability. Finally, despite sparse reporting in primary studies, a content analysis of exercise descriptions yielded some evidence of complexity, ambiguity, interpersonal interaction, and fidelity but not necessarily interdependence. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Evaluating the Discriminatory Power of a Computer-based System for Assessing Penetrating Trauma on Retrospective Multi-Center Data

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Ogunyemi, Omolola I.; Rice, Phillip L.; Clarke, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the discriminatory power of TraumaSCAN-Web, a system for assessing penetrating trauma, using retrospective multi-center case data for gunshot and stab wounds to the thorax and abdomen. Methods 80 gunshot and 114 stab cases were evaluated using TraumaSCAN-Web. Areas under the Receiver Operator Characteristic Curves (AUC) were calculated for each condition modeled in TraumaSCAN-Web. Results Of the 23 conditions modeled by TraumaSCAN-Web, 19 were present in either the gunshot or stab case data. The gunshot AUCs ranged from 0.519 (pericardial tamponade) to 0.975 (right renal injury). The stab AUCs ranged from 0.701 (intestinal injury) to 1.000 (tracheal injury). PMID:16779090

  12. Phase III Technology for All Americans Project: Creating Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards for Technological Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugger, William E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of Phase III of the Technology for All Americans Project are to develop student assessment standards, professional development standards, program standards, and effective leaders. The project is based on the Standards for Technology Literacy, a NASA initiative. (JOW)

  13. Assessment of Perceived Health Status in Hypertensive and Diabetes Mellitus Patients at Primary Health Centers in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mandhari, Ahmed; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Hasni, Alya; Al-Sumri, Nada

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the impact of diabetes mellitus and hypertension as well as other demographic and clinical characteristics on perceived health status in primary health centers in Oman. Methods: In a cross-sectional retrospective study, 450 patients (aged ≥ 18 years) seen at six primary health centers in Wilayat A’ Seeb in the Muscat region, Oman, were selected. Perceived health status of the physical (PSCC) and mental (MSCC) components of quality-of-life were assessed using the 12-item short form health survey (SF-12). The analyses were performed using univariate statistical techniques. Results: The mean age of the participants was 54 ± 12 years and they were mostly female (62%). The presence of both diabetes mellitus and hypertension was associated with lower physical scores compared to those with diabetes alone (p = 0.001) but only marginally lower than those with hypertension alone (p = 0.066). No significant differences were found across the disease groups in mental scores (P = 0.578). Age was negatively correlated (p < 0.001) but male gender (P < 0.001), married (p < 0.001), literate (p < 0.001) and higher income (p = 0.002) were all associated with higher physical scores. Moreover, longer disease duration was associated with lower physical scores (p < 0.001). With regards to the mental status, male (p = 0.005), marriage (P = 0.017) and higher income (p < 0.001) were associated with higher mental scores. Polypharmacy was associated with lower physical (p < 0.001) and mental (p = 0.005) scores. Conclusions: The presence of both diseases was associated with lower physical scores of perceived health status. Health status was also affected by various demographic and clinical characteristics. However, the results should be interpreted in light of the study's limitations. PMID:22174966

  14. Using Media Centers in Education. The NATUL Project. Teacher Use of Library Media Centers in the Future: A National Needs Assessment by Use of Delphi-Fault Tree Analysis for Instructional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rulon Kent

    This study was designed to arrive at a possible consensus of expert opinions as related to teacher use of library media centers in American public education, and to analyze the essential teacher skills and knowledge suggested by the experts through this systematic methodology. This provided a national needs assessment to serve as a basis for…

  15. Assessment of cancer care in Indian elderly cancer patients: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Shahi, UP

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study aimed to assess the profiles of elderly cancer patient to optimize cancer care in Indian setup. The profiles have been compared with that of younger patients in terms of epidemiological, clinical data, co-morbidity, treatment, toxicity, clinical outcome, and survival pattern. Materials and Methods: The study comprised cancer patients attending radiotherapy outdoor (November 2005 to June 2006). There were 104 patients of age ≥60 years (elderly group) and 121 patients of 45-59 years (younger group). Results: Elderly group had median age 65 years (60-88 years) with M:F = 1:1. The younger group had median age 50 years (45-59 years) with M:F = 1:2. Elderly had higher proportion of gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tract malignancies. Younger group had higher proportion of breast, lymphoma, and brain tumor. 13% had co-morbidity, 50% received treatment, 27% were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery, and two-third of these cases belong to elderly group. Majority tolerated treatment well. 10% had significant grade of toxicity. 57% of elderly patients did not accept and one-fourth of all cases did not complete the prescribed treatment. 88% cases were responders of which 70% showed complete response. There were no differences between two groups. At 12 months 35% of treated patients came for follow-up. At first 12 months, 60-70% were alive without disease. Conclusion: There were differences between two groups in terms of performance status, treatment acceptance, and treatment modality prescribed. Elderly patients deserve same opportunity as younger patients for treatment and survival options from the oncologist. PMID:24455630

  16. Identification and initial assessment of candidate BWR late-phase in-vessel accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.

    1991-04-15

    Work sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and perform preliminary assessments of candidate BWR (boiling water reactor) in-vessel accident management strategies was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during fiscal year 1990. Mitigative strategies for containment events have been the subject of a companion study at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The focus of this Oak Ridge effort was the development of new strategies for mitigation of the late phase events, that is, the events that would occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage. The work began with an investigation of the current status of BWR in-vessel accident management procedures and proceeded through a preliminary evaluation of several candidate new strategies. The steps leading to the identification of the candidate strategies are described. The four new candidate late-phase (in-vessel) accident mitigation strategies identified by this study and discussed in the report are: (1) keep the reactor vessel depressurized; (2) restore injection in a controlled manner; (3) inject boron if control blade damage has occurred; and (4) containment flooding to maintain core and structural debris in-vessel. Additional assessments of these strategies are proposed.

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of Vehicle Lightweighting: Novel Mathematical Methods to Estimate Use-Phase Fuel Consumption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Wallington, Timothy J; Sullivan, John L; Keoleian, Gregory A

    2015-08-18

    Lightweighting is a key strategy to improve vehicle fuel economy. Assessing the life-cycle benefits of lightweighting requires a quantitative description of the use-phase fuel consumption reduction associated with mass reduction. We present novel methods of estimating mass-induced fuel consumption (MIF) and fuel reduction values (FRVs) from fuel economy and dynamometer test data in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database. In the past, FRVs have been measured using experimental testing. We demonstrate that FRVs can be mathematically derived from coast down coefficients in the EPA vehicle test database avoiding additional testing. MIF and FRVs calculated for 83 different 2013 MY vehicles are in the ranges 0.22-0.43 and 0.15-0.26 L/(100 km 100 kg), respectively, and increase to 0.27-0.53 L/(100 km 100 kg) with powertrain resizing to retain equivalent vehicle performance. We show how use-phase fuel consumption can be estimated using MIF and FRVs in life cycle assessments (LCAs) of vehicle lightweighting from total vehicle and vehicle component perspectives with, and without, powertrain resizing. The mass-induced fuel consumption model is illustrated by estimating lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission benefits from lightweighting a grille opening reinforcement component using magnesium or carbon fiber composite for 83 different vehicle models. PMID:26168234

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of Vehicle Lightweighting: Novel Mathematical Methods to Estimate Use-Phase Fuel Consumption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Wallington, Timothy J; Sullivan, John L; Keoleian, Gregory A

    2015-08-18

    Lightweighting is a key strategy to improve vehicle fuel economy. Assessing the life-cycle benefits of lightweighting requires a quantitative description of the use-phase fuel consumption reduction associated with mass reduction. We present novel methods of estimating mass-induced fuel consumption (MIF) and fuel reduction values (FRVs) from fuel economy and dynamometer test data in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database. In the past, FRVs have been measured using experimental testing. We demonstrate that FRVs can be mathematically derived from coast down coefficients in the EPA vehicle test database avoiding additional testing. MIF and FRVs calculated for 83 different 2013 MY vehicles are in the ranges 0.22-0.43 and 0.15-0.26 L/(100 km 100 kg), respectively, and increase to 0.27-0.53 L/(100 km 100 kg) with powertrain resizing to retain equivalent vehicle performance. We show how use-phase fuel consumption can be estimated using MIF and FRVs in life cycle assessments (LCAs) of vehicle lightweighting from total vehicle and vehicle component perspectives with, and without, powertrain resizing. The mass-induced fuel consumption model is illustrated by estimating lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission benefits from lightweighting a grille opening reinforcement component using magnesium or carbon fiber composite for 83 different vehicle models.

  19. Ion-beam-induced magnetic and structural phase transformation of Ni-stabilized face-centered-cubic Fe films on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gloss, Jonas; Shah Zaman, Sameena; Jonner, Jakub; Novotny, Zbynek; Schmid, Michael; Varga, Peter; Urbánek, Michal

    2013-12-23

    Metastable face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe/Cu(100) thin films are good candidates for ion-beam magnetic patterning due to their magnetic transformation upon ion-beam irradiation. However, pure fcc Fe films undergo spontaneous transformation when their thickness exceeds 10 ML. This limit can be extended to approximately 22 ML by deposition of Fe at increased CO background pressures. We show that much thicker films can be grown by alloying with Ni for stabilizing the fcc γ phase. The amount of Ni necessary to stabilize nonmagnetic, transformable fcc Fe films in dependence on the residual background pressure during the deposition is determined and a phase diagram revealing the transformable region is presented.

  20. The role of health impact assessment in Phase V of the Healthy Cities European Network.

    PubMed

    Simos, Jean; Spanswick, Lucy; Palmer, Nicola; Christie, Derek

    2015-06-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a prospective decision-making aid tool that aims to improve the quality of policies, programmes or projects through recommendations that promote health. It identifies how and through which pathways a decision can impact a wide range of health determinants and seeks to define the distribution of effects within populations, thereby raising the issue of equity. HIA was introduced to the WHO European Healthy Cities Network as one of its four core themes during the Phase IV (2004-08). Here we present an evaluation of the use of HIA during Phase V (2009-13), where HIA was linked with the overarching theme of health and health equity in all local policies and a requirement regarding capacity building. The evaluation was based on 10 case studies contributed by 9 Healthy Cities in five countries (France, Hungary, Italy, Spain and the UK). A Realist Evaluation framework was used to collect and aggregate data obtained through three methods: an HIA factors analysis, a case-study template analysis using Nvivo software and a detailed questionnaire. The main conclusion is that HIA significantly helps promote Health in All Policies (HiAP) and sustainability in Healthy Cities. It is recommended that all Healthy City candidates to Phase VI (2014-18) of the WHO Healthy Cities European Network effectively adopt HIA and HiAP.

  1. Culture-centered approaches: the relevance of assessing emotional health for Latinos with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Jeannie Belinda; Mezuk, Briana; Duran, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Within Latino culture, there is a belief that strong emotions can cause diabetes. Because of this belief and evidence regarding the bi-directional relationship between depression and diabetes, the objectives of this study were to determine if medical doctors are asking Latinos with diabetes about emotional problems and to assess attitudes toward professional help for emotional problems. Research design and methods Data come from the nationally representative National Latino and Asian American Study and the National Comorbidity Survey Replication study. Only Latino subsamples were included (n=3076). A smaller subsample with complete data (n=2568) was used for the inquiry outcome variable. Weighted χ2 analysis and logistic regression were conducted to determine the likelihood of being asked about emotional problems and attitudes toward professional help. Results Latinos with mood disorders or anxiety (MD/AX; OR 2.84, 95% CI 2.02 to 4.00), diabetes only (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.69), and co-occurring diabetes and MD/AX (OR 6.67, 95% CI 2.33 to 19.04) were more likely to be asked about emotional problems, relative to Latinos without diabetes or MD/AX. A minority of respondents with diabetes (32%) were asked about emotional problems. Respondents with diabetes only were more likely to feel comfortable talking to a professional for personal problems compared with those without diabetes or MD/AX (OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.99 to 2.09). Although the relationship between having diabetes and feeling comfortable taking to a professional is not statistically significant, z-test statistics indicate that having diabetes influences attitudes about discussing emotional problems. Conclusions Among Latinos, having diabetes is associated with greater likelihood of being asked about emotional problems and feeling comfortable talking to a professional about personal problems. Consistent with the cultural relevance of emotions as a cause of diabetes, asking about emotional problems

  2. DOSE ASSESSMENT OF THE FINAL INVENTORIES IN CENTER SLIT TRENCHES ONE THROUGH FIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, L.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.

    2011-05-02

    In response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), this study evaluates the performance of waste disposed in Slit Trenches 1-5 by calculating exposure doses and concentrations. As of 8/19/2010, Slit Trenches 1-5 have been filled and are closed to future waste disposal in support of an ARRA-funded interim operational cover project. Slit Trenches 6 and 7 are currently in operation and are not addressed within this analysis. Their current inventory limits are based on the 2008 SA and are not being impacted by this study. This analysis considers the location and the timing of waste disposal in Slit Trenches 1-5 throughout their operational life. In addition, the following improvements to the modeling approach have been incorporated into this analysis: (1) Final waste inventories from WITS are used for the base case analysis where variance in the reported final disposal inventories is addressed through a sensitivity analysis; (2) Updated K{sub d} values are used; (3) Area percentages of non-crushable containers are used in the analysis to determine expected infiltration flows for cases that consider collapse of these containers; (4) An updated representation of ETF carbon column vessels disposed in SLIT3-Unit F is used. Preliminary analyses indicated a problem meeting the groundwater beta-gamma dose limit because of high H-3 and I-129 release from the ETF vessels. The updated model uses results from a recent structural analysis of the ETF vessels indicating that water does not penetrate the vessels for about 130 years and that the vessels remain structurally intact throughout the 1130-year period of assessment; and (5) Operational covers are included with revised installation dates and sets of Slit Trenches that have a common cover. With the exception of the modeling enhancements noted above, the analysis follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA (WSRC, 2008) and the 2008 SA (Collard and Hamm, 2008). Infiltration flows through the vadose zone are

  3. Assessment of Autonomic Function by Phase Rectification of RRInterval Histogram Analysis in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasari-Junior, Olivassé; Benchimol-Barbosa, Paulo Roberto; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic Chagas disease (ChD), impairment of cardiac autonomic function bears prognostic implications. Phase‑rectification of RR-interval series isolates the sympathetic, acceleration phase (AC) and parasympathetic, deceleration phase (DC) influences on cardiac autonomic modulation. Objective This study investigated heart rate variability (HRV) as a function of RR-interval to assess autonomic function in healthy and ChD subjects. Methods Control (n = 20) and ChD (n = 20) groups were studied. All underwent 60-min head-up tilt table test under ECG recording. Histogram of RR-interval series was calculated, with 100 ms class, ranging from 600–1100 ms. In each class, mean RR-intervals (MNN) and root-mean-squared difference (RMSNN) of consecutive normal RR-intervals that suited a particular class were calculated. Average of all RMSNN values in each class was analyzed as function of MNN, in the whole series (RMSNNT), and in AC (RMSNNAC) and DC (RMSNNDC) phases. Slopes of linear regression lines were compared between groups using Student t-test. Correlation coefficients were tested before comparisons. RMSNN was log-transformed. (α < 0.05). Results Correlation coefficient was significant in all regressions (p < 0.05). In the control group, RMSNNT, RMSNNAC, and RMSNNDC significantly increased linearly with MNN (p < 0.05). In ChD, only RMSNNAC showed significant increase as a function of MNN, whereas RMSNNT and RMSNNDC did not. Conclusion HRV increases in proportion with the RR-interval in healthy subjects. This behavior is lost in ChD, particularly in the DC phase, indicating cardiac vagal incompetence. PMID:26131700

  4. A Short Assessment of Select Remediation Issues at the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2007-06-01

    At the invitation of the National Academies, Roy Gephart traveled to Russia with an eight-member U.S. team during June, 2008 to participate in a workshop hosted by the National Academies and the Russian Academy of Sciences on radiation contamination and remediation issues in the former Soviet Union. Cleanup problems were assessed by the American participants for six Russian sites: Kurchatov Institute, Lakes 10 and 11 at Mayak, Andreev Bay, Krasnokamensk Mining Enterprise (Siberia), Almaz Mining Enterprise (North Caucasus), and one site for testing peaceful nuclear explosions. Roy lead the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute review session and wrote an assessment of key cleanup issues. Kurchatov is the leading institute in the Former Soviet Union devoted to military and civilian nuclear programs. Founded in 1943 in the outskirts of Moscow, this 100 hectare site of nearly undeveloped, prime real estate is now surrounded by densely populated urban and business districts. Today there are growing concerns over the public safety and environmental security of the site resulting from increasingly obsolete nuclear facilities and a legacy of inadequate waste management practices that resulted in contaminant releases and challenging remediation problems. In addition, there is growing concern over the presence of nuclear facilities within urban areas creating potential targets for terrorist attacks.

  5. Breast cancer tumor size assessment with mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging at a community based multidisciplinary breast center.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Sarah Ines; Scholle, Max; Buckmaster, Jennifer; Paley, Robert Hunter; Kowdley, Gopal Chandru

    2012-04-01

    Paramount to staging and patient management is accurately measuring the size of invasive breast cancers. We assessed the accuracy of mammography (MG), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at our community-based hospital in which multiple radiologists and imaging machines are used in the care of our patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 277 patients seen at our breast center from 2009 to 2010. We tabulated MG, US, and MRI-reported tumor sizes in 161 women with pathology-proven invasive breast cancer and compared the preoperative size measurements with final pathologic tumor size. In the 161 patients, 169 lesions were identified. Imaging using all three modalities was available in 47 patients. When compared with final pathology, MRI had a correlation of r = 0.75 to mean tumor size as compared with US (r = 0.67) and MG (r = 0.76). Mean tumor size was 1.90 cm by MG, 1.87 cm by US, 2.40 cm by MRI, and 2.19 cm by pathology. We were able to achieve an excellent correlation of pathologic tumor size to preoperative imaging. The absolute differences in size between the modalities were small. MRI, in select patients, added to the assessment of tumor size based on US and MG. PMID:22472402

  6. Assessment of highway particulate impacts: Phase 1, Task A -- Problem evaluation. Final report, 1991--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, W.; Bradow, R.; Gertler, A.

    1999-09-01

    This report provides an assessment of highway particulate impacts. It evaluates the existing state of knowledge related to: (1) what the sources of the particulates are, especially those specific to highways; (2) methods of assessing particulate impacts from highway sources; (3) relationship between highway derived particulates and other particulate sources; (4) particulate instrumentation, measurement, and monitoring methods; (5) assessment potential public health risks; and (6) control strategies for mitigating highway particulate impacts. Sources evaluated included diesel and spark ignition engine emissions, tire and brake wear, resuspensions from road sanding and salting operations, and unpaved roads. Model evaluated included dispersion, source/receptor, and emissions modeling. Based on this information, four sources of highway particulates were determined to need additional study in order to more completely understand the highway particulate source problem. These area were: paved road resuspension, dust suspension resulting from road sanding and salting operations, diesel engine emissions, and unpaved roads. Although unpaved roads were considered outside of the scope of the work of this contract, the other three areas were targeted for additional field work as part of Phase 1.

  7. Lead is not off center in PbTe: the importance of r-space phase information in extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keiber, T; Bridges, F; Sales, B C

    2013-08-30

    PbTe is a well-known thermoelectric material. Recent x-ray total scattering studies suggest that Pb moves off center along 100 in PbTe, by ∼0.2  Å at 300 K, producing a split Pb-Te pair distribution. We present an extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) study of PbTe (and Tl doped PbTe) to determine if Pb or Te is off center. EXAFS provides sensitive r- or k-space phase information which can differentiate between a split peak for the Pb-Te distribution (indicative of off-center Pb) and a thermally broadened peak. We find no evidence for a split peak for Pb-Te or Te-Pb. At 300 K, the vibration amplitude for Pb-Te (or Te-Pb) is large; this thermally induced disorder is indicative of weak bonds, and the large disorder is consistent with the low thermal conductivity at 300 K. We also find evidence of an anharmonic potential for the nearest Pb-Te bonds, consistent with the overall anharmonicity found for the phonon modes. This effect is modeled by a "skew" factor (C3) which significantly improves the fit of the Pb-Te and Te-Pb peaks for the high temperature EXAFS data; C3 becomes significant above approximately 150-200 K. The consequences of these results will be discussed.

  8. The second phase in creating the cardiac center for the next generation: beyond structure to process improvement.

    PubMed

    Woods, J

    2001-01-01

    The third generation cardiac institute will build on the successes of the past in structuring the service line, re-organizing to assimilate specialist interests, and re-positioning to expand cardiac services into cardiovascular services. To meet the challenges of an increasingly competitive marketplace and complex delivery system, the focus for this new model will shift away from improved structures, and toward improved processes. This shift will require a sound methodology for statistically measuring and sustaining process changes related to the optimization of cardiovascular care. In recent years, GE Medical Systems has successfully applied Six Sigma methodologies to enable cardiac centers to control key clinical and market development processes through its DMADV, DMAIC and Change Acceleration processes. Data indicates Six Sigma is having a positive impact within organizations across the United States, and when appropriately implemented, this approach can serve as a solid foundation for building the next generation cardiac institute. PMID:11765624

  9. Assessing the predictive value of the rodent neurofunctional assessment for commonly reported adverse events in phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mead, Andy N; Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Chapman, Kathryn; Ewart, Lorna; Giarola, Alessandra; Jackson, Samuel J; Jarvis, Philip; Jordaan, Pierre; Redfern, Will; Traebert, Martin; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Vargas, Hugo M

    2016-10-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS)-related safety concerns are major contributors to delays and failure during the development of new candidate drugs (CDs). CNS-related safety data on 141 small molecule CDs from five pharmaceutical companies were analyzed to identify the concordance between rodent multi-parameter neurofunctional assessments (Functional Observational Battery: FOB, or Irwin test: IT) and the five most common adverse events (AEs) in Phase I clinical trials, namely headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue/somnolence and pain. In the context of this analysis, the FOB/IT did not predict the occurrence of these particular AEs in man. For AEs such as headache, nausea, dizziness and pain the results are perhaps unsurprising, as the FOB/IT were not originally designed to predict these AEs. More unexpected was that the FOB/IT are not adequate for predicting 'somnolence/fatigue' nonclinically. In drug development, these five most prevalent AEs are rarely responsible for delaying or stopping further progression of CDs. More serious AEs that might stop CD development occurred at too low an incidence rate in our clinical dataset to enable translational analysis.

  10. A Tale of Two Community Networks Program Centers: Operationalizing and Assessing CBPR Principles and Evaluating Partnership Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Johnson, Cassandra; Allen, Michele L.; Colditz, Graham A.; Hurtado, G. Ali; Davey, Cynthia S.; Sanders Thompson, Vetta L.; Drake, Bettina F.; Svetaz, Maria Veronica; Rosas-Lee, Maira; Goodman, Melody S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community Networks Program (CNP) centers are required to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach within their specific priority communities. Not all communities are the same and unique contextual factors and collaborators’ priorities shape each CBPR partnership. There are also established CBPR and community engagement (CE) principles shown to lead to quality CBPR in any community. However, operationalizing and assessing CBPR principles and partnership outcomes to understand the conditions and processes in CBPR that lead to achieving program and project level goals is relatively new in the science of CBPR. Objectives We sought to describe the development of surveys on adherence to and implementation of CBPR/CE principles at two CNP centers and examine commonalities and differences in program- versus project-level CBPR evaluation. Methods A case study about the development and application of CBPR/CE principles for the Missouri CNP, Program for the Elimination of Cancer Disparities, and Minnesota CNP, Padres Informados/Jovenes Preparados, surveys was conducted to compare project versus program operationalization of principles. Survey participant demographics were provided by CNP. Specific domains found in CBPR/CE principles were identified and organized under an existing framework to establish a common ground. Operational definitions and the number of survey items were provided for each domain by CNP. Conclusion There are distinct differences in operational definitions of CBPR/CE principles at the program and project levels of evaluation. However, commonalities support further research to develop standards for CBPR evaluation across partnerships and at the program and project levels. PMID:26213405

  11. Deep level transient spectroscopy assessment of silicon contamination in AlGaAs layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, E.; Sanchez, F.; Muñoz, E.; Gibart, P.; Powell, A.; Roberts, J. S.

    1995-08-01

    A systematic silicon contamination has been detected by deep level transient spectroscopy in undoped and n-type doped (Te, Se, Sn) AlGaAs layers, grown in two different metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactors. DX center generation by substitutional donors, with very specific capture and emission thermal barriers (fingerprints), is the key to unambiguously identifying their presence, with detection limits well below the standard secondary ion mass spectroscopy capability. We comment on the potential sources of Si contamination (most common in this epitaxial technique), and on the relevance of such contamination to interpreting correctly experimental data related to the microscopic structure of DX centers.

  12. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  13. Comparison of solid and liquid-phase bioassays using ecoscores to assess contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Martínez Aldaya, Maite; Damidot, Denis

    2011-10-01

    Bioassays on aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils were compared, belonging to a wide array of trophic and response levels and using ecoscores for evaluating ecotoxicological and genotoxicological endpoints. The method was applied to four coke factory soils contaminated mainly with PAHs, but also to a lesser extent by heavy metals and cyanides. Aquatic bioassays do not differ from terrestrial bioassays when scaling soils according to toxicity but they are complementary from the viewpoint of ecological relevance. Both aquatic and terrestrial endpoints are strongly correlated with concentrations of 3-ring PAHs. This evaluation procedure allows us to propose a cost-effective battery which embraces a wide array of test organisms and response levels: it includes two rapid bioassays (Microtox(®) and springtail avoidance), a micronucleus test and three bioassays of a longer duration (algal growth, lettuce germination and springtail reproduction). This battery can be recommended for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. PMID:21570756

  14. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern

  15. Large deployable antenna program. Phase 1: Technology assessment and mission architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Craig A.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1991-01-01

    The program was initiated to investigate the availability of critical large deployable antenna technologies which would enable microwave remote sensing missions from geostationary orbits as required for Mission to Planet Earth. Program goals for the large antenna were: 40-meter diameter, offset-fed paraboloid, and surface precision of 0.1 mm rms. Phase 1 goals were: to review the state-of-the-art for large, precise, wide-scanning radiometers up to 60 GHz; to assess critical technologies necessary for selected concepts; to develop mission architecture for these concepts; and to evaluate generic technologies to support the large deployable reflectors necessary for these missions. Selected results of the study show that deployable reflectors using furlable segments are limited by surface precision goals to 12 meters in diameter, current launch vehicles can place in geostationary only a 20-meter class antenna, and conceptual designs using stiff reflectors are possible with areal densities of 2.4 deg/sq m.

  16. Phase change material applications in buildings: an environmental assessment for some Spanish climate severities.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Usón, Alfonso; Ferreira, Germán; López-Sabirón, Ana M; Mainar-Toledo, M D; Zabalza Bribián, Ignacio

    2013-02-01

    This work proposes an environmental analysis based on the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. LCA was applied to determine if energy savings are large enough to balance the environmental impact caused during phase change material (PCM) manufacture and its installation on tiles. Inputs and outputs of each management stage have been defined and the inventory emissions were calculated by SIMAPRO v 7.3.2. Emissions were classified into several impact categories; climate change, human toxicity, acidification, ozone depletion, particulate matter formation and eutrophication. Three commercial PCMs, evaluated using five different Spanish weather climates, were studied to explore a wide range of conditions. The main results conclude that the use of PCM can reduce the overall energy consumption and the environmental impacts. This reduction is strongly influenced by the climate conditions and the PCM introduced. PMID:23262321

  17. An Assessment of the Technical Readiness of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process (VPCAR) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This poster provides an assessment of the technical readiness of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process (VPCAR). The VPCAR technology is a fully regenerative water recycling technology designed specifically for applications such as a near term Mars exploration mission. The VPCAR technology is a highly integrated distillation/catalytic oxidation based water processor. It is designed to accept a combined wastewater stream (urine, condensate, and hygiene) and produces potable water in a single process step which requires -no regularly scheduled re-supply or maintenance for a 3 year mission. The technology is designed to be modular and to fit into a volume comparable to a single International Space Station Rack (when sized for a crew of 6). This poster provides a description of the VPCAR technology and a summary of the current performance of the technology. Also provided are the results of two separate NASA sponsored system trade studies which investigated the potential payback of further development of the VPCAR technology.

  18. Assessment of uterine and umbilical artery velocimetry during latent and active phases of normal labor.

    PubMed

    Meizner, I; Levy, A; Katz, M

    1993-01-01

    Twenty healthy parturients in active labor were monitored with continuous wave Doppler to assess changes in uterine and umbilical velocity waveforms. Each case served as its own control. Tracings of fetal heart rate monitoring were normal in all patients. The analysis of the waveforms included the peak systolic/end-diastolic ratio for the umbilical circulation (umbilical artery), and the systolic minus diastolic velocity divided by systolic velocity (resistance index) was used as an indication of downstream resistance in the uterine arteries. Recordings from umbilical, left and right uterine arteries were obtained during various stages of progression of labor as indicated by Friedman's curve. In latent phase labor with intact membranes, as well as in three consecutive measurements throughout active phase labor until delivery, umbilical artery systolic/end-diastolic ratios, before, during and after contraction did not change--2.2 +/- 0.5, 2.3 +/- 0.6, 2.2 +/- 0.3 and 2.5 +/- 0.7 (NS). No changes in the resistance to flow in the left and right uterine arteries were recorded during both latent and active phases of labor--0.53 +/- 0.09, 0.52 +/- 0.1, 0.5 +/- 0.07, 0.56 +/- 0.07 (NS) and 0.59 +/- 0.1, 0.57 +/- 0.1, 0.56 +/- 0.1, 0.59 +/- 0.08 (NS), respectively. These results suggest stability of the fetal cardiovascular system ensuring continuous constant gas exchange process during labor, enabling most term fetuses to tolerate labor to a degree where minimal if any metabolic changes occur.

  19. An assessment of the cost of microwave sintering ceramic tiles for armor applications: Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report documents the findings of the second phase of work to assess the costs of microwave sintering ceramic tiles for armor applications. In the first phase of work, the cost of microwave sintering and preliminary estimates of the total cost of microwave-sintered tiles under two microwave frequencies (i.e., 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz) for alumina and silicon carbide materials were reported. The second phase of work extends to the previous work to include all pre- and post-sintering manufacturing steps and considers process and cost variations in these steps that may result from the adoption of microwave sintering. Two separate models were developed for two different materials. As before, a process-cost approach was utilized within a spreadsheet environment. When compared to conventional sintering, the manufacturing of microwave-sintered alumina armor tiles will require an additional binder removal step prior to microwave sintering. The base-case cost of microwave-sintered alumina tiles is estimated to be $46.80/part and $50.50/part, given the use of 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz microwave power sources, respectively. In the case of microwave sintering of silicon carbide armor tiles, the material preparation step will be significantly different from conventional sintering. Instead of a binder removal step, there will be a green machining step. The base-case cost of microwave-sintered silicon carbide tiles is estimated to be $324.50/part and $327.50/part for 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz microwave power sources, respectively--compared to $235/part for conventionally-sintered tiles. Several sensitivity analyses of the impacts of variations in key economic and technical parameters on the costs of microwave-sintered tiles were conducted. Those analyses indicate that costs are quite sensitive to changes in the quantity of energy required during sintering.

  20. Management assessment of tank waste remediation system contractor readiness to proceed with phase 1B privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, J.O.

    1998-01-09

    This Management Assessment of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Contractor Readiness to Proceed With Phase 1B Privatization documents the processes used to determine readiness to proceed with tank waste treatment technologies from private industry, now known as TWRS privatization. An overall systems approach was applied to develop action plans to support the retrieval and disposal mission of the TWRS Project. The systems and infrastructure required to support the mission are known. Required systems are either in place or plans have been developed to ensure they exist when needed. Since October 1996 a robust system engineering approach to establishing integrated Technical Baselines, work breakdown structures, tank farms organizational structure and configurations, work scope, and costs has become part of the culture within the TWRS Project. An analysis of the programmatic, management, and technical activities necessary to declare readiness to proceed with execution of the mission demonstrates that the system, personnel, and hardware will be on-line and ready to support the private contractors. The systems approach included defining the retrieval and disposal mission requirements and evaluating the readiness of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team to support initiation of waste processing by the private contractors in June 2002 and to receive immobilized waste shortly thereafter. The Phase 1 feed delivery requirements from the private contractor Requests for Proposal were reviewed. Transfer piping routes were mapped, existing systems were evaluated, and upgrade requirements were defined.

  1. Establishing proof of mechanism: Assessing target modulation in early-phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; Do, Khanh; Coyne, Geraldine O'Sullivan; Chen, Alice; Ji, Jiuping; Rubinstein, Larry; Doroshow, James H

    2016-08-01

    Since modulation of the putative target and the observed anti-tumor effects form the basis for the clinical development of a molecularly targeted therapy, early-phase clinical trials should be designed to demonstrate proof-of-mechanism in tissues of interest. In addition to establishing safety and the maximum tolerated dose, first-in-human clinical trials should be designed to demonstrate target modulation, define the proposed mechanism of action, and evaluate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships of a new anti-cancer agent. Assessing target modulation in paired tumor biopsies in patients with solid tumors presents multiple challenges, including procedural issues such as patient safety, ethical considerations, and logistics of sample handling and processing. In addition, the availability of qualified biomarker assay technologies, resources to conduct such studies, and real-time analysis of samples to detect inter-species differences that may affect the determination of optimal sampling time points must be taken into account. This article provides a discussion of the challenges that confront the practical application of pharmacodynamic studies in early-phase clinical trials of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27663476

  2. Assessment of methane biodegradation kinetics in two-phase partitioning bioreactors by pulse respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Alberto; López, Juan C; Figueroa-González, Ivonne; Muñoz, Raúl; Quijano, Guillermo

    2014-12-15

    Biological methane biodegradation is a promising treatment alternative when the methane produced in waste management facilities cannot be used for energy generation. Two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs), provided with a non-aqueous phase (NAP) with high affinity for the target pollutant, are particularly suitable for the treatment of poorly water-soluble compounds such as methane. Nevertheless, little is known about the influence of the presence of the NAP on the resulting biodegradation kinetics in TPPBs. In this study, an experimental framework based on the in situ pulse respirometry technique was developed to assess the impact of NAP addition on the methane biodegradation kinetics using Methylosinus sporium as a model methane-degrading microorganism. A comprehensive mass transfer characterization was performed in order to avoid mass transfer limiting scenarios and ensure a correct kinetic parameter characterization. The presence of the NAP mediated significant changes in the apparent kinetic parameters of M. sporium during methane biodegradation, with variations of 60, 120, and 150% in the maximum oxygen uptake rate, half-saturation constant and maximum specific growth rate, respectively, compared with the intrinsic kinetic parameters retrieved from a control without NAP. These significant changes in the kinetic parameters mediated by the NAP must be considered for the design, operation and modeling of TPPBs devoted to air pollution control.

  3. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Umesh K. Saxena

    2009-06-04

    This project involved providing technical assistance to help small and medium size industries in Wisconsin to reduce operating costs by managing energy, waste and productivity. The project helped save 525 companies on average about $40,000 per year. Under the direction of Dr. Saxena, more than twenty undergraduate and ten graduate students were trained in energy, waste, and productivity management.

  4. Definition of a Novel Pathway Centered on Lysophosphatidic Acid To Recruit Monocytes during the Resolution Phase of Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gobbetti, Thomas; Kusters, Dennis H. M.; Reutelingsperger, Christopher P.; Flower, Roderick J.

    2015-01-01

    Blood-derived monocytes remove apoptotic cells and terminate inflammation in settings as diverse as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. They express high levels of the proresolving receptor ALX/FPR2, which is activated by the protein annexin A1 (ANXA1), found in high abundance in inflammatory exudates. Using primary human blood monocytes from healthy donors, we identified ANXA1 as a potent CD14+CD16− monocyte chemoattractant, acting via ALX/FPR2. Downstream signaling pathway analysis revealed the p38 MAPK-mediated activation of a calcium independent phospholipase A2 with resultant synthesis of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) driving chemotaxis through LPA receptor 2 and actin cytoskeletal mobilization. In vivo experiments confirmed ANXA1 as an independent phospholipase A2–dependent monocyte recruiter; congruently, monocyte recruitment was significantly impaired during ongoing zymosan-induced inflammation in AnxA1−/− or alx/fpr2/3−/− mice. Using a dorsal air-pouch model, passive transfer of apoptotic neutrophils between AnxA1−/− and wild-type mice identified effete neutrophils as the primary source of soluble ANXA1 in inflammatory resolution. Together, these data elucidate a novel proresolving network centered on ANXA1 and LPA generation and identify previously unappreciated determinants of ANXA1 and ALX/FPR2 signaling in monocytes. PMID:26101324

  5. Definition of a Novel Pathway Centered on Lysophosphatidic Acid To Recruit Monocytes during the Resolution Phase of Tissue Inflammation.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Simon; Gobbetti, Thomas; Kusters, Dennis H M; Reutelingsperger, Christopher P; Flower, Roderick J; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-08-01

    Blood-derived monocytes remove apoptotic cells and terminate inflammation in settings as diverse as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. They express high levels of the proresolving receptor ALX/FPR2, which is activated by the protein annexin A1 (ANXA1), found in high abundance in inflammatory exudates. Using primary human blood monocytes from healthy donors, we identified ANXA1 as a potent CD14(+)CD16(-) monocyte chemoattractant, acting via ALX/FPR2. Downstream signaling pathway analysis revealed the p38 MAPK-mediated activation of a calcium independent phospholipase A2 with resultant synthesis of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) driving chemotaxis through LPA receptor 2 and actin cytoskeletal mobilization. In vivo experiments confirmed ANXA1 as an independent phospholipase A2-dependent monocyte recruiter; congruently, monocyte recruitment was significantly impaired during ongoing zymosan-induced inflammation in AnxA1(-/-) or alx/fpr2/3(-/-) mice. Using a dorsal air-pouch model, passive transfer of apoptotic neutrophils between AnxA1(-/-) and wild-type mice identified effete neutrophils as the primary source of soluble ANXA1 in inflammatory resolution. Together, these data elucidate a novel proresolving network centered on ANXA1 and LPA generation and identify previously unappreciated determinants of ANXA1 and ALX/FPR2 signaling in monocytes.

  6. Lack of cardiovascular risk assessment in inflammatory arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Teo, Michelle; Fung, Daisy

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate cardiovascular risk assessment at a Canadian rheumatology center and describe the cardiovascular risk of inflammatory arthritis (IA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients using the Framingham risk score. A retrospective chart review of 504 patients attending nine rheumatology practices at the University of Alberta Hospital was performed. A pre-specified case report form detailed patient demographics, cardiac risk factors, variables for the Framingham 2008 score, disease activity, and medication use. In this group of 504 patients, 64 (12.7%) had SLE (male (M) to female (F) ratio = 60:4) and 440 (87.3%) had an IA (M to F ratio = 117:323). Of the SLE patients, 31 (48.4%) met four or more American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, 33 (51.6%) had less than four ACR criteria. Of the IA patients, 156 (35.5%) were CCP positive and 257 (58.4%) were RF positive. Utilizing the chart data, retrospective Framingham risk scores were calculable for one (1.6%) SLE patient and three (0.68%) IA patients. The most common cardiac risk factors not documented in the medical records of both the SLE and IA patients included: (1) positive family history of MI, (2) diabetes, and (3) lipid status. The blood pressure was more frequently documented in the SLE patients (93.8%) compared to the IA patients (56.1%). While traditional cardiac risk factors only partially contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in these patients, cardiovascular risk assessment was suboptimally performed amongst a large group of rheumatologists. A dedicated cardiovascular risk reduction clinic for inflammatory rheumatic diseases has been established at this site to fulfill this need and evaluate treatment strategies. PMID:21503617

  7. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: A new method to assess and quantify learning phase.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, T S; Jayasekera, N; Singh, R; Patel, A; Kuiper, J H; Richardson, J B

    2014-09-01

    Hip resurfacing had initially gained acceptance and popularity as it helps preserve femoral bone stock. In this study we tried to answer the following questions; 1. Whether there is a learning curve for hip resurfacing? 2. Is it present in surgeons from non-developer centres? 3. Is it present in surgeons from developer centres as well? The Oswestry outcome centre was setup to serve an independent international registry for collecting, analysing and reporting outcomes following hip resurfacing. Over a 10 year period, 4535 patients (5000 hips) were recruited from different countries and within the UK from different centres in this study by 139 surgeons from 37 different countries. Our study has shown that function can be used to assess the level of surgical competence. The results from this multilevel analysis have helped to answer the questions posed in the introduction. Hip resurfacing is a surgical procedure with a learning phase and this learning effect is more pronounced in non-developer surgeons as compared to developer surgeons. Hip scores can be used to assess proficiency and competence of surgeons undertaking hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

  8. Partitioning tracer test for detection, estimation, and remediation performance assessment of subsurface nonaqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, M.; Delshad, M.; Dwarakanath, V.; McKinney, D.C.; Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Tilburg, C.E.; Jackson, R.E.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper we present a partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) technique for the detection, estimation, and remediation performance assessment of the subsurface contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by examples of experimental and simulation results. The experimental results are from partitioning tracer experiments in columns packed with Ottawa sand. Both the method of moments and inverse modeling techniques for estimating NAPL saturation in the sand packs are demonstrated. In the simulation examples we use UTCHEM, a comprehensive three-dimensional, chemical flood compositional simulator developed at the University of Texas, to simulate a hypothetical two-dimensional aquifer with properties similar to the Borden site contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and we show how partitioning interwell tracer tests can be used to estimate the amount of PCE contaminant before remedial action and as the remediation process proceeds. Tracer test results from different stages of remediation are compared to determine the quantity of PCE removed and the amount remaining. Both the experimental (small-scale) and simulation (large-scale) results demonstrate that PITT can be used as an innovative and effective technique to detect and estimate the amount of residual NAPL and for remediation performance assessment in subsurface formations. 43 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [Assessment of Cyto- and Genotoxicity of Underground Waters from the Far Eastern Center on Radioactive Waste Treatment Site].

    PubMed

    Oudalova, A A; Pyatkova, S V; Geras'kin, S A; Kiselev, S M; Akhromeev, S V

    2016-01-01

    This study has been completed in the frames of activities on the environment assessment in the vicinity of the Far Eastern center (FEC) on radioactive waste treatment (a branch of Fokino, Sysoev Bay). Underground waters collected at the FEC technical site were surveyed both with instrumental techniques and bioassays. Concentrations of some chemicals (ranged to the third hazard category) in the samples collected are over the permitted limits. Activities of 137Cs and 90Sr in waters amount up to 3.8 and 16.2 Bq/l, correspondingly. The integral pollution index is over 1 in all the samples and could amount up to 165. The Allium-test application allows the detection of the sample points where underground waters have an enhanced mutagenic potential. Dependencies between biological effects and pollution levels are analyzed. The findings obtained could be used for the monitoring optimized and decision making on rehabilitation measures to decrease negative influence of the enterprise on the environment. PMID:27534072

  10. Optimal left ventricular lead position assessed with phase analysis on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Boogers, Mark J.; Chen, Ji; van Bommel, Rutger J.; Borleffs, C. Jan Willem; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; van der Hiel, Bernies; Al Younis, Imad; Schalij, Martin J.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between the site of latest mechanical activation as assessed with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS), left ventricular (LV) lead position and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods The patient population consisted of consecutive patients with advanced heart failure in whom CRT was currently indicated. Before implantation, 2-D echocardiography and GMPS were performed. The echocardiography was performed to assess LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). The site of latest mechanical activation was assessed by phase analysis of GMPS studies and related to LV lead position on fluoroscopy. Echocardiography was repeated after 6 months of CRT. CRT response was defined as a decrease of ≥15% in LVESV. Results Enrolled in the study were 90 patients (72% men, 67±10 years) with advanced heart failure. In 52 patients (58%), the LV lead was positioned at the site of latest mechanical activation (concordant), and in 38 patients (42%) the LV lead was positioned outside the site of latest mechanical activation (discordant). CRT response was significantly more often documented in patients with a concordant LV lead position than in patients with a discordant LV lead position (79% vs. 26%, p<0.01). After 6 months, patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LVEF, LVESV and LVEDV (p<0.05), whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvement in these variables. Conclusion Patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LV volumes and LV systolic function, whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvements. PMID:20953608

  11. Comprehensive Seismic Monitoring for Emergency Response and Hazards Assessment: Recent Developments at the USGS National Earthquake Information Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buland, R. P.; Guy, M.; Kragness, D.; Patton, J.; Erickson, B.; Morrison, M.; Bryon, C.; Ketchum, D.; Benz, H.

    2009-12-01

    The USGS National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) has put into operation a new generation of seismic acquisition, processing and distribution subsystems that seamlessly integrate regional, national and global seismic network data for routine monitoring of earthquake activity and response to large, damaging earthquakes. The system, Bulletin Hydra, was designed to meet Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) design goals to handle thousands of channels of real-time seismic data, compute and distribute time-critical seismic information for emergency response applications, and manage the integration of contributed earthquake products and information, arriving from near-real-time up to six weeks after an event. Bulletin Hydra is able meet these goals due to a modular, scalable, and flexible architecture that supports on-the-fly consumption of new data, readily allows for the addition of new scientific processing modules, and provides distributed client workflow management displays. Through the Edge subsystem, Bulletin Hydra accepts waveforms in half a dozen formats. In addition, Bulletin Hydra accepts contributed seismic information including hypocenters, magnitudes, moment tensors, unassociated and associated picks, and amplitudes in a variety of formats including earthworm import/export pairs and EIDS. Bulletin Hydra has state-driven algorithms for computing all IASPEI standard magnitudes (e.g. mb, mb_BB, ML, mb_LG, Ms_20, and Ms_BB) as well as Md, Ms(VMAX), moment tensor algorithms for modeling different portions of the wave-field at different distances (e.g. teleseismic body-wave, centroid, and regional moment tensors), and broadband depth. All contributed and derived data are centrally managed in an Oracle database. To improve on single station observations, Bulletin Hydra also does continuous real-time beam forming of high-frequency arrays. Finally, workflow management displays are used to assist NEIC analysts in their day-to-day duties. All combined

  12. Comparative assessment of olive oil mill effluents from three-phase and two-phase systems, treated for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rouvalis, A; Iliopoulou-Georgudaki, J

    2010-10-01

    By-products of a two-phase and a three-phase olive oil mill process treated in an anaerobic fermentation system for hydrogen production, were evaluated by three bioassays: the zebrafish Danio rerio embryo test and two microbiotests, Thamnotoxkit F and Daphtoxkit F™ pulex. Samples from both processes were classified as "very toxic" with LC(50) values ranging from 1.52% (T. platyurus 24 h test) to 4.48% (D. pulex 48 h-LC₅₀). Toxicity values were differently correlated to physicochemical parameters showing different degree of influence. The treated effluents of both process systems remained very toxic showing the necessity for further treatment, aiming to environmentally safe discharges.

  13. Improving the Measurement of Socioeconomic Status for the National Assessment of Educational Progress: A Theoretical Foundation--Recommendations to the National Center for Education Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    At the request of the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB, 2003), the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) convened a panel of experts to provide recommendations concerning socioeconomic status (SES) as a construct, with the understanding that their recommendations might ultimately lead to a new measure of SES that could be used…

  14. Professional Development Needs Assessment Survey of Inservice Clients of the Center for Vocational Professional Personnel Development at the Pennsylvania State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisner, Mary J.; Elliott, Franklin E.; Foster, Pamela M.; Covington, Myrna A.; King, Marsha G.; Liou, Kun-I Tony

    The Center for Vocational Professional Personnel Development conducted a needs assessment in order to plan and deliver staff development workshops in the 34 vocational schools served in Pennsylvania's central region. Respondents from the 30 participating schools were 30 administrators and 600 teachers (371 vocational and 144 academic teachers and…

  15. You Can Lead Students to Water, but You Can't Make Them Think: An Assessment of Student Engagement and Learning through Student-Centered Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Jennifer; Mowder, Denise; Bohte, Joy

    2016-01-01

    The current project conducted an assessment of specific, directed use of student-centered teaching techniques in a criminal justice and criminology research methods and statistics class. The project sought to ascertain to what extent these techniques improved or impacted student learning and engagement in this traditionally difficult course.…

  16. Early Phase in the Development of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Addiction: Opioid Relapse Takes Initial Center Stage.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Yasmin L; Yoon, Michelle; Manini, Alex F; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Ostman, Maria; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Multiple cannabinoids derived from the marijuana plant have potential therapeutic benefits but most have not been well investigated, despite the widespread legalization of medical marijuana in the USA and other countries. Therapeutic indications will depend on determinations as to which of the multiple cannabinoids, and other biologically active chemicals that are present in the marijuana plant, can be developed to treat specific symptoms and/or diseases. Such insights are particularly critical for addiction disorders, where different phytocannabinoids appear to induce opposing actions that can confound the development of treatment interventions. Whereas Δ(9)-tetracannabinol has been well documented to be rewarding and to enhance sensitivity to other drugs, cannabidiol (CBD), in contrast, appears to have low reinforcing properties with limited abuse potential and to inhibit drug-seeking behavior. Other considerations such as CBD's anxiolytic properties and minimal adverse side effects also support its potential viability as a treatment option for a variety of symptoms associated with drug addiction. However, significant research is still needed as CBD investigations published to date primarily relate to its effects on opioid drugs, and CBD's efficacy at different phases of the abuse cycle for different classes of addictive substances remain largely understudied. Our paper provides an overview of preclinical animal and human clinical investigations, and presents preliminary clinical data that collectively sets a strong foundation in support of the further exploration of CBD as a therapeutic intervention against opioid relapse. As the legal landscape for medical marijuana unfolds, it is important to distinguish it from "medical CBD" and other specific cannabinoids, that can more appropriately be used to maximize the medicinal potential of the marijuana plant. PMID:26269227

  17. Early Phase in the Development of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Addiction: Opioid Relapse Takes Initial Center Stage.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Yasmin L; Yoon, Michelle; Manini, Alex F; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Ostman, Maria; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Multiple cannabinoids derived from the marijuana plant have potential therapeutic benefits but most have not been well investigated, despite the widespread legalization of medical marijuana in the USA and other countries. Therapeutic indications will depend on determinations as to which of the multiple cannabinoids, and other biologically active chemicals that are present in the marijuana plant, can be developed to treat specific symptoms and/or diseases. Such insights are particularly critical for addiction disorders, where different phytocannabinoids appear to induce opposing actions that can confound the development of treatment interventions. Whereas Δ(9)-tetracannabinol has been well documented to be rewarding and to enhance sensitivity to other drugs, cannabidiol (CBD), in contrast, appears to have low reinforcing properties with limited abuse potential and to inhibit drug-seeking behavior. Other considerations such as CBD's anxiolytic properties and minimal adverse side effects also support its potential viability as a treatment option for a variety of symptoms associated with drug addiction. However, significant research is still needed as CBD investigations published to date primarily relate to its effects on opioid drugs, and CBD's efficacy at different phases of the abuse cycle for different classes of addictive substances remain largely understudied. Our paper provides an overview of preclinical animal and human clinical investigations, and presents preliminary clinical data that collectively sets a strong foundation in support of the further exploration of CBD as a therapeutic intervention against opioid relapse. As the legal landscape for medical marijuana unfolds, it is important to distinguish it from "medical CBD" and other specific cannabinoids, that can more appropriately be used to maximize the medicinal potential of the marijuana plant.

  18. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  19. Gas-Phase Energetics of Actinide Oxides: An Assessment of Neutral and Cationic Monoxides and Dioxides from Thorium to Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-09-01

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  20. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry. PMID:19725530

  1. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF SUBSURFACE FATE OF MONOETHANOLAMINE AT SOUR GAS PROCESSING PLANT SITES-PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Sorensen

    1999-02-01

    Alkanolamines are commonly used by the natural gas industry to remove hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and other acid gases from the natural gas in which they occur (''sour'' gas if hydrogen sulfide is present). At sour gas-processing plants, as at all plants that use alkanolamines for acid gas removal (AGR), spills and on-site management of wastes containing alkanolamines and associated reaction products have occasionally resulted in subsurface contamination that is presently the focus of some environmental concern. In 1994, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) initiated a three-phase program to investigate the natural attenuation processes that control the subsurface transport and fate of the most commonly used alkanolamine in Canada, monoethanolamine (MEA). Funding for the MEA research program was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd. (CanOxy), Gas Research Institute (GRI), Environment Canada, and the National Energy Board of Canada. The MEA research program focused primarily on examining the biodegradability of MEA and MEA-related waste materials in soils and soil-slurries under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions, evaluating the mobility of MEA in soil and groundwater and the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques for removing contaminants and toxicity from MEA-contaminated soil. The presently inactive Okotoks sour gas-processing plant, owned by CanOxy in Alberta, Canada, was the source of samples and field data for much of the laboratory-based experimental work and was selected to be the location for the field-based efforts to evaluate remediation techniques. The objective of the research program is to provide the natural gas industry with ''real world'' data and insights developed under laboratory and field conditions regarding the effective and environmentally sound use of biological methods for the remediation of soil

  3. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 2. Aerosol effects on warm convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-01

    In Part I of this work a 3-D cloud tracking algorithm and phase space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space) were introduced and described in detail. We showed how new physical insight can be gained by following cloud trajectories in the CvM space. Here this approach is used to investigate aerosol effects on cloud fields of warm cumuli. We show a clear effect of the aerosol loading on the shape and size of CvM clusters. We also find fundamental differences in the CvM space between simulations using bin versus bulk microphysical schemes, with the bin scheme precipitation expressing much higher sensitivity to changes in aerosol concentrations. Using the bin microphysical scheme, we find that the increase in cloud center of gravity altitude with increase in aerosol concentrations occurs for a wide range of cloud sizes. This is attributed to reduced sedimentation, increased buoyancy and vertical velocities, and increased environmental instability, all of which are tightly coupled to inhibition of precipitation processes and subsequent feedbacks of clouds on their environment. Many of the physical processes shown here are consistent with processes typically associated with cloud invigoration.

  4. Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation Phase 1 Seep Task data report: Contaminant source area assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2, Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Seep Task efforts during 1993 and 1994 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented here follow results form the first year of sampling, 1992, which are contained in the Phase 1 RI report for WAG 2 (DOE 1995a). The WAG 2 Seep Task efforts focused on contaminants in seeps, tributaries, and main streams within the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. This report is designed primarily as a reference for contaminants and a resource for guiding remedial decisions. Additional in-depth assessments of the Seep Task data may provide clearer understandings of contaminant transport from the different source areas in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 consists of WOC and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, and the associated flood plains and subsurface environment. The WOC watershed encompasses ORNL and associated WAGs. WAG 2 acts as an integrator for contaminant releases from the contaminated sites at ORNL and as the conduit transporting contaminants to the Clinch River. The main objectives of the Seep Task were to identify and characterize seeps, tributaries and source areas that are responsible for the contaminant releases to the main streams in WAG 2 and to quantify their input to the total contaminant release from the watershed at White Oak Dam (WOD). Efforts focused on {sup 90}Sr, {sup 3}H, and {sup 137}Cs because these contaminants pose the greatest potential human health risk from water ingestion at WOD. Bimonthly sampling was conducted throughout the WOC watershed beginning in March 1993 and ending in August 1994. Samples were also collected for metals, anions, alkalinity, organics, and other radionuclides.

  5. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's scientific and technical information program. Results of phase 1: Knowledge and attitudes survey, LaRC research personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Cross, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Langley STI program was assessed using feedback obtained from Langley engineers and scientists. A survey research procedure was conducted in two stages. Personal interviews with 64 randomly selected Langley engineers and scientists were used to obtain information for questionnaire development. Data were then collected by means of the questionnaire which covered various aspects of the Langley STI program, utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the six objectives for Phase 1. The completed questionnaires were analyzed. From the analysis of the data, recommendations were made for improving the Langley STI program.

  6. Co-ordinatively Unsaturated Al3+ Centers as Binding Sites for Active Catalyst Phases of Platinum on -Al2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jiangzhi; Mei, Donghei; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Do Heui; Peden, Charles; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Szanyi, Janos

    2009-01-01

    In many heterogeneous catalysts, the interaction of metal particles with their oxide support can alter the electronic properties of the metal and can play a critical role in determining particle morphology and maintaining dispersion. We used a combination of ultrahigh magnetic field, solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with density functional theory calculations to reveal the nature of anchoring sites of a catalytically active phase of platinum on the surface of a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst support material. The results obtained show that coordinatively unsaturated pentacoordinate Al{sup 3+} (Al{sub penta}{sup 3+}) centers present on the (100) facets of the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface are anchoring Pt. At low loadings, the active catalytic phase is atomically dispersed on the support surface (Pt/Al{sub penta}{sup 3+} = 1), whereas two-dimensional Pt rafts form at higher coverages.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of frustrated arbitrary spin-S J1-J2 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the body-centered-cubic lattice in random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the frustrated arbitrary spin-S J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the body-centered-cubic lattice for Néel phase are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green's function method within the random phase approximation (RPA). The role of spin quantum number and frustration strength on sublattice magnetization, Néel temperature, internal energy, and free energy are carefully analyzed. The curve of zero-temperature sublattice magnetization / S versus frustration strength J2/J1 values are almost flat at the larger spin quantum number S=10. With the increase of normalized temperature T/TN, the larger the spin quantum number S, the faster the / S drops, and the smaller influence of J2/J1 on the / S versus T/TN curve. Under the RPA approach, the Néel temperature TN /Sp and the internal energy E/Sp at the Néel point are independent of spin quantum number S. The numerical results show that the internal energy E/Sp at the Néel point seems independent of the frustration strength J2/J1. This indicates that thermodynamic quantities have universal characteristics for large spin quantum number.

  8. Involvement of the German Research Center for GeoSciences (GFZ) in the EPOS Implementation Phase 2015-18 (European Plate Observing System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lauterjung, J.

    2015-12-01

    Under the Horizon 2020 Programme INFRADEV-3, the European Commission (EC) has awarded a prioritized grant for the establishment of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) during a four-year Implementation Phase 2015-18. As laid in detail during the EPOS Preparatory Phase 2010-14, the EPOS cyberinfrastructure will be established as an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) and it will encompass the implementation of both the EPOS Integrated Core Services (ICS) for solid Earth Science and a multitude of EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS). As one of the 29 awardees of the EC grant, the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) will play an important role in the implementation of EPOS and its Thematic and Integrated Core Services. The presented poster will give an overview of GFZ's involvement in the different Work Packages, including administrative tasks (WP3 Harmonization) as well as the technical implementation efforts (WP7 ICS Development, WP8 Seismology, WP11 Volcano Observations, WP12 Satellite Data, WP13 Geomagnetic Observations, WP14 Anthropogenic Hazards, WP15 Geological Information and Modelling, WP16 Multi-Scale Laboratories and WP17 Geo Energy Test Beds).

  9. Phase two of Site 300`s ecological risk assessment: Model verification and risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, T.M.; Gregory, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors completed the baseline ecological risk assessment (ERA) for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Site 300 in 1993. Using data collection and modeling techniques adapted from the human health risk assessment (HRA), they evaluated the potential hazard of contaminants in environmental media to ecological receptors. They identified potential hazards to (1) aquatic invertebrates from heavy metal contaminants in surface water, (2) burrowing vertebrates from contaminants volatilizing from subsurface soil into burrow air, and (3) grazing deer and burrowing vertebrates from cadmium contamination in surface soil. They recently began collecting data to refine the estimates of potential hazard to these ecological receptors. Bioassay results form the surface water failed to verify a hazard to aquatic invertebrates. Soil vapor surveys of subsurface burrows did verify the presence of high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, they have not yet verified a true impact on the burrowing populations. The authors also completed an extensive surface soil sampling program, which identified local hot spots of cadmium contamination. In addition, they have been collecting data on the land use patterns of the deer population. Their data indicate that deer do not typically use those areas with cadmium surface soil contamination. Information from this phase of the ERA, along with the results of the HRA, will direct the selection of remedial alternatives for the site. For the ecological receptors, remedial alternatives include developing a risk management program which includes ensuring that (1) sensitive burrowing species (such as rare or endangered species) do not use areas of surface or subsurface contamination, and (2) deer populations do not use areas of surface soil contamination.

  10. Assessing long-term health and cost outcomes of patient-centered medical homes serving adults with poor diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Pagán, José A; Carlson, Erin K

    2013-10-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an integrated primary care delivery model particularly suited for patients with poor diabetes control. Although PCMH models targeting adults with diabetes have shown some early success, little is known about the long-term benefits of medical homes in terms of health and cost outcomes. The performance of a PCMH model in adults with poor diabetes control was assessed using simulated controlled trial data obtained from the Archimedes model of disease progression and health care utilization. Using the Cardio-Metabolic Risk data set, we compared health and cost outcomes over a 20-year period between adults with poor diabetes control (HbA1c >9%) receiving standard care and these same adults receiving care under a PCMH model with a 49% HbA1c intervention improvement rate at a per-beneficiary per-month care management cost of $20 per month. The results suggest that the PCMH model has the potential to not only reduce the proportion of the population with bilateral blindness, foot amputations, and myocardial infarctions-and the mortality rate-but it can also do so in a cost-effective manner ($7898 per quality-adjusted life year). The PCMH model is cost saving for the population 50 to 64 years old and it is particularly cost-effective for men ($883 per quality-adjusted life year). Moreover, these effects are relatively large for adults 30 to 49 years old (lower bilateral blindness and death rates), women (lower foot amputation and death rates), and men (lower bilateral blindness and myocardial infarction rates). The PCMH model has potential long-term benefits to both patients with poor diabetes control as well as health care systems and providers willing to invest in this health care delivery approach. PMID:23799676

  11. Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-05-31

    In accordance with the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5801), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in 1977. SERI was designated as a national laboratory and became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 1991. NREL was established to support DOE's mission to research and develop energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Among other responsibilities, NREL operates the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) located in Jefferson County, Colorado. The NWTC is a federally-owned, contractor-operated site. In accordance with the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, DOE is required to evaluate existing Site-Wide Environmental Assessments (EA) every five years to determine whether the Site-Wide EA adequately addresses current agency plans, functions, programs and resource utilization. A Site-Wide EA for the NWTC was published in 1996 (DOE-EA-1127). DOE has determined that a new comprehensive EA should be prepared for the site to address new site development proposals and changes in the regional environment. DOE is the lead agency for this EA, and other federal, state, and local agencies and the public have been invited to participate in the environmental documentation process. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to support DOE's mission in the research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Alternative energy technology research is needed to improve technology designs, improve power generation efficiencies, increase economic competitiveness, and fully characterize and minimize environmental impacts from various technologies. The Proposed Action would provide and maintain enhanced facilities and infrastructure that would adequately support the site purpose of state-of-the-art alternative energy research, development, and demonstration.

  12. High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document phase 1 assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Biebesheimer, E., Westinghouse Hanford Co.

    1996-09-30

    This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) Phase I Assessment Report for the subject facility, represents the results of an Administrative Assessment to determine whether S/RID requirements are fully addressed by existing policies, plans or procedures. It contains; compliance status, remedial actions, and an implementing manuals report linking S/RID elements to requirement source to implementing manual and section.

  13. A national survey of child advocacy center directors regarding knowledge of assessment, treatment referral, and training needs in physical and sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Wherry, Jeffrey N; Huey, Cassandra C; Medford, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services are a core component of child advocacy centers in the United States. Child advocacy center directors were surveyed about (a) trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder; (b) referral criteria for treatment of abuse victims; (c) evidence-based treatments for abused children; (d) reliable, valid, and normed measures helpful in assessment; and (e) training needs. Directors accurately identified posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, but additional symptoms were misidentified. Directors identified best practices for assessment and treatment, but they misidentified non-evidence-based practices. Primary reasons for referral for services included severity of abuse and emotional response of the child. However, referrals based on assessment findings were not a high priority. Directors expressed some training needs for staff consistent with issues identified in the study. PMID:25942286

  14. Assessment of indoor and outdoor PM species at schools and residences in a high-altitude Ecuadorian urban center.

    PubMed

    Raysoni, Amit U; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, M Margaret; Montoya, Teresa; Eschanique, Patricia; Racines, Marcia; Li, Wen-Whai

    2016-07-01

    An air monitoring campaign to assess children's environmental exposures in schools and residences, both indoors and outdoors, was conducted in 2010 in three low-income neighborhoods in Z1 (north), Z2 (central), and Z3 (southeast) zones of Quito, Ecuador - a major urban center of 2.2 million inhabitants situated 2850 m above sea level in a narrow mountainous basin. Z1 zone, located in northern Quito, historically experienced emissions from quarries and moderate traffic. Z2 zone was influenced by heavy traffic in contrast to Z3 zone which experienced low traffic densities. Weekly averages of PM samples were collected at schools (one in each zone) and residences (Z1 = 47, Z2 = 45, and Z3 = 41) every month, over a twelve-month period at the three zones. Indoor PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 10.6 ± 4.9 μg/m(3) (Z1 school) to 29.0 ± 30.5 μg/m(3) (Z1 residences) and outdoor PM2.5 concentrations varied from 10.9 ± 3.2 μg/m(3) (Z1 school) to 14.3 ± 10.1 μg/m(3) (Z2 residences), across the three zones. The lowest values for PM10-2.5 for indoor and outdoor microenvironments were recorded at Z2 school, 5.7 ± 2.8 μg/m(3) and 7.9 ± 2.2 μg/m(3), respectively. Outdoor school PM concentrations exhibited stronger associations with corresponding indoor values making them robust proxies for indoor exposures in naturally ventilated Quito public schools. Correlation analysis between the school and residential PM size fractions and the various pollutant and meteorological parameters from central ambient monitoring (CAM) sites suggested varying degrees of temporal relationship. Strong positive correlation was observed for outdoor PM2.5 at Z2 school and its corresponding CAM site (r = 0.77) suggesting common traffic related emissions. Spatial heterogeneity in PM2.5 concentrations between CAM network and sampled sites was assessed using Coefficient of Divergence (COD) analysis. COD values were lower when CAM sites were paired with outdoor

  15. Assessment of indoor and outdoor PM species at schools and residences in a high-altitude Ecuadorian urban center.

    PubMed

    Raysoni, Amit U; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, M Margaret; Montoya, Teresa; Eschanique, Patricia; Racines, Marcia; Li, Wen-Whai

    2016-07-01

    An air monitoring campaign to assess children's environmental exposures in schools and residences, both indoors and outdoors, was conducted in 2010 in three low-income neighborhoods in Z1 (north), Z2 (central), and Z3 (southeast) zones of Quito, Ecuador - a major urban center of 2.2 million inhabitants situated 2850 m above sea level in a narrow mountainous basin. Z1 zone, located in northern Quito, historically experienced emissions from quarries and moderate traffic. Z2 zone was influenced by heavy traffic in contrast to Z3 zone which experienced low traffic densities. Weekly averages of PM samples were collected at schools (one in each zone) and residences (Z1 = 47, Z2 = 45, and Z3 = 41) every month, over a twelve-month period at the three zones. Indoor PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 10.6 ± 4.9 μg/m(3) (Z1 school) to 29.0 ± 30.5 μg/m(3) (Z1 residences) and outdoor PM2.5 concentrations varied from 10.9 ± 3.2 μg/m(3) (Z1 school) to 14.3 ± 10.1 μg/m(3) (Z2 residences), across the three zones. The lowest values for PM10-2.5 for indoor and outdoor microenvironments were recorded at Z2 school, 5.7 ± 2.8 μg/m(3) and 7.9 ± 2.2 μg/m(3), respectively. Outdoor school PM concentrations exhibited stronger associations with corresponding indoor values making them robust proxies for indoor exposures in naturally ventilated Quito public schools. Correlation analysis between the school and residential PM size fractions and the various pollutant and meteorological parameters from central ambient monitoring (CAM) sites suggested varying degrees of temporal relationship. Strong positive correlation was observed for outdoor PM2.5 at Z2 school and its corresponding CAM site (r = 0.77) suggesting common traffic related emissions. Spatial heterogeneity in PM2.5 concentrations between CAM network and sampled sites was assessed using Coefficient of Divergence (COD) analysis. COD values were lower when CAM sites were paired with outdoor

  16. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  17. Aging assessment of essential HVAC chillers used in nuclear power plants. Phase 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blahnik, D.E.; Klein, R.F.

    1993-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of chillers used in the essential safety air-conditioning systems of nuclear power plants. Centrifugal chillers in the 75- to 750-ton refrigeration capacity range are the predominant type used. The chillers used, and air-conditioning systems served, vary in design from plant-to-plant. It is crucial to keep chiller internals very clean and to prevent the leakage of water, air, and other contaminants into the refrigerant containment system. Periodic operation on a weekly or monthly basis is necessary to remove moisture and noncondensable gases that gradually build up inside the chiller. This is especially desirable if a chiller is required to operate only as an emergency standby unit. The primary stressors and aging mechanisms that affect chillers include vibration, excessive temperatures and pressures, thermal cycling, chemical attack, and poor quality cooling water. Aging is accelerated by moisture, non-condensable gases (e.g., air), dirt, and other contamination within the refrigerant containment system, excessive start/stop cycling, and operating below the rated capacity. Aging is also accelerated by corrosion and fouling of the condenser and evaporator tubes. The principal cause of chiller failures is lack of adequate monitoring. Lack of performing scheduled maintenance and human errors also contribute to failures.

  18. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... effective and immediate removal of the discharge or mitigation or prevention of a substantial threat of...

  19. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... effective and immediate removal of the discharge or mitigation or prevention of a substantial threat of...

  20. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... effective and immediate removal of the discharge or mitigation or prevention of a substantial threat of...

  1. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... effective and immediate removal of the discharge or mitigation or prevention of a substantial threat of...

  2. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... effective and immediate removal of the discharge or mitigation or prevention of a substantial threat of...

  3. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  4. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  5. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study. Volume 1: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Gerson, H. I.; Srinivas, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The status of the technologies for phased-array-fed dual reflector systems is reviewed. The different aspects of these technologies, including optical performances, phased array systems, problems encountered in phased array design, beamforming networks, MMIC design and its incorporation into waveguide systems, reflector antenna structures, and reflector deployment mechanisms are addressed.

  6. CONTROLLED DIESEL EXPOSURES: INTER-PHASING HUMAN AND ANIMAL STUDIES AND THEIR USE IN THE RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controlled diesel exposures: Inter-phasing human and animal studies and their use in the risk assessment process.
    Michael C. Madden, US EPA.

    Particulate matter (PM) has been reported to be associated with health effects (e.g., premature deaths, hospitalizations, lung ...

  7. LABORATORY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERMEABILITY AND DIFFUSION CHARACTERISTICS OF FLORIDA CONCRETES - PHASE I - METHODS DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of Phase I of a laboratory assessment of the permeability and diffusion characteristics of Florida concretes. (NOTE: The ability of concrete to permit air flow under pressure (permeability) and the passage of radon gas without any pressure difference (dif...

  8. Major-element geochemistry of the Silent Canyon-Black Mountain peralkaline volcanic centers, northwestern Nevada Test Site: applications to an assessment of renewed volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowe, Bruce M.; Sargent, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    The Silent Canyon and Black Mountain volcanic centers are located in the northern part of the Nevada Test Site. The Silent Canyon volcanic center is a buried cauldron complex of Miocene age (13-15 m.y.). Black Mountain volcanic center is an elliptical-shaped cauldron complex of late Miocene age. The lavas and tuffs of the two centers comprise a subalkaline-peralkaline association. Rock types range from quartz normative subalkaline trachyte and rhyolite to peralkaline comendite. The Gold Flat Member of the Thirsty Canyon Tuff (Black Mountain) is a pantellerite. The major-element geochemistry of the Black Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic centers differs in the total range and distribution of Si02, contents, the degree of peralkalinity (molecular Na2O+K2O>Al2O3) and in the values of total iron and alumina through the range of rock types. These differences indicate that the suites were unrelated and evolved from differing magma bodies. The Black Mountain volcanic cycle represents a renewed phase of volcanism following cessation of the Timber Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic cycles. Consequently, there is a small but numerically incalculable probability of recurrence of Black Mountain-type volcanism within the Nevada Test Site region. This represents a potential risk with respect to deep geologic storage of high-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site.

  9. Measurement of plutonium and other actinide elements at the center for accelerator mass spectrometry: a comparative assessments of competing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T H; McAninch, J

    1999-02-01

    Low-level measurements of the long-lived actinide isotopes have a number of important applications throughout the DOE complex. These include radiobioassay programs, environmental assessments, characterization of radioactive wastes, evaluation of waste storage and treatment options, environmental remediation, basic research in chemistry and geochemistry, and other specialized non- proliferation and national security applications. As an example, it has been estimated that for the next few decades more than 1 million radiochemical analyses per year will be needed in support of US efforts to remediate the legacy of radioactive waste generated by weapons production and the nuclear power industry (Crain, 1996). Traditional radiometric counting methods do not have sufficient sensitivity to address many of these requirements. There is also a growing need to evaluate and monitor exposures to DOE workers involved in decommissioning, environmental management and/or remediation of contaminated sites and facilities. Quantitative measurements based on low-level detection techniques are of particular interest in the validation of radionuclide transport models and improving radiation dosimetry/risk estimates. Quantitative data and information are required to assess the potential health-effects of exposures occurring under special conditions (e.g., resuspension/inhalation of high-specific activity particles), of inhomogeneous radiation exposure and assessment of associated dose distributions to different parts of the body/tissue, of low dose exposure, and to validate and/or develop new and improved dosimetry models. Atom counting technology has now developed sufficiently to provide substantially better sensitivity than ionizing radiation detectors for selected long- lived radionuclides. Clearly the development of a robust, high-throughput, highly sensitive actinide measurement capability based on this new technology would have broad and sustainable impact on a range of DOE

  10. The Effect of Additional Training on Motor Outcomes at Discharge from Recovery Phase Rehabilitation Wards: A Survey from Multi-Center Stroke Data Bank in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Nariaki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Jeong, Seungwon; Sugiyama, Motoya; Kondo, Katsunori; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential benefits of additional training in patients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation ward using the data bank of post-stroke patient registry. Subjects and Methods Subjects were 2507 inpatients admitted to recovery phase rehabilitation wards between November 2004 and November 2010. Participants were retrospectively divided into four groups based upon chart review; patients who received no additional rehabilitation, patients who were added with self-initiated off hours training, patients who were added with off hours training by ward staff, patients who received both self-initiated training and training by ward staff. Parameters for assessing outcomes included length of stay, motor/cognitive subscales of functional independent measures (FIM) and motor benefit of FIM calculated by subtracting the score at admission from that at discharge. Results Participants were stratified into three groups depending on the motor FIM at admission (≦28, 29∼56, 57≦) for comparison. Regarding outcome variables, significant inter-group differences were observed in all items examined within the subgroup who scored 28 or less and between 29 and 56. Meanwhile no such trends were observed in the group who scored 57 or more compared with those who scored less. In a decision tree created based upon Exhaustive Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection method, variables chosen were the motor FIM at admission (the first node) additional training (the second node), the cognitive FIM at admission(the third node). Conclusions Overall the results suggest that additional training can compensate for the shortage of regular rehabilitation implemented in recovery phase rehabilitation ward, thus may contribute to improved outcomes assessed by motor FIM at discharge. PMID:24626224

  11. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (Phase 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Powell, Richard W.; Prince, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center received a request from Mr. Daniel Murri (NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics) to develop an autonomous aerobraking capability. An initial evaluation for all phases of this assessment was approved to proceed at the NESC Review Board meeting. The purpose of phase 1 of this study was to provide an assessment of the feasibility of autonomous aerobraking. During this phase, atmospheric, aerodynamic, and thermal models for a representative spacecraft were developed for both the onboard algorithm known as Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software, and a ground-based "truth" simulation developed for testing purposes. The results of the phase 1 assessment are included in this report.

  12. Phase-transition thresholds and vaporization phenomena for ultrasound phase-change nanoemulsions assessed via high-speed optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paul S; Matsunaga, Terry O; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically activated phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) based on perfluorocarbon droplets have been proposed for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic clinical applications. When generated at the nanoscale, droplets may be small enough to exit the vascular space and then be induced to vaporize with high spatial and temporal specificity by externally-applied ultrasound. The use of acoustical techniques for optimizing ultrasound parameters for given applications can be a significant challenge for nanoscale PCCAs due to the contributions of larger outlier droplets. Similarly, optical techniques can be a challenge due to the sub-micron size of nanodroplet agents and resolution limits of optical microscopy. In this study, an optical method for determining activation thresholds of nanoscale emulsions based on the in vitro distribution of bubbles resulting from vaporization of PCCAs after single, short (<10 cycles) ultrasound pulses is evaluated. Through ultra-high-speed microscopy it is shown that the bubbles produced early in the pulse from vaporized droplets are strongly affected by subsequent cycles of the vaporization pulse, and these effects increase with pulse length. Results show that decafluorobutane nanoemulsions with peak diameters on the order of 200 nm can be optimally vaporized with short pulses using pressures amenable to clinical diagnostic ultrasound machines. PMID:23760161

  13. Performance assessment of the phased remediation of a former gas manufacturing plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. P.; Shields, A.

    2003-04-01

    microorganisms present in groundwater, allowing the presence of PAH and BTEX degradative pathways to be assessed and quantified. Integration and detailed interpretation of the various sets of data is undertaken using a biogeochemical groundwater model which couples multi-species contaminant transport with microbial and chemical reactions. Results show significant reductions in dissolved phase hydrocarbons are being achieved within, and downgradient of the aeration zone and demonstrate the impact of the sparge system on the physico-chemical environment. Integration of laboratory challenge tests for hydrocarbon mineralisation rates with in situ measurements from the sparge system have demonstrated the response of the subsurface environment to the changes in redox conditions following the introduction of the sparge barrier. These results also provide guidance on the long-term effectiveness of the sparge barrier as an in-situ treatment technology for enhanced plume attenuation.

  14. Multimodal Quantitative Phase Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy Accurately Assesses Intestinal Inflammation and Epithelial Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Philipp; Brückner, Markus; Ketelhut, Steffi; Heidemann, Jan; Kemper, Björn; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., Crohn's disease and Ulcerative colitis, has significantly increased over the last decade. The etiology of IBD remains unknown and current therapeutic strategies are based on the unspecific suppression of the immune system. The development of treatments that specifically target intestinal inflammation and epithelial wound healing could significantly improve management of IBD, however this requires accurate detection of inflammatory changes. Currently, potential drug candidates are usually evaluated using animal models in vivo or with cell culture based techniques in vitro. Histological examination usually requires the cells or tissues of interest to be stained, which may alter the sample characteristics and furthermore, the interpretation of findings can vary by investigator expertise. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM), based on the detection of optical path length delay, allows stain-free quantitative phase contrast imaging. This allows the results to be directly correlated with absolute biophysical parameters. We demonstrate how measurement of changes in tissue density with DHM, based on refractive index measurement, can quantify inflammatory alterations, without staining, in different layers of colonic tissue specimens from mice and humans with colitis. Additionally, we demonstrate continuous multimodal label-free monitoring of epithelial wound healing in vitro, possible using DHM through the simple automated determination of the wounded area and simultaneous determination of morphological parameters such as dry mass and layer thickness of migrating cells. In conclusion, DHM represents a valuable, novel and quantitative tool for the assessment of intestinal inflammation with absolute values for parameters possible, simplified quantification of epithelial wound healing in vitro and therefore has high potential for translational diagnostic use. PMID:27685659

  15. Assessing the performance of quantum repeaters for all phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the most sought-after goals in experimental quantum communication is the implementation of a quantum repeater. The performance of quantum repeaters can be assessed by comparing the attained rate with the quantum and private capacity of direct transmission, assisted by unlimited classical two-way communication. However, these quantities are hard to compute, motivating the search for upper bounds. Takeoka, Guha and Wilde found the squashed entanglement of a quantum channel to be an upper bound on both these capacities. In general it is still hard to find the exact value of the squashed entanglement of a quantum channel, but clever sub-optimal squashing channels allow one to upper bound this quantity, and thus also the corresponding capacities. Here, we exploit this idea to obtain bounds for any phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channel. This bound allows one to benchmark the implementation of quantum repeaters for a large class of channels used to model communication across fibers. In particular, our bound is applicable to the realistic scenario when there is a restriction on the mean photon number on the input. Furthermore, we show that the squashed entanglement of a channel is convex in the set of channels, and we use a connection between the squashed entanglement of a quantum channel and its entanglement assisted classical capacity. Building on this connection, we obtain the exact squashed entanglement and two-way assisted capacities of the d-dimensional erasure channel and bounds on the amplitude-damping channel and all qubit Pauli channels. In particular, our bound improves on the previous best known squashed entanglement upper bound of the depolarizing channel.

  16. Feasibility assessment for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process: the effect of liquid saturation and binder liquid viscosity.

    PubMed

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2014-11-20

    A novel reverse-phase wet granulation process was developed and the feasibility of the process compared to a conventional wet granulation process. The reverse-phase granulation approach involves the immersion of the dry powder formulation into the binder liquid followed by controlled breakage to form granules. Conventional wisdom would warn against this approach due to the initial formation of a slurry or over-wetted powder formulation. However, a feasibility assessment of the novel approach was motivated by the potential advantages of eliminating traditional granule nucleation variables and reducing risk of uncontrolled granule growth. The effects of liquid saturation and binder liquid viscosity on the physical properties of granules formed using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes were compared. Liquid saturation significantly affected the physical properties of granules prepared using both processes. At liquid saturation up to ∼1 the reverse-phase process typically resulted in larger, less porous granules than the conventional process. However, at a liquid saturation >1.1 the conventional process exhibited uncontrolled growth and significantly larger granule size as a result of decreased intragranular porosity. The response to liquid saturation was seen as a steady growth mechanism for the reverse-phase process compared to an induction growth mechanism for the conventional process, indicating potential robustness advantages of the reverse-phase approach. Despite institutional perceptions to the contrary, the reverse-phase process was shown to be feasible and merits further detailed investigation. PMID:25218187

  17. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Child Care Centers: the Impact of a Wellness Policy Initiative on Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation Outcomes, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Joyce; Evers, Sarah; Davis, Justin; Griffin, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The child care environment has emerged as an ideal setting in which to implement policies that promote healthy body weight of children. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a wellness policy and training program on the physical activity and nutrition environment in 24 child care centers in Georgia. Methods We used the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation instrument to identify changes to foods served, staff behaviors, and physical activity opportunities. Observations were performed over 1 day, beginning with breakfast and concluding when the program ended for the day. Observations were conducted from February 2010 through April 2011 for a total of 2 observations in each center. Changes to nutrition and physical activity in centers were assessed on the basis of changes in scores related to the physical activity and nutrition environment documented in the observations. Paired t test analyses were performed to determine significance of changes. Results Significant improvements to total nutrition (P < .001) and physical activity scores (P < .001) were observed. Results indicate that centers significantly improved the physical activity environments of centers by enhancing active play (P = .02), the sedentary environment (P = .005), the portable environment (P = .002), staff behavior (P = .004), and physical activity training and education (P < .001). Significant improvements were found for the nutrition environment (P < .001), and nutrition training and education (P < .001). Conclusion Findings from this study suggest that implementing wellness policies and training caregivers in best practices for physical activity and nutrition can promote healthy weight for young children in child care settings. PMID:23701720

  18. Nutritional Status Assessment During the Phase IIA and Phase III Lunar/Mars Life Support Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Block, Gladys; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; Fanselow, Stephanie A.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Gillman, Patricia L.; Nillen, Jeannie I.; Rice, Barbara L.; Smith, Myra D.

    2000-01-01

    Nutrition is a critical concern for extended-duration space missions (Smith and Lane, 1999). Loss of body weight is a primary consequence of altered nutrition, and is frequently observed during space flight (Smith and Lane; 1999). Other existing dietary concerns for space flight include excessive intakes of sodium and iron, and insufficient intakes of water and vitamin D (Smith and Lane, 1999). Furthermore, dependence on closed or semi-closed food systems increases the likelihood of inadequate intakes of key nutrients. This is a significant concern for extended-duration space missions. Space nutrition research often necessitates detailed recording of all food consumption. While this yields extremely accurate data, it requires considerable time and effort, and thus is not suitable for routine medical monitoring during space flight. To alleviate this problem, a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was designed to provide a quick and easy, yet reasonably accurate, method for crewmembers to provide dietary intake information to the ground. We report here a study which was designed to assess nutritional status before, during, and after the 60-d and 91-d chamber stays. An additional goal of the study was to validate a food frequency questionnaire designed specifically for use with space flight food systems.

  19. Altered phase interactions between spontaneous blood pressure and flow fluctuations in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Nonlinear assessment of cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Peng, C. K.; Huang, Norden E.; Wu, Zhaohua; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Cavallerano, Jerry; Novak, Vera

    2008-04-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is an important mechanism that involves dilatation and constriction in arterioles to maintain relatively stable cerebral blood flow in response to changes of systemic blood pressure. Traditional assessments of autoregulation focus on the changes of cerebral blood flow velocity in response to large blood pressure fluctuations induced by interventions. This approach is not feasible for patients with impaired autoregulation or cardiovascular regulation. Here we propose a newly developed technique-the multimodal pressure-flow (MMPF) analysis, which assesses autoregulation by quantifying nonlinear phase interactions between spontaneous oscillations in blood pressure and flow velocity during resting conditions. We show that cerebral autoregulation in healthy subjects can be characterized by specific phase shifts between spontaneous blood pressure and flow velocity oscillations, and the phase shifts are significantly reduced in diabetic subjects. Smaller phase shifts between oscillations in the two variables indicate more passive dependence of blood flow velocity on blood pressure, thus suggesting impaired cerebral autoregulation. Moreover, the reduction of the phase shifts in diabetes is observed not only in previously-recognized effective region of cerebral autoregulation (<0.1 Hz), but also over the higher frequency range from ˜0.1 to 0.4 Hz. These findings indicate that type 2 diabetes mellitus alters cerebral blood flow regulation over a wide frequency range and that this alteration can be reliably assessed from spontaneous oscillations in blood pressure and blood flow velocity during resting conditions. We also show that the MMPF method has better performance than traditional approaches based on Fourier transform, and is more suitable for the quantification of nonlinear phase interactions between nonstationary biological signals such as blood pressure and blood flow.

  20. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses.

  1. In situ X-ray data collection and structure phasing of protein crystals at Structural Biology Center 19-ID

    SciTech Connect

    Michalska, Karolina; Tan, Kemin; Chang, Changsoo; Li, Hui; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Molitsky, Michael; Alkire, Randy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-10-15

    A prototype of a 96-well plate scanner forin situdata collection has been developed at the Structural Biology Center (SBC) beamline 19-ID, located at the Advanced Photon Source, USA. The applicability of this instrument for protein crystal diffraction screening and data collection at ambient temperature has been demonstrated. Several different protein crystals, including selenium-labeled, were used for data collection and successful SAD phasing. Without the common procedure of crystal handling and subsequent cryo-cooling for data collection atT= 100 K, crystals in a crystallization buffer show remarkably low mosaicity (<0.1°) until deterioration by radiation damage occurs. Data presented here show that cryo-cooling can cause some unexpected structural changes. Based on the results of this study, the integration of the plate scanner into the 19-ID end-station with automated controls is being prepared. With improvement of hardware and software,in situdata collection will become available for the SBC user program including remote access.

  2. An Analysis of the Effect on the Data Processing of Korea GPS Network by the Absolute Phase Center Variations of GPS Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jeongho; Lim, Hyung-Chul; Jo, Jung Hyun; Cho, Sungki; Cho, Jung-Ho

    2006-12-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) has prepared for a transition from the relative phase center variation (PCV) to the absolute PCV, because the terrestrial scale problem of the absolute PCV was resolved by estimating the PCV of the GPS satellites. Thus, the GPS data will be processed by using the absolute PCV which will be an IGS standard model in the near future. It is necessary to compare and analyze the results between the relative PCV and the absolute PCV for the establishment of the reliable processing strategy. This research analyzes the effect caused by the absolute PCV via the GPS network data processing. First, the four IGS stations, Daejeon, Suwon, Beijing and Wuhan, are selected to make longer baselines than 1000 km, and processed by using the relative PCV and the absolute PCV to examine the effect of the antenna raydome. Beijing and Wuhan stations of which the length of baselines are longer than 1000 km show the average difference of 1.33 cm in the vertical! component, and 2.97 cm when the antenna raydomes are considered. Second, the 7 permanent GPS stations among the total 9 stations, operated by Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, are processed by applying the relative PCV and the absolute PCV, and their results are compared and analyzed. An insignificant effect of the absolute PCV is shown in Korea regional network with the average difference of 0.12 cm in the vertical component.

  3. The Beta-hCG + Erythropoietin in Acute Stroke (BETAS) study A three center, single dose, open label, non-controlled, Phase IIa safety trial

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Steven C.; Fitzpatrick, Camille; Warren, Michael; Hill, Michael D.; Brown, David; Whitaker, Laura; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Plon, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Background Animal data suggest the utility beta-hCG followed by erythropoietin to promote brain repair after stroke. The current study directly translated these results by evaluating safety of this sequential growth factor therapy via a three center, single dose, open label, non-controlled, Phase IIa trial. Methods Patients with ischemic stroke 24–48 hours old and NIHSS score of 6–24 started a nine day course of beta-hCG (once-daily on days 1, 3 and 5 of study participation) followed by erythropoietin (once-daily on days 7, 8, and 9 of study participation). This study also evaluated performance of serially measured domain-specific endpoints. Results A total of 15 patients were enrolled. Two deaths occurred, neither related to study medications. No safety concerns were noted among clinical or laboratory measures, including screening for DVT and serial measures of serum hemoglobin. In several instances, domain-specific endpoints provided greater insight into impairments as compared to global outcome measures. Conclusions Results support the safety of this sequential, two growth factor therapy initiated 24–48 hours after stroke onset. PMID:20203320

  4. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of phase 4: Knowledge and attitudes survey, academic and industrial personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Glassman, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback from engineers and scientists in the academic and industrial community provided an assessment of the usage and perceived quality of NASA Langley generated STI and the familiarity and usage of selected NASA publications and services and identified ways to increase the accessibility of Langley STI. The questionnaire utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the seven objectives for Phase IV. From a contact list of nearly 1,200 active industrial and academic researchers, approximately 600 addresses were verified. The 497 persons who agreed to participate were mailed questionnaires. The 381 completed questionnaires received by the cutoff date were analyzed. Based on the survey findings, recommendations were made for increasing the familiarity with and use of NASA and Langley STI and selected NASA publications and services. In addition, recommendations were made for increasing the accessibility of Langley STI.

  5. Occurrence assessment for disinfectants and disinfection by-products (phase 6A) in public drinking water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    The EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water is developing national primary drinking water regulations for disinfectant and disinfection by-product contaminants. Thirteen contaminants are being considered to be regulated under Phase 6. These contaminants, referred to as Phase 6a, are the subject of the report. The information is important for setting the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal for a contaminant. The exposure information also is used to estimate the baseline health impact assessment of current levels and for evaluation of the health benefits of the regulatory alternatives.

  6. The effect of water fluoride concentration on dental caries and fluorosis in five Iran provinces: A multi-center two-phase study

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Gholamhossein; Valaie, Nasser; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Water fluoride level is unknown in many regions of Iran. Besides, only few non-controlled studies world-wide have assessed the effect of water fluoride on dental fluorosis and caries. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of 76 water supplies in 54 cities and evaluate the effect of fluoride on dental caries and fluorosis in a large multi-project study. Materials and Methods: In the first phase (cross-sectional), fluoride levels of 76 water tanks in 54 cities/villages in five provinces of Iran were randomly evaluated in five subprojects. In the second phase (retrospective cohort), 1127 middle school children (563 cohort and 564 control subjects) in the high and low ends of fluoride concentration in each subproject were visited. Their decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) and fluorosis states were assessed. The data were analyzed using Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and independent-samples t-test (α = 0.05). Results: Mean fluoride level was 0.298 ± 0.340 mg/L in 54 cities/villages. Only eight water tanks had fluoride levels within the normal range and only one was higher than normal and the rest (67 tanks) were all at low levels. Overall, a significant association was observed between fluoride level and fluorosis. However, this was not the case in all areas, as in 2 of 5 provinces, the effect of fluoride on fluorosis was not confirmed. In 4 of the 5 areas studied, there was a significant link between fluoride level and DMFT. Conclusion: Extremely low fluoride levels in Iran cities are an alarming finding and need attention. Higher fluoride is likely to reduce dental caries while increasing fluorosis. This finding was not confirmed in all the areas studied. PMID:25709672

  7. Stimulated recall methodology for assessing work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Li, Yaqiong; Kelly, Michelle M; DuBenske, Lori L; Xie, Anping; McCabe, Brenna; Orne, Jason; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2014-11-01

    Human factors and ergonomics methods are needed to redesign healthcare processes and support patient-centered care, in particular for vulnerable patients such as hospitalized children. We implemented and evaluated a stimulated recall methodology for collective confrontation in the context of family-centered rounds. Five parents and five healthcare team members reviewed video records of their bedside rounds, and were then interviewed using the stimulated recall methodology to identify work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds. The evaluation of the methodology was based on a survey of the participants, and a qualitative analysis of interview data in light of the work system model of Smith and Carayon (1989, 2001). Positive survey feedback from the participants was received. The stimulated recall methodology identified barriers and facilitators in all work system elements. Participatory ergonomics methods such as the stimulated recall methodology allow a range of participants, including parents and children, to participate in healthcare process improvement.

  8. The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS): Risk assessment and real-time toxicovigilance across United States poison centers

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, William A.; Litovitz, Toby L. . E-mail: toby@poison.org; Belson, Martin G.; Kilbourne, Edwin

    2005-09-01

    The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) is a uniform data set of US poison centers cases. Categories of information include the patient, the caller, the exposure, the substance(s), clinical toxicity, treatment, and medical outcome. The TESS database was initiated in 1985, and provides a baseline of more than 36.2 million cases through 2003. The database has been utilized for a number of safety evaluations. Consideration of the strengths and limitations of TESS data must be incorporated into data interpretation. Real-time toxicovigilance was initiated in 2003 with continuous uploading of new cases from all poison centers to a central database. Real-time toxicovigilance utilizing general and specific approaches is systematically run against TESS, further increasing the potential utility of poison center experiences as a means of early identification of potential public health threats.

  9. Stimulated Recall Methodology for Assessing Work System Barriers and Facilitators in Family-Centered Rounds in a Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Li, Yaqiong; Kelly, Michelle M.; DuBenske, Lori L.; Xie, Anping; McCabe, Brenna; Orne, Jason; Cox, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics methods are needed to redesign healthcare processes and support patient-centered care, in particular for vulnerable patients such as hospitalized children. We implemented and evaluated a stimulated recall methodology for collective confrontation in the context of family-centered rounds. Five parents and five healthcare team members reviewed video records of their bedside rounds, and were then interviewed using the stimulated recall methodology to identify work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds. The evaluation of the methodology was based on a survey of the participants, and a qualitative analysis of interview data in light of the work system model of Smith and Carayon (1989; 2000). Positive survey feedback from the participants was received. The stimulated recall methodology identified barriers and facilitators in all work system elements. Participatory ergonomics methods such as the stimulated recall methodology allow a range of participants, including parents and children, to participate in healthcare process improvement. PMID:24894378

  10. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP): Overview of Phase II Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearns, L. O.

    2008-12-01

    NARCCAP is an international program that serves the climate scenario needs of the United States, Canada, and northern Mexico. We are systematically investigating the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and producing high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models(RCMs)and multiple global model responses to a future emission scenario, by nesting the RCMs within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, over a domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The project also includes a validation component through nesting the participating RCMs within NCEP reanalyses. The basic spatial resolution of the RCM simulations is 50 km. This program includes RCMs that participated in the European PRUDENCE program (HadRM3 and RegCM), the Canadian regional climate model (CRCM) as well as the NCEP regional spectral model (RSM), the NCAR/PSU MM5, and NCAR WRF. AOGCMs include the Hadley Centre HadCM3, NCAR CCSM3, the Canadian CGCM3 and the GFDL model. The resulting climate model runs form the basis for multiple high resolution climate scenarios that can be used in climate change impacts assessments over North America. High resolution (50 km) global time-slice experiments based on the GFDL atmospheric model (AM2.1) and the NCAR atmospheric model (CAM3) have also been produced and will be compared with the simulations of the regional models. There also will be opportunities for double nesting over key regions through which additional modelers in the regional modeling community will be able to participate in NARCCAP. Additional key science issues are being investigated such as the importance of compatible physics in the nested and nesting models. Measures of uncertainty across the multiple runs are being developed by geophysical statisticians. In this overview talk, results from Phase II of the project, the RCM simulations using boundary conditions from the

  11. A Review and Evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of Phase I--Knowledge and Attitudes Survey, LaRC Research Personnel. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; And Others

    As Phase I of a comprehensive evaluation of the NASA-affiliated Langley Research Center's (LaRC) scientific and technical information (STI) program, an internal survey was conducted to obtain feedback from LaRC scientists and engineers concerning the effectiveness of the STI program. The first stage of the survey, which involved interviews with 64…

  12. The Assessment of Business and Industry Needs. Phase 2 of Multi-County Assessment of Adult Needs Project (MAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLennan Community Coll., TX.

    The McLennan Community College Multi-County Needs Assessment Project's (MAP) survey to identify employer needs is discussed in the document. The Business and Industry Survey, one component of MAP, was conducted in the central Texas area (Bosque, Falls, Hill, and McLennan counties) during 1974-1975. Survey development and procedures for its…

  13. The Assessment of Adult Needs; Phase I of Multi-County Assessment of Adult Needs Project (MAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, L. G.; And Others

    In order to assess the felt needs and interests of the local population and business community relative to education and training, a survey was designed and implemented in the four-county area surrounding Waco, Texas. This volume, part one of a three part series documents the work done in developing and conducting the community needs assessment…

  14. Assessment of Foot Trajectory for Human Gait Phase Detection Using Wireless Ultrasonic Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new highly accurate gait phase detection system using wearable wireless ultrasonic sensors, which can be used in gait analysis or rehabilitation applications. The gait phase detection system uses the foot displacement information during walking to extract the following gait phases: heel-strike, heel-off, toe-off, and mid-swing. The displacement of foot-mounted ultrasonic sensor is obtained from several passive anchors placed at known locations by employing local spherical positioning technique, which is further enhanced by the combination of recursive Newton-Gauss method and Kalman Filter. The algorithm performance is examined by comparing with a commercial optical motion tracking system with ten healthy subjects and two foot injured subjects. Accurate estimates of gait cycle (with an error of -0.02 ±0.01 s), stance phase(with an error of 0.04±0.03 s), and swing phase (with an error of -0.05±0.03 s) compared to the reference system are obtained. We have also investigated the influence of walking velocities on the performance of the proposed gait phase detection algorithm. Statistical analysis shows that there is no significant difference between both systems during different walking speeds. Moreover, we have tested and discussed the possibility of the proposed system for clinical applications by analyzing the experimental results for both healthy and injured subjects. The experiments show that the estimated gait phases have the potential to become indicators for sports and rehabilitation engineering.

  15. An Exploratory Study on Using Wiki to Foster Student Teachers' Learner-Centered Learning and Self and Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eugenia M. W.; Lai, Yiu Chi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an exploratory study that examined whether a wiki-based project could foster student-centered learning. Student teachers were divided into five groups to tackle a group project which involved creating digital learning materials on wiki that could teach information technology (IT) to secondary school students. As assessment…

  16. ASSESSMENT OF DIOXIN INHALATION EXPOSURES AND POTENTIAL HEALTH IMPACTS FOLLOWING THE COLLAPSE OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER TOWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the days following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) towers, EPA, other federal agencies, and New York City and New York State public health and environmental authorities initiated numerous air monitoring activities to better ...

  17. ASSESSING CARCINOGENIC POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) LEVELS IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE NEW YORK WORLD TRADE CENTER DISASTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on Sept. 11, 2001 (9/11) created an immense dust cloud followed by fires that emitted smoke and soot into the air of New York City (NYC) well into December. Outdoor pollutant levels in lower Manhattan returned to urban...

  18. A Population-Based Survival Assessment of Categorizing Level III and IV Rural Hospitals as Trauma Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Melanie; Newgard, Craig D.; Mullins, Richard J.; Diggs, Brian S.; Stone, Judith V.; Adams, Annette L.; Hedges, Jerris R.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Patients injured in rural areas are hypothesized to have improved outcomes if statewide trauma systems categorize rural hospitals as Level III and IV trauma centers, though evidence to support this belief is sparse. Purpose: To determine if there is improved survival among injured patients hospitalized in states that categorize rural…

  19. Caregiver Objective Burden and Assessments of Patient-Centered, Family-Focused Care for Frail Elderly Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Julia Hannum; Bowman, Karen F.; O'Toole, Elizabeth E.; Abbott, Katherine; Love, Thomas E.; Thomas, Charles; Dawson, Neal V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing consensus that quality of care for frail elders should include family and be evaluated in terms of patient-centered, family-focused care (PCFFC). Family caregivers are in a unique and sometimes sole position to evaluate such care. In the context of caring for physically frail elders, this study examined the extent to…

  20. Tank waste remediation system phase I high-level waste feed processability assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, S.L.; Stegen, G.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This report evaluates the effects of feed composition on the Phase I high-level waste immobilization process and interim storage facility requirements for the high-level waste glass.Several different Phase I staging (retrieval, blending, and pretreatment) scenarios were used to generate example feed compositions for glass formulations, testing, and glass sensitivity analysis. Glass models and data form laboratory glass studies were used to estimate achievable waste loading and corresponding glass volumes for various Phase I feeds. Key issues related to feed process ability, feed composition, uncertainty, and immobilization process technology are identified for future consideration in other tank waste disposal program activities.