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Sample records for assessment study pts

  1. Environmental liability assessments at PTS facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McNeish, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Pipeline, Terminal and Storage (PTS) facilities have inherent environmental liabilities due to the handling and use of hazardous materials and the potential for release to the environment. Defining the potential cost of the environmental liability for a PTS facility requires assessment of the activities, events, and facilities which may contribute to environmental damage. Such environmental liability assessments contain significant uncertainty. The extent of contamination, potential for a spill, probable environmental damage from a spill, or remediation cost of existing contamination may not be known. Including the uncertainty in such assessments provides a more realistic portrayal of the potential environmental liability of a PTS facility than a simple deterministic assessment. The environmental liabilities which may be associated with PTS facilities are presented in Section 2. An approach to cost risk assessment of environmental liabilities is discussed in Section 3, followed by an example cost risk analysis in Section 4 and a brief summary in Section 5.

  2. Assessing Safety of Pneumatic Tube System (PTS) for Patients with Very Low Hematologic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Koroglu, Mustafa; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Berber, Ilhami; Nizam, Ilknur; Yagar, Yavuz; Kayis, Seyit Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Preventive interventions save lives during the process of chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies, when a hematology laboratory can ensure accurate results. The use of a pneumatic tube system (PTS) is associated with measurement errors and unnecessary transfusions. The aim of this study was to evaluate pre-analytical errors associated with transportation method (PTS versus hand-delivered) and to investigate whether there are unnecessary transfusion events in pancytopenia leukemia patients with very low hematological parameters. Material/Methods A total of 140 paired blood collections were performed for hemogram and biochemistry assays. Paired EDTA and serum gel blood samples were collected from 58 cases with acute leukemia on different days. For each pair, one sample was hand-delivered by a courier (Group 1) while the other sample was transported through a PTS (Group 2). Results The hand-delivered method showed that some platelet transfusions were unnecessary for different thrombocyte cut-off values. Calculated unnecessary platelet (PLT) transfusion ratios when using PTS (PLT <30×103/μL, 16.3%; PLT <25×103/μL, 16.4%; PLT <20×103/μL, 80.3%; PLT <15×103/μL, 48.6%; and PLT <10×103/μL, 150.0%) were found to be statistically significant (p=0.002, p=0.046, p<0.000, p=0.028, and p<0.000, respectively). In contrast, for RBC transfusion ratios, although the ratios were high in Group 2, we found no significant difference between the two groups; (HGB <8.0 g/dL, 23.3%; HGB <9.0 g/dL, 25.0%, HGB<10.0 g/dL, 19.3%) and (p=0.002, p=0.085, p<0.160, and p=0.235, respectively). Conclusions Although our results cannot be universally applied, physicians should be careful, skeptical, and suspicious of transfusion decisions in hematology clinics and consider potential analytical and pre-analytical errors in cases of severe cytopenia when using PTS. PMID:27097101

  3. Assessment of the Accutrend GCT and PTS CardioChek meters to measure blood triglyceride concentrations in cats.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Elissa K; Dhand, Navneet K; Baral, Randolph M; Snow, David H; Malik, Richard; Govendir, Merran

    2010-06-01

    Point-of-care (POC) meters that determine whole blood triglyceride (TG) concentrations are used in human medicine to monitor both fasting and post-prandial TG concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate their performance for determining feline TG concentrations. A total of 116 venous blood samples were collected from 55 cats. TG concentrations were measured in whole blood using two meters: the Accutrend glucose cholesterol triglyceride (GCT) (GCT: Roche Diagnostics) and PTS CardioChek (PTS - Polymer Technology Systems), and results compared to those determined by a National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA) accredited veterinary laboratory. The GCT was not suitable for use in cats with normal TG concentrations (<0.9 mmol/l), as it overestimated almost 80% of the values; however, this device performed better with TG concentrations between 0.9 and 2.0 mmol/l. The PTS meter performed well in cats with normal TG concentrations, correctly classifying 90% of values as 'normal', and fairly well with TG concentrations <2.0 mmol/l. The PTS meter could be used to determine whether cats have normal fasting TG concentrations or predict mild elevations in serum TG, whereas the GCT meter can only be used to predict cats with elevated TG concentrations. Although both meters have limitations in determining some TG concentrations, the PTS in particular, could be used as a screening tool to distinguish normal cats to those with hypertriglyceridaemia. PMID:20207565

  4. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  5. Review of thermal-hydraulic calculations for Calvert Cliffs and H. B. Robinson PTS study. [Pressurized thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.H.; Yuelys-Miksis, C.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic transient calculations performed by LANL using the TRAC-PF1 code and by INEL using the RELAP5 code for the USNRC pressurized thermal shock (PTS) study of the Calvert Cliffs and H.B. Robinson Nuclear Power Plants have been reviewed at BNL including the input decks and steady state calculations. Furthermore, six transients for each plant have been selected for the in-depth review. Simple hand calculations based on the mass and energy balances of the entire reactor system, have been performed to predict the temperature and pressure of the reactor system, and the results have been compared with those obtained by the code calculation. In general, the temperatures and pressures of the primary system calculated by the codes have been very reasonable. The secondary pressures calculated by TRAC appear to indicate that the codes have some difficulty with the condensation model and further work is needed to assess the code calculation of the U-tube steam generator pressure when the cold auxiliary feedwater is introduced to the steam generator. However, it is not expected that this uncertainty would affect the transient calculations significantly.

  6. Cerebral blood flow in patients (PTS) exposed to neurotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, G.; Mena, I.; Thomas, C.

    1994-05-01

    Exposure to neurotoxic chemicals as pesticides, glues, solvents, etc. are known to induce neurologic and psychiatric symptomatology. We report on 72 pts, 33 young pts, 8 males, and 26 females, age 55 (7) yrs, 15 of them exposed to pesticides, and 37 to solvents. They were studied with quantitative and qualitative analysis of rCBF performed with 30 mCi of Xe-133 (Xe) by inhalation followed by 30 mCi of Tc-HMPAO given IV. Imaging was performed with a brain dedicated system, and distribution of rCBF was assessed with automatic ROI definition, and HMPAO normalized to maximal pixel activity in the brain. Results of Xe rCBF are expressed as mean and (S.D.) in ml/min/100g, and HMPAO as mean and (S.D.) uptake per ROI and compared with age-matched controls, 10 young and 20 elderly individuals, and also to a group of 36 elderly chronic fatigue pts (CFS), and 26 depression pts. CBF was diminished in young and elderly, 45 (7) and 40 (7) ml/min 100g, p<0.02 for both groups. Thus we conclude that pts exposed to chemicals present with diminished CBF, worse in elderly in the right dorsal frontal and parietal lobes, and in young, in left dorsal frontal and temporal lobes. These findings are significantly different from observations in pts and chronic fatigue and depression.

  7. Endosafe(R)-Portable Test System (PTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Burbank, Dan

    2005-01-01

    The Portable Test System (PTS) is a hand-held device for monitoring the presence of potentially hazardous bacteria in the environment. It uses an immunological method derived from the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) to detect bacterial cell membranes and other molecular components of a cell. Further modifications of the PTS will allow detection of individual hazardous species of bacteria. This study was a follow-up of previous PTS and other immunological tests performed on the KC-135 during 2002-2003 (Maule et al., 2003, J. Gravit. Physiol.) and in the underwater habitat Aquarius during NEEMO 5 (Maule et al., 2005, Appl. Environ. Microbiol in prep.). The experiments described here were part of a final testing phase prior to use of the PTS on the International Space Station (ISS), scheduled for launch on 12A.1 on February 9th 2006. The specific aspects of PTS operation studied were those involving a fluid component: pumping, mixing, incubations and pipetting into the instrument. The PTS uses a stepper motor to move fluid along small channels, which may be affected by reduced gravity.

  8. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  9. A porous Mn(V) coordination framework with PtS topology: assessment of the influence of a terminal nitride on CO2 sorption.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael J; D'Alessandro, Deanna M; Kepert, Cameron J

    2013-10-01

    A new coordination framework material, [Zn{MnN(CN)4(H2O)}]·2H2O·MeOH, has been characterised crystallographically and the effect of a terminal nitride on the N2, H2 and CO2 sorption capacities of the material assessed through porosimetery measurements and DRIFTS.

  10. Fidelity of Implementing an Assessment Translation and Adaptation Framework in a Study of an Emerging International Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Magda Yanira

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the complex process of translation and adaptation of two Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) performance tasks (PTs), originally developed in English for American students, into the languages and cultures of five participating countries. Focusing on confirming evidence bits (CEBs), disconfirming evidence bits (DEBs), and no…

  11. Mildly compromised tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor biosynthesis due to Pts variants leads to unusual body fat distribution and abdominal obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Korner, Germaine; Scherer, Tanja; Adamsen, Dea; Rebuffat, Alexander; Crabtree, Mark; Rassi, Anahita; Scavelli, Rossana; Homma, Daigo; Ledermann, Birgit; Konrad, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Wolfrum, Christian; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klingenspor, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Wolf, Eckhard; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Blau, Nenad; Rozman, Jan; Thöny, Beat

    2016-03-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases, alkylglycerol monooxygenase, and nitric oxide synthases (NOS). Inborn errors of BH4 metabolism lead to severe insufficiency of brain monoamine neurotransmitters while augmentation of BH4 by supplementation or stimulation of its biosynthesis is thought to ameliorate endothelial NOS (eNOS) dysfunction, to protect from (cardio-) vascular disease and/or prevent obesity and development of the metabolic syndrome. We have previously reported that homozygous knock-out mice for the 6-pyruvolytetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS; Pts-ko/ko) mice with no BH4 biosynthesis die after birth. Here we generated a Pts-knock-in (Pts-ki) allele expressing the murine PTPS-p.Arg15Cys with low residual activity (15% of wild-type in vitro) and investigated homozygous (Pts-ki/ki) and compound heterozygous (Pts-ki/ko) mutants. All mice showed normal viability and depending on the severity of the Pts alleles exhibited up to 90% reduction of PTPS activity concomitant with neopterin elevation and mild reduction of total biopterin while blood L-phenylalanine and brain monoamine neurotransmitters were unaffected. Yet, adult mutant mice with compromised PTPS activity (i.e., Pts-ki/ko, Pts-ki/ki or Pts-ko/wt) had increased body weight and elevated intra-abdominal fat. Comprehensive phenotyping of Pts-ki/ki mice revealed alterations in energy metabolism with proportionally higher fat content but lower lean mass, and increased blood glucose and cholesterol. Transcriptome analysis indicated changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes associated with obesity, weight loss, hepatic steatosis, and insulin sensitivity were consistent with the observed phenotypic alterations. We conclude that reduced PTPS activity concomitant with mildly compromised BH4-biosynthesis leads to abnormal body fat distribution and abdominal obesity at least in mice. This study associates a novel

  12. Emerging Theoretical Models of Reading through Authentic Assessments among Preservice Teachers: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oboler, Eileen S.; Gupta, Abha

    2010-01-01

    This two-part study examines the emerging understanding of the reading process among preservice teachers (PTs), enrolled in a teacher preparation course on diagnostic reading. The study focuses on the use of reading assessment tools to understand the process of reading, while using reading inventories for diagnostic as well as pedagogical…

  13. Next Generation LOCAD-PTS Cartridge Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, H.; Nutter, D.; Weite, E.; Wells, M.; Maule, J.; Damon, M.; Monaco, L.; Steele, A.; Wainwright, N.

    2008-01-01

    Future astrobiology exploration missions will require rapid, point-of-use techniques for surface science experiments and contamination monitoring. The Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) team is developing operational instruments that advance spaceflight technologies to molecular-based methods. Currently, LOCAD-Portable Test System (PTS) is quantifying levels of the bacterial molecule endotoxin onboard the Internatioal Space Station. Future research and development will focus on more sensitive molecular techniques that expand the number of compounds detected to include beta-glucan from fungal cell walls.

  14. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Huang, X. B.; Zhou, S. T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Dan, J. K.; Li, J.; Cai, H. C.; Wang, K. L.; Ouyang, K.; Xu, Q.; Duan, S. C.; Chen, G. H.; Wang, M.; Feng, S. P.; Yang, L. B.; Xie, W. P.; Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  15. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Zhang, S. Q. Dan, J. K. Li, J. Cai, H. C. Wang, K. L. Ouyang, K. Xu, Q. Duan, S. C. Chen, G. H. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  16. The methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha contains an inducible import pathway for peroxisomal matrix proteins with an N-terminal targeting signal (PTS2 proteins).

    PubMed

    Faber, K N; Haima, P; Gietl, C; Harder, W; Ab, G; Veenhuis, M

    1994-12-20

    Two main types of peroxisomal targeting signals have been identified that reside either at the extreme C terminus (PTS1) or the N terminus (PTS2) of the protein. In the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha the majority of peroxisomal matrix proteins are of the PTS1 type. Thus far, for H. polymorpha only amine oxidase (AMO) has been shown to contain a PTS2 type signal. In the present study we expressed H. polymorpha AMO under control of the strong endogenous alcohol oxidase promoter. Partial import of AMO into peroxisomes was observed in cells grown in methanol/(NH4)2SO4-containing medium. However, complete import of AMO occurred if the cells were grown under conditions that induce expression of the endogenous AMO gene. Similar results were obtained when the heterologous PTS2 proteins, glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase from watermelon and thiolase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were synthesized in H. polymorpha. The import of PTS1 proteins, however, was not affected by the growth conditions. These results indicate that the reduced rate of AMO import in (NH4)2SO4-grown cells is not due to competition with PTS1 proteins for the same import pathway. Apparently, AMO is imported via a separate pathway that is induced by amines and functions for PTS2 proteins in general.

  17. The small RNA SgrS controls sugar–phosphate accumulation by regulating multiple PTS genes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Jennifer B.; Vanderpool, Carin K.

    2011-01-01

    A number of bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) act as global regulators of stress responses by controlling expression of multiple genes. The sRNA SgrS is expressed in response to glucose–phosphate stress, a condition associated with disruption of glycolytic flux and accumulation of sugar–phosphates. SgrS has been shown to stimulate degradation of the ptsG mRNA, encoding the major glucose transporter. This study demonstrates that SgrS regulates the genes encoding the mannose and secondary glucose transporter, manXYZ. Analysis of manXYZ mRNA stability and translation in the presence and absence of SgrS indicate that manXYZ is regulated by SgrS under stress conditions and when SgrS is ectopically expressed. In vitro footprinting and in vivo mutational analyses showed that SgrS base pairs with manXYZ within the manX coding sequence to prevent manX translation. Regulation of manX did not require the RNase E degradosome complex, suggesting that the primary mechanism of regulation is translational. An Escherichia coli ptsG mutant strain that is manXYZ+ experiences stress when exposed to the glucose analogs α-methyl glucoside or 2-deoxyglucose. A ptsG manXYZ double mutant is resistant to the stress, indicating that PTS transporters encoded by both SgrS targets are involved in taking up substrates that cause stress. PMID:21245045

  18. Structural insights into cargo recognition by the yeast PTS1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Stefanie; Drepper, Friedel; Fischer, Sven; Fodor, Krisztian; Passon, Daniel; Platta, Harald W; Zenn, Michael; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Wilmanns, Matthias; Warscheid, Bettina; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-10-30

    The peroxisomal matrix protein import is facilitated by cycling import receptors that shuttle between the cytosol and the peroxisomal membrane. The import receptor Pex5p mediates the import of proteins harboring a peroxisomal targeting signal of type I (PTS1). Purified recombinant Pex5p forms a dimeric complex with the PTS1-protein Pcs60p in vitro with a KD of 0.19 μm. To analyze the structural basis for receptor-cargo recognition, the PTS1 and adjacent amino acids of Pcs60p were systematically scanned for Pex5p binding by an in vitro site-directed photo-cross-linking approach. The cross-linked binding regions of the receptor were subsequently identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Most cross-links were found with TPR6, TPR7, as well as the 7C-loop of Pex5p. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a bivalent interaction mode for Pex5p and Pcs60p. Interestingly, Pcs60p lacking its C-terminal tripeptide sequence was efficiently cross-linked to the same regions of Pex5p. The KD value of the interaction of truncated Pcs60p and Pex5p was in the range of 7.7 μm. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed a monovalent binding mode for the interaction of Pex5p and Pcs60p lacking the PTS1. Our data indicate that Pcs60p contains a second contact site for its receptor Pex5p, beyond the C-terminal tripeptide. The physiological relevance of the ancillary binding region was supported by in vivo import studies. The bivalent binding mode might be explained by a two-step concept as follows: first, cargo recognition and initial tethering by the PTS1-receptor Pex5p; second, lock-in of receptor and cargo. PMID:26359497

  19. Family and Individual Factors Associated with Substance Involvement and PTS Symptoms among Adolescents in Greater New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; La Greca, Annette M.; Alexandersson, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of hurricane impact as well as family and individual risk factors on posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and substance involvement among clinically referred adolescents affected by Hurricane Katrina. Method: A total of 80 adolescents (87% male; 13-17 years old; mean age = 15.6 years; 38% minorities) and…

  20. Molecular recognition of PTS-1 cargo proteins by Pex5p: implications for protein mistargeting in primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L

    2015-02-13

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3-4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state.

  1. PTS Infrasound portable array in Tunisia: Deployment and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, Mohamed; Khemiri, Lotfi; Mialle, Pierrick; Le Pichon, Alexis; Vergoz, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Within the scope of a scientific collaboration between the Tunisian NDC and the PTS an infrasound portable array (I66TN) were deployed in Tunisia for 6 Months starting from 15th of May 2013 till 15th of November 2013. The 4 sites of the portable array were installed in the mountain ranges surrounding the city of Aïn Draham in northwest of Tunisia with an aperture of about 1KM. The installation was done by Dr. Pierrick Mialle, a representative from the PTS, together with a team from the Tunisian NDC. Data retrieval is performed by the Tunisian NDC team on a periodic basis. The Data recorded by I66TN and the data recorded by the IMS Infrasound Station I48TN during the same period were processed. A bulletin of the fusion of the data of the two stations was created with the support of the French NDC. In this poster, we will present the different steps of the deployment of the station I66TN and show the results of the data processing and data fusion.

  2. Novel peroxisomal protease Tysnd1 processes PTS1- and PTS2-containing enzymes involved in β-oxidation of fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Kurochkin, Igor V; Mizuno, Yumi; Konagaya, Akihiko; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schönbach, Christian; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisomes play an important role in β-oxidation of fatty acids. All peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized in the cytosol and post-translationally sorted to the organelle. Two distinct peroxisomal signal targeting sequences (PTSs), the C-terminal PTS1 and the N-terminal PTS2, have been defined. Import of precursor PTS2 proteins into the peroxisomes is accompanied by a proteolytic removal of the N-terminal targeting sequence. Although the PTS1 signal is preserved upon translocation, many PTS1 proteins undergo a highly selective and limited cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that Tysnd1, a previously uncharacterized protein, is responsible both for the removal of the leader peptide from PTS2 proteins and for the specific processing of PTS1 proteins. All of the identified Tysnd1 substrates catalyze peroxisomal β-oxidation. Tysnd1 itself undergoes processing through the removal of the presumably inhibitory N-terminal fragment. Tysnd1 expression is induced by the proliferator-activated receptor α agonist bezafibrate, along with the increase in its substrates. A model is proposed where the Tysnd1-mediated processing of the peroxisomal enzymes promotes their assembly into a supramolecular complex to enhance the rate of β-oxidation. PMID:17255948

  3. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  4. Evaluation of a portable test system for assessing endotoxin activity in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yohko; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Shimamori, Toshio; Tsuchiya, Masakazu; Niehaus, Andrew; Lakritz, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare endotoxin activities detected in raw milk samples obtained from cattle by a commercially available portable test system (PTS) and traditional microplate limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assay, which determined activities using a kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Raw milk samples were obtained from 53 and 12 dairy cattle without and with clinical mastitis, respectively. Comparison between the KT and PTS was performed by the Friedman test. The Pearson product moment correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate associations between any two continuous variables. Linear regression model analysis was also performed to obtain the equation describing the relationship between PTS and KT assay. The endotoxin activities detected in 200- or 400-fold diluted milk samples were similar between PTS and KT assay, whereas a significant difference was observed in 100-fold diluted milk (P<0.001). The results obtained from 200- (r(2)=0.778, P<0.001) and 400-fold diluted milk samples (r(2)=0.945, P<0.001) using PTS correlated with those using KT assay. The median milk endotoxin activities in Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical mastitis cows were 0.655 and 11,523.5 EU/ml, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that PTS as a simple and easy test to assess endotoxin activity in raw milk is efficient, simple and reproducible. PMID:26279135

  5. Evaluation of a portable test system for assessing endotoxin activity in raw milk

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yohko; SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; SHIMAMORI, Toshio; TSUCHIYA, Masakazu; NIEHAUS, Andrew; LAKRITZ, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare endotoxin activities detected in raw milk samples obtained from cattle by a commercially available portable test system (PTS) and traditional microplate limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assay, which determined activities using a kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Raw milk samples were obtained from 53 and 12 dairy cattle without and with clinical mastitis, respectively. Comparison between the KT and PTS was performed by the Friedman test. The Pearson product moment correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate associations between any two continuous variables. Linear regression model analysis was also performed to obtain the equation describing the relationship between PTS and KT assay. The endotoxin activities detected in 200- or 400-fold diluted milk samples were similar between PTS and KT assay, whereas a significant difference was observed in 100-fold diluted milk (P<0.001). The results obtained from 200- (r2=0.778, P<0.001) and 400-fold diluted milk samples (r2=0.945, P<0.001) using PTS correlated with those using KT assay. The median milk endotoxin activities in Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical mastitis cows were 0.655 and 11,523.5 EU/ml, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that PTS as a simple and easy test to assess endotoxin activity in raw milk is efficient, simple and reproducible. PMID:26279135

  6. Regulation of the pts operon in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vadeboncoeur, C; Frenette, M; Lortie, L A

    2000-10-01

    The sugar transport system called phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) is widespread among eubacteria. Its is generally composed of two cytoplasmic proteins, HPr and El, which are found in all bacteria possessing a PTS, and a family of Ells whose number, specificity, and molecular structure in terms of domain arrangement vary from species to species. In low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the genes coding for the general proteins HPr and El, designated ptsH and ptsl respectively, are organized into the pts operon. In this paper, we summarize current knowledge about the regulation of the pts operon in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. Physiological data indicate that El and most particularly HPr make up a substantial proportion of cellular proteins. Their synthesis is not coordinated and is influenced by environmental factors. The principal DNA cis-elements involved in the regulation of pts operon transcription are a strong promoter whose sequence and structure are very similar to those of the canonical promoter recognized by the Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis major RNA polymerases, a 5'-untranslated region, a rho-dependent terminator located at the 5' end of ptsl, and an intrinsic terminator located downstream from ptsl. Analysis of ptsH and ptsl Shine-Dalgarno sequences as well as experimental results obtained with a Streptococcus salivarius mutant suggest that the expression of HPr and El is also controlled at the translation level.

  7. PredPlantPTS1: A Web Server for the Prediction of Plant Peroxisomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Sigrun; Buchwald, Daniela; Lingner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes) with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e., novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i) the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii) information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii) the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de.

  8. Children’s Postdisaster Trajectories of PTS Symptoms: Predicting Chronic Distress

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Betty S.; Llabre, Maria M.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no studies of the distinct trajectories of children’s psychological distress over the first year after a destructive natural disaster and the determinants of these trajectories. Objective We examined these issues using an existing dataset of children exposed to Hurricane Andrew, one of the most devastating natural disasters in US history. Methods At 3-months postdisaster, 568 children (55 % girls; grades 3–5) residing in areas most directly affected by the hurricane completed measures of hurricane exposure and stressors, social support, coping, and general anxiety. Children also reported major life events occurring since the hurricane (at 7-months) and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms at 3-, 7-, and 10-months postdisaster. Results Latent growth mixture modeling identified three trajectories of PTS reactions: resilient (37 %), recovering (43 %), and chronic distress (20 %). Predictors of the trajectories were examined. Odds ratios indicated that, compared to the resilient trajectory, girls were more likely to be in the recovering and chronically distressed trajectories, as were children reporting higher anxiety and greater use of coping strategies that reflected poor emotion regulation. Compared to the recovering trajectory, children in the chronically distressed trajectory had greater odds of reporting high anxiety, less social support, more intervening life events, and greater use of poor emotion regulation strategies. Conclusions Hurricane exposure may be less effective in identifying children who develop chronic postdisaster distress than other child (anxiety, coping) and contextual variables (social support, life events). Effective screening after disasters is critical for identifying youth most in need of limited clinical resources. PMID:24683300

  9. The DeoR-Type Regulator SugR Represses Expression of ptsG in Corynebacterium glutamicum▿

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Verena; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2007-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows on a variety of carbohydrates and organic acids. Uptake of the preferred carbon source glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) is reduced during coutilization of glucose with acetate, sucrose, or fructose compared to growth on glucose as the sole carbon source. Here we show that the DeoR-type regulator SugR (NCgl1856) represses expression of ptsG, which encodes the glucose-specific PTS enzyme II. Overexpression of sugR resulted in reduced ptsG mRNA levels, decreased glucose utilization, and perturbed growth on media containing glucose. In mutants lacking sugR, expression of the ptsG′-′cat fusion was increased two- to sevenfold during growth on gluconeogenic carbon sources but remained similar during growth on glucose or other sugars. As shown by DNA microarray analysis, SugR also regulates expression of other genes, including ptsS and the putative NCgl1859-fruK-ptsF operon. Purified SugR bound to DNA regions upstream of ptsG, ptsS, and NCgl1859, and a 75-bp ptsG promoter fragment was sufficient for SugR binding. Fructose-6-phosphate interfered with binding of SugR to the ptsG promoter DNA. Thus, while during growth on gluconeogenic carbon sources SugR represses ptsG, ptsG expression is derepressed during growth on glucose or under other conditions characterized by high fructose-6-phosphate concentrations, representing one mechanism which allows C. glutamicum to adapt glucose uptake to carbon source availability. PMID:17293426

  10. LOCAD-PTS: Operation of a New System for Microbial Monitoring Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maule, J.; Wainwright, N.; Steele, A.; Gunter, D.; Flores, G.; Effinger, M.; Danibm N,; Wells, M.; Williams, S.; Morris, H.; Monaco, L.

    2008-01-01

    Microorganisms within the space stations Salyut, Mir and the International Space Station (ISS), have traditionally been monitored with culture-based techniques. These techniques involve growing environmental samples (cabin water, air or surfaces) on agar-type media for several days, followed by visualization of resulting colonies; and return of samples to Earth for ground-based analysis. This approach has provided a wealth of useful data and enhanced our understanding of the microbial ecology within space stations. However, the approach is also limited by the following: i) More than 95% microorganisms in the environment cannot grow on conventional growth media; ii) Significant time lags occur between onboard sampling and colony visualization (3-5 days) and ground-based analysis (as long as several months); iii) Colonies are often difficult to visualize due to condensation within contact slide media plates; and iv) Techniques involve growth of potentially harmful microorganisms, which must then be disposed of safely. This report describes the operation of a new culture-independent technique onboard the ISS for rapid analysis (within minutes) of endotoxin and -1, 3-glucan, found in the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria and fungi, respectively. This technique involves analysis of environmental samples with the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay in a handheld device. This handheld device and sampling system is known as the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS). A poster will be presented that describes a comparative study between LOCAD-PTS analysis and existing culture-based methods onboard the ISS; together with an exploratory survey of surface endotoxin throughout the ISS. It is concluded that while a general correlation between LOCAD-PTS and traditional culture-based methods should not necessarily be expected, a combinatorial approach can be adopted where both sets of data are used together to generate a more complete story of

  11. Equity Assessment Study. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadale, LaVerna M.; Zhao, Peisheng

    This assessment study is a culminating activity of an eight-year initiative to facilitate gender equity and more equitable campus environments - Mentoring Institutional Equity in New York State Two-Year Colleges. Eighteen two-year colleges participated in the application and implementation of an educational equity model designed to enhance gender…

  12. Expression of the agmatine deiminase pathway in Enterococcus faecalis is activated by the AguR regulator and repressed by CcpA and PTS(Man) systems.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Cristian; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Víctor S; Magni, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the agmatine deiminase system (AgDI) has been investigated in Enterococcus faecalis, little information is available with respect to its gene regulation. In this study we demonstrate that the presence of exogenous agmatine induces the expression of agu genes in this bacterium. In contrast to the homologous and extensively characterized AgDI system of S. mutants, the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis is not induced in response to low pH. In spite of this, agmatine catabolism in this bacterium contributes by neutralizing the external medium while enhancing bacterial growth. Our results indicate that carbon catabolic repression (CCR) operates on the AgDI system via a mechanism that involves interaction of CcpA and P-Ser-HPr with a cre site found in an unusual position considering the aguB promoter (55 nt upstream the +1 position). In addition, we found that components of the mannose phosphotransferase (PTS(Man)) system also contributed to CCR in E. faecalis since a complete relief of the PTS-sugars repressive effect was observed only in a PTS(Man) and CcpA double defective strain. Our gene context analysis revealed that aguR is present in oral and gastrointestinal microorganisms. Thus, regulation of the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis seems to have evolved to obtain energy and resist low pH conditions in order to persist and colonize gastrointestinal niches.

  13. A ptsP deficiency in PGPR Pseudomonas fluorescens SF39a affects bacteriocin production and bacterial fitness in the wheat rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Godino, Agustina; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF39a is a plant-growth-promoting bacterium isolated from wheat rhizosphere. In this report, we demonstrate that this native strain secretes bacteriocins that inhibit growth of phytopathogenic strains of the genera Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. An S-type pyocin gene was detected in the genome of strain SF39a and named pys. A non-polar pys::Km mutant was constructed. The bacteriocin production was impaired in this mutant. To identify genes involved in bacteriocin regulation, random transposon mutagenesis was carried out. A miniTn5Km1 mutant, called P. fluorescens SF39a-451, showed strongly reduced bacteriocin production. This phenotype was caused by inactivation of the ptsP gene which encodes a phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase (EI(Ntr)) of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)). In addition, this mutant showed a decrease in biofilm formation and protease production, and an increase in surface motility and pyoverdine production compared with the wild-type strain. Moreover, we investigated the ability of strain SF39a-451 to colonize the wheat rhizosphere under greenhouse conditions. Interestingly, the mutant was less competitive than the wild-type strain in the rhizosphere. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of both the relevance of the ptsP gene in bacteriocin production and functional characterization of a pyocin S in P. fluorescens. PMID:26708985

  14. Single-Crystalline cooperite (PtS): Crystal-Chemical characterization, ESR spectroscopy, and {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvina, V. I. Ivanov, A. V.; Zaremba, M. A.; Antsutkin, O. N.; Forsling, W.

    2008-05-15

    Single-crystalline cooperite (PtS) with a nearly stoichiometric composition was characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, electron-probe X-ray microanalysis, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. For the first time it was demonstrated that {sup 195}Pt static and MAS NMR spectroscopy can be used for studying natural platinum minerals. The {sup 195}Pt chemical-shift tensor of cooperite was found to be consistent with the axial symmetry and is characterized by the following principal values: {delta}{sub xx} = -5920 ppm, {delta}{sub yy} = -3734 ppm, {delta}{sub zz} = +4023 ppm, and {delta}{sub iso} = -1850 ppm. According to the ESR data, the samples of cooperite contain copper(II), which is adsorbed on the surface during the layer-by-layer crystal growth and is not involved in the crystal lattice.

  15. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements. PMID:23764214

  16. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements.

  17. Low-Complexity SLM and PTS Schemes for PAPR Reduction in OFDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin-Liang; Ouyang, Yuan; Hsu, Ming-Yen

    One major drawback of orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing is the high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the output signal. The selected mapping (SLM) and partial transmit sequences (PTS) methods are two promising techniques for PAPR reduction. However, to generate a set of candidate signals, these techniques need a bank of inverse fast Fourier transforms (IFFT's) and thus require high computational complexity. In this paper, we propose two low-complexity multiplication-free conversion processes to replace the IFFT's in the SLM method, where each conversion process for an N-point IFFT involves only 3N complex additions. Using these proposed conversions, we develop several new SLM schemes and a combined SLM & PTS method, in which at least half of the IFFT blocks are reduced. Computer simulation results show that, compared to the conventional methods, these new schemes have approximately the same PAPR reduction performance under the same number of candidate signals for transmission selection.

  18. Indications of decreasing human PTS concentrations in North West Russia

    PubMed Central

    Rylander, Charlotta; Sandanger, Torkjel M.; Petrenya, Natalya; Konoplev, Alexei; Bojko, Evgeny; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2011-01-01

    Background The Russian Arctic covers an enormous landmass with diverse environments. It inhabits more than 20 different ethnic groups, all of them with various living conditions and food traditions. Indigenous populations with a traditional way of living are exposed to a large number of anthropogenic pollutants, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and toxic metals, mainly through the diet. Human monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals in the Russian Arctic has only been performed on irregular intervals over the past 15 years, thus, there is still a lack of baseline data from many ethnic groups and geographical regions. The aim of the current study was to investigate concentrations of POPs and toxic metals in three groups of indigenous people from the Russian Arctic. Plasma concentrations of POPs were measured in one of the locations (Nelmin-Nos) in 2001–2003 which gave the unique opportunity to compare concentrations over time in a small Russian arctic community. Methods During 2009 and early 2010, 209 blood samples were collected from three different study sites in North West Russia; Nelmin-Nos, Izhma and Usinsk. The three study sites are geographically separated and the inhabitants are expected to have different dietary habits and living conditions. All blood samples were analyzed for POPs and toxic metals. Results PCB 153 was present in highest concentrations of the 18 PCBs analyzed. p,p′-DDE and HCB were the two most dominating OC pesticides. Males had higher concentrations of PCB 138, 153 and 180 than women and age was a significant predictor of PCB 153, 180, HCB and p,p′-DDD. Males from Izhma had significantly higher concentrations of HCB than males from the other study sites and women from Usinsk had higher concentrations of p,p′-DDE. Parity was a significant predictor of p,p′-DDE. Hg and Pb concentrations increased with increasing age and males had significantly higher concentrations of Pb than women. The study

  19. Seryl-phosphorylated HPr regulates CcpA-independent carbon catabolite repression in conjunction with PTS permeases in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A

    2010-03-01

    Carbohydrate catabolite repression (CCR) in Streptococcus mutans can be independent of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) and requires specific components of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar:phosphotransferase system (PTS) permeases. Here, the effects of various ptsH (HPr) and hprK (HPr kinase/phosphatase) mutations on growth and CCR were evaluated. An hprKV265F mutation, which enhanced Ser46 phosphorylation of HPr, inhibited growth on multiple PTS sugars. A ptsHS46A mutation reversed the effects of hprKV265F in most cases. A strain carrying a ptsHS46D mutation, which mimics HPr(Ser-P), presented with more severe growth defects than the hprKV265F mutant. The hprKV265F mutant enhanced CCR of the fruA and levD operons, a phenotype reversible by the ptsHS46A mutation. The effects of the hprKV265F mutation on fruA and levD expression were independent of CcpA, but dependent on ManL (IIAB(Man)) and, to a lesser extent, on FruI (IIABC(Fru)), in a carbohydrate-specific fashion. Expression of the Bacillus subtilis ptsG gene in the manL mutant did not restore CCR of the lev or fru operons. The hprKV265F mutation inhibited growth on cellobiose and lactose, but only the transcription of the cel operon was decreased. Thus, in S. mutans, serine-phosphorylated HPr functions in concert with particular PTS permeases to prioritize carbohydrate utilization by modulating sugar transport and transcription of catabolic operons. PMID:20487301

  20. Assessing the quality of study reports on spa therapy based on randomized controlled trials by the spa therapy checklist (SPAC).

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Hiroharu; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Maeda, Masaharu; Hayasaka, Shinya; Okuizum, Hiroyasu; Goto, Yasuaki; Okada, Shinpei; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Abe, Takafumi

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of study reports on spa therapy based on randomized controlled trials by the spa therapy and balneotherapy checklist (SPAC), and to show the relationship between SPAC score and the characteristics of publication. We searched the following databases from 1990 up to September 30, 2013: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Ichushi Web, Global Health Library, the Western Pacific Region Index Medicus, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We used the SPAC to assess the quality of reports on spa therapy and balneotherapy trials (SPAC) that was developed using the Delphi consensus method. Fifty-one studies met all inclusion criteria. Forty studies (78%) were about "Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective)". The total SPAC score (full-mark; 19 pts) was 10.8 ± 2.3 pts (mean ± SD). The items for which a description was lacking (very poor; <50%) in many studies were as follows: "locations of spa facility where the data were collected"; "pH"; "scale of bathtub"; "presence of other facility and exposure than bathing (sauna, steam bath, etc.)"; "qualification and experience of care provider"; "Instructions about daily life" and "adherence". We clarified that there was no relationship between the publish period, languages, and the impact factor (IF) for the SPAC score. In order to prevent flawed description, SPAC could provide indispensable information for researchers who are going to design a research protocol according to each disease.

  1. PTS-Mediated Regulation of the Transcription Activator MtlR from Different Species: Surprising Differences despite Strong Sequence Conservation.

    PubMed

    Joyet, Philippe; Derkaoui, Meriem; Bouraoui, Houda; Deutscher, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The hexitol D-mannitol is transported by many bacteria via a phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In most Firmicutes, the transcription activator MtlR controls the expression of the genes encoding the D-mannitol-specific PTS components and D-mannitol-1-P dehydrogenase. MtlR contains an N-terminal helix-turn-helix motif followed by an Mga-like domain, two PTS regulation domains (PRDs), an EIIB(Gat)- and an EIIA(Mtl)-like domain. The four regulatory domains are the target of phosphorylation by PTS components. Despite strong sequence conservation, the mechanisms controlling the activity of MtlR from Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus are quite different. Owing to the presence of a tyrosine in place of the second conserved histidine (His) in PRD2, L. casei MtlR is not phosphorylated by Enzyme I (EI) and HPr. When the corresponding His in PRD2 of MtlR from B. subtilis and G. stearothermophilus was replaced with alanine, the transcription regulator was no longer phosphorylated and remained inactive. Surprisingly, L. casei MtlR functions without phosphorylation in PRD2 because in a ptsI (EI) mutant MtlR is constitutively active. EI inactivation prevents not only phosphorylation of HPr, but also of the PTS(Mtl) components, which inactivate MtlR by phosphorylating its EIIB(Gat)- or EIIA(Mtl)-like domain. This explains the constitutive phenotype of the ptsI mutant. The absence of EIIB(Mtl)-mediated phosphorylation leads to induction of the L. caseimtl operon. This mechanism resembles mtlARFD induction in G. stearothermophilus, but differs from EIIA(Mtl)-mediated induction in B. subtilis. In contrast to B. subtilis MtlR, L. casei MtlR activation does not require sequestration to the membrane via the unphosphorylated EIIB(Mtl) domain. PMID:26159071

  2. Variable length adjacent partitioning for PTS based PAPR reduction of OFDM signal

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Zeyid T.; Rahman, Md. Mijanur; Yaakob, S. N.; Razalli, Mohammad Shahrazel; Kadhim, Rasim A.

    2015-05-15

    Peak-to-Average power ratio (PAPR) is a major drawback in OFDM communication. It leads the power amplifier into nonlinear region operation resulting into loss of data integrity. As such, there is a strong motivation to find techniques to reduce PAPR. Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS) is an attractive scheme for this purpose. Judicious partitioning the OFDM data frame into disjoint subsets is a pivotal component of any PTS scheme. Out of the existing partitioning techniques, adjacent partitioning is characterized by an attractive trade-off between cost and performance. With an aim of determining effects of length variability of adjacent partitions, we performed an investigation into the performances of a variable length adjacent partitioning (VL-AP) and fixed length adjacent partitioning in comparison with other partitioning schemes such as pseudorandom partitioning. Simulation results with different modulation and partitioning scenarios showed that fixed length adjacent partition had better performance compared to variable length adjacent partitioning. As expected, simulation results showed a slightly better performance of pseudorandom partitioning technique compared to fixed and variable adjacent partitioning schemes. However, as the pseudorandom technique incurs high computational complexities, adjacent partitioning schemes were still seen as favorable candidates for PAPR reduction.

  3. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Ren, X. D. Dan, J. K. Wang, K. L. Zhang, S. Q. Li, J. Xu, Q. Cai, H. C. Duan, S. C. Ouyang, K. Chen, G. H. Ji, C. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  4. Cloning and molecular analysis of a mannitol operon of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase (PTS) type from Vibrio cholerae O395.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanath; Smith, Kenneth P; Floyd, Jody L; Varela, Manuel F

    2011-03-01

    A putative mannitol operon of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase (PTS) type was cloned from Vibrio cholerae O395, and its activity was studied in Escherichia coli. The 3.9-kb operon comprising three genes is organized as mtlADR. Based on the sequence analysis, these were identified as genes encoding a putative mannitol-specific enzyme IICBA (EII(Mtl)) component (MtlA), a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MtlD), and a mannitol operon repressor (MtlR). The transport of [(3)H]mannitol by the cloned mannitol operon in E. coli was 13.8 ± 1.4 nmol/min/mg protein. The insertional inactivation of EII(Mtl) abolished mannitol and sorbitol transport in V. cholerae O395. Comparison of the mannitol utilization apparatus of V. cholerae with those of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria suggests highly conserved nature of the system. MtlA and MtlD exhibit 75% similarity with corresponding sequences of E. coli mannitol operon genes, while MtlR has 63% similarity with MtlR of E. coli. The cloning of V. cholerae mannitol utilization system in an E. coli background will help in elucidating the functional properties of this operon.

  5. New PAPR Reduction in an OFDM System Using Hybrid of PTS-CAPPR Methods with GA Coded Side Information Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradabpet, Chusit; Yoshizawa, Shingo; Miyanaga, Yoshikazu; Dejhan, Kobchai

    In this paper, we propose a new PAPR reduction by using the hybrid of partial transmit sequences (PTS) and cascade adaptive peak power reduction (CAPPR) methods with side information (SI) technique coded by genetic algorithm (GA). These methods are used in an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) system. The OFDM employs orthogonal sub-carriers for data modulation. These sub-carriers unexpectedly present a large peak to average power ratio (PAPR) in some cases. A proposed reduction method realizes both the advantages of PTS and CAPPR at the same time. In order to obtain the optimum condition on PTS for PAPR reduction, a quite large calculation cost is demanded and thus it is impossible to obtain the optimum PTS in a short time. In the proposed method, by using the pseudo-optimum condition based on a GA coded SI technique, the total calculation cost becomes drastically reduced. In simulation results, the proposed method shows the improvement on PAPR and also reveals the high performance on bit error rate (BER) of an OFDM system.

  6. New PAPR Reduction in OFDM System Using Hybrid of PTS-APPR Methods with Coded Side Information Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradabpet, Chusit; Yoshizawa, Shingo; Miyanaga, Yoshikazu; Dejhan, Kobchai

    In this paper, we propose a new PAPR reduction by using the hybrid of a partial transmit sequences (PTS) and an adaptive peak power reduction (APPR) methods with coded side information (SI) technique. These methods are used in an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) system. The OFDM employs orthogonal sub-carriers for data modulation. These sub-carriers unexpectedly present a large Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) in some cases. In order to reduce PAPR, the sequence of input data is rearranged by PTS. The APPR method is also used to controls the peak level of modulation signals by an adaptive algorithm. A proposed reduction method consists of these two methods and realizes both advantages at the same time. In order to make the optimum condition on PTS for PAPR reduction, a quite large calculation cost must be demanded and thus it is impossible to obtain the optimum PTS. In the proposed method, by using the pseudo-optimum condition with a coded SI technique, the total calculation cost becomes drastically reduced. In simulation results, the proposed method shows the improvement on PAPR and also reveals the high performance on bit error rate (BER) of an OFDM system.

  7. MAP kinase phosphatase 1 harbors a novel PTS1 and is targeted to peroxisomes following stress treatments.

    PubMed

    Kataya, Amr R A; Schei, Edit; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-05-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, twenty mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are regulated by five MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs). Arabidopsis MKP1 has an important role in biotic, abiotic and genotoxic stresses and has been shown to interact with and negatively regulate specifically MPK3 and MPK6. MKP1 has been reported to have a role in negative regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA) production. As essential organelles involved in production of ROS and SA, peroxisomes could possibly be an important compartment for MKP1 activity, however MKP1 was previously reported to be cytosolic. By screening Arabidopsis protein phosphatases for peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), we identified MKP1 as a putative peroxisomal protein. Arabidopsis MKP1 was found to harbor a non-canonical PTS1-like tripeptide (Ser-Ala-Leu>) that is conserved in MKP1 orthologs. We show experimentally that the C-terminal Ser-Ala-Leu> can function as a novel PTS1, and alanine in position -2, adds more relaxation to the plant PTS1 motif. The full-length MKP1 remained in the cytosol when transiently expressed in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts under standard conditions. When different biotic and abiotic stresses were applied to mesophyll protoplasts, the full length protein changed its targeting to unidentified organelle-like structures that subsequently fused with peroxisomes. Our results identify MKP1 as a protein dually targeted to cytosol and peroxisomes. The finding that MKP1 targets peroxisomes by a non-canonical PTS1 under stressful conditions highlights the complexity of peroxisomal targeting mechanism.

  8. Tysnd1 Deficiency in Mice Interferes with the Peroxisomal Localization of PTS2 Enzymes, Causing Lipid Metabolic Abnormalities and Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yumi; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Iseki, Mioko; Iwasa, Hiroyasu; Akita, Masumi; Tsukui, Tohru; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Ito, Chizuru; Toshimori, Kiyotaka; Nishimukai, Megumi; Hara, Hiroshi; Maeba, Ryouta; Okazaki, Tomoki; Alodaib, Ali Nasser Ali; Amoudi, Mohammed Al; Jacob, Minnie; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Horai, Yasushi; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Motegi, Hiromi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Noda, Tetsuo; Kurochkin, Igor V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Schönbach, Christian; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles involved in lipid metabolic processes, including those of very-long-chain fatty acids and branched-chain fatty acids, among others. Peroxisome matrix proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Targeting signals (PTS or peroxisomal targeting signal) at the C-terminus (PTS1) or N-terminus (PTS2) of peroxisomal matrix proteins mediate their import into the organelle. In the case of PTS2-containing proteins, the PTS2 signal is cleaved from the protein when transported into peroxisomes. The functional mechanism of PTS2 processing, however, is poorly understood. Previously we identified Tysnd1 (Trypsin domain containing 1) and biochemically characterized it as a peroxisomal cysteine endopeptidase that directly processes PTS2-containing prethiolase Acaa1 and PTS1-containing Acox1, Hsd17b4, and ScpX. The latter three enzymes are crucial components of the very-long-chain fatty acids β-oxidation pathway. To clarify the in vivo functions and physiological role of Tysnd1, we analyzed the phenotype of Tysnd1−/− mice. Male Tysnd1−/− mice are infertile, and the epididymal sperms lack the acrosomal cap. These phenotypic features are most likely the result of changes in the molecular species composition of choline and ethanolamine plasmalogens. Tysnd1−/− mice also developed liver dysfunctions when the phytanic acid precursor phytol was orally administered. Phyh and Agps are known PTS2-containing proteins, but were identified as novel Tysnd1 substrates. Loss of Tysnd1 interferes with the peroxisomal localization of Acaa1, Phyh, and Agps, which might cause the mild Zellweger syndrome spectrum-resembling phenotypes. Our data established that peroxisomal processing protease Tysnd1 is necessary to mediate the physiological functions of PTS2-containing substrates. PMID:23459139

  9. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase TagK in the PTS-mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I.; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multi-component PEP-dependent:tag-PTS present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-Tagatose catabolic Pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TFHis6) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TFHis6. Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate (Fru-1P) are substrates for the TagK-TFHis6 enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate (Tag-6P) and D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific enzyme II (EIITag) in E.coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and EI, to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. PMID:26159072

  10. Identification and characterization of the non-PTS fru locus of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581.

    PubMed

    Chiou, C-Y; Wang, H-H; Shaw, G-C

    2002-10-01

    A genetic locus that is adjacent to the gene encoding the small acid-soluble protein SASP C-4 of Bacillus megaterium has been identified. This locus, designated fru, contains a beta-fructosidase gene (fruA), a gene encoding a hydrophobic protein that is closely related to non-PTS sugar permeases of the proton symport type (fruP), and a gene coding for a transcriptional regulator of the LacI/GalR family (fruR). The FruA protein can hydrolyze sucrose and raffinose, but not maltose, isomaltose, trehalose, melibiose or lactose. The transcription initiation site of fruP has been mapped and the fruP promoter identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that the FruR protein can bind specifically to a DNA fragment containing the fruP promoter region. DNase I footprinting analysis has defined the FruR binding site. Disruption of fruR led to high-level constitutive expression of fruPA, but had no effect on expression from the fruR promoter itself, indicating that FruR acts as a repressor of fruPA expression, but does not autoregulate its own synthesis. Interestingly, expression of fruPA in B. megaterium was not induced by sucrose, raffinose, fructose or inulin, whereas the constitutive expression of fruPA in a fruR mutant was repressed by both glucose and sucrose. Possible physiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:12395198

  11. Portfolio assessment: practice teachers' early experience.

    PubMed

    Spence, William; El-Ansari, Walid

    2004-07-01

    Experience was recognised to be a vital source of learning as long ago as 1762 [Emile, Everyman, London, 1993] and reflection on practice experience may be one way forward in addressing nursing's anxieties concerning the practice theory gap. However, despite the acceptance that subjectivity in the process seems inevitable and potentially important, little is understood of the practitioner's experience of practice assessment. Two questionnaires sought the views of specialist community nursing practitioner (SCNP) programme (United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (UKCC) 2001) practice teachers (PTs) on the introduction of the portfolio approach to practice assessment. These were distributed to 62 and 76 PTs and the response rates were 32% and 50%, respectively. Responses of those PTs from the three specialisms participating in the piloting of the portfolio approach were compared with those using an existing approach. An action research method was adopted which attempted to use established theory to explain the challenges presented by the introduction of this approach and ultimately to raise the PT group's awareness of assessment issues. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected and the findings support the use of the portfolio approach to practice assessment. The PT experience of portfolio use was found to be a largely positive one. PTs reported the utility of the portfolio in prompting student self-evaluation of learning. Concerns were expressed by PTs around the quality of portfolio evidence although many felt that it had promoted students' reflection on practice. Inter-PT reliability in practice assessment was identified as a topic for PT continuing professional development. Many sources of evidence, including patient feedback, were used by PTs in their assessment of students although PTs using the portfolio approach used less first-hand experience of students' practice in their assessments of competence, relying more

  12. National Children's Study Dietary Assessment Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    The National Children's Study dietary assessment workshop was an opportunity for experts in dietary assessment methodology to gather and discuss the current state of knowledge about methodologies used to assess dietary intake during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

  13. Catabolic regulation analysis of Escherichia coli and its crp, mlc, mgsA, pgi and ptsG mutants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most bacteria can use various compounds as carbon sources. These carbon sources can be either co-metabolized or sequentially metabolized, where the latter phenomenon typically occurs as catabolite repression. From the practical application point of view of utilizing lignocellulose for the production of biofuels etc., it is strongly desirable to ferment all sugars obtained by hydrolysis from lignocellulosic materials, where simultaneous consumption of sugars would benefit the formation of bioproducts. However, most organisms consume glucose prior to consumption of other carbon sources, and exhibit diauxic growth. It has been shown by fermentation experiments that simultaneous consumption of sugars can be attained by ptsG, mgsA mutants etc., but its mechanism has not been well understood. It is strongly desirable to understand the mechanism of metabolic regulation for catabolite regulation to improve the performance of fermentation. Results In order to make clear the catabolic regulation mechanism, several continuous cultures were conducted at different dilution rates of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.7 h-1 using wild type Escherichia coli. The result indicates that the transcript levels of global regulators such as crp, cra, mlc and rpoS decreased, while those of fadR, iclR, soxR/S increased as the dilution rate increased. These affected the metabolic pathway genes, which in turn affected fermentation result where the specific glucose uptake rate, the specific acetate formation rate, and the specific CO2 evolution rate (CER) were increased as the dilution rate was increased. This was confirmed by the 13C-flux analysis. In order to make clear the catabolite regulation, the effect of crp gene knockout (Δcrp) and crp enhancement (crp+) as well as mlc, mgsA, pgi and ptsG gene knockout on the metabolism was then investigated by the continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1 and by some batch cultures. In the case of Δcrp (and also Δmlc) mutant, TCA cycle and

  14. Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

    1995-01-26

    The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

  15. Pex13p is an SH3 protein of the peroxisome membrane and a docking factor for the predominantly cytoplasmic PTs1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J; Kalish, J E; Morrell, J C; Bjorkman, J; Urquhart, A J; Crane, D I

    1996-10-01

    Import of newly synthesized PTS1 proteins into the peroxisome requires the PTS1 receptor (Pex5p), a predominantly cytoplasmic protein that cycles between the cytoplasm and peroxisome. We have identified Pex13p, a novel integral peroxisomal membrane from both yeast and humans that binds the PTS1 receptor via a cytoplasmically oriented SH3 domain. Although only a small amount of Pex5p is bound to peroxisomes at steady state (< 5%), loss of Pex13p further reduces the amount of peroxisome-associated Pex5p by approximately 40-fold. Furthermore, loss of Pex13p eliminates import of peroxisomal matrix proteins that contain either the type-1 or type-2 peroxisomal targeting signal but does not affect targeting and insertion of integral peroxisomal membrane proteins. We conclude that Pex13p functions as a docking factor for the predominantly cytoplasmic PTS1 receptor.

  16. A manual therapy intervention improves symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Signorini, Massimo; Bassetti, Massimo; Del Rosso, Angela; Orlandi, Martina; De Scisciolo, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), manual therapy interventions (MTI) reduce tissue adhesion and increase wrist mobility. We evaluated the efficacy of a MTI in relieving CTS signs and symptoms. Twenty-two CTS patients (pts) (41 hands) were treated with a MTI, consisting in 6 treatments (2/week for 3 weeks) of soft tissues of wrist and hands and of carpal bones. Pts were assessed for hand sensitivity, paresthesia, hand strength, hand and forearm pain, night awakening; Phalen test, thenar eminence hypotrophy and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS). Median nerve was studied by sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and distal motor latency (DML). CTS was scored as minimal, mild, medium, severe and extreme. We considered as control group the same pts assessed before treatment: at baseline (T0a) and after 12 weeks (T0b). Pts were evaluated at the end of treatment (T1) and after 24-week (T2) follow-up. At T0b, versus T0a, forearm pain and Phalen test positivity were increased and hand strength reduced (p < 0.05). BCTQ-SSS and BCTQ-FSS scores improved at T1 versus T0b (p < 0.05) with the amelioration maintained at T2. At T1, the number of pts with paresthesia, night awakening, hypoesthesia, Phalen test, hand strength reduction and hand sensitivity was reduced with the lacking of symptoms maintained at T2 (p < 0.05). No changes in SNCV, DML and CTS scoring were shown. MTI improved CTS signs and symptoms, with benefits maintained at follow-up. Thus, it may be valid as a conservative therapy.

  17. Teacher Assessment and Peer Assessment in Practice. Educational Studies 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Yuji

    This study examined teacher and peer assessment of English language oral presentation skills in Japanese classrooms. Twelve graduate university students' oral class presentations were assessed by a teacher and four peers. After presentations were rated, teachers calculated the evaluations, and classmates shared their opinions on the top three…

  18. Assessing Vocal Performances Using Analytical Assessment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gynnild, Vidar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated ways to improve the appraisal of vocal performances within a national academy of music. Since a criterion-based assessment framework had already been adopted, the conceptual foundation of an assessment rubric was used as a guide in an action research project. The group of teachers involved wanted to explore thinking…

  19. Rationale and Design of the ATTRACT Study - A Multicenter Randomized Trial to Evaluate Pharmacomechanical Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for the Prevention of Post-Thrombotic Syndrome in Patients with Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Kahn, Susan R.; Julian, Jim; Magnuson, Elizabeth; Jaff, Michael R.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Cohen, David J.; Comerota, Anthony J.; Gornik, Heather L.; Razavi, Mahmood K.; Lewis, Lawrence; Kearon, Clive

    2013-01-01

    Background Current standard therapy for patients with acute proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) consists of anticoagulant therapy and graduated elastic compression stockings. Despite use of this strategy, the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) develops frequently, causes substantial patient disability, and impairs quality of life (QOL). Pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (PCDT), which rapidly removes acute venous thrombus, may reduce the frequency of PTS. However, this hypothesis has not been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial. Study Design The ATTRACT Study is an ongoing NIH-sponsored, Phase III, multicenter, randomized, open-label, assessor-blinded, parallel two-arm, controlled clinical trial. Approximately 692 patients with acute proximal DVT involving the femoral, common femoral, and/or iliac vein are being randomized to receive PCDT + standard therapy versus standard therapy alone. The primary study hypothesis is that PCDT will reduce the proportion of patients who develop PTS within 2 years by one-third, assessed using the Villalta Scale. Secondary outcomes include safety, general and venous disease-specific QOL, relief of early pain and swelling, and cost-effectiveness. Conclusion ATTRACT will determine if PCDT should be routinely used to prevent PTS in patients with symptomatic proximal DVT above the popliteal vein. PMID:23537968

  20. Assessing observational studies of medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, Arthur; Bentler, Suzanne; Charlton, Mary; Lanska, Douglas; Butani, Yogita; Soomro, G Mustafa; Benson, Kjell

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies have assessed the validity of the observational study design by comparing results of studies using this design to results from randomized controlled trials. The present study examined design features of observational studies that could have influenced these comparisons. Methods To find at least 4 observational studies that evaluated the same treatment, we reviewed meta-analyses comparing observational studies and randomized controlled trials for the assessment of medical treatments. Details critical for interpretation of these studies were abstracted and analyzed qualitatively. Results Individual articles reviewed included 61 observational studies that assessed 10 treatment comparisons evaluated in two studies comparing randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The majority of studies did not report the following information: details of primary and ancillary treatments, outcome definitions, length of follow-up, inclusion/exclusion criteria, patient characteristics relevant to prognosis or treatment response, or assessment of possible confounding. When information was reported, variations in treatment specifics, outcome definition or confounding were identified as possible causes of differences between observational studies and randomized controlled trials, and of heterogeneity in observational studies. Conclusion Reporting of observational studies of medical treatments was often inadequate to compare study designs or allow other meaningful interpretation of results. All observational studies should report details of treatment, outcome assessment, patient characteristics, and confounding assessment. PMID:16137327

  1. Case Studies in Assessment for Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Audrey A.; Patton, James R.; Clark, Gary M.

    2005-01-01

    This book presents a group of case studies to show how to assess students to develop a clear statement of transition service needs and then use that information for goals and objectives in their IEP or ITP (individual transition plan). The case studies format will help you see in a concrete way how assessment procedures relate to young people with…

  2. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  3. Using Portfolio Assessment To Study Classroom Assessment Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John O.; Bachor, Dan; Baer, Markus

    This study focused on one task that is characteristic of teacher responsibilities and activities in the school: the evaluation of student achievement. It involved 127 preservice elementary school teachers who assessed the performance of 3 simulated students on 6 language arts tasks. Information collected included the marks assigned to students on…

  4. Identification and characterization of two Alcaligenes eutrophus gene loci relevant to the poly(beta-hydroxybutyric acid)-leaky phenotype which exhibit homology to ptsH and ptsI of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pries, A; Priefert, H; Krüger, N; Steinbüchel, A

    1991-01-01

    From genomic libraries of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 in lambda L47 and in pVK100, we cloned DNA fragments which restored the wild-type phenotype to poly(beta-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB)-leaky mutants derived from strains H16 and JMP222. The nucleotide sequence analysis of a 4.5-kb region of one of these fragments revealed two adjacent open reading frames (ORF) which are relevant for the expression of the PHB-leaky phenotype. The 1,799-bp ORF1 represented a gene which was referred to as phbI. The amino acid sequence of the putative protein I (Mr, 65,167), which was deduced from phbI, exhibited 38.9% identity with the primary structure of enzyme I of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). The upstream 579-bp ORF2 was separated by 50 bp from ORF1. It included the 270-bp phbH gene which encoded protein H (Mr, 9,469). This protein exhibited 34.9% identity to the HPr protein of the E. coli PEP-PTS. Insertions of Tn5 in different PHB-leaky mutants were mapped at eight different positions in phbI and at one position in phbH. Mutants defective in phbH or phbI exhibited no pleiotropic effects and were not altered with respect to the utilization of fructose. However, PHB was degraded at a higher rate in the stationary growth phase. The functions of these HPr- and enzyme I-like proteins in the metabolism of PHB are still unknown. Evidence for the involvement of these proteins in regulation of the metabolism of intracellular PHB was obtained, and a hypothetical model is proposed. Images PMID:1653223

  5. Assessing the Academic Benefit of Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisneros-Donahue, Teresa; Krentler, Kathleen A.; Reinig, Bruce; Sabol, Karey

    2012-01-01

    Study abroad is a growing phenomenon in higher education. Although such growth is typically lauded, efforts to measure the impact of international experiences on student learning have been limited. This study assesses the academic benefit of a study abroad program, offered by a U.S. university, with measures of self-reported learning. Study abroad…

  6. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  7. Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D.D.; Tyler, N.; Montrosse, B.E.; Young, C.; Robb, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study (SEFNA). Actions taken after the release of The 2001 Faculty Shortage Study demonstrate that supply-and-demand imbalances can be improved. The projected shortage of special education faculty will directly and negatively affect students with disabilities and…

  8. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  9. Case study examples using self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, D; Hutton, C L; Nerbonne, M A; Newman, C W; Smoski, W J

    1990-10-01

    The following case studies demonstrate the application of self-assessment techniques. The selection of procedures reported here is not meant to imply necessarily that these procedures are more or less effective or more widely used than other available self-assessment tests, but rather to illustrate the various purposes for which self-assessment tools may be employed. Case 1 illustrates the contribution of data obtained from the Hearing Performance Inventory (Giolas, Owens, Lamb, & Shubert, 1979) in the management and counseling of a severely hearing impaired adult. Case 2 involves the use of the Hearing Problem Inventory developed by Hutton in Atlanta (HPI-A, Hutton, 1987). Application of the Self-Assessment of Communication (SAC) and Significant Other Assessment of Communication (SOAC) (Schow and Nerbonne, 1982) is shown in Case 3, whereas Case 4 demonstrates the usefulness of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE, Ventry and Weinstein, 1982). Both the SAC/SOAC and HHIE batteries involve problem cases associated with hearing aid fitting and assessment of benefit. The final illustration (Case 5) is a report on the Children's Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS), a new questionnaire developed by Smoski, Brunt, and Tannahill/ISHA (1987) for assessing parent's judgment of children's listening abilities (Appendix). The versatility of self-assessment applications across a broad assortment of impairment levels, age groups, and clinical settings is demonstrated in these cases. Hopefully the reader will see more clearly the application and value of these and other non-audiometric techniques and will be motivated to increase the use of self-assessment tools in the individual work setting. PMID:2269415

  10. Needs Assessment Project: FY83 Reverification Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.

    As part of a continuing assessment of educational needs in a seven-state region, researchers conducted a reverification study to check the validity of educational needs first identified in fiscal year (FY) 1980. The seven states are Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The original FY80 Needs Assessment…

  11. Needs Assessment Project: FY 82 Verification Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; O'Donnell, Phyllis

    As part of a continuing assessment of educational needs in a seven-state region, researchers conducted a verification study to check the validity of educational needs first identified in fiscal year (FY) 1980. The seven states comprise Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. This report describes assessment…

  12. Response Bias in Needs Assessment Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calsyn, Robert J.; Klinkenberg, W. Dean

    1995-01-01

    Agencies conducting needs assessments in which respondents are asked about their awareness of the agency must be alert to a bias that inflates awareness (agency awareness acquiescence). A study with 157 college students demonstrated such awareness bias, which was related to the impression management component of social desirability. (SLD)

  13. Assessing Learning with Logo: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jane; Ryba, Ken

    1986-01-01

    This study used the Model for Assessing Learning with Logo (Nolan and Ryba) to examine effects of Logo programming on junior high school students' thinking skills. The model addresses both student acquisition of Logo-related thinking skills and the extent to which they transfer skills to noncomputer problem solving tasks. (MBR)

  14. Quantitative stress-redistribution planar T1-201 scintigraphy: Assessment of the extent of hypoperfused myocardium by relationship to angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Bassir, R.; Maddahi, J.; Garcia, E.; Van Train, K.; Bughi, S.; Becerra, A.; Weiss, T.; Brown, D.; Shaw, C.; Berman, D.

    1984-01-01

    The size of hypoperfused myocardium (HM) in coronary artery (CA) disease (D) potentially provides a prognostic index that may not be accurately assess by conventional angiographic classification. The authors studied 62 consecutive patients (pts) with planar stress-redistribution T1-201 scintigraphy (T1-201) and coronary arteriography who did not have prior myocardial infarction and achieved 85% predicted maximum heart rate on exercise. Of 62 pts, 42 had CAD (>50% stenosis). For T1-201 quantification of the size of HM, maximum count circumferential profiles of initial distribution and % washout were obtained and compared to previously established normal limits. The area enclosed between the normal limits and the abnormal portion of the pt's profiles represented a quantitative T1-201 jeopardy score (JS). Despite increasing T1-201 JS from 1 to 3 vessel (V) and left-main (LM) D, significant overlap between the different angiographic groups was observed; of 45 pts with mild JS (<300), 14 (31%) had 3VD and/or LMD. The angiographic extent of CAD was also analyzed using a method (CLASS) proposed by Gensini et al based on the CA territory, location and severity of stenosis, and collateral circulation. T1-201 JS correlated significantly with CLASS (r=.78, p<.01). Of the 45 pts with mild JS, only 5 (11%) had severe CLASS score. Thus, the size of the hypoperfused myocardium by quantitative stress- and redistribution T1-201 correlates better with a more complex angiographic estimate of myocardium at risk than conventional 1, 2, and 3 vessel disease classification.

  15. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

  16. Children's Postdisaster Trajectories of PTS Symptoms: Predicting Chronic Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Greca, Annette M.; Lai, Betty S.; Llabre, Maria M.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are no studies of the distinct trajectories of children's psychological distress over the first year after a destructive natural disaster and the determinants of these trajectories. Objective: We examined these issues using an existing dataset of children exposed to Hurricane Andrew, one of the most devastating natural…

  17. A Study of Assessments Designed for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delepine, Sidney G., III

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study is to compare a new assessment tool, the SkillsUSA Connect Assessment with the NOCTI assessment to determine which test results in more students achieving success. A quantitative study, designed to compare test scores of students taking the NOCTI assessment and new assessments from SkillsUSA, called the…

  18. Cumulative impact assessment: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, J.S.; Bain, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) indirectly addressed cumulative impacts. Attempts to include cumulative impacts in environmental impact assessments, however, did not began until the early 1980's. One such effort began when The Federal Energy and Regulatory Commission (FERC) received over 1200 applications for hydroelectric projects in the Pacific Northwest. Federal and State Agencies, Indian tribes and environmental groups realized the potential cumulative effect such development could have on fish and wildfire resources. In response, the FERC developed the Cluster Impact Assessment Procedure (CIAP). The CIAP consisted of public scoping meetings; interactive workshops designed to identify projects with potential for cumulative effects, important resources, available data; and preparation of a NEPA document (EA or EIS). The procedure was modifies to assess the cumulative impacts of fifteen hydroelectric projects in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho. The methodology achieved its basic objective of evaluating the impact of hydroelectric development on fish and wildfire resources. In addition, the use of evaluative techniques to determine project interactions and degrees of impact hindered acceptance of the conclusions. Notwithstanding these problems, the studies provided a basis for decision-makers to incorporate the potential effects of cumulative impacts into the decision-making process. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis; Jacobs, Mark; Scheil, Christine; Collins, John

    1992-01-01

    A top-level feasibility study was conducted that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs which use two or more of the following propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4, and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined emphasized the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where possible. In support of this study, numerous mission scenarios were characterized that used various combinations of Earth, lunar, and Mars propellants to establish engine system requirements to assess the promising engine system design concept examined, and to determine overall exploration leverage of such systems compared to state-of-the-art cryogenic (LOX/H2) propulsion systems. Initially in the study, critical propulsion system technologies were assessed. Candidate expander and gas generator cycle LOX/H2/CO, LOX/H2/CH4, and LOX/CO/CH4 engine system designs were parametrically evaluated. From this evaluation baseline, tripropellant Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) LOX cooled and bipropellant Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) and Mars Excursion Vehicle (MEV) engine systems were identified. Representative tankage designs for a MTV were also investigated. Re-evaluation of the missions using the baseline engine design showed that in general the slightly lower performance, smaller, lower weight gas generator cycle-based engines required less overall mission Mars and in situ propellant production (ISPP) infrastructure support compared to the larger, heavier, higher performing expander cycle engine systems.

  20. Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis; Jacobs, Mark; Scheil, Christine; Collins, John

    1992-06-01

    A top-level feasibility study was conducted that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs which use two or more of the following propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4, and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined emphasized the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where possible. In support of this study, numerous mission scenarios were characterized that used various combinations of Earth, lunar, and Mars propellants to establish engine system requirements to assess the promising engine system design concept examined, and to determine overall exploration leverage of such systems compared to state-of-the-art cryogenic (LOX/H2) propulsion systems. Initially in the study, critical propulsion system technologies were assessed. Candidate expander and gas generator cycle LOX/H2/CO, LOX/H2/CH4, and LOX/CO/CH4 engine system designs were parametrically evaluated. From this evaluation baseline, tripropellant Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) LOX cooled and bipropellant Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) and Mars Excursion Vehicle (MEV) engine systems were identified. Representative tankage designs for a MTV were also investigated. Re-evaluation of the missions using the baseline engine design showed that in general the slightly lower performance, smaller, lower weight gas generator cycle-based engines required less overall mission Mars and in situ propellant production (ISPP) infrastructure support compared to the larger, heavier, higher performing expander cycle engine systems.

  1. Fisheries resource identification and assessment studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Program coordination activities were shifted from the Space Oceanography Program of NAVOCEANO to the National Environmental Satellite Service as part of NOAA in October 1970. Program activities in remote sensing continued in the development of low-light-level image intensifiers, spectrometers, aerial photography, and lasers for the location, identification, and quantification of living marine resources at or near the sea surface. Other studies included the development of a biologically controlled impoundment for remote sensor investigations and limited activities in fish oil film research. In addition to these remote sensing studies, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) program at the Mississippi Test Facility is participating in space oceanography studies related to fisheries and in the ERTS-A and Skylab experiments. Aspects of the NMFS program related to fisheries resource identification and assessment during the period 1970 and 1971 are discussed.

  2. Hegemonic Masculinity in Sport Education: Case Studies of Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers with Teaching Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, YuChun; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research had indicated that pre-service teachers (PTs) with coaching orientations reinforced sexism and masculine bias while employing the sport education (SE) model. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether or not and the degree to which SE delivered by PTs with teaching orientations served to combat or reinforce sexism…

  3. The Healthy Communities Study Nutrition Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Lorrene D.; Wakimoto, Patricia; Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Thompson, Frances E.; Loria, Catherine M.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Kao, Janice; Crawford, Patricia B.; Webb, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Multifaceted community interventions directed at improving food environments are emerging, but their impact on dietary change and obesity prevalence has not been documented adequately. The Healthy Communities Study (HCS) is seeking to identify characteristics and combinations of programs and policies that are associated with children’s diets and obesity-related outcomes in various types of communities across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used in 2013–2015 in the HCS to assess dietary intake, school nutrition environments, and other nutrition-related behaviors. The conceptual framework of the HCS is based on the socioecological model and behaviors shown in previous studies to be related to obesity in children-guided selection of domains. Nine domains were identified as essential measures of nutrition in the HCS: (1) intake of selected foods and beverages; (2) food patterns and behaviors; (3) social support; (4) home environment; (5) school environment; (6) community environment; (7) breastfeeding history; (8) household food insecurity; and (9) dieting behaviors and body image. Children’s dietary intake was assessed using a dietary screener and up to two automated 24-hour recalls. Dietary-related behaviors were assessed by a survey administered to the parent, child, or both, depending on child age. School nutrition measures were obtained from a combination of school staff surveys and researcher observations. Information from these measures is expected to contribute to a better understanding of “what is working” to improve the dietary behaviors that are likely to prevent obesity and improve health in children. PMID:26384936

  4. Endovascular stent placement for chronic post-thrombotic symptomatic ilio-femoral venous obstructive lesions: a single-center study of safety, efficacy and quality-of-life improvement

    PubMed Central

    Falcoz, Marie-Tiphaine; Falvo, Nicolas; Aho-Glélé, Serge; Demaistre, Emmanuel; Galland, Christophe; Favelier, Sylvain; Pottecher, Pierre; Chevallier, Olivier; Bonnotte, Bernard; Audia, Sylvain; Samson, Maxime; Terriat, Béatrice; Midulla, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a frequent complication of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) despite adequate treatment. Venous angioplasty and stent placement has been progressively used to restore and maintain venous patency in PTS patients. This study reports our single-center experience with the use of endovascular treatment for chronic post-thrombotic symptomatic ilio-femoral venous obstructive lesions. Methods A prospective mono-centric observational cohort study of PTS patients with chronic symptomatic ilio-femoral venous obstructive lesions referred for endovascular treatment was conducted from March 2012 to April 2016. Procedure consisted in recanalization, pre-dilation and self-expandable stenting of stenotic or occluded iliac and/or femoral veins. Severity of PTS, quality-of-life and treatment outcomes were assessed using Villalta scale and Chronic Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ-20) at baseline and 3 months after the procedure. Imaging follow-up was based on duplex ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Results Twenty-one patients (11 females, 10 males; median age, 41 years; range, 32–60) were included. Recanalization and stenting was successfully accomplished in all prime procedures, 4 patients benefitted from an additional procedure. Immediate technical success rate was 96% considering 25 procedures, performed without any complications. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 6–30 months) with a 90.5% stent patency rate. Villalta score significantly decreased from baseline compared with 3 months after the procedure [14 (range, 11–22) and 5 (range, 1–10), respectively, P<0.0001], showing a significant decrease in the severity of PTS. CIVIQ-20 score significantly decreased from baseline compared with 3 months after stenting [48.5 (range, 39–73) and 26.5 (range, 21–45), respectively, P<0.0001] thus showing a significant improvement of quality-of-life. Post-procedural CIVIQ-20 score was significantly associated with

  5. Integrated Operations Architecture Technology Assessment Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As part of NASA's Integrated Operations Architecture (IOA) Baseline, NASA will consolidate all communications operations. including ground-based, near-earth, and deep-space communications, into a single integrated network. This network will make maximum use of commercial equipment, services and standards. It will be an Internet Protocol (IP) based network. This study supports technology development planning for the IOA. The technical problems that may arise when LEO mission spacecraft interoperate with commercial satellite services were investigated. Commercial technology and services that could support the IOA were surveyed, and gaps in the capability of existing technology and techniques were identified. Recommendations were made on which gaps should be closed by means of NASA research and development funding. Several findings emerged from the interoperability assessment: in the NASA mission set, there is a preponderance of small. inexpensive, low data rate science missions; proposed commercial satellite communications services could potentially provide TDRSS-like data relay functions; and. IP and related protocols, such as TCP, require augmentation to operate in the mobile networking environment required by the space-to-ground portion of the IOA. Five case studies were performed in the technology assessment. Each case represented a realistic implementation of the near-earth portion of the IOA. The cases included the use of frequencies at L-band, Ka-band and the optical spectrum. The cases also represented both space relay architectures and direct-to-ground architectures. Some of the main recommendations resulting from the case studies are: select an architecture for the LEO/MEO communications network; pursue the development of a Ka-band space-qualified transmitter (and possibly a receiver), and a low-cost Ka-band ground terminal for a direct-to-ground network, pursue the development of an Inmarsat (L-band) space-qualified transceiver to implement a global, low

  6. Internal Film Receiver systems assessment study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.V.

    1988-03-01

    This report documents SERI's Internal Film Receiver (IFR) design study and system assessment effort; and it compares the performance and economic potential of this system to conventional salt-in-tube receivers and to systems with the direct absorption receiver (DAR). SPECO, Inc., under contract to SERI, performed the receiver configuration work and their final report is included as Appendix A. The IFR is similar to the DAR in that both use films flowing over nearly vertical plates to absorb the solar energy. However, in the IFR the radiation strikes the outside of the absorber plate and the working fluid flows down the inside. The results of the system-level assessment indicate that the IFR concept has the potential to deliver levelized energy costs (LEC) on the order of 5%--7% lower than the salt-in-tube receiver. Although the potential economic benefits of the IFR are not as great as those for the DAR, which shows more than a 15% improvement in LEC over the salt-in-tube receiver system, this may be offset by the lower technical risks with the IFR. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Academic Advising Assessment Practices: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Keith L.

    2012-01-01

    In academic courses, assessment is used to evaluate the effect of teaching on student learning. Academic advising has been viewed as a form of teaching (Crookston, 1972); therefore, it is necessary to assess the effect of academic advising on student learning. The best practices of assessment of academic achievement involve the following three…

  8. Social Studies Objectives, Second Assessment. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    Major social studies objectives delineated in this booklet provide a framework for the measurement of student achievement in the social studies. The booklet is arranged in four chapters. The first chapter describes the development of social studies objectives; the other chapters respectively list the social studies objectives for the specific age…

  9. Temperature-Dependent Expression of phzM and Its Regulatory Genes lasI and ptsP in Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain M18▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaofang; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yaqian; Huang, Xianqing; Ren, Bin; Zhang, Xuehong

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain M18, an effective biological control agent isolated from the melon rhizosphere, has a genetic background similar to that of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. However, the predominant phenazine produced by strain M18 is phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) rather than pyocyanin (PYO); the quantitative ratio of PCA to PYO is 105 to 1 at 28°C in strain M18, while the ratio is 1 to 2 at 37°C in strain PAO1. We first provided evidence that the differential production of the two phenazines in strains M18 and PAO1 is related to the temperature-dependent and strain-specific expression patterns of phzM, a gene involved in the conversion of PCA to PYO. Transcriptional levels of phzM were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, and the activities of both transcriptional and translational phzM′-′lacZ fusions were determined in strains M18 and PAO1, respectively. Using lasI::Gm and ptsP::Gm inactivation M18 mutants, we further show that expression of the phzM gene is positively regulated by the quorum-sensing protein LasI and negatively regulated by the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase protein PtsP. Surprisingly, the lasI and ptsP regulatory genes were also expressed in a temperature-dependent and strain-specific manner. The differential production of the phenazines PCA and PYO by strains M18 and PAO1 may be a consequence of selective pressure imposed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its relative M18 in the two different niches over a long evolutionary process. PMID:19717631

  10. Michigan Educational Assessment Program: Social Studies, Grade 7. Test Number 65, Student Assessment Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    The Michigan Educational Assessment Program presents an untimed, 100-question Social Studies Test (Form 65) for grade 7 students to assess social studies skills. This document contains the test booklet only. (PN)

  11. Michigan Educational Assessment Program: Social Studies, Grade 10. Test Number 95, Student Assessment Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    The Michigan Educational Assessment Program presents an untimed, 100-question Social Studies Test (Form 95) for grade 10 students to assess social studies skills. This document contains the test booklet only. (PN)

  12. Michigan Educational Assessment Program: Social Studies, Grade 4. Test Number 35, Student Assessment Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    The Michigan Educational Assessment Program presents an untimed, 70-question Social Studies Test (Form 35) for grade 4 students to assess social studies skills. This document contains the test booklet only. (PN)

  13. Students' Assessment Preferences, Perceptions of Assessment and Their Relationships to Study Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Watering, Gerard; Gijbels, David; Dochy, Filip; van der Rijt, Janine

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to gain more insight into students' actual preferences and perceptions of assessment, into the effects of these on their performances when different assessment formats are used, and into the different cognitive process levels assessed. Data were obtained from two sources. The first was the scores on the assessment of…

  14. Preliminary assessment of the effects of biaxial loading on reactor pressure vessel structural-integrity-assessment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-04-01

    Effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness were studied to determine potential impact on structural integrity assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient loading and pressure-temperature (PT) loading produced by reactor heatup and cooldown transients. Biaxial shallow-flaw fracture-toughness tests results were also used to determine the parameter controlling fracture in the transition temperature range, and to develop a related dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation. Shallow-flaw and biaxial loading effects were found to reduce the conditional probability of crack initiation by a factor of nine when the shallow-flaw fracture-toughness K{sub Jc} data set, with biaxial-loading effects adjustments, was substituted in place of ASME Code K{sub Ic} data set in PTS analyses. Biaxial loading was found to reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV steel such that the lower-bound curve was located between ASME K{sub Ic} and K{sub IR} curves. This is relevant to future development of P-T curve analysis procedures. Fracture in shallow-flaw biaxial samples tested in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture.

  15. System Losses and Assessment Trade Study

    SciTech Connect

    David Shropshire; Steve Piet; Nick Soelberg; Robert Cherry; Roger Henry; David Meikrantz; Greg Teske; Eric Shaber; Candido Pereira

    2009-09-01

    This Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) study has developed new analysis methods to examine old and new technology options toward the goal of improving fuel cycle systems. We have integrated participants and information from AFCI Systems Analysis, Transmutation Fuels, Separations, and Waste Form Campaigns in the Systems Losses and Assessment Trade Study. The initial objectives of this study were to 1) increase understanding of system interdependencies and thereby identify system trade-offs that may yield important insights, 2) define impacts of separations product purity on fuel manufacture and transmutation reactivity, 3) define impacts from transuranic (TRU) losses to waste, 4) identify the interrelationships involved in fuels and separations technology performance, and 5) identify system configuration adjustments with the greatest potential for influencing system losses. While bounding and analyzing this initial problem, we also identified significantly higher-level programmatic drivers with broad implications to the current fuel cycle research charter and the general issue of a DOE complex wide need for a comprehensive and integrated nuclear material management as addressed by the new DOE Order 410.2 titled “Management of Nuclear Materials”. The initial modeling effort developed in this study for a much smaller subset of material (i.e., commercial fuel) and a selected transmutation scheme (i.e., fast reactor recycling) is a necessary first step towards examining a broader set of nuclear material management options, dispositioning strategies and integrated waste management options including potential areas of research leverage. The primary outcome from this initial study has been an enhanced integration among Campaigns and associated insights and analysis methods. Opportunities for improved understanding between the groups abound. The above lanthanide-actinide example highlights the importance of evaluating options via integration across the Campaigns

  16. Methodological Quandaries in Studying Process and Outcomes in Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topping, Keith J.

    2010-01-01

    Peer assessment is very various in its implementation. Six studies of peer assessment are reviewed, four of them in higher education. A literature review is followed by five empirical studies. Strengths and weaknesses of each study are considered and issues are raised. Variables in peer assessment needing further exploration are extricated--in…

  17. 36 CFR 254.23 - Studies, assessments, and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Studies, assessments, and... AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.23 Studies, assessments, and approval... necessary studies and assessments to— (1) Determine if the applicant has made a satisfactory showing...

  18. 36 CFR 254.23 - Studies, assessments, and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Studies, assessments, and... AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.23 Studies, assessments, and approval... necessary studies and assessments to— (1) Determine if the applicant has made a satisfactory showing...

  19. A Case Study of Systemic Aspects of Assessment Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Rogers P.; Knudsen, Jennifer; Greeno, James G.

    1996-01-01

    Findings from a study of diverse assessment practices in a fifth-grade classroom were used to develop a framework for describing assessment system practices. The framework is used to compare different assessment activities, and new criteria for designing systemically valid assessments to support and extend classroom practices are proposed. (SLD)

  20. Undergraduate study in psychology: Curriculum and assessment.

    PubMed

    Norcross, John C; Hailstorks, Robin; Aiken, Leona S; Pfund, Rory A; Stamm, Karen E; Christidis, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    The undergraduate curriculum in psychology profoundly reflects and shapes the discipline. Yet, reliable information on the undergraduate psychology curriculum has been difficult to acquire due to insufficient research carried out on unrepresentative program samples with disparate methods. In 2014, APA launched the first systematic effort in a decade to gather national data on the psychology major and program outcomes. We surveyed a stratified random sample of department chairs/coordinators of accredited colleges and universities in the United States that offer undergraduate courses and programs in psychology. A total of 439 undergraduate psychology programs (45.2%) completed the survey. This article summarizes, for both associate and baccalaureate programs, the results of the Undergraduate Study in Psychology. Current practices concerning the introductory course, the courses offered, core requirements, the psychology minor, and tracks/concentrations are presented. The frequency of formal program reviews and program-level assessment methods are also addressed. By extending prior research on the undergraduate curriculum, we chronicle longitudinal changes in the psychology major over the past 20 years.

  1. Undergraduate study in psychology: Curriculum and assessment.

    PubMed

    Norcross, John C; Hailstorks, Robin; Aiken, Leona S; Pfund, Rory A; Stamm, Karen E; Christidis, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    The undergraduate curriculum in psychology profoundly reflects and shapes the discipline. Yet, reliable information on the undergraduate psychology curriculum has been difficult to acquire due to insufficient research carried out on unrepresentative program samples with disparate methods. In 2014, APA launched the first systematic effort in a decade to gather national data on the psychology major and program outcomes. We surveyed a stratified random sample of department chairs/coordinators of accredited colleges and universities in the United States that offer undergraduate courses and programs in psychology. A total of 439 undergraduate psychology programs (45.2%) completed the survey. This article summarizes, for both associate and baccalaureate programs, the results of the Undergraduate Study in Psychology. Current practices concerning the introductory course, the courses offered, core requirements, the psychology minor, and tracks/concentrations are presented. The frequency of formal program reviews and program-level assessment methods are also addressed. By extending prior research on the undergraduate curriculum, we chronicle longitudinal changes in the psychology major over the past 20 years. PMID:26866985

  2. Information Technology Assessment Study: Full Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A team was formed to assess NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) information technology research and development activities. These activities were reviewed for their relevance to OSS missions, for their potential for using products better supplied by industry or other government agencies, and for recommending an information technology (IT) infusion strategy for appropriate products for OSS missions. Assessment scope and methodology are presented. IT needs and interests for future OSS missions and current NASA IT research and development (R&D) are discussed. Non-NASA participants provide overviews of some of their IT R&D programs. Implementation and infusion issues and the findings and recommendations of the assessment team are presented.

  3. The Bacillus subtilis mannose regulator, ManR, a DNA-binding protein regulated by HPr and its cognate PTS transporter ManP.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Marian; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2013-05-01

    The transcriptional activator ManR of the Bacillus subtilis mannose utilization operon is composed of an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, two phosphotransferase system (PTS) regulation domains (PRDs), an EIIB(Bgl) - and an EIIA(Fru) -like domain. Site-specific mutagenesis of ManR revealed the role of conserved amino acids representing potential phosphorylation sites. This was investigated by β-galactosidase activity tests and by mobility shift assays after incubation with the PTS components HPr and EI. In analogy to other PRD-containing regulators we propose stimulation of ManR activity by phosphorylation. Mutations in PRD1 lowered ManR activity, whereas mutations in PRD2 abolished ManR activity completely. The Cys415Ala (EIIB(Bgl)) and the His570Ala mutations (EIIA(Fru)) provoked constitutive activities to different degrees, whereas the latter had the greater influence. Addition of EIIBA(Man) reduced the binding capability significantly in a wild-type and a Cys415Ala background, but had no effect on a His570Ala mutant. The different expression levels originating from the two promoters PmanR and PmanP could be ascribed to different 5'-untranslated mRNA regions. Sequences of 44 bp were identified and confirmed as the ManR binding sites by DNase I footprinting. The binding properties of ManR, in particular the equilibrium dissociation constant KD and the dissociation rate kdiss, were determined for both promoter regions. PMID:23551403

  4. Dissociation of CaIrO3-type MgSiO3 at ultra-high PTs: implications for the solar giants and terrestrial exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.

    2006-05-01

    CaIrO3-type MgSiO3 is the abundant planet-forming silicate, stable at pressures and temperatures (PTs) at and beyond those of Earth's core-mantle boundary. We have found using first principles quasiharmonic free energy computations that this mineral should undergo dissociation into MgO and SiO2 at PTs expected to occur in the cores of the gas giants, Jupiter and Saturn (>~10 Mbar, 10,000 K). The transformation should be important to the modeling of internal structure of the Saturn-like exoplanet HD149026b and perhaps the mantle of Earth-like GJ876d. At ~10 Mbar and ~ 10,000 K the resulting aggregate should have thermally activated carriers, causing electrical conductivity close to metallic values, and a correspondingly large electronic contribution to thermal conductivity, while simultaneously shutting down radiative heat transport because of electronic damping. In addition, we propose another dissociation in CaIrO3-type NaMgF3 at ~ 40 GPa, suggesting it is a good low-pressure analog of MgSiO3. Research supported by NSF/EAR 013533 (COMPRES), 0230319, NSF/ITR 0428774 (VLab), and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute. Collaborators: Renata M. Wentzcovitch (University of Minnesota) and Philip B. Allen (SUNY)

  5. Information Technology Assessment Study: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A team was formed to assess NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) information technology research and development activities. These activities were reviewed for their relevance to OSS missions, for their potential for using products better supplied by industry or other government agencies, and for recommending an IT infusion strategy for appropriate products for OSS missions. Assessment scope and methodology and the findings and recommendations of OSS IT users and providers are presented.

  6. The Present Absence: Assessment in Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrez, Cheryl A.; Claunch-Lebsack, Elizabeth Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, first the authors describe the aims of and a definition of social studies education and classroom assessment. Second, the authors provide an overview of issues related to classroom assessment followed by trends in social studies classrooms and assessment. Then the authors address essential systems and best practices related to…

  7. Student Perceptions of Peer Assessment: An Interdisciplinary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planas Lladó, Anna; Soley, Lídia Feliu; Fraguell Sansbelló, Rosa Maria; Pujolras, Gerard Arbat; Planella, Joan Pujol; Roura-Pascual, Núria; Suñol Martínez, Joan Josep; Moreno, Lino Montoro

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment provides students with multiple benefits during their learning process. The aim of our study is to examine students' perception of peer assessment. Questionnaires were administered before and after the peer-assessment process to 416 students studying 11 different subjects in four different fields taught at the University of…

  8. Attitudes and diagnostic practice in low back pain: A qualitative study amongst Greek and British physiotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Evdokia; McCarthy, Christopher J; Gliatis, John; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore current diagnostic practice and attitudes of Greek and United Kingdom physiotherapists (PTs) on assessing low back pain (LBP) patients. METHODS Three focus groups were undertaken, followed by a structured questionnaire-type survey comprising 23 health professionals and a random stratified sample of 150 PTs, respectively. Twenty-nine themes relating to LBP diagnostic practice emerged. These were then given to 30 British PTs assessing their level of agreement with their Greek counterparts. Analysis was performed by percentage agreements and χ2 tests. RESULTS The survey was divided into three subsections; PTs’ attitudes on LBP assessment, patients’ attitudes and diagnostic/healthcare issues, each constituting 14, 7 and 8 statements, respectively. Over half of the statements fell within the 30%-80% agreement between Greece and United Kingdom whereas, 5 statements reported low (< 10%) and 8 statements demonstrated high (> 90%) PT percentage agreement. Similarities across British and Greek PTs were detected in history taking methods and in the way PTs feel patients perceive physiotherapy practice whereas, re-assessment was undertaken less frequently in Greece. Diagnosis according to 91% of the Greek PTs is considered a “privilege” which is exclusive for doctors in Greece (only 17% British PTs agreed) and is accompanied with a great overuse of medical investigations. Forty percent of Greek PTs (compared to 0% of British) consider themselves as “executers”, being unable to interfere with treatment plan, possibly implying lack of autonomy. CONCLUSION Although similarities on history taking methods and on patients’ attitudes were detected across both groups, gross differences were found in re-assessment procedures and diagnostic issues between Greek and British physiotherapists, highlighting differences in service delivery and professional autonomy. PMID:27672569

  9. Attitudes and diagnostic practice in low back pain: A qualitative study amongst Greek and British physiotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Evdokia; McCarthy, Christopher J; Gliatis, John; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore current diagnostic practice and attitudes of Greek and United Kingdom physiotherapists (PTs) on assessing low back pain (LBP) patients. METHODS Three focus groups were undertaken, followed by a structured questionnaire-type survey comprising 23 health professionals and a random stratified sample of 150 PTs, respectively. Twenty-nine themes relating to LBP diagnostic practice emerged. These were then given to 30 British PTs assessing their level of agreement with their Greek counterparts. Analysis was performed by percentage agreements and χ2 tests. RESULTS The survey was divided into three subsections; PTs’ attitudes on LBP assessment, patients’ attitudes and diagnostic/healthcare issues, each constituting 14, 7 and 8 statements, respectively. Over half of the statements fell within the 30%-80% agreement between Greece and United Kingdom whereas, 5 statements reported low (< 10%) and 8 statements demonstrated high (> 90%) PT percentage agreement. Similarities across British and Greek PTs were detected in history taking methods and in the way PTs feel patients perceive physiotherapy practice whereas, re-assessment was undertaken less frequently in Greece. Diagnosis according to 91% of the Greek PTs is considered a “privilege” which is exclusive for doctors in Greece (only 17% British PTs agreed) and is accompanied with a great overuse of medical investigations. Forty percent of Greek PTs (compared to 0% of British) consider themselves as “executers”, being unable to interfere with treatment plan, possibly implying lack of autonomy. CONCLUSION Although similarities on history taking methods and on patients’ attitudes were detected across both groups, gross differences were found in re-assessment procedures and diagnostic issues between Greek and British physiotherapists, highlighting differences in service delivery and professional autonomy.

  10. Assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder four and one-half years after the Iraqi invasion.

    PubMed

    al-Naser, F; al-Khulaifi, I M; Martino, C

    2000-01-01

    In the earliest formulations of posttraumatic stress (PTS) and even posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it was clear that war could engender PTSD within both primary and secondary victims. The clinical course of PTS and PTSD is not always clear, but the disorder may persist months and even years after the precipitating traumatic event. The current study was undertaken in an effort to assess the prevalence of PTSD in a sample of 404 Kuwaiti citizens 4.5 years after the invasion and occupation of Kuwait by the Iraqi Army. Results indicate a psychometrically assessed prevalence of PTSD of 28.4%. A subsample of 195 students revealed a prevalence of 45.6%. If correct, these data are worrisome indeed and point to 1) a significant public health challenge facing the government of Kuwait, as well as, 2) the increased sensitivity of the young to traumatic stress, both personally and vicariously. Based upon the current data, there may exist a virtual epidemic of posttraumatic stress disorder within the Kuwaiti population 4.5 years after the end of the Iraqi occupation. These data argue the need for a comprehensive confirmatory epidemiological investigation in the current prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder within the Kuwaiti population so that appropriate resources may be further directed to address what may be a significant public health problem. PMID:11232095

  11. Assessing the English Major: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNew, Janet; Malone, Cindy

    1994-01-01

    Considers how departments of English can evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum and teaching throughout the entire program. Outlines the way that the joint English department at the College of St. Benedict and St. John's University developed a full-scale assessment program for the undergraduate major. (HB)

  12. Assessing Moderator Variables: Two Computer Simulation Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Craig A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for conceptualizing moderating relationships based on their type (strictly correlational and classically correlational) and form, whether continuous, noncontinuous, logistic, or quantum. Results of computer simulations comparing three statistical approaches for assessing moderator variables are presented, and advantages of…

  13. Needs Assessment Project: Factor Analytic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; Holcomb, Zelda J.

    Data collected by the Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) in its 1980 Needs Assessment Project was reduced to eight marker variables for use in subsequent individual state factor analyses. These variables concern (1) high need family situations; (2) effective career education/guidance; (3) increased school capacity for working with families;…

  14. Assessment Leaders' Perspectives of Institutional Cultures of Assessment: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Matthew; Henderson, Susan; Bustamante, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Institutional cultures of assessment are praised as beneficial to student learning. Yet, extant studies have not explored the theoretical foundations and pragmatic approaches to shaping cultures of assessment. The researchers used the Delphi method to explore 10 higher education assessment leaders' attitudes and theoretical perspectives regarding…

  15. A phase II study of paclitaxel, weekly, 24-hour continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Quietzsch, D; Haag, C; Lingenfelser, T; Schroeder, M; Hartmann, J T; Baronius, W; Hempel, V; Clemens, M; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cisplatin and 24 h continuous infusion of 5-FU/folinic acid in patients (pts) with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Forty-five chemotherapy-naive pts (28 male and 17 female) with a median age of 60 years (range 35–74) were enrolled. 5-FU 2 g/m2was given weekly over 24 h i.v. preceded by folinic acid 500 mg/m2as a 2 h infusion. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2was administered as a 3 h-infusion on days 1 and 22 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2as 1 h infusion on days 8 and 29. Six weeks of therapy (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36) followed by 2 weeks rest were considered one cycle. A median of 3 cycles (range 1–4) were administered to 45 pts assessable for response, survival and toxicity. Five pts (11%) obtained a CR and 18 pts (40%) a PR (ORR 51%; 95% Cl: 35.8–66.3%). Responses were achieved in the liver, lymph nodes, lungs and at the site of the primary tumour. Nine pts (20%) had stable disease. Thirteen pts (29%) were considered to have failed treatment, 8 pts (18%) due to progressive disease and 5 pts (11%) who did not receive one complete cycle of therapy due to acute non-haematologic toxicity. The median progression-free and overall survival times were 9 months (range 1–36+) and 14 months (range 2–36+), respectively. Neutropenia WHO III°/IV° occurred in 7 pts (15%) with only 1 pt having grade IV. Additional non-haematologic WHO III°/IV° toxicities included nausea/vomiting in 5 (11%), alopecia in 22 (49%), and diarrhoea in 1 patient each (2%). Dose reductions or treatment delays were necessary in 8 pts (17%), mainly due to neutropenia. All pts were treated on an outpatient basis. The combination of paclitaxel, cisplatin and continuously infused 5-FU/folinic acid appears to be a highly active regimen for the treatment of pts with advanced gastric cancer. While the overall acceptable toxicity allows its use in the palliative setting, it may also be an attractive

  16. Surveying Assessment in Experiential Learning: A Single Campus Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Thomas; Wilson, Jay; Purton, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the methods of experiential assessment in use at a Canadian university and the extent to which they are used. Exploring experiential assessment will allow identification of commonly used methods and facilitate the development of best practices of assessment in the context of experiential learning (EL) at…

  17. Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Buddenhagen, Christopher Evan; Chimera, Charles; Clifford, Patti

    2009-01-01

    Background There is widespread interest in biofuel crops as a solution to the world's energy needs, particularly in light of concerns over greenhouse-gas emissions. Despite reservations about their adverse environmental impacts, no attempt has been made to quantify actual, relative or potential invasiveness of terrestrial biofuel crops at an appropriate regional or international scale, and their planting continues to be largely unregulated. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a widely accepted weed risk assessment system, we analyzed a comprehensive list of regionally suitable biofuel crops to show that seventy percent have a high risk of becoming invasive versus one-quarter of non-biofuel plant species and are two to four times more likely to establish wild populations locally or be invasive in Hawaii or in other locations with a similar climate. Conclusions/Significance Because of climatic and ecological similarities, predictions of biofuel crop invasiveness in Hawaii are applicable to other vulnerable island and subtropical ecosystems worldwide. We demonstrate the utility of an accessible and scientifically proven risk assessment protocol that allows users to predict if introduced species will become invasive in their region of interest. Other evidence supports the contention that propagule pressure created by extensive plantings will exacerbate invasions, a scenario expected with large-scale biofuel crop cultivation. Proactive measures, such as risk assessments, should be employed to predict invasion risks, which could then be mitigated via implementation of appropriate planting policies and adoption of the “polluter-pays” principle. PMID:19384412

  18. Bidirectional Relationships between Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress: A Longitudinal Study of Detroit Residents

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Sarah R.; Walsh, Kate; Uddin, Monica; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has documented bidirectional relationships between trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress (PTS), such that individuals who are exposed to more traumatic events are at increased risk of developing PTS, and more severe PTS is associated with more subsequent trauma exposure. However, the empirical literature is limited by a lack of longitudinal studies that include continuous measures of PTS, differentiate between assaultive (e.g., sexual assault, being help up or mugged) and non-assaultive (e.g., serious illness, natural disaster) trauma, and focus on urban contexts. The purpose of this study was to fill these gaps through testing three-wave cross-lagged panel models of exposure to assaultive and non-assaultive traumatic events and PTS among a large sample of urban-dwelling adults (N = 1360; 84.4% non-Hispanic Black). In the model including assaultive trauma, more Wave 2 assaultive events were associated with significantly higher Wave 3 PTS. In contrast, in the model including non-assaultive trauma, higher Wave 1 and Wave 2 PTS were associated with more non-assaultive events at Waves 2 and 3, respectively. Taken together, the findings suggest a cycle of adversity wherein urban residents who have experienced assaultive trauma are at risk of more severe PTS, which in turn increases risk for exposure to non-assaultive trauma. This cycle could be tested directly in future studies through models including both types of events. Additional research on the mechanisms that underlie the pathways between PTS and traumatic events could also have implications for policy and practice. PMID:24886002

  19. System Study: Technology Assessment and Prioritizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this NASA funded project is to assess and prioritize advanced technologies required to achieve the goals for an "Intelligent Propulsion System" through collaboration among GEAE, NASA, and Georgia Tech. Key GEAE deliverables are parametric response surface equations (RSE's) relating technology features to system benefits (sfc, weight, fuel burn, design range, acoustics, emission, etc...) and listings of Technology Impact Matrix (TIM) with benefits, debits, and approximate readiness status. TIM has been completed for GEAE and NASA proposed technologies. The combined GEAE and NASA TIM input requirement is shown in Table.1. In the course of building the RSE's and TIM, significant parametric technology modeling and RSE accuracy improvements were accomplished. GEAE has also done preliminary ranking of the technologies using Georgia Tech/GEAE USA developed technology evaluation tools. System level impact was performed by combining beneficial technologies with minimum conflict among various system figures of merits to assess their overall benefits to the system. The shortfalls and issues with modeling the proposed technologies are identified, and recommendations for future work are also proposed.

  20. Outcomes Assessment Handbook: How To Develop a Practical Outcomes Assessment Program for a Home Study School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Robert J.

    This handbook is designed to provide school decision makers with a global view of how assessment programs for home study schools are developed. Outcomes assessment (OA) is a required element for recognition by the National Home Study Council Accrediting Committee and hence for member schools. This handbook is designed to enable program developers…

  1. Space reactor assessment and validation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, Stephen; Morey, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    The present difficulties experienced by the United States in launching payloads into space has suggested a number of problems which are associated with the handling of hazardous materials in spacecraft. The question has arisen as to the safety of launching highly radioactive material such as plutonium-238, related to the possibility of its dispersion into the atmosphere during a launch vehicle explosion. An alternative is the use of a small nuclear reactor which is not started until it is in space and contains little or no radioactivity at launch. A first order assessment of six small reactor concepts with power levels up to 100 MWe was performed. Both the nuclear feasibility of these concepts to operate at their rated power levels between 7 and 10 years and the capability of these concepts to remain subcritical both before and during launch and also in the case of water immersion during a potential launch failure or abort were investigated.

  2. Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technology Enhancement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) has designed and tested a nominal 10-MeV prototype Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) inspection system to detect shielded nuclear material. This report highlights two specific areas that will provide further PPA technology enhancements, namely, an optimal gamma-ray detection system and the off axis radiation detection sensitivity. Detection of low-atomic number (Z) shielded nuclear material had been initially addressed by the inclusion of dedicated Geiger-Müller (GM) detectors co-located above each of the Photonuclear Neutron Detectors (PNDs). Several different radiation detectors were investigated to assess if this type of gamma-ray detector was optimal. The LND 719 GM detector was shown to have the best photon sensitivity and demonstrated an optimal ability to detect low-Z shielded nuclear material. Beyond the technical performance of this detector, its low cost and availability makes it a logical choice for a field-deployable system. In terms of off-axis detection sensitivity, simulation and benchmarking experiments have indicated that the PPA inspection system can successfully detect nuclear material (within 120 seconds) in various shielding configurations even when it is located at a distance of as much as 30 cm off the interrogating beam axis (the exact sensitivity to off-axis interrogations will be largely dependent on the actual shielding material). As a general rule, high-Z shielding will allow detection at larger off-axis distances than low-Z materials.

  3. [The Italian Group for the Study of Streptokinase in Myocardial Infarct: Study of electrocardiographic changes].

    PubMed

    Piccolo, E; Delise, P; Zuin, G; Bonso, A; Romano, S; Ricciardiello, V; Fischer, D; Tani, F; Forleo, C; Portulano, V

    1987-01-01

    The twofold purpose of the ECG sub-group study of G.I.S.S.I. (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Streptokinasi nell'Infarto miocardico) is to evaluate whether exist different ECG evolution in pts with AMI treated with streptokinase (SK YES) and/or with coronary reperfusion (early CK peak) with respect to pts non treated with streptokinase (SK NO) and/or without coronary reperfusion (late CK peak) and to establish whether the ECG is useful to recognize the patients in which reperfusion occurs. Among 365 pts randomized for G.I.S.S.I., 209 pts with first myocardial infarction, admitted within 6 hours from the onset of pain, alive for at least 24 hours, were included. 98 were SK YES and 111 SK NO: 48 cases (group A) had the CK peak before 15th hour; 59 cases (group B) had the CK peak between 15th and 21th hour: 102 cases (group C) had the CK peak after 21th hour. In all the patients ECG was analyzed on admission and thereafter at 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 24th hours and on 2nd, 3rd, 7th and 14th days. RESULTS--Anterior myocardial infarction--SK YES pts had in respected to SK NO pts a significantly lower sum of ST elevation on anterior leads (sigma ST increases V1-V6) at all times after admission starting from 6th hour. A similar behaviour was observed in groups A and B in respect to group C. SK YES pts when compared to SK NO pts had an earlier loss of the sum of R wave in anterior leads (sigma RV1-V6), although the difference was not statistically significant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Measuring Student Performance: Assessment in the Social Studies. Theme Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, Henry, Ed.; Pyne, John, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The four articles in this theme issue provide an overview of assessment in the social studies and the rationale behind the movement for a more authentic assessment of learning outcomes. In the first article, "Thinking as an Unnatural Act," William T. Daly offers a clear rationale for social studies teachers to re-examine the methods of assessing…

  5. 36 CFR 254.23 - Studies, assessments, and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Studies, assessments, and approval. 254.23 Section 254.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.23 Studies, assessments, and...

  6. 36 CFR 254.23 - Studies, assessments, and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Studies, assessments, and approval. 254.23 Section 254.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.23 Studies, assessments, and...

  7. 36 CFR 254.23 - Studies, assessments, and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Studies, assessments, and approval. 254.23 Section 254.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.23 Studies, assessments, and...

  8. Quality Assessment of Internationalised Studies: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juknyte-Petreikiene, Inga

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews forms of higher education internationalisation at an institutional level. The relevance of theoretical background of internationalised study quality assessment is highlighted and definitions of internationalised studies quality are presented. Existing methods of assessment of higher education internationalisation are criticised…

  9. Wound assessment tools and nurses' needs: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Greatrex-White, Sheila; Moxey, Helen

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain how well different wound assessment tools meet the needs of nurses in carrying out general wound assessment and whether current tools are fit for purpose. The methodology employed was evaluation research. In order to conduct the evaluation, a literature review was undertaken to identify the criteria of an optimal wound assessment tool which would meet nurses' needs. Several freely available wound assessment tools were selected based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria and an audit tool was developed to evaluate the selected tools based on how well they met the criteria of the optimal wound assessment tool. The results provide a measure of how well the selected wound assessment tools meet the criteria of the optimal wound assessment tool. No tool was identified which fulfilled all the criteria, but two (the Applied Wound Management tool and the National Wound Assessment Form) met the most criteria of the optimal tool and were therefore considered to best meet nurses' needs in wound assessment. The study provides a mechanism for the appraisal of wound assessment tools using a set of optimal criteria which could aid practitioners in their search for the best wound assessment tool.

  10. Assessment, Autonomy, and Elementary Social Studies Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Lambert, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background/context: In an era of accountability and standardization, elementary social studies is consistently losing its curricular foothold to English/language arts, math, and science instruction. Purpose: This article examines the relationship between elementary teachers' perceptions of instructional autonomy, teaching context, state…

  11. Prospective Administrators Studying Communities: Instruction and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Donald B.; Huang, C. David

    Although individuals preparing for careers in educational administration have recognized the importance of the community for schools and school districts, they have often lacked a complex understanding of "community." This paper describes a community-study research project that was developed and implemented in a graduate educational administration…

  12. Needs Assessment Project. FY 81 Revalidation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.

    Initiated in 1981 to provide an update and to reaffirm the status of educational needs of a seven-state region, a revalidation study by Appalachia Educational Laboratory was conducted. Results indicated some variations from the needs expressed at state conferences in 1980, but the revalidation showed that the importance of educational needs had…

  13. Needs Assessment Project. FY84 Confirmation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.

    A needs sensing confirmation study was conducted to identify the Appalachia Educational Laboratory's (AEL) long term research and development program needs and provide guidelines for its seven member states' activities. The AEL Board of Directors, individuals serving in similar positions as the Board members, and a sample of non-public school…

  14. Walworth County Employer Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoehr, Keith W.; Banerdt, Jack

    In 1982, a study was conducted to obtain information from businesses, industries, and agencies in Walworth County that would assist Gateway Technical Institute (GTI) in providing programs and services to meet employers' manpower needs. Surveys were administered to 133 businesses and industries, requesting information on the firms' characteristics,…

  15. Canadian Journal of Native Studies: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes and critically analyzes volume of "Canadian Journal of Native Studies" (v4 n2 1984). Sketches journal's history and critiques three articles. Article topics include history (Indian treaties and Indian policy administration); resource development impacts (reserve land flooding, native health, and fishing); and native education (case…

  16. Risk Assessment Stability: A Revalidation Study of the Arizona Risk/Needs Assessment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwalbe, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    The actuarial method is the gold standard for risk assessment in child welfare, juvenile justice, and criminal justice. It produces risk classifications that are highly predictive and that may be robust to sampling error. This article reports a revalidation study of the Arizona Risk/Needs Assessment instrument, an actuarial instrument for juvenile…

  17. Current Assessment Practices: A Report from the Virginia Assessment Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Adult Educators Research Network, Dayton.

    The report details the activities of the Virginia Assessment Study Group in documenting the utility of various approaches to assessing adult education programs and instruction within the state. A group of diverse practitioners convened during 1997 to establish project objectives and research questions and to report on their work. The reports of…

  18. Supporting nanomaterial risk assessment by case studies of nano-titanium dioxide using comprehensive environmental assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach for two case studies of nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) in real world applications: water treatment and sunscreen. CEA combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm.

  19. System Study: Technology Assessment and Prioritizing Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    For the Intelligent Engine System (Propulsion 21) study, each technology was evaluated to determine the impact to fuel burn, acoustics, and NOx emissions. The optimum combination of technologies and their overall benefits to the system were also evaluated, resulting in noise improvement potential of 1.89 EPNdB cumulative margin,-1.34 percent fuel burn, and 50 percent NOx reduction from the 2015 UEET-QAT baseline. All the technology evaluations, except T18-20D, were based on newengines, where the engine was resized to obtain the maximum system benefit while maintaining the same cycle parameters as the 2015 UEET-QAT baseline. The impact of turbine clearance control on deteriorated engines, T18-20D, was also evaluated. Recommendations for future system study work include, but were not limited to, validation of a university-developed engine deterioration model and customer value analysis as figures of merit beside fuel burn, emissions, and acoustics.

  20. Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaccio, D.; Jacobs, M.; Collins, J.; Scheil, C.; Meyer, M.

    1992-07-01

    A feasibility study was performed that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs that utilize two or more of the propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4 and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined focused on the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where feasible. From the evaluation baseline employed, tripropellant MTV LOX cooled and bipropellant LEV and MEV engine systems are identified.

  1. Higher Education Quality Assessment in China: An Impact Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shuiyun

    2015-01-01

    This research analyses an external higher education quality assessment scheme in China, namely, the Quality Assessment of Undergraduate Education (QAUE) scheme. Case studies were conducted in three Chinese universities with different statuses. Analysis shows that the evaluated institutions responded to the external requirements of the QAUE…

  2. Three Reflections on Assessing Safety Training Needs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleezer, Catherine M.; Kelsey, Kathleen D.; Wood, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Needs assessment plays an important role in training and human performance improvement efforts, but the literature contains little research on this topic. This study extended previous research on the Performance Analysis for Training (PAT) model of needs assessment by examining its implementation to determine environmental and occupational health…

  3. Social Studies Assessment in Wisconsin Public Schools. A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehlage, Gary G.; And Others

    The Public Law enacted in 1971 requires that fundamental subject matter areas taught in Wisconsin's public schools be assessed. It is proposed in this paper that assessment of the State's social studies programs needs to focus its attention on the school environment, which educators can and should control, change, and improve, rather than…

  4. Perceptions of Assessment in Elementary Physical Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Alisa R.; Griffin, Linda L.; France, Thaddeus

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was twofold: (a) to examine a teacher's perceptions of attempting to implement assessments aligned with the NASPE standards and (b) to examine students' perceptions of assessment in physical education. Participants were 46 4th grade students and their physical education teacher. Data were collected through a Likert-scale…

  5. Unmasking Cleckley's psychopath: assessing historical case studies.

    PubMed

    DeShong, Hilary L; Helle, Ashley C; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2016-05-01

    The current study investigated original case descriptions of psychopathy (Cleckley, 1941) in relation to current conceptualizations and general personality traits. Attorneys, forensic psychologists and clinical faculty members completed ratings of psychopathy and personality after reading vignettes based on Cleckley's descriptions of a psychopath. The results suggest that professionals' ratings are consistent with current conceptualizations of psychopathy. Furthermore, the five-factor model (FFM) personality traits of the vignettes aligned with the current literature on the FFM and psychopathy (i.e. low neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness). The results further supported that a general trait model, like the FFM, may be well suited to describe the underlying personality traits of psychopathy. Gender differences were also examined. PMID:26931520

  6. Preliminary systems design study assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1991-10-01

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each concept. The SDS results are published in eight volumes. Volume I contains an executive summary. The SDS summary and analysis of results are presented in Volume II. Volumes III through VII contain descriptions of twelve system and four subsystem concepts. Volume VIII contains the appendixes.

  7. PRELIMINARY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

  8. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

  9. AN APPROACH TO METHODS DEVELOPMENT FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure assessment studies require methods that are rapid, cost-effective and have a high sample through-put. The development of analytical methods for exposure studies should be based on specific information for individual studies. Human exposure studies suggest that di...

  10. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  11. Assessing the first wave of epidemiological studies of nanomaterial workers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Candace S. J.; Pelclova, Daniela; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Schulte, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The results of early animal studies of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and air pollution epidemiology suggest that it is important to assess the health of ENM workers. Initial epidemiological studies of workers’ exposure to ENMs (<100 nm) are reviewed and characterized for their study designs, findings, and limitations. Of the 15 studies, 11 were cross-sectional, 4 were longitudinal (1 was both cross-sectional and longitudinal in design), and 1 was a descriptive pilot study. Generally, the studies used biologic markers as the dependent variables. All 11 cross-sectional studies showed a positive relationship between various biomarkers and ENM exposures. Three of the four longitudinal studies showed a negative relationship; the fourth showed positive findings after a 1-year follow-up. Each study considered exposure to ENMs as the independent variable. Exposure was assessed by mass concentration in 10 studies and by particle count in six studies. Six of them assessed both mass and particle concentrations. Some of the studies had limited exposure data because of inadequate exposure assessment. Generally, exposure levels were not very high in comparison to those in human inhalation chamber studies, but there were some exceptions. Most studies involved a small sample size, from 2 to 258 exposed workers. These studies represent the first wave of epidemiological studies of ENM workers. They are limited by small numbers of participants, inconsistent (and in some cases inadequate) exposure assessments, generally low exposures, and short intervals between exposure and effect. Still, these studies are a foundation for future work; they provide insight into where ENM workers are experiencing potentially adverse effects that might be related to ENM exposures. PMID:26635494

  12. Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Study Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckendahl, Chad W.; Davis, Susan L.; Plake, Barbara S.; Sireci, Stephen G.; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Zenisky, April L.; Wells, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    The "Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress: Study Reports" describes the special studies that comprised the design of the evaluation. In the Final Report, the authors presented a practical discussion of the evaluation studies to its primary, intended audience, namely policymakers. On this accompanying CD, readers will find…

  13. Carbon Catabolite Repression and the Related Genes of ccpA, ptsH and hprK in Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Muzi; Lu, Yanping; Wang, Jufang; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    The strictly anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is capable of producing ethanol, hydrogen and lactic acid by directly fermenting glucan, xylan and various lignocellulosically derived sugars. By using non-metabolizable and metabolizable sugars as substrates, we found that cellobiose, galactose, arabinose and starch utilization was strongly inhibited by the existence of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). However, the xylose and mannose consumptions were not markedly affected by 2-DG at the concentration of one-tenth of the metabolizable sugar. Accordingly, T. aotearoense SCUT27 could consume xylose and mannose in the presence of glucose. The carbon catabolite repression (CCR) related genes, ccpA, ptsH and hprK were confirmed to exist in T. aotearoense SCUT27 through gene cloning and protein characterization. The highly purified Histidine-containing Protein (HPr) could be specifically phosphorylated at Serine 46 by HPr kinase/phosphatase (HPrK/P) with no need to add fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) or glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) in the reaction mixture. The specific protein-interaction of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) and phosphorylated HPr was proved via affinity chromatography in the absence of formaldehyde. The equilibrium binding constant (KD) of CcpA and HPrSerP was determined as 2.22 ± 0.36 nM by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, indicating the high affinity between these two proteins. PMID:26540271

  14. Carbon Catabolite Repression and the Related Genes of ccpA, ptsH and hprK in Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Muzi; Lu, Yanping; Wang, Jufang; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    The strictly anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is capable of producing ethanol, hydrogen and lactic acid by directly fermenting glucan, xylan and various lignocellulosically derived sugars. By using non-metabolizable and metabolizable sugars as substrates, we found that cellobiose, galactose, arabinose and starch utilization was strongly inhibited by the existence of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). However, the xylose and mannose consumptions were not markedly affected by 2-DG at the concentration of one-tenth of the metabolizable sugar. Accordingly, T. aotearoense SCUT27 could consume xylose and mannose in the presence of glucose. The carbon catabolite repression (CCR) related genes, ccpA, ptsH and hprK were confirmed to exist in T. aotearoense SCUT27 through gene cloning and protein characterization. The highly purified Histidine-containing Protein (HPr) could be specifically phosphorylated at Serine 46 by HPr kinase/phosphatase (HPrK/P) with no need to add fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) or glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) in the reaction mixture. The specific protein-interaction of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) and phosphorylated HPr was proved via affinity chromatography in the absence of formaldehyde. The equilibrium binding constant (KD) of CcpA and HPrSerP was determined as 2.22 ± 0.36 nM by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, indicating the high affinity between these two proteins.

  15. 3F8 monoclonal antibody treatment of patients with stage 4 neuroblastoma: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N K; Kushner, B H; Yeh, S D; Larson, S M

    1998-06-01

    3F8 is an IgG3 murine monoclonal antibody directed against the ganglioside GD2. In a phase II study, 3F8 was administered i.v. to 16 patients (pts) who had stage 4 neuroblastoma. Response was seen in bony lesions (2 of 7 pts) and marrow (3 of 8 pts). Acute toxicities of pain, fever, urticaria, hypertension, hypotension and anaphylactoid reactions were self-limited and manageable. Three pts are long-term survivors between 79-130+ months after 3F8 treatment without additional systemic therapy and no delayed neurological complications. The potential benefits of 3F8 when added to chemoradio-therapy warrant further investigation.

  16. Enhancing the Cognitive Complexity in Social Studies Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stobaugh, Rebecca; Tassell, Janet Lynne; Day, Martha M.; Blankenship, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Social studies teachers are charged with the task of developing students' understandings as students engage in critical examination of social studies issues and topics. Teachers often use test items from textbooks or instructional resources, or create their own classroom assessments with no specific pedagogical foundation. All too often, these…

  17. An Empirical Study of a Solo Performance Assessment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized model of solo music performance assessment. Specifically, this study investigates the influence of technique and musical expression on perceptions of overall performance quality. The Aural Musical Performance Quality (AMPQ) measure was created to measure overall performance quality, technique,…

  18. International Civic and Citizenship Education Study: Assessment Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Wolfram; Fraillon, Julian; Ainley, John; Losito, Bruno; Kerr, David

    2008-01-01

    This document outlines the framework and assessment design for the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) sponsored by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). Over the past 50 years, IEA has conducted comparative research studies focusing on educational policies, practices, and…

  19. A Study of Prior Learning Assessment in Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jean Marie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of prior learning assessment (PLA) in postsecondary degree completion for adult community college students at Mountwest Community and Technical College (MCTC). The study group consisted of 339 MCTC graduates, who applied PLA credits toward degree completion between the academic year 2006 and 2011.…

  20. International Computer and Information Literacy Study: Assessment Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraillon, Julian; Schulz, Wolfram; Ainley, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the International Computer and Information Literacy Study 2013 (ICILS 2013) is to investigate, in a range of countries, the ways in which young people are developing "computer and information literacy" (CIL) to support their capacity to participate in the digital age. To achieve this aim, the study will assess student…

  1. Pre-training assessment tool (JPAT)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chow, J; Bennett, L

    2001-01-01

    A tool for assessing the suitability of candidates for home dialysis (Jo-Pre-training Assessment Tool--JPAT) was developed. JPAT acts as a screening instrument to identify suitable candidates for the home dialysis programme, and therefore increases a patient's chance of learning to manage the programme. JPAT is in the form of an interview questionnaire consisting of 38 assessment items in six domains: physical stability, nutritional status, communication, ability to maintain self-care, psychological suitability and social support. A pilot study was conducted (n = 20, 1996-1997) using a descriptive study design, with subjects randomly selected from an existing dialysis programme. Pearson correlation and 2-tailed tests were employed to explore the relationship between the assessment outcome (i.e. the initial JPAT scores) and the follow up data (i.e. data collected within the seven days following the initial JPAT assessment). Many of the variables attained statistical significance (p < 0.05). The inter-rater reliability was calculated at an average Kappa value of 0.909. Overall, results suggest that JPAT is sufficiently reliable to be used as a tool for assessing patients who suffer from ESRD. PMID:12603073

  2. Pre-training assessment tool (JPAT)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chow, J; Bennett, L

    2001-01-01

    A tool for assessing the suitability of candidates for home dialysis (Jo-Pre-training Assessment Tool--JPAT) was developed. JPAT acts as a screening instrument to identify suitable candidates for the home dialysis programme, and therefore increases a patient's chance of learning to manage the programme. JPAT is in the form of an interview questionnaire consisting of 38 assessment items in six domains: physical stability, nutritional status, communication, ability to maintain self-care, psychological suitability and social support. A pilot study was conducted (n = 20, 1996-1997) using a descriptive study design, with subjects randomly selected from an existing dialysis programme. Pearson correlation and 2-tailed tests were employed to explore the relationship between the assessment outcome (i.e. the initial JPAT scores) and the follow up data (i.e. data collected within the seven days following the initial JPAT assessment). Many of the variables attained statistical significance (p < 0.05). The inter-rater reliability was calculated at an average Kappa value of 0.909. Overall, results suggest that JPAT is sufficiently reliable to be used as a tool for assessing patients who suffer from ESRD.

  3. An action research study of secondary science assessment praxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas Gerald

    This practical participatory action research study illuminates the assessment praxes of four Ontario secondary level science teachers at one school using a facilitative approach. Participants were joined by a thematic concern, that is, a commitment to inform and improve assessment. Hence, two distinct sets of research questions emerged. The first involves the nature of assessment as we asked, what was the current state of assessment practice in secondary science? What were participants' initial understandings of assessment and actual practices at the onset of this research? To what extent did these initial understandings and actual practices change due to the illumination of assessment praxes through action research involvement? What was their level of awareness of current Ontario government pronouncements and in what ways did they implement this knowledge? The second theme, concerning the nature of action research, was realised by asking what did participants learn about action research? What other learning and professional gains were realised during this study? And, what did I learn about action research and assessment through my involvement in this study? Data were collected via supportive discussion groups, individual interviews, classroom visitations, journals and documentation. This professional development experience facilitated 'interactive professionalism' as teachers worked in a small group and interacted frequently in the course of planning, testing new ideas, attempting to solve different problems, and assess the effectiveness of those ideas. In addition, this action research effort was strategic and systematic, to attain a high degree of specific interactions, (personal interviews, group meetings, classroom observations, evidence collection). This series of deliberate and planned intentions helped participants solve assessment dilemmas. We developed an awareness and understanding of the need for more preservice and inservice assessment training

  4. A physiotherapy triage assessment service for people with low back disorders: evaluation of short-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Brenna; Pahwa, Punam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the short-term effects of physiotherapy triage assessments on self-reported pain, functioning, and general well-being and quality of life in people with low back-related disorders. Methods: Participants with low back–related complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists (PTs). Before undergoing the triage assessment, the participants completed a battery of questionnaires covering a range of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial features. The study used the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and the Medical Outcomes Survey 36-item short-form version 2 (SF-36v2) to assess self-reported pain, function, and quality of life. Baseline measures and variables were analyzed using a descriptive analysis method (ie, proportions, means, medians). Paired samples t-tests or Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank tests were used to analyze the overall group differences between the pretest and posttest outcome measures where appropriate. Results: A total of 108 out of 115 (93.9%) participants completed the posttest survey. The Physical Component Summary of the SF36v2 was the only measure that demonstrated significant improvement (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A spinal triage assessment program delivered by PTs can be viewed as a complex intervention that may have the potential to affect a wide range of patient-related outcomes. Further research is needed to examine the long-term outcomes and explore potential mechanisms of improvement using a biopsychosocial framework. PMID:22915980

  5. Exposure assessment in industry specific retrospective occupational epidemiology studies.

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, N S; Checkoway, H

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of exposure for occupational epidemiology studies has received increasing attention in recent years and, as a result, a body of methodological literature has begun to take form. This paper reviews the generic issues in the methodology of exposure assessment, particularly methods for quantitative retrospective assessment studies. A simple framework, termed an exposure data matrix (EDM), for defining and analysing exposure data is proposed and discussed in terms of the definition of matrix dimensions and scales. Several methods for estimation, interpolation, and extrapolation, ranging from subjective ratings to quantitative statistical modelling are presented and discussed. The various approaches to exposure assessment based on the EDM concept are illustrated with studies of lung disease among coal miners and other dust and chemically induced chronic occupational diseases. The advantages of validated statistical models are emphasised. The importance of analysis and control of errors in exposure assessments, and integration of the exposure assessment and exposure-response processes, especially for emerging occupational health issues, is emphasised. PMID:7489051

  6. Context Sampling Descriptive Assessment: A Pilot Study of a Further Approach to Functional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, Nathalie; Furniss, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Background: The ability of descriptive assessments to differentiate functions of problem behaviours might be increased by systematically sampling natural contexts characterized by different establishing operations. This study evaluated the stability of such characteristics, and variability in challenging behaviour, for three school contexts.…

  7. Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems Braille Reading Assessment: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey, Virginia K.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This exploratory study determined whether transcribing selected test items on an adult life and work skills reading test into braille could maintain the same approximate scale-score range and maintain fitness within the item response theory model as used by the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (CASAS) for developing…

  8. Teaching, Learning, and Assessment Together: Reflective Assessments for Middle and High School English and Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Arthur K.; Evans, Laurynn

    2010-01-01

    This book offers easy-to-use classroom strategies for middle and high school English and Social Studies classrooms. They demonstrate how teaching, learning, and assessment are inseparable and seamless. Each strategy will engage your students in activity and reflection, consuming little class time, costing nothing, and uniting the three dimensions…

  9. AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference, Hilton Head Island, SC, Aug. 10-12, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1-2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to aircraft dynamics and aerodynamics in atmospheric disturbances, vehicle trajectory optimization, projectile and missile flight dynamics, high alpha prediction codes for flow phenomenon, aircraft handling qualities, high alpha CFD and control, aircraft agility, unsteady flow phenomenon, parameter estimation, hypersonic technology, CFD for store separation, aeroassist technology, and unsteady and high alpha numerical studies. Particular attention is given to optimal recovery from microburst wind shear, optimal trajectories for an unmanned air-vehicle in the horizontal plane, numerical simulation of missile flow fields, pulsating spanwise blowing on a fighter aircraft, pilot control identification using minimum model error estimation, Navier-Stokes computations for oscillating control surfaces, aircraft agility maneuvers, fin motion after projectile exit from gun tube, the vortical structure in the wake during dynamic stall, nonlinear aerodynamic parameter estimation, missile and spacecraft coning instabilities, 3D Euler solutions on wing-pylon-store configuration with unstructured tetrahedral meshes, and a simulation model for tail rotor failure.

  10. Exposure Assessment in Cohort Studies of Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Arrandale, Victoria H.; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Brunekreef, Bert; Gold, Diane R.; London, Stephanie J.; Miller, J. David; Özkaynak, Halûk; Ries, Nola M.; Sears, Malcolm R.; Silverman, Frances S.; Takaro, Tim K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The environment is suspected to play an important role in the development of childhood asthma. Cohort studies are a powerful observational design for studying exposure–response relationships, but their power depends in part upon the accuracy of the exposure assessment. Objective The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss issues that make accurate exposure assessment a challenge and to suggest strategies for improving exposure assessment in longitudinal cohort studies of childhood asthma and allergies. Data synthesis Exposures of interest need to be prioritized, because a single study cannot measure all potentially relevant exposures. Hypotheses need to be based on proposed mechanisms, critical time windows for effects, prior knowledge of physical, physiologic, and immunologic development, as well as genetic pathways potentially influenced by the exposures. Modifiable exposures are most important from the public health perspective. Given the interest in evaluating gene–environment interactions, large cohort sizes are required, and planning for data pooling across independent studies is critical. Collection of additional samples, possibly through subject participation, will permit secondary analyses. Models combining air quality, environmental, and dose data provide exposure estimates across large cohorts but can still be improved. Conclusions Exposure is best characterized through a combination of information sources. Improving exposure assessment is critical for reducing measurement error and increasing power, which increase confidence in characterization of children at risk, leading to improved health outcomes. PMID:21081299

  11. Landscape ecological risk assessment study in arid land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lu; Amut, Aniwaer; Shi, Qingdong; Wang, Gary Z.

    2007-09-01

    The ecosystem risk assessment is an essential decision making system for predicting the reconstruction and recovery of a damaged ecosystem after intensive mankind activities. The sustainability of environment and resources of the lake ecosystem in arid districts have been paid close attention to by international communities as well as numerous experts and scholars. The ecological risk assessment offered a scientific foundation for making the decision and execution of ecological risk management. Bosten Lake, the largest inland freshwater lake in China, is the main water source of the industrial and agricultural production as well as the local residence in Yanqi basin, Kuara city and Yuri County in the southern Xinjiang. Bosten Lake also provides a direct water source for emergency transportation in the Lower Reaches of Tarim River. However, with the intensive utilizations of water and soil resources, the environmental condition in the Bosten Lake has become more and more serious. In this study, the theory and method of landscape ecological risk assessment has been practiced using 3S technologies combined with the frontier theory of landscape ecology. Defining the mainly risk resource including flood, drought, water pollution and rich nutrition of water has been evaluated based on the ecosystem risk assessment system. The main process includes five stages: regional natural resources analysis, risk receptor selection, risk sources evaluation, exposure and hazard analysis, and integrated risk assessment. Based on the risk assessment results, the environmental risk management countermeasure has been determined.

  12. [Social support assessment in Brazilian studies: conceptual aspects and measures].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Tonantzin Ribeiro; Pawlowski, Josiane; Bandeira, Denise Ruschel; Piccinini, Cesar Augusto

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the different ways of evaluating the social support in Brazilian studies. A surveying of scientific Brazilian publications from 1987 to 2007 was done in the Indexpsi, Pepsic, SciELO and Lilacs databases according to keywords social support and social network. Fifty-five studies included some type of assessing social support in Brazilian samples. The results indicated a rise in the number of studies about social support assessment in the last years using interviews to investigate received and perceived support, predominantly. However, the construction was applied without theoretical basis and was associated with many other concepts, sometimes without an appropriate articulation. Besides, there were evidences of lacking reliable, valid and standardized instruments to Brazilian population by considering the instruments currently used and revised by this study.

  13. Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

  14. Combining life cycle assessment and qualitative risk assessment: the case study of alumina nanofluid production.

    PubMed

    Barberio, Grazia; Scalbi, Simona; Buttol, Patrizia; Masoni, Paolo; Righi, Serena

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the authors propose a framework for combining life cycle assessment (LCA) and Risk Assessment (RA) to support the sustainability assessment of emerging technologies. This proposal includes four steps of analysis: technological system definition; data collection; risk evaluation and impacts quantification; results interpretation. This scheme has been applied to a case study of nanofluid alumina production in two different pilot lines, "single-stage" and "two-stage". The study has been developed in the NanoHex project (enhanced nano-fluid heat exchange). Goals of the study were analyzing the hotspots and highlighting possible trade-off between the results of LCA, which identifies the processes having the best environmental performance, and the results of RA, which identifies the scenarios having the highest risk for workers. Indeed, due to lack of data about exposure limits, exposure-dose relationships and toxicity of alumina nanopowders (NPs) and nanofluids (NF), the workplace exposure has been evaluated by means of qualitative risk assessment, using Stoffenmanager Nano. Though having different aims, LCA and RA have a complementary role in the description of impacts of products/substances/technologies. Their combined use can overcome limits of each of them and allows a wider vision of the problems to better support the decision making process.

  15. Assessing Student Learning in the Major Field of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessing student attainment in the major field of study is increasingly important to employers and accrediting bodies alike. Construction and manufacturing firms do not like engineers who design faulty bridges and airplanes. Marketing firms want to hire students who understand the difference between a niche market and a global market. School…

  16. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) in Studies of Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul

    2009-01-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is particularly suitable for studying substance use, because use is episodic and thought to be related to mood and context. This article reviews EMA methods in substance use research, focusing on tobacco and alcohol use and relapse, where EMA has been most applied. Common EMA designs combine event-based…

  17. A Validation Study of the Youth Development Assessment Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatelli, Ronald M.; Anderson, Stephen A.; Kosutic, Iva; Sanderson, Jessica; Rubinfeld, Stacey

    2009-01-01

    This article details the development of the Youth Development Assessment Device (YDAD), an instrument designed to measure a youth's experiences within youth development programs. A total of 1,074 adolescents, between 12 and 18 years of age, participated in the study. Exploratory factor analysis yielded three factors: Supportive Environment,…

  18. Gainesville Junior College Community Impact Study/Needs Assessment Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Barbara; And Others

    Procedures, methodology, and findings are reported for a six-part study undertaken by Gainesville Junior College (GJC) to: assess the economic impact of the college on its service area; determine community attitudes concerning the degree to which GJC has met stated goals and objectives; and identify needed services and programs that GJC has yet to…

  19. A Study of Sustainable Assessment Theory in Higher Education Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Robert J.; Skinner, William F.; Schwabrow, Lynsey A.

    2013-01-01

    A study of sustainable assessment theory in nine tutorial courses at four colleges demonstrated that three long-term learning outcomes improved: Independence, Intellectual Maturity and Creativity. Eight of 10 traits associated with these outcomes were validated through internal reliability, faculty and student rubrics, and faculty case studies…

  20. PROSPECTIVE PREGNANCY STUDY DESIGNS FOR ASSESSING REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants
    Germaine M. Buck,1 Courtney D. Johnson,1 Joseph Stanford,2 Anne Sweeney,3 Laura Schieve,4 John Rockett,5 Sherry G. Selevan,6 Steve Schrader 7

    Abstract
    The origin of successfu...

  1. Inmate Literacy Assessment Study at the Lake County Indiana Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutay, Jeanette C.; Plebanski, David; McCafferty, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study utilized a sample of 159 inmates from a small Northwest Indiana correctional facility to examine the educational attainment and literacy proficiency of the inmates. The 3rd edition of the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT-3) was used to assess the spelling, reading and arithmetic achievement of the inmates. Overall the results of this…

  2. The School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study: Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Devaney, Barbara

    This publication, which is based on the School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study, describes the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (SBP), presents findings on the nutrients and foods provided in school meals, and describes the dietary intakes of the nation's students on a typical school day. Data were derived…

  3. Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Donna, Ed.; Rosenthal, Laura J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of essays, "Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment," edited by Donna Heiland and Laura J. Rosenthal, represents an important new venture in the Foundation's communication program. The book is the product of many authors, including the editors, both of whom have written essays for it. But it is the…

  4. Assessing Meritorious Teacher Performance: A Differential Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellett, Chad D; Capie, William

    The Teacher Assessment and Development System (TADS) - Meritorious Teacher Program (MTP) FORM instrument is used in the Dade County Public Schools, Miami, Florida, to evaluate teachers. Its validity for decisions concerning merit pay for master teachers was examined in this study. Specifically, its ability to discriminate between high performing…

  5. Interoceptive Assessment and Exposure in Panic Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Trakowski, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) protocols for panic disorder (PD) typically include some form of interoceptive exposure (IE)--repeated exposure to internal sensations. Despite the widespread clinical use of IE, there is a notable absence of empirical reports about the nature of interoceptive assessments and IE. The present study was designed…

  6. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  7. Planning Intervention Using Dynamic Assessments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasson, Natalie; Dodd, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic assessments (DA) of language have been shown to be a useful addition to the battery of tests used to diagnose language impairments in children, and to evaluate their skills. The current article explores the value of the information gained from a DA in planning intervention for a child with language impairment. A single case study was used…

  8. A Validation Study of Early Adolescents' Pubertal Self-Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Katharine E.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Nichols, Jeanne F.; Irvin, Veronica L.; Keating, Kristen; Simon, Gayle M.; Gehrman, Christine; Jones, Kenneth Lee

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether self-assessed puberty is sufficiently reliable and valid to substitute for physician examination when feasibility of physician examination is low (e.g., behavioral research). Adolescents (convenience sample N = 178 endocrinology patients and N = 125 from educational trial; mean age 12.7 and 11.3 years,…

  9. Assessment of APRN Student Competency Using Simulation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kesten, Karen S; Brown, Helen F; Meeker, Meaghan C

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and evaluation of competency for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) is a challenge facing educators, regulators, and consumers of health care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using simulation to assess and evaluate APRN student competence in managing complex cases. Students were videotaped in the simulation laboratory at four separate intervals; two independent reviewers used the APRN Competency Evaluation Tool to review the simulation. Results showed statistically significant improvement in all categories of evaluation following increased exposure to simulation of complex cases. Student competence increased for managing complex patients, use of evidence-based guidelines, patient safety, leadership, prioritization, delegation, collaboration, communication, and professionalism. PMID:26521505

  10. Development Impact Assessment (DIA) Case Study. South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Sadie; Nawaz, Kathleen; Sandor, Debra

    2015-05-19

    This case study reviews South Africa’s experience in considering the impacts of climate change action on development goals, focusing on the South African energy sector and development impact assessments (DIAs) that have and could be used to influence energy policy or inform the selection of energy activities. It includes a review of assessments—conducted by government ministries, technical partners, and academic institutes and non-governmental organizations (NGOs)—that consider employment, health, and water implications of possible energy sector actions, as well as multi-criteria impact assessments.

  11. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations. PMID:24175172

  12. Development of a Probabilistic Assessment Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, Robert A.; Brennan, Sean T.; Freeman, P.A.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Becker, Mark F.; Herkelrath, William N.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Neuzil, Christopher E.; Swanson, Sharon M.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Nelson, Philip H.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a probabilistic assessment methodology developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for evaluation of the resource potential for storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the subsurface of the United States as authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110-140, 2007). The methodology is based on USGS assessment methodologies for oil and gas resources created and refined over the last 30 years. The resource that is evaluated is the volume of pore space in the subsurface in the depth range of 3,000 to 13,000 feet that can be described within a geologically defined storage assessment unit consisting of a storage formation and an enclosing seal formation. Storage assessment units are divided into physical traps (PTs), which in most cases are oil and gas reservoirs, and the surrounding saline formation (SF), which encompasses the remainder of the storage formation. The storage resource is determined separately for these two types of storage. Monte Carlo simulation methods are used to calculate a distribution of the potential storage size for individual PTs and the SF. To estimate the aggregate storage resource of all PTs, a second Monte Carlo simulation step is used to sample the size and number of PTs. The probability of successful storage for individual PTs or the entire SF, defined in this methodology by the likelihood that the amount of CO2 stored will be greater than a prescribed minimum, is based on an estimate of the probability of containment using present-day geologic knowledge. The report concludes with a brief discussion of needed research data that could be used to refine assessment methodologies for CO2 sequestration.

  13. [Study on the risk assessment method of regional groundwater pollution].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yu, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Zong-Qing; Li, Ding-Long; Sun, Hong-Wei

    2013-02-01

    Based on the boundary elements of system risk assessment, the regional groundwater pollution risk assessment index system was preliminarily established, which included: regional groundwater specific vulnerability assessment, the regional pollution sources characteristics assessment and the health risk assessment of regional featured pollutants. The three sub-evaluation systems were coupled with the multi-index comprehensive method, the risk was characterized with the Spatial Analysis of ArcMap, and a new method to evaluate regional groundwater pollution risk that suitable for different parts of natural conditions, different types of pollution was established. Take Changzhou as an example, the risk of shallow groundwater pollution was studied with the new method, and found that the vulnerability index of groundwater in Changzhou is high and distributes unevenly; The distribution of pollution sources is concentrated and has a great impact on groundwater pollution risks; Influenced by the pollutants and pollution sources, the values of health risks are high in the urban area of Changzhou. The pollution risk of shallow groundwater is high and distributes unevenly, and distributes in the north of the line of Anjia-Xuejia-Zhenglu, the center of the city and the southeast, where the human activities are more intense and the pollution sources are intensive.

  14. A Longitudinal Study of the Bidirectional Relationship Between Social Support and Posttraumatic Stress Following a Natural Disaster.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jonathan M; Lowe, Sarah R; Galea, Sandro; Norris, Fran H; Koenen, Karestan C

    2016-06-01

    There is ample evidence that social support is protective against posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms through social causation processes. It is also likely that PTS is associated with decreased social support through social selection processes. Few studies, however, have examined the longitudinal and bidirectional associations between social support and PTS in a postdisaster context, and whether such associations vary by type of support (e.g., emotional, informational, or tangible). We examined these relationships using Galveston Bay Recovery Study data. Participants (N = 658) were interviewed 2-6 months (W1), 5-9 months (W2), and 14-19 months (W3) after Hurricane Ike in 2008. Longitudinal relationships between each support type and PTS were examined in cross-lagged models. W1 emotional support was negatively associated with W2 PTS (Estimate = -.13, p = .007), consistent with social causation. W1 PTS was negatively associated with W2 emotional support (Estimate = -.14, p = .019), consistent with social selection. In contrast, pathways were nonsignificant at subsequent waves and for informational and tangible support. Results suggested that postdisaster social causation and selection were limited to emotional support and diminish over time. Based on these findings, postdisaster services should emphasize restoring supportive social connections to minimize the psychiatric consequences of disaster, especially among those with prior evidence of distress. PMID:27163339

  15. A Longitudinal Study of the Bidirectional Relationship Between Social Support and Posttraumatic Stress Following a Natural Disaster.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jonathan M; Lowe, Sarah R; Galea, Sandro; Norris, Fran H; Koenen, Karestan C

    2016-06-01

    There is ample evidence that social support is protective against posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms through social causation processes. It is also likely that PTS is associated with decreased social support through social selection processes. Few studies, however, have examined the longitudinal and bidirectional associations between social support and PTS in a postdisaster context, and whether such associations vary by type of support (e.g., emotional, informational, or tangible). We examined these relationships using Galveston Bay Recovery Study data. Participants (N = 658) were interviewed 2-6 months (W1), 5-9 months (W2), and 14-19 months (W3) after Hurricane Ike in 2008. Longitudinal relationships between each support type and PTS were examined in cross-lagged models. W1 emotional support was negatively associated with W2 PTS (Estimate = -.13, p = .007), consistent with social causation. W1 PTS was negatively associated with W2 emotional support (Estimate = -.14, p = .019), consistent with social selection. In contrast, pathways were nonsignificant at subsequent waves and for informational and tangible support. Results suggested that postdisaster social causation and selection were limited to emotional support and diminish over time. Based on these findings, postdisaster services should emphasize restoring supportive social connections to minimize the psychiatric consequences of disaster, especially among those with prior evidence of distress.

  16. Open market customer: Volume 2 -- Case study assessments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kotowski, J.; Wikler, G.; Milward, R.; Gudger, K.

    1998-06-01

    This second volume of the Open Market Customer (OMC) contains the case study assessments that illustrate the discussions in Volume 1 and the supporting framework. There are two types of assessments in this volume: actual case studies and prototype case studies. The first, the actual case studies are full OMC assessments of four different types of existing large commercial/industrial facilities. They are, in order of their appearance in this volume: Logan International Airport, Boston, MA--Airport; Washington University, St. Louis, MO--Four-Year University; Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL--Hospital; and Sierra Pine Ltd., Rocklin, CA--Wood Products Manufacturing. The second type of assessments are the prototype case studies. They were performed on four different types of facilities falling under two market segments. These facilities` models were developed using assumed characteristics, such as floor areas and energy sources. They are, in order of appearance in this volume: Retail Building--small commercial; Sit-Down Restaurant--small commercial; Primary School--small commercial; and Planned Residential Community--residential. For each facility, the characteristics or assumptions are described in detail. Using these characteristics or assumptions a framework for each energy type used on-site was developed. Each framework describes the annual consumption of that energy type as well as the infrastructure supporting it. For example, a facility`s electricity framework shows the estimated annual electricity consumption and expenditures within each of the nine functional areas at that facility. Further, the framework shows the estimated capital associated with each functional area, such as substations, electric distribution lines, and motors. Appendices at the end of this volume contain the frameworks for each case study.

  17. Environmental impact assessment as a complement of life cycle assessment. Case study: Upgrading of biogas.

    PubMed

    Morero, Betzabet; Rodriguez, María B; Campanella, Enrique A

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a comparison between an environmental impact assessment (EIA) and a life cycle assessment (LCA) using a case study: upgrading of biogas. The upgrading of biogas is studied using three solvents: water, physical solvent and amine. The EIA follows the requirements of the legislation of Santa Fe Province (Argentina), and the LCA follows ISO 14040. The LCA results showed that water produces a minor impact in most of the considered categories whereas the high impact in the process with amines is the result of its high energy consumptions. The positive results obtained in the EIA (mainly associated with the cultural and socioeconomic components) make the project feasible and all the negative impacts can be mitigated by preventive and remedial measures. From the strengths and weaknesses of each tool, it is inferred that the EIA is a procedure that can complement the LCA.

  18. Environmental impact assessment as a complement of life cycle assessment. Case study: Upgrading of biogas.

    PubMed

    Morero, Betzabet; Rodriguez, María B; Campanella, Enrique A

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a comparison between an environmental impact assessment (EIA) and a life cycle assessment (LCA) using a case study: upgrading of biogas. The upgrading of biogas is studied using three solvents: water, physical solvent and amine. The EIA follows the requirements of the legislation of Santa Fe Province (Argentina), and the LCA follows ISO 14040. The LCA results showed that water produces a minor impact in most of the considered categories whereas the high impact in the process with amines is the result of its high energy consumptions. The positive results obtained in the EIA (mainly associated with the cultural and socioeconomic components) make the project feasible and all the negative impacts can be mitigated by preventive and remedial measures. From the strengths and weaknesses of each tool, it is inferred that the EIA is a procedure that can complement the LCA. PMID:25971645

  19. DESIGNING STUDIES AND COLLECTING DATA USEFUL FOR CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGNING STUDIES AND COLLECTING DATA USEFUL FOR CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT. J E Simmons1, C Gennings2, M Casey2, M J Plewa3, E D Wagner3, W H Carter, Jr.2, A McDonald1,Y M Sey1, L K Teuschler3 1NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP NC, USA; 2VCU, Richmond, VA, USA;3Univ. Illinois, Urba...

  20. Asymmetrical motor behaviour as a window to early leg preference: a longitudinal study in infants 7-12 months of age.

    PubMed

    Atun-Einy, Osnat

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study explored leg preference in infancy during half-kneel pulling-to-stand (PTS) and asymmetrical four-point kneeling, which is part of the typical motor repertoire of infants. The special characteristics of the half-kneel PTS as a discrete task, performed in a bilateral context provide the opportunity to explore leg preference during an asymmetrical behaviour. Twenty-seven infants were observed in their homes, every 3 weeks between the ages of 7-12 months. Leg preference was determined by the "lead-out" limb used as the infants pulled to stand from the half-kneeling position (half-kneel PTS). As a complementary measure, the leading leg during asymmetrical four-point kneeling and crawling ("asymmetrical four-point patterns") was used in the 10 infants who developed these patterns. The infants studied showed a general preference for using a leading leg during half-kneel PTS, which was mostly consistent over the study period. A strong correlation was found between leg preferences during half-kneel PTS and asymmetrical four-point patterns. The findings documented functional asymmetry in infant lower limbs during half-kneel PTS and asymmetrical four-point patterns, highlighting the importance of the tasks used to define leg preference.

  1. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics.

  2. Quantitative study designs used in quality improvement and assessment.

    PubMed

    Ormes, W S; Brim, M B; Coggan, P

    2001-01-01

    This article describes common quantitative design techniques that can be used to collect and analyze quality data. An understanding of the differences between these design techniques can help healthcare quality professionals make the most efficient use of their time, energies, and resources. To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these various study designs, it is necessary to assess factors that threaten the degree with which quality professionals may infer a cause-and-effect relationship from the data collected. Processes, the conduits of organizational function, often can be assessed by methods that do not take into account confounding and compromising circumstances that affect the outcomes of their analyses. An assumption that the implementation of process improvements may cause real change is incomplete without a consideration of other factors that might also have caused the same result. It is only through the identification, assessment, and exclusion of these alternative factors that administrators and healthcare quality professionals can assess the degree to which true process improvement or compliance has occurred. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of common quantitative design techniques and reviews the corresponding threats to the interpretability of data obtained from their use. PMID:11378972

  3. Exposure Assessment in the National Children’s Study: Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Larry L.; Özkaynak, Halûk; Whyatt, Robin M.; Barr, Dana B.; Wang, Richard Y.; Naeher, Luke; Akland, Gerry; Bahadori, Tina; Bradman, Asa; Fortmann, Roy; Liu, L-J. Sally; Morandi, Maria; O’Rourke, Mary Kay; Thomas, Kent; Quackenboss, James; Ryan, P. Barry; Zartarian, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    The science of exposure assessment is relatively new and evolving rapidly with the advancement of sophisticated methods for specific measurements at the picogram per gram level or lower in a variety of environmental and biologic matrices. Without this measurement capability, environmental health studies rely on questionnaires or other indirect means as the primary method to assess individual exposures. Although we use indirect methods, they are seldom used as stand-alone tools. Analyses of environmental and biologic samples have allowed us to get more precise data on exposure pathways, from sources to concentrations, to routes, to exposure, to doses. They also often allow a better estimation of the absorbed dose and its relation to potential adverse health outcomes in individuals and in populations. Here, we make note of various environmental agents and how best to assess exposure to them in the National Children’s Study—a longitudinal epidemiologic study of children’s health. Criteria for the analytical method of choice are discussed with particular emphasis on the need for long-term quality control and quality assurance measures. PMID:16079082

  4. Improving Academic Program Assessment: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Megan; Grays, Makayla P.; Fulcher, Keston H.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Starting with the premise that better assessment leads to more informed decisions about student learning, we investigated the factors that lead to assessment improvement. We used "meta-assessment" (i.e., evaluating the assessment process) to identify academic programs in which the assessment process had improved over a two-year period.…

  5. Natural analogue studies: present status and performance assessment implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smellie, John A. T.; Karlsson, Fred; Alexander, W. Russell

    1997-04-01

    Studies of natural geological and archaeological systems as analogues to long-term processes, which are predicted to occur within a radioactive waste repository environment, have become increasingly popular over the last 10 years or so, to the extent that such studies form an integral part of many national programmes for radioactive waste disposal. There is now a common consensus that the natural analogue approach is a very useful scientific methodology to: (a) identify and understand processes and mechanisms analogous to those which could occur in the vicinity of a repository over realistic timescales, (b) derive input data which have been successfully used to test some of the laboratory-based models which form the basis of long-term repository performance assessment, and (c) to produce data which can be input directly to performance assessment models. Increasingly, analogues are playing an important role in public awareness, enabling the layman to understand better the concept of radioactive disposal and demonstrating the reliability of the disposal system over long periods of geological time. The complexity of geological systems means that it is very often difficult and sometimes impossible to quantify precisely the physico-chemical boundary conditions necessary to model a particular geochemical process or mechanism. Consequently, the availability of quantitative analogue data is limited when repository performance assessments are considered. However, this in no way detracts from their value in building confidence by demonstrating that important processes do exist and by showing qualitatively that they behave in a way predicted by models based on laboratory-derived data. The transfer of natural analogue data from the complexity of field studies to simplistic models which, by necessity, are used in performance assessments, is an area of activity which is presently being addressed. Field analogue studies are now being planned to interface with laboratory

  6. Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H.; Georgiou, D.N.; Wheeldon, J.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

  7. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles.

  8. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles. PMID:27492180

  9. Understanding Classroom Assessment in Dilemmatic Spaces: Case Studies of Singaporean Music Teachers' Conceptions of Classroom Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Wei Shin

    2014-01-01

    With the articulation of new "Holistic and Balanced Assessment" initiatives in Singaporean schools, a new standard of conceptualising and enacting classroom assessment is expected of Singaporean teachers. This paper draws on findings from a study of the diversity of classroom assessment "concourse", representing the variations…

  10. Assessing analytical comparability of biosimilars: GCSF as a case study.

    PubMed

    Nupur, Neh; Singh, Sumit Kumar; Narula, Gunjan; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-10-01

    The biosimilar industry is witnessing an unprecedented growth with the newer therapeutics increasing in complexity over time. A key step towards development of a biosimilar is to establish analytical comparability with the innovator product, which would otherwise affect the safety/efficacy profile of the product. Choosing appropriate analytical tools that can fulfil this objective by qualitatively and/or quantitatively assessing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the product is highly critical for establishing equivalence. These CQAs cover the primary and higher order structures of the product, product related variants and impurities, as well as process related impurities, and host cell related impurities. In the present work, we use such an analytical platform for assessing comparability of five approved Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (GCSF) biosimilars (Emgrast, Lupifil, Colstim, Neukine and Grafeel) to the innovator product, Neupogen(®). The comparability studies involve assessing structural homogeneity, identity, secondary structure, and product related modifications. Physicochemical analytical tools include peptide mapping with mass determination, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, reverse phase chromatography (RPC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) have been used in this exercise. Bioactivity assessment include comparison of relative potency through in vitro cell proliferation assays. The results from extensive analytical examination offer robust evidence of structural and biological similarity of the products under consideration with the pertinent innovator product. For the most part, the biosimilar drugs were found to be comparable to the innovator drug anomaly that was identified was that three of the biosimilars had a typical variant which was reported as an oxidized species in the literature. But, upon further investigation using RPC-FLD and ESI-MS we found that this is likely a conformational variant of the biotherapeutic been

  11. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  12. Situated argumentation, learning and science education: A case study of prospective teachers' experiences in an innovative science course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munford, Danusa

    Various authors had called attention to the significance of argumentation to science education. Nevertheless, argumentation practices had been considerably rare in science classrooms. Moreover, little is know about how people engage in argumentation as science learners to construct knowledge about the natural world and about science. This study was conducted in a science education course for prospective teachers (PTs) at a university in the Northeast United States. The course was composed of three instructional units, focusing on evolution, light and climate change. In each unity, PTs were confronted with questions, and, working in pairs, they built evidence-based arguments. Various types of technology tools were used to support PTs' in that process. The study addresses the experiences of four prospective teachers, adopting a case study research design informed by grounded theory and phenomenology theoretical frameworks. The research questions were: (1) What is the nature of the arguments that PTs' construct? (2) How PTs's understandings about argumentation develop throughout the course? (3) What accounts for PTs' understandings about argument construction? The primary sources of data for the study were (1) electronic artifacts constructed by PTs and (2) interviews with participants conducted after each unit. The structure of their arguments was analyzed to determine the extent to which PTs explored multiple explanations, provided relevant evidence to support their conclusions, explained how evidence and conclusions were related, and recognized limitations in explanations. The results of the study suggest that there are some common trends in the development of understandings about scientific arguments. Initially, learners acknowledged the role of evidence in scientific arguments, and tended to provide evidence to support their claims. However, PTs tended not to explain how these pieces of evidence would be related to their conclusions, and saw little value in

  13. Risk assessment under FQPA: case study with chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Clevelan, C B; Oliver, G R; Chen, B; Mattsson, J

    2001-10-01

    Key science policies have had significant impact on the evolving implementation of the Food Quality and Protection Act (FQPA) (PL 104-170, 1996) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The impact offour of these policies will be examined using the risk assessment for chlorpyrifos as a case study. These policies are selection of a regulatory endpoint, use of animal data without consideration of human data for setting the reference dose, a 10 FQPA safety factor and use of the 99.9 percentile of modeled consumer exposure in the acute dietary assessment. Each of these policy decisions had individual impact that was then compounded as cumulative impact on the revised risk assessment for chlorpyrifos conducted by the US EPA in 2000 [Federal Register Notice 65(159) (2000) 49982]. But embedded within each science policy, there are assumptions which may be too conservative and which together have resulted in a very large multiplicative reduction in the allowable exposure limits for chlorpyrifos in the US. These new exposure limits are quite different from other regulatory standards around the world. There is third party opposition to many of these policies and many believe the understanding of the relationship between exposure and what is known about human and animal responses to chlorpyrifos has been clouded. These changes in policy insert a new level of conservatism into the scientific statement of risk and create confusion that threatens to weaken the credibility of the regulatory process. PMID:11770891

  14. Operability assessment in CTEPH: Lessons from the CHEST-1 study.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David P; Biederman, Andrzej; D'Armini, Andrea M; Dartevelle, Philippe G; Gan, Hui-Li; Klepetko, Walter; Lindner, Jaroslav; Mayer, Eckhard; Madani, Michael M

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy is the gold standard treatment for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and is potentially curative, although some patients are unsuitable for pulmonary endarterectomy and require alternative management. Lack of standardized assessment of pulmonary endarterectomy eligibility risks suboptimal treatment in some patients. We discuss the implications for future clinical trials and practice of a unique operability assessment in patients who have chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and were initially screened for inclusion in the CHEST-1 (Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Trial-1) study. The CHEST-1 study evaluated riociguat for the treatment of inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) or persistent/recurrent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy. Screened patients who were initially considered "inoperable" underwent central independent adjudication by a committee of experienced surgeons, or local adjudication in collaboration with an experienced surgeon. Operability decisions were based on accessibility of thrombi and the association between pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and the extent of obstruction, using pulmonary angiography/computed tomography with ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy as the minimum diagnostic tests. Of 446 patients screened for CHEST-1, a total of 188 and 124 underwent central and local adjudication, respectively, after being initially considered to be "inoperable." After a second assessment by an experienced surgeon, 69 of these 312 "inoperable" patients were deemed operable. Rigorous measures in CHEST-1 guaranteed that only technically inoperable patients, or patients who had persistent/recurrent pulmonary hypertension, were enrolled, thus ensuring that only patients for whom surgery was not an option were enrolled. This study design sets new standards for future clinical trials and practice in CTEPH, helping

  15. Operability assessment in CTEPH: Lessons from the CHEST-1 study.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David P; Biederman, Andrzej; D'Armini, Andrea M; Dartevelle, Philippe G; Gan, Hui-Li; Klepetko, Walter; Lindner, Jaroslav; Mayer, Eckhard; Madani, Michael M

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy is the gold standard treatment for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and is potentially curative, although some patients are unsuitable for pulmonary endarterectomy and require alternative management. Lack of standardized assessment of pulmonary endarterectomy eligibility risks suboptimal treatment in some patients. We discuss the implications for future clinical trials and practice of a unique operability assessment in patients who have chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and were initially screened for inclusion in the CHEST-1 (Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Trial-1) study. The CHEST-1 study evaluated riociguat for the treatment of inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) or persistent/recurrent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy. Screened patients who were initially considered "inoperable" underwent central independent adjudication by a committee of experienced surgeons, or local adjudication in collaboration with an experienced surgeon. Operability decisions were based on accessibility of thrombi and the association between pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and the extent of obstruction, using pulmonary angiography/computed tomography with ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy as the minimum diagnostic tests. Of 446 patients screened for CHEST-1, a total of 188 and 124 underwent central and local adjudication, respectively, after being initially considered to be "inoperable." After a second assessment by an experienced surgeon, 69 of these 312 "inoperable" patients were deemed operable. Rigorous measures in CHEST-1 guaranteed that only technically inoperable patients, or patients who had persistent/recurrent pulmonary hypertension, were enrolled, thus ensuring that only patients for whom surgery was not an option were enrolled. This study design sets new standards for future clinical trials and practice in CTEPH, helping

  16. Assessing Assessment Quality: Criteria for Quality Assurance in Design of (Peer) Assessment for Learning--A Review of Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Harm; Leenknecht, Martijn; Segers, Mien

    2011-01-01

    The interest in "assessment for learning" (AfL) has resulted in a search for new modes of assessment that are better aligned to students' learning how to learn. However, with the introduction of new assessment tools, also questions arose with respect to the quality of its measurement. On the one hand, the appropriateness of traditional,…

  17. Assessing interpersonal aspects of schizoid personality disorder: preliminary validation studies.

    PubMed

    Kosson, David S; Blackburn, Ronald; Byrnes, Katherine A; Park, Sohee; Logan, Caroline; Donnelly, John P

    2008-03-01

    In 2 studies, we examined the reliability and validity of an interpersonal measure of schizoid personality disorder (SZPD) based on nonverbal behaviors and interpersonal interactions occurring during interviews. A total of 556 male jail inmates in the United States participated in Study 1; 175 mentally disordered offenders in maximum security hospitals in the United Kingdom participated in Study 2. Across both samples, scores on the Interpersonal Measure of Schizoid Personality Disorder (IM-SZ) exhibited adequate reliability and patterns of correlations with other measures consistent with expectations. The scale displayed patterns of relatively specific correlations with interview and self-report measures of SZPD. In addition, the IM-SZ correlated in an expected manner with features of psychopathy and antisocial personality and with independent ratings of interpersonal behavior. We address implications for assessment of personality disorder.

  18. Life cycle assessment study of a Chinese desktop personal computer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huabo; Eugster, Martin; Hischier, Roland; Streicher-Porte, Martin; Li, Jinhui

    2009-02-15

    Associated with the tremendous prosperity in world electronic information and telecommunication industry, there continues to be an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts related to the accelerating mass production, electricity use, and waste management of electronic and electric products (e-products). China's importance as both a consumer and supplier of e-products has grown at an unprecedented pace in recent decade. Hence, this paper aims to describe the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the environmental performance of Chinese e-products from a global level. A desktop personal computer system has been selected to carry out a detailed and modular LCA which follows the ISO 14040 series. The LCA is constructed by SimaPro software version 7.0 and expressed with the Eco-indicator'99 life cycle impact assessment method. For a sensitivity analysis of the overall LCA results, the so-called CML method is used in order to estimate the influence of the choice of the assessment method on the result. Life cycle inventory information is complied by ecoinvent 1.3 databases, combined with literature and field investigations on the present Chinese situation. The established LCA study shows that that the manufacturing and the use of such devices are of the highest environmental importance. In the manufacturing of such devices, the integrated circuits (ICs) and the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) are those parts contributing most to the impact. As no other aspects are taken into account during the use phase, the impact is due to the way how the electricity is produced. The final process steps--i.e. the end of life phase--lead to a clear environmental benefit if a formal and modern, up-to-date technical system is assumed, like here in this study. PMID:19070352

  19. Time and flow study for technology assessment of PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Katsumi; Umeda, Tokuo; Inamura, Kiyonari; Hasegawa, Toshitsune; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Mori, Yoshinobu; Ikezoe, Junpei; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1994-05-01

    Quantitative description of the value of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) in the health care environment is essential to assess the benefits with which PACS provides us. It is necessary to obtain data related to our film-based system before PACS installation in order to make quantitative comparison of before-and-after PACS operation, so that we can assess the clinical effectiveness brought by the PACS itself. We conducted flow study to acquire the whole chart of data flow related to radiological examination. And then defined the parameters and employed them to conduct time study for measuring several items concerning order entry, report making and image delivery at outpatient clinics and wards of eight departments using stopwatches, IC cards and time-recorders. This paper describes the results of measurement. For example, the location of each clinic/ward affected the time spent for images/reports delivery, and that hand writing time occupies more than half of the time required for making a single diagnostic report in 16 percent of cases. These results indicate that acceptability by medical staff is the key to successful operation of PACS. For instance, simple man-machine interaction at image display workstation must be properly realized. By using the same parameters mentioned above, we can compare those data with the results measured after PACS operation in a few years.

  20. Post-traumatic syringomyelia (cystic myelopathy): a prospective study of 449 patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Schurch, B; Wichmann, W; Rossier, A B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the incidence of post-traumatic syringomyelia (PTS), to correlate the presence of PTS with its most common signs and symptoms, and to compare results from the Swiss Paraplegic Centre with those reported in the medical literature. METHODS--A total of 449 recent traumatic paraplegic and tetraplegic patients admitted to the Swiss Paraplegic Centre in Zurich between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1993 were prospectively analysed. Yearly clinical tests with conventional radiographs and additional T1 and T2 weighted images were performed as soon as PTS was diagnosed. RESULTS--Of these 449 patients 20 patients displayed symptoms of PTS (4.45%). Ten non-operated patients remained clinically stable (average time: 37 months). Ten worsened--three refused operation, seven were operated on. Mean worsening time was 97 months. Deterioration was closely related to the enlargement of the cyst whereas in operated patients neurological improvement or stabilisation correlated with collapse of the cyst. CONCLUSIONS--Delay between appearance of the first symptoms of PTS and deterioration making surgery necessary may be long (mean five years in the seven operated patients) underlining the need for regular tests. "Slosh" and "suck" mechanisms could explain cyst enlargement as surgical realignment of the spine resulted in a complete cyst collapse in two of the operated patients (normalisation of CSF flow? ). Cord compression, tense syrinx at the fracture site, and kyphosis seemed to be closely linked to the enlargement of the cyst with subsequent further neurological deterioration. Images PMID:8558154

  1. assessing contributions of jgofs; previewing Studies in Ocean Ecology, Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Deborah K.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Bowles, Margaret C.

    Despite impediments to travel imposed by global political and health concerns, 332 scientists and students from 32 countries gathered in Washington, D.C. in early May to celebrate the conclusion of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), and to assess both its accomplishments and the future course of research in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry.Launched in 1987 under the auspices of the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), JGOFS became the first core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) 2 years later as its first field studies were getting underway. Global in scope and multinational and interdisciplinary from its inception, JGOFS adopted two major goals: to understand the processes controlling the cycling of carbon and other biogenic elements in the ocean and their exchange with the atmosphere and the sea floor, and to advance our capacity to predict the response of ocean systems to anthropogenic perturbations.

  2. Assessing Consumer Health Vocabulary Familiarity: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Tse, Tony; Crowell, Jon; Browne, Allen; Ngo, Long

    2007-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of the difficulty of consumer health texts is a prerequisite for improving readability. General purpose readability formulas based primarily on word length are not well suited for the health domain, where short technical terms may be unfamiliar to consumers. To address this need, we previously developed a regression model for predicting “average familiarity” with consumer health vocabulary (CHV) terms. Objective The primary goal was to evaluate the ability of the CHV term familiarity model to predict (1) surface-level familiarity of health-related terms and (2) understanding of the underlying meaning (concept familiarity) among actual consumers. Secondary goals involved exploring the effect of demographic factors (eg, health literacy) on surface-level and concept-level familiarity and describing the relationship between the two levels of familiarity. Methods Survey instruments for assessing surface-level familiarity (45 items) and concept-level familiarity (15 items) were developed. All participants also completed a demographic survey and a standardized health literacy assessment, S-TOFHLA. Results Based on surveys completed by 52 consumers, linear regression suggests that predicted CHV term familiarity is a statistically significantly predictor (P < .001) of participants’ surface-level and concept-level familiarity performance. Health literacy was a statistically significant predictor of surface-level familiarity scores (P < .001); its effect on concept-level familiarity scores warrants further investigation (P = 0.06). Educational level was not a significant predictor of either type of familiarity. Participant scores indicated that conceptualization lagged behind recognition, especially for terms predicted as “likely to be familiar” (P = .006). Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that the CHV term familiarity model is predictive of consumer recognition and understanding of terms in the health domain. Potential uses

  3. Integrated Watershed Assessment: The Northern River Basins Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, F. J.; Gummer, W. D.

    2001-05-01

    Begun in 1991 and completed in 1996, the Northern River Basins Study (NRBS) was a \\$12 M initiative established by the governments of Canada, Alberta, and the Northwest Territories to assess the cumulative impacts of development, particularly pulp mill related effluent discharges, on the health of the Peace, Athabasca and Slave river basins. The NRBS was launched in response to concerns expressed by northern residents following the 1991 approval of the Alberta Pacific Pulp Mill in Athabasca. Although initiated by governments, the NRBS was set-up to be `arms-length' and was managed by a 25 member Study Board that represented the many interests in the basins, including industry, environmental groups, aboriginal peoples, health, agriculture, education, municipalities, and the federal, territorial and provincial governments. Overseen by an independent Science Advisory Committee, an integrated research program was designed covering eight scientific components: fate and distribution of contaminants, food chain impacts, nutrients, hydrology/hydraulics and sediment transport, uses of the water resources, drinking water quality, traditional knowledge, and synthesis/modeling. Using a 'weight of evidence' approach with a range of ecological and sociological indicators, cumulative impacts from pulp and paper-related discharges and other point and non-point sources of pollution were determined in relation to the health and contaminant levels of aquatic biota, nutrient and dissolved oxygen-related stress, hydrology and climate related changes, and human health and use of the river basins. Based on this assessment and Study Board deliberations, site-specific and basin-wide scientific and management-related recommendations were made to Ministers regarding regulatory and policy changes, basin management and monitoring options, and future research. The Study reinforces the importance of conducting ecosystem-based , interdisciplinary science and the need for public involvement in

  4. Technical Letter Report Development of Flaw Size Distribution Tables Including Effects of Flaw Depth Sizing Errors for Draft 10CFR 50.61a (Alternate PTS Rule) JCN-N6398, Task 4

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2013-04-22

    This document describes a new method to determine whether the flaws in a particular reactor pressure vessel are consistent with the assumptions regarding the number and sizes of flaws used in the analyses that formed the technical justification basis for the new voluntary alternative Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) rule (Draft 10 CFR 50.61a). The new methodology addresses concerns regarding prior methodology because ASME Code Section XI examinations do not detect all fabrication flaws, they have higher detection performance for some flaw types, and there are flaw sizing errors always present (e.g., significant oversizing of small flaws and systematic under sizing of larger flaws). The new methodology allows direct comparison of ASME Code Section XI examination results with values in the PTS draft rule Tables 2 and 3 in order to determine if the number and sizes of flaws detected by an ASME Code Section XI examination are consistent with those assumed in the probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations performed in support of the development of 10 CFR 50.61a.

  5. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-09-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  6. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  7. Life cycle assessment of active and passive groundwater remediation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Peter; Finkel, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Groundwater remediation technologies, such as pump-and-treat (PTS) and funnel-and-gate systems (FGS), aim at reducing locally appearing contaminations. Therefore, these methodologies are basically evaluated with respect to their capability to yield local improvements of an environmental situation, commonly neglecting that their application is also associated with secondary impacts. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a widely accepted method of assessing the environmental aspects and potential impacts related to a product, process or service. This study presents the set-up of a LCA framework in order to compare the secondary impacts caused by two conceptually different technologies at the site of a former manufactured gas plant in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany. As a FGS is already operating at this site, a hypothetical PTS of the same functionality is adopted. During the LCA, the remediation systems are evaluated by focusing on the main technical elements and their significance with respect to resource depletion and potential adverse effects on ecological quality, as well as on human health. Seven impact categories are distinguished to address a broad spectrum of possible environmental loads. A main point of discussion is the reliability of technical assumptions and performance predictions for the future. It is obvious that a high uncertainty exists when estimating impact specific indicator values over operation times of decades. An uncertainty analysis is conducted to include the imprecision of the underlying emission and consumption data and a scenario analysis is utilised to contrast various possible technological variants. Though the results of the study are highly site-specific, a generalised relative evaluation of potential impacts and their main sources is the principle objective rather than a discussion of the calculated absolute impacts. A crucial finding that can be applied to any other site is the central role of steel, which particularly derogates

  8. Life cycle assessment of active and passive groundwater remediation technologies.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Peter; Finkel, Michael

    2006-02-10

    Groundwater remediation technologies, such as pump-and-treat (PTS) and funnel-and-gate systems (FGS), aim at reducing locally appearing contaminations. Therefore, these methodologies are basically evaluated with respect to their capability to yield local improvements of an environmental situation, commonly neglecting that their application is also associated with secondary impacts. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a widely accepted method of assessing the environmental aspects and potential impacts related to a product, process or service. This study presents the set-up of a LCA framework in order to compare the secondary impacts caused by two conceptually different technologies at the site of a former manufactured gas plant in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany. As a FGS is already operating at this site, a hypothetical PTS of the same functionality is adopted. During the LCA, the remediation systems are evaluated by focusing on the main technical elements and their significance with respect to resource depletion and potential adverse effects on ecological quality, as well as on human health. Seven impact categories are distinguished to address a broad spectrum of possible environmental loads. A main point of discussion is the reliability of technical assumptions and performance predictions for the future. It is obvious that a high uncertainty exists when estimating impact specific indicator values over operation times of decades. An uncertainty analysis is conducted to include the imprecision of the underlying emission and consumption data and a scenario analysis is utilised to contrast various possible technological variants. Though the results of the study are highly site-specific, a generalised relative evaluation of potential impacts and their main sources is the principle objective rather than a discussion of the calculated absolute impacts. A crucial finding that can be applied to any other site is the central role of steel, which particularly derogates

  9. Mechanistic and physiological consequences of HPr(ser) phosphorylation on the activities of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system in gram-positive bacteria: studies with site-specific mutants of HPr.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J; Sutrina, S L; Saier, M H; Stewart, G C; Peterkofsky, A; Reddy, P

    1989-01-01

    The bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS) catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of its sugar substrates. The protein-kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of serine 46 in the phosphocarrier protein, HPr, inhibits PTS activity, but neither the mechanism of this inhibition nor its physiological significance is known. Site-specific HPr mutants were constructed in which serine 46 was replaced by alanine (S46A), threonine (S46T), tyrosine (S46Y) or aspartate (S46D). The purified S46D protein exhibited markedly lower Vmax and higher Km values than the wild-type, S46T or S46A protein for the phosphoryl transfer reactions involving HPr(His approximately P). Interactions of HPr with the enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer to and from HPr regulated the kinase-catalyzed reaction. These results establish the inhibitory effect of a negative charge at position 46 on PTS-mediated phosphoryl transfer and suggest that HPr is phosphorylated on both histidyl and seryl residues by enzymes that recognize its tertiary rather than its primary structure. In vivo studies showed that a negative charge on residue 46 of HPr strongly inhibits PTS-mediated sugar uptake, but that competition of two PTS permeases for HPr(His approximately P) is quantitatively more important to the regulation of PTS function than serine 46 phosphorylation. Images PMID:2507315

  10. Social Studies in British Columbia: Technical Report of the 1989 Social Studies Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Carl J.; And Others

    In May 1989, over 100,000 British Columbia (Canada) students in grades 4, 7, and 10 took part in social studies attitude and achievement surveys. All grade 10 teachers were asked to respond to a questionnaire, as were a selected sample of grades 4 and 7 teachers. This report contains the results of that social studies assessment. The report is…

  11. Functional assessment scales: a study of persons after stroke.

    PubMed

    Granger, C V; Cotter, A C; Hamilton, B B; Fiedler, R C

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate disability in persons after stroke by using combinations of functional assessment item, subscale, domain, and full-scale scores, to predict (1) the burden of care measured in minutes of assistance provided per day by another person in the home, and (2) the subject's level of satisfaction with life in general. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) each contributed to prediction of the subject's physical care needs. A change in total FIM score of one point (range, 61 to 126) was equivalent to an average of 2.19 minutes of help from another person per day and a change in one point in the SIP physical dysfunction (SIPPHYS) score (range, 4.0% to 57.4%) was equivalent to an average of 3.32 minutes. Along with the Brief Symptom Inventory and a measure of visual ability, the FIM contributed to predicting the patient's general satisfaction as well. The burden of care and subjective satisfaction with life in general are important standards by which functional assessment instruments may be compared to reflect, in pragmatic terms, the impact of disability on the lives of individuals and on the human and economic resources of the community.

  12. Spacelab user implementation assessment study. Volume 4: SUIAS appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The capital investment for the integration and checkout of Spacelab payloads is assessed. Detailed data pertaining to this assessment and a computer cost model utilized in the compilation of programmatic resource requirements are delineated.

  13. [Economic assessment, a field between clinical research and observational studies].

    PubMed

    Launois, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Health technology assessments propose to study the differential impact of health interventions in a complex care system which is characterised by the multitude of individual behaviours and the diverse nature of the institutions involved. Current systems for data collection lend themselves poorly to this rigorous analysis of efficacy of treatments in the actual situations where they are used. Randomised trials endeavour to neutralise any parasitic interference which could compromise testing for a causal relationship between the treatment administered and the result obtained. Their methodology which establishes the term ceteris paribus in the principle of good practice lends itself poorly to an analysis of individual behaviour. Observational studies are start from actual treatment situations to describe them as reliably as possible. By definition, however, these assume that the natural course of events is not deviated by any intervention. The absence of an experimental plan increases the likelihood of bias and makes it more difficult to test for causal relationships. They lend themselves poorly to testing for incremental efficacy. The two instruments to be preferred are decisional analysis and quasi-experimental studies. Decisional analysis help to avoid the problems of external validity associated with randomised clinical trials by associating parameters which are extracted from data obtained from everyday practice. Quasi-experimental studies or pragmatic trials are based on the reality of behaviour of the prescriber and his/her patients; their impact on efficacy, quality of life social costs of the disease and of treatments may be identified under normal conditions of use. PMID:12609811

  14. Primary and Secondary Teachers' Conceptions of Assessment: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remesal, Ana

    2011-01-01

    A particular framework of teachers' conceptions about assessment in school is presented. Fifty teachers of primary and secondary school were interviewed. Results of a qualitative analysis allowed building a model of conceptions of assessment. This model comprises four dimensions about the effects of assessment on: teaching, learning,…

  15. System Safety Hazards Assessment in Conceptual Program Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eben, Dennis M.; Saemisch, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Providing a program in the concept development phase with a method of determining system safety benefits of potential concepts has always been a challenge. Lockheed Martin Space and Strategic Missiles has developed a methodology for developing a relative system safety ranking using the potential hazards of each concept. The resulting output supports program decisions with system safety as an evaluation criterion with supporting data for evaluation. This approach begins with a generic hazards list that has been tailored for the program being studied and augmented with an initial hazard analysis. Each proposed concept is assessed against the list of program hazards and ranked in three derived areas. The hazards can be weighted to show those that are of more concern to the program. Sensitivities can be also be determined to test the robustness of the conclusions

  16. A National Survey of State Assessment Practices in the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckles, Stephen; Schug, Mark C.; Watts, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Reports the results from a 1999 survey conducted through phone interviews to identify which states were using assessments in social studies and to describe the types of assessments being used. Finds that two-thirds of the states conduct assessments in social studies while most assessments use objective questions. (CMK)

  17. Utility of routine postoperative laboratory studies in patients undergoing potentially curative resection for adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Skenderis, B S; Rodriguez-Bigas, M; Weber, T K; Petrelli, N J

    1999-01-01

    In an effort to lower healthcare costs, this study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of routine postoperative (PO) laboratory studies and determine whether abnormalities alter patient (PT) care. This was a retrospective review of 105 PTs undergoing elective curative resection for colorectal cancer. A serum electrolyte and liver panel and a hematologic panel were drawn in all PTs. OF 8749 total laboratory values obtained, 5894 (67%) were normal. Two of these (0.03%) elicited a therapeutic intervention. Of the 2004 values that were low (23%), 103 (5.1%) elicited a therapeutic response. Of the 851 that were high (10%), 21 (2.5%) elicited a therapeutic response. Of 2089 preoperative laboratory values, 252 (12%) were abnormal, but in only 15 incidences in 9 PTs was any action taken. Three PTs required potassium supplementation and 6 PTs were transfused packed red blood cells before surgery. In the PO period 2603 laboratory values of 6660 obtained (39%) were abnormal. Of these, 735 (28%) were high and 1868 (72%) were low. Twenty of 735 (27%) high values triggered a therapeutic response that most commonly required administration of insulin for elevated serum glucose in 17 of 197 occasions in five diabetic PTs. On three occasions potassium was removed from intravenous fluids. Five of 275 (1.8%) low calcium values were treated in five patients. Potassium was replaced in 17 of 32 occasions in 14 patients where it was low. In this group of PTs, PO serum potassium, hemoglobin levels, and serum glucose in diabetics were the only values important in making therapeutic decisions. If laboratory studies can be streamlined into only those necessary, substantial savings in health care will be seen without sacrificing quality medical care.

  18. Recent Results from EO Studies on Indian Carbon Cycle Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhwal, V. K.; Kushwaha, S. P. S.; Singh, S.; Patel, N. R.; Nayak, R. K.; Patil, P.; Dutt, C. B. S.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Jha, C. S.; Rajsekhar, G.; Pujar, G. S.; Trivedi, S.; Sharma, N.; Ali, M. M.

    2011-08-01

    The monsoon based climate system, diverse land use and land cover distribution and cultural practices poses complex issues in monitoring, assessment and simulation of Indian carbon cycle. Several studies reported lack of spatially and temporally consistent databases, need for calibration and validation of models, and development of national frame work to maintain consistency and completeness in efforts and reduction of uncertainty. Considering the need, as part of ISRO Geosphere Biosphere Programme, National Carbon Project (NCP) initiative was taken up to understand and assess land, atmosphere and oceanic components of carbon cycle with a significant scope for integration of remote sensing, geospatial and process based models. The results from the initial studies are discussed in the paper. An increase of the country's forest carbon stocks from 6244.8 to 6621.6 Mt with an annual increment of 37.7 Mt of the carbon from 1995 to 2005 is reported. In the national scale, CASA model based average annual NPP is estimated to be 1.5 Pg C Yr-1 and is increasing at the rate of 0.005 Pg C Yr-2 during past 25 years from 1981-2006. Analysis of Mid tropospheric CO2 levels retrieved from AIRS data since 2002 till now revealed increasing rate of CO2 at 2.14 ppmv yr-1. It was also o found that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate The paper presents further details on different sub components, recent results and challenges ahead of the project.

  19. The Methods Behind 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Informatics Needs and Capacity of Local Health Departments (LHDs) survey is the most recent comprehensive source of quantitative data on LHD informatics. Conducted by the National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO), this is the third nationally representative quantitative study of LHD informatics since 2009. The previous 2 comprehensive quantitative assessments were conducted by NACCHO in 2009-2010 and 2011. Given that public health informatics is rapidly evolving, the 2015 Informatics survey is a much-needed country-wide assessment of the current informatics needs and capacities of LHDs. This article outlines detailed methodology used in the 2015 Informatics survey, including instrument development, pretesting, sampling design and sample size, survey administration, and sampling weights. A 9-member advisory committee representing federal, state, and local health agency representatives guided the design and implementation of this study. The survey instrument was organized into 6 topic areas: demographics, physical infrastructure, skills and capacity available, public health workforce development needs, electronic health records, and health information exchange. The instrument was pretested with a sample of 20 LHDs and subsequently pilot-tested with 30 LHDs. The survey was administered via the Qualtrics survey software to the sample of 650 LHDs, selected using stratified random sampling. The survey was fielded for approximately 8 weeks and 324 usable responses were received, constituting a response rate of 50%. Statistical weights were developed to account for 3 factors: (a) disproportionate response rate by population size (using 7 population strata), (b) oversampling of LHDs with larger population sizes, and (c) sampling rather than a census approach. PMID:27684627

  20. Scaling studies and conceptual experiment designs for NGNP CFD assessment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this report is to document scaling studies and conceptual designs for flow and heat transfer experiments intended to assess CFD codes and their turbulence models proposed for application to prismatic NGNP concepts. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses have been applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant turbulent forced convection with slight transverse property variation. In a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) simulation, the flow quickly becomes laminar with some possible buoyancy influences. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple hot jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentumdominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two types of heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary

  1. A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

  2. Advanced power supplies: Scoping study and technology assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report presents a scoping study as well as a technology assessment for advanced power supplies used in industrial, commercial and residential applications. The study is focused on applications where electro-technologies provide opportunity for increased use of electricity, or where new processes based on power electronics and electricity use can supplant established methods, creating additional value for utility end-use customers. Target customers can be in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. In most of the targeted applications, the power delivered to the load is conditioned by a power supply to a form which can be usefully utilized. Frequently, the power supply represents a key cost factor, and often is a primary limiter of the performance achievable in the end-use application process. Identifying where such limits and opportunities exist can open the door to technology advances which benefit the targeted end-user. This report presents power supply requirements in various applications including induction cooking, induction heating, metal finishing, ozonation systems, pulse power incinerators and sterilizers, welding, plasma spraying, corrosion protection, precision welding, magnet supplies, induction hardening, anodizing, and other similar areas. The report highlights the potential for improvements in the power supply itself, and for any resulting improvements in the process, in the reliability, power quality and cost of the system. A market study is then used to prioritize R and D efforts in areas of maximum potential economic impact.

  3. Clinical decision-making in the management of cervical spine derangement: a case study survey using a patient vignette

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Tracy; Kelly, Christina; Murphy, Erin; Whissel, Paul; Brown, Michael; Schenk, Ron

    2014-01-01

    was postural analysis. After receiving additional information regarding the patient's posture, the majority of clinicians in each of the three groups then chose active range of motion (AROM). However, after additional information was given, the majority of the MDT group chose repeated end range cervical movements as their next examination measure, and the FAAOMPT group varied. The majority of the FAAOMPT group continued to assess the patient through an entire examination sequence, while the majority of the MDT group discontinued testing. A descriptive analysis of the intervention sequences depicted a trend toward direction of preference (DP) exercises for the MDT group (80.3%), and passive movements or mobilization exercises for the FAAOMPT group. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that PTs with post-graduate training through the McKenzie Institute or through Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (OMPT) Fellowship training may demonstrate an inherent bias toward their advanced training in the assessment and treatment of acute cervical derangement. Although no significant findings can be reported secondary to sample size limitations, future studies may be performed to further explore this topic. PMID:24976755

  4. Assessing Conifer Ray Parenchyma for Ecological Studies: Pitfalls and Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    von Arx, Georg; Arzac, Alberto; Olano, José M.; Fonti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Ray parenchyma is an essential tissue for tree functioning and survival. This living tissue plays a major role for storage and transport of water, nutrients, and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), thus regulating xylem hydraulics and growth. However, despite the importance of rays for tree carbon and water relations, methodological challenges hamper knowledge about ray intra- and inter-tree variability and its ecological meaning. In this study we provide a methodological toolbox for soundly quantifying spatial and temporal variability of different ray features. Anatomical ray features were surveyed in different cutting planes (cross-sectional, tangential, and radial) using quantitative image analysis on stem-wood micro-sections sampled from 41 mature Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris). The percentage of ray surface (PERPAR), a proxy for ray volume, was compared among cutting planes and between early- and latewood to assess measurement-induced variability. Different tangential ray metrics were correlated to assess their similarities. The accuracy of cross-sectional and tangential measurements for PERPAR estimates as a function of number of samples and the measured wood surface was assessed using bootstrapping statistical technique. Tangential sections offered the best 3D insight of ray integration into the xylem and provided the most accurate estimates of PERPAR, with 10 samples of 4 mm2 showing an estimate within ±6.0% of the true mean PERPAR (relative 95% confidence interval, CI95), and 20 samples of 4 mm2 showing a CI95 of ±4.3%. Cross-sections were most efficient for establishment of time series, and facilitated comparisons with other widely used xylem anatomical features. Earlywood had significantly lower PERPAR (5.77 vs. 6.18%) and marginally fewer initiating rays than latewood. In comparison to tangential sections, PERPAR was systematically overestimated (6.50 vs. 4.92%) and required approximately twice the sample area for similar accuracy. Radial cuttings

  5. Assessing Conifer Ray Parenchyma for Ecological Studies: Pitfalls and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Georg; Arzac, Alberto; Olano, José M; Fonti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Ray parenchyma is an essential tissue for tree functioning and survival. This living tissue plays a major role for storage and transport of water, nutrients, and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), thus regulating xylem hydraulics and growth. However, despite the importance of rays for tree carbon and water relations, methodological challenges hamper knowledge about ray intra- and inter-tree variability and its ecological meaning. In this study we provide a methodological toolbox for soundly quantifying spatial and temporal variability of different ray features. Anatomical ray features were surveyed in different cutting planes (cross-sectional, tangential, and radial) using quantitative image analysis on stem-wood micro-sections sampled from 41 mature Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris). The percentage of ray surface (PERPAR), a proxy for ray volume, was compared among cutting planes and between early- and latewood to assess measurement-induced variability. Different tangential ray metrics were correlated to assess their similarities. The accuracy of cross-sectional and tangential measurements for PERPAR estimates as a function of number of samples and the measured wood surface was assessed using bootstrapping statistical technique. Tangential sections offered the best 3D insight of ray integration into the xylem and provided the most accurate estimates of PERPAR, with 10 samples of 4 mm(2) showing an estimate within ±6.0% of the true mean PERPAR (relative 95% confidence interval, CI95), and 20 samples of 4 mm(2) showing a CI95 of ±4.3%. Cross-sections were most efficient for establishment of time series, and facilitated comparisons with other widely used xylem anatomical features. Earlywood had significantly lower PERPAR (5.77 vs. 6.18%) and marginally fewer initiating rays than latewood. In comparison to tangential sections, PERPAR was systematically overestimated (6.50 vs. 4.92%) and required approximately twice the sample area for similar accuracy. Radial cuttings

  6. Impact of the agricultural research service watershed assessment studies on the conservation effects assessment project cropland national assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA initiated the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) in 2002 to analyze societal and environmental benefits gained from the increased conservation program funding provided in the 2002 Farm Bill. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and...

  7. Assessment study of lichenometric methods for dating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomelli, Vincent; Grancher, Delphine; Naveau, Philippe; Cooley, Daniel; Brunstein, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of the most classical approaches used in lichenometry. In particular, we perform a detailed comparison among methods based on the statistical analysis of either the largest lichen diameters recorded on geomorphic features or the frequency of all lichens. To assess the performance of each method, a careful comparison design with well-defined criteria is proposed and applied to two distinct data sets. First, we study 350 tombstones. This represents an ideal test bed because tombstone dates are known and, therefore, the quality of the estimated lichen growth curve can be easily tested for the different techniques. Secondly, 37 moraines from two tropical glaciers are investigated. This analysis corresponds to our real case study. For both data sets, we apply our list of criteria that reflects precision, error measurements and their theoretical foundations when proposing estimated ages and their associated confidence intervals. From this comparison, it clearly appears that two methods, the mean of the n largest lichen diameters and the recent Bayesian method based on extreme value theory, offer the most reliable estimates of moraine and tombstones dates. Concerning the spread of the error, the latter approach provides the smallest uncertainty and it is the only one that takes advantage of the statistical nature of the observations by fitting an extreme value distribution to the largest diameters.

  8. Assessing landscape health: a case study from northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bertollo, P

    2001-03-01

    This article investigates the concept of biophysical landscape health for what are termed "highly governed landscapes." It proposes a definition of landscape health along with a preliminary diagnostic model and methods. The idea of landscape health derives from the emerging integrative science of ecosystem health, which seeks to diagnose ecosystem condition as humans diagnose human health. Highly governed landscapes, such as the reclaimed areas of coastal northeastern Italy, are landscapes that have been subject to even greater degrees of human manipulation than normal cultural landscapes. These highly altered landscapes are not easily served by existing environmental paradigms and concepts of health are seen to have numerous advantages. This paper condenses a broader investigation of landscape health into three main sections. A brief review of the literature is followed by a case study, which details two different phases of landscape transformation in the Lower Piave area of northeastern Italy. A definition and general parameters of biophysical landscape health are then presented after this background stage. Some key parameters of biophysical health include absence of distress and risk factors, sustainability, biodiversity, resilience, and balance. For certain parameters, a preliminary landscape health diagnostic framework is presented that includes potential diagnostic methods and thresholds based on findings from this case study. At the paper's conclusion, a summary diagnostic model is presented, which suggests a process needed to implement landscape health assessment into practice. PMID:11148762

  9. Use of wearable technology for performance assessment: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Papi, Enrica; Osei-Kuffour, Denise; Chen, Yen-Ming A; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis is increasing globally but current compliance with rehabilitation remains poor. This study explores whether wearable sensors can be used to provide objective measures of performance with a view to using them as motivators to aid compliance to osteoarthritis rehabilitation. More specifically, the use of a novel attachable wearable sensor integrated into clothing and inertial measurement units located in two different positions, at the waist and thigh pocket, was investigated. Fourteen healthy volunteers were asked to complete exercises adapted from a knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation programme whilst wearing the three sensors including five times sit-to-stand test, treadmill walking at slow, preferred and fast speeds. The performances of the three sensors were validated against a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill. The systems showed a high correlation (r(2) > 0.7) and agreement (mean difference range: -0.02-0.03 m, 0.005-0.68 s) with gold standards. The novel attachable wearable sensor was able to monitor exercise tasks as well as the inertial measurement units (ICC > 0.95). Results also suggested that a functional placement (e.g., situated in a pocket) is a valid position for performance monitoring. This study shows the potential use of wearable technologies for assessing subject performance during exercise and suggests functional solutions to enhance acceptance.

  10. Use of wearable technology for performance assessment: A validation study

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Enrica; Osei-Kuffour, Denise; Chen, Yen-Ming A; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis is increasing globally but current compliance with rehabilitation remains poor. This study explores whether wearable sensors can be used to provide objective measures of performance with a view to using them as motivators to aid compliance to osteoarthritis rehabilitation. More specifically, the use of a novel attachable wearable sensor integrated into clothing and inertial measurement units located in two different positions, at the waist and thigh pocket, was investigated. Fourteen healthy volunteers were asked to complete exercises adapted from a knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation programme whilst wearing the three sensors including five times sit-to-stand test, treadmill walking at slow, preferred and fast speeds. The performances of the three sensors were validated against a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill. The systems showed a high correlation (r2 > 0.7) and agreement (mean difference range: −0.02–0.03 m, 0.005–0.68 s) with gold standards. The novel attachable wearable sensor was able to monitor exercise tasks as well as the inertial measurement units (ICC > 0.95). Results also suggested that a functional placement (e.g., situated in a pocket) is a valid position for performance monitoring. This study shows the potential use of wearable technologies for assessing subject performance during exercise and suggests functional solutions to enhance acceptance. PMID:25937613

  11. A Case Study of Teacher Personal Practice Assessment Theories and Complexities of Implementing Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Cathy; Skoog, Gerald; Dabbs, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The value and effectiveness of formative assessment in the classroom has gained an increasing amount of attention during the past decade, especially since the publication of seminal work by Black and Wiliam titled "Assessment and Classroom Learning." Since that time, there has been a renewed interest in describing and evaluating teacher…

  12. Use of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment to Improve Interpretation of a Recreational Water Epidemiological Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a supplemental water quality monitoring study and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to complement the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water study at Boq...

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PHASE I STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I studies were sponsored by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) to address critical information needs for assessing human exposures to multiple chemicals from multiple pathways and media. These studies were...

  14. Study of Exclusion and Assessibility of Students with Disabilities in the 1994 Trial State Assessment (TSA) of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancavage, Fran; And Others

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a survey of national trends in educational achievement, is attempting to expand its inclusion of students with disabilities or limitations that have previously caused them to be excluded from the assessment. The study described was a precursor to the 1996 changes in NAEP inclusion procedures.…

  15. The effect of comorbidities on COPD assessment: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Thomsen, Lars Pilegaard; Bielaska, Barbara; Jensen, Vania Helbo; Vuust, Morten; Rees, Stephen Edward

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently suffer from comorbidities. COPD severity may be evaluated by the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) combined risk assessment score (GOLD score). Spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT) measure lung function and elucidate pulmonary pathology. This study assesses associations between GOLD score and measurements of lung function in COPD patients with and without (≤1) comorbidities. It evaluates whether the presence of comorbidities influences evaluation by GOLD score of COPD severity, and questions whether GOLD score describes morbidity rather than COPD severity. Methods In this prospective study, 106 patients with stable COPD were included. Patients treated for lung cancer were excluded. Demographics, oxygen saturation (SpO2), modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, COPD exacerbations, and comorbidities were recorded. Body plethysmography and DLCO were measured, and HR-CT performed and evaluated for emphysema and airways disease. COPD severity was stratified by the GOLD score. Correlation analyses: 1) GOLD score, 2) emphysema grade, and 3) airways disease and lung function parameters, described by: forced expiratory volume in the first second in percent of expected value (FEV1%), inspiratory capacity (IC%), total lung volume (TLC%), IC/TLC, and SpO2. Correlation analyses between subgroups and hierarchical cluster analysis were performed. Results Significant associations were found between GOLD score and both emphysema grade (correlation coefficients [cc]: −0.2, P=0.03) and lung function parameters (cc: −0.5 to −0.7, P-values all <0.001) weakened in patients with >1 comorbidity (cc: −0.4 to −0.5, P-values all 0.001). Significant differences between subgroups were found in GOLD score and both FEV1% (cc: −0.2, P=0.02) and IC/TLC (cc: −0

  16. Study Addiction – A New Area of Psychological Study: Conceptualization, Assessment, and Preliminary Empirical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Atroszko, Paweł A.; Andreassen, Cecilie Schou; Griffiths, Mark D.; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent research has suggested that for some individuals, educational studying may become compulsive and excessive and lead to ‘study addiction’. The present study conceptualized and assessed study addiction within the framework of workaholism, defining it as compulsive over-involvement in studying that interferes with functioning in other domains and that is detrimental for individuals and/or their environment. Methods The Bergen Study Addiction Scale (BStAS) was tested – reflecting seven core addiction symptoms (salience, mood modification, tolerance, withdrawal, conflict, relapse, and problems) – related to studying. The scale was administered via a cross-sectional survey distributed to Norwegian (n = 218) and Polish (n = 993) students with additional questions concerning demographic variables, study-related variables, health, and personality. Results A one-factor solution had acceptable fit with the data in both samples and the scale demonstrated good reliability. Scores on BStAS converged with scores on learning engagement. Study addiction (BStAS) was significantly related to specific aspects of studying (longer learning time, lower academic performance), personality traits (higher neuroticism and conscientiousness, lower extroversion), and negative health-related factors (impaired general health, decreased quality of life and sleep quality, higher perceived stress). Conclusions It is concluded that BStAS has good psychometric properties, making it a promising tool in the assessment of study addiction. Study addiction is related in predictable ways to personality and health variables, as predicted from contemporary workaholism theory and research. PMID:26014668

  17. Study on territorial risk assessment in Beibu Gulf of Guangxi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Hou, L. S.; Zhang, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    This study is based on the theories of terrestrial exploration risk in the Beibu Gulf Economic Zone in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Using ArcGIS and modelling methods, the spatial distributions of resources and environmental carrying capacity, terrestrial exploration dynamics, and terrestrial exploration potential are studied and evaluated in an integrated way. The results of the study are as follows: Mashan county, Longan county, Luchuan county, et al. have some low-risk land that can be explored, and infrastructure investment should be increased in these locations. Whereas, low-risk terrestrial development is possible in Qinzhou city, Heng county, Longan county, et al. and should be carried out in a planned and gradual fashion. The medium risk regions are distributed all over the region, but are concentrated in the city area of Nanning. However, the middle and north parts of Yulin city, the south part of Chongzuo city, Qinnan district, et al. are also in the same category and priority can be given to improve the quality and efficiency of these regions. The high risk regions, mainly distribute in the Liangqin district, Yining district, Binyang county, et al. This region should focus on the development principles of priority protection, appropriate development, and point-like development. Whereas, the extremely-high-risk areas, of which more than 60% are in Tiandeng county, Daxin county, Shanglin county, et al., are unsuitable for further development. The three-dimensional risk matrix method can make up for the deficiencies of other methods and has broad prospects in regional terrestrial development risk assessment.

  18. Assessing function in patients undergoing joint replacement: a study protocol for a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Joint replacement is an effective intervention for people with advanced arthritis, although there is an important minority of patients who do not improve post-operatively. There is a need for robust evidence on outcomes after surgery, but there are a number of measures that assess function after joint replacement, many of which lack any clear theoretical basis. The World Health Organisation has introduced the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which divides function into three separate domains: Impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions. The aim of this study is to compare the properties and responsiveness of a selection of commonly used outcome tools that assess function, examine how well they relate to the ICF concepts, and to explore the changes in the measures over time. Methods/design Two hundred and sixty three patients listed for lower limb joint replacement at an elective orthopaedic centre have been recruited into this study. Participants attend the hospital for a research appointment prior to surgery and then at 3-months and 1-year after surgery. At each assessment time, function is assessed using a range of measures. Self-report function is assessed using the WOMAC, Aberdeen Impairment, Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction Measure, SF-12 and Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile 2. Clinician-administered measures of function include the American Knee Society Score for knee patients and the Harris Hip Score for hip patients. Performance tests include the timed 20-metre walk, timed get up and go, sit-to-stand-to-sit, step tests and single stance balance test. During the performance tests, participants wear an inertial sensor and data from motion analysis are collected. Statistical analysis will include exploring the relationship between measures describing the same ICF concepts, assessing responsiveness, and studying changes in measures over time. Discussion There are a

  19. 76 FR 71341 - BASINS and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools: Case Study Guide to Potential Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... AGENCY BASINS and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools: Case Study Guide to Potential Applications AGENCY... Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case Study Guide to Potential Applications (EPA/600/R-11/123A). EPA also... WEPP climate assessment tools. The report presents a series of short case studies designed...

  20. The Issue of Subjectivity in Authentic Social Studies Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Pat

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that scoring criteria should be used in order to reduce teacher subjectivity in scoring classroom assessments. Describes scoring criteria as specific expectations made clear in task instructions used to evaluate student work. Provides an example assessment task for high school geography and addresses three common teacher errors. (CMK)

  1. Assessing Fieldwork Risk for Undergraduate Projects. Directions: JGHE Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgitt, David; Bullard, Jo

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the five steps involved in conducting risk assessment for fieldwork using two examples of typical student projects: (1) identity the hazards; (2) identify who might be harmed; (3) evaluate the risks; (4) record the findings; and (5) review the assessment periodically. Addresses expeditions and work overseas. (CMK)

  2. Assessment at the Boundaries: Service Learning as Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Suellen

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the value systems which inform assessment practices in higher education, specifically how particular forms of knowledge valued in the curriculum shape and constrain assessment practices. The data for this article is drawn from two courses which participated in a service learning research and development project at the…

  3. Wetlands in the ecological risk assessment process: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Saban, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    In the past few years, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) process as outlined in the EPA document Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment has been successfully used to assess risk to birds, mammals, aquatic organisms, plants, and to a limited extent, reptiles and amphibians, but has only recently been applied to wetlands. Due to the unique role that wetlands play in the environment as sources and sinks for nutrients, sediment retention, high productivity, habitat transition zones, aquifer recharge, high diversity and richness of biota, and aesthetic value, it is important to consider the entire wetland system in the ERA process. Because nearly sixty percent of Superfund sites are located in or near wetlands, a comprehensive approach is proposed to evaluate potential risks to flora and fauna in these wetland environments. Using the delineation and functional assessment techniques developed by wetland scientists, an estuarine wetland in western Washington was evaluated within the scope of ERA`S. The ERA was applied to the wetland using functional assessments as an integral part of the problem formulation phase of the risk assessment process. Applying the ERA process to wetlands enhances the functional assessment process and helps to define critical elements to evaluate within wetland systems. The results of this risk assessment help to define patches within a landscape that are potentially at risk and how to prioritize remedial actions.

  4. Case study applications of the BASINS climate assessment tool (CAT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This EPA report will illustrate the application of different climate assessment capabilities within EPA’s BASINS modeling system for assessing a range of potential questions about the effects of climate change on streamflow and water quality in different watershed settings and us...

  5. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  6. Dynamic Assessment of Children with Language Impairments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasson, Natalie; Botting, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the construction of a procedure for dynamic assessment of the expressive grammar of children already identified with language impairments. Few instruments exist for the dynamic assessment of language, and those that have been developed have been largely used to successfully differentiate language impaired from culturally…

  7. Guidelines for Multicultural Assessment: An Asian Indian American Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Frances K.; Fine, Emily S.; Greif, Dan C.; Devenny, Jean M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assessment of ethnic minority clients is often hindered by clinician bias and lack of culturally sensitive instruments. Multicultural guidelines can enhance clinician awareness and sensitivity in conducting assessments with diverse populations. These guidelines are illustrated using an Asian Indian American character from Lahiri's (2008)…

  8. Assessment of Student Performance. Volume I: Findings and Conclusions. Studies of Education Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattri, Nidhi; And Others

    New to the current assessment-reform movement is an emphasis on the use of performance assessments to support systematic state-, district-, or school-wide objectives. This document presents findings of a study that sought to document and analyze the key characteristics of performance assessments, the facilitators and barriers in assessment reform,…

  9. Case Studies in Making Assessment Efficient While Developing Student Professionalism and Managing Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossiter, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    It is known that assessment drives learning and hence a good assessment design is key to effective student development. This paper gives some case studies in effective assessment strategies within engineering. The main contribution is to demonstrate how one can simultaneously meet a number of requirements with individual assessments and therefore…

  10. Gender Differences in Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among Participants of a Violence Intervention Program at a Pediatric Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Purtle, Jonathan; Adams-Harris, Erica; Frisby, Bianca; Rich, John A; Corbin, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs) have emerged as a strategy to address posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms among violently injured patients and their families. HVIP research, however, has focused on males and little guidance exists about how HVIPs could be tailored to meet gender-specific needs. We analyzed pediatric HVIP data to assess gender differences in prevalence and type of PTS symptoms. Girls reported more PTS symptoms than boys (6.96 vs 5.21, P = .027), particularly hyperarousal symptoms (4.00 vs 2.82, P = .002) such as feeling upset by reminders of the event (88.9% vs 48.3%, P = .005). Gender-focused research represents a priority area for HVIPs.

  11. Sediment quality assessment studies in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Long, E.R.; Thursby, G.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends program, a bioeffects assessment study was conducted in the vicinity of Boston Harbor, Massachusetts. Surficial sediment samples were collected at 55 sites and subsamples were tested for toxicity using (1) the 10-day whole sediment test with Ampelisca abdita, (2) the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development assays with sediment pore water, and (3) Microtox{trademark} assay with organic sediment extracts. Eleven percent of the samples were significantly toxic in the amphipod test, only 4% were toxic in the sea urchin fertilization test whereas all of the samples were highly toxic in the sea urchin embryological development assay; the Microtox assay determined 56% of the organic sediment extracts to be significantly toxic. Sediment chemical analyses for metals, AVS/SEM, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides were performed on 30 of the 55 samples. Twenty-seven of the 30 samples exceeded at least one probable effects level (PEL) value. For the 20 samples that exceeded 5 or more PELS, the concordance between the predicted and observed toxicity was 20% for the amphipod test, 60% for the Microtox test, and 100% for the sea urchin embryological development assay. There were no significant correlations among the different toxicity tests or between the tests and the contaminant concentrations in the bulk sediment. Possible explanations for the apparent lack of correlation between the sediment chemistry and the toxicity tests will be discussed.

  12. Assessment of existing studies of wind loading on solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L. M.

    1981-02-01

    In developing solar collectors, wind loading is the major structural design consideration. Wind loading investigations have focused on establishing safe bounds for steady state loading and verifying rational but initial and conservative design approaches for the various solar collector concepts. As such, the effort has been very successful, and has contributed greatly to both the recognition and qualitative understanding of many of the physical phenomena involved. Loading coefficients corresponding to mean wind velocities have been derived in these prior studies to measure the expected structural loading on the various solar collectors. Current design and testing procedures for wind loading are discussed. The test results corresponding to numerous wind tests on heliostats, parabolic troughs, parabolic dishes, and field mounted photovoltaic arrays are discussed and the applicability of the findings across the various technologies is assessed. One of the most significant consistencies in the data from all the technologies is the apparent benefit provided by fences and field shielding. Taken in toto, these data show that load reductions of three or possibly more seem feasible, though a more thorough understanding of the phenomena involved must be attained before this benefit can be realized. It is recommended that the required understanding be developed to take advantage of this benefit and that field tests be conducted to correlate with both analyses and tests.

  13. Mixture risk assessment: a case study of Monsanto experiences.

    PubMed

    Nair, R S; Dudek, B R; Grothe, D R; Johannsen, F R; Lamb, I C; Martens, M A; Sherman, J H; Stevens, M W

    1996-01-01

    Monsanto employs several pragmatic approaches for evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. These approaches are similar to those recommended by many national and international agencies. When conducting hazard and risk assessments, priority is always given to using data collected directly on the mixture of concern. To provide an example of the first tier of evaluation, actual data on acute respiratory irritation studies on mixtures were evaluated to determine whether the principle of additivity was applicable to the mixture evaluated. If actual data on the mixture are unavailable, extrapolation across similar mixtures is considered. Because many formulations are quite similar in composition, the toxicity data from one mixture can be extended to a closely related mixture in a scientifically justifiable manner. An example of a family of products where such extrapolations have been made is presented to exemplify this second approach. Lastly, if data on similar mixtures are unavailable, data on component fractions are used to predict the toxicity of the mixture. In this third approach, process knowledge and scientific judgement are used to determine how the known toxicological properties of the individual fractions affect toxicity of the mixture. Three examples of plant effluents where toxicological data on fractions were used to predict the toxicity of the mixture are discussed. The results of the analysis are used to discuss the predictive value of each of the above mentioned toxicological approaches for evaluating chemical mixtures.

  14. Assessing the use of poplar tree systems as a landfill evapotranspiration barrier with the SHAW model.

    PubMed

    Preston, G M; McBride, R A

    2004-08-01

    The use of poplar tree systems (PTS) as evapotranspiration barriers on decommissioned landfills is gaining attention as an option for leachate management. This study involved field-testing the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model for its ability to reliably estimate poplar transpiration, volumetric soil water content, and soil temperature at a landfill located in southern Ontario, Canada. The model was then used to estimate deep drainage and to ascertain the influence of a young PTS on the soil water balance of the landfill cover. The SHAW model tended to underestimate poplar transpiration [mean difference (MD) ranged from 0.33 to 3.55 mm on a daily total basis] and overestimate volumetric soil water content by up to 0.10 m3 m(-3). The model estimated soil temperature very well, particularly in the upper 1 m of the landfill cover (MD ranged from -0.1 to 1.6 x degrees C in this layer). The SHAW model simulations showed that deep drainage decreased appreciably with the presence of a young PTS largely through increased interception of rainfall, and that PTS have a good potential to act as effective evapotranspiration barriers in northern temperate climate zones. PMID:15462337

  15. Assessing the role of static length scales behind glassy dynamics in polydisperse hard disks.

    PubMed

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-06-01

    The possible role of growing static order in the dynamical slowing down toward the glass transition has recently attracted considerable attention. On the basis of random first-order transition theory, a new method to measure the static correlation length of amorphous order, called "point-to-set" (PTS) length, has been proposed and used to show that the dynamic length grows much faster than the static length. Here, we study the nature of the PTS length, using a polydisperse hard-disk system, which is a model that is known to exhibit a growing hexatic order upon densification. We show that the PTS correlation length is decoupled from the steeper increase of the correlation length of hexatic order and dynamic heterogeneity, while closely mirroring the decay length of two-body density correlations. Our results thus provide a clear example that other forms of order can play an important role in the slowing down of the dynamics, casting a serious doubt on the order-agnostic nature of the PTS length and its relevance to slow dynamics, provided that a polydisperse hard-disk system is a typical glass former. PMID:26038545

  16. A Prospective Investigation of Emotion Dysregulation as a Moderator of the Relation between Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Substance Use Severity

    PubMed Central

    Tull, Matthew T.; Bardeen, Joseph R.; DiLillo, David; Messman-Moore, Terri; Gratz, Kim L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite strong evidence for an association between the experience of posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and substance use, little is known about the particular individuals most at-risk for problematic substance use in response to PTS symptoms. Consequently, the goal of this study was to conduct a prospective investigation of the moderating role of emotion dysregulation (assessed through self-report and behavioral measures) in the relation between PTS symptoms and substance use 8-months later within a sample of 106 young adult women. No main effect of PTS symptoms on substance use was found. Instead, PTS symptoms were only associated with later substance use in the context of heightened emotion dysregulation. Results provide support for emotion dysregulation as a key factor that may increase risk for substance use among women experiencing PTS symptoms and highlight a target for future interventions aimed at reducing risk for the development of maladaptive behaviors stemming from PTS symptoms. PMID:25483275

  17. EOS imaging versus current radiography: A health technology assessment study

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub-Ahari, Alireza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Yusefi, Mahmoud; Velayati, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: EOS is a 2D/3D muscle skeletal diagnostic imaging system. The device has been developed to produce a high quality 2D, full body radiographs in standing, sitting and squatting positions. Three dimensional images can be reconstructed via sterEOS software. This Health Technology Assessment study aimed to investigate efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new emerged EOS imaging system in comparison with conventional x-ray radiographic techniques. Methods: All cost and outcome data were assessed from Iran's Ministry of Health Perspective. Data for clinical effectiveness was extracted using a rigorous systematic review. As clinical outcomes the rate of x-ray emission and related quality of life were compared with Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR). Standard costing method was conducted to find related direct medical costs. In order to examine robustness of the calculated Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) we used two-way sensitivity analysis. GDP Per capita of Islamic Republic of Iran (2012) adopted as cost-effectiveness threshold. Results: Review of related literature highlighted the lack of rigorous evidence for clinical outcomes. Ultra low dose EOS imaging device is known as a safe intervention because of FDA, CE and CSA certificates. The rate of emitted X-ray was 2 to 18 fold lower for EOS compared to the conventional techniques (p<0.001). The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio for EOS relative to CR calculated $50706 in baseline analysis (the first scenario) and $50714, $9446 respectively for the second and third scenarios. Considering the value of neither $42146 as upper limit, nor the first neither the second scenario could pass the cost-effectiveness threshold for Iran. Conclusion: EOS imaging technique might not be considered as a cost-effective intervention in routine practice of health system, especially within in-patient wards. Scenario analysis shows that, only in an optimum condition such as lower

  18. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  19. Synthesis and assessment of date palm genetic diversity studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough assessment of genetic diversity and population differentiation of Phoenix dactylifera are critical for its dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of its genetic diversity. Estimates of genetic diversity based on phenotypic, biochemical and molecular markers; and fruit quality tr...

  20. FORMAL SCENARIO DEVELOPMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario analysis is a process of evaluating possible future events through the consideration of alternative plausible (though not equally likely) outcomes (scenarios). The analysis is designed to enable improved decision-making and assessment through a more rigorous evaluation o...

  1. PARALLEL MODELS OF ASSESSMENT: INFANT MENTAL HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC ASSESSMENT MODELS INTERSECT THROUGH EARLY CHILDHOOD CASE STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Gart, Natalie; Zamora, Irina; Williams, Marian E

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic Assessment (TA; S.E. Finn & M.E. Tonsager, 1997; J.D. Smith, 2010) is a collaborative, semistructured model that encourages self-discovery and meaning-making through the use of assessment as an intervention approach. This model shares core strategies with infant mental health assessment, including close collaboration with parents and caregivers, active participation of the family, a focus on developing new family stories and increasing parents' understanding of their child, and reducing isolation and increasing hope through the assessment process. The intersection of these two theoretical approaches is explored, using case studies of three infants/young children and their families to illustrate the application of TA to infant mental health. The case of an 18-month-old girl whose parents fear that she has bipolar disorder illustrates the core principles of the TA model, highlighting the use of assessment intervention sessions and the clinical approach to preparing assessment feedback. The second case follows an infant with a rare genetic syndrome from ages 2 to 24 months, focusing on the assessor-parent relationship and the importance of a developmental perspective. Finally, assessment of a 3-year-old boy illustrates the development and use of a fable as a tool to provide feedback to a young child about assessment findings and recommendations.

  2. PARALLEL MODELS OF ASSESSMENT: INFANT MENTAL HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC ASSESSMENT MODELS INTERSECT THROUGH EARLY CHILDHOOD CASE STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Gart, Natalie; Zamora, Irina; Williams, Marian E

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic Assessment (TA; S.E. Finn & M.E. Tonsager, 1997; J.D. Smith, 2010) is a collaborative, semistructured model that encourages self-discovery and meaning-making through the use of assessment as an intervention approach. This model shares core strategies with infant mental health assessment, including close collaboration with parents and caregivers, active participation of the family, a focus on developing new family stories and increasing parents' understanding of their child, and reducing isolation and increasing hope through the assessment process. The intersection of these two theoretical approaches is explored, using case studies of three infants/young children and their families to illustrate the application of TA to infant mental health. The case of an 18-month-old girl whose parents fear that she has bipolar disorder illustrates the core principles of the TA model, highlighting the use of assessment intervention sessions and the clinical approach to preparing assessment feedback. The second case follows an infant with a rare genetic syndrome from ages 2 to 24 months, focusing on the assessor-parent relationship and the importance of a developmental perspective. Finally, assessment of a 3-year-old boy illustrates the development and use of a fable as a tool to provide feedback to a young child about assessment findings and recommendations. PMID:27333488

  3. Hydrodynamic and Ecological Assessment of Nearshore Restoration: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Thom, Ronald M.; Fuller, Roger

    2010-04-10

    Along the Pacific Northwest coast, much of the estuarine habitat has been diked over the last century for agricultural land use, residential and commercial development, and transportation corridors. As a result, many of the ecological processes and functions have been disrupted. To protect coastal habitats that are vital to aquatic species, many restoration projects are currently underway to restore the estuarine and coastal ecosystems through dike breaches, setbacks, and removals. Information on physical processes and hydrodynamic conditions are critical for the assessment of the success of restoration actions. Restoration of a 160- acre property at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River in Puget Sound has been proposed. The goal is to restore native tidal habitats and estuary-scale ecological processes by removing the dike. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed for the Stillaguamish River estuary to simulate estuarine processes. The model was calibrated to observed tide, current, and salinity data for existing conditions and applied to simulate the hydrodynamic responses to two restoration alternatives. Responses were evaluated at the scale of the restoration footprint. Model data was combined with biophysical data to predict habitat responses at the site. Results showed that the proposed dike removal would result in desired tidal flushing and conditions that would support four habitat types on the restoration footprint. At the estuary scale, restoration would substantially increase the proportion of area flushed with freshwater (< 5 ppt) at flood tide. Potential implications of predicted changes in salinity and flow dynamics are discussed relative to the distribution of tidal marsh habitat.

  4. Summaries and Technical Documentation for Performance Changes in Citizenship and Social Studies Assessments, 1969-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This report summarizes changes in student performance in the areas of citizenship and social studies, as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. An initial assessment of citizenship was conducted in 1969-70, and an initial assessment of social studies was conducted in 1971-72. Both areas were reassessed in 1975-76. Because…

  5. Systems, Ideologies and History: A Three-Dimensional Absence in the Study of Assessment Reform Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flórez Petour, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes the case for the need to study assessment reform processes from a broader and more complex perspective that takes the historical, ideological and systemic aspects of assessment policies into account. It draws on a larger study to demonstrate how the understanding of Assessment for Learning (AfL) reforms is enriched by such a…

  6. A Phenomenological Case Study: Teacher Bias Effects on Early Education Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Rebecca Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological case study explored the lived experiences of a purposive sample of 20 current and past early education teachers who have experience in assessing children through observational assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine if bias affects the documentation of observational assessment and the implementation…

  7. Quality Assessment of University Studies as a Service: Dimensions and Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pukelyte, Rasa

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews a possibility to assess university studies as a service. University studies have to be of high quality both in their content and in the administrative level. Therefore, quality of studies as a service is an important constituent part of study quality assurance. When assessing quality of university studies as a service, it is…

  8. Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments: Four Case Studies of Water Utility Practices (2011 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the final report titled, Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments: Four Case Studies of Water Utility Practices. This report was prepared by the National Center for Environmental Assessment's Global Climate Research Staff in the Office of Research and Developmen...

  9. The Assessment of Lesson Plans in Teacher Education: A Case Study in Assessment Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummons, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper forms part of an exploration of assessment on one part-time higher education (HE) course: an in-service, professional qualification for teachers and trainers in the learning and skills sector which is delivered on a franchise basis across a network of further education colleges in the north of England. This paper proposes that the…

  10. Assessment in the Kindergarten Classroom: An Empirical Study of Teachers' Assessment Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyle, Angela; DeLuca, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Within the current accountability framework of public education, kindergarten teachers face the challenge of balancing traditional developmental programing and current academically oriented curriculum. Central to this challenge is teachers' uses of assessment to measure and communicate student learning in relation to their curricular stance.…

  11. Assessing Spatial Data Quality of Participatory GIS Studies: a Case Study in Cape Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musungu, K.

    2015-10-01

    Participatory GIS (PGIS) has been prescribed by scholars who sought to find a means to enable more equitable access to GIS data, diversifying the types of knowledge captured by a GIS and re-engineering GIS software. The popularity of PGIS is evident in the various studies and contexts in which it has been utilised. These include studies in risk assessment, land administration, resource management, crime mapping and urban design to mention but a few. Despite the popularity of PGIS as a body of research, little has been done in the analysis of the quality of PGIS information. The study investigated the use of data quality criteria commonly used in traditional GIS systems and shows that it is possible to apply the criteria used in traditional GIS to PGIS. It provides a starting point for PGIS studies to assess the quality of the product. Notably, this a reflective exercise on one case study, but the methodologies used in this study have been replicated in many others undertaken by Community Based Organisations as well as Non-Governmental Organisations. Therefore the findings are relevant to such projects.

  12. Risky Assessments: Participant Suicidality and Distress Associated with Research Assessments in a Treatment Study of Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sarah K.; Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Murray, Angela; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of self-reported suicidality and distress during research assessments in a sample of 63 women meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder and current and chronic suicidality. The risk management protocol we used during the two-year study period (University of Washington Risk Assessment…

  13. A Systematic and Transparent Approach for Assessing the Methodological Quality of Intervention Effectiveness Research: The Study Design and Implementation Assessment Device (Study DIAD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Cooper, Harris

    2008-01-01

    Assessments of studies meant to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, programs, and policies can serve an important role in the interpretation of research results. However, evidence suggests that available quality assessment tools have poor measurement characteristics and can lead to opposing conclusions when applied to the same body of…

  14. Geochemical and microbiological assessment of groundwater status: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi, E.; Del Bon, A.; Amalfitano, S.; Fazi, S.; Zoppini, A.; Parrone, D.; Ghergo, S.

    2012-04-01

    The qualitative status of the groundwater resources is drawing increasingly attention in relation to the requirements of the European legislative framework. The monitoring strategies are developed by considering the chemical processes affecting groundwater quality. However, despite the use of biological indicators is a common practice for the qualitative assessment of surface waters, a similar approach is hardly being taken into account by policy makers for ground waters. Aquifers are key environments due to the ecosystem capability to ameliorate water quality, e.g. through the natural biodegradation of chemical contaminants. The objective of this research was to characterize a porous water table aquifer from a geochemical and microbiological point of view, aiming to link the hydrogeochemical properties to distribution patterns of the free-living microbial communities. The broader perspective is to integrate the role of microorganisms in the groundwater evolution processes, with new insights in the knowledge of the different microbial communities inhabiting different aquifer typologies. Moreover, microbiological parameters that could be used as a valuable indicator of groundwater quality are sought. A field-scale analysis was performed along the southern Sabatini Mounts aquifer (Central Italy, 50 sampling sites), in an area of about 340 square km, where Pleistocene volcanic products overlay Pleistocene gravel and silt-clay layers, the latter being much more widespread in the downgradient part of the study area. The selected aquifer is contaminated by natural origin elements such as arsenic and fluoride, as well as by human activities, both diffuse (agriculture) and localized, especially in the downgradient part of the aquifer (e.g. landfills, quarries, oil deposits). The main physicochemical parameters of ground waters were determined in situ (redox status, pH, conductivity, T, DO, alkalinity) and in laboratory by ionic chromatography and mass spectrometry (major

  15. Assessment Study of Small Space Debris Removal by Laser Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Papa, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Space debris in Earth orbit poses significant danger to satellites, humans in space, and future space exploration activities. In particular, the increasing number of unidentifiable objects, smaller than 10 cm, presents a serious hazard. Numerous technologies have been studied for removing unwanted objects in space. Our approach uses a short wavelength laser stationed in orbit to vaporize these small objects. This paper discusses the power requirements for space debris removal using lasers. A short wavelength laser pumped directly or indirectly by solar energy can scan, identify, position, and illuminate the target, which will then be vaporized or slow down the orbital speed of debris by laser detonation until it re-enters the atmosphere. The laser-induced plasma plume has a dispersive motion of approximately 105 m/sec with a Lambertian profile in the direction of the incoming beam [1-2]. The resulting fast ejecting jet plume of vaporized material should prevent matter recombination and condensation. If it allows any condensation of vaporized material, the size of condensed material will be no more than a nanoscale level [3]. Lasers for this purpose can be indirectly pumped by power from an array of solar cells or directly pumped by the solar spectrum [4]. The energy required for vaporization and ionization of a 10 cm cube ( 2700 gm) of aluminum is 87,160 kJ. To remove this amount of aluminum in 3 minutes requires a continuous laser beam power of at least 5.38 MW under the consideration of 9% laser absorption by aluminum [5] and 5% laser pumping efficiency. The power needed for pumping 5.38 MW laser is approximately 108 MW, which can be obtained from a large solar array with 40% efficiency solar cells and a minimal area of 450 meters by 450 meters. This solar array would collect approximately 108 MW. The power required for system operation and maneuvering can be obtained by increasing solar panel size. This feasibility assessment covers roughly the power requirement

  16. Marine-target craters on Mars? An assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ormo, J.; Dohm, J.M.; Ferris, J.C.; Lepinette, A.; Fairen, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Observations of impact craters on Earth show that a water column at the target strongly influences lithology and morphology of the resultant crater. The degree of influence varies with the target water depth and impactor diameter. Morphological features detectable in satellite imagery include a concentric shape with an inner crater inset within a shallower outer crater, which is cut by gullies excavated by the resurge of water. In this study, we show that if oceans, large seas, and lakes existed on Mars for periods of time, marine-target craters must have formed. We make an assessment of the minimum and maximum amounts of such craters based on published data on water depths, extent, and duration of putative oceans within "contacts 1 and 2," cratering rate during the different oceanic phases, and computer modeling of minimum impactor diameters required to form long-lasting craters in the seafloor of the oceans. We also discuss the influence of erosion and sedimentation on the preservation and exposure of the craters. For an ocean within the smaller "contact 2" with a duration of 100,000 yr and the low present crater formation rate, only ???1-2 detectable marine-target craters would have formed. In a maximum estimate with a duration of 0.8 Gyr, as many as 1400 craters may have formed. An ocean within the larger "contact 1-Meridiani," with a duration of 100,000 yr, would not have received any seafloor craters despite the higher crater formation rate estimated before 3.5 Gyr. On the other hand, with a maximum duration of 0.8 Gyr, about 160 seafloor craters may have formed. However, terrestrial examples show that most marine-target craters may be covered by thick sediments. Ground penetrating radar surveys planned for the ESA Mars Express and NASA 2005 missions may reveal buried craters, though it is uncertain if the resolution will allow the detection of diagnostic features of marine-target craters. The implications regarding the discovery of marine-target craters on

  17. Alternative Assessment: Implications for Social Studies. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Pat

    Alternative forms of evaluating student progress are changing testing or assessment in U.S. schools. From the teacher-made to the standardized test, the familiar over-emphasis on multiple-choice items is giving way to expanded generative formats in which students are called upon to demonstrate mastery through applications in which they use complex…

  18. Institutional Assessment of Student Information Literacy Ability: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in the assessment of learning outcomes in higher education, stakeholders are demanding concrete evidence of student learning. This applies no less to information literacy outcomes, which have been adopted by many colleges and universities around the world. This article describes the experience of a university library in…

  19. Study, Examinations, and Stress: Blood Pressure Assessments in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Brian M.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of stress associated with higher education and its impact on markers of student health is explored in three experiments looking at blood pressure levels in college students. All participants were full-time undergraduate students of psychology. In Experiment 1, academic fear of failure, assessed using psychometric testing, was found to be…

  20. Assessment of Institutional Strategic Goal Realization: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holwick, Jana W.

    2009-01-01

    Strategic planning is a common tool utilized at colleges and universities to assist in achieving institutional goals. Leaders in higher education have taken best practices from corporate management and adapted them in an effort to develop comprehensive approaches to institutional planning, assessment and accountability. Various models for planning…

  1. Qualitative Assessment across Language Barriers: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronje, Johannes C.

    2009-01-01

    If students cannot express themselves in the language of the assessor, and if the assessor is not familiar with the cultural constraints within which students operate, it is difficult for the assessor to collect evidence of adequate performance. This article describes the assessment of three digital artefacts where the assessor strove to…

  2. A Step-by-Step Study of Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietsch, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a guide to the development of formative assessments for school librarians participating in professional learning communities (PLC). It describes librarians' reading of assigned books, meeting with their PLCs, and incorporation of learned strategies in their daily instruction. Central library service readers' regular…

  3. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  4. Beyond the Bubble in History/Social Studies Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakstone, Joel; Smith, Mark; Wineburg, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Teachers need tools and assessments that will prepare students to meet the ambitious goals laid out by the Common Core State Standards. The multiple-choice tests that dominate in history will not prepare students to analyze primary and secondary sources, cite textual evidence to support arguments, consider the influence of an author's perspective,…

  5. Alaska national hydrography dataset positional accuracy assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha; Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Constance, Eric; Mantey, Kim; Vinyard-Houx, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Initial visual assessments Wide range in the quality of fit between features in NHD and these new image sources. No statistical analysis has been performed to actually quantify accuracy Determining absolute accuracy is cost prohibitive (must collect independent, well defined test points) Quantitative analysis of relative positional error is feasible.

  6. Prenatal Child Abuse Risk Assessment: A Preliminary Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weberling, Lara Cady; Forgays, Deborah Kirby; Crain-Thoreson, Catherine; Hyman, Ira

    2003-01-01

    Tested the validity of the Brigid Collins Risk Screener (BCRS) to assess child abuse risk in a sample of 49 expectant mothers. Found that at 3 months postpartum, high-risk mothers scored significantly lower on the quality of infants' physical, social, and emotional environments than moderate or low-risk mothers. Concluded that the BCRS appears to…

  7. Continuous Curriculum Assessment and Improvement: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Art

    2007-01-01

    Many factors, including reduced teaching resources, higher student-to-teacher ratios, evolving teaching technologies, and increased emphasis on success skills, have made it necessary for many teaching faculties to become more deliberate about continuous curriculum assessment and improvement. An example is the evolution of food science education…

  8. A Validity Study of the Salter Environmental Type Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    Correlational analyses of data from 202 students on the Work Environment Scale and Salter Environmental Type Assessment (SETA) supported concurrent validity. Factor analysis identified three factors accounting for 70% of variance: positive work settings, structure, and work pressure/task orientation. SETA appears useful as a commensurate Myers…

  9. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT IN THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY-INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The science of exposure assessment is relatively new and evolving rapidly with the advancement of sophisticated methods for specific measurements at the picogram per gram level or lower in a variety of environmental and biologic matrices. Without this measurement capability, envi...

  10. Quantum Mechanics Concept Assessment: Development and Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of students' learning in first semester upper-division quantum mechanics, we needed a high-quality conceptual assessment instrument for comparing outcomes of different curricular approaches. The process of developing such a tool started with converting a preliminary version of a 14-item open-ended quantum…

  11. Cultural Shifts, Multimodal Representations, and Assessment Practices: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal texts involve the presence, absence, and co-occurrence of alphabetic text with visual, audio, tactile, gestural, and spatial representations. This article explores how teachers' evaluation of students' multimodal work can be understood in terms of cognition and culture. When teachers apply a paradigm of assessment rooted in print-based…

  12. In vivo assessment of dopamine and serotonin receptors measured by C-11 n-methylspiperone (NMSP) in patients with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Tune, L.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Suneja, S.; Bjorvinsson, E.; Pearlson, G.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors carried out PET imaging with C-11 NMSP in 13 pts. diagnosed as chronic schizophrenic by (DSM 3) criteria. They had no detectable serum neuroleptics by radioassay at the time of the scan. No pt. had received a neuroleptic for at least 1 week before study, with an avg. abstinence of 7 mo. One had never been on neuroleptics. During the time of scanning, 8/13 had delusions and hallucinations. There was no statistically significant difference from 44 age and sex matched control subjects for the 43 min. Caudate/cerebellar ratio, or the Frontal/Cerebellar ratio, both measures of relative dopamine D2, and serotonin S2 binding. These preliminary studies suggest that these drug free pts. show no large differences in the receptor levels compared to normal data. Differences from in vitro data could be due to: differences in duration of illness (the avg. 10.3) yrs.; difference in age (our pts. vg. 32.7 are much younger than those dying with schizophrenia); drug induced effects at death or persistent neuroleptic effect in our pts.; or difference in method.

  13. Elements of impact assessment: a case study with cyber attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanchieh Jay; Holsopple, Jared; Liu, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Extensive discussions have taken place in recent year regarding impact assessment - what is it and how can we do it? It is especially intriguing in this modern era where non-traditional warfare has caused either information overload or limited understanding of adversary doctrines. This work provides a methodical discussion of key elements for the broad definition of impact assessment (IA). The discussion will start with a process flow involving components related to IA. Two key functional components, impact estimation and threat projection, are compared and illustrated in detail. These details include a discussion of when to model red and blue knowledge. Algorithmic approaches will be discussed, augmented with lessons learned from our IA development for cyber situation awareness. This paper aims at providing the community with a systematic understanding of IA and its open issues with specific examples.

  14. A Study of Arbitrations in Pennsylvania's Writing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, James R.

    In 1991 Pennsylvania began implementation of a direct writing assessment at the sixth-grade and ninth-grade levels. A total of 18,758 sixth graders and 16,575 ninth graders wrote a response to 1 of 9 prompts reflecting 3 modes of writing. A six-point holistic scale was used to score the papers, with two readers scoring each paper. A third reader,…

  15. Space Shuttle flying qualities and flight control system assessment study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, T. T.; Johnston, D. E.; Mcruer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The suitability of existing and proposed flying quality and flight control system criteria for application to the space shuttle orbiter during atmospheric flight phases was assessed. An orbiter experiment for flying qualities and flight control system design criteria is discussed. Orbiter longitudinal and lateral-directional flying characteristics, flight control system lag and time delay considerations, and flight control manipulator characteristics are included. Data obtained from conventional aircraft may be inappropriate for application to the shuttle orbiter.

  16. Cogeneration computer model assessment: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, L.

    1983-01-01

    Cogeneration computer simulation models to recommend the most desirable models or their components for use by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) in evaluating potential cogeneration projects was assessed. Existing cogeneration modeling capabilities are described, preferred models are identified, and an approach to the development of a code which will best satisfy SCE requirements is recommended. Five models (CELCAP, COGEN 2, CPA, DEUS, and OASIS) are recommended for further consideration.

  17. Quantum mechanics concept assessment: Development and validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2015-06-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of students' learning in first semester upper-division quantum mechanics, we needed a high-quality conceptual assessment instrument for comparing outcomes of different curricular approaches. The process of developing such a tool started with converting a preliminary version of a 14-item open-ended quantum mechanics assessment tool (QMAT) to a multiple-choice (MC) format. Further question refinement, development of effective distractors, adding new questions, and robust statistical analysis has led to a 31-item quantum mechanics concept assessment (QMCA) test. The QMCA is used as post-test only to assess students' knowledge about five main topics of quantum measurement: the time-independent Schrödinger equation, wave functions and boundary conditions, time evolution, and probability density. During two years of testing and refinement, the QMCA has been given in alpha (N =61 ) and beta versions (N =263 ) to students in upper division quantum mechanics courses at 11 different institutions with an average post-test score of 54%. By allowing for comparisons of student learning across different populations and institutions, the QMCA provides instructors and researchers a more standard measure of effectiveness of different curricula or teaching strategies on student conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we discuss the construction of effective distractors and the use of student interviews and expert feedback to revise and validate both questions and distractors. We include the results of common statistical tests of reliability and validity, which suggest the instrument is presently in a stable, usable, and promising form.

  18. Studies towards assessing the effects of aviation on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayari, Arezoo

    Emissions from aviation are an important component in the overall concerns about the effects of human activities on climate. Aviation emissions modify the chemical and physical properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in various ways. Aircraft emit gases and particles that can either directly or indirectly affect climate and air quality, including: carbon dioxide (CO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx) that can increase ozone (O3) production and increase the destruction of methane (CH4); water vapor that under certain atmospheric conditions can lead to contrail formation; and soot and other particles that along with contrails can affect the amount and characteristics of cirrus clouds. Soot and sulfate particles can also change the cloudiness by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Due to the high growth in air traffic that is projected to continue, it is important to understand the effects of aviation on air quality and climate. Based on then existing analyses of the emissions and their effects, the aviation contribution in changing the radiative forcing on the climate system was about 5% of the total human-related emissions (relative to 1750) in 2005 (Lee et al., 2009). This contribution is a result of various effects, especially the direct effects of CO2, NOx-induced effects, aerosol direct and indirect effects, and increased cloudiness from contrail formation and aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei. One of the main challenges of the aviation scientific community has been to increase the level of scientific understanding of these effects, especially with respect to those most uncertain (i.e. NOx effects, contrail-cirrus and aerosol effects). Another challenge has been to develop a simple climate model (SCM) that has the level of sophistication necessary to accurately assess aviation induced climate effects while being easy to use by policy makers for use in policy considerations. The main objectives in this study were: (1) to evaluate the

  19. 75 FR 51806 - Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment: Four Case Studies of Water Utility Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... AGENCY Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment: Four Case Studies of Water Utility Practices AGENCY...-day public comment period for the draft document titled, ``Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment... utilities to assess their vulnerability to future climate change. The report is intended to illustrate...

  20. What University Students Think about Assessment: A Case Study from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Serafina; Pentassuglia, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, assessment is widely recognized as a key element in higher education systems. Current studies are moving towards the revision of traditional modalities of testing, the individuation of alternative forms of assessment, and, above all, the analysis of conceptions that teachers and students have about assessment. The present research is…

  1. Teaching Writing in the Shadow of Standardized Writing Assessment: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimi, Hunter

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study results from interviews with five high school English teachers regarding their writing instruction. The researcher sought to answer these questions: (1) How had the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program's (TCAP) Writing Assessment affected their teaching as gauged by the teachers' statements regarding the assessment,…

  2. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment and U.S. EPA Nanomaterial Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    These case studies are not completed risk assessments but are structured around an approach known as comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA), which combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm (Davis, J.M., J. Nanosci. Nanotech. 7:402-9, 2007). ...

  3. Exploring Assessment and Accountability for Children's Learning: A Case Study of a Hong Kong Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sing Pui; Wong, Siu Man

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: Assessment and accountability have been given prominent attention in the field of education in recent decades. Educators have been debating what assessment is, how it is practiced in school, and how it is used for accountability purposes. A case study was conducted of the assessment practices in a Hong Kong preschool to…

  4. Individual Personality Dynamics in Family Assessment and Counseling: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kent W.

    2001-01-01

    Integrative Family Therapy provides four family systems assessment components and an intrapsychic assessment component as the foundation for understanding family strengths and challenges. Presents a case study in which obtaining a balanced assessment of the systemic and intrapsychic dynamics was critical to the success of therapy. (GCP)

  5. The Psychometric Properties of Scales that Assess Market Orientation and Team Leadership Skills: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the psychometric properties of two scales that can be used in predicting team performance: specifically how team members assess the market orientation of their work unit as well the leadership skills present in the team. The first scale is a three-dimensional assessment of the unit's market orientation (innovative, process, or…

  6. Race and Writing Assessment. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric. Volume 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inoue, Asao B., Ed.; Poe, Mya, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Race and Writing Assessment" brings together established and up-and-coming scholars in composition studies to explore how writing assessment needs to change in order to account for the increasing diversity of students in college classrooms today. Contributors identify where we have ignored race in our writing assessment approaches and explore…

  7. Assessment Criteria for Competency-Based Education: A Study in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastré, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Amsing-Smit, Pauline; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of type of assessment criteria (performance-based vs. competency-based), the relevance of assessment criteria (relevant criteria vs. all criteria), and their interaction on secondary vocational education students' performance and assessment skills. Students on three programmes in the domain of nursing and care…

  8. Nationwide Desert Highway Assessment: A Case Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuesong; Wang, Fuchun; Wang, Binggang

    2011-01-01

    The natural environment affects the construction of desert highways. Conversely, highway construction affects the natural environment and puts the ecological environment at a disadvantage. To satisfy the variety and hierarchy of desert highway construction and discover the spatio-temporal distribution of the natural environment and its effect on highway construction engineering, an assessment of the natural regional divisions of desert highways in China is carried out for the first time. Based on the general principles and method for the natural region division, the principles, method and index system for desert highway assessment is put forward by combining the desert highway construction features and the azonal differentiation law. The index system combines the dominant indicator and four auxiliary indicators. The dominant indicator is defined by the desert’s comprehensive state index and the auxiliary indicators include the sand dune height, the blown sand strength, the vegetation coverage ratio and the annual average temperature difference. First the region is divided according to the dominant indicator. Then the region boundaries are amended according to the four auxiliary indicators. Finally the natural region division map for desert highway assessment is presented. The Chinese desert highways can be divided into three sections: the east medium effect region, the middle medium-severe effect region, and the west slight-medium effect region. The natural region division map effectively paves the way for the route planning, design, construction, maintenance and ongoing management of desert highways, and further helps environmental protection. PMID:21845155

  9. Nationwide desert highway assessment: a case study in China.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuesong; Wang, Fuchun; Wang, Binggang

    2011-07-01

    The natural environment affects the construction of desert highways. Conversely, highway construction affects the natural environment and puts the ecological environment at a disadvantage. To satisfy the variety and hierarchy of desert highway construction and discover the spatio-temporal distribution of the natural environment and its effect on highway construction engineering, an assessment of the natural regional divisions of desert highways in China is carried out for the first time. Based on the general principles and method for the natural region division, the principles, method and index system for desert highway assessment is put forward by combining the desert highway construction features and the azonal differentiation law. The index system combines the dominant indicator and four auxiliary indicators. The dominant indicator is defined by the desert's comprehensive state index and the auxiliary indicators include the sand dune height, the blown sand strength, the vegetation coverage ratio and the annual average temperature difference. First the region is divided according to the dominant indicator. Then the region boundaries are amended according to the four auxiliary indicators. Finally the natural region division map for desert highway assessment is presented. The Chinese desert highways can be divided into three sections: the east medium effect region, the middle medium-severe effect region, and the west slight-medium effect region. The natural region division map effectively paves the way for the route planning, design, construction, maintenance and ongoing management of desert highways, and further helps environmental protection.

  10. Review of Chinese Environmental Risk Assessment Regulations and Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Yuchao; Lou, In Chio; Gao, Jixi

    2012-01-01

    Environmental risk assessment is an essential step in the development of solutions for pollution problems and new environmental regulations. An assessment system for environmental risks has been developed in China in recent decades. However, many of the Chinese technical guidelines, standards, and regulations were directly adapted from those of developed countries, and were not based on the Chinese environmental and socioeconomic context. Although existing environmental regulations for pollutants are usually obtained by extrapolations from high-dose toxicological data to low-dose scenarios using linear-non-threshold (LNT) models, toxicologists have argued that J-shaped or inverse J-shaped curves may dominate the dose–response relationships for environmental pollutants at low doses because low exposures stimulate biological protective mechanisms that are ineffective at higher doses. The costs of regulations based on LNT and J-shaped models could therefore be dramatically different. Since economic factors strongly affect the decision-making process, particularly for developing countries, it is time to strengthen basic research to provide more scientific support for Chinese environmental regulations. In this paper, we summarize current Chinese environmental policies and standards and the application of environmental risk assessment in China, and recommend a more scientific approach to the development of Chinese regulations. PMID:22740787

  11. Objectifying Facial Expressivity Assessment of Parkinson's Patients: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as “facial masking,” a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed. PMID:25478003

  12. Outcome of venous stenting following catheter directed thrombolysis for acute proximal lower limb venous thrombosis: a prospective study with venous Doppler follow-up at 1-year.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Reddy, Babu; Nagesh, C M; Agarwal, Naveen; Manjunath, C N

    2015-10-01

    Functional outcome of venous stent placement for the management of acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) following catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess immediate and intermediate term outcomes among patients treated with venous stenting following CDT in patients with proximal lower limb DVT. Thirty consecutive patients aged between 20-70 years with proximal lower limb DVT formed the study group. The mean duration of CDT done with streptokinase was 4.5 ± 1.3 days. Patients with residual venous obstruction and/or large clot burden were treated further with venous angioplasty and/or stenting. Primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety, efficacy and patency of venous stenting in the management of incomplete result following CDT. After 12 months, post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) was assessed clinically using Villalta scale and deep venous patency was assessed through duplex ultrasound. We studied 8 (5 female and 3 male) patients with 9 (3 left and 6 right) limb involvement and 13 stent (4 balloon expandable and 9 self expandable) placement. All patients improved clinically immediately following venous stenting. Technical success was achieved in all patients. One patient developed pulmonary embolism during course of hospital stay. One patient had stent thrombosis and PTS and another patient died due to carcinoma breast during follow-up. Deep venous stenting is an effective mode of treatment in proximal acute lower limb DVT with high late patency rate up to 1-year.

  13. Incidence and Outcomes of Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Fourth Primary Tumors: A Long-term Follow-up Study in a Betel Quid Chewing Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Adel, Mohamad; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Fang, Ku-Hao; Wang, Yu-Chien; Chang, Kai-Ping; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Yang, Lan Yan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the incidence and outcomes of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and fourth primary tumors (PTs) in a betel-chewing endemic area.We retrospectively examined the records of 1836 OSCC patients who underwent radical tumor resection between 1996 and 2014. The outcome measures included the incidence and number of multiple PTs, the main risk factors, and their associations with overall survival (OS).Of the 1836 patients, 1400 (76.3%) had a single PT, 344 (18.7%) a second PT, 67 (3.6%) a third PT, and 25 (1.4%) a fourth PT. Univariate analyses (log-rank test) identified the following factors as significantly associated with a fourth PT: simultaneous first and second PTs, betel quid chewing, buccal subsite, and pT3-4 status. After allowance for the potential confounding effect of other risk factors, all of these factors retained their independent prognostic significance in stepwise multivariate analyses, the only exception being betel chewing. The incidences of second, third, and fourth PTs at 5 and 10 years were 20.2%/34.6%, 4.0%/8.6%, and 1.0%/2.3%, respectively. The 5 and 10-year OS rates (calculated from the diagnosis of each PTs) for patients with a single, second, third, and fourth PTs were 68%/61%, 43%/37%, 45%/39%%, and 30%/30%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among patients with a fourth PT, those who underwent radical surgery showed a significantly higher 3-year OS than those who did not (57% vs 13%; P = 0.0442).Fourth PTs are rarely observed in OSCC patients in a betel quid-chewing endemic area. Long-term survival rates of patients treated with radical surgery seems acceptable, being 4-fold higher than their counterparts. PMID:27015170

  14. Predicting Children's Academic Achievement from Early Assessment Scores: A Validity Generalization Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Juhu; Suen, Hoi K.

    2003-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies investigating the predictive validity of early assessment, observed predictive validity coefficients across studies are not stable. A validity generalization study was conducted in order to answer the question of whether the relationship between early assessment of children and later achievement is…

  15. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND... assessments and health effects studies. (a) ATSDR shall provide a report of the results of a health......

  16. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND... assessments and health effects studies. (a) ATSDR shall provide a report of the results of a health......

  17. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND... assessments and health effects studies. (a) ATSDR shall provide a report of the results of a health......

  18. Needs Assessment of the Healthcare Sector in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area. Research Report. Business Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Virginia Community Coll., Annandale. Office of Institutional Research.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the growing population of elderly citizens will result in an increased demand for healthcare services that will rise for a full 50 years. This study assesses the need for healthcare sector workers in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Information on the skills, education, and experience that…

  19. Quality of life assessment by community pharmacists: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J P; Smith, M C; Banahan, B F; Frate, D A; Parks, B R

    1998-02-01

    Implicit in the evolving role of pharmacy is that its practitioners embrace the concept of quality of life (QoL). In recent years there has been an increased interest in incorporating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures into clinical practice, primarily focusing on the physician as the user of this information. Pharmacists may be able to use these instruments in their practices to provide better pharmaceutical care. To explore the feasibility of such an undertaking, questionnaires were mailed to a national sample of community pharmacies. In addition to the questionnaire, the respondents were provided with examples of two instruments: the Duke Health Profile and the QOLIE-10. A definition of HRQoL was provided to the respondents. After two mailings and a reminder postcard, a usable response rate of 27.2% was achieved. The results revealed that over 80% of the respondents currently discuss HRQoL issues with their patients. In addition, 66% reported that they attempt to assess the HRQoL of their patients, albeit usually on a subjective, informal basis. After viewing examples of HRQoL instruments, over three-quarters of the respondents reported a willingness to use HRQoL assessment tools in their practices. However, only 53.7% of the respondents were familiar with the concept of HRQoL. Less than 5% reported familiarity with formal instruments. The self-reported knowledge of pharmacists concerning HRQoL was low and the respondents recognized a significant gap between their current knowledge and the level of knowledge needed to assess the HRQoL of their patients formally. The results suggest a possible role for the pharmacist in HRQoL assessment. However, the use of HRQoL instruments in community pharmacies will require further training and education on the part of pharmacists concerning the concept of HRQoL, the issues involved in its measurement and how they can use HRQoL information in their practices. In addition, a number of unanswered questions must be

  20. A comparative study of ship hull structures fatigue assessment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petinov, Sergei V.; Polezhayeva, Helena A.; Yermolayeva, Natalya S.

    1992-07-01

    Several methods of fatigue assessment in ship hull structures are compared. The analysis is focused on fatigue problems of hull structures concerning: evaluation, the design state of fatigue damage of a structure formulation, and the adequacy of methods and data bases for the purpose of the analyses. To illustrate the discussion, examples of allowable nominal stress at a given fatigue life calculation are presented for bottom frame web slot and for a bottom longitudinal transverse bulkhead bracket connection in the case of a container ship. The low cycle (local strain) method is regarded as the most advantageous at present almost in all practical problems connected to fatigue.

  1. Integrating risk assessment and life cycle assessment: a case study of insulation.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Yurika; Levy, Jonathan I; Norris, Gregory A; Wilson, Andrew; Hofstetter, Patrick; Spengler, John D

    2002-10-01

    Increasing residential insulation can decrease energy consumption and provide public health benefits, given changes in emissions from fuel combustion, but also has cost implications and ancillary risks and benefits. Risk assessment or life cycle assessment can be used to calculate the net impacts and determine whether more stringent energy codes or other conservation policies would be warranted, but few analyses have combined the critical elements of both methodologies In this article, we present the first portion of a combined analysis, with the goal of estimating the net public health impacts of increasing residential insulation for new housing from current practice to the latest International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2000). We model state-by-state residential energy savings and evaluate particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5), NOx, and SO2 emission reductions. We use past dispersion modeling results to estimate reductions in exposure, and we apply concentration-response functions for premature mortality and selected morbidity outcomes using current epidemiological knowledge of effects of PM2.5 (primary and secondary). We find that an insulation policy shift would save 3 x 10(14) British thermal units or BTU (3 x 10(17) J) over a 10-year period, resulting in reduced emissions of 1,000 tons of PM2.5, 30,000 tons of NOx, and 40,000 tons of SO2. These emission reductions yield an estimated 60 fewer fatalities during this period, with the geographic distribution of health benefits differing from the distribution of energy savings because of differences in energy sources, population patterns, and meteorology. We discuss the methodology to be used to integrate life cycle calculations, which can ultimately yield estimates that can be compared with costs to determine the influence of external costs on benefit-cost calculations.

  2. Assessment of SPM in perfusion brain SPECT studies. A numerical simulation study using bootstrap resampling methods.

    PubMed

    Pareto, Deborah; Aguiar, Pablo; Pavía, Javier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Cot, Albert; Falcón, Carles; Benabarre, Antoni; Lomeña, Francisco; Vieta, Eduard; Ros, Domènec

    2008-07-01

    Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) has become the technique of choice to statistically evaluate positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) functional brain studies. Nevertheless, only a few methodological studies have been carried out to assess the performance of SPM in SPECT. The aim of this paper was to study the performance of SPM in detecting changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in hypo- and hyperperfused areas in brain SPECT studies. The paper seeks to determine the relationship between the group size and the rCBF changes, and the influence of the correction for degradations. The assessment was carried out using simulated brain SPECT studies. Projections were obtained with Monte Carlo techniques, and a fan-beam collimator was considered in the simulation process. Reconstruction was performed by using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with and without compensation for attenuation, scattering, and spatial variant collimator response. Significance probability maps were obtained with SPM2 by using a one-tailed two-sample t-test. A bootstrap resampling approach was used to determine the sample size for SPM to detect the between-group differences. Our findings show that the correction for degradations results in a diminution of the sample size, which is more significant for small regions and low-activation factors. Differences in sample size were found between hypo- and hyperperfusion. These differences were larger for small regions and low-activation factors, and when no corrections were included in the reconstruction algorithm.

  3. Risk assessment and pathway study of arsenic in industrially contaminated sites of Hyderabad: a case study.

    PubMed

    Chandra Sekhar, K; Chary, N S; Kamala, C T; Venkateswara Rao, J; Balaram, V; Anjaneyulu, Y

    2003-08-01

    Different areas in the industrial region of Patancheru near Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (A.P), India are contaminated with high concentration of arsenic, which is attributed to industrial source like veterinary chemicals, pharmaceuticals, pesticide industries, etc. Fourteen villages of this area of Patancheru were assessed for arsenic contamination by collecting samples of water (surface and ground), soil, fodder, milk, and vegetables. The total arsenic content in the whole blood, urine, hair, and nails of the residents showing arsenical skin lesions and other clinical manifestations were also studied. To understand the bioavailability of arsenic in this environment and its possible entry into human food chain, speciation studies of arsenic was carried out and the results are presented in this paper.

  4. Assessing hypertension in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

    PubMed

    Davis, H S; Merry, H R; MacKnight, C; Rockwood, K

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the self-report hypertension variables in the CSHA, recorded in the screening questionnaire and the Self-Administered Risk Factor (SARF) questionnaire. The two questions showed high agreement (phi coefficient 0.83). Each was modestly but significantly associated with other simultaneous reports of heart disease and stroke, and with subsequent mortality. Only the SARF asked questions about treatment; controlling for treatment effects, five-year survival was longest among those with no hypertension and no treatment (mean survival time 1,645 days; 95% CI 1,632 to 1,658), and shortest for those with no reported hypertension who were receiving "antihypertensive" medications presumably prescribed for other cardiovascular disease (mean survival time 1,496 days; 95% CI 1,457 to 1,535). The SARF questions incorporating high blood pressure and treatment appear preferable to assess the risks associated with hypertension.

  5. Space station contamination study: Assessment of contaminant spectral brightness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    The assessment of spectral brightness resulting from the ambient-contaminant interaction requires a knowledge of the details of cross sections and excitation mechanisms. The approach adopted was to utilize the spectral brightness measurements made on Spacelab 1 and on the S3-4 spacecraft to identify source mechanisms, key cross sections and hence, the abundance of contaminant species. These inferred abundances were then used to update the composition comprising the total column concentrations predicted by the Science and Engineering Associates' configuration contamination model for the Space Station and to scale the irradiances to four altitudes: 300, 350, 400, and 463 km. The concentration irradiances are compared with zodiacal natural background levels. The results demonstrate that emissive contamination is significantly more severe than anticipated. It is shown that spectral emissions can become competitive with the zodiacal background up to altitudes as high as 400 km for the vacuum ultraviolet and visible emissions.

  6. Provisional Assessment of Recent Studies on Health Effects of Particulate Matter Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the findings of EPA’s survey and provisional assessment of studies published since the completion of the 2009 PM ISA. EPA has screened and surveyed the recent literature and developed a provisional assessment that places those studies of potentially greatest ...

  7. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  8. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES...

  9. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES...

  10. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  11. The Use of Analytic Rubric in the Assessment of Writing Performance--Inter-Rater Concordance Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyreli, Latif; Ari, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the purpose was to determine whether there was concordance among raters in the assessment of the writing performance using analytic rubric; furthermore, factors affecting the assessment process were examined. The analytic rubric used in the study consists of three sections and ten properties: External structure (format, spelling and…

  12. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  13. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  14. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  15. CEAP - WATERSHED ASSESSMENT STUDY ON CROPLANDS - FINDINGS TO DATE AND PLANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ARS-led Watershed Assessment Study for the Croplands CEAP project was charged with providing scientific support for the National Assessment. The study leveraged the long-term ARS research watershed infrastructure to accomplish five main objectives. 1) Develop and implement a data system to store...

  16. A Study of STEM Assessments in Engineering, Science, and Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael; Moreno, Mario; Phillips, Alison; Guzey, S. Selcen; Moore, Tamara J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, scale, and validate assessments in engineering, science, and mathematics with grade appropriate items that were sensitive to the curriculum developed by teachers. The use of item response theory to assess item functioning was a focus of the study. The work is part of a larger project focused on increasing…

  17. A Psychometric Study of the Infant and Toddler Intervals of the Social Emotional Assessment Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Jane K.; Waddell, Misti L.; Clifford, Jantina R.; Funk, Kristin; Hoselton, Robert M.; Chen, Ching-I

    2013-01-01

    Psychometric and utility studies on Social Emotional Assessment Measure (SEAM), an innovative tool for assessing and monitoring social-emotional and behavioral development in infants and toddlers with disabilities, were conducted. The Infant and Toddler SEAM intervals were the study focus, using mixed methods, including item response theory…

  18. The Effects of Finite Sampling on State Assessment Sample Requirements. NAEP Validity Studies. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chromy, James R.

    This study addressed statistical techniques that might ameliorate some of the sampling problems currently facing states with small populations participating in State National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) assessments. The study explored how the application of finite population correction factors to the between-school component of…

  19. Assessing Student Retention in Online Learning Environments: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston, Wallace; Ice, Phil; Burgess, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    In their initial study, authors Boston, Ice, and Gibson (2011) explored the relationship between student demographics and interactions, and retention at a large online university. Participants in the preliminary study (n = 20,569) included degree-seeking undergraduate students who completed at least one course at the American Public University…

  20. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODS DEVELOPMENT PILOTS FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are needed to link exposure with health effects. EPA began methods development pilot studies in 2000 to address general questions about exposures and outcome measures. Selected pilot studies are highlighted in this poster. The “Literature Re...

  1. Overview of risk assessment in new EPA epidemiology studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 2003, the Office of Research and Development of the US Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of epidemiology studies of water quality and health effects among beach goers at beaches across the United States. These studies are designed to establish associati...

  2. Quality Assessment of University Studies: Attitude of Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valiuskeviciute, Audrone; Druskyte, Ruta; Mikutaviciene, Inga

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the research on study quality state at three Lithuanian universities. The research was performed during the spring semester in 2003. Research participants were 669 students, 227 teachers, 126 administration officers and 359 graduates. The outcomes of the research did not aim at revealing the state of study quality in a…

  3. Assessing Medication Effects in the MTA Study Using Neuropsychological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jeffery N.; Conners, C. Keith; Hervey, Aaron S.; Tonev, Simon T.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Abikoff, Howard B.; Elliott, Glen; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; March, John S.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Pelham, William E.; Severe, Joanne B.; Swanson, James M.; Wells, Karen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Background: While studies have increasingly investigated deficits in reaction time (RT) and RT variability in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), few studies have examined the effects of stimulant medication on these important neuropsychological outcome measures. Methods: 316 children who participated in the Multimodal…

  4. ASSESSING EXPOSURE CLASSIFICATION IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a prospective epidemiologic study examining cancer and non-cancer health outcomes for over 55,000 pesticide applicators and 34,000 spouses in Iowa and North Carolina. Questionnaires were used to collect information about the use of specific ...

  5. A Model for Assessing Impact of Institutional Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A three-dimensional model was developed to assist researchers in conceptualizing the research-study-impact process. Drawing on communication and decision making literature, the model relates time, action, and audience dimensions. The results of these relationships is labeled "institutional study impact." Impact is viewed as the outcomes from a…

  6. Transgender health: findings from two needs assessment studies in Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, Gretchen P

    2005-02-01

    HIV/AIDS, suicide, violence, and barriers to health care access among transgender people were explored using two needs assessment surveys conducted in Philadelphia in 1997. A total of 182 people responded to a face-to-face interview or self-administered mail survey: 113 male-to-female individuals and 69 female-to-male individuals. About three-fifths of respondents had engaged in unprotected sexual activity during the past 12 months. The risk for HIV infection from unprotected sex was significantly higher among respondents of color than among white respondents. About one-third (30.1 percent) of respondents had attempted suicide. More than half of respondents had been forced to have sex, 56.3 percent had experienced violence in their homes, and 51.3 percent had been physically abused. Twenty-six percent of respondents had been denied medical care because they were transgender. These findings suggest that prevention services that specifically address HIV/AIDS, suicide, and violence among transgender people are urgently needed.

  7. Hyper-velocity impact risk assessment study for LOFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinati, Emanuele

    Within the ESA Cosmic Vision programme, the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) mission is one of the candidates for the M3 slot opportunity. LOFT is an x-ray (2-30 keV) experiment with two instruments on-board: the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). Both are based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Due to the design of the instrumental configuration, hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids and orbital debris represent a significant hazard factor. During the three-year assessment phase of LOFT, we performed experimental test campaigns at the MPIK Van de Graaff accelerator to measure the degradation of LOFT SDD prototypes induced by hyper-velocity impacts. For the WFM, to mitigate the impact risk we designed and tested at the TUM plasma accelerator a compact double-wall shield using thin (~10 micron) foils of Kapton and Polypropylene, capable to effectively stop hyper-velocity particles up to 70 micron in size, in a remarkable agreement with simulations performed in ESABASE2. We present the results of these activities in the context of LOFT, and brievly discuss the potential applicability of the SDD as a debris detector.

  8. Questioning western assessment of trauma among Tibetan torture survivors. A quantitative assessment study with comments from Buddhist Lamas.

    PubMed

    Elsass, Peter; Carlsson, Jessica; Jespersen, Kristian; Phuntsok, Kalsang

    2009-01-01

    Our study falls in line with the numerous studies providing a critique of the use of western diagnostic instruments for assessing trauma in a cross-cultural context. Our purpose has been to give evidence for the Tibetan torture survivors' degree of traumatisation and for their use of spirituality to overcome their difficult situation. In addition we wanted to question the use of our western methods in an Asian context. 102 tortured refugees attended a formalised needs assessment including neuropsychological and psychological measures of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 25 (HSCL-25). Even though significant correlations between the amount of the measures of organized violence and neuropsychological and psychological distress were found in our data, the division of the material into different subgroups according to e.g. religious and non-religious groups did not have an influence on the level of distress. After the assessment study, eight Tibetan lamas were interviewed about their views on our methods and results. They questioned the validity of our western rating scales and explained that our results might be influenced by the Tibetan culture, which among other things can be characterized as having a view and articulation of suffering much more complex than the units of our study's rating scales.

  9. Questioning western assessment of trauma among Tibetan torture survivors. A quantitative assessment study with comments from Buddhist Lamas.

    PubMed

    Elsass, Peter; Carlsson, Jessica; Jespersen, Kristian; Phuntsok, Kalsang

    2009-01-01

    Our study falls in line with the numerous studies providing a critique of the use of western diagnostic instruments for assessing trauma in a cross-cultural context. Our purpose has been to give evidence for the Tibetan torture survivors' degree of traumatisation and for their use of spirituality to overcome their difficult situation. In addition we wanted to question the use of our western methods in an Asian context. 102 tortured refugees attended a formalised needs assessment including neuropsychological and psychological measures of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 25 (HSCL-25). Even though significant correlations between the amount of the measures of organized violence and neuropsychological and psychological distress were found in our data, the division of the material into different subgroups according to e.g. religious and non-religious groups did not have an influence on the level of distress. After the assessment study, eight Tibetan lamas were interviewed about their views on our methods and results. They questioned the validity of our western rating scales and explained that our results might be influenced by the Tibetan culture, which among other things can be characterized as having a view and articulation of suffering much more complex than the units of our study's rating scales. PMID:20065538

  10. Assessment of a Pesticide Exposure Intensity Algorithm in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of the exposure assessment is a critical factor in epidemiological investigations of pesticide exposures and health in agricultural populations. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate questionnaire-based exposure metrics. The Agricultural Health Study...

  11. Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

    1980-11-01

    Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

  12. US country studies program: Support for climate change studies, national plans, and technology assessments

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the objectives of the next phase of the U.S. Country Studies Program which was launched in support of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The next phases of this program aim to: assist countries in preparing Climate Change Action plans; support technology assessments and development of technology initiatives; enhance exchange of information and expertise in support of FCCC. The program offers support for these processes in the form of handbooks which have been published to aid in preparing action plans, and to provide information on methane, forestry, and energy technologies. In addition an array of training workshops have been and are scheduled to offer hands on instruction to participants, expert advice is available from trained personnel, and modeling tools are available to aid in development of action plans.

  13. How to scientifically assess a restoration project: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.; Freire, D. M.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Vazquez-Calvo, C.

    2012-04-01

    Commonly, it is said that there is lack of communication among scientists, conservators, restorers, project managers and architects. But sometimes this communication flows, and we can find enormous benefits from and for all the participating agents. This is the case we present in this work, in which technical agents in charge of the restoration of a building, asked for some scientific advice to perform the restoration of a heritage building. The results were successful and fantastic for both of them, in terms of one part asking for consultation and the other answering to the demands and resolving real problems. This is the case of a marvellous Renaissance building (Medinaceli Dukes palace, 15th-16th centuries) in the central area of Spain (Cogolludo, Guadalajara). Focused on the restoration project, we were asked for consultancy on how to solve matters like the assessment of the already fixed in project cleaning method for the stone façades, the efficacy and durability methods for some conservation products to be applied, the presence or not of a patina on the stone; the viability of using some restoration mortars, and the origin of some efflorescences that came out just after placed in the building a restoration rendering mortar. Responses to these matters were answered by performing tests both in the lab and on site in the building. The efficiency and effects on stone of the blasting cleaning method was assessed by first analysing the nature and thickness of the surface deposits to be removed (SEM-EDS analyses); secondly, roughness and colour measurements were performed, and thirdly, SEM-EDS analyses were carried out again to determine whether the cleaning method was able to remove part of the surface deposits, completely, or even part of the stone substrate. Some conservation products were tested on stone specimens, both their efficacy and their durability, concluding that it was better not to apply any of them. A patina was found on the stone façade under SEM

  14. Assessment of cognition in mild cognitive impairment: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Peter J.; Jackson, Colleen E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Albert, Marilyn S.; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer’s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come. PMID:21575877

  15. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  16. Assessment of abilities in basketball: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Derri, V; Kioumourtzoglou, E; Tzetzis, G

    1998-08-01

    Understanding the responding at two competitive levels of sports is prerequisite for successful identification and selection of the best athletes. The present study is a preliminary report about scores on 17 cognitive, perceptual, motor, and psychological measures of 13 elite Greek basketball athletes (national team), 20 to 22 years of age, and 15 children on a national basketball team and 14 to 15 years of age. Longitudinal studies must be conducted for the identification of the relationships among these measures and basketball performance and the development of a model for selection of athletes.

  17. Looking at the Mirror: A Self-Study of Science Teacher Educators' PCK for Teaching Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirdögen, Betül; Aydin, Sevgi; Tarkin, Aysegül

    2015-01-01

    In this self-study, we aimed to delve into how re-designing and teaching re-designed practicum course offered to pre-service teachers (PTs) enriched our, as science teacher educators, development of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for teaching science teachers. This self-study was conducted during a compulsory practicum course in which we…

  18. Assessing Student Engagement: HSSSE Pilot Study with Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    NAIS and the NAIS Commission on Accreditation recently launched a three-year pilot study on the use of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) among independent schools. HSSSE, administered by Indiana University, is a survey designed to investigate the attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of high school students about their work. This…

  19. Assessing Affective Constructs in Reading: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conradi, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Research investigating affective dimensions in reading has long been plagued by vaguely defined constructs and, consequently, by an array of potentially problematic instruments designed to measure them. This mixed-methods study investigated the relationship among three popular group-administered instruments intended to tap affective constructs in…

  20. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  1. Assessing Salivary Cortisol in Studies of Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Eve B.; Granger, Douglas A.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Laird, Brandi

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated the susceptibility of radioimmunoassays (RIA) for saliva cortisol to interference effects caused by oral stimulants (drink mix crystals) used to facilitate saliva collection in studies with children. Found that oral stimulants artificially inflated estimated cortisol concentrations, with the magnitude of the interference-effect…

  2. Objective Measurements in Assessing a Black Music Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Frederick J.

    1990-01-01

    A study of 80 eighth grade students investigated whether incorporation of a African-American music program would have special benefits for African-American students, music-experienced students, or high-musical-ability students. African-American students, taught material consistent with their heritage, performed better than whites. It is concluded…

  3. Assessing Student Attitudes toward Heterogeneous Grouping: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poppish, Susan; And Others

    Evidence suggests that tracking of students on the secondary level may not only be discriminatory, but also counterproductive to the personal, educational, and economic potential of all students. The English and Social Studies department of Oak Hill High School, in Wales, Maine, developed an intervention program concerning heterogeneous grouping…

  4. Preliminary Systems Design Study assessment report. Volume 8, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each concept. This volume of the Systems Design Study contain four Appendixes that were part of the study. Appendix A is an EG&G Idaho, Inc., report that represents a review and compilation of previous reports describing the wastes and quantities disposed in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains the process flowsheets considered in this study, but not selected for detailed analysis. Appendix C is a historical tabulation of radioactive waste incinerators. Appendix D lists Department of Energy facilities where cementation stabilization systems have been used.

  5. Genesis Solar Wind Collector Cleaning Assessment: 60366 Sample Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goreva, Y. S.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D.; Jurewicz, A. J.; Allton, J. H.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to recognize, localize, characterize and remove particle and thin film surface contamination, a small subset of Genesis mission collector fragments are being subjected to extensive study via various techniques [1-5]. Here we present preliminary results for sample 60336, a Czochralski silicon (Si-CZ) based wafer from the bulk array (B/C).

  6. An approach for integrating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment: The dibutyl phthalate case study

    SciTech Connect

    Euling, Susan Y.; Thompson, Chad M.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Benson, Robert

    2013-09-15

    An approach for evaluating and integrating genomic data in chemical risk assessment was developed based on the lessons learned from performing a case study for the chemical dibutyl phthalate. A case study prototype approach was first developed in accordance with EPA guidance and recommendations of the scientific community. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was selected for the case study exercise. The scoping phase of the dibutyl phthalate case study was conducted by considering the available DBP genomic data, taken together with the entire data set, for whether they could inform various risk assessment aspects, such as toxicodynamics, toxicokinetics, and dose–response. A description of weighing the available dibutyl phthalate data set for utility in risk assessment provides an example for considering genomic data for future chemical assessments. As a result of conducting the scoping process, two questions—Do the DBP toxicogenomic data inform 1) the mechanisms or modes of action?, and 2) the interspecies differences in toxicodynamics?—were selected to focus the case study exercise. Principles of the general approach include considering the genomics data in conjunction with all other data to determine their ability to inform the various qualitative and/or quantitative aspects of risk assessment, and evaluating the relationship between the available genomic and toxicity outcome data with respect to study comparability and phenotypic anchoring. Based on experience from the DBP case study, recommendations and a general approach for integrating genomic data in chemical assessment were developed to advance the broader effort to utilize 21st century data in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Performed DBP case study for integrating genomic data in risk assessment • Present approach for considering genomic data in chemical risk assessment • Present recommendations for use of genomic data in chemical risk assessment.

  7. The study of target damage assessment system based on image change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Fan; Feng, Xinxi

    2009-10-01

    Target Damage Assessment (TDA) system is an important component of the intelligent command and control system. The method of building TDA based on Image Change Detection can greatly improve the system efficiency and accuracy, thus get a fast and precise assessment results. This paper firstly analyzes the structure of TDA system. Then studies the key technology in this system. Finally, gives an evaluation criteria based on image change detection of the target damage assessment system.

  8. Teacher Factors and Perceived Assessment Practices Needs of Social Studies Teachers in Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekuri, Emmanuel Etta; Egbai, Julius Michael; Ita, Caroline Iserome

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated perceived assessment practices needs among social studies teachers in Cross River State, Nigeria, in relation to some teacher factors (attitude towards social studies, sex, teaching experience and educational qualification). Subjects who participated in this study were 297 social studies teachers (144 males and 153 females)…

  9. Assessing Statistical Change Indices in Selected Social Work Intervention Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Amanda D.; Huggins-Hoyt, Kimberly Y.; Pettus, Joelle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined how evaluation and intervention research (IR) studies assessed statistical change to ascertain effectiveness. Methods: Studies from six core social work journals (2009-2013) were reviewed (N = 1,380). Fifty-two evaluation (n= 27) and intervention (n = 25) studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies were…

  10. Epidemiological Assessments of Skin Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Qing; Cho, Eunyoung; Weinstock, Martin A.; Mashfiq, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHSs) to identifying epidemiological factors associated with multiple skin diseases, including skin cancer, psoriasis, and other inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. Methods. We carried out a narrative review of NHS articles published between 1976 and 2016. Results. The NHSs have identified environmental and lifestyle factors related to psoriasis, supporting obesity and smoking as psoriasis risk factors; associations between psoriasis and diabetes, myocardial infarction, and Crohn’s disease, supporting psoriasis as a systemic disorder; and associations of pigmentary traits, ultraviolet radiation, and lifestyle factors such as citrus consumption with risk of skin cancer. Genetic studies have identified novel genetic loci for skin pigmentation (e.g., IRF4, SLC24A4, NID1, and EDNRB) and skin cancer (e.g., TET2 and HERC2-OCA2). Work continues on highly prevalent but less studied skin conditions such as rosacea, acne, and atopic dermatitis. The NHS results have influenced public health policies on indoor tanning devices. Conclusions. The NHSs have provided invaluable resources on skin disease population science and contributed to the etiological understanding of multiple skin disorders. PMID:27459457

  11. A Comparative Study on Emerging Electric Vehicle Technology Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jonathan; Khowailed, Gannate; Blackburn, Julia; Sikes, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Numerous organizations have published reports in recent years that investigate the ever changing world of electric vehicle (EV) technologies and their potential effects on society. Specifically, projections have been made on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these vehicles and how they compare to conventional vehicles or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Similar projections have been made on the volumes of oil that these vehicles can displace by consuming large amounts of grid electricity instead of petroleum-based fuels. Finally, the projected rate that these new vehicle fleets will enter the market varies significantly among organizations. New ideas, technologies, and possibilities are introduced often, and projected values are likely to be refined as industry announcements continue to be made. As a result, over time, a multitude of projections for GHG emissions, oil displacement, and market penetration associated with various EV technologies has resulted in a wide range of possible future outcomes. This leaves the reader with two key questions: (1) Why does such a collective range in projected values exist in these reports? (2) What assumptions have the greatest impact on the outcomes presented in these reports? Since it is impractical for an average reader to review and interpret all the various vehicle technology reports published to date, Sentech Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted a comparative study to make these interpretations. The primary objective of this comparative study is to present a snapshot of all major projections made on GHG emissions, oil displacement, or market penetration rates of EV technologies. From the extensive data found in relevant publications, the key assumptions that drive each report's analysis are identified and 'apples-to-apples' comparisons between all major report conclusions are attempted. The general approach that was taken in this comparative study is comprised of six primary steps: (1

  12. FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, N

    2008-09-30

    In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch

  13. SEASAT economic assessment. Volume 7: Marine transporation case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The studies conducted of the potential use of SEASAT ocean condition data and resulting forecasts by dry cargo ships and tankers reached the following conclusions. The SEASAT ocean condition data and resulting forecasts could be usefully employed to route ships around storms, thereby resulting in reduced adverse weather damage, time loss and the related operating costs, and occasional catastrophic losses. These benefits are incremental benefits beyond those which present and future conventional ship routing procedures can supply. The values of the benefits are listed.

  14. Assessment of domestic water quality: case study, Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Samira Ibrahim; Jurdi, Mey

    2007-12-01

    In urban cities, the environmental services are the responsibility of the public sector, where piped water supply is the norm for urban household. Likewise, in Beirut City (capital of Lebanon) official water authorities are the main supplier of domestic water through a network of piping system that leaks in many areas. Beirut City and its suburbs are overpopulated since it is the residence of 1/3 of the Lebanese citizens. Thus, Beirut suffers deficiency in meeting its water demand. Water rationing, as a remedial action, is firmly established since four decades by the Lebanese Water Authorities. Consumers resorted then to private wells to supplement their domestic water needs. Consequently, household water quality is influenced by external factors relating to well water characteristics and internal factors depending on the types of the pipes of the distribution network and cross connections to sewer pipes. These factors could result in chemical and microbial contamination of drinking water. The objective of this study is to investigate domestic water quality variation in Beirut City emerging form the aforementioned factors. The presented work encircles a typical case study of Beirut City (Ras Beirut). Results showed deterioration pattern in domestic water quality. The predicted metal species and scales within the water pipes of distribution network depended on water pH, hardness, sulfate, chloride, and iron. The corrosion of iron pipes mainly depended on Mg hardness.

  15. Training Needs Assessment in the Botswana Public Service: A Case Study of Five State Sector Ministries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balisi, Shadreck

    2014-01-01

    Using qualitative methods, this study analysed the process of training needs assessment in the Botswana public service, with special focus on five state sector ministries. It is evident from the research findings that there is little and an unsystematic approach to the needs assessment prior to training. The research further revealed that the…

  16. Do Current State Standards and Assessments Reflect College Readiness?: A Case Study. Issues in College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2005

    2005-01-01

    Do state standards and assessments provide accurate, meaningful information about the college readiness levels of the state's high school students? To suggest an answer to this question, this study examined data from one state in which students in grades 8 and 10 take both a statewide assessment and the corresponding component of ACT's Educational…

  17. Changes and Possibilities: A Case Study of Nova Scotia Classroom Assessment Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zoost, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous writers have identified a different set of skills needed for employment in New Times, little analytic attention has been paid to how educational assessment policies contribute to envisioning such future citizens. This case study illustrates how Nova Scotia classroom assessment policy for Grades 7-9 English classes envisions young…

  18. The Relationship between Studying Music and Mathematics Performance on the New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Kristie L.

    2011-01-01

    On assessments such as Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) (Stigler & Hiebert, 1999) and Program for International Assessment (PISA) ("PISA 2006 Science Competencies for Tomorrow's World", 2007) students in the United States have not been performing as well in mathematics as students in other countries. In order for the…

  19. Assessment in Early Primary Education: An Empirical Study of Five School Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; Hughes, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Within the current standards-based framework of early primary education, teachers must negotiate the integration of assessment with traditional, developmental orientations to teaching and learning. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine teachers' approaches to early primary assessment within five different school contexts:…

  20. Effective Use of Peer Assessment in a Graduate Level Writing Assignment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Ashley; Jacobs, Shoshanah; Newton, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    At the undergraduate level, considerable evidence exists to support the use of peer assessment, but there is less research at the graduate level. In the present study, we investigated student perception of the peer assessment experience and the ability of graduate students to provide feedback that is comparable to the instructor and that is…

  1. Learning Outcomes Assessment: Extrapolating from Study Abroad to International Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Donald L.; Matthews, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    For international service-learning to thrive, it must document student learning outcomes that accrue to participants. The approaches to international service-learning assessment must be compelling to a variety of stakeholders. Recent large-scale projects in study abroad learning outcomes assessment--including the Georgia Learning Outcomes of…

  2. Measuring Classroom Assessment Practice Using Instructional Artifacts: A Validation Study of the QAS Notebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Jose Felipe; Borko, Hilda; Stecher, Brian; Luskin, Rebecca; Kloser, Matt

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a pilot validation study of the Quality Assessment in Science Notebook, a portfolio-like instrument for measuring teacher assessment practices in middle school science classrooms. A statewide sample of 42 teachers collected 2 notebooks during the school year, corresponding to science topics taught in the fall and spring.…

  3. An Internet-Based Telerehabilitation System for the Assessment of Motor Speech Disorders: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Anne J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.; Russell, Trevor G.; Cahill, Louise M.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Clark, Kathy M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This pilot study explored the feasibility and effectiveness of an Internet-based telerehabilitation application for the assessment of motor speech disorders in adults with acquired neurological impairment. Method: Using a counterbalanced, repeated measures research design, 2 speech-language pathologists assessed 19 speakers with…

  4. THE USE OF STEM CELLS FOR TOXICOLOGY STUDIES AND RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In general terms, toxicology studies are used in support of risk assessments of adverse health outcomes as a result of exposures to chemical and physical agents. In particular, toxicological data are used to provide information that aids in the assessment of disease outcomes at e...

  5. Designing and Developing a Programme-Focused Assessment Strategy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunton, James; Brown, Mark; Costello, Eamon; Walsh, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes the process that the Humanities Programme Team, in Dublin City University's Open Education Unit, has undertaken with regard to developing a systematic, programme-focused assessment strategy. It charts the development of an Assessment Matrix that facilitated the enhancement of programme coherence in the context of a…

  6. A Comparative Study of Adolescent Risk Assessment Instruments: Predictive and Incremental Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Jennifer L.; Schmidt, Fred; McKinnon, Lauren; Chattha, H. K.; Meyers, Joanna R.

    2008-01-01

    Promising new adolescent risk assessment tools are being incorporated into clinical practice but currently possess limited evidence of predictive validity regarding their individual and/or combined use in risk assessments. The current study compares three structured adolescent risk instruments, Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory…

  7. A Case Study of Teacher Learning in an Assessment for Learning Project in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan; Leung, Pamela Pui Wan; Chow, Alice Wai Kwan; Wong, Ping Man

    2010-01-01

    Changes in assessment practices in the direction of assessment for learning (AfL) can be a powerful force to enhance student learning. This article presents a case study of teacher learning in an AfL project in Hong Kong. In the Project, AfL strategies were adopted in Chinese Language and English Language classrooms at the junior secondary level.…

  8. The Portfolio Project: A Study of Assessment, Instruction, and Middle School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Terry

    This book is a study, in research-based narrative form, of one middle school's implementation of a new portfolio assessment plan in response to statewide policy changes in California. The book highlights the interactions of state, district, and local forces as teachers work to implement a portfolio-assessment plan that collects student work and…

  9. Add+VantageMR® Assessments: A Case Study of Teacher and Student Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briand, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    This case study analyzes the effect of the Add+VantageMRRTM (AVMR) program on a teacher's pedagogy and on her students' progress in mathematics. AVMR, a professional development program in early mathematics, trains teachers to assess their students' progress and apply those insights to their teaching pedagogy. The AVMR assessment uses a…

  10. Health Literacy Assessment of the STOFHLA: Paper versus Electronic Administration Continuation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesser, Amy K.; Keene Woods, Nikki; Wipperman, Jennifer; Wilson, Rachel; Dong, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Low health literacy is associated with poor health outcomes. Research is needed to understand the mechanisms and pathways of its effects. Computer-based assessment tools may improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness of health literacy research. The objective of this preliminary study was to assess if administration of the Short Test of Functional…

  11. A Generalizability Study of Salter Environmental Type Assessment Scores by Social Climate Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Daniel W.

    2003-01-01

    The Salter Environmental Type Assessment- Experimental Form B (SETA-Form B) was designed to be a commensurate environmental assessment for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. This study addressed the generalizability of the SETA-Form B scores provided by 800 college students across 4 environmental domains. Although the results were mostly positive,…

  12. Assessment of Visuospatial Neglect in Stroke Patients Using Virtual Reality: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Aznar, Miguel; de Kort, Alexander Cornelis; van de Vis, Wim; Veltink, Peter; van der Kooij, Herman

    2009-01-01

    One of the neuropsychological deficits that can result from a stroke is the neglect phenomenon. Neglect has traditionally been assessed with paper-and-pencil tasks, which are administered within the reaching space of a person. The purpose of this explorative study is to investigate whether it is possible to assess neglect in the extrapersonal…

  13. Synchronous Computer-Mediated Dynamic Assessment: A Case Study of L2 Spanish Past Narration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darhower, Mark Anthony

    2014-01-01

    In this study, dynamic assessment is employed to help understand the developmental processes of two university Spanish learners as they produce a series of past narrations in a synchronous computer mediated environment. The assessments were conducted in six weekly one-hour chat sessions about various scenes of a Spanish language film. The analysis…

  14. Validating the Student Developmental Task and Lifestyle Assessment: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Peter M.; Cooper, Diane L.

    2002-01-01

    Study assessed the effectiveness of the Student Developmental Task and Lifestyle Assessment (SDTLA) in measuring psychosocial changes from the freshman year through the senior year using longitudinal research design. Results provide evidence of validity for the SDTLA and demonstrate that as a measurement tool, the SDTLA is sensitive to changes…

  15. The Relational-Behavior Model: A Pilot Assessment Study for At-Risk College Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.; Perkins, Michele D.

    2007-01-01

    This pilot study examined the relational-behavior model (RBM) as an HIV/AIDS assessment tool for at-risk college populations. Based on this theory, a survey was constructed to assess the six areas associated with HIV/AIDS prevention: personal awareness, knowledge deficiency, relational skills, HIV/STD stigmatization, community awareness, and…

  16. BASINS and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case Study Guide to Potential Applications (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft report supports application of two recently developed water modeling tools, the BASINS and WEPP climate assessment tools. The report presents a series of short case studies designed to illustrate the capabilities of these tools for conducting scenario based assessments...

  17. Capacity Building as a Tool for Assessing Training and Development Activity: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Sripirabaa, B.

    2008-01-01

    In recognition of its increasing importance, many organizations make periodic assessments of their training and development activity. The objective of the present study was to extend the concept of capacity building to the assessment of training and development activity in an automobile component manufacturing organization, using a developed and…

  18. Faculty Engagement with Learning Outcomes Assessment: A Study of Public Two-Year Colleges in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was the assumption that faculty at the postsecondary level in the U. S. are not sufficiently or effectively engaged with student learning outcomes assessment (LOA) activities and/or practices. This issue emerged in two primary ways within the Scholarship of Assessment (SoA) body of literature: (1) as a…

  19. Implementing a Portfolio Assessment System for Chapter 1 Program Improvement: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, David; Trevisan, Mike

    This paper presents findings of a case study that documented the implementation of a portfolio assessment system in response to mandated program improvement and assessed its impact on teacher and student behaviors. The sample included elementary and middle school teachers and students from three Chapter 1 schools in a rural California school…

  20. Information Literacy and Communication Research: A Case Study on Interdisciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natalle, Elizabeth J.; Crowe, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    This report offers an interdisciplinary approach for conducting assessment on learning outcomes in undergraduate communication research skills where information literacy is embedded in the expected outcome. A Communication Studies department and the University Library piloted a two-year program to develop strategies for coordinated assessment that…

  1. Art in Social Studies Assessments: An Untapped Resource for Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirn, Susan; Libresco, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses a relatively new trend in assessment in American history education which offers interesting opportunities to inject the arts into mainstream education in ways that could provide a catalyst for engagement with social justice issues. Document-based questions (DBQs) on statewide social studies assessments afford art and social…

  2. Design and Study of the Instrument to Assess Students' Attitude toward Graphing Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reznichenko, Nataliya

    2007-01-01

    Assumptions: In mathematics learning, one of the considerations in the graphing calculator (GC) use is to understand students' attitude toward calculators. Rationale: This presentation describes design of an assessment instrument of students' attitude toward graphing calculator. Objectives: A pilot study that assessed the effectiveness of the…

  3. Effective Formative E-Assessment of Student Learning: A Study on a Statistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Paula; Pang, Marco Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    The process of formative assessment in universities has the potential to engage students in reflection and to take greater ownership of their learning. We report on a study involving 104 students taking a statistics course in a degree programme in rehabilitation science in Hong Kong. The assessment strategy was redesigned to include a weekly…

  4. Assessment of Sediment Measurements in Lake Michigan as a Case Study: Implications for Monitoring and Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Michigan, the sixth largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area, was utilized as a water body for assessment within a case study. Field data collected at 116 sediment sampling sites throughout the lake in an intensive monitoring effort were utilized for assessment ...

  5. A Case Study Objectively Assessing Female Physical Activity Levels within the National Curriculum for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Matthew; Daly-Smith, Andrew; Morley, David; McKenna, James

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the National Curriculum for Physical Education (NCPE) lesson themes and contexts on the profile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Fifteen, Year 9 Physical Education (PE) lessons were assessed within the lesson themes of Outwitting Opponents (OO) (delivered through field hockey…

  6. Values as a Bridge between Sustainability and Institutional Assessment: A Case Study from BOKU University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Maria Miguel; Hoover, Elona; Burford, Gemma; Buchebner, Julia; Lindenthal, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that values-focused assessment can provide a useful lens for integrating sustainability and institutional performance assessment in universities. Design/methodology/approach: This study applies a values elicitation methodology for indicator development, through thematic analysis of…

  7. Preliminary systems design study assessment report. Volume 7, Subsystem concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each. This volume contains the descriptions and other relevant information of the four subsystems required for most of the ex situ processing systems. This volume covers the metal decontamination and sizing subsystem, soils processing subsystem, low-level waste subsystem, and retrieval subsystem.

  8. Communications systems technology assessment study. Volume 2: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Khatri, R. K.; Kiesling, J. D.; Weiss, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The cost and technology characteristics are examined for providing special satellite services at UHF, 2.5 GHz, and 14/12 GHz. Considered are primarily health, educational, informational and emergency disaster type services. The total cost of each configuration including space segment, earth station, installation operation and maintenance was optimized to reduce the user's total annual cost and establish preferred equipment performance parameters. Technology expected to be available between now and 1985 is identified and comparisons made between selected alternatives. A key element of the study is a survey of earth station equipment updating past work in the field, providing new insight into technology, and evaluating production and test methods that can reduce costs in large production runs. Various satellite configurations were examined. The cost impact of rain attenuation at Ku-band was evaluated. The factors affecting the ultimate capacity achievable with the available orbital arc and available bandwidth were analyzed.

  9. Space station contamination study: Assessment of contaminant spectral brightness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The results presented show that spectral emissions which arise as a result of vehicle-ambient atmospheric interactions are significant and can become competitive with the natural zodiacal background up to altitudes as high as 400 km for the Vacuun Ultraviolet (VUV) and Visible Infrared Spectra (VIS) for the worst case conditions used. The empirical database on the induced environment of space vehicles is very sparse, and these results are based on a number of assumptions and cannot be regarded as definitive at the present time. Since the technique for doing calculations of this kind was developed in its preliminary form for the purpose of this study, a list of greatly improved estimates are provided of the contamination irradiances. Tasks which are considered most important in order to achieve a higher confidence level for the preliminary conclusions drawn are provided.

  10. Study of the Gastric Emptying in Humans: Biomagnetic Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, E.; Córdova, T.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Sosa, M.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2006-09-01

    Biomagnetic studies of the gastrointestinal system can be carried out in two ways. Recording the magnetic field produced by the myenteric nervous system or created by any oral contrast mean as magnetic tracers or markers. In the first case, a SQUID magnetometer is demanded while a fluxgate magnetometer is enough in the second case. In this work, a magnetic marker was ingested by 8 healthy volunteers, in three gastric volume conditions, to measure the luminal content volume effect in the gastric emptying and to perform the quantification of the peristaltic frequencies in gastric and duodenum tract segments. The average emptying times for low luminal content, relative to the emptying time when the intake was the highest, were 43.6 ± 15.6 % and 77.3 ± 47.0 %. These results show that the biomagnetic technique is a powerful modality to estimate the effects of the gastric volume in the gastric emptying and a way to record the peristaltic frequencies.

  11. Robot-assisted home hazard assessment for fall prevention: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Luger, Tana M; Coley, Heather L; Taylor, Benjamin B; Padir, Taskin; Ritchie, Christine S; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    We examined the feasibility of using a remotely manoeuverable robot to make home hazard assessments for fall prevention. We employed use-case simulations to compare robot assessments with in-person assessments. We screened the homes of nine elderly patients (aged 65 years or more) for fall risks using the HEROS screening assessment. We also assessed the participants' perspectives of the remotely-operated robot in a survey. The nine patients had a median Short Blessed Test score of 8 (interquartile range, IQR 2-20) and a median Life-Space Assessment score of 46 (IQR 27-75). Compared to the in-person assessment (mean = 4.2 hazards identified per participant), significantly more home hazards were perceived in the robot video assessment (mean = 7.0). Only two checklist items (adequate bedroom lighting and a clear path from bed to bathroom) had more than 60% agreement between in-person and robot video assessment. Participants were enthusiastic about the robot and did not think it violated their privacy. The study found little agreement between the in-person and robot video hazard assessments. However, it identified several research questions about how to best use remotely-operated robots.

  12. Robot-assisted home hazard assessment for fall prevention: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Luger, Tana M; Coley, Heather L; Taylor, Benjamin B; Padir, Taskin; Ritchie, Christine S; Houston, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    We examined the feasibility of using a remotely manoeuverable robot to make home hazard assessments for fall prevention. We employed use-case simulations to compare robot assessments with in-person assessments. We screened the homes of nine elderly patients (aged 65 years or more) for fall risks using the HEROS screening assessment. We also assessed the participants' perspectives of the remotely-operated robot in a survey. The nine patients had a median Short Blessed Test score of 8 (interquartile range, IQR 2-20) and a median Life-Space Assessment score of 46 (IQR 27-75). Compared to the in-person assessment (mean = 4.2 hazards identified per participant), significantly more home hazards were perceived in the robot video assessment (mean = 7.0). Only two checklist items (adequate bedroom lighting and a clear path from bed to bathroom) had more than 60% agreement between in-person and robot video assessment. Participants were enthusiastic about the robot and did not think it violated their privacy. The study found little agreement between the in-person and robot video hazard assessments. However, it identified several research questions about how to best use remotely-operated robots. PMID:24352900

  13. Radiation exposure assessment for portsmouth naval shipyard health studies.

    PubMed

    Daniels, R D; Taulbee, T D; Chen, P

    2004-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposures of 13,475 civilian nuclear shipyard workers were investigated as part of a retrospective mortality study. Estimates of annual, cumulative and collective doses were tabulated for future dose-response analysis. Record sets were assembled and amended through range checks, examination of distributions and inspection. Methods were developed to adjust for administrative overestimates and dose from previous employment. Uncertainties from doses below the recording threshold were estimated. Low-dose protracted radiation exposures from submarine overhaul and repair predominated. Cumulative doses are best approximated by a hybrid log-normal distribution with arithmetic mean and median values of 20.59 and 3.24 mSv, respectively. The distribution is highly skewed with more than half the workers having cumulative doses <10 mSv and >95% having doses <100 mSv. The maximum cumulative dose is estimated at 649.39 mSv from 15 person-years of exposure. The collective dose was 277.42 person-Sv with 96.8% attributed to employment at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. PMID:15266069

  14. Study on vulnerability assessment of cable-stayed bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. C.; Yan, D.

    2006-03-01

    A structure is vulnerable if any small damage will trigger disproportionately large consequences, even leads to a cascade of failure events and progressive collapse. The structural vulnerability performance depends upon the properties, locations of damaged components and the way they are connected to the rest of the structure. In this paper, progressive failure analysis method is utilized for the vulnerability study of cable-stayed bridges. The goal of it is to identify various failure scenarios initiated from the sudden damage of some bridge components. Based on the analysis results, assuming that the behaviors of damaged components can be modeled using plastic hinges, the hybrid element model is introduced to derived the modified stiffness matrix considering both of the effects of bending moments and shear forces. Furthermore, the vulnerability index in terms of the nodal stiffness degradation can be analytically quantified, which could be regarded as an index to determine the bridge failure consequences, so that the vulnerability distribution graph for the whole bridge can be sketched to evaluate the bridge performances from vulnerability viewpoints. This quantitative approach is applicable for structural evaluation under unforeseen attack and illustrated on a typical long-span cable-stayed bridge.

  15. Assessment of protein allergenicity: studies in brown norway rats.

    PubMed

    Knippels, Léon M J; Penninks, André H

    2002-05-01

    For the safety evaluation of genetically engineered crops, the potential allergenicity of the newly introduced protein(s) has become an important issue. There is, however, no universal and reliable test system for the evaluation of the allergic sensitizing ability of food proteins. Therefore, there is a growing interest in the development of animal models. This paper summarizes the results of a promising food allergy model developed in Brown Norway (BN) rats. The results demonstrate that BN rats can be sensitized via the relevant oral route of exposure. Daily gavage dosing of the animals with several food proteins, without the use of adjuvants, resulted in significant antigen-specific IgE responses. In addition, the profile of allergens recognized by the immune system of the BN rat, appeared comparable to the profile of allergens recognized by allergic humans. Besides oral sensitization, local and systemic immune-mediated effects, such as increased gastrointestinal permeability, decreased breathing frequency, and decreased blood pressure, could also be observed in the sensitized animals after an oral challenge. All together, these observations suggest that this BN rat model might provide a suitable animal model to study the allergenicity of food proteins in humans.

  16. Comparison Among Methods of Retinopathy Assessment (CAMRA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Martha E.; Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ranjani, Harish; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Olsen, Timothy W.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ward, Laura A.; Lynn, Michael J.; Hendrick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared smartphone fundus photography, nonmydriatic fundus photography, and 7-field mydriatic fundus photography for their abilities to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy (DR). Design This was a prospective, comparative study of 3 photography modalities. Participants Diabetic patients (n = 300) were recruited at the ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary diabetes care center in Chennai, India. Methods Patients underwent photography by all 3 modalities, and photographs were evaluated by 2 retina specialists. Main Outcome Measures The sensitivity and specificity in the detection of DR for both smartphone and nonmydriatic photography were determined by comparison with the standard method, 7-field mydriatic fundus photography. Results The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography, compared with 7-field mydriatic fundus photography, for the detection of any DR were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43–56) and 94% (95% CI, 92–97), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 81% (95% CI, 75–86) and 94% (95% CI, 92–96%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography for the detection of vision-threatening DR were 59% (95% CI, 46–72) and 100% (95% CI, 99–100), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 54% (95% CI, 40–67) and 99% (95% CI, 98–100), respectively. Conclusions Smartphone and nonmydriatic fundus photography are each able to detect DR and sight-threatening disease. However, the nonmydriatic camera is more sensitive at detecting DR than the smartphone. At this time, the benefits of the smartphone (connectivity, portability, and reduced cost) are not offset by the lack of sufficient sensitivity for detection of DR in most clinical circumstances. PMID:26189190

  17. A Study on Hazard Assessment of Employees in New Buildings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the physical and psychological health effects of air pollutants from new building materials, 100 employees who worked in new buildings were given a general health questionnaire, and the prevalence of their subjective complaints was measured. The collected data were classified according to age, gender, smoking status, profession, working time, sleep time, life style, and length of employment. The results obtained were summarized as follows: The THI lie scale scores were significantly higher among the older respondents. Compared to males, females showed a significantly higher level in the depression itemas well asa tendency toward high ratios of physical and psychological complaints. The smoking group showed higher scores regarding health complaints related to most physical and psychological items. Smokers showed significantly increased respiratory organ complaints compared to nonsmokers. Those with a profession showed significantly higher level of nervousness. The group of those working 7 to 10 hours group showed higher rates of complaints in the multiple subjective symptoms and mouth/anus items than the group working less than 2 hours. Those living an irregular life showed a tendency toward higher rates of complaints for most physical and psychological subjective factors. Those who were satisfied with their environments showed significantly lower scores in the mouth/anus, impulsiveness, mental irritability, depression, and nervousness items. In summary, this study shows that the health complaint scores regarding physical and psychological symptoms tended to be higher among the unsatisfied group, the irregular life group, the group who worked long hours, the elderly, smokers, and females. These results can be used to improve the psychosomatic health status and working environments of employees working in new buildings. PMID:24278609

  18. Fish Health Study Ashtabula River Natural Resource Damage Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, V.S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Baumann, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Ashtabula River is located in northeast Ohio, flowing into Lake Erie at Ashtabula, Ohio. Tributaries include Fields Brook, Hubbard Run, Strong Brook, and Ashtabula Creek. The bottom sediments, bank soils and biota of Fields Brook have been severely contaminated by unregulated discharges of hazardous substances. Hazardous substances have migrated downstream from Fields Brook to the Ashtabula River and Harbor, contaminating bottom sediments, fish and wildlife. There are presently more than 1,000,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment in the Ashtabula River and Harbor, much of which originated from Fields Brook. Contaminants include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated benzenes, chlorinated ethenes, hexachlorobutadiene, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), other organic chemicals, heavy metals and low level radionuclides. A Preassessment Screen, using existing data, was completed for the Ashtabula River and Harbor on May 18, 2001. Among the findings was that the fish community at Ashtabula contained approximately 45 percent fewer species and 52 percent fewer individuals than the Ohio EPA designated reference area, Conneaut Creek. The Ashtabula River and Conneaut Creek are similar in many respects, with the exception of the presence of contamination at Ashtabula. The difference in the fish communities between the two sites is believed to be at least partially a result of the hazardous substance contamination at Ashtabula. In order to investigate this matter further, the Trustees elected to conduct a study of the status and health of the aquatic biological communities of the Ashtabula River and Conneaut Creek in 2002-2004. The following document contains brief method descriptions (more detail available in attached Appendix A) and a summary of the data used to evaluate the health status of brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) collected from the above sites.

  19. Assessment of Social Media Utilization and Study Habit of Students of Tertiary Institutions in Katsina State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olutola, Adekunle Thomas; Olatoye, Olufunke Omotoke; Olatoye, Rafiu Ademola

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated assessment of social media utilization and study habits of students of tertiary institutions in Katsina State. The descriptive survey design was adopted for this study. Three hundred and eighty-one (381) students' of tertiary institutions in Katsina State were randomly selected for the study. Researchers'-designed…

  20. Using Formative Assessments to Improve Student Learning Outcomes: A Study of the Different Types of Formative Assessments Teachers Use to Drive Instruction and Their Effects on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzina, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the difference between summative and formative assessments is still unclear for many teachers and principals as well as the effects formative assessments have on student learning outcomes. This quantitative study was conducted to explicitly explore formative assessments as a means to improve student learning outcomes, while examining…

  1. Assessing Gains in Language Proficiency, Cross-Cultural Competence, and Regional Awareness during Study Abroad: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Siska, Peter; Wolfel, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    As a critical part of the internationalization movement in college curricula, study abroad initiatives are becoming more and more popular and the need to assess their outcomes more and more evident. While numerous studies have investigated the language gain associated with study abroad, researchers are also beginning to look at potential gains in…

  2. Prospective Assessment of Cannabis Withdrawal in Adolescents with Cannabis Dependence: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milin, Robert; Manion, Ian; Dare, Glenda; Walker, Selena

    2008-01-01

    A study to identify and assess the withdrawal symptoms in adolescents afflicted with cannabis dependence is conducted. Results conclude that withdrawal symptoms of cannabis were present in adolescents seeking treatment for this substance abuse.

  3. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHOD IN AN EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDY OF TRIHALOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND SPONTANEOUS ABORTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trihalomethanes are common contaminants of chlorinated drinking water. Studies of their health effects have been hampered by exposure misclassification, due in part to limitations inherent in using utility sampling records. We used two exposure assessment methods, one based on ut...

  4. Hegemonic Masculinity in Sport Education: Case Studies of Experienced In-Service Teachers with Teaching Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, YuChun; Curtner-Smith, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Research has revealed that while pre-service teachers (PTs) with coaching orientations reinforce sexism and masculine bias, those with teaching orientations combat and reject it. The purpose of this study was to examine four sport education (SE) seasons taught by two experienced in-service teachers for the presence or absence of sexism and…

  5. USDOE study: Human health and ecological risk assessment for produced water discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.; Hamilton, L.D.

    1994-12-31

    Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain high concentrations of radionuclides, organics and heavy metals. There are concerns about potential human health and ecological impacts from the discharge of these contaminants to the Gulf of Mexico. Data collected in the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) field study are being used in a series of human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will support scientifically-based regulation and risk management. This presentation: summarizes risk assessments performed for produced water discharges; describes how uncertainties in these assessments are guiding data collection efforts in the USDOE field study; and outlines ongoing risk assessment studies. In these studies, risk assessment is treated as an iterative process. An initial screening-level assessment is performed to identify important contaminants, transport and exposure pathways, and parameters. These intermediate results are used to guide data collection efforts and refinements to the analysis. At this stage in the analysis, risk is described in terms of probabilities; the uncertainties in each measured or modeled parameter are considered explicitly.

  6. Measuring suicidality using the personality assessment inventory: a convergent validity study with federal inmates.

    PubMed

    Patry, Marc W; Magaletta, Philip R

    2015-02-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Personality Assessment Inventory in correctional contexts, only two studies to date have specifically focused on suicide ideation. This article examines the convergent validity of the Suicide Ideation Scale and the Suicide Potential Index on the Personality Assessment Inventory in a large, nontreatment sample of male and female federal inmates (N = 1,120). The data indicated robust validity support for both the Suicide Ideation Scale and Suicide Potential Index, which were each correlated with a broad group of validity indices representing multiple assessment modalities. Recommendations for future research to build upon these findings through replication and extension are made.

  7. Assessing Implicit Cognition Among Patients Lost to Follow-up for HIV Care: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Eric; Lyons, Thomas; Wolfe, Brenda; Rolfsen, Norma; Williams, Maryanne; Rucker, Monique; Glick, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While a growing body of research indicates that implicit cognitive processes play an important role in a range of health behaviors, the assessment of these impulsive, associative mental processes among patients living with HIV has received little attention. This preliminary study explored how multidimensional scaling (MDS) could be used to assess implicit cognitive processes among patients lost to follow-up for HIV care and develop interventions to improve their engagement. Method: The sample consisted of 33 patients who were identified as lost to follow up for HIV care at two urban hospitals. Participants were randomly assigned to either the MDS assessment program or control group. All participants underwent measures designed to gauge behavioral change intentions and treatment motivation. Assessment group participants were interviewed to determine their reactions to the assessment program. Results: The MDS assessment program identified cognitive processes and their relationship to treatment-related behaviors among assessment group participants. Assessment group participants reported significantly greater behavior change intentions than those in the control group (p =.02; Cohen’s d = 0.84). Conclusion: MDS shows promise as a tool to identify implicit cognitive processes related to treatment-related behaviors. Assessments based on MDS could serve as the basis for patient-centered clinical interventions designed to improve treatment adherence and HIV care engagement in general. PMID:27347274

  8. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyun; Mason, Steve; Hypnar, Andrew; Bennett, Austin

    2016-03-01

    This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009). Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926) were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students' motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students' demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson. Key pointsCATCH PE is an empirically-evidenced quality PE curricular that is conducive to improving students' manipulative skill competency.Boys significantly outperformed than girls in all three manipulative skills.Girls need to improve motor skill competency in striking skill. PE Metrics are feasible assessment rubrics that can be easily used by trained physical

  9. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiyun; Mason, Steve; Hypnar, Andrew; Bennett, Austin

    2016-01-01

    This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009). Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926) were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students’ motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students’ demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson. Key points CATCH PE is an empirically-evidenced quality PE curricular that is conducive to improving students’ manipulative skill competency. Boys significantly outperformed than girls in all three manipulative skills. Girls need to improve motor skill competency in striking skill. PE Metrics are feasible assessment rubrics that can be easily used by trained

  10. Establishing assessment criteria for clinical reasoning in orthopedic manual physical therapy: a consensus-building study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Euson; Woods, Nicole; Dubrowski, Adam; Hodges, Brian; Carnahan, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Clinical reasoning (CR) represents one of the core components of clinical competence in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (OMPT). While education standards have been developed to guide curricular design, assessment of CR has not yet been standardized. Without theory-informed and rigorously developed measures, the certification of OMPTs lacks credibility and is less defensible. The purpose of this study was to use a theory-informed approach to generate assessment criteria for developing new assessment tools to evaluate CR in OMPT. Methods: A list of assessment criteria was generated based on international education standards and multiple theoretical perspectives. A modified Delphi method was used to gain expert consensus on the importance of these assessment criteria for the assessment of CR in OMPT. The OMPTs from 22 countries with experience in assessing CR were invited to participate in three rounds of online questionnaires to rate their level of agreement with these criteria. Responses were tabulated to analyze degree of consensus and internal consistency. Results: Representatives from almost half of the OMPT member organizations (MO) participated in three rounds of the Delphi. High levels of agreement were found among respondents regarding the importance and feasibility of most assessment criteria. There was high internal consistency among items within the proposed item subgroupings. Discussion: A list of assessment criteria has been established that will serve as a framework for developing new assessment tools for CR assessment in OMPT. These criteria will be important for guiding the design of certification processes in OMPT as well as other episodes of CR assessment throughout OMPT training. PMID:26309379

  11. Adherence to Warfarin Assessed by Electronic Pill Caps, Clinician Assessment, and Patient Reports: Results from the IN-RANGE Study

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Catherine S.; Chen, Zhen; Price, Maureen; Gross, Robert; Metlay, Joshua P.; Christie, Jason D.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Newcomb, Craig W.; Samaha, Frederick F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Patient adherence to warfarin may influence anticoagulation control; yet, adherence among warfarin users has not been rigorously studied. Objective Our goal was to quantify warfarin adherence over time and to compare electronic medication event monitoring systems (MEMS) cap measurements with both self-report and clinician assessment of patient adherence. Design We performed a prospective cohort study of warfarin users at 3 Pennsylvania-based anticoagulation clinics and assessed pill-taking behaviors using MEMS caps, patient reports, and clinician assessments. Results Among 145 participants, the mean percent of days of nonadherence by MEMS was 21.8% (standard deviation±21.1%). Participants were about 6 times more likely to take too few pills than to take extra pills (18.8 vs. 3.3%). Adherence changed over time, initially worsening over the first 6 months of monitoring, which was followed by improvement beyond 6 months. Although clinicians were statistically better than chance at correctly labeling a participant’s adherence (odds ratio = 2.05, p = 0.015), their estimates often did not correlate with MEMS-cap data; clinicians judged participants to be “adherent” at 82.8% of visits that were categorized as moderately nonadherent using MEMS-cap data (≥20% nonadherence days). Similarly, at visits when participants were moderately nonadherent by MEMS, they self-reported perfect adherence 77.9% of the time. Conclusions These results suggest that patients may benefit from adherence counseling even when they claim to be taking their warfarin or the clinician feels they are doing so, particularly several months into their course of therapy. PMID:17587092

  12. Physical activity assessment in American Indian schoolchildren in the Pathways study.

    PubMed

    Going, S B; Levin, S; Harrell, J; Stewart, D; Kushi, L; Cornell, C E; Hunsberger, S; Corbin, C; Sallis, J

    1999-04-01

    The objective of the Pathways physical activity feasibility study was to develop methods for comparing type and amount of activity between intervention and control schools participating in a school-based obesity prevention program. Two methods proved feasible: 1) a specially designed 24-h physical activity recall questionnaire for assessing the frequency and type of activities and 2) use of a triaxial accelerometer for assessing amount of activity. Results from pilot studies supporting the use of these methods are described. Analyses of activity during different segments of the day showed that children were most active after school. The activities reported most frequently (e.g., basketball and mixed walking and running) were also the ones found to be most popular in the study population on the basis of formative assessment surveys. Both the physical activity recall questionnaire and the triaxial accelerometer methods will be used to assess the effects of the full-scale intervention on physical activity.

  13. The clinical impact of perfusion scintigraphy with dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtmann, N.; Dae, M.; Lanzer, P.; Sajardo, L.; Faulkner, D.; Botvinick, E.

    1984-01-01

    In order to assess their clinical impact, the authors analyzed perfusion scintigrams (PS) with dipyridamole (D) and the resultant clinical management in 41 consecutive patients (PTS). Population mean age was 67, with 22 males and represented 14% of those having PS. Fifteen PTS had rest chest pain of unknown cause and 26 PTS had pain typical or suggestive of angina but couldn't undergo dynamic stress due to claudication, arthritis, amputation, stroke, recent surgery or other disability. Four PTS were studies for surgical clearance, 3 following angiography to assess coronary pathophysiology and 9 had prior negative or equivocal stress PS at suboptimal levels. Among 18 PTS with reversible scintigraphic abnormalities, 10 underwent subsequent catheterization, with successful CABG in 7, PTCA in 1, aggressive medical treatment of ischemia in 11, and 2 had noncoronary surgery delayed. One PT with associated extensive fixed abnormalities underwent CABG and died late in heart failure. Among 23 PTS without significant scintigraphic reversibility, 8 with normal studies were discharged, 3 went on to uncomplicated noncardiac surgery and 11 PTS, 9 with dilated cardiomyopathy, were managed without therapeutic change. D infusion was uncomplicated and related findings on PS correlated well with coronary angiography, where available in 19 of 20 PTS. PS with D: 1) is safe; 2) correlates closely with coronary anatomy; and 3) adds unique, important pathophysiologic information to clinical evaluation and impacts strongly on the management of a large number of PTS with known or suspected coronary disease.

  14. Combining direct and proxy assessments to reduce attrition bias in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Osypuk, Theresa L; White, Kellee; Mujahid, Mahasin; Maria Glymour, M

    2013-01-01

    Retaining severely impaired individuals poses a major challenge in longitudinal studies of determinants of dementia or memory decline. In the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), participants complete direct memory assessments biennially until they are too impaired to complete the interview. Thereafter, proxy informants, typically spouses, assess the subject's memory and cognitive function using standardized instruments. Because there is no common scale for direct memory assessments and proxy assessments, proxy reports are often excluded from longitudinal analyses. The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) implemented full neuropsychological examinations on a subsample (n=856) of HRS participants, including respondents with direct or proxy cognitive assessments in the prior HRS core interview. Using data from the ADAMS, we developed an approach to estimating a dementia probability and a composite memory score on the basis of either proxy or direct assessments in HRS core interviews. The prediction model achieved a c-statistic of 94.3% for DSM diagnosed dementia in the ADAMS sample. We applied these scoring rules to HRS core sample respondents born 1923 or earlier (n=5483) for biennial assessments from 1995 to 2008. Compared with estimates excluding proxy respondents in the full cohort, incorporating information from proxy respondents increased estimated prevalence of dementia by 12 percentage points in 2008 (average age=89) and suggested accelerated rates of memory decline over time.

  15. An Assessment of the Study Habits and Skills of Students in Postsecondary Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a study conducted at Wilson County Technical College, North Carolina, to assess the study habits and skills of 74 students enrolled in basic science courses in 1987. Student responses to the Study Behavior Inventory-Form D suggest that students had difficulty with time management and keeping up-to-date with assignments. (DMM)

  16. Study Quality Assessment in Systematic Reviews of Research on Intervention Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Kathleen; Littell, Julia H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study is to advance an approach to the assessment of the quality of studies considered for inclusion in systematic reviews of the effects of social-care interventions. Method: To achieve this objective, quality is defined in relation to the widely accepted validity typology; prominent approaches to study quality…

  17. Using Common Assessments to Inform Social Studies Instruction and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nicholas John

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the problem of inconsistent achievement in social studies on the Delaware State Testing Program (DSTP) at a high school in Delaware. Since 2002, the district began an initiative to create common assessments for all core content areas that were meant to align with the state standards. In social studies, that initiative was the…

  18. An Assessment of Treatment Integrity in Behavioral Intervention Studies Conducted with Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, John J.; Mayton, Michael R.; Carter, Stacy L.; Chitiyo, Morgan; Menendez, Anthony L.; Huang, Ann

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which behavioral intervention studies conducted with persons with mental retardation operationally defined the independent variables and evaluated and reported measures of treatment integrity. The study expands the previous work in this area reported by Gresham, Gansle, and Noell (1993) and…

  19. Using Automated Assessment Feedback to Enhance the Quality of Student Learning in Universities: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggam, John

    There are many different ways of providing university students with feedback on their assessment performance, ranging from written checklists and handwritten commentaries to individual verbal feedback. Regardless of whether the feedback is summative or formative in nature, it is widely recognized that providing consistent, meaningful written feedback to students on assessment performance is not a simple task, particularly where a module is delivered by a team of staff. Typical student complaints about such feedback include: inconsistency of comment between lecturers; illegible handwriting; difficulty in relating feedback to assessment criteria; and vague remarks. For staff themselves, there is the problem that written comments, to be of any benefit to students, are immensely time-consuming. This paper illustrates, through a case study, the enormous benefits of Automated Assessment Feedback for staff and students. A clear strategy on how to develop an automated assessment feedback system, using the simplest of technologies, is provided.

  20. Written reflection and drawing as assessment: A case study of a Navajo elementary science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Madeline

    The purpose of the study was to assess if science learning could be determined by using written reflection and drawings in a science classroom of 5 th-grade Navajo students. The significance of this study was the understanding of the culture, assessments and learning of Navajo students. I studied a classroom on the Navajo reservation wherein 26 members of the class took part in science instruction complemented by using writing and drawing which were used as their assessments. The perceptions of the 8 students who were interviewed represent the case. In the study I profiled the 8 participants. Their culture, language, and views on assessment and learning were documented by their words. Their responses described their learning experiences. Assessments were seen as frustrating and limiting expression of what was known and damaging when not contributed to learning. Students explained that drawing enabled them to remember along with provoking vocabulary development. Student cultural knowledge was documented as valuable background experience contributing to learning within the classroom. Students viewed science as needing to be useful in their culture. Finally, they were also very candid that their teachers must first get to know them for meaningful learning to begin. Learning for students was reinforced through writing and drawing the lesson's activities. Further concept development was assisted utilizing metacognition and creative problem solving techniques of elaboration and fluency applied to the writing and drawings. Based on the findings of this study, recommendations were made for use of holistic means of assessing Navajo children in science where preferred learning styles along with cultural background need to be included in assessment protocols. Using new and better assessment techniques can directly impact how students document their learning as well as reveal how they acquire new knowledge.

  1. From kidnapping to corruption: some trials and tribulations in the implementation of rapid assessment studies.

    PubMed

    Fazey

    2000-03-01

    In between the description of the methodology and the discussion of assessment results, lies a crucial area, namely that of implementation. If assessment methods cannot be implemented, there will be no assessment report, and no recommendations for intervention or policy development. Implementation is a critical, yet neglected, area of drug policy delivery. This paper describes some of the problems associated with the implementation of rapid assessment studies commissioned by the United Nations International Drug Control Programme (UNDCP) over the last 5 years. Drawing on the author's experience of commissioning rapid assessments on the extent and nature of drug use in a variety of international settings and political contexts, the paper draws eight main lessons for rapid assessments commissioned within the context of international development programmes. These are: (1) the need to get high level political support; (2) the need to employ competent social scientists to run the assessment; (3) the need to define exactly the object of the assessment; (4) the necessity of spelling out the methodology and the time scale; (5) the careful establishment of the financial framework; (6) the importance of cultivating contacts; (7) the necessity of actually getting a report; and (8) the danger of accepting an unseen or unread consultant's report as the basis for programme implementation. The paper emphasises the critical importance of planning prior to implementation and flexibility during it.

  2. The Biomonitoring, Environmental Epidemiology, and Short-Lived Chemicals (BEES-C) Instrument for Assessing Study Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental epidemiology studies can be an effective means to assess impacts on human health from exposure to environmental stressors. Exposure scenarios are often extremely complex and proper assessment is critical for interpreting epidemiological study results. Biomarkers are...

  3. Assessing the quality of studies on the diagnostic accuracy of tumor markers

    PubMed Central

    Goebell, Peter J.; Kamat, Ashish M.; Sylvester, Richard J.; Black, Peter; Droller, Michael; Godoy, Guilherme; Hudson, M’Liss A.; Junker, Kerstin; Kassouf, Wassim; Knowles, Margaret A.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Seiler, Roland; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With rapidly increasing numbers of publications, assessments of study quality, reporting quality, and classification of studies according to their level of evidence or developmental stage have become key issues in weighing the relevance of new information reported. Diagnostic marker studies are often criticized for yielding highly discrepant and even controversial results. Much of this discrepancy has been attributed to differences in study quality. So far, numerous tools for measuring study quality have been developed, but few of them have been used for systematic reviews and meta-analysis. This is owing to the fact that most tools are complicated and time consuming, suffer from poor reproducibility, and do not permit quantitative scoring. Methods The International Bladder Cancer Network (IBCN) has adopted this problem and has systematically identified the more commonly used tools developed since 2000. Results In this review, those tools addressing study quality (Quality Assessment of Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale), reporting quality (Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy), and developmental stage (IBCN phases) of studies on diagnostic markers in bladder cancer are introduced and critically analyzed. Based upon this, the IBCN has launched an initiative to assess and validate existing tools with emphasis on diagnostic bladder cancer studies. Conclusions The development of simple and reproducible tools for quality assessment of diagnostic marker studies permitting quantitative scoring is suggested. PMID:25159014

  4. Mapping of Assessment Procedures in Schools: A Study of Assessment Procedures in Three Subject Areas at Year 12 Level in Queensland State Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBryde, Bruce; Lamont, Ann

    In the light of recommendations for future directions in secondary education made by the Review of School Based Assessment in Queensland Secondary Schools, this study aimed to systematically map current internal assessment practices for grade 12, and to determine the degree of satisfaction in schools with these practices. The study was performed…

  5. Revisiting the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Studies of an Aging Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; Malik, S.N.M.; Simonen, F.A.

    1999-08-01

    The Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were a series of studies performed in the early-mid 1980s as part of an NRC-organized comprehensive research project to confirm the technical bases for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) rule, and to aid in the development of guidance for licensee plant-specific analyses. The research project consisted of PTS pilot analyses for three PWRs: Oconee Unit 1, designed by Babcock and Wilcox; Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, designed by Combustion Engineering; and H.B. Robinson Unit 2, designed by Westinghouse. The primary objectives of the IPTS studies were (1) to provide for each of the three plants an estimate of the probability of a crack propagating through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) due to PTS; (2) to determine the dominant overcooling sequences, plant features, and operator actions and the uncertainty in the plant risk due to PTS; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective actions. The NRC is currently evaluating the possibility of revising current PTS regulatory guidance. Technical bases must be developed to support any revisions. In the years since the results of IPTS studies were published, the fracture mechanics model, the embrittlement database, embrittlement correlation, inputs for flaw distributions, and the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) computer code have been refined. An ongoing effort is underway to determine the impact of these fracture-technology refinements on the conditional probabilities of vessel failure calculated in the IPTS Studies. This paper discusses the results of these analyses performed for one of these plants.

  6. An approach to assessment of endocrine disruption in the National Children's Study.

    PubMed Central

    Longnecker, Matthew P; Bellinger, David C; Crews, David; Eskenazi, Brenda; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Woodruff, Tracey J; Susser, Ezra S

    2003-01-01

    In this article we consider the importance of assessing endocrine disruption in a large new cohort that has been proposed, the National Children's Study (NCS). We briefly review evidence that endocrine disruption is a potentially important hypothesis for human studies and weigh the need to assess endocrine disruption in the NCS. We note the salient features of earlier, similar cohort studies that serve as reference points for the design of the NCS. Finally, we discuss features of the NCS that would allow or enhance assessment of endocrine disruption, even if endocrine disruption were not a primary hypothesis motivating the study. At this time, the evidence supporting endocrine disruption in humans with background-level exposures is not strong. Thus, a compelling rationale for the NCS will probably need to be based on core hypotheses that focus on other issues. Nonetheless, if properly designed, the NCS could serve as an excellent resource for investigating future hypotheses regarding endocrine disruption. PMID:14527852

  7. E-assessment of prior learning: a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Methods Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Results Of the 157 staff with no formal education, 87 began the practical and/or theoretical assessments, and 63 completed both assessments. Several of the staff passed the practical assessments, except the morning hygiene assessment, where several failed. Other areas for staff development, i.e. where several failed (>50%), were the theoretical assessment of the learning objectives: Health, Oral care, Ergonomics, hygiene, esthetic, environmental, Rehabilitation, Assistive technology, Basic healthcare and Laws and organization. None of the staff passed all assessments. Number of years working in elderly care and staff age were not statistically significantly related to the total score of grades on the various learning objectives. Conclusion The interactive assessments were useful in assessing staff members’ practical and theoretical knowledge, skills, and abilities and in identifying areas in need of development. It is important that personnel who lack formal qualifications be clearly identified and given a chance to develop their competence through training, both theoretical and practical. The interactive e-assessment approach analyzed in the present pilot study could serve as a starting point. PMID:24742168

  8. Clinical audit project in undergraduate medical education curriculum: an assessment validation study

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Carole; Mak, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the merit of the Clinical Audit Project (CAP) in an assessment program for undergraduate medical education using a systematic assessment validation framework. Methods A cross-sectional assessment validation study at one medical school in Western Australia, with retrospective qualitative analysis of the design, development, implementation and outcomes of the CAP, and quantitative analysis of assessment data from four cohorts of medical students (2011- 2014). Results The CAP is fit for purpose with clear external and internal alignment to expected medical graduate outcomes.  Substantive validity in students’ and examiners’ response processes is ensured through relevant methodological and cognitive processes. Multiple validity features are built-in to the design, planning and implementation process of the CAP.  There is evidence of high internal consistency reliability of CAP scores (Cronbach’s alpha > 0.8) and inter-examiner consistency reliability (intra-class correlation>0.7). Aggregation of CAP scores is psychometrically sound, with high internal consistency indicating one common underlying construct.  Significant but moderate correlations between CAP scores and scores from other assessment modalities indicate validity of extrapolation and alignment between the CAP and the overall target outcomes of medical graduates.  Standard setting, score equating and fair decision rules justify consequential validity of CAP scores interpretation and use. Conclusions This study provides evidence demonstrating that the CAP is a meaningful and valid component in the assessment program. This systematic framework of validation can be adopted for all levels of assessment in medical education, from individual assessment modality, to the validation of an assessment program as a whole.  PMID:27716612

  9. State-Based Case Studies of Assessment Initiatives in Undergraduate Education: Chronology of Critical Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Carol M.; Ewell, Peter T.

    The Education Commission of the States (ECS) together with the American Association for Higher Education recently conducted five case studies of state-based approaches to assessment in undergraduate education in Colorado, Missouri, New Jersey, South Dakota, and Virginia. The case studies, in turn, are part of the Missouri Governor John Ashcroft's…

  10. Descriptive Study of State Assessment Policies for Accommodating English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, Lynn Shafer; Rivera, Charlene; Acosta, Barbara D.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) conducted a study of the U.S. Department of Education's (ED)'s efforts to support states in meeting the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) (Ashby, 2006). The study found the requirement to include all students, including English language learners (ELLs) in standards and assessment systems, a…

  11. Assessing Honor Code Effectiveness: Results of a Multipronged Approach from a Five Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sledge, Sally; Pringle, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study at a small public university to assess student, faculty and alumni perceptions of academic integrity and business ethics. The phases of the research are detailed for application or replication by other institutions of higher education. The study involves anonymous surveys and academic integrity-based…

  12. Understanding Perspectives of English Language Learning and Assessment Practices: A Mixed-Method Embedded Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Angela Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study contributed to the continuing dialogue of quality language programs and student outcomes for classroom language learning and assessments within the standardized testing era to language learning programs within Colombia. The particular purpose of this one-phase, embedded, mixed-method study examined students' and teachers' beliefs about…

  13. Revision Vodcast Influence on Assessment Scores and Study Processes in Secondary Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marencik, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-experimental switching replications design with matched participants was employed to determine the influence of revision vodcasts, or video podcasts, on students' assessment scores and study processes in secondary physics. This study satisfied a need for quantitative results in the area of vodcast influence on students' learning…

  14. DOSIMETRY AND REPRODUCTIVE/DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY DESIGN AND INTERPRETATION FOR RISK OR SAFETY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly reproductive and developmental toxicity studies are utilized in assessing the potential for adverse affects in pregnant women, nursing infants, and children. These studies largely have been utilized based upon the dose to the mother due to the complexity of describin...

  15. Teachers' Classroom Assessment Practices and Fourth-Graders' Reading Literacy Achievements: An International Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Shiqi; Johnson, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    This study, through multilevel analyses of the data of four English-speaking nations (i.e., Canada, England, New Zealand and the United States) from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2001 database, investigated the relationship between teachers' uses of various types of classroom assessments and their fourth-graders'…

  16. Using a University-Wide Syllabus Study to Examine Learning Outcomes and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham-McLain, Laurel

    2011-01-01

    This cross-disciplinary study examined syllabus quality (n = 280) and the connection of learning outcomes to the Dimensions of a Duquesne Education for two purposes: informing instructional development and writing an accreditation self-study. Three researchers coded the syllabi for learning outcomes, assessment, and the presence of these…

  17. A Pilot Validation Study of the Early Assessment Program English Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether results on the English Early Assessment Program (EAP) examination predict college-level English success. Previous research indicates a relationship between EAP college-prepared status and academic achievement. The present study is unique, in that student-level community college English grades were…

  18. Patterns of attention and experiences of post-traumatic stress symptoms following childbirth: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Dale-Hewitt, Vanessa; Slade, Pauline; Wright, Ingram; Cree, Michelle; Tully, Chris

    2012-08-01

    Childbirth for some women can be experienced as a traumatic event whereby it is appraised as threatening to life and associated with feelings of fear, helplessness or horror. These women may develop symptoms consistent with post-traumatic stress disorder or its sub-clinical symptoms (post-traumatic stress, PTS). Cognitive processes such as attentional biases have been identified in individuals with PTS exposed to other traumatic events. This study used an experimental design (the modified Stroop task) to investigate the relationship between attentional biases and PTS symptoms in 50 women who experienced their labour and delivery as stressful and responded with fear, helplessness and horror. Attentional biases away from childbirth words were significantly associated with both symptoms of post-traumatic stress and more negative experiences of childbirth. A negative experience was also associated with more severe symptoms of PTS. Positive experiences were unassociated with attentional biases or symptoms. Post-traumatic stress responses, in this population, may be associated with avoidance, and through influencing cognitive processing, acting as a maintaining factor of distress. PMID:22688919

  19. Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through virtual patients: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Elenita; Ziegert, Kristina; Hult, Håkan; Fors, Uno

    2016-01-01

    To avoid test-driven learning, there have been discussions regarding the use of more formative assessments in health care education to promote students' deep learning. Feedback is important in formative assessment, but many students ignore it; therefore, interventions should be introduced which stimulate them to reflect on the new knowledge. The aim for this study was to explore if Virtual Patient (VP)-based formative assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, had an impact on postgraduate pediatric nursing students' development of clinical reasoning abilities. Students' self-evaluations served as the basis for measuring progress. Data was analysed using deductive content analysis. The findings showed a clear progression of the clinical reasoning ability of the students. After the first assessment, the students described feelings of uncertainty and that their knowledge gaps were exposed. At the mid-course assessment the awareness of improved clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how to solve the VP cases. In the final assessment, self-efficacy was expressed. VP-based assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, early in the education resulted in a gain of students' own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on during clinical practice and visualised expected clinical competence.

  20. A retrospective cohort study among iron-steel workers in Anshan, China: exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Pan, Guowei; Tanaka, Chieko; Feng, Yiping; Yu, Lianzheng; Liu, Tiefu; Liu, Liming; Hanaoka, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Ken

    2006-09-01

    Although adequate assessment of exposure is needed in epidemiological studies among foundry workers, previous studies are often lacking in this aspect. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of a Chinese iron and steel company with a 14-yr follow up during 1980-1993. Exposure assessment was performed for a single job, i.e., the current job for the active worker and the longest job for the retired or deceased worker as of the end of the follow-up, which was allocated as the surrogate of lifetime job and was applied to a job-exposure matrix. Of the 147,062 cohort members, 52,394 males (43%) and 5,291 females (21%) were exposed to any of 15 hazardous factors such as dust, silica, PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), CO (carbon monoxide) and heat. In 2,104 randomly selected samples, the exposure assessment of exposed workers based on a single job was found to be 12-14% lower than the real situation. This study suggests that the exposure assessment is valuable in evaluating the health effects among the foundry workers, despite some limitations such as underestimation of exposure assessment and the lack of data regarding smoking and drinking habits. PMID:16981402

  1. Constitutive expression of selected genes from the pentose phosphate and aromatic pathways increases the shikimic acid yield in high-glucose batch cultures of an Escherichia coli strain lacking PTS and pykF

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last two decades many efforts have been directed towards obtaining efficient microbial processes for the production of shikimic acid (SA); however, feeding high amounts of substrate to increase the titer of this compound has invariably rendered low conversion yields, leaving room for improvement of the producing strains. In this work we report an alternative platform to overproduce SA in a laboratory-evolved Escherichia coli strain, based on plasmid-driven constitutive expression of six genes selected from the pentose phosphate and aromatic amino acid pathways, artificially arranged as an operon. Production strains also carried inactivated genes coding for phosphotransferase system components (ptsHIcrr), shikimate kinases I and II (aroK and aroL), pyruvate kinase I (pykF) and the lactose operon repressor (lacI). Results The strong and constitutive expression of the constructed operon permitted SA production from the beginning of the cultures, as evidenced in 1 L batch-mode fermentors starting with high concentrations of glucose and yeast extract. Inactivation of the pykF gene improved SA production under the evaluated conditions by increasing the titer, yield and productivity of this metabolite compared to the isogenic pykF+ strain. The best producing strain accumulated up to 43 g/L of SA in 30 h and relatively low concentrations of acetate and aromatic byproducts were detected, with SA accounting for 80% of the produced aromatic compounds. These results were consistent with high expression levels of the glycolytic pathway and synthetic operon genes from the beginning of fermentations, as revealed by transcriptomic analysis. Despite the consumption of 100 g/L of glucose, the yields on glucose of SA and of total aromatic compounds were about 50% and 60% of the theoretical maximum, respectively. The obtained yields and specific production and consumption rates proved to be constant with three different substrate concentrations. Conclusions

  2. Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Davoli, E.; Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M.; Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M.; Fanelli, R.

    2010-08-15

    An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

  3. Risk assessment of oil and gas well drilling activities in Iran - a case study: human factors.

    PubMed

    Amir-Heidari, Payam; Farahani, Hadi; Ebrahemzadih, Mehrzad

    2015-01-01

    Oil and gas well drilling activities are associated with numerous hazards which have the potential to cause injury or harm for people, property and the environment. These hazards are also a threat for the reputation of drilling companies. To prevent accidents and undesired events in drilling operations it is essential to identify, evaluate, assess and control the attendant risks. In this work, a structured methodology is proposed for risk assessment of drilling activities. A case study is performed to identify, analyze and assess the risks arising from human factors in one of the on shore drilling sites in southern Iran. A total of 17 major hazards were identified and analyzed using the proposed methodology. The results showed that the residual risks of 100% of these hazards were in the acceptable or transitional zone, and their levels were expected to be lowered further by proper controls. This structured methodology may also be used in other drilling sites and companies for assessing the risks.

  4. Incorporating formative assessment and science content into elementary science methods---A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, Derek John

    Just as elementary students enter the science classroom with prior knowledge and experiences, so do preservice elementary teachers who enter the science methods classroom. Elementary science methods instructors recognize the challenges associated with preparing teachers for the science classroom. Two of these challenges include overcoming limited science content understanding and a low science teaching efficacy. Based upon research in science misconceptions, conceptual change theory, formative assessment, and science teaching efficacy, this design experiment explored the use of formative assessment in an authentic learning environment to address some of these challenges. As a case study, the goal was to identify two specific topics in science which the preservice teachers did not understand and to model consistent use of formative assessment to guide instruction in those science topics for six weeks. The research questions for this study sought to explore the design of the class while also exploring students' understanding of the science content and their understanding of formative assessment. One specific question was whether the formative data could differentiate between deeply held student misconceptions in science and incomplete science understanding. In addition, data was collected to measure changes in science teaching efficacy as well as preservice teachers' desire to use formative assessment in their own future classrooms. Based upon student interviews and a final content quiz, the participants in this study did show improved science content understanding in the areas of plant food/energy and plate tectonics. The course design implemented a variety of formative assessment tools including formative assessment probes, student science notebooks, student concept maps, a non-graded quiz, and more. The STEBI-B survey identified improved science teaching efficacy among the participants. Student final essays indicated improved understanding of formative assessment

  5. Field studies in estuarine ecosystems: A review of approaches for assessing contaminant effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The types of data obtained in field studies must correspond to data used for risk assessment in order to verify approaches to predicting contaminant fate and effects in estuarine systems. Survival of caged test animals at field test sites provides field data for direct comparison with laboratory toxicity test results. Coupling survival and other effects data from caged-animal studies with assessments of stocks and dynamics of populations of the same or a related species at the field site allows extrapolation from simple laboratory and field test results to more complex and ecologically significant interpretations. The paper presents examples of various approaches to contaminant problems in estuaries.

  6. Effect of continuous assessment on learning outcomes on two chemical engineering courses: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuunila, R.; Pulkkinen, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of continuous assessment on the learning outcomes of two chemical engineering courses is studied over a several-year period. Average grades and passing percentages of courses after the final examination are reported and also student feedback on the courses is collected. The results indicate significantly better learning results after the adoption of continuous assessment in the courses. Also student feedback suggests higher quality in teaching after the adoption of more activating teaching methods which compel students to study effectively throughout the course.

  7. Student self-assessment and its impact on learning - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dearnley, Christine A; Meddings, Fiona S

    2007-05-01

    Student self-assessment is widely reported to offer numerous advantages to the learner. It is a popular practice for empowering students and the advantages are claimed to incorporate increased dialogue between students and teachers and the development of skills that encompass critical awareness and reflectivity. It is, potentially, a process that may enable health care practitioners to be lifelong learners, equipped with the skills for autonomy in learning and professional practice. As such it might be viewed as an essential element of the curriculum. This paper reports on a study designed to evaluate the implementation of self-assessment among student health care practitioners. The pilot study examined the impact of self-assessment on learning and how the process was perceived by students and staff. Findings indicated that a varied approach had been taken to its implementation, which had significant repercussions in the way in which it was perceived by students. Similarly, there was a varied approach taken by students to the process of self-assessment and this had significant repercussions for its overall value as a learning tool. The outcomes of this study provide a sound rational for maintaining and expanding the practice of student self-assessment and important lessons for the process of doing so. PMID:16870309

  8. Student self-assessment and its impact on learning - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dearnley, Christine A; Meddings, Fiona S

    2007-05-01

    Student self-assessment is widely reported to offer numerous advantages to the learner. It is a popular practice for empowering students and the advantages are claimed to incorporate increased dialogue between students and teachers and the development of skills that encompass critical awareness and reflectivity. It is, potentially, a process that may enable health care practitioners to be lifelong learners, equipped with the skills for autonomy in learning and professional practice. As such it might be viewed as an essential element of the curriculum. This paper reports on a study designed to evaluate the implementation of self-assessment among student health care practitioners. The pilot study examined the impact of self-assessment on learning and how the process was perceived by students and staff. Findings indicated that a varied approach had been taken to its implementation, which had significant repercussions in the way in which it was perceived by students. Similarly, there was a varied approach taken by students to the process of self-assessment and this had significant repercussions for its overall value as a learning tool. The outcomes of this study provide a sound rational for maintaining and expanding the practice of student self-assessment and important lessons for the process of doing so.

  9. Southeast Regional Assessment Study: an assessment of the opportunities of solar electric power generation in the Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and assess opportunities for demonstration and large scale deployment of solar electric facilities in the southeast region and to define the technical, economic, and institutional factors that can contribute to an accelerated use of solar energy for electric power generation. Graphs and tables are presented indicating the solar resource potential, siting opportunities, energy generation and use, and socioeconomic factors of the region by state. Solar electric technologies considered include both central station and dispersed solar electric generating facilities. Central stations studied include solar thermal electric, wind, photovoltaic, ocean thermal gradient, and biomass; dispersed facilities include solar thermal total energy systems, wind, and photovoltaic. The value of solar electric facilities is determined in terms of the value of conventional facilities and the use of conventional fuels which the solar facilities can replace. Suitable cost and risk sharing mechanisms to accelerate the commercialization of solar electric technologies in the Southeast are identified. The major regulatory and legal factors which could impact on the commercialization of solar facilities are reviewed. The most important factors which affect market penetration are reviewed, ways to accelerate the implementation of these technologies are identified, and market entry paths are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

  10. Health Risk Assessment using in vitro digestion model in assessing bioavailability of heavy metal in rice: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Omar, N A; Praveena, S M; Aris, A Z; Hashim, Z

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the bioavailability of heavy metal contamination and its health risks after rice ingestion. This study aimed to determine bioavailability of heavy metal (As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Co, Al, Fe, Zn and Pb) concentrations in cooked rice and human Health Risk Assessment (HRA). The results found Zn was the highest (4.3±0.1 mg/kg), whereas As showed the lowest (0.015±0.001 mg/kg) bioavailability of heavy metal concentration in 22 varieties of cooked rice. For single heavy metal exposure, no potential of non carcinogenic health risks was found, while carcinogenic health risks were found only for As. Combined heavy metal exposures found that total Hazard Quotient (HQtotal) values for adult were higher than the acceptable range (HQTotal<1), whereas total Lifetime Cancer Risk (LCRTotal) values were higher than the acceptable range (LCRTotal values >1×10(-4)) for both adult and children. This study is done to understand that the inclusion of bioavailability heavy metal into HRA produces a more realistic estimation of human heavy metal exposure.

  11. Evaluation of the pneumatic tube system for transportation of packed red cell units

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Supriya; Basu, Sabita; Chakraborty, Subhosmito; Sinha, Subir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pneumatic tube system (PTS) is commonly used in hospital settings to transport blood samples to diagnostic laboratories. At our blood center, we receive blood requisitions via the PTS, but units are carried to the ward by human courier. Recently we considered using the PTS for transporting blood units. Since, there are reports of hemolysis in blood samples sent through the PTS, we evaluated this system for transporting red cell units. Aims: The aim was to assess the effect of PTS transport on the quality of packed red cell units. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 red blood cells units (RBC), (25 non-irradiated and 25 irradiated) were subjected to transportation through the PTS. The control arm in the study was age-matched RBC units not subjected to PTS transport. Each RBC unit was evaluated for hemoglobin (Hb), lactate dehydrogenase, potassium and plasma hemoglobin (Hb). The paired t-test was used to compare these parameters, and the P value was calculated. Results and Conclusion: The percentage of hemolysis after transportation through PTS was below the recommended guidelines. Delivery of the blood unit to the wrong station, bags lying unattended at the destination were few of the problems that had to be addressed. To conclude, though the PTS is a safe means of transporting blood products with reduction in the turn-around-time, it must be validated before use. PMID:26420944

  12. What is Learned from Longitudinal Studies of Advertising and Youth Drinking and Smoking? A Critical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jon P

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the methodology employed in longitudinal studies of advertising and youth drinking and smoking behaviors. These studies often are given a causal interpretation in the psychology and public health literatures. Four issues are examined from the perspective of econometrics. First, specification and validation of empirical models. Second, empirical issues associated with measures of advertising receptivity and exposure. Third, potential endogeneity of receptivity and exposure variables. Fourth, sample selection bias in baseline and follow-up surveys. Longitudinal studies reviewed include 20 studies of youth drinking and 26 studies of youth smoking. Substantial shortcomings are found in the studies, which preclude a causal interpretation. PMID:20617009

  13. Profiling postgraduate workplace-based assessment implementation in Ireland: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aileen; Galvin, Rose; Steinert, Yvonne; Scherpbier, Albert; O'Shaughnessy, Ann; Walsh, Gillian; Horgan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, workplace-based assessment (WBA) was formally integrated as a method of formative trainee assessment into 29 basic and higher specialist medical training (BST/HST) programmes in six postgraduate training bodies in Ireland. The aim of this study is to explore how WBA is being implemented and to examine if WBA is being used formatively as originally intended. A retrospective cohort study was conducted and approved by the institution's Research Ethics Committee. A profile of WBA requirements was obtained from 29 training programme curricula. A data extraction tool was developed to extract anonymous data, including written feedback and timing of assessments, from Year 1 and 2 trainee ePortfolios in 2012-2013. Data were independently quality assessed and compared to the reference standard number of assessments mandated annually where relevant. All 29 training programmes mandated the inclusion of at least one case-based discussion (max = 5; range 1-5). All except two non-clinical programmes (93 %) required at least two mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise assessments per year and Direct Observation of Procedural Skills assessments were mandated in 27 training programmes over the course of the programme. WBA data were extracted from 50 % of randomly selected BST ePortfolios in four programmes (n = 142) and 70 % of HST ePortfolios (n = 115) in 21 programmes registered for 2012-2013. Four programmes did not have an eligible trainee for that academic year. In total, 1142 WBAs were analysed. A total of 164 trainees (63.8 %) had completed at least one WBA. The average number of WBAs completed by HST trainees was 7.75 (SD 5.8; 95 % CI 6.5-8.9; range 1-34). BST trainees completed an average of 6.1 assessments (SD 9.3; 95 % CI 4.01-8.19; range 1-76). Feedback-of varied length and quality-was provided on 44.9 % of assessments. The majority of WBAs were completed in the second half of the year. There is significant heterogeneity with respect to the frequency and

  14. Assessing the Impact of Free Primary Education Using Retrospective and Prospective Data: Lessons from the Nairobi Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Oketch, Moses; Ezeh, Alex Chika; Mutisya, Maurice; Ejakait, Charles Epari

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and methodology used to assess the impact of free primary education (FPE) policy in Nairobi, Kenya. The key outcome of the study was to assess the impact of FPE on schooling outcomes among the urban poor. The study assesses the impact of FPE by examining how two non-comparable groups responded to the introduction of…

  15. Influence of Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning on the Implementation of Assessment for Learning in Inquiry Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Winnie Wing Mui; Lee, Theodore Tai Hoi

    2011-01-01

    Assessment for learning is a worldwide initiative. With the aim of learning about the influence of teachers' attitudes and perceptions of assessment for learning on daily teaching practices, this study investigated the implementation of assessment for learning using rubrics as a tool for inquiry study. Nineteen secondary school teachers using…

  16. Dallas area rapid transit LRT starter line assessment study design. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Shunk, G.A.; Turnbull, K.F.; Lindquist, N.F.

    1995-03-01

    Light rail transit (LRT) systems have recently been implemented in a number of urban areas throughout the United States and additional projects are in various stages of planning and development. Questions have been raised concerning the impact of these systems on ridership levels, transit operating costs, regional mobility, land use, economic development, energy, air quality, congestion levels, and other factors. The implementation of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) LRT starter line provides the opportunity to assess the impact of an LRT system in a Southwestern city in the United States. This research project was undertaken to assist with the development of a comprehensive study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line. To accomplish this objective, a review was conducted of before-and-after studies of recent LRT, heavy rail, and high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) projects. The goals and objectives of the DART system were also reviewed and existing transportation-related data collection activities in the Dallas area were examined. This information was used to develop a preliminary study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line. This report documents the review of recent before-and-after studies and presents the preliminary study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line.

  17. The Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale (G-SAS): a reliability and validity study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suck Won; Grant, Jon E; Potenza, Marc N; Blanco, Carlos; Hollander, Eric

    2009-03-31

    Two hundred seven patients with DSM-IV Pathological Gambling Disorder completed both the Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale (G-SAS) and the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale--modified for Pathological Gambling (PG-YBOCS) at baseline visit and weekly or biweekly thereafter during the 12-week study period. The week 1 to week 2 visit data were used to assess test-retest reliability. Weekly or biweekly data were used for the G-SAS validity. The PG-YBOCS reliability and validity data have been published previously. We used the PG-YBOCS as the established scale and compared the G-SAS performance with the PG-YBOCS. Test-retest reliability was statistically significant. The correlations between the G-SAS and the PG-YBOCS and Clinical Global Impression rating were excellent. Findings suggest that the G-SAS is reliable and valid in assessing changes in symptoms during a drug treatment study.

  18. Offpost operable unit remedial investigation/endangerment assessment/feasibility study, draft final work plan

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This document presents the scope of work for additional data collection activities and interpretive reports to be performed in the off-post operable unit (OU) for preparation of: (1) Addendum to the final remedial investigation report; (2)` Revision of the draft final endangerment assessment/feasibility study. The plan is divided into the following sections: (1) Requirements for the RI addendum - technical approach and data collection program for the RI addendum - technical approach and data collection program for ground water, soil, sediment, biota, air; (2) Revision of the endagerment assessment - items that need to be reevaluated; (3) Revision of the feasibility study - evaluation of different media and ARAR`s development of remedial alternatives; (4) Schedule and description of deliverables. Appendix a contains a detailed approach for the 96th avenue risk assessment.

  19. A Study of the Utility of Results from the 1992 Trial State Assessment (TSA) in Reading for State-Level Administrators of Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Cheryl Davis; DeStefano, Lizanne

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of the 1992 TSA in reading was studied using interviews from 26 state directors of assessment. Perceptions about TSA credibility and orientation of test components and current use of TSA results were examined. The directors suggested involving more teachers in assessment, modifying descriptors, disseminating results quicker, and…

  20. International Code Assessment and Applications Program: Summary of code assessment studies concerning RELAP5/MOD2, RELAP5/MOD3, and TRAC-B. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.

    1993-12-01

    Members of the International Code Assessment Program (ICAP) have assessed the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) advanced thermal-hydraulic codes over the past few years in a concerted effort to identify deficiencies, to define user guidelines, and to determine the state of each code. The results of sixty-two code assessment reviews, conducted at INEL, are summarized. Code deficiencies are discussed and user recommended nodalizations investigated during the course of conducting the assessment studies and reviews are listed. All the work that is summarized was done using the RELAP5/MOD2, RELAP5/MOD3, and TRAC-B codes.