Science.gov

Sample records for assigning large proteins

  1. A Semiautomated Assignment Protocol for Methyl Group Side Chains in Large Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggul; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Geoffrey; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The developments of biosynthetic specific labeling strategies for side-chain methyl groups have allowed structural and dynamic characterization of very large proteins and protein complexes. However, the assignment of the methyl-group resonances remains an Achilles' heel for NMR, as the experiments designed to correlate side chains to the protein backbone become rather insensitive with the increase of the transverse relaxation rates. In this chapter, we outline a semiempirical approach to assign the resonances of methyl-group side chains in large proteins. This method requires a crystal structure or an NMR ensemble of conformers as an input, together with NMR data sets such as nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), to be implemented in a computational protocol that provides a probabilistic assignment of methyl-group resonances. As an example, we report the protocol used in our laboratory to assign the side chains of the 42-kDa catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Although we emphasize the labeling of isoleucine, leucine, and valine residues, this method is applicable to other methyl group side chains such as those of alanine, methionine, and threonine, as well as reductively methylated cysteine side chains.

  2. Rapid assignment of solution 31P NMR spectra of large proteins by solid-state spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iuga, Adriana; Spoerner, Michael; Ader, Christian; Brunner, Eike; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2006-07-21

    The application of the (31)P NMR spectroscopy to large proteins or protein complexes in solution is hampered by a relatively low intrinsic sensitivity coupled with large line widths. Therefore, the assignment of the phosphorus signals by two-dimensional NMR methods in solution is often extremely time consuming. In contrast, the quality of solid-state NMR spectra is not dependent on the molecular mass and the solubility of the protein. For the complex of Ras with the GTP-analogue GppCH(2)p we show solid-state (31)P NMR methods to be more sensitive by almost one order of magnitude than liquid-state NMR. Thus, solid-state NMR seems to be the method of choice for obtaining the resonance assignment of the phosphorus signals of protein complexes in solution. Experiments on Ras.GDP complexes show that the microcrystalline sample can be substituted by a precipitate of the sample and that unexpectedly the two structural states observed earlier in solution are present in crystals as well.

  3. Fast and accurate resonance assignment of small-to-large proteins by combining automated and manual approaches.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Markus; Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Marsh, Joseph A; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available.

  4. Fast and Accurate Resonance Assignment of Small-to-Large Proteins by Combining Automated and Manual Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Niklasson, Markus; Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Marsh, Joseph A.; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available. PMID:25569628

  5. Fast and accurate resonance assignment of small-to-large proteins by combining automated and manual approaches.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Markus; Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Marsh, Joseph A; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available. PMID:25569628

  6. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  7. Managing Large Volumes of Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, James; Hagen, John, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In spring 2003, the Distance Education Network (DEN), Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC), had 860 students and more than 1,000 enrollments in 70 courses toward 10 different degrees. Typically, for assignments in engineering courses, professors require students to show how their answers are derived so that…

  8. Toward consistent assignment of structural domains in proteins.

    PubMed

    Veretnik, Stella; Bourne, Philip E; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; Shindyalov, Ilya N

    2004-06-01

    The assignment of protein domains from three-dimensional structure is critically important in understanding protein evolution and function, yet little quality assurance has been performed. Here, the differences in the assignment of structural domains are evaluated using six common assignment methods. Three human expert methods (AUTHORS (authors' annotation), CATH and SCOP) and three fully automated methods (DALI, DomainParser and PDP) are investigated by analysis of individual methods against the author's assignment as well as analysis based on the consensus among groups of methods (only expert, only automatic, combined). The results demonstrate that caution is recommended in using current domain assignments, and indicates where additional work is needed. Specifically, the major factors responsible for conflicting domain assignments between methods, both experts and automatic, are: (1) the definition of very small domains; (2) splitting secondary structures between domains; (3) the size and number of discontinuous domains; (4) closely packed or convoluted domain-domain interfaces; (5) structures with large and complex architectures; and (6) the level of significance placed upon structural, functional and evolutionary concepts in considering structural domain definitions. A web-based resource that focuses on the results of benchmarking and the analysis of domain assignments is available at

  9. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  10. A ‘just-in-time’ HN(CA)CO experiment for the backbone assignment of large proteins with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner-Allen, Jon W.; Jiang, Ling; Zhou, Pei

    2006-07-01

    Among the suite of commonly used backbone experiments, HNCACO presents an unresolved sensitivity limitation due to fast 13CO transverse relaxation and passive 13Cα-13Cβ coupling. Here, we present a high-sensitivity 'just-in-time' (JIT) HN(CA)CO pulse sequence that uniformly refocuses 13Cα-13Cβ coupling while collecting 13CO shifts in real time. Sensitivity comparisons of the 3-D JIT HN(CA)CO, a CT-HMQC-based control, and a HSQC-based control with selective 13Cα inversion pulses were performed using a 2H/13C/15N labeled sample of the 29 kDa HCA II protein at 15 °C. The JIT experiment shows a 42% signal enhancement over the CT-HMQC-based experiment. Compared to the HSQC-based experiment, the JIT experiment is 16% less sensitive for residues experiencing proper 13Cα refocusing and 13Cα-13Cβ decoupling. However, for the remaining residues, the JIT spectrum shows a 106% average sensitivity gain over the HSQC-based experiment. The high-sensitivity JIT HNCACO experiment should be particularly beneficial for studies of large proteins to provide 13CO resonance information regardless of residue type.

  11. Graphical interpretation of Boolean operators for protein NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Verdegem, Dries; Dijkstra, Klaas; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a graphics based algorithm for semi-automated protein NMR assignments. Using the basic sequential triple resonance assignment strategy, the method is inspired by the Boolean operators as it applies "AND"-, "OR"- and "NOT"-like operations on planes pulled out of the classical three-dimensional spectra to obtain its functionality. The method's strength lies in the continuous graphical presentation of the spectra, allowing both a semi-automatic peaklist construction and sequential assignment. We demonstrate here its general use for the case of a folded protein with a well-dispersed spectrum, but equally for a natively unfolded protein where spectral resolution is minimal. PMID:18762868

  12. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  13. Solution NMR resonance assignment strategies for β-barrel membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel A; Columbus, Linda

    2013-08-01

    Membrane proteins in detergent micelles are large and dynamic complexes that present challenges for solution NMR investigations such as spectral overlap and line broadening. In this study, multiple methods are introduced to facilitate resonance assignment of β-barrel membrane proteins using Opa60 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a model system. Opa60 is an eight-stranded β-barrel with long extracellular loops (∼63% of the protein) that engage host receptors and induce engulfment of the bacterium. The NMR spectra of Opa60 in detergent micelles exhibits significant spectral overlap and resonances corresponding to the loop regions had variable line widths, which interfered with a complete assignment of the protein. To assign the β-barrel residues, trypsin cleavage was used to remove much of the extracellular loops while preserving the detergent solubilized β-barrel. The removal of the loop resonances significantly improved the assignment of the Opa60 β-barrel region (97% of the resonances corresponding to the β-barrel and periplasmic turns were assigned). For the loop resonance assignments, two strategies were implemented; modulating temperature and synthetic peptides. Lowering the temperature broadened many peaks beyond detection and simplified the spectra to only the most dynamic regions of the loops facilitating 27 loop resonances to be assigned. To further assign functionally important and unstructured regions of the extracellular loops, a synthetic 20 amino acid peptide was synthesized and had nearly complete spectral overlap with the full-length protein allowing 17 loop resonances to be assigned. Collectively, these strategies are effective tools that may accelerate solution NMR structure determination of β-barrel membrane proteins.

  14. Solution NMR resonance assignment strategies for β-barrel membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Daniel A; Columbus, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins in detergent micelles are large and dynamic complexes that present challenges for solution NMR investigations such as spectral overlap and line broadening. In this study, multiple methods are introduced to facilitate resonance assignment of β-barrel membrane proteins using Opa60 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a model system. Opa60 is an eight-stranded β-barrel with long extracellular loops (∼63% of the protein) that engage host receptors and induce engulfment of the bacterium. The NMR spectra of Opa60 in detergent micelles exhibits significant spectral overlap and resonances corresponding to the loop regions had variable line widths, which interfered with a complete assignment of the protein. To assign the β-barrel residues, trypsin cleavage was used to remove much of the extracellular loops while preserving the detergent solubilized β-barrel. The removal of the loop resonances significantly improved the assignment of the Opa60 β-barrel region (97% of the resonances corresponding to the β-barrel and periplasmic turns were assigned). For the loop resonance assignments, two strategies were implemented; modulating temperature and synthetic peptides. Lowering the temperature broadened many peaks beyond detection and simplified the spectra to only the most dynamic regions of the loops facilitating 27 loop resonances to be assigned. To further assign functionally important and unstructured regions of the extracellular loops, a synthetic 20 amino acid peptide was synthesized and had nearly complete spectral overlap with the full-length protein allowing 17 loop resonances to be assigned. Collectively, these strategies are effective tools that may accelerate solution NMR structure determination of β-barrel membrane proteins. PMID:23754333

  15. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    DOEpatents

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  16. Root-mean-square-deviation-based rapid backbone resonance assignments in proteins.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ashok K; Barnwal, Ravi P; Agarwal, Geetika; Chary, Kandala V R

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the methodology based on the estimation of root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) between two sets of chemical shifts is very useful to rapidly assign the spectral signatures of (1)H(N), (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (13)C', (1)H(α) and (15)N spins of a given protein in one state from the knowledge of its resonance assignments in a different state, without resorting to routine established procedures (manual and automated). We demonstrate the utility of this methodology to rapidly assign the 3D spectra of a metal-binding protein in its holo-state from the knowledge of its assignments in apo-state, the spectra of a protein in its paramagnetic state from the knowledge of its assignments in diamagnetic state and, finally, the spectra of a mutant protein from the knowledge of the chemical shifts of the corresponding wild-type protein. The underlying assumption of this methodology is that, it is impossible for any two amino acid residues in a given protein to have all the six chemical shifts degenerate and that the protein under consideration does not undergo large conformational changes in going from one conformational state to another. The methodology has been tested using experimental data on three proteins, M-crystallin (8.5 kDa, predominantly β-sheet, for apo- to holo-state), Calbindin (7.5 kDa, predominantly α-helical, for diamagnetic to paramagnetic state and apo to holo) and EhCaBP1 (14.3 kDa, α-helical, the wild-type protein with one of its mutant). In all the cases, the extent of assignment is found to be greater than 85%.

  17. A Markov Random Field Framework for Protein Side-Chain Resonance Assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a critical role in structural genomics, and serves as a primary tool for determining protein structures, dynamics and interactions in physiologically-relevant solution conditions. The current speed of protein structure determination via NMR is limited by the lengthy time required in resonance assignment, which maps spectral peaks to specific atoms and residues in the primary sequence. Although numerous algorithms have been developed to address the backbone resonance assignment problem [68,2,10,37,14,64,1,31,60], little work has been done to automate side-chain resonance assignment [43, 48, 5]. Most previous attempts in assigning side-chain resonances depend on a set of NMR experiments that record through-bond interactions with side-chain protons for each residue. Unfortunately, these NMR experiments have low sensitivity and limited performance on large proteins, which makes it difficult to obtain enough side-chain resonance assignments. On the other hand, it is essential to obtain almost all of the side-chain resonance assignments as a prerequisite for high-resolution structure determination. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel side-chain resonance assignment algorithm based on alternative NMR experiments measuring through-space interactions between protons in the protein, which also provide crucial distance restraints and are normally required in high-resolution structure determination. We cast the side-chain resonance assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF) framework, and extend and apply combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute the optimal solution that best interprets the NMR data. Our MRF framework captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NMR spectra, and exploits the structural information available from the backbone conformations determined by orientational restraints and a set of discretized side-chain conformations (i.e., rotamers). A Hausdorff

  18. Normalized Cut Algorithm for Automated Assignment of Protein Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, M. P.; Liang, S.; Zha, H.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel computational method for automatic assignment of protein domains from structural data. At the core of our algorithm lies a recently proposed clustering technique that has been very successful for image-partitioning applications. This grap.,l-theory based clustering method uses the notion of a normalized cut to partition. an undirected graph into its strongly-connected components. Computer implementation of our method tested on the standard comparison set of proteins from the literature shows a high success rate (84%), better than most existing alternative In addition, several other features of our algorithm, such as reliance on few adjustable parameters, linear run-time with respect to the size of the protein and reduced complexity compared to other graph-theory based algorithms, would make it an attractive tool for structural biologists.

  19. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results.

  20. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results. PMID:26260854

  1. Organic Chemistry YouTube Writing Assignment for Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Annaliese K.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes efforts to incorporate and evaluate the use of a YouTube writing assignment in large lecture classes to personalize learning and improve conceptual understanding of chemistry through peer- and self-explanation strategies. Although writing assignments can be a method to incorporate peer- and self-explanation strategies, this…

  2. RASP: rapid and robust backbone chemical shift assignments from protein structure.

    PubMed

    MacRaild, Christopher A; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-03-01

    Chemical shift prediction has an unappreciated power to guide backbone resonance assignment in cases where protein structure is known. Here we describe Resonance Assignment by chemical Shift Prediction (RASP), a method that exploits this power to derive protein backbone resonance assignments from chemical shift predictions. Robust assignments can be obtained from a minimal set of only the most sensitive triple-resonance experiments, even for spectroscopically challenging proteins. Over a test set of 154 proteins RASP assigns 88 % of residues with an accuracy of 99.7 %, using only information available from HNCO and HNCA spectra. Applied to experimental data from a challenging 34 kDa protein, RASP assigns 90 % of manually assigned residues using only 40 % of the experimental data required for the manual assignment. RASP has the potential to significantly accelerate the backbone assignment process for a wide range of proteins for which structural information is available, including those for which conventional assignment strategies are not feasible. PMID:24445369

  3. Efficient eigenvalue assignment by state and output feedback with applications for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannell, Eric C.; Kenny, Sean P.; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1995-01-01

    The erection and deployment of large flexible structures having thousands of degrees of freedom requires controllers based on new techniques of eigenvalue assignment that are computationally stable and more efficient. Scientists at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a novel and efficient algorithm for the eigenvalue assignment of large, time-invariant systems using full-state and output feedback. The objectives of this research were to improve upon the output feedback version of this algorithm, to produce a toolbox of MATLAB functions based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm, and to experimentally verify the algorithm and software by implementing controllers designed using the MATLAB toolbox on the phase 2 configuration of NASA Langley's controls-structures interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory model used to study space structures. Results from laboratory tests and computer simulations show that effective controllers can be designed using software based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm.

  4. CONSERVATION. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching hotspots.

    PubMed

    Wasser, S K; Brown, L; Mailand, C; Mondol, S; Clark, W; Laurie, C; Weir, B S

    2015-07-01

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa's major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two areas. Increasing law enforcement in these two hotspots could help curtail future elephant losses across Africa and disrupt this organized transnational crime. PMID:26089357

  5. CONSERVATION. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching hotspots.

    PubMed

    Wasser, S K; Brown, L; Mailand, C; Mondol, S; Clark, W; Laurie, C; Weir, B S

    2015-07-01

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa's major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two areas. Increasing law enforcement in these two hotspots could help curtail future elephant losses across Africa and disrupt this organized transnational crime.

  6. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  7. Computer assignment of the backbone resonances of labelled proteins using two-dimensional correlation experiments.

    PubMed

    Morelle, N; Brutscher, B; Simorre, J P; Marion, D

    1995-02-01

    We present ALPS (Assignment for Labelled Protein Spectra), a flexible computer program for the automatic assignment of backbone NMR resonances of (15)N/(13)C-labelled proteins. The program constructs pseudoresidues from peak-picking lists of a set of two-dimensional triple resonance experiments and uses either a systematic search or a simulated annealing-based optimization to perform the assignment. This method has been successfully tested on two-dimensional triple resonance spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c (2) (116 amino acids).

  8. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  9. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of murine amelogenin, an enamel biomineralization protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Cort, John R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-06-01

    Amelogenin is the predominant matrix protein in developing dental enamel. Making extensive use of residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids samples, the majority of the main and side chain resonances for murine amelogenin were assigned in 2% aqueous acetic acid at pH 3.0. This research was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US-DOE. A large part of this research was performed at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  10. NMR Assignments for a Helical 40 kDa Membrane Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Kim, Hak J.; Jacob, Jaison; Soennichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2004-04-28

    Backbone nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments were achieved for diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) in detergent micelles. DAGK is a homotrimeric integral membrane protein comprised of 121 residue subunits, each having three transmembrane segments. Assignments were made using TROSY-based pulse sequences. DAGK was found to be an almost exclusively helical protein. This work points to the feasibility of both solving the structure of DAGK using solution NMR methods and using NMR as a primary tool in structural studies of other helical integral membrane proteins of similar size and complexity.

  11. Review of Methods to Assign the NMR Peaks of Reductively Methylated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Kevin J.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysyl side-chain amines has been a successful tool in the advancement of high resolution structural biology. The utility of this method has continuously gained ground as a protein chemical modification; first, as a tool to aid protein crystallization and later, as a probe in protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. As an isotope-labeling strategy for NMR studies, reductive methylation has contributed to the study of protein-protein interactions and global conformational changes. While more detailed structural studies using this labeling strategy are possible, the hurdle of assigning the NMR peaks to the corresponding reductively methylated amine hinders its use. In this review, we discuss and compare strategies used to assign the NMR peaks of reductively methylated protein-amines. PMID:25175010

  12. Bioinformatic tools for DNA/protein sequence analysis, functional assignment of genes and protein classification.

    PubMed

    Rehm, B H

    2001-12-01

    The development of efficient DNA sequencing methods has led to the achievement of the DNA sequence of entire genomes from (to date) 55 prokaryotes, 5 eukaryotic organisms and 10 eukaryotic chromosomes. Thus, an enormous amount of DNA sequence data is available and even more will be forthcoming in the near future. Analysis of this overwhelming amount of data requires bioinformatic tools in order to identify genes that encode functional proteins or RNA. This is an important task, considering that even in the well-studied Escherichia coli more than 30% of the identified open reading frames are hypothetical genes. Future challenges of genome sequence analysis will include the understanding of gene regulation and metabolic pathway reconstruction including DNA chip technology, which holds tremendous potential for biomedicine and the biotechnological production of valuable compounds. The overwhelming volume of information often confuses scientists. This review intends to provide a guide to choosing the most efficient way to analyze a new sequence or to collect information on a gene or protein of interest by applying current publicly available databases and Web services. Recently developed tools that allow functional assignment of genes, mainly based on sequence similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence, using the currently available and increasing biological databases will be discussed.

  13. Optimizing a realistic large-scale frequency assignment problem using a new parallel evolutionary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves-González, José M.; Vega-Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Gómez-Pulido, Juan A.; Sánchez-Pérez, Juan M.

    2011-08-01

    This article analyses the use of a novel parallel evolutionary strategy to solve complex optimization problems. The work developed here has been focused on a relevant real-world problem from the telecommunication domain to verify the effectiveness of the approach. The problem, known as frequency assignment problem (FAP), basically consists of assigning a very small number of frequencies to a very large set of transceivers used in a cellular phone network. Real data FAP instances are very difficult to solve due to the NP-hard nature of the problem, therefore using an efficient parallel approach which makes the most of different evolutionary strategies can be considered as a good way to obtain high-quality solutions in short periods of time. Specifically, a parallel hyper-heuristic based on several meta-heuristics has been developed. After a complete experimental evaluation, results prove that the proposed approach obtains very high-quality solutions for the FAP and beats any other result published.

  14. SAS-Pro: simultaneous residue assignment and structure superposition for protein structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shweta B; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html.

  15. SAS-Pro: Simultaneous Residue Assignment and Structure Superposition for Protein Structure Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shweta B.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html. PMID:22662161

  16. Automated analysis of protein NMR assignments using methods from artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, D E; Kulikowski, C A; Huang, Y; Feng, W; Tashiro, M; Shimotakahara, S; Chien, C; Powers, R; Montelione, G T

    1997-06-20

    An expert system for determining resonance assignments from NMR spectra of proteins is described. Given the amino acid sequence, a two-dimensional 15N-1H heteronuclear correlation spectrum and seven to eight three-dimensional triple-resonance NMR spectra for seven proteins, AUTOASSIGN obtained an average of 98% of sequence-specific spin-system assignments with an error rate of less than 0.5%. Execution times on a Sparc 10 workstation varied from 16 seconds for smaller proteins with simple spectra to one to nine minutes for medium size proteins exhibiting numerous extra spin systems attributed to conformational isomerization. AUTOASSIGN combines symbolic constraint satisfaction methods with a domain-specific knowledge base to exploit the logical structure of the sequential assignment problem, the specific features of the various NMR experiments, and the expected chemical shift frequencies of different amino acids. The current implementation specializes in the analysis of data derived from the most sensitive of the currently available triple-resonance experiments. Potential extensions of the system for analysis of additional types of protein NMR data are also discussed.

  17. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  18. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  19. Large-scale air traffic surveillance using an IMM estimator with assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Li, Yicong; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present the development and implementation of a multisensor-multitarget tracking algorithm for large scale air traffic surveillance based on the IMM state estimator combined with a 2-dimensional assignment for data association. The algorithm can be used to track a large umber of targets from measurements obtained with a large number of radars. The use of the algorithm is illustrated on measurements obtained from 5 FAA radars, which are asynchronous, heterogeneous and geographically distributed over a large area. Both secondary radar data (beacon returns from cooperative targets) as well as primary radar data (skin returns from non-cooperative targets) are used. The target IDs from the beacon returns are not used in the data association. The surveillance region includes about 800 targets that exhibit different types of motion. The performance of the IMM estimator is compared with that of the Kalman filter. A number of performance measures that can be used on real data without knowledge of the ground truth are presented for this purpose. It is shown that the IMM estimator performs better than the Kalman filter. The advantage of fusing multisensor data is quantified. It is also shown that the computational requirements in the multisensor case are lower than in single sensor case.

  20. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  1. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  2. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  3. Narrow carbonyl resonances in proton-diluted proteins facilitate NMR assignments in the solid-state.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    HNCO/HNCACO type correlation experiments are an alternative for assignment of backbone resonances in extensively deuterated proteins in the solid-state, given the fact that line widths on the order of 14-17 Hz are achieved in the carbonyl dimension without the need of high power decoupling. The achieved resolution demonstrates that MAS solid-state NMR on extensively deuterated proteins is able to compete with solution-state NMR spectroscopy if proteins are investigated with correlation times tau(c) that exceed 25 ns. PMID:20232230

  4. Using Computer-Based Writing Software to Facilitate Writing Assignments in Large Political Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishiyama, John; Watson, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally accepted in the literature that writing assignments, even short ones, increase both student writing ability and comprehension of the material covered in the assignments. As class enrollments increase, particularly at the introductory level, however, instructors often sacrifice writing assignments because of the difficulty in…

  5. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution - especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  6. Rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments using cryogenic probes, a distributed Linux-based computing architecture, and an integrated set of spectral analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Daniel; Colson, Kimberly; Moseley, Hunter N B; Anklin, Clemens; Oswald, Robert; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-01-01

    Rapid data collection, spectral referencing, processing by time domain deconvolution, peak picking and editing, and assignment of NMR spectra are necessary components of any efficient integrated system for protein NMR structure analysis. We have developed a set of software tools designated AutoProc, AutoPeak, and AutoAssign, which function together with the data processing and peak-picking programs NMRPipe and Sparky, to provide an integrated software system for rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments. In this paper we demonstrate that these tools, together with high-sensitivity triple resonance NMR cryoprobes for data collection and a Linux-based computer cluster architecture, can be combined to provide nearly complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structures (based on chemical shift data) for a 59-residue protein in less than 30 hours of data collection and processing time. In this optimum case of a small protein providing excellent spectra, extensive backbone resonance assignments could also be obtained using less than 6 hours of data collection and processing time. These results demonstrate the feasibility of high throughput triple resonance NMR for determining resonance assignments and secondary structures of small proteins, and the potential for applying NMR in large scale structural proteomics projects.

  7. Reduced dimensionality 3D HNCAN for unambiguous HN, CA and N assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Mishra, Pushpa; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2012-03-01

    We present here an improvisation of HNN (Panchal, Bhavesh et al., 2001) called RD 3D HNCAN for backbone (HN, CA and 15N) assignment in both folded and unfolded proteins. This is a reduced dimensionality experiment which employs CA chemical shifts to improve dispersion. Distinct positive and negative peak patterns of various triplet segments along the polypeptide chain observed in HNN are retained and these provide start and check points for the sequential walk. Because of co-incrementing of CA and 15N, peaks along one of the dimensions appear at sums and differences of the CA and 15N chemical shifts. This changes the backbone assignment protocol slightly and we present this in explicit detail. The performance of the experiment has been demonstrated using Ubiquitin and Plasmodium falciparum P2 proteins. The experiment is particularly valuable when two neighboring amino acid residues have nearly identical backbone 15N chemical shifts.

  8. On the problem of resonance assignments in solid state NMR of uniformly ¹⁵N,¹³C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Determination of accurate resonance assignments from multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra is one of the major problems in biomolecular solid state NMR, particularly for relative large proteins with less-than-ideal NMR linewidths. This article investigates the difficulty of resonance assignment, using a computational Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm to search for assignments from artificial three-dimensional spectra that are constructed from the reported isotropic (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of two proteins whose structures have been determined by solution NMR methods. The results demonstrate how assignment simulations can provide new insights into factors that affect the assignment process, which can then help guide the design of experimental strategies. Specifically, simulations are performed for the catalytic domain of SrtC (147 residues, primarily β-sheet secondary structure) and the N-terminal domain of MLKL (166 residues, primarily α-helical secondary structure). Assuming unambiguous residue-type assignments and four ideal three-dimensional data sets (NCACX, NCOCX, CONCA, and CANCA), uncertainties in chemical shifts must be less than 0.4 ppm for assignments for SrtC to be unique, and less than 0.2 ppm for MLKL. Eliminating CANCA data has no significant effect, but additionally eliminating CONCA data leads to more stringent requirements for chemical shift precision. Introducing moderate ambiguities in residue-type assignments does not have a significant effect. PMID:25797013

  9. Direct correlation of consecutive C'-N groups in proteins: a method for the assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santoro, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    Two novel 3D (13)C-detected experiments, hNcocaNCO and hnCOcaNCO, are proposed to facilitate the resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins. The experiments correlate the (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts of two consecutive amide moieties without involving other nuclei, thus taking advantage of the good dispersion shown by the (15)N-(13)C' correlations, even for proteins that lack a well defined tertiary structure. The new pulse sequences were successfully tested using Nupr1, an intrinsically disordered protein of 93 residues.

  10. iHADAMAC: A complementary tool for sequential resonance assignment of globular and highly disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Sophie; Plevin, Michael J.; Willbold, Dieter; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    An experiment, iHADAMAC, is presented that yields information on the amino-acid type of individual residues in a protein by editing the 1H- 15N correlations into seven different 2D spectra, each corresponding to a different class of amino-acid types. Amino-acid type discrimination is realized via a Hadamard encoding scheme based on four different spin manipulations as recently introduced in the context of the sequential HADAMAC experiment. Both sequential and intra-residue HADAMAC experiments yield highly complementary information that greatly facilitate resonance assignment of proteins with high frequency degeneracy, as demonstrated here for a 188-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment of the hepatitis C virus protein NS5A.

  11. "CON-CON" assignment strategy for highly flexible intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Piai, Alessandro; Hošek, Tomáš; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Brutscher, Bernhard; Bermel, Wolfgang; Pierattelli, Roberta; Felli, Isabella C

    2014-12-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of highly flexible proteins whose characterization by NMR spectroscopy is complicated by severe spectral overlaps. The development of experiments designed to facilitate the sequence-specific assignment procedure is thus very important to improve the tools for the characterization of IDPs and thus to be able to focus on IDPs of increasing size and complexity. Here, we present and describe the implementation of a set of novel ¹H-detected 5D experiments, (HACA)CON(CACO)NCO(CA)HA, BT-(H)NCO(CAN)CONNH and BT-HN(COCAN)CONNH, optimized for the study of highly flexible IDPs that exploit the best resolved correlations, those involving the carbonyl and nitrogen nuclei of neighboring amino acids, to achieve sequence-specific resonance assignment. Together with the analogous recently proposed pulse schemes based on ¹³C detection, they form a complete set of experiments for sequence-specific assignment of highly flexible IDPs. Depending on the particular sample conditions (concentration, lifetime, pH, temperature, etc.), these experiments present certain advantages and disadvantages that will be discussed. Needless to say, that the availability of a variety of complementary experiments will be important for accurate determination of resonance frequencies in complex IDPs.

  12. Chemical shift assignment of the alternative scaffold protein IscA.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Matija; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    The IscA protein (11.5 kDa) is an essential component of the iron sulphur cluster biogenesis machine. In bacteria, the machine components are clustered in operons, amongst which the most important is the isc operon. Bacterial IscA has direct homologues also in eukaryotes. Like the protein IscU, IscA is thought to assist cluster formation as an alternative scaffold protein which receives the cluster before transferring it further to the final acceptors. Several crystal structures have been published. They all report an IscA dimeric form, although the packing of the protomers in the dimers differs amongst structures. No solution studies have currently been reported. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the cluster-free E. coli IscA as a starting point for further studies of the structure and functions of this still poorly characterized protein. We show that IscA exists in solution as an equilibrium between different species. Spectrum assignment was thus challenging given the heterogeneous nature of the sample but doable through judicious choice of selective labelling and concentration dependent studies.

  13. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  14. BEST-HNN and 2D-(HN) NH experiments for rapid backbone assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Paul, Subhradip; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2010-05-01

    HNN has proven to be an extremely valuable experiment for rapid and unambiguous backbone (H N, 15N) assignment in ( 13C, 15N) labeled proteins. However, low sensitivity of the experiment is often a limiting factor, especially when the transverse relaxation times ( T2) are short. We show here that BEST modification Schanda et al. (2006) [2] increases the sensitivity per unit time by more than a factor of 2.0 and thus substantially increases the speed of data collection; good 3D data can be collected in 8-10 h. Next, we present a simple method for amino-acid type identification based on simple 2D versions of the HNN experiment, labeled here as 2D-(HN) NH. Each of these experiments which produce anchor points for Gly, Ala, Ser/Thr residues, can be recorded in less than an hour. These enable rapid data acquisition, rapid analysis, and consequently rapid assignment of backbone (H N, 15N) resonances. The 2D-(HN) NH experiment does not involve aliphatic/aromatic protons and hence can be applied to deuterated protein samples as well, which is an additional advantage. The experiments have been demonstrated with human ubiquitin (76 aa) and acetic-acid denatured HIV-1 protease (99 aa), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  15. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  16. Resonance assignment of PsbP: an extrinsic protein from photosystem II of Spinacia oleracea.

    PubMed

    Rathner, Adriana; Chandra, Kousik; Rathner, Petr; Horničáková, Michaela; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Müller, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    PsbP (23 kDa) is an extrinsic eukaryotic protein of photosystem II found in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. It has been proven to be indispensable for proper functioning of the oxygen evolving complex. By interaction with other extrinsic proteins (PsbQ, PsbO and PsbR), it modulates the concentration of two cofactors of the water splitting reaction, Ca(2+) and Cl(-). The crystallographic structure of PsbP from Spinacia oleracea lacks the N-terminal part as well as two inner regions which were modelled as loops. Those unresolved parts are believed to be functionally crucial for the binding of PsbP to the thylakoid membrane. In this NMR study we report (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the backbone and side chain atoms of the PsbP protein. Based on these data, an estimate of the secondary structure has been made. The structural motifs found fit the resolved parts of the crystallographic structure very well. In addition, the complete assignment set provides preliminary insight into the dynamic regions.

  17. Toward a better understanding of structural divergences in proteins using different secondary structure assignment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. F. O.

    2014-04-01

    Structural disagreements on the location and quantity of secondary structure segments comprise a current challenging problem leading to several limitations for theoretical and applied research. This paper presents 116 structural evaluations by steric and hydrophobic interactions in secondary structures within a specific template group; determines simple prediction rules that calculate 88 occurrence frequencies of large and hydrophobic residues into target intra- and inter-subgroups with structure disagreements; and utilizes 42 comparisons between the methods PROMOTIF, DSSP and STRIDE. In the stereochemical predictions inside the subgroups there are predominantly excellent and/or good success amounts with their expected values, and the disclosure of a triple molecular mechanism by residue volumetric and hydrophobic ingredients. The method comparisons show high compatibility scores between them, therefore validating their seemingly incompatible assignments. Thus, the nonconsensual ascriptions are better understood and appreciated. Furthermore, such results suggest a broad utility of our assignment method for other benchmark datasets and known methods.

  18. A practical implementation of cross-spectrum in protein backbone resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Delaglio, Frank; Tjandra, Nico

    2010-04-01

    The concept of cross-spectrum is applied in protein NMR spectroscopy to assist in the backbone sequential resonance assignment. Cross-spectrum analysis is used routinely to reveal correlations in frequency domains as a means to reveal common features contained in multiple time series. Here the cross-spectrum between related NMR spectra, for example HNCO and HN(CA)CO, can be calculated with point-by-point multiplications along their common C' carbon axis. In the resulting higher order cross-spectrum, an enhanced correlation signal occurs at every common i-1 carbon frequency allowing the amide proton H(N) (and nitrogen N) resonances from residues i and i-1 to be identified. The cross-spectrum approach is demonstrated using 2D spectra H(N)CO, H(NCA)CO, H(NCO)CACB, and H(N)CACB measured on a 15N/13C double-labeled Ubiquitin sample. These 2D spectra are used to calculate two pseudo-3D cross-spectra, H(i)-H(i)(-1)-C'(i)(-1) and H(i)-H(i)(-1)-CA(i)(-1)CB(i)(-1). We show using this approach, backbone resonances of H, C', CA, and CB can be fully assigned without ambiguity. The cross-spectrum principle is expected to offer an easy, practical, and more quantitative approach for heteronuclear backbone resonance assignment. PMID:20053573

  19. Using MUSIC and CC(CO)NH for backbone assignment of two medium-sized proteins not fully accessible to standard 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Annette K; Frøystein, Nils Åge

    2014-01-01

    The backbone assignment of medium-sized proteins is rarely as straightforward as that of small proteins, and thus often requires creative solutions. Here, we describe the application of a combination of standard 3D heteronuclear methods with CC(CO)NH and a variety of MUltiplicity Selective In-phase Coherence transfer (MUSIC) experiments. Both CC(CO)NH and MUSIC are, in theory, very powerful methods for the backbone assignment of proteins. Due to low sensitivity, their use has usually been linked to small proteins only. However, we found that combining CC(CO)NH and MUSIC experiments simplified the assignment of two challenging medium-sized proteins of 13 and 19.5 kDa, respectively. These methods are to some extent complementary to each other: CC(CO)NH acquired with a long isotropic mixing time can identify amino acids with large aliphatic side chains. Whereas the most sensitive MUSIC experiments identify amino acid types that cannot be detected by CC(CO)NH, comprising the residues with acid and amide groups, and aromatic rings in their side chains. Together these methods provide a means of identifying the majority of peaks in the 2D 15N HSQC spectrum which simplifies the backbone assignment work even for proteins, e.g., small kinases, whose standard spectra resulted in little spectral resolution and low signal intensities.

  20. Writing Assignments with a Metacognitive Component Enhance Learning in a Large Introductory Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mynlieff, Michelle; Manogaran, Anita L.; St. Maurice, Martin; Eddinger, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Writing assignments, including note taking and written recall, should enhance retention of knowledge, whereas analytical writing tasks with metacognitive aspects should enhance higher-order thinking. In this study, we assessed how certain writing-intensive "interventions," such as written exam corrections and peer-reviewed writing…

  1. Enhanced biosynthetically directed fractional carbon-13 enrichment of proteins for backbone NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Broc R; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Gupta, Riju A; Rovnyak, David

    2015-11-01

    Routes to carbon-13 enrichment of bacterially expressed proteins include achieving uniform or positionally selective (e.g. ILV-Me, or (13)C', etc.) enrichment. We consider the potential for biosynthetically directed fractional enrichment (e.g. carbon-13 incorporation in the protein less than 100%) for performing routine n-(D)dimensional NMR spectroscopy of proteins. First, we demonstrate an approach to fractional isotope addition where the initial growth media containing natural abundance glucose is replenished at induction with a small amount (e.g. 10%(w/w)u-(13)C-glucose) of enriched nutrient. The approach considered here is to add 10% (e.g. 200mg for a 2g/L culture) u-(13)C-glucose at the induction time (OD600=0.8), resulting in a protein with enhanced (13)C incorporation that gives almost the same NMR signal levels as an exact 20% (13)C sample. Second, whereas fractional enrichment is used for obtaining stereospecific methyl assignments, we find that (13)C incorporation levels no greater than 20%(w/w) yield (13)C and (13)C-(13)C spin pair incorporation sufficient to conduct typical 3D-bioNMR backbone experiments on moderate instrumentation (600 MHz, RT probe). Typical 3D-bioNMR experiments of a fractionally enriched protein yield expected backbone connectivities, and did not show amino acid biases in this work, with one exception. When adding 10% u-(13)C glucose to expression media at induction, there is poor preservation of (13)Cα-(13)Cβ spin pairs in the amino acids ILV, leading to the absence of Cβ signals in HNCACB spectra for ILV, a potentially useful editing effect. Enhanced fractional carbon-13 enrichment provides lower-cost routes to high throughput protein NMR studies, and makes modern protein NMR more cost-accessible.

  2. NMR assignments for the telokin-like domain of bacteriophage P22 coat protein

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Alessandro A.; Fraser, LaTasha C. R.; Sheftic, Sarah R.; Suhanovsky, Margaret M.; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage P22 virion is assembled from identical coat protein monomers in a complex reaction that is generally conserved among tailed, double-stranded DNA bacteriophages and viruses. Many coat proteins of dsDNA viruses have structures based on the HK97 fold, but in some viruses and phages there are additional domains. In the P22 coat protein a “telokin-like” domain was recently identified, whose structure has not yet been characterized at high-resolution. Two recently published low-resolution cryo-EM reconstructions suggest markedly different folds for the telokin-like domain, that lead to alternative conclusions about its function in capsid assembly and stability. Here we report 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR resonance assignments for the telokin-like domain. The secondary structure predicted from the chemical shift values obtained in this work shows significant discrepancies from both cryo-EM models but agrees better with one of the models. In particular, the functionally important “D-loop” in one model shows chemical shifts and solvent exchange protection more consistent with β-sheet structure. Our work will set the basis for a high-resolution NMR structure determination of the telokin-like domain that will help improve the cryo-EM models, and in turn lead to a better understanding of how coat protein monomers assemble into the icosahedral capsids required for virulence. PMID:22987227

  3. Reliable resonance assignments of selected residues of proteins with known structure based on empirical NMR chemical shift prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da-Wei; Meng, Dan; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    A robust NMR resonance assignment method is introduced for proteins whose 3D structure has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the method is to obtain a subset of correct assignments from a parsimonious set of 3D NMR experiments of 15N, 13C labeled proteins. Chemical shifts of sequential residue pairs are predicted from static protein structures using PPM_One, which are then compared with the corresponding experimental shifts. Globally optimized weighted matching identifies the assignments that are robust with respect to small changes in NMR cross-peak positions. The method, termed PASSPORT, is demonstrated for 4 proteins with 100-250 amino acids using 3D NHCA and a 3D CBCA(CO)NH experiments as input producing correct assignments with high reliability for 22% of the residues. The method, which works best for Gly, Ala, Ser, and Thr residues, provides assignments that serve as anchor points for additional assignments by both manual and semi-automated methods or they can be directly used for further studies, e.g. on ligand binding, protein dynamics, or post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation.

  4. Resonance assignment of DVU2108 that is part of the Orange Protein complex in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Neca, António J; Soares, Rui; Carepo, Marta S P; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-04-01

    We report the 94 % assignment of DVU2108, a protein belonging to the Orange Protein family, that in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms a protein complex named the Orange Protein complex. This complex has been shown to be implicated in the cell division of this organism. DVU2108 is a conserved protein in anaerobic microorganisms and in Desulfovibrio gigas the homologous protein was isolated with a novel Mo-Cu cluster non-covalently attached to the polypeptide chain. However, the heterologously produced DVU2108 did not contain any bound metal. These assignments provide the means to characterize the interaction of DVU2108 with the proteins that form the Orange Protein complex using NMR methods. PMID:26373427

  5. Writing Assignments with a Metacognitive Component Enhance Learning in a Large Introductory Biology Course.

    PubMed

    Mynlieff, Michelle; Manogaran, Anita L; St Maurice, Martin; Eddinger, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Writing assignments, including note taking and written recall, should enhance retention of knowledge, whereas analytical writing tasks with metacognitive aspects should enhance higher-order thinking. In this study, we assessed how certain writing-intensive "interventions," such as written exam corrections and peer-reviewed writing assignments using Calibrated Peer Review and including a metacognitive component, improve student learning. We designed and tested the possible benefits of these approaches using control and experimental variables across and between our three-section introductory biology course. Based on assessment, students who corrected exam questions showed significant improvement on postexam assessment compared with their nonparticipating peers. Differences were also observed between students participating in written and discussion-based exercises. Students with low ACT scores benefited equally from written and discussion-based exam corrections, whereas students with midrange to high ACT scores benefited more from written than discussion-based exam corrections. Students scored higher on topics learned via peer-reviewed writing assignments relative to learning in an active classroom discussion or traditional lecture. However, students with low ACT scores (17-23) did not show the same benefit from peer-reviewed written essays as the other students. These changes offer significant student learning benefits with minimal additional effort by the instructors.

  6. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, K J; Yang, Y; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Hong, Mei

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D (13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, or 3D (15)N-(13)C-(13)C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-Cα-Cβ or N-Cα-Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  7. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-11-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of (13)C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against (13)C' or (13)C(α) spins coupled to (15)N. As a result, (1)H-(15)N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns.

  8. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  9. Semiautomatic sequence-specific assignment of proteins based on the tertiary structure--the program st2nmr.

    PubMed

    Pristovsek, Primoz; Rüterjans, Heinz; Jerala, Roman

    2002-02-01

    The sequence-specific assignment of resonances is still the most time-consuming procedure that is necessary as the first step in high-resolution NMR studies of proteins. In many cases a reliable three-dimensional (3D) structure of the protein is available, for example, from X-ray spectroscopy or homology modeling. Here we introduce the st2nmr program that uses the 3D structure and Nuclear Overhauser Effect spectroscopy (NOESY) peak list(s) to evaluate and optimize trial sequence-specific assignments of spin systems derived from correlation spectra to residues of the protein. A distance-dependent target function that scores trial assignments based on the presence of expected NOESY crosspeaks is optimized in a Monte Carlo fashion. The performance of the program st2nmr is tested on real NMR data of an alpha-helical (cytochrome c) and beta-sheet (lipocalin) protein using homology models and/or X-ray structures; it succeeded in completely reproducing the correct sequence-specific assignments in most cases using 2D and/or 15N/13C Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. Additionally to amino acid residues the program can also handle ligands that are bound to the protein, such as heme, and can be used as a complementary tool to fully automated assignment procedures. PMID:11908496

  10. Quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment in large-scale stochastic dynamic systems for resilient and economic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Goswami, K.; Datta, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    Failure of structural systems under dynamic loading can be prevented via active vibration control which shifts the damped natural frequencies of the systems away from the dominant range of a loading spectrum. The damped natural frequencies and the dynamic load typically show significant variations in practice. A computationally efficient methodology based on quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment technique and optimization under uncertainty has been formulated in the present work that will rigorously account for these variations and result in economic and resilient design of structures. A novel scheme based on hierarchical clustering and importance sampling is also developed in this work for accurate and efficient estimation of probability of failure to guarantee the desired resilience level of the designed system. Finally the most robust set of feedback matrices is selected from the set of probabilistically characterized optimal closed-loop system to implement the new methodology for design of active controlled structures. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the proposed methodology.

  11. Quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment in large-scale stochastic dynamic systems for resilient and economic design

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sonjoy; Goswami, Kundan; Datta, Biswa N.

    2014-12-10

    Failure of structural systems under dynamic loading can be prevented via active vibration control which shifts the damped natural frequencies of the systems away from the dominant range of loading spectrum. The damped natural frequencies and the dynamic load typically show significant variations in practice. A computationally efficient methodology based on quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment technique and optimization under uncertainty has been formulated in the present work that will rigorously account for these variations and result in an economic and resilient design of structures. A novel scheme based on hierarchical clustering and importance sampling is also developed in this work for accurate and efficient estimation of probability of failure to guarantee the desired resilience level of the designed system. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the proposed methodology.

  12. Quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment in large-scale stochastic dynamic systems for resilient and economic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sonjoy; Goswami, Kundan; Datta, Biswa N.

    2014-12-01

    Failure of structural systems under dynamic loading can be prevented via active vibration control which shifts the damped natural frequencies of the systems away from the dominant range of loading spectrum. The damped natural frequencies and the dynamic load typically show significant variations in practice. A computationally efficient methodology based on quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment technique and optimization under uncertainty has been formulated in the present work that will rigorously account for these variations and result in an economic and resilient design of structures. A novel scheme based on hierarchical clustering and importance sampling is also developed in this work for accurate and efficient estimation of probability of failure to guarantee the desired resilience level of the designed system. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the proposed methodology.

  13. Side-chain H and C resonance assignment in protonated/partially deuterated proteins using an improved 3D 13C-detected HCC-TOCSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kaifeng; Vögeli, Beat; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2005-06-01

    We propose the use of 13C-detected 3D HCC-TOCSY experiments for assignment of 1H and 13C resonances in protonated and partially deuterated proteins. The experiments extend 2D C-13-start and C-13-observe TOCSY type experiments proposed earlier [J. Biomol. NMR 26 (2) (2003) 167]. Introduction of the third 1H dimension to 2D TOCSY: (i) reduces the peak overlap and (ii) increases the sensitivity per unit time, even for highly deuterated (>85%) protein samples, which makes this improved method an attractive tool for the side-chain H and C assignment of average sized proteins with natural isotope abundance as well as large partially deuterated proteins. The experiments are demonstrated with a 16 kDa 15N, 13C-labeled non-deuterated apo-CcmE and a 48 kDa uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled and fractionally (˜90%) deuterated dimeric sFkpA. It is predicted that this method should be suitable for the assignment of methyl 13C and 1H chemical shifts of methyl protonated, highly deuterated and 13C-labeled proteins with even higher molecular weight.

  14. Protein-ligand NOE matching: a high-throughput method for binding pose evaluation that does not require protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Constantine, Keith L; Davis, Malcolm E; Metzler, William J; Mueller, Luciano; Claus, Brian L

    2006-06-01

    Given the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein, the binding pose of a ligand can be determined using distance restraints derived from assigned intra-ligand and protein-ligand nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs). A primary limitation of this approach is the need for resonance assignments of the ligand-bound protein. We have developed an approach that utilizes data from 3D 13C-edited, 13C/15N-filtered HSQC-NOESY spectra for evaluating ligand binding poses without requiring protein NMR resonance assignments. Only the 1H NMR assignments of the bound ligand are essential. Trial ligand binding poses are generated by any suitable method (e.g., computational docking). For each trial binding pose, the 3D 13C-edited, 13C/15N-filtered HSQC-NOESY spectrum is predicted, and the predicted and observed patterns of protein-ligand NOEs are matched and scored using a fast, deterministic bipartite graph matching algorithm. The best scoring (lowest "cost") poses are identified. Our method can incorporate any explicit restraints or protein assignment data that are available, and many extensions of the basic procedure are feasible. Only a single sample is required, and the method can be applied to both slowly and rapidly exchanging ligands. The method was applied to three test cases: one complex involving muscle fatty acid-binding protein (mFABP) and two complexes involving the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) I-domain. Without using experimental protein NMR assignments, the method identified the known binding poses with good accuracy. The addition of experimental protein NMR assignments improves the results. Our "NOE matching" approach is expected to be widely applicable; i.e., it does not appear to depend on a fortuitous distribution of binding pocket residues.

  15. A new strategy for sequential assignment of intrinsically unstructured proteins based on 15N single isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Gerard, Melanie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new efficient strategy for the sequential assignment of amide resonances of a conventional 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of intrinsically unfolded proteins, based on composite NOESY-TOCSY and TOCSY-NOESY mixing times. These composite mixing times lead to a Hα-proton mediated unidirectional transfer of amide to amide proton. We have implemented the composite mixing times in an HSQC-NOESY-HSQC manner to obtain directional connectivity between amides of neighbouring residues. We experimentally determine the optimal mixing times for both transfer schemes, and demonstrate its use in the assignment for both a fragment of the neuronal tau protein and for α-synuclein.

  16. Proton and nitrogen sequential assignments and secondary structure determination of the human FK506 and rapamycin binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.K.; Michnick, S.W.; Karplus, M.; Schreiber, S.L. )

    1991-05-14

    Sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N assignments of human FKBP, a cytosolic binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, are reported. A combination of homonuclear and relayed heteronuclear experiments has enabled assignment of 98 of 99 backbone amide NHs, 119 of 120 C{sup {alpha}}Hs, 97 of 99 non-proline amide {sup 15}Ns, and 375 of 412 side-chain resonances of this 107-residue protein. Long-range NOEs are used to demonstrate that FKBP has a novel folding topology consisting of a five-stranded antiparallel {beta} sheet with +3, +1, {minus}3, +1 loop connectivity.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy and mode assignments for an analog of the green fluorescent protein chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A. P.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W. W.; Reid, P. J.

    2001-07-01

    Infrared absorption (IR), Raman, and resonance Raman spectra have been obtained from 500 to 1700 cm -1 for 4-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethyl-imidazolinone (HBDI), an analog of the green-fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore. Numerous transitions are evident in both the IR and Raman spectra, with the resonance Raman spectrum of HBDI dominated by a subset of transitions in the 1430-1700 cm -1 region. Assignment of the transitions in this frequency region to the corresponding normal coordinates is accomplished through computational studies employing density functional and Hartree-Fock theory. The computational results indicate that the vibrational transitions in this frequency range are dominated by in-plane stretching modes that are localized to the imidazolinone or tyrosine portions of the chromophore, rather than being delocalized over the entire chromophore. No evidence is obtained for significant excited-state structural evolution along the O-H stretching coordinate. The implications of these findings with respect to the excited-state proton transfer dynamics of GFP are discussed.

  18. A spectral correlation function for efficient sequential NMR assignments of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-11-01

    A new computer-based approach is described for efficient sequence-specific assignment of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins. For this purpose three-dimensional (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra are divided up into two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H strips which extend over the entire spectral width along one dimension and have a width of ca. 100 Hz, centered about the amide proton chemical shifts along the other dimension. A spectral correlation function enables sorting of these strips according to proximity of the corresponding residues in the amino acid sequence. Thereby, starting from a given strip in the spectrum, the probability of its corresponding to the C-terminal neighboring residue is calculated for all other strips from the similarity of their peak patterns with a pattern predicted for the sequentially adjoining residue, as manifested in the scalar product of the vectors representing the predicted and measured peak patterns. Tests with five different proteins containing both α-helices and β-sheets, and ranging in size from 58 to 165 amino acid residues show that the discrimination achieved between the sequentially neighboring residue and all other residues compares well with that obtained with an unguided interactive search of pairs of sequentially neighboring strips, with important savings in the time needed for complete analysis of 3D (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra. The integration of this routine into the program package XEASY ensures that remaining ambiguities can be resolved by visual inspection of the strips, combined with reference to the amino acid sequence and information on spin-system types obtained from additional NMR spectra.

  19. Investigations of Protein Structure and Function Using the Scientific Literature: An Assignment for an Undergraduate Cell Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate biology curricula are being modified to model and teach the activities of scientists better. The assignment described here, one that investigates protein structure and function, was designed for use in a sophomore-level cell physiology course at Earlham College. Students work in small groups to read and present in poster format on…

  20. Reduced dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH experiment: an efficient backbone assignment tool for NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-09-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment of proteins forms the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone ((1)H, (15)N, (13)C(α) and (13)C') resonances of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality experiment--(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone ((13)C(α) and (13)C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text). The resulted increased dispersion of peaks--which is different in sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) frequency regions--greatly facilitates the analysis of the spectrum by resolving the problems (associated with routine assignment strategies) arising because of degenerate amide (15)N and backbone (13)C chemical shifts. Further, the spectrum provides direct distinction between intra- and inter-residue correlations because of their opposite peak signs. The other beneficial feature of the spectrum is that it provides: (a) multiple unidirectional sequential (i→i + 1) (15)N and (13)C correlations and (b) facile identification of certain specific triplet sequences which serve as check points for mapping the stretches of sequentially connected HSQC cross peaks on to the primary sequence for assigning the resonances sequence specifically. On top of all this, the F₂-F₃ planes of the spectrum corresponding to sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) chemical shifts enable rapid and unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks through matching their coordinates in these two planes (see the text). Overall, the experiment presented here will serve as an important backbone assignment tool for variety of structural and functional proteomics and drug discovery research programs by NMR involving well behaved small folded proteins (MW

  1. CH3-specific NMR assignment of alanine, isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins using a single sample.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Hamelin, Olivier; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Marion, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    A new strategy for the NMR assignment of aliphatic side-chains in large perdeuterated proteins is proposed. It involves an alternative isotopic labeling protocol, the use of an out-and-back (13)C-(13)C TOCSY experiment ((H)C-TOCSY-C-TOCSY-(C)H) and an optimized non-uniform sampling protocol. It has long been known that the non-linearity of an aliphatic spin-system (for example Ile, Val, or Leu) substantially compromises the efficiency of the TOCSY transfers. To permit the use of this efficient pulse scheme, a series of optimized precursors were designed to yield linear (13)C perdeuterated side-chains with a single protonated CH3 group in these three residues. These precursors were added to the culture medium for incorporation into expressed proteins. For Val and Leu residues, the topologically different spin-systems introduced for the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups enable stereospecific assignment. All CH3 can be simultaneously assigned on a single sample using a TOCSY experiment. It only requires the tuning of a mixing delay and is thus more versatile than the relayed COSY experiment. Enhanced resolution and sensi-tivity can be achieved by non-uniform sampling combined with the removal of the large JCC coupling by deconvolution prior to the processing by iterative soft thresholding. This strategy has been used on malate synthase G where a large percentage of the CH3 groups could be correlated directly up to the backbone Ca. It is anticipated that this robust combined strategy can be routinely applied to large proteins.

  2. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER KD

    2007-12-27

    This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up

  3. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    WEBER RA

    2009-01-16

    The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste

  4. 1H- and 15N-NMR assignment and solution structure of the chemotactic Escherichia coli Che Y protein.

    PubMed

    Bruix, M; Pascual, J; Santoro, J; Prieto, J; Serrano, L; Rico, M

    1993-08-01

    Che Y is a 129-residue parallel alpha/beta protein involved in bacterial chemotaxis. We have used this protein as a model to study the folding reaction of parallel alpha/beta proteins. As a first step we carried out the complete assignment of the 1H and 15N spectra from Escherichia coli Che Y protein on the basis of two-dimensional 1H homonuclear and 1H-15N heteronuclear experiments by using sequence-specific methods. Our assignments differ from the preliminary assignments made by Kar et al. [Kar, L., Matsumura, P. & Johnson, M.E. (1992) Biochem. J. 287, 521-531] of aromatic residues obtained by comparison of NOEs with short proton-proton distances in the crystal structure of Che Y. The analysis of the extension of the secondary elements, as well as a preliminary calculation of the three-dimensional structure, indicate that the solution structure is closely coincident with the single crystal structure determined by X-ray diffraction.

  5. A Monte Carlo/Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Sequential Resonance Assignment in Solid State NMR of Uniformly Labeled Proteins with Magic-Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-01-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/13Cα crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomolec. NMR, vol. 34, pp. 75-87, 2006) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal. PMID:20547467

  6. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata: Sequential and stereospecific resonance assignment and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, P.C.; Clore, G.M.; Beress, L.; Gronenborn, A.M. )

    1989-03-07

    The sequential resonance assignment of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata is presented. This is carried out with two-dimensional NMR techniques to identify through-bond and through-space (< 5{angstrom}) connectivities. Added spectral complexity arises from the fact that the sample is an approximately 1:1 mixture of two BDS-I isoproteins, (Leu-18)-BDS-I and (Phe-18)-BDS-I. Complete assignments, however, are obtained, largely due to the increased resolution and sensitivity afforded at 600 MHz. In addition, the stereospecific assignment of a large number of {beta}-methylene protons is achieved from an analysis of the pattern of {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}{beta}} coupling constants and the relative magnitudes of intraresidue NOEs involving the NH, C{sup {alpha}}H, and C{sup {beta}}H protons. Regular secondary structure elements are deduced from a qualitative interpretation of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement, {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constant, and amide NH exchange data. A triple-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet is found to be related to that found in partially homologous sea anemone polypeptide toxins.

  7. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes for sensitive fluorescent assignment of protein inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Klingstedt, Therése; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nogalska, Anna; Prokop, Stefan; Häggqvist, Bo; Danielsson, Olof; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie; Heppner, Frank L; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-03-18

    Small hydrophobic ligands identifying intracellular protein deposits are of great interest, as protein inclusion bodies are the pathological hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Here we report that fluorescent amyloid ligands, termed luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), rapidly and with high sensitivity detect protein inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle tissue from patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). LCOs having a conjugated backbone of at least five thiophene units emitted strong fluorescence upon binding, and showed co-localization with proteins reported to accumulate in s-IBM protein inclusion bodies. Compared with conventional amyloid ligands, LCOs identified a larger fraction of immunopositive inclusion bodies. When the conjugated thiophene backbone was extended with terminal carboxyl groups, the LCO revealed striking spectral differences between distinct protein inclusion bodies. We conclude that 1) LCOs are sensitive, rapid and powerful tools for identifying protein inclusion bodies and 2) LCOs identify a wider range of protein inclusion bodies than conventional amyloid ligands.

  8. Concerted two-dimensional NMR approaches to hydrogen-1, carbon-13, and nitrogen-15 resonance assignments in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Reily, M.D.; Westler, W.M.; Ulrich, E.L.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-01-10

    When used in concert, one-bond carbon-carbon correlations, one-bond and multiple-bond proton-carbon correlations, and multiple-bond proton-nitrogen correlations, derived from two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra of isotopically enriched proteins, provide a reliable method of assigning proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances. In contrast to procedures that simply extend proton assignments to carbon or nitrogen resonances, this technique assigns proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances coordinately on the basis of their integrated coupling networks. Redundant spin coupling pathways provide ways of resolving overlaps frequently encountered in homonuclear {sup 1}H 2D NMR spectra and facilitate the elucidation of complex proton spin systems. Carbon-carbon and proton-carbon couplings can be used to bridge the aromatic and aliphatic parts of proton spin systems; this avoids possible ambiguities that may result from the use of nuclear Overhauser effects to assign aromatic amino acid signals. The technique is illustrated for Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin and cytochrome c-553, both uniformly enriched with carbon-13 (26%) or nitrogen-15 (98%).

  9. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation.

    PubMed

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  10. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  11. Identification and RNA segment assignment of six structural proteins of Scylla serrata reovirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yangyang; Fan, Dongyang; Zhang, Zhao; Yang, Jifang; Liu, Jingwen; Chen, Jigang

    2016-08-01

    Scylla serrata reovirus (SsRV) is one of the most prevalent viral pathogens of the mud crab (S. serrata). The virus represents an unassigned novel genus in the Reoviridae family, and contains 12 double-stranded RNA genomic segments. Previous analysis of virion proteins concluded that SsRV contains at least eight structural proteins, ranging from 25 to 160 kDa. Here, tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Western blotting were used to re-identify the structural proteins. The results indicate that proteins encoded by SsRV segments S1, S3, S6, S9, S11, and S12 are structural proteins.

  12. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    PubMed

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  13. The Personal Response: A Novel Writing Assignment to Engage First Year Students in Large Human Biology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.; Poronnik, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of highly valued scientific writing skills in the first year of university is challenging. This report describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a novel written assignment, "The Personal Response" and accompanying Peer Review, in the course, Human Biology (BIOL1015) at The University of Queensland. These assignments were…

  14. CATH FunFHMMer web server: protein functional annotations using functional family assignments.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Ward, John; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-07-01

    The widening function annotation gap in protein databases and the increasing number and diversity of the proteins being sequenced presents new challenges to protein function prediction methods. Multidomain proteins complicate the protein sequence-structure-function relationship further as new combinations of domains can expand the functional repertoire, creating new proteins and functions. Here, we present the FunFHMMer web server, which provides Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for query protein sequences based on the functional classification of the domain-based CATH-Gene3D resource. Our server also provides valuable information for the prediction of functional sites. The predictive power of FunFHMMer has been validated on a set of 95 proteins where FunFHMMer performs better than BLAST, Pfam and CDD. Recent validation by an independent international competition ranks FunFHMMer as one of the top function prediction methods in predicting GO annotations for both the Biological Process and Molecular Function Ontology. The FunFHMMer web server is available at http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer.

  15. CATH FunFHMMer web server: protein functional annotations using functional family assignments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G.; Dawson, Natalie L.; Ward, John; Orengo, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    The widening function annotation gap in protein databases and the increasing number and diversity of the proteins being sequenced presents new challenges to protein function prediction methods. Multidomain proteins complicate the protein sequence–structure–function relationship further as new combinations of domains can expand the functional repertoire, creating new proteins and functions. Here, we present the FunFHMMer web server, which provides Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for query protein sequences based on the functional classification of the domain-based CATH-Gene3D resource. Our server also provides valuable information for the prediction of functional sites. The predictive power of FunFHMMer has been validated on a set of 95 proteins where FunFHMMer performs better than BLAST, Pfam and CDD. Recent validation by an independent international competition ranks FunFHMMer as one of the top function prediction methods in predicting GO annotations for both the Biological Process and Molecular Function Ontology. The FunFHMMer web server is available at http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer. PMID:25964299

  16. Letter to the Editor: H-1, C-13 and N-15 Assignments for the Archaeglobus fulgidis Protein AF2095.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Robert; Acton, Thomas; Chiang, Yiwen; Rajan, Paranji K.; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Liu, Jinfeng; Ma, LiChung; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano

    2004-09-01

    targeted for structural analysis by NESG. AF2095 belongs to the Pfam family PF01981 - UPF0099, protein domain family of unknown function that has been found in yeast, archaebacteria and eubacteria. AF2095 has been assigned to NESG Cluster ID:17431, a set of fourteen protein sequences with high (> {approx}30%) sequence identity (Liu, 2004). This cluster includes proteins of human, Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis, yeast, archaeal and eubacterial origin. A total of fifty-six proteins are identified when the analysis is expanded to include all available genomes. Therefore, determining the NMR solution structure of AF2095 can be leveraged to infer 3D structural information for at least an additional fifty-five proteins. Here we report the near complete 1H, 15N, 13CO, and 13C NMR assignments and secondary structure of AF2095. These data provide a basis for determining the solution structure of AF2095, for further investigation of the function of this protein and for providing representative structural and functional information for the protein domain family that includes AF2095.

  17. NMR resonance assignments of the lantibiotic immunity protein NisI from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina Alexandra; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Berninger, Lucija; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small antimicrobial peptide which acts against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains express four genes for self-protection against their own antimicrobial compound. This immunity system consists of the lipoprotein NisI and the ABC transporter NisFEG. NisI is attached to the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane via a covalently linked diacylglycerol anchor. Both the lipoprotein and the ABC transporter are needed for full immunity but the exact immunity mechanism is still unclear. To gain insights into the highly specific immunity mechanism of nisin producing strains on a structural level we present here the backbone resonance assignment of NisI (25.8 kDa) as well as the virtually complete (1)H,(15)N,(13)C chemical shift assignments for the isolated 12.7 kDa N-terminal and 14.6 kDa C-terminal domains of NisI.

  18. NMR resonance assignments of the lantibiotic immunity protein NisI from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina Alexandra; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Berninger, Lucija; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small antimicrobial peptide which acts against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains express four genes for self-protection against their own antimicrobial compound. This immunity system consists of the lipoprotein NisI and the ABC transporter NisFEG. NisI is attached to the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane via a covalently linked diacylglycerol anchor. Both the lipoprotein and the ABC transporter are needed for full immunity but the exact immunity mechanism is still unclear. To gain insights into the highly specific immunity mechanism of nisin producing strains on a structural level we present here the backbone resonance assignment of NisI (25.8 kDa) as well as the virtually complete (1)H,(15)N,(13)C chemical shift assignments for the isolated 12.7 kDa N-terminal and 14.6 kDa C-terminal domains of NisI. PMID:25613223

  19. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    TU, T.A.

    2007-01-04

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  20. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  1. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  2. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of an IgG-binding domain from protein G

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, L.Y.; Yang, J.C.; Derrick, J.P.; Sutcliffe, M.J.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Murphy, J.P.; Goward, C.R.; Atkinson, T. )

    1991-06-04

    Protein G is a member of a class of cell surface bacterial proteins from Streptococcus that bind IgG with high affinity. A fragment of molecular mass 6,988, which retains IgG-binding activity, has been generated by proteolytic digestion and analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. Two-dimenstional DQF-COSY, TOCSY, and NOESY spectra have been employed to assign the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the peptide. Elements of regular secondary structure have been identified by using nuclear Overhauser enhancement, coupling constant, and amide proton exchange data. The secondary structure consists of a central {alpha}-helix (Ala28-Val44), flanked by two portions of {beta}-sheet (Val5-Val26 and Asp45-Lys62). This is a fundamentally different arrangement of secondary structure from that of protein A, which is made up of three consecutive {alpha}-helics in free solution. The authors conclude that the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of protein A and protein G with IgG are different.

  3. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed Central

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A.; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T.; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtained from triple resonance experiments HNCACB, HN(CO)CACB, HNCO, CC(CO)NH, and [15N]-edited TOCSY, and HCCH-TOCSY. Secondary structure was determined by using secondary chemical shifts and characteristic NOEs. In addition, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings were measured from a spin-state selective [1H, 15N] correlation spectrum acquired from a sample dissolved in a dilute liquid crystal. Four EF-hand motifs with characteristic helix-loop-helix patterns were observed. Three of these are typical calcium-binding EF-hands, whereas site 2 is an atypical nonbinding site. The global fold of calerythrin was assessed by dipolar couplings. Measured dipolar couplings were compared with values calculated from four crystal structures of proteins with sequence homology to calerythrin. These data allowed us to recognize an overall similarity between the folds of calerythrin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins from the sandworm Nereis diversicolor and the amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum. PMID:10631973

  4. Pseudo-4D triple resonance experiments to resolve HN overlap in the backbone assignment of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Bagai, Ireena; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-02-01

    The solution NMR resonance assignment of the protein backbone is most commonly carried out using triple resonance experiments that involve (15)N and (1)HN resonances. The assignment becomes problematic when there is resonance overlap of (15)N-(1)HN cross peaks. For such residues, one cannot unambiguously link the "left" side of the NH root to the "right" side, and the residues associated with such overlapping HN resonances remain often unassigned. Here we present a solution to this problem: a hybrid (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HN(CO)CA(CON)CA sequence. In this experiment, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the Ca(i-1) resonance, which helps in resolving the ambiguity involved in connecting the Ca(i) and Ca(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots. The experiment has limited sensitivity, and is only suited for small or unfolded proteins. In a companion experiment, (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HNCO(N)CA, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the CO(i-1) resonance, hence resolving the ambiguity existent in pairing up the Ca(i) and CO(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots. PMID:21190062

  5. Assigning DYW-type PPR proteins to RNA editing sites in the funariid mosses Physcomitrella patens and Funaria hygrometrica.

    PubMed

    Rüdinger, Mareike; Szövényi, Péter; Rensing, Stefan A; Knoop, Volker

    2011-07-01

    The plant-specific pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins with variable PPR repeat lengths (PLS-type) and protein extensions up to the carboxyterminal DYW domain have received attention as specific recognition factors for the C-to-U type of RNA editing events in plant organelles. Here, we report a DYW-protein knockout in the model plant Physcomitrella patens specifically affecting mitochondrial RNA editing positions cox1eU755SL and rps14eU137SL. Assignment of DYW proteins and RNA editing sites might best be corroborated by data from a taxon with a slightly different, yet similarly manageable low number of editing sites and DYW proteins. To this end we investigated the mitochondrial editing status of the related funariid moss Funaria hygrometrica. We find that: (i) Funaria lacks three mitochondrial RNA editing positions present in Physcomitrella, (ii) that F. hygrometrica cDNA sequence data identify nine DYW proteins as clear orthologues of their P. patens counterparts, and (iii) that the 'missing' 10th DYW protein in F. hygrometrica is responsible for two mitochondrial editing sites in P. patens lacking in F. hygrometrica (nad3eU230SL, nad4eU272SL). Interestingly, the third site of RNA editing missing in F. hygrometrica (rps14eU137SL) is addressed by the DYW protein characterized here and the presence of its orthologue in F. hygrometrica is explained through its simultaneous action on site cox1eU755SL conserved in both mosses.

  6. Sparsely-sampled High-resolution 4-D Experiments for Efficient Backbone Resonance Assignment of Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jie; Wu, Jihui; Zhou, Pei

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play important roles in many critical cellular processes. Due to their limited chemical shift dispersion, IDPs often require four pairs of resonance connectivities (Hα, Cα, Cβ and CO) for establishing sequential backbone assignment. Because most conventional 4-D triple-resonance experiments share an overlapping Cα evolution period, combining existing 4-D experiments does not offer an optimal solution for non-redundant collection of a complete set of backbone resonances. Using alternative chemical shift evolution schemes, we propose a new pair of 4-D triple resonance experiments—HA(CA)CO(CA)NH/HA(CA)CONH—that complement the 4-D HNCACB/HN(CO)CACB experiments to provide complete backbone resonance information. Collection of high-resolution 4-D spectra with sparse sampling and FFT-CLEAN processing enables efficient acquisition and assignment of complete backbone resonances of IDPs. Importantly, because the CLEAN procedure iteratively identifies resonance signals and removes their associating aliasing artifacts, it greatly reduces the dependence of the reconstruction quality on sampling schemes and produces high-quality spectra even with less-than-optimal sampling schemes. PMID:21277815

  7. How do you assign persistent identifiers to extracts from large, complex, dynamic data sets that underpin scholarly publications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Car, Nicholas; Evans, Benjamin; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Persistent identifiers in the form of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are becoming more mainstream, assigned at both the collection and dataset level. For static datasets, this is a relatively straight-forward matter. However, many new data collections are dynamic, with new data being appended, models and derivative products being revised with new data, or the data itself revised as processing methods are improved. Further, because data collections are becoming accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: they also can easily mix and match data from multiple collections, each of which can have a complex history. Inevitably extracts from such dynamic data sets underpin scholarly publications, and this presents new challenges. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has been experiencing and making progress towards addressing these issues. The NCI is large node of the Research Data Services initiative (RDS) of the Australian Government's research infrastructure, which currently makes available over 10 PBytes of priority research collections, ranging from geosciences, geophysics, environment, and climate, through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and social sciences. Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI and then processed there to higher-level data products or directly analysed. Individual datasets range from multi-petabyte computational models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution datasets. To facilitate access, maximise reuse and enable integration across the disciplines, datasets have been organized on a platform called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Combined, the NERDIP data collections form a rich and diverse asset for researchers: their co-location and standardization optimises the value of existing data, and forms a new resource to underpin data-intensive Science. New publication

  8. Automated Assignment of MS/MS Cleavable Cross-Links in Protein 3D-Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Michael; Pettelkau, Jens; Fritzsche, Romy; Ihling, Christian H.; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    CID-MS/MS cleavable cross-linkers hold an enormous potential for an automated analysis of cross-linked products, which is essential for conducting structural proteomics studies. The created characteristic fragment ion patterns can easily be used for an automated assignment and discrimination of cross-linked products. To date, there are only a few software solutions available that make use of these properties, but none allows for an automated analysis of cleavable cross-linked products. The MeroX software fills this gap and presents a powerful tool for protein 3D-structure analysis in combination with MS/MS cleavable cross-linkers. We show that MeroX allows an automatic screening of characteristic fragment ions, considering static and variable peptide modifications, and effectively scores different types of cross-links. No manual input is required for a correct assignment of cross-links and false discovery rates are calculated. The self-explanatory graphical user interface of MeroX provides easy access for an automated cross-link search platform that is compatible with commonly used data file formats, enabling analysis of data originating from different instruments. The combination of an MS/MS cleavable cross-linker with a dedicated software tool for data analysis provides an automated workflow for 3D-structure analysis of proteins. MeroX is available at www.StavroX.com .

  9. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2008-06-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 (contig 83.1_1_243_746) contains the sequence for an hypothetical protein that falls into the DUF683 family. As observed for the other 54 DUF683 proteins currently listed in the GenBank database, this 78-residue (9.0 kDa) protein in Cyanothece is also found in a nitrogen fixation gene cluster suggesting that it is involved in the process. To date no structural information exists for any of the proteins in the DUF683 family. In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 may play in nitrogen fixation and to obtain structural information for a member of the DUF683 protein family, a construct containing DUF683 from Cyanothece 51142 was generated, expressed, purified, and the solution properties characterized. A total rotational correlation time (tc) of 17.1 ns was estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggesting a molecular weight of ~ 40 kDa, an observation dictating that DUF683 is a tetramer in solution. Using triple-labeled (2H, 13C, 15N) and residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids (L, K, V, and E/Q) samples, most of the backbone and side chain resonances for DUF683 were assigned. The 13C alpha chemical shifts and NOESY NMR data indicate that the protein is helical from K18-E75.

  10. Solid-state NMR resonance assignments of the filament-forming CARD domain of the innate immunity signaling protein MAVS.

    PubMed

    He, Lichun; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in the innate immune response against viral infections. Viral RNA present in the cytoplasm is detected by retinoic acid inducible gene I like receptors, which then activate MAVS via heterotypic interactions between their respective caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARD). This leads to the formation of active, high molecular weight MAVS complexes formed by homotypic interactions between the single N-terminal CARDs of MAVS. Filaments formed by the N-terminal MAVS(CARD) alone are sufficient to induce the autocatalytic conversion from a monomeric to an aggregated state in a prion-like manner. Here, we present the nearly complete spectroscopic (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of human MAVS(CARD) filaments obtained from a single sample by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding secondary chemical shifts suggest that the filamentous form of MAVS(CARD) retains an exclusively alpha-helical fold that is very similar to the X-ray structure determined previously from monomeric MAVS(CARD)-maltose binding protein fusion constructs.

  11. A Bayesian-probability-based method for assigning protein backbone dihedral angles based on chemical shifts and local sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Haiyan

    2007-01-01

    Chemical shifts contain substantial information about protein local conformations. We present a method to assign individual protein backbone dihedral angles into specific regions on the Ramachandran map based on the amino acid sequences and the chemical shifts of backbone atoms of tripeptide segments. The method uses a scoring function derived from the Bayesian probability for the central residue of a query tripeptide segment to have a particular conformation. The Ramachandran map is partitioned into representative regions at two levels of resolution. The lower resolution partitioning is equivalent to the conventional definitions of different secondary structure regions on the map. At the higher resolution level, the alpha and beta regions are further divided into subregions. Predictions are attempted at both levels of resolution. We compared our method with TALOS using the original TALOS database, and obtained comparable results. Although TALOS may produce the best results with currently available databases which are much enlarged, the Bayesian-probability-based approach can provide a quantitative measure for the reliability of predictions.

  12. 3D NMR spectroscopy for resonance assignment and structure elucidation of proteins under MAS: novel pulse schemes and sensitivity considerations.

    PubMed

    Heise, Henrike; Seidel, Karsten; Etzkorn, Manuel; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2005-03-01

    Two types of 3D MAS NMR experiments are introduced, which combine standard (NC,CC) transfer schemes with (1H,1H) mixing to simultaneously detect connectivities and structural constraints of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with high spectral resolution. The homonuclear CCHHC and CCC experiments are recorded with one double-quantum evolution dimension in order to avoid a cubic diagonal in the spectrum. Depending on the second transfer step, spin systems or proton-proton contacts can be determined with reduced spectral overlap. The heteronuclear NHHCC experiment encodes NH-HC proton-proton interactions, which are indicative for the backbone conformation of the protein. The third dimension facilitates the identification of the amino acid spin system. Experimental results on U-[15N,13C]valine and U-[15N,13C]ubiquitin demonstrate their usefulness for resonance assignments and for the determination of structural constraints. Furthermore, we give a detailed analysis of alternative multidimensional sampling schemes and their effect on sensitivity and resolution. PMID:15705514

  13. Disulfide assignment of the C-terminal cysteine knot of agouti-related protein (AGRP) by direct sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Y; Zeni, L; Rosenfeld, R D; Stark, K L; Rohde, M F; Haniu, M

    1999-12-01

    We have assigned the disulfide structure of Md-65 agouti-related protein (Md65-AGRP) using differential reduction and alkylation followed by direct sequencing analysis. The mature human AGRP is a single polypeptide chain of 112 amino acid residues, consisting of an N-terminal acidic region and a unique C-terminal cysteine-rich domain. The C-terminal domain, a 48 amino acid peptide named Md65-AGRP, was expressed in Escherichia coil cells and refolded under different conditions from the mature recombinant protein. The disulfide bonds in the cystine knot structure of Md65-AGRP were partially reduced using tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (TCEP) under acidic conditions, followed by alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The procedure generated several isoforms with varying degrees of NEM alkylation. The multiple forms of Md65-AGRP generated by partial reduction and NEM modification were then completely reduced and carboxymethylated to identify unreactive disulfide bonds. Differentially labeled Md65-AGRP were directly sequenced and analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. The results confirmed that Md65-AGRP contained the same disulfide structure as that of Md5-AGRP reported previously [Bures, E. J., Hui, J. O., Young, Y. et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 12172-12177].

  14. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  15. Backbone ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N resonance assignments of the α-helical membrane protein TM0026 from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Kroncke, Brett M; Columbus, Linda

    2013-10-01

    Critical to the use of solution NMR to describe the structure and flexibility of membrane proteins is the thorough understanding of the degree of perturbation induced by the detergent or other membrane mimetic. To develop a deeper understanding of the interaction between membrane proteins and micelles or bicelles, we will investigate the differences in structure and flexibility of a model membrane protein TM0026 from Thermotoga maritima using solution NMR. A comparison of the structural differences between TM0026 solubilized in different detergent combinations will provide important insight into the degree of modulation of membrane proteins by detergent physical properties. Here we report the nearly complete backbone and Cβ resonance assignments of the two transmembrane helical model protein TM0026. These assignments are the first step to using TM0026 to elucidate the interaction between membrane proteins and membrane mimetics.

  16. Comparative 2D NMR studies of human insulin and des-pentapeptide insulin: Sequential resonance assignment and implications for protein dynamics and receptor recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Qingxin ); Weiss, M.A. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1991-06-04

    The solution structure and dynamics of human insulin are ivestigated by 2D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in reference to a previously analyzed analogue, des-pentapeptide (B26-B30) insulin. This spectroscopic comparison is of interest since (i) the structure of the C-terminal region of the B-chain has not been determined in the monomeric state and (ii) the role of this region in binding to the insulin receptor has been the subject of long-standing speculation. The present NMR studies are conducted in the presence of an organic cosolvent (20% acetic acid), under which conditions both proteins are monomeric and stably folded. Complete sequential assignment of human insulin is obtained and leads to the following conclusions. (1) The secondary structure of the insulin monomer (three {alpha}-helices and B-chain {beta}-turn) is similar to that observed in the 2-Zn crustal state. (2) The folding of DPI is essentially the same as the corresponding portion of intact insulin, in accord with the similarities between their respective crystal structues. (3) residues B24-B28 adopt an extended configuration in the monomer and pack against the hydrophobic core as in crystallographic dimers; residues B29 and B30 are largely disordered. (4) The insulin fold is shown to provide a model for collective motions in a protein with implications for the mechanism of protein-protein recognition. To their knowledge, this paper describes the first detailed analysis of a protein NMR spectrum under conditions of extensive conformational broadening.

  17. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-09-01

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled (13)C,(15)N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein. PMID:27586017

  18. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Raikwal, Nisha; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H/15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide (1H/15N) and carbon (13Cα/13C‧) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  19. Improved Peak Detection and Deconvolution of Native Electrospray Mass Spectra from Large Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jonathan; Trnka, Michael J.; Roh, Soung-Hun; Robinson, Philip J. J.; Shiau, Carrie; Fujimori, Danica Galonic; Chiu, Wah; Burlingame, Alma L.; Guan, Shenheng

    2015-12-01

    Native electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (native MS) measures biomolecules under conditions that preserve most aspects of protein tertiary and quaternary structure, enabling direct characterization of large intact protein assemblies. However, native spectra derived from these assemblies are often partially obscured by low signal-to-noise as well as broad peak shapes because of residual solvation and adduction after the electrospray process. The wide peak widths together with the fact that sequential charge state series from highly charged ions are closely spaced means that native spectra containing multiple species often suffer from high degrees of peak overlap or else contain highly interleaved charge envelopes. This situation presents a challenge for peak detection, correct charge state and charge envelope assignment, and ultimately extraction of the relevant underlying mass values of the noncovalent assemblages being investigated. In this report, we describe a comprehensive algorithm developed for addressing peak detection, peak overlap, and charge state assignment in native mass spectra, called PeakSeeker. Overlapped peaks are detected by examination of the second derivative of the raw mass spectrum. Charge state distributions of the molecular species are determined by fitting linear combinations of charge envelopes to the overall experimental mass spectrum. This software is capable of deconvoluting heterogeneous, complex, and noisy native mass spectra of large protein assemblies as demonstrated by analysis of (1) synthetic mononucleosomes containing severely overlapping peaks, (2) an RNA polymerase II/α-amanitin complex with many closely interleaved ion signals, and (3) human TriC complex containing high levels of background noise.

  20. 3D HCCH 3-TOCSY for Resonance Assignment of Methyl-Containing Side Chains in 13C-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrín, Dušan; Uhrínová, Stanislava; Leadbeater, Claire; Nairn, Jacqueline; Price, Nicholas C.; Barlow, Paul N.

    2000-02-01

    Two 3D experiments, (H)CCH3-TOCSY and H(C)CH3-TOCSY, are proposed for resonance assignment of methyl-containing amino acid side chains. After the initial proton-carbon INEPT step, during which either carbon or proton chemical shift labeling is achieved (t1), the magnetization is spread along the amino acid side chains by a carbon spin lock. The chemical shifts of methyl carbons are labeled (t2) during the following constant time interval. Finally the magnetization is transferred, in a reversed INEPT step, to methyl protons for detection (t3). The proposed experiments are characterized by high digital resolution in the methyl carbon dimension (t2max = 28.6 ms), optimum sensitivity due to the use of proton decoupling during the long constant time interval, and an optional removal of CH2, or CH2 and CH, resonances from the F2F3 planes. The building blocks used in these experiments can be implemented in a range of heteronuclear experiments focusing on methyl resonances in proteins. The techniques are illustrated using a 15N, 13C-labeled E93D mutant of Schizosacharomyces pombe phosphoglycerate mutase (23.7 kDa).

  1. Large-scale identification of yeast integral membrane protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John P.; Lo, Russell S.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Desmarais, Cynthia; Stagljar, Igor; Noble, William Stafford; Fields, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a large-scale screen to identify interactions between integral membrane proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using a modified split-ubiquitin technique. Among 705 proteins annotated as integral membrane, we identified 1,985 putative interactions involving 536 proteins. To ascribe confidence levels to the interactions, we used a support vector machine algorithm to classify interactions based on the assay results and protein data derived from the literature. Previously identified and computationally supported interactions were used to train the support vector machine, which identified 131 interactions of highest confidence, 209 of the next highest confidence, 468 of the next highest, and the remaining 1,085 of low confidence. This study provides numerous putative interactions among a class of proteins that have been difficult to analyze on a high-throughput basis by other approaches. The results identify potential previously undescribed components of established biological processes and roles for integral membrane proteins of ascribed functions. PMID:16093310

  2. Genetic linkage between the Kell blood group system and prolactin-inducible protein loci: provisional assignment of KEL to chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Zelinski, T; Coghlan, G; Myal, Y; Shiu, R P; Philipps, S; White, L; Lewis, M

    1991-05-01

    The Kell blood group locus (KEL) is tightly linked to the prolactin-inducible protein locus (PIP) with zeta = 9.12 at theta = 0.00 for combined paternal and maternal meioses. In view of the regional localization of PIP to 7q32-q36 (Myal et al. 1989a), a similar assignment for KEL is favoured.

  3. Automatic Assignment of NOESY Cross Peaks and Determination of the Protein Structure of a New World Scorpion Neurotoxin Using NOAH/DIAMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; Jablonsky, Michael J.; Jackson, Patricia L.; Braun, Werner; Krishna, N. Rama

    2001-01-01

    The 3D NMR structures of the scorpion neurotoxin, CsE-v5, were determined from the same NOESY spectra with NOAH/DIAMOD, an automated assignment and 3D structure calculation software package, and with a conventional manual assignment combined with a distance geometry/simulated annealing (X-PLOR) refinement method. The NOESY assignments and the 3D structures obtained from the two independent methods were compared in detail. The NOAH/DIAMOD program suite uses feedback filtering and self-correcting distance geometry methods to automatically assign NOESY spectra and to calculate the 3D structure of a protein. NOESY cross peaks were automatically picked using a standard software package and combined with 74 manually assigned NOESY peaks to start the NOAH/DIAMOD calculations. After 63 NOAH/DIAMOD cycles, using REDAC procedures in the last 8 cycles, and final FANTOM constrained energy minimization, a bundle of 20 structures with the smallest target functions has a RMSD of 0.81 Å for backbone atoms and 1.11 Å for all heavy atoms to the mean structure. Despite some missing chemical shifts of side chain protons, 776 (including 74 manually assigned) of 1130 NOE peaks were unambiguously assigned, 150 peaks have more than one possible assignment compatible with the bundle structures, and only 30 peaks could not be assigned within the given chemical shift tolerance ranges in either the D1 or the D2 dimension. The remaining 174, mainly weak NOE peaks were not compatible with the final 20 best bundle structures at the last NOAH/DIAMOD cycle. The automatically determined structures agree well with the structures determined independently using the conventional method and the same NMR spectra, with the mean RMSD in well-defined regions of 0.84 Å for bb and 1.48 Å for all heavy atoms from residues 2-5, 18-26, 32-36, and 39-45. This study demonstrates the potential of the NOAH/DIAMOD program suite to automatically assign NMR data for proteins and determine their structure.

  4. Vibrational entropy of a protein: large differences between distinct conformations.

    PubMed

    Goethe, Martin; Fita, Ignacio; Rubi, J Miguel

    2015-01-13

    In this article, it is investigated whether vibrational entropy (VE) is an important contribution to the free energy of globular proteins at ambient conditions. VE represents the major configurational-entropy contribution of these proteins. By definition, it is an average of the configurational entropies of the protein within single minima of the energy landscape, weighted by their occupation probabilities. Its large part originates from thermal motion of flexible torsion angles giving rise to the finite peak widths observed in torsion angle distributions. While VE may affect the equilibrium properties of proteins, it is usually neglected in numerical calculations as its consideration is difficult. Moreover, it is sometimes believed that all well-packed conformations of a globular protein have similar VE anyway. Here, we measure explicitly the VE for six different conformations from simulation data of a test protein. Estimates are obtained using the quasi-harmonic approximation for three coordinate sets, Cartesian, bond-angle-torsion (BAT), and a new set termed rotamer-degeneracy lifted BAT coordinates by us. The new set gives improved estimates as it overcomes a known shortcoming of the quasi-harmonic approximation caused by multiply populated rotamer states, and it may serve for VE estimation of macromolecules in a very general context. The obtained VE values depend considerably on the type of coordinates used. However, for all coordinate sets we find large entropy differences between the conformations, of the order of the overall stability of the protein. This result may have important implications on the choice of free energy expressions used in software for protein structure prediction, protein design, and NMR refinement. PMID:26574230

  5. Vibrational entropy of a protein: large differences between distinct conformations.

    PubMed

    Goethe, Martin; Fita, Ignacio; Rubi, J Miguel

    2015-01-13

    In this article, it is investigated whether vibrational entropy (VE) is an important contribution to the free energy of globular proteins at ambient conditions. VE represents the major configurational-entropy contribution of these proteins. By definition, it is an average of the configurational entropies of the protein within single minima of the energy landscape, weighted by their occupation probabilities. Its large part originates from thermal motion of flexible torsion angles giving rise to the finite peak widths observed in torsion angle distributions. While VE may affect the equilibrium properties of proteins, it is usually neglected in numerical calculations as its consideration is difficult. Moreover, it is sometimes believed that all well-packed conformations of a globular protein have similar VE anyway. Here, we measure explicitly the VE for six different conformations from simulation data of a test protein. Estimates are obtained using the quasi-harmonic approximation for three coordinate sets, Cartesian, bond-angle-torsion (BAT), and a new set termed rotamer-degeneracy lifted BAT coordinates by us. The new set gives improved estimates as it overcomes a known shortcoming of the quasi-harmonic approximation caused by multiply populated rotamer states, and it may serve for VE estimation of macromolecules in a very general context. The obtained VE values depend considerably on the type of coordinates used. However, for all coordinate sets we find large entropy differences between the conformations, of the order of the overall stability of the protein. This result may have important implications on the choice of free energy expressions used in software for protein structure prediction, protein design, and NMR refinement.

  6. Assignment of the sup 1 H NMR spectrum and secondary structure elucidation of the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous bacteriophage IKe

    SciTech Connect

    van Duynhoven, J.P.M.; Folkers, P.J.M.; Prinse, C.W.J.M.; Harmsen, B.J.M.; Konings, R.N.H.; Hilbers, C.W. )

    1992-02-04

    By means of 2D NMR techniques, all backbone resonances in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by gene V of the filamentous phage IKe have been assigned sequence specifically. In addition, a major part of the side chain resonances could be assigned as well. Analysis of NOESY data permitted the elucidation of the secondary structure of IKe gene V protein. The major part of the secondary structure is present as an antiparallel {beta}-sheet, i.e., as two {beta}-loops which partly combine into a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet structure, one {beta}-loop and one triple-stranded {beta}-sheet structure. It is shown that a high degree of homology exists with the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by gene V of the distantly related filamentous phase M13.

  7. Direct mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins of the yeast large ribosomal subunit using capillary LC/FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Berger, Scott J.; Martinović, Suzana; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography was used to characterize intact proteins from the large subunit of the yeast ribosome. High mass measurement accuracy, achieved by “mass locking” with an internal standard from a dual electrospray ionization source, allowed identification of ribosomal proteins. Analyses of the intact proteins revealed information on cotranslational and posttranslational modifications of the ribosomal proteins that included loss of the initiating methionine, acetylation, methylation, and proteolytic maturation. High-resolution separations permitted differentiation of protein isoforms having high structural similarity as well as proteins from their modified forms, facilitating unequivocal assignments. The study identified 42 of the 43 core large ribosomal subunit proteins and 58 (of 64 possible) core large subunit protein isoforms having unique masses in a single analysis. These results demonstrate the basis for the high-throughput analyses of complex mixtures of intact proteins, which we believe will be an important complement to other approaches for defining protein modifications and their changes resulting from physiological processes or environmental perturbations. PMID:11983894

  8. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  9. Three-dimensional electron cryo-microscopy study of the extrinsic domains of the oxygen-evolving complex of spinach: assignment of the PsbO protein.

    PubMed

    Nield, Jon; Balsera, Monica; De Las Rivas, Javier; Barber, J

    2002-04-26

    Three independent three-dimensional reconstructions of the spinach photosystem II-light-harvesting complex supercomplex were derived from single particle analyses of non-stained, vitrified samples imaged by electron microscopy. Each reconstruction was found to differ significantly in the composition of the lumenal oxygen-evolving complex extrinsic proteins. From difference mapping, aided by electron microscopy of negatively stained selectively washed samples, regions of density were assigned to the PsbO and PsbP/PsbQ proteins. Interpretation of the density assigned to the PsbO protein was explored using computer-aided structural predictions. PsbO is calculated to be mainly a beta-protein (38% beta) composed of two domains within an overall elongated shape (Pazos, F., Heredia, P., Valencia, A., and De Las Rivas, J. (2001) Proteins Struct. Funct. Genet. 45, 372-381). The positioning and fitting of the proposed structural model for the PsbO protein within the three-dimensional map indicated that there is a single copy per reaction center. Moreover, the structural model derived for PsbO, together with difference mapping, indicates that this protein stretches across the surface of the reaction center with its N- and C-terminal domains located toward the CP47 and CP43 side, respectively. This structural assignment is discussed in terms of the recent x-ray-derived cyanobacterial model of PSII (Zouni, A., Witt, H.-T., Kern, J., Fromme, P., Krauss, N., Saenger, W., and Orth, P. (2001) Nature 409, 739-743).

  10. Predicting protein functions from redundancies in large-scale protein interaction networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    Interpreting data from large-scale protein interaction experiments has been a challenging task because of the widespread presence of random false positives. Here, we present a network-based statistical algorithm that overcomes this difficulty and allows us to derive functions of unannotated proteins from large-scale interaction data. Our algorithm uses the insight that if two proteins share significantly larger number of common interaction partners than random, they have close functional associations. Analysis of publicly available data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals >2,800 reliable functional associations, 29% of which involve at least one unannotated protein. By further analyzing these associations, we derive tentative functions for 81 unannotated proteins with high certainty. Our method is not overly sensitive to the false positives present in the data. Even after adding 50% randomly generated interactions to the measured data set, we are able to recover almost all (approximately 89%) of the original associations.

  11. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Matsuda, Isamu; Long, Fei; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40-80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055-15058, 2015) combines the reverse (13)C, (15)N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of "highlighted" labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching (13)CO or (15)N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling (13)CO-(15)N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ~15% loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ~90% of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D (15)N/(13)Cα correlation and 2D (13)Cα/(13)CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and (1)H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using (13)C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (~300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable means of signal assignments especially for larger proteins through reducing the

  12. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Matsuda, Isamu; Long, Fei; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40-80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055-15058, 2015) combines the reverse (13)C, (15)N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of "highlighted" labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching (13)CO or (15)N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling (13)CO-(15)N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ~15% loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ~90% of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D (15)N/(13)Cα correlation and 2D (13)Cα/(13)CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and (1)H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using (13)C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (~300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable means of signal assignments especially for larger proteins through reducing the

  13. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction for Q4DY78, a conserved kinetoplastid-specific protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    D'Andréa, Éverton Dias; Diehl, Anne; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosma brucei and Leishmania spp. are kinetoplastid protozoa causative agents of Chagas disease, sleeping sickness and leishmaniasis, respectively, neglected tropical diseases estimated to infect millions of people worldwide. Their genome sequencing has revealed approximately 50 % of genes encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function, opening possibilities for novel target identification and drug discovery. Q4DY78 is a putative essential protein from T. cruzi conserved in the related kinetoplastids and divergent from mammalian host proteins. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C chemical shift assignments and secondary structure analysis of the Q4DY78 protein as basis for NMR structure determination, functional analysis and drug screening.

  14. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  15. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  16. Detecting differential protein expression in large-scale population proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Soyoung; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-06-17

    Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics shows great potential in clinical biomarker studies, identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins in biological samples. However, methods are needed to appropriately handle issues/challenges unique to mass spectrometry data in order to detect as many biomarker proteins as possible. One issue is that different mass spectrometry experiments generate quite different total numbers of quantified peptides, which can result in more missing peptide abundances in an experiment with a smaller total number of quantified peptides. Another issue is that the quantification of peptides is sometimes absent, especially for less abundant peptides and such missing values contain the information about the peptide abundance. Here, we propose a Significance Analysis for Large-scale Proteomics Studies (SALPS) that handles missing peptide intensity values caused by the two mechanisms mentioned above. Our model has a robust performance in both simulated data and proteomics data from a large clinical study. Because varying patients’ sample qualities and deviating instrument performances are not avoidable for clinical studies performed over the course of several years, we believe that our approach will be useful to analyze large-scale clinical proteomics data.

  17. Large scale protein separations: engineering aspects of chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Y; Moo-Young, M

    1990-01-01

    The engineering considerations common to large scale chromatographic purification of proteins are reviewed. A discussion of the industrial chromatography fundamentals is followed by aspects which affect the scale of separation. The separation column geometry, the effect of the main operational parameters on separation performance, and the physical characteristics of column packing are treated. Throughout, the emphasis is on ion exchange and size exclusion techniques which together constitute the major portion of commercial chromatographic protein purifications. In all cases, the state of current technology is examined and areas in need of further development are noted. The physico-chemical advances now underway in chromatographic separation of biopolymers would ensure a substantially enhanced role for these techniques in industrial production of products of new biotechnology.

  18. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for themore » growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.« less

  19. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Joseph D.; Baird, James K.; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M.; Hodge, Teresa A.; Huang, Sijay

    2015-03-30

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. We report that these include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  20. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  1. Folding of a large protein at high structural resolution

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Mayne, Leland; Hinshaw, James R.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Englander, S. Walter

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic folding of the large two-domain maltose binding protein (MBP; 370 residues) was studied at high structural resolution by an advanced hydrogen-exchange pulse-labeling mass-spectrometry method (HX MS). Dilution into folding conditions initiates a fast molecular collapse into a polyglobular conformation (<20 ms), determined by various methods including small angle X-ray scattering. The compaction produces a structurally heterogeneous state with widespread low-level HX protection and spectroscopic signals that match the equilibrium melting posttransition-state baseline. In a much slower step (7-s time constant), all of the MBP molecules, although initially heterogeneously structured, form the same distinct helix plus sheet folding intermediate with the same time constant. The intermediate is composed of segments that are distant in the MBP sequence but adjacent in the native protein where they close the longest residue-to-residue contact. Segments that are most HX protected in the early molecular collapse do not contribute to the initial intermediate, whereas the segments that do participate are among the less protected. The 7-s intermediate persists through the rest of the folding process. It contains the sites of three previously reported destabilizing mutations that greatly slow folding. These results indicate that the intermediate is an obligatory step on the MBP folding pathway. MBP then folds to the native state on a longer time scale (∼100 s), suggestively in more than one step, the first of which forms structure adjacent to the 7-s intermediate. These results add a large protein to the list of proteins known to fold through distinct native-like intermediates in distinct pathways. PMID:24191053

  2. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone 15N and 13C‧/13Cα chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone 15N(i) chemical shifts with that of 13C‧ (i - 1)/13Cα (i - 1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate 15N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2(15N)-F3(1H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  3. A non-uniformly sampled 4D HCC(CO)NH-TOCSY experiment processed using maximum entropy for rapid protein sidechain assignment

    PubMed Central

    Mobli, Mehdi; Stern, Alan S.; Bermel, Wolfgang; King, Glenn F.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the stiffest challenges in structural studies of proteins using NMR is the assignment of sidechain resonances. Typically, a panel of lengthy 3D experiments are acquired in order to establish connectivities and resolve ambiguities due to overlap. We demonstrate that these experiments can be replaced by a single 4D experiment that is time-efficient, yields excellent resolution, and captures unique carbon-proton connectivity information. The approach is made practical by the use of non-uniform sampling in the three indirect time dimensions and maximum entropy reconstruction of the corresponding 3D frequency spectrum. This 4D method will facilitate automated resonance assignment procedures and it should be particularly beneficial for increasing throughput in NMR-based structural genomics initiatives. PMID:20299257

  4. A non-uniformly sampled 4D HCC(CO)NH-TOCSY experiment processed using maximum entropy for rapid protein sidechain assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobli, Mehdi; Stern, Alan S.; Bermel, Wolfgang; King, Glenn F.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2010-05-01

    One of the stiffest challenges in structural studies of proteins using NMR is the assignment of sidechain resonances. Typically, a panel of lengthy 3D experiments are acquired in order to establish connectivities and resolve ambiguities due to overlap. We demonstrate that these experiments can be replaced by a single 4D experiment that is time-efficient, yields excellent resolution, and captures unique carbon-proton connectivity information. The approach is made practical by the use of non-uniform sampling in the three indirect time dimensions and maximum entropy reconstruction of the corresponding 3D frequency spectrum. This 4D method will facilitate automated resonance assignment procedures and it should be particularly beneficial for increasing throughput in NMR-based structural genomics initiatives.

  5. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  6. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for the protein coded by gene locus BB0938 of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Xiao, Rong; Ho, Chi K.; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The product of gene locus BB0938 from Bordetella bronchiseptica (Swiss-Prot ID: Q7WNU7-BORBR; NESG target ID: BoR11; Wunderlich et al., 2004; Pfam ID: PF03476) is a 128-residue protein of unknown function. This broadly conserved protein family is found in eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 98% of backbone and 94% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a b topology with a seven-residue helical insert, ??????????. BMRB deposit with accession number 6693. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  7. Toxicological relationships between proteins obtained from protein target predictions of large toxicity databases

    SciTech Connect

    Nigsch, Florian; Mitchell, John B.O.

    2008-09-01

    The combination of models for protein target prediction with large databases containing toxicological information for individual molecules allows the derivation of 'toxiclogical' profiles, i.e., to what extent are molecules of known toxicity predicted to interact with a set of protein targets. To predict protein targets of drug-like and toxic molecules, we built a computational multiclass model using the Winnow algorithm based on a dataset of protein targets derived from the MDL Drug Data Report. A 15-fold Monte Carlo cross-validation using 50% of each class for training, and the remaining 50% for testing, provided an assessment of the accuracy of that model. We retained the 3 top-ranking predictions and found that in 82% of all cases the correct target was predicted within these three predictions. The first prediction was the correct one in almost 70% of cases. A model built on the whole protein target dataset was then used to predict the protein targets for 150 000 molecules from the MDL Toxicity Database. We analysed the frequency of the predictions across the panel of protein targets for experimentally determined toxicity classes of all molecules. This allowed us to identify clusters of proteins related by their toxicological profiles, as well as toxicities that are related. Literature-based evidence is provided for some specific clusters to show the relevance of the relationships identified.

  8. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  9. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Michely C; Costa, Marcília P; Pacheco, Ana C L; Kamimura, Michel T; Silva, Samara C; Carneiro, Laura D G; Sousa, Ana P L; Soares, Carlos E A; Souza, Celeste S F; de Oliveira, Diana Magalhães

    2009-07-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  10. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  11. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; English, Brian P; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C; Singer, Robert H; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2014-10-23

    A subclass of fluorescent proteins (FPs), large Stokes shift (LSS) FP, are characterized by increased spread between excitation and emission maxima. We report a photoswitchable variant of a red FP with an LSS, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation and emission at 445 and 622 nm, but violet irradiation photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation and emission at 573 and 621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical, and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells and determine its crystal structure in the LSS form. Mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and spectroscopy of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the LSS, pH dependence, and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate the applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution photoactivated localization microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects.

  12. An intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment for the assignment of main-chain resonances in 15N, 13C labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Mäntylahti, Sampo; Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Permi, Perttu

    2009-11-01

    An improved pulse sequence, intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH, is described for establishing solely (13)C'(i), (15)N(i), (1)HN(i) connectivities in uniformly 15N/13C-labeled proteins. In comparison to the "out-and-back" style intra-HN(CA)CO experiment, the new pulse sequence offers at least two-fold higher experimental resolution in the (13)C' dimension and on average 1.6 times higher sensitivity especially for residues in alpha-helices. Performance of the new experiment was tested on a small globular protein ubiquitin and an intrinsically unfolded 110-residue cancer/testis antigen CT16/PAGE5. Use of intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment in combination with the established HNCO experiment was crucial for the assignment of highly disordered CT16. PMID:19768387

  13. The human urinary proteome contains more than 1500 proteins, including a large proportion of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Jun; Kumar, Chanchal; Zhang, Yanling; Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Background Urine is a desirable material for the diagnosis and classification of diseases because of the convenience of its collection in large amounts; however, all of the urinary proteome catalogs currently being generated have limitations in their depth and confidence of identification. Our laboratory has developed methods for the in-depth characterization of body fluids; these involve a linear ion trap-Fourier transform (LTQ-FT) and a linear ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap) mass spectrometer. Here we applied these methods to the analysis of the human urinary proteome. Results We employed one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography for protein separation and fractionation. Fractionated proteins were digested in-gel or in-solution, and digests were analyzed with the LTQ-FT and LTQ-Orbitrap at parts per million accuracy and with two consecutive stages of mass spectrometric fragmentation. We identified 1543 proteins in urine obtained from ten healthy donors, while essentially eliminating false-positive identifications. Surprisingly, nearly half of the annotated proteins were membrane proteins according to Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Furthermore, extracellular, lysosomal, and plasma membrane proteins were enriched in the urine compared with all GO entries. Plasma membrane proteins are probably present in urine by secretion in exosomes. Conclusion Our analysis provides a high-confidence set of proteins present in human urinary proteome and provides a useful reference for comparing datasets obtained using different methodologies. The urinary proteome is unexpectedly complex and may prove useful in biomarker discovery in the future. PMID:16948836

  14. Investigating the Role of Large-Scale Domain Dynamics in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Huang, Jie-rong; Bouvier, Denis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Sattler, Michael; Hart, Darren J.; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered linkers provide multi-domain proteins with degrees of conformational freedom that are often essential for function. These highly dynamic assemblies represent a significant fraction of all proteomes, and deciphering the physical basis of their interactions represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe the difficulties associated with mapping the large-scale domain dynamics and describe two recent examples where solution state methods, in particular NMR spectroscopy, are used to investigate conformational exchange on very different timescales. PMID:27679800

  15. Investigating the Role of Large-Scale Domain Dynamics in Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Huang, Jie-Rong; Bouvier, Denis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Sattler, Michael; Hart, Darren J; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered linkers provide multi-domain proteins with degrees of conformational freedom that are often essential for function. These highly dynamic assemblies represent a significant fraction of all proteomes, and deciphering the physical basis of their interactions represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe the difficulties associated with mapping the large-scale domain dynamics and describe two recent examples where solution state methods, in particular NMR spectroscopy, are used to investigate conformational exchange on very different timescales. PMID:27679800

  16. Investigating the Role of Large-Scale Domain Dynamics in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Huang, Jie-rong; Bouvier, Denis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Sattler, Michael; Hart, Darren J.; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered linkers provide multi-domain proteins with degrees of conformational freedom that are often essential for function. These highly dynamic assemblies represent a significant fraction of all proteomes, and deciphering the physical basis of their interactions represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe the difficulties associated with mapping the large-scale domain dynamics and describe two recent examples where solution state methods, in particular NMR spectroscopy, are used to investigate conformational exchange on very different timescales.

  17. The structural basis for optimal performance of oligothiophene-based fluorescent amyloid ligands: conformational flexibility is essential for spectral assignment of a diversity of protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Klingstedt, Therése; Shirani, Hamid; Åslund, K O Andreas; Cairns, Nigel J; Sigurdson, Christina J; Goedert, Michel; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-07-29

    Protein misfolding diseases are characterized by deposition of protein aggregates, and optical ligands for molecular characterization of these disease-associated structures are important for understanding their potential role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have proven useful for optical identification of a broader subset of disease-associated protein aggregates than conventional ligands, such as thioflavin T and Congo red. Herein, the molecular requirements for achieving LCOs able to detect nonthioflavinophilic Aβ aggregates or non-congophilic prion aggregates, as well as spectrally discriminate Aβ and tau aggregates, were investigated. An anionic pentameric LCO was subjected to chemical engineering by: 1) replacing thiophene units with selenophene or phenylene moieties, or 2) alternating the anionic substituents along the thiophene backbone. In addition, two asymmetric tetrameric ligands were generated. Overall, the results from this study identified conformational freedom and extended conjugation of the conjugated backbone as crucial determinants for obtaining superior thiophene-based optical ligands for sensitive detection and spectral assignment of disease-associated protein aggregates.

  18. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the conserved region in the middle domain of S. pombe Sin1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2015-04-01

    SAPK-interacting protein 1 (Sin1) is an important component of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). TOR is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and forms functionally distinct protein complexes referred to as TORC1 and TORC2. TORC2, conserved from yeast to humans, phosphorylates AGC-family protein kinases and has many cellular functions including the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. The Sin1 subunit of TORC2 is required for the binding of TORC2 to substrates, and the conserved region in the middle (CRIM) domain of Sin1 is important in the substrate recognition of TORC2. Here, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sin1 (amino acids 247-400) (Sin1CRIM), which possesses the CRIM domain. These data contribute toward the structure determination of Sin1CRIM and an understanding of the interactions of Sin1CRIM with substrates of TORC2.

  19. Origin and evolution of yolk proteins: expansion and functional diversification of large lipid transfer protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long Tao; Hui, Jerome H L; Chu, Ka Hou

    2013-04-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG) and apolipoprotein (APO) play a central role in animal reproduction and lipid circulation, respectively. Although previous studies have examined the structural and functional relationships of these large lipid transfer proteins (LLTPs) from an evolutionary perspective, the mechanism in generating these different families have not been addressed in invertebrates. In this study, the most comprehensive phylogenetic and genomic analysis of the LLTP superfamily genes is carried out. We propose the expansion and diversification of LLTPs in invertebrates are mediated via retrotransposon-mediated duplications, followed by either subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization in different lineages. In agreement with a previous hypothesis, our analysis suggests that all LLTPs originate from a series of duplications of a primitive yolk protein gene similar to VTG. Two early consecutive duplications of the yolk protein genes resulted in the formation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and the APO gene ancestor. Gains and losses of domains and genes occurred in each of these families in different animal lineages, with MTP becoming truncated. MTP maintained only the components stabilizing the huge lipoprotein particle. Surprisingly, for the first time, two VTG-like protein families were found to independently arise in the lineages of insects. This work consolidates the reconstruction of the evolutionary roadmap of the LLTP superfamily and provides the first mechanistic explanation on the expansion of family members via retrotransposition in invertebrates. PMID:23426435

  20. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E; Milner, Matthew J; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling.

  1. Large-scale proteomic analysis of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Springer, David L

    2004-10-01

    Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins is a promising approach for the identification of novel drug targets and/or disease biomarkers. Despite notable technological developments, obstacles related to extraction and solublization of membrane proteins are encountered. A critical discussion of the different preparative methods of membrane proteins is offered in relation to downstream proteomic applications, mainly gel-based analyses and mass spectrometry. Frequently, unknown proteins are identified by high-throughput profiling of membrane proteins. In search for novel membrane proteins, analysis of protein sequences using computational tools is performed to predict the presence of transmembrane domains. This review also presents these bioinformatic tools with the human proteome as a case study. Along with technological innovations, advancements in the areas of sample preparation and computational prediction of membrane proteins will lead to exciting discoveries.

  2. Improved binding site assignment by high-resolution mapping of RNA-protein interactions using iCLIP.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Christian; Curk, Tomaz; Anders, Simon; Schwarzl, Thomas; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Sieber, Jana; Hollerer, Ina; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Huber, Wolfgang; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-08-11

    Individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) allows the determination of crosslinking sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) on RNAs. iCLIP is based on ultraviolet light crosslinking of RBPs to RNA, reverse transcription and high-throughput sequencing of fragments terminating at the site of crosslinking. As a result, start sites of iCLIP fragments are expected to cluster with a narrow distribution, typically representing the site of direct interaction between the RBP and the RNA. Here we show that for several RBPs (eIF4A3, PTB, SRSF3, SRSF4 and hnRNP L), the start sites of iCLIP fragments show a fragment length-dependent broader distribution that can be shifted to positions upstream of the known RNA-binding site. We developed an analysis tool that identifies these shifts and can improve the positioning of RBP binding sites.

  3. Large-scale crystallization of proteins for purification and formulation.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Dariusch

    2015-07-01

    Since about 170 years, salts were used to create supersaturated solutions and crystallize proteins. The dehydrating effect of salts as well as their kosmotropic or chaotropic character was revealed. Even the suitability of organic solvents for crystallization was already recognized. Interestingly, what was performed during the early times is still practiced today. A lot of effort was put into understanding the underlying physico-chemical interaction mechanisms leading to protein crystallization. However, it was understood that already the solvation of proteins is a highly complex process not to mention the intricate interrelation of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions taking place. Although many basic questions are still unanswered, preparative protein crystallization was attempted as illustrated in the presented case studies. Due to the highly variable nature of crystallization, individual design of the crystallization process is needed in every single case. It was shown that preparative crystallization from impure protein solutions as a capture step is possible after applying adequate pre-treatment procedures like precipitation or extraction. Protein crystallization can replace one or more chromatography steps. It was further shown that crystallization can serve as an attractive alternative means for formulation of therapeutic proteins. Crystalline proteins can offer enhanced purity and enable highly concentrated doses of the active ingredient. Easy scalability of the proposed protein crystallization processes was shown using the maximum local energy dissipation as a suitable scale-up criterion. Molecular modeling and target-oriented protein engineering may allow protein crystallization to become part of a platform purification process in the near future.

  4. Backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments for the C-terminal domain of Tcb2, a cytoskeletal calcium-binding protein from Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Adina M; Gurrola, Theodore E; Sterner, Robert C; Sleister, Heidi M; Honts, Jerry E; Fowler, C Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Tcb2 is a putative calcium-binding protein from the membrane-associated cytoskeleton of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. It has been hypothesized to participate in several calcium-mediated processes in Tetrahymena, including ciliary movement, cell cortex signaling, and pronuclear exchange. Sequence analysis suggests that the protein belongs to the calmodulin family, with N- and C-terminal domains connected by a central linker, and two helix-loop-helix motifs in each domain. However, its calcium-binding properties, structure and precise biological function remain unknown. Interestingly, Tcb2 is a major component of unique contractile fibers isolated from the Tetrahymena cytoskeleton; in these fibers, addition of calcium triggers an ATP-independent type of contraction. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the C-terminal domain of the protein (Tcb2-C) in the absence and presence of calcium ions. (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra show that the domain is well folded both in the absence and presence of calcium, and undergoes a dramatic conformational change upon calcium addition. Secondary structure prediction from chemical shifts reveals an architecture encountered in other calcium-binding proteins, with paired EF-hand motifs connected by a flexible linker. These studies represent a starting point for the determination of the high-resolution solution structure of Tcb2-C at both low and high calcium levels, and, together with additional structural studies on the full-length protein, will help establish the molecular basis of Tcb2 function and unique contractile properties.

  5. Assignment of IR bands of isolated and protein-bound Peridinin in its fundamental and triplet state by static FTIR, time-resolved step-scan FTIR and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetti, Alberto; Kish, Elizabeth; Robert, Bruno; Spezia, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational properties of Peridinin in its fundamental state and in the excited triplet state have been investigated by DFT calculations and static and time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. The infrared spectrum of Peridinin in its fundamental state has been explored in the whole 2000-600 cm-1 range, and interpreted in term of molecular vibrations. In particular, new infrared bands have been identified and assigned to specific molecular vibrations. 3Peridinin molecular vibrations have also been investigated by DFT calculations. In addition, putative IR bands belonging to Peridinin and 3Peridinin have been identified in the step-scan FTIR difference spectrum of the Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein from Amphidinium carterae, where light induce formation of a triplet state localized on one or more Peridinins. The exact nature of the triplet state formed in Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein from dinoflagellates, in particular the possible involvement in this triplet state of 3Chlorophyll a, has been largely debated in the last few years (see Carbonera et al., 2014 [3]); time-resolved differential FTIR experiments have played a key role in this debate. Identification of IR marker bands for the main molecule (Peridinin) implicated in this photophysical process is therefore particularly important and makes this study a significant step towards the full understanding of Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins photophysics.

  6. Oligomeric viral proteins: small in size, large in presence

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Bhargavi; Smith, Amber M.; Fernandes, Jason D.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites that rely heavily on host cellular processes for replication. The small number of proteins typically encoded by a virus is faced with selection pressures that lead to the evolution of distinctive structural properties, allowing each protein to maintain its function under constraints such as small genome size, high mutation rate, and rapidly changing fitness conditions. One common strategy for this evolution is to utilize small building blocks to generate protein oligomers that assemble in multiple ways, thereby diversifying protein function and regulation. In this review, we discuss specific cases that illustrate how oligomerization is used to generate a single defined functional state, to modulate activity via different oligomeric states, or to generate multiple functional forms via different oligomeric states. PMID:27685368

  7. (¹⁵N ± ¹³C') edited (4, 3)D-H(CC)CONH TOCSY and (4, 3)D-NOESY HNCO experiments for unambiguous side chain and NOE assignments of proteins with high shift degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Arora, Ashish

    2011-11-01

    Well-resolved and unambiguous through-bond correlations and NOE data are crucial for high-quality protein structure determination by NMR. In this context, we present here (4, 3)D reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments: H(CC)CONH TOCSY and NOESY HNCO--which instead of (15)N shifts exploit the linear combination of (15)N(i) and (13)C'(i-1) shifts (where i is a residue number) to resolve the through-bond (1)H-(1)H correlations and through-space (1)H-(1)H NOEs. The strategy makes use of the fact that (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts when combined linearly provide a dispersion which is better compared to those of the individual chemical shifts. The extended dispersion thus available in these experiments will help to obtain the unambiguous side chain and accurate NOE assignments especially for medium-sized alpha-helical or partially unstructured proteins [molecular weight (MW) between 12-15 kDa] as well as higher MW (between 15-25 kDa) folded proteins where spectral overlap renders inaccurate and ambiguous NOEs. Further, these reduced dimensionality experiments in combination with routinely used (15)N and (13)C' edited TOCSY and NOESY experiments will provide an alternative way for high-quality NMR structure determination of large unstable proteins (with very high shift degeneracy), which are not at all amenable to 4D NMR. The utility of these experiments has been demonstrated here using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin (76 aa) protein.

  8. (¹⁵N ± ¹³C') edited (4, 3)D-H(CC)CONH TOCSY and (4, 3)D-NOESY HNCO experiments for unambiguous side chain and NOE assignments of proteins with high shift degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Arora, Ashish

    2011-11-01

    Well-resolved and unambiguous through-bond correlations and NOE data are crucial for high-quality protein structure determination by NMR. In this context, we present here (4, 3)D reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments: H(CC)CONH TOCSY and NOESY HNCO--which instead of (15)N shifts exploit the linear combination of (15)N(i) and (13)C'(i-1) shifts (where i is a residue number) to resolve the through-bond (1)H-(1)H correlations and through-space (1)H-(1)H NOEs. The strategy makes use of the fact that (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts when combined linearly provide a dispersion which is better compared to those of the individual chemical shifts. The extended dispersion thus available in these experiments will help to obtain the unambiguous side chain and accurate NOE assignments especially for medium-sized alpha-helical or partially unstructured proteins [molecular weight (MW) between 12-15 kDa] as well as higher MW (between 15-25 kDa) folded proteins where spectral overlap renders inaccurate and ambiguous NOEs. Further, these reduced dimensionality experiments in combination with routinely used (15)N and (13)C' edited TOCSY and NOESY experiments will provide an alternative way for high-quality NMR structure determination of large unstable proteins (with very high shift degeneracy), which are not at all amenable to 4D NMR. The utility of these experiments has been demonstrated here using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin (76 aa) protein. PMID:22002239

  9. Assignment of disulfide bonds in gp64, a putative cell-cell adhesion protein of Polysphondylium pallidum. Presence of Sushi domains in the cellular slime mold protein.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Kumazaki, T; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-18

    The 64-kDa membrane-bound glycoprotein of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum (referred to as gp64), seems to be implicated in cell-cell adhesion. Previously we have isolated a full-length gp64 cDNA, determined its nucleotide sequence, and found that all cysteine residues in the protein are involved in the formation of disulfide bonds. The disulfide arrangement of the 36 cysteines in gp64 was established by analysis of proteolytically cleaved protein and sequence analysis of cystine-containing fragments. Since gp64 has 36 Cys residues, 18 disulfide bonds must exist and the positions of 15 of them were determined. The 15 disulfide bonds in gp64 constitute five characteristic, so-called Sushi domains. In a Sushi domain, the first Cys in a sequence is connected to the third one and the second Cys to the fourth one. This is the first report describing the presence of Sushi domains in a cellular slime mold protein. From these data, gp64 appears to be distinct from all other previously described cell-adhesion proteins.

  10. Chemical shift assignment of the intrinsically disordered N-terminus and the rubredoxin domain in the folded metal bound and unfolded oxidized state of mycobacterial protein kinase G.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Matthias; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein kinase G (PknG) is a 82 kDa multidomain eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinase mediating the survival of pathogenic mycobacteria within host macrophages. The N-terminal sequence preceding the catalytic kinase domain contains an approximately 75 residues long tail, which was predicted to show no regulatory secondary structure (1-75 = NORS) but harbors the major in vivo phosphorylation site (T63), and a rubredoxin-like metal binding motif (74-147 = RD). In the reduced rubredoxin motif, four conserved cysteine residues that are present as two C-X-X-C-G motifs coordinate a metal ion. The cysteines are further involved in sensing the redox environment to regulate PknG catalytic activity. Here, we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the highly dynamic unstructured N-terminal region NORS and the RD in the reduced, metal bound, presumably folded and the oxidized, presumably unfolded state. Chemical shifts have been deposited at the BioMagResBank under the BMRB accession numbers 26,028 for the His-PknG1-147 with the RD in reduced, metal bound state, 26,027 for His-PknG1-75, and 26,030 and 26,029 for PknG74-147 either in the reduced, metal bound or oxidized state, respectively. The presented chemical shift assignments pave the route for the structural characterization of the regulation of PknG by redox changes and posttranslational modifications (phosphorylation).

  11. Quality Control Test for Sequence-Phenotype Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Maria Teresa Lara; Rosario, Pablo Benjamín Leon; Luna-Nevarez, Pablo; Gamez, Alba Savin; Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Relating a gene mutation to a phenotype is a common task in different disciplines such as protein biochemistry. In this endeavour, it is common to find false relationships arising from mutations introduced by cells that may be depurated using a phenotypic assay; yet, such phenotypic assays may introduce additional false relationships arising from experimental errors. Here we introduce the use of high-throughput DNA sequencers and statistical analysis aimed to identify incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments and observed that 10–20% of these false assignments are expected in large screenings aimed to identify critical residues for protein function. We further show that this level of incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments may significantly alter our understanding about the structure-function relationship of proteins. We have made available an implementation of our method at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/chispas. PMID:25700273

  12. BACHSCORE. A tool for evaluating efficiently and reliably the quality of large sets of protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, E.; Zamuner, S.; Cossio, P.; Laio, A.; Seno, F.; Trovato, A.

    2013-12-01

    In protein structure prediction it is of crucial importance, especially at the refinement stage, to score efficiently large sets of models by selecting the ones that are closest to the native state. We here present a new computational tool, BACHSCORE, that allows its users to rank different structural models of the same protein according to their quality, evaluated by using the BACH++ (Bayesian Analysis Conformation Hunt) scoring function. The original BACH statistical potential was already shown to discriminate with very good reliability the protein native state in large sets of misfolded models of the same protein. BACH++ features a novel upgrade in the solvation potential of the scoring function, now computed by adapting the LCPO (Linear Combination of Pairwise Orbitals) algorithm. This change further enhances the already good performance of the scoring function. BACHSCORE can be accessed directly through the web server: bachserver.pd.infn.it. Catalogue identifier: AEQD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130159 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 687 455 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer capable of running an executable produced by a g++ compiler (4.6.3 version). Operating system: Linux, Unix OS-es. RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes Classification: 3. Nature of problem: Evaluate the quality of a protein structural model, taking into account the possible “a priori” knowledge of a reference primary sequence that may be different from the amino-acid sequence of the model; the native protein structure should be recognized as the best model. Solution method: The contact potential scores the occurrence of any given type of residue pair in 5 possible

  13. Recent advances in large-scale protein interactome mapping

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Virja; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie most, if not all, cellular functions. The comprehensive mapping of these complex networks of stable and transient associations thus remains a key goal, both for systems biology-based initiatives (where it can be combined with other ‘omics’ data to gain a better understanding of functional pathways and networks) and for focused biological studies. Despite the significant challenges of such an undertaking, major strides have been made over the past few years. They include improvements in the computation prediction of PPIs and the literature curation of low-throughput studies of specific protein complexes, but also an increase in the deposition of high-quality data from non-biased high-throughput experimental PPI mapping strategies into publicly available databases. PMID:27158474

  14. Characterization and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a protein related to the murine 102-kDa cadherin-associated protein ([alpha]-catenin)

    SciTech Connect

    Claverie, J.M. ); Hardelin, J.P.; Legouis, R.; Levilliers, J.; Petit, C. ); Bougueleret, L. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-01-01

    We report the characterization of a human cDNA encompassing the complete coding region of a 945-residue putative protein (CAP-R) 80% identical to the recently described murine 102-kDa [alpha]-catenin (CAP102). The CAP-R protein mostly differs from CAP102 by the presence of a 48-residue insert. This insert exhibits similarity with a segment of the type 1 neurofibromatosis gene product. The analysis of a publicly available human [open quote]expressed sequence tag[close quotes] collection revealed the existence of another human cDNA more closely related (89% identical) to CAP 102. This strongly suggests that CAP-R is not the human homologue of the murine 102- kDa [alpha]-catenin but a new closely related gene of the vinculin family. This is further supported by the computed mutation rates falling outside the range observed for mammalian orthologous genes. Using in situ hybridization, the CAP-R gene could be mapped to the pll.l-pl2 region of human chromosome 2 and to the homologous B3-D region of mouse chromosome 6. 32 refs., 4 fig.

  15. A Simple and Effective Protein Folding Activity Suitable for Large Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive hands-on simulation of protein folding suitable for use in large lecture classes. This activity uses a minimum of parts, tools, and skill to simulate some of the fundamental principles of protein folding. The major concepts targeted are that proteins begin as linear polypeptides and fold to…

  16. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P.

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  17. 43 CFR 2521.3 - Assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Procedures § 2521.3 Assignment...), assignments of desert-land entries were recognized, the Department of the Interior, largely for administrative reasons, held that a desert-land entry might be assigned as a whole or in its entirety, but refused...

  18. 43 CFR 2521.3 - Assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Procedures § 2521.3 Assignment...), assignments of desert-land entries were recognized, the Department of the Interior, largely for administrative reasons, held that a desert-land entry might be assigned as a whole or in its entirety, but refused...

  19. 43 CFR 2521.3 - Assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Procedures § 2521.3 Assignment...), assignments of desert-land entries were recognized, the Department of the Interior, largely for administrative reasons, held that a desert-land entry might be assigned as a whole or in its entirety, but refused...

  20. 43 CFR 2521.3 - Assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Procedures § 2521.3 Assignment...), assignments of desert-land entries were recognized, the Department of the Interior, largely for administrative reasons, held that a desert-land entry might be assigned as a whole or in its entirety, but refused...

  1. Bridge over troubled proline: assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins using (HCA)CON(CAN)H and (HCA)N(CA)CO(N)H experiments concomitantly with HNCO and i(HCA)CO(CA)NH.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Maarit; Piirainen, Henni; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is by far the most versatile and information rich technique to study intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). While NMR is able to offer residue level information on structure and dynamics, assignment of chemical shift resonances in IDPs is not a straightforward process. Consequently, numerous pulse sequences and assignment protocols have been developed during past several years, targeted especially for the assignment of IDPs, including experiments that employ H(N), H(α) or (13)C detection combined with two to six indirectly detected dimensions. Here we propose two new HN-detection based pulse sequences, (HCA)CON(CAN)H and (HCA)N(CA)CO(N)H, that provide correlations with (1)H(N)(i - 1), (13)C'(i - 1) and (15)N(i), and (1)H(N)(i + 1), (13)C'(i) and (15)N(i) frequencies, respectively. Most importantly, they offer sequential links across the proline bridges and enable filling the single proline gaps during the assignment. We show that the novel experiments can efficiently complement the information available from existing HNCO and intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH pulse sequences and their concomitant usage enabled >95 % assignment of backbone resonances in cytoplasmic tail of adenosine receptor A2A in comparison to 73 % complete assignment using the HNCO/i(HCA)CO(CA)NH data alone. PMID:24346685

  2. SVM ensemble based transfer learning for large-scale membrane proteins discrimination.

    PubMed

    Mei, Suyu

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins play important roles in molecular trans-membrane transport, ligand-receptor recognition, cell-cell interaction, enzyme catalysis, host immune defense response and infectious disease pathways. Up to present, discriminating membrane proteins remains a challenging problem from the viewpoints of biological experimental determination and computational modeling. This work presents SVM ensemble based transfer learning model for membrane proteins discrimination (SVM-TLM). To reduce the data constraints on computational modeling, this method investigates the effectiveness of transferring the homolog knowledge to the target membrane proteins under the framework of probability weighted ensemble learning. As compared to multiple kernel learning based transfer learning model, the method takes the advantages of sparseness based SVM optimization on large data, thus more computationally efficient for large protein data analysis. The experiments on large membrane protein benchmark dataset show that SVM-TLM achieves significantly better cross validation performance than the baseline model.

  3. Very simple combination of TROSY, CRINEPT and multiple quantum coherence for signal enhancement in an HN(CO)CA experiment for large proteins.

    PubMed

    Bayrhuber, Monika; Riek, Roland

    2011-04-01

    Sensitivity enhancement in liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) triple resonance experiments for the sequential assignment of proteins is important for the investigation of large proteins or protein complexes. We present here the 3D TROSY-MQ/CRINEPT-HN(CO)CA which makes use of a ¹⁵N-¹H-TROSY element and a ¹³C'-¹³CA CRINEPT step combined with a multiple quantum coherence during the ¹³CA evolution period. Because of the introduction of these relaxation-optimized elements and 10 less pulses required, when compared with the conventional TROSY-HN(CO)CA experiment an average signal enhancement of a factor of 1.8 was observed for the membrane protein-detergent complex KcsA with a rotational correlation time τ(c) of around 60 ns.

  4. Very simple combination of TROSY, CRINEPT and multiple quantum coherence for signal enhancement in an HN(CO)CA experiment for large proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrhuber, Monika; Riek, Roland

    2011-04-01

    Sensitivity enhancement in liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) triple resonance experiments for the sequential assignment of proteins is important for the investigation of large proteins or protein complexes. We present here the 3D TROSY-MQ/CRINEPT-HN(CO)CA which makes use of a 15N- 1H-TROSY element and a 13C'- 13CA CRINEPT step combined with a multiple quantum coherence during the 13CA evolution period. Because of the introduction of these relaxation-optimized elements and 10 less pulses required, when compared with the conventional TROSY-HN(CO)CA experiment an average signal enhancement of a factor of 1.8 was observed for the membrane protein-detergent complex KcsA with a rotational correlation time τ c of around 60 ns.

  5. Computational large-scale mapping of protein-protein interactions using structural complexes.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Benjamin; Wuchty, Stefan; Panchenko, Anna R

    2013-01-01

    Although the identification of protein interactions by high-throughput methods progresses at a fast pace, "interactome" datasets still suffer from high rates of false positives and low coverage. To map the interactome of any organism, this unit presents a computational framework to predict protein-protein or gene-gene interactions utilizing experimentally determined evidence of structural complexes, atomic details of binding interfaces and evolutionary conservation.

  6. Assignments That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashimoto, I.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests, on a humorous note, a game-plan for assignment justification and elaboration that utilizes, in a constructive and professional manner, the best of what is known about assignment-making. (EL)

  7. Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis in Arabidopsis Mesophyll Protoplasts by Split Firefly Luciferase Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Feng; Bush, Jenifer; Xiong, Yan; Li, Lei; McCormack, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) constitute the regulatory network that coordinates diverse cellular functions. There are growing needs in plant research for creating protein interaction maps behind complex cellular processes and at a systems biology level. However, only a few approaches have been successfully used for large-scale surveys of PPIs in plants, each having advantages and disadvantages. Here we present split firefly luciferase complementation (SFLC) as a highly sensitive and noninvasive technique for in planta PPI investigation. In this assay, the separate halves of a firefly luciferase can come into close proximity and transiently restore its catalytic activity only when their fusion partners, namely the two proteins of interest, interact with each other. This assay was conferred with quantitativeness and high throughput potential when the Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplast system and a microplate luminometer were employed for protein expression and luciferase measurement, respectively. Using the SFLC assay, we could monitor the dynamics of rapamycin-induced and ascomycin-disrupted interaction between Arabidopsis FRB and human FKBP proteins in a near real-time manner. As a proof of concept for large-scale PPI survey, we further applied the SFLC assay to testing 132 binary PPIs among 8 auxin response factors (ARFs) and 12 Aux/IAA proteins from Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the SFLC assay is ideal for in vivo quantitative PPI analysis in plant cells and is particularly powerful for large-scale binary PPI screens. PMID:22096563

  8. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  9. A Method for Solution NMR Structural Studies of Large Integral Membrane Proteins: Reverse Micelle Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Kielec, Joseph M.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The structural study of membrane proteins perhaps represents one of the greatest challenges of the post-genomic era. While membrane proteins comprise over 50% of current and potential drug targets, their structural characterization lags far behind that of soluble proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers great potential not only with respect to structural characterization of integral membrane proteins but may also provide the ability to study the details of small ligand interactions. However, the size limitations of solution NMR have restricted comprehensive structural characterization of membrane protein NMR structures to the relatively small β-barrel proteins or helical proteins of relatively simple topology. In an effort to escape the barriers presented by slow molecular reorientation of large integral membrane proteins solubilized by detergent micelles in water, we have adapted the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy originally developed for the study of large soluble proteins by solution NMR methods. Here we review a novel approach to the solubilization of large integral membrane proteins in reverse micelle surfactants dissolved in low viscosity alkane solvents. The procedure is illustrated with a 54 kDa construct of the homotetrameric KcsA potassium channel. PMID:19665988

  10. Core-Cone Structured Monodispersed Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Ultra-large Cavity for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun; Yu, Meihua; Noonan, Owen; Zhang, Jun; Song, Hao; Zhang, Hongwei; Lei, Chang; Niu, Yuting; Huang, Xiaodan; Yang, Yannan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2015-11-25

    A new type of monodispersed mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a core-cone structure (MSN-CC) has been synthesized. The large cone-shaped pores are formed by silica lamellae closely packed encircling a spherical core, showing a structure similar to the flower dahlia. MSN-CC has a large pore size of 45 nm and a high pore volume of 2.59 cm(3) g(-1). MSN-CC demonstrates a high loading capacity of large proteins and successfully delivers active β-galactosidase into cells, showing their potential as efficient nanocarriers for the cellular delivery of proteins with large molecular weights. PMID:26426420

  11. Large-scale determination of previously unsolved protein structures using evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Kinch, Lisa; Park, Hahnbeom; Liao, Yuxing; Pei, Jimin; Kim, David E; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Grishin, Nick V; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of the structures of proteins without detectable sequence similarity to any protein of known structure remains an outstanding scientific challenge. Here we report significant progress in this area. We first describe de novo blind structure predictions of unprecendented accuracy we made for two proteins in large families in the recent CASP11 blind test of protein structure prediction methods by incorporating residue-residue co-evolution information in the Rosetta structure prediction program. We then describe the use of this method to generate structure models for 58 of the 121 large protein families in prokaryotes for which three-dimensional structures are not available. These models, which are posted online for public access, provide structural information for the over 400,000 proteins belonging to the 58 families and suggest hypotheses about mechanism for the subset for which the function is known, and hypotheses about function for the remainder. PMID:26335199

  12. NPHP4 controls ciliary trafficking of membrane proteins and large soluble proteins at the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Takada, Saeko; Standley, Clive; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Bellvé, Karl D.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein nephrocystin-4 (NPHP4) is widespread in ciliated organisms, and defects in NPHP4 cause nephronophthisis and blindness in humans. To learn more about the function of NPHP4, we have studied it in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. NPHP4 is stably incorporated into the distal part of the flagellar transition zone, close to the membrane and distal to CEP290, another transition zone protein. Therefore, these two proteins, which are incorporated into the transition zone independently of each other, define different domains of the transition zone. An nphp4-null mutant forms flagella with nearly normal length, ultrastructure and intraflagellar transport. When fractions from isolated wild-type and nphp4 flagella were compared, few differences were observed between the axonemes, but the amounts of certain membrane proteins were greatly reduced in the mutant flagella, and cellular housekeeping proteins >50 kDa were no longer excluded from mutant flagella. Therefore, NPHP4 functions at the transition zone as an essential part of a barrier that regulates both membrane and soluble protein composition of flagella. The phenotypic consequences of NPHP4 mutations in humans likely follow from protein mislocalization due to defects in the transition zone barrier. PMID:25150219

  13. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled receptors and their low long-term stabilities. In this review, we discuss methods used for expression and purification of GPCRs for crystallographic and NMR studies. We also summarize protein engineering methods that played a crucial role in obtaining GPCR crystal structures. PMID:25873898

  14. Large-scale production and protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Milić, Dalibor; Veprintsev, Dmitry B

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) gave insights into molecular mechanisms of their action and contributed significantly to molecular pharmacology. This is primarily due to technical advances in protein engineering, production and crystallization of these important receptor targets. On the other hand, NMR spectroscopy of GPCRs, which can provide information about their dynamics, still remains challenging due to difficulties in preparation of isotopically labeled receptors and their low long-term stabilities. In this review, we discuss methods used for expression and purification of GPCRs for crystallographic and NMR studies. We also summarize protein engineering methods that played a crucial role in obtaining GPCR crystal structures.

  15. A Scalable Approach for Protein False Discovery Rate Estimation in Large Proteomic Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Wilhelm, Mathias; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    Calculating the number of confidently identified proteins and estimating false discovery rate (FDR) is a challenge when analyzing very large proteomic data sets such as entire human proteomes. Biological and technical heterogeneity in proteomic experiments further add to the challenge and there are strong differences in opinion regarding the conceptual validity of a protein FDR and no consensus regarding the methodology for protein FDR determination. There are also limitations inherent to the widely used classic target-decoy strategy that particularly show when analyzing very large data sets and that lead to a strong over-representation of decoy identifications. In this study, we investigated the merits of the classic, as well as a novel target-decoy-based protein FDR estimation approach, taking advantage of a heterogeneous data collection comprised of ∼19,000 LC-MS/MS runs deposited in ProteomicsDB (https://www.proteomicsdb.org). The "picked" protein FDR approach treats target and decoy sequences of the same protein as a pair rather than as individual entities and chooses either the target or the decoy sequence depending on which receives the highest score. We investigated the performance of this approach in combination with q-value based peptide scoring to normalize sample-, instrument-, and search engine-specific differences. The "picked" target-decoy strategy performed best when protein scoring was based on the best peptide q-value for each protein yielding a stable number of true positive protein identifications over a wide range of q-value thresholds. We show that this simple and unbiased strategy eliminates a conceptual issue in the commonly used "classic" protein FDR approach that causes overprediction of false-positive protein identification in large data sets. The approach scales from small to very large data sets without losing performance, consistently increases the number of true-positive protein identifications and is readily implemented in

  16. Large-scale identification of membrane proteins with properties favorable for crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jared; Kagawa, Allison; Kurasaki, Kellie; Ataie, Niloufar; Cho, Il Kyu; Li, Qing X; Ng, Ho Leung

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein crystallography is notoriously difficult due to challenges in protein expression and issues of degradation and structural stability. We have developed a novel method for large-scale screening of native sources for integral membrane proteins that have intrinsic biochemical properties favorable for crystallization. Highly expressed membrane proteins that are thermally stable and nonaggregating in detergent solutions were identified by mass spectrometry from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Sus scrofa cerebrum. Many of the membrane proteins identified had been crystallized previously, supporting the promise of the approach. Most identified proteins have known functions and include high-value targets such as transporters and ATPases. To validate the method, we recombinantly expressed and purified the yeast protein, Yop1, which is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum curvature. We demonstrate that Yop1 can be purified with the detergent dodecylmaltoside without aggregating.

  17. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918

  18. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment.

  19. “C.R.E.A.T.E.”-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Rotella, Francis M.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M.; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R.

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918

  20. Large-scale de novo prediction of physical protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Elefsinioti, Antigoni; Saraç, Ömer Sinan; Hegele, Anna; Plake, Conrad; Hubner, Nina C; Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias; Schroeder, Michael; Stelzl, Ulrich; Beyer, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Information about the physical association of proteins is extensively used for studying cellular processes and disease mechanisms. However, complete experimental mapping of the human interactome will remain prohibitively difficult in the near future. Here we present a map of predicted human protein interactions that distinguishes functional association from physical binding. Our network classifies more than 5 million protein pairs predicting 94,009 new interactions with high confidence. We experimentally tested a subset of these predictions using yeast two-hybrid analysis and affinity purification followed by quantitative mass spectrometry. Thus we identified 462 new protein-protein interactions and confirmed the predictive power of the network. These independent experiments address potential issues of circular reasoning and are a distinctive feature of this work. Analysis of the physical interactome unravels subnetworks mediating between different functional and physical subunits of the cell. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the network for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of complex diseases by applying it to genome-wide association studies of neurodegenerative diseases. This analysis provides new evidence implying TOMM40 as a factor involved in Alzheimer's disease. The network provides a high-quality resource for the analysis of genomic data sets and genetic association studies in particular. Our interactome is available via the hPRINT web server at: www.print-db.org.

  1. Large-scale screening for novel low-affinity extracellular protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushell, K. Mark; Söllner, Christian; Schuster-Boeckler, Benjamin; Bateman, Alex; Wright, Gavin J.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular protein–protein interactions are essential for both intercellular communication and cohesion within multicellular organisms. Approximately a fifth of human genes encode membrane-tethered or secreted proteins, but they are largely absent from recent large-scale protein interaction datasets, making current interaction networks biased and incomplete. This discrepancy is due to the unsuitability of popular high-throughput methods to detect extracellular interactions because of the biochemical intractability of membrane proteins and their interactions. For example, cell surface proteins contain insoluble hydrophobic transmembrane regions, and their extracellular interactions are often highly transient, having half-lives of less than a second. To detect transient extracellular interactions on a large scale, we developed AVEXIS (avidity-based extracellular interaction screen), a high-throughput assay that overcomes these technical issues and can detect very transient interactions (half-lives ≤ 0.1 sec) with a low false-positive rate. We used it to systematically screen for receptor–ligand pairs within the zebrafish immunoglobulin superfamily and identified novel ligands for both well-known and orphan receptors. Genes encoding receptor–ligand pairs were often clustered phylogenetically and expressed in the same or adjacent tissues, immediately implying their involvement in similar biological processes. Using AVEXIS, we have determined the first systematic low–affinity extracellular protein interaction network, supported by independent biological data. This technique will now allow large-scale extracellular protein interaction mapping in a broad range of experimental contexts. PMID:18296487

  2. SERF: in vitro election of random RNA fragments to identify protein binding sites within large RNAs.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, U; Nierhaus, K H

    2001-11-01

    In vitro selection experiments have various goals depending on the composition of the initial pool and the selection method applied. We developed an in vitro selection variant (SERF, selection of random RNA fragments) that is useful for the identification of short RNA fragments originating from large RNAs that bind specifically to a protein. A pool of randomly fragmented RNA is constructed from a large RNA, which is the natural binding partner for a protein. Such a pool contains all the potential binding sites and is therefore used as starting material for affinity selection with the purified protein to find its natural target. Here we provide a detailed experimental protocol of the method. SERF has been developed for ribosomal systems and is a general approach providing a basis for functional and structural characterization of RNA-protein interactions in large ribonucleoprotein particles.

  3. Large-scale identification of encystment-related proteins and genes in Pseudourostyla cristata

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiuxia; Chen, Fenfen; Niu, Tao; Qu, Ruidan; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of a ciliate into cyst is an advance strategy against an adverse situation. However, the molecular mechanism for the encystation of free-living ciliates is poorly understood. A large-scale identification of the encystment-related proteins and genes in ciliate would provide us with deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms for the encystations of ciliate. We identified the encystment-related proteins and genes in Pseudourostyla cristata with shotgun LC-MS/MS and scale qRT-PCR, respectively, in this report. A total of 668 proteins were detected in the resting cysts, 102 of these proteins were high credible proteins, whereas 88 high credible proteins of the 724 total proteins were found in the vegetative cells. Compared with the vegetative cell, 6 specific proteins were found in the resting cyst. However, the majority of high credible proteins in the resting cyst and the vegetative cell were co-expressed. We compared 47 genes of the co-expressed proteins with known functions in both the cyst and the vegetative cell using scale qRT-PCR. Twenty-seven of 47 genes were differentially expressed in the cyst compared with the vegetative cell. In our identifications, many uncharacterized proteins were also found. These results will help reveal the molecular mechanism for the formation of cyst in ciliates. PMID:26079518

  4. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part I: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Mayaro virus (MAYV).

    PubMed

    Melekis, Efstathios; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Chasapis, Christos T; Margiolaki, Irene; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Macro domains are ADP-ribose-binding modules present in all eukaryotic organisms, bacteria and archaea. They are also found in non-structural proteins of several positive strand RNA viruses such as alphaviruses. Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the macro domain from New World Mayaro Alphavirus. The recombinant protein was well-folded and in a monomeric state. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure determined by TALOS+.

  5. Assignment of the gene (UQCRFS1) for the Rieske iron-sulfur protein subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex to the 22q13 and 19q12-q13. 1 regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.V.; Anderson, L. ); Duff, C.; Worton, R. ); Ozawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi ); Rozen, R. Montreal Children's Hospital )

    1994-05-01

    In this report, the authors used in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid mapping to localize the human gene for the Rieske iron-sulfur protein. The assignment of the gene for the Rieske iron-sulfur protein to human chromosomes 22q13 and 19q12-q13.1 confirms that it is encoded by the nuclear genome. The localization of four subunits of complex III to different human chromosomes - 8, 16, and 22/19 - precludes the existence of a gene cluster for this complex within the human genome. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  7. Crystallization of the large membrane protein complex photosystem I in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bahige G; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2013-12-23

    Traditional macroscale protein crystallization is accomplished nontrivially by exploring a range of protein concentrations and buffers in solution until a suitable combination is attained. This methodology is time-consuming and resource-intensive, hindering protein structure determination. Even more difficulties arise when crystallizing large membrane protein complexes such as photosystem I (PSI) due to their large unit cells dominated by solvent and complex characteristics that call for even stricter buffer requirements. Structure determination techniques tailored for these "difficult to crystallize" proteins such as femtosecond nanocrystallography are being developed yet still need specific crystal characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to screen protein crystallization conditions at low ionic strength in a microfluidic device. This is realized in one microfluidic experiment using low sample amounts, unlike traditional methods where each solution condition is set up separately. Second harmonic generation microscopy via second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC) was applied for the detection of nanometer- and micrometer-sized PSI crystals within microchannels. To develop a crystallization phase diagram, crystals imaged with SONICC at specific channel locations were correlated to protein and salt concentrations determined by numerical simulations of the time-dependent diffusion process along the channel. Our method demonstrated that a portion of the PSI crystallization phase diagram could be reconstructed in excellent agreement with crystallization conditions determined by traditional methods. We postulate that this approach could be utilized to efficiently study and optimize crystallization conditions for a wide range of proteins that are poorly understood to date.

  8. Crystallization of the Large Membrane Protein Complex Photosystem I in a Microfluidic Channel

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Traditional macroscale protein crystallization is accomplished non-trivially by exploring a range of protein concentrations and buffers in solution until a suitable combination is attained. This methodology is time consuming and resource intensive, hindering protein structure determination. Even more difficulties arise when crystallizing large membrane protein complexes such as photosystem I (PSI) due to their large unit cells dominated by solvent and complex characteristics that call for even stricter buffer requirements. Structure determination techniques tailored for these ‘difficult to crystallize’ proteins such as femtosecond nanocrystallography are being developed, yet still need specific crystal characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to screen protein crystallization conditions at low ionic strength in a microfluidic device. This is realized in one microfluidic experiment using low sample amounts, unlike traditional methods where each solution condition is set up separately. Second harmonic generation microscopy via Second Order Nonlinear Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC) was applied for the detection of nanometer and micrometer sized PSI crystals within microchannels. To develop a crystallization phase diagram, crystals imaged with SONICC at specific channel locations were correlated to protein and salt concentrations determined by numerical simulations of the time-dependent diffusion process along the channel. Our method demonstrated that a portion of the PSI crystallization phase diagram could be reconstructed in excellent agreement with crystallization conditions determined by traditional methods. We postulate that this approach could be utilized to efficiently study and optimize crystallization conditions for a wide range of proteins that are poorly understood to date. PMID:24191698

  9. MLL2 protein is a prognostic marker for gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Haige; Lu, Lu; Ge, Bei; Gao, Shenmeng; Ma, Yongyong; Liang, Bin; Yu, Kang; Yang, Kaiyan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed linage leukemia gene 2 (MLL2) is identified as a novel mutation gene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the significance of MLL2 protein expression for the prognosis of DLBCL is unclear. In this study, we detected MLL2 protein expression in primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PGI-DLBCL) samples by using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry, and analyzed the correlation between MLL2 protein expression and tumor proliferation activity. In addition, we investigated clinical significance of MLL2 protein expression for PGI-DLBCL prognosis. We found that there was significant difference in MLL2 protein expression between PGI-DLBCL and reactive hyperplasia of lymph node. High expression of MLL2 protein indicated higher clinical stage. In older patients (>60 years) with PGI-DLBCL, MLL2 protein expression was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression and negatively correlated with patient survival. Our data suggest that MLL2 protein is overexpressed in PGI-DLBCL and appears as a prognostic factor for patients of PGI-DLBCL, especially for those older than 60 years old. PMID:26722499

  10. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  11. MLL2 protein is a prognostic marker for gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haige; Lu, Lu; Ge, Bei; Gao, Shenmeng; Ma, Yongyong; Liang, Bin; Yu, Kang; Yang, Kaiyan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed linage leukemia gene 2 (MLL2) is identified as a novel mutation gene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the significance of MLL2 protein expression for the prognosis of DLBCL is unclear. In this study, we detected MLL2 protein expression in primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PGI-DLBCL) samples by using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry, and analyzed the correlation between MLL2 protein expression and tumor proliferation activity. In addition, we investigated clinical significance of MLL2 protein expression for PGI-DLBCL prognosis. We found that there was significant difference in MLL2 protein expression between PGI-DLBCL and reactive hyperplasia of lymph node. High expression of MLL2 protein indicated higher clinical stage. In older patients (>60 years) with PGI-DLBCL, MLL2 protein expression was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression and negatively correlated with patient survival. Our data suggest that MLL2 protein is overexpressed in PGI-DLBCL and appears as a prognostic factor for patients of PGI-DLBCL, especially for those older than 60 years old. PMID:26722499

  12. Myrosinase-binding proteins are derived from a large wound-inducible and repetitive transcript.

    PubMed

    Taipalensuu, J; Falk, A; Ek, B; Rask, L

    1997-02-01

    Several non-myrosinase proteins have been found in association with some of the myrosinases extracted from rape (Brassica napus) seed. Most of these proteins seemed to belong to a large family of proteins ranging in size over approximately 30-110 kDa, namely the myrosinase-binding protein (MBP) family. Potentially all of these MBPs might be derived from a single large precursor, encoded by a 3.3-kb transcript. This transcript coded for a 99-kDa glycine-rich protein with a highly repetitive structure. The mature 50-kDa and 52-kDa MBP amino-terminal was located 255 amino acids from the putative initiation methionine. Also, a more divergently related transcript, the protein product of which was unknown, has been cloned. However, the largest open reading frame suggested a proline-rich protein. While this transcript seemed to be expressed predominantly in seeds, the MBP transcripts were expressed in several tissues and also exhibited a responsiveness to wounding and methyl jasmonate. Both proteins exhibited significant similarities to lectins from Artocarpus integer and from Maclura pomifera.

  13. The Failed Writing Assignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swyt, Wendy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an unsuccessful English 101 writing assignment in which students were asked to analyze a Gary Larson cartoon. Examines critically the type of assignment that seeks to address and incorporate the student writer's "local knowledge" of cultural texts, while at the same time containing what counts as knowledge within limited parameters of…

  14. Characterizing the existing and potential structural space of proteins by large-scale multiple loop permutations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide structural genomics projects are increasing structure coverage of sequence space but have not significantly expanded the protein structure space itself (i.e., number of unique structural folds) since 2007. Discovering new structural folds experimentally by directed evolution and random recombination of secondary-structure blocks is also proved rarely successful. Meanwhile, previous computational efforts for large-scale mapping of protein structure space are limited to simple model proteins and led to an inconclusive answer on the completeness of the existing observed protein structure space. Here, we build novel protein structures by extending naturally occurring circular (single-loop) permutation to multiple loop permutations (MLPs). These structures are clustered by structural similarity measure called TM-score. The computational technique allows us to produce different structural clusters on the same naturally occurring, packed, stable core but with alternatively connected secondary-structure segments. A large-scale MLP of 2936 domains from structural classification of protein domains reproduces those existing structural clusters (63%) mostly as hubs for many nonredundant sequences and illustrates newly discovered novel clusters as islands adopted by a few sequences only. Results further show that there exist a significant number of novel potentially stable clusters for medium-size or large-size single-domain proteins, in particular, >100 amino acid residues, that are either not yet adopted by nature or adopted only by a few sequences. This study suggests that MLP provides a simple yet highly effective tool for engineering and design of novel protein structures (including naturally knotted proteins). The implication of recovering new-fold targets from critical assessment of structure prediction techniques (CASP) by MLP on template-based structure prediction is also discussed. Our MLP structures are available for download at the publication page of the

  15. BCSearch: fast structural fragment mining over large collections of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, Frédéric; Martz, François; Vavrusa, Marek; Bécot, Jérôme; Rey, Julien; Tufféry, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Resources to mine the large amount of protein structures available today are necessary to better understand how amino acid variations are compatible with conformation preservation, to assist protein design, engineering and, further, the development of biologic therapeutic compounds. BCSearch is a versatile service to efficiently mine large collections of protein structures. It relies on a new approach based on a Binet–Cauchy kernel that is more discriminative than the widely used root mean square deviation criterion. It has statistics independent of size even for short fragments, and is fast. The systematic mining of large collections of structures such as the complete SCOPe protein structural classification or comprehensive subsets of the Protein Data Bank can be performed in few minutes. Based on this new score, we propose four innovative applications: BCFragSearch and BCMirrorSearch, respectively, search for fragments similar and anti-similar to a query and return information on the diversity of the sequences of the hits. BCLoopSearch identifies candidate fragments of fixed size matching the flanks of a gaped structure. BCSpecificitySearch analyzes a complete protein structure and returns information about sites having few similar fragments. BCSearch is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/services/BCSearch. PMID:25977292

  16. Strategy for large scale solubilization of coal - characterization of Neurospora protein and gene

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Chen, Y.P.; Mishra, N.C.

    1995-12-31

    Low grade coal placed on mycelial mat of Neurospora crassa growing on Petri plate was found to be solubilized by this fungus. A heat stable protein has been purified to near homogeneity which can solubilize low grade coal in in vitro. The biochemical properties of the Neurospora protein will be presented. The nature of the product obtained after solubilization of coal by Neurospora protein in vivo and in vitro will also be presented. The N-terminus sequence of the amino acids of this protein will be used to design primer for possible cloning of gene for Neurospora protein capable of solubilization of coal in order to develop methodology for coal solubilization on a large scale.

  17. Transdermal immunization with large proteins by means of ultradeformable drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Paul, A; Cevc, G; Bachhawat, B K

    1995-12-01

    By means of novel, ultradeformable and self-optimizing agent carriers called transfersomes, large molecules can be brought into the body through intact permeability barriers. This permits non-invasive immunization through normal skin and gives rise to a similar or even slightly higher antibody titer than subcutaneous injections of the same immunogen formulation. The former type of immunization also results in a higher IgA/IgG ratio in the blood than the repeated immunogen injections, as shown here for a soluble protein, human serum albumin, as well as for an integral membrane protein, gap junction protein, in mice.

  18. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats.

    PubMed

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  19. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  20. Correlated motion of protein subdomains and large-scale conformational flexibility of RecA protein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Garmay; A, Shvetsov; D, Karelov; D, Lebedev; A, Radulescu; M, Petukhov; V, Isaev-Ivanov

    2012-02-01

    Based on X-ray crystallographic data available at Protein Data Bank, we have built molecular dynamics (MD) models of homologous recombinases RecA from E. coli and D. radiodurans. Functional form of RecA enzyme, which is known to be a long helical filament, was approximated by a trimer, simulated in periodic water box. The MD trajectories were analyzed in terms of large-scale conformational motions that could be detectable by neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. The analysis revealed that large-scale RecA monomer dynamics can be described in terms of relative motions of 7 subdomains. Motion of C-terminal domain was the major contributor to the overall dynamics of protein. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the MD trajectories in the atom coordinate space showed that rotation of C-domain is correlated with the conformational changes in the central domain and N-terminal domain, that forms the monomer-monomer interface. Thus, even though C-terminal domain is relatively far from the interface, its orientation is correlated with large-scale filament conformation. PCA of the trajectories in the main chain dihedral angle coordinate space implicates a co-existence of a several different large-scale conformations of the modeled trimer. In order to clarify the relationship of independent domain orientation with large-scale filament conformation, we have performed analysis of independent domain motion and its implications on the filament geometry.

  1. hnCOcaNH and hncoCANH pulse sequences for rapid and unambiguous backbone assignment in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2010-09-01

    Time-saving in data acquisition is a major thrust of NMR pulse sequence development in the context of structural proteomics research. The conventional HNCA and HN(CA)CO pulse sequences, routinely used for sequential backbone assignment, have the limitation that they cannot distinguish inter- and intra-residue correlations. In order to remove this ambiguity, one has to record HNCO and HN(CO)CA or sequential HNCA experiments which provide unambiguous information of sequential correlations. However, this almost doubles the experimental time. Besides, they require repeated scanning through the (15)N planes to search for the matching peaks along the carbon dimension. In this background, we present here two pulse sequences, termed as hncoCANH and hnCOcaNH that lead to spectra equivalent to HNCA and HN(CA)CO spectra, respectively, but with direct distinction of inter- and intra-residue peaks; these occur with opposite signs in the new experiments. The two pulse sequences have been derived by simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] to frequency-label (13)C(alpha) or (13)C' instead of (15)N during the t(1) period. Like HN(C)N, these spectra also exhibit special patterns of self and sequential peaks around glycines and prolines, which enable direct identification of certain triplets of residues and thus provide internal checks during the sequential assignment walk. The spectra enable rapid and unambiguous assignment of H(N), (15)N and (13)C(alpha) (or (13)C') in a single experiment, and thus would be of great value in high-throughput structural proteomics. PMID:20643567

  2. Approach for growth of high-quality and large protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Hirose, Mika; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Murai, Ryota; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Three crystallization methods for growing large high-quality protein crystals, i.e. crystallization in the presence of a semi-solid agarose gel, top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) and a large-scale hanging-drop method, have previously been presented. In this study the effectiveness of crystallization in the presence of a semi-solid agarose gel has been further evaluated by crystallizing additional proteins in the presence of 2.0% (w/v) agarose gel, resulting in complete gelification with high mechanical strength. In TSSG the seed crystals are hung by a seed holder protruding from the top of the growth vessel to prevent polycrystallization. In the large-scale hanging-drop method, a cut pipette tip was used to maintain large-scale droplets consisting of protein-precipitant solution. Here a novel crystallization method that combines TSSG and the large-scale hanging-drop method is reported. A large and single crystal of lysozyme was obtained by this method.

  3. Backbone and side chain NMR assignment, along with the secondary structure prediction of RRM2 domain of La protein from a lower eukaryote exhibiting identical structural organization with its human homolog.

    PubMed

    Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Chasapis, Christos T; Apostolidi, Maria; Konstantinidou, Parthena; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    The La protein (Lupus antigen), a key mediator during biogenesis of RNA polymerase III transcripts, contains a characteristic La motif and one or two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains, depending on the organism of origin. The RRM1 domain is conserved in higher eukaryotes and located in the N-terminal region, whereas the C-terminal RRM2 domain is absent in most lower eukaryotes and its specific role remains, so far, uncharacterized. Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignment of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of RRM2 of La protein from Dictyostelium discoideum. Interestingly, the La protein in this lower eukaryote, exhibits high homology to its human counterpart. Moreover, it contains two RRM domains, instead of one, raising questions on its evolutionary origin and the putative role of RRM2 in vivo. We also provide its secondary structure as predicted by the TALOS+ online tool.

  4. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  5. Assignment of the human FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP) gene to chromosome 1p36 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.A.; Rosen, C.A.; Carter, K.C.

    1996-04-15

    This report describes the localization of the human FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP) gene to human chromosome 1p36 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This protein is the binding site for rapamycin and FK506, two potent immunosuppressive drugs. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Detection and assignment of proteins encoded by rice black streaked dwarf fijivirus S7, S8, S9 and S10.

    PubMed

    Isogai, M; Uyeda, I; Lee, B C

    1998-06-01

    The proteins encoded by rice black streaked dwarf fijivirus (RBSDV) genomic segments 7-10 (S7-S10) were characterized. Open reading frames (ORFs) from these segments were expressed as fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. Antibodies raised against the expressed products were used as probes to determine whether the viral ORFs encode structural proteins. In Western blots, antibodies to the expressed S8 and S10 products reacted with a core capsid (65 kDa) and a major outer capsid (56 kDa) protein, respectively, while none of the antibodies to S7 and S9 products reacted with structural proteins. Antisera to RBSDV S7 ORF1 and S9 ORF1 each detected a single protein of the predicted size in total protein extracts from infected rice plants and viruliferous Laodelphax striatellus. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that antibodies to RBSDV S7 ORF1 and RBSDV S9 ORF1 reacted with tubular structures and viroplasm, respectively, in sections of both infected maize plants and viruliferous L. striatellus. Antisera to ORF2 of S7 and S9 failed to detect any proteins in the infected tissue using either Western blotting or immuno-electron microscopic techniques.

  7. Protein Identification False Discovery Rates for Very Large Proteomics Data Sets Generated by Tandem Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Lukas; Claassen, Manfred; Schrimpf, Sabine P.; Jovanovic, Marko; Schmidt, Alexander; Buhmann, Joachim M.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of a proteome is a fundamental goal in proteomics. To achieve saturation coverage of a proteome or specific subproteome via tandem mass spectrometric identification of tryptic protein sample digests, proteomics data sets are growing dramatically in size and heterogeneity. The trend toward very large integrated data sets poses so far unsolved challenges to control the uncertainty of protein identifications going beyond well established confidence measures for peptide-spectrum matches. We present MAYU, a novel strategy that reliably estimates false discovery rates for protein identifications in large scale data sets. We validated and applied MAYU using various large proteomics data sets. The data show that the size of the data set has an important and previously underestimated impact on the reliability of protein identifications. We particularly found that protein false discovery rates are significantly elevated compared with those of peptide-spectrum matches. The function provided by MAYU is critical to control the quality of proteome data repositories and thereby to enhance any study relying on these data sources. The MAYU software is available as standalone software and also integrated into the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. PMID:19608599

  8. Designing Cyber-Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drogemuller, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Recommends that teachers prevent plagiarism by structuring research assignments so that copying material from references is very difficult. Suggests that teachers be specific, select relevant topics, and insist on full referencing. (DDR)

  9. My Favorite Assignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Robert E.; Johnson, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Presents two assignments that show (1) how George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" can be applied to business writing and (2) how structured student-teacher conferences can generate enthusiasm for oral expression in a business communication course. (AEA)

  10. Personal Writing Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Examines one element of rhetorical history--the sorts of subjects teachers have assigned students and their change from objective, centripetal writing tasks to subjective, centrifugal tasks. Documents the historical evolution of rhetorical tradition. (AEW)

  11. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Julia; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. PMID:27248802

  12. Large-scale determination of previously unsolved protein structures using evolutionary information

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Kinch, Lisa; Park, Hahnbeom; Liao, Yuxing; Pei, Jimin; Kim, David E; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Grishin, Nick V; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of the structures of proteins without detectable sequence similarity to any protein of known structure remains an outstanding scientific challenge. Here we report significant progress in this area. We first describe de novo blind structure predictions of unprecendented accuracy we made for two proteins in large families in the recent CASP11 blind test of protein structure prediction methods by incorporating residue–residue co-evolution information in the Rosetta structure prediction program. We then describe the use of this method to generate structure models for 58 of the 121 large protein families in prokaryotes for which three-dimensional structures are not available. These models, which are posted online for public access, provide structural information for the over 400,000 proteins belonging to the 58 families and suggest hypotheses about mechanism for the subset for which the function is known, and hypotheses about function for the remainder. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09248.001 PMID:26335199

  13. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions.

  14. Large, dynamic, multi-protein complexes: a challenge for structural biology.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Boura, Evzen

    2014-11-19

    Structural biology elucidates atomic structures of macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, and their complexes to understand the basic mechanisms of their functions. Among proteins that pose the most difficult problems to current efforts are those which have several large domains connected by long, flexible polypeptide segments. Although abundant and critically important in biological cells, such proteins have proven intractable by conventional techniques. This gap has recently led to the advancement of hybrid methods that use state-of-the-art computational tools to combine complementary data from various high- and low-resolution experiments. In this review, we briefly discuss the individual experimental techniques to illustrate their strengths and limitations, and then focus on the use of hybrid methods in structural biology. We describe how representative structures of dynamic multi-protein complexes are obtained utilizing the EROS hybrid method that we have co-developed. PMID:25335513

  15. Large, dynamic, multi-protein complexes: a challenge for structural biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różycki, Bartosz; Boura, Evzen

    2014-11-01

    Structural biology elucidates atomic structures of macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, and their complexes to understand the basic mechanisms of their functions. Among proteins that pose the most difficult problems to current efforts are those which have several large domains connected by long, flexible polypeptide segments. Although abundant and critically important in biological cells, such proteins have proven intractable by conventional techniques. This gap has recently led to the advancement of hybrid methods that use state-of-the-art computational tools to combine complementary data from various high- and low-resolution experiments. In this review, we briefly discuss the individual experimental techniques to illustrate their strengths and limitations, and then focus on the use of hybrid methods in structural biology. We describe how representative structures of dynamic multi-protein complexes are obtained utilizing the EROS hybrid method that we have co-developed.

  16. Understanding the Physical Properties that Control Protein Crystallization by Analysis of Large-Scale Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Price, W.; Chen, Y; Handelman, S; Neely, H; Manor, P; Karlin, R; Nair, R; Montelione, G; Hunt, J; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Crystallization is the most serious bottleneck in high-throughput protein-structure determination by diffraction methods. We have used data mining of the large-scale experimental results of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium and experimental folding studies to characterize the biophysical properties that control protein crystallization. This analysis leads to the conclusion that crystallization propensity depends primarily on the prevalence of well-ordered surface epitopes capable of mediating interprotein interactions and is not strongly influenced by overall thermodynamic stability. We identify specific sequence features that correlate with crystallization propensity and that can be used to estimate the crystallization probability of a given construct. Analyses of entire predicted proteomes demonstrate substantial differences in the amino acid-sequence properties of human versus eubacterial proteins, which likely reflect differences in biophysical properties, including crystallization propensity. Our thermodynamic measurements do not generally support previous claims regarding correlations between sequence properties and protein stability.

  17. Detecting remote evolutionary relationships among proteins by large-scale semantic embedding.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Iain; Weston, Jason; Noble, William Stafford; Leslie, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Virtually every molecular biologist has searched a protein or DNA sequence database to find sequences that are evolutionarily related to a given query. Pairwise sequence comparison methods--i.e., measures of similarity between query and target sequences--provide the engine for sequence database search and have been the subject of 30 years of computational research. For the difficult problem of detecting remote evolutionary relationships between protein sequences, the most successful pairwise comparison methods involve building local models (e.g., profile hidden Markov models) of protein sequences. However, recent work in massive data domains like web search and natural language processing demonstrate the advantage of exploiting the global structure of the data space. Motivated by this work, we present a large-scale algorithm called ProtEmbed, which learns an embedding of protein sequences into a low-dimensional "semantic space." Evolutionarily related proteins are embedded in close proximity, and additional pieces of evidence, such as 3D structural similarity or class labels, can be incorporated into the learning process. We find that ProtEmbed achieves superior accuracy to widely used pairwise sequence methods like PSI-BLAST and HHSearch for remote homology detection; it also outperforms our previous RankProp algorithm, which incorporates global structure in the form of a protein similarity network. Finally, the ProtEmbed embedding space can be visualized, both at the global level and local to a given query, yielding intuition about the structure of protein sequence space.

  18. Rbfox Proteins Regulate Splicing as Part of a Large Multiprotein Complex LASR.

    PubMed

    Damianov, Andrey; Ying, Yi; Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tran, Diana; Vashisht, Ajay A; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Xing, Yi; Martin, Kelsey C; Wohlschlegel, James A; Black, Douglas L

    2016-04-21

    Rbfox proteins control alternative splicing and posttranscriptional regulation in mammalian brain and are implicated in neurological disease. These proteins recognize the RNA sequence (U)GCAUG, but their structures and diverse roles imply a variety of protein-protein interactions. We find that nuclear Rbfox proteins are bound within a large assembly of splicing regulators (LASR), a multimeric complex containing the proteins hnRNP M, hnRNP H, hnRNP C, Matrin3, NF110/NFAR-2, NF45, and DDX5, all approximately equimolar to Rbfox. We show that splicing repression mediated by hnRNP M is stimulated by Rbfox. Virtually all the intron-bound Rbfox is associated with LASR, and hnRNP M motifs are enriched adjacent to Rbfox crosslinking sites in vivo. These findings demonstrate that Rbfox proteins bind RNA with a defined set of cofactors and affect a broader set of exons than previously recognized. The function of this multimeric LASR complex has implications for deciphering the regulatory codes controlling splicing networks.

  19. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Assignment of Rights to Benefits § 433.146 Rights assigned; assignment method. (a) Except as specified...

  20. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Assignment of Rights to Benefits § 433.146 Rights assigned; assignment method. (a) Except as specified...

  1. Backbone and side-chain ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N assignments of the PPIase domain of macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein from Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Tse, Man-Kit; Cheung, Stanley K K; Ke, Yi-hong; Lau, Candy C Y; Sze, Kong-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-04-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterium uniquely evolved to thrive in the inhospitable phagolysosome of macrophage. C. burnetii causes Q fever in humans and animals, which is emerging as a global public health concern. It is highly infectious and designated as a category B biowarfare agent because of its ubiquitous nature, abundant natural reservoirs, high resistance to environmental conditions, ease of transmission and low infectious dose. The lack of knowledge and awareness of C. burnetii leads to under-reporting and under-diagnosing of Q fever cases. Therefore, further understanding of the interactions between the infected host and the bacteria is necessary. C. burnetii macrophage infectivity potentiator (cb-Mip) is a secreted protein of 230 amino acids involving in intracellular survival of the pathogen. cb-Mip belongs to the family of FK506 binding protein, which possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Besides acting as a PPIase, Mip protein homolog has been identified as virulence factor of many intracellular pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, we report the near complete resonance assignments of the PPIase domain-containing region of Mip protein of C. burnetii. Secondary structure prediction based on chemical shift index analysis indicates that the protein adopts a predominately beta-strand structure, which is consistent with the crystal structure of homologous Mip protein in Legionella pneumophila.

  2. Lowest electronic states of the CP47 antenna protein complex of photosystem II: simulation of optical spectra and revised structural assignments.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Mike; Acharya, Khem; Neupane, Bhanu; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-09-16

    In this work, we present simulated steady-state absorption, emission, and nonresonant hole burning (HB) spectra for the CP47 antenna complex of photosystem II (PS II) based on fits to recently refined experimental data (Neupane et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4214). Excitonic simulations are based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure of the PS II core from cyanobacteria (Guskov et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2009, 16, 334), and allow for preliminary assignment of the chlorophylls (Chls) contributing to the lowest excitonic states. The search for realistic site energies was guided by experimental constraints and aided by simple fitting algorithms. The following experimental constraints were used: (i) the oscillator strength of the lowest-energy state should be approximately ≤0.5 Chl equivalents; (ii) the excitonic structure must explain the experimentally observed red-shifted (∼695 nm) emission maximum; and (iii) the excitonic interactions of all states must properly describe the broad (non-line-narrowed, NLN) HB spectrum (including its antihole) whose shape is extremely sensitive to the excitonic structure of the complex, especially the lowest excitonic states. Importantly, our assignments differ significantly from those previously reported by Raszewski and Renger (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 4431), due primarily to differences in the experimental data simulated. In particular, we find that the lowest state localized on Chl 526 possesses too high of an oscillator strength to fit low-temperature experimental data. Instead, we suggest that Chl 523 most strongly contributes to the lowest excitonic state, with Chl 526 contributing to the second excitonic state. Since the fits of nonresonant holes are more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra, we suggest that fits of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provide more realistic site energies.

  3. Unfolding the Role of Large Heat Shock Proteins: New Insights and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daming; Subjeck, John; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) of eukaryotes are evolutionarily conserved molecules present in all the major intracellular organelles. They mainly function as molecular chaperones and participate in maintenance of protein homeostasis in physiological state and under stressful conditions. Despite their relative abundance, the large HSPs, i.e., Hsp110 and glucose-regulated protein 170 (Grp170), have received less attention compared to other conventional HSPs. These proteins are distantly related to the Hsp70 and belong to Hsp70 superfamily. Increased sizes of Hsp110 and Grp170, due to the presence of a loop structure, result in their exceptional capability in binding to polypeptide substrates or non-protein ligands, such as pathogen-associated molecules. These interactions that occur in the extracellular environment during tissue injury or microbial infection may lead to amplification of an immune response engaging both innate and adaptive immune components. Here, we review the current advances in understanding these large HSPs as molecular chaperones in proteostasis control and immune modulation as well as their therapeutic implications in treatment of cancer and neurodegeneration. Given their unique immunoregulatory activities, we also discuss the emerging evidence of their potential involvement in inflammatory and immune-related diseases. PMID:26973652

  4. Accounting for large amplitude protein deformation during in silico macromolecular docking.

    PubMed

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-02-22

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  5. Establishment and characterization of human engineered cells stably expressing large extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Daekee; Kang, Gwang-Sik; Han, Dong Keun; Park, Kwideok; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel-coated culture plates have been used to study the relationship between the ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior. However, it is unclear whether ECM-coated dishes mimic the natural ECM microenvironment because the architecture of the ECM is constructed of randomly distributed fibers. The purpose of this study was the production and confirmation of human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as collagen I/II and fibronectin. First, large (over 10 kb) ECM vectors encoding human collagen I/II and fibronectin were constructed and the circular vectors were linearized. Second, the linear ECM vectors were introduced into immortalized human embryonic kidney cells using various transfection methods. The polyethylenimine and liposome methods showed higher efficiencies than electroporation for transfection of these large vectors. Third, human ECM engineered cells were established by stable integration of the vector into the genomic DNA and resulted in stable overexpression of mRNA and proteins. In summary, human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as human collagen I/II and fibronectin were successfully prepared, and secretion of the ECM components into the surrounding environment was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Thus, human ECM engineered cells naturally secreting ECM components could be valuable for studying the relationship between the native ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior.

  6. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or multiple genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) 1. Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power 2–6. Consequently, many eQTL are likely missed, especially those with smaller effects 7. Further, most studies use mRNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics 8–13 reported surprising differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes 9,10, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here, we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyes cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green-fluorescent-protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high vs. low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci cluster at hotspot locations that influence multiple proteins—in some cases, more than half of those examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell physiology between yeast strains. PMID:24402228

  7. Large Proteins Have a Great Tendency to Aggregate but a Low Propensity to Form Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Hassan; Parrini, Claudia; Relini, Annalisa; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Mannini, Benedetta; Pesce, Alessandra; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of soluble proteins into ordered fibrillar aggregates with cross-β structure is an essential event of many human diseases. The polypeptides undergoing aggregation are generally small in size. To explore if the small size is a primary determinant for the formation of amyloids under pathological conditions we have created two databases of proteins, forming amyloid-related and non-amyloid deposits in human diseases, respectively. The size distributions of the two protein populations are well separated, with the systems forming non-amyloid deposits appearing significantly larger. We have then investigated the propensity of the 486-residue hexokinase-B from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YHKB) to form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. This size is intermediate between the size distributions of amyloid and non-amyloid forming proteins. Aggregation was induced under conditions known to be most effective for amyloid formation by normally globular proteins: (i) low pH with salts, (ii) pH 5.5 with trifluoroethanol. In both situations YHKB aggregated very rapidly into species with significant β-sheet structure, as detected using circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction, but a weak Thioflavin T and Congo red binding. Moreover, atomic force microscopy indicated a morphology distinct from typical amyloid fibrils. Both types of aggregates were cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma cells, as indicated by the MTT assay. This analysis indicates that large proteins have a high tendency to form toxic aggregates, but low propensity to form regular amyloid in vivo and that such a behavior is intrinsically determined by the size of the protein, as suggested by the in vitro analysis of our sample protein. PMID:21249193

  8. Accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations in mitochondrial protein-coding genes of large versus small mammals

    PubMed Central

    Popadin, Konstantin; Polishchuk, Leonard V.; Mamirova, Leila; Knorre, Dmitry; Gunbin, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    After the effective size of a population, Ne, declines, some slightly deleterious amino acid replacements which were initially suppressed by purifying selection become effectively neutral and can reach fixation. Here we investigate this phenomenon for a set of all 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes from 110 mammalian species. By using body mass as a proxy for Ne, we show that large mammals (i.e., those with low Ne) as compared with small ones (in our sample these are, on average, 369.5 kg and 275 g, respectively) have a 43% higher rate of accumulation of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions relative to synonymous substitutions, and an 8–40% higher rate of accumulation of radical amino acid substitutions relative to conservative substitutions, depending on the type of amino acid classification. These higher rates result in a 6% greater amino acid dissimilarity between modern species and their most recent reconstructed ancestors in large versus small mammals. Because nonsynonymous substitutions are likely to be more harmful than synonymous substitutions, and radical amino acid substitutions are likely to be more harmful than conservative ones, our results suggest that large mammals experience less efficient purifying selection than small mammals. Furthermore, because in the course of mammalian evolution body size tends to increase and, consequently, Ne tends to decline, evolution of mammals toward large body size may involve accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations in mitochondrial protein-coding genes, which may contribute to decline or extinction of large mammals. PMID:17679693

  9. cOSPREY: A Cloud-Based Distributed Algorithm for Large-Scale Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuchao; Dong, Yuxi; Zhou, Jingtian; Hallen, Mark; Donald, Bruce R; Zeng, Jianyang; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Finding the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) of a huge combinatorial search space is the key challenge in computational protein design (CPD) problems. Traditional algorithms lack a scalable and efficient distributed design scheme, preventing researchers from taking full advantage of current cloud infrastructures. We design cloud OSPREY (cOSPREY), an extension to a widely used protein design software OSPREY, to allow the original design framework to scale to the commercial cloud infrastructures. We propose several novel designs to integrate both algorithm and system optimizations, such as GMEC-specific pruning, state search partitioning, asynchronous algorithm state sharing, and fault tolerance. We evaluate cOSPREY on three different cloud platforms using different technologies and show that it can solve a number of large-scale protein design problems that have not been possible with previous approaches.

  10. Direct detection of x-rays for protein crystallography employing a thick, large area CCD

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer; McKay, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for directly determining the crystalline structure of a protein crystal. The crystal is irradiated by a finely collimated x-ray beam. The interaction of the x-ray beam with the crystal produces scattered x-rays. These scattered x-rays are detected by means of a large area, thick CCD which is capable of measuring a significant number of scattered x-rays which impact its surface. The CCD is capable of detecting the position of impact of the scattered x-ray on the surface of the CCD and the quantity of scattered x-rays which impact the same cell or pixel. This data is then processed in real-time and the processed data is outputted to produce a image of the structure of the crystal. If this crystal is a protein the molecular structure of the protein can be determined from the data received.

  11. cOSPREY: A Cloud-Based Distributed Algorithm for Large-Scale Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuchao; Dong, Yuxi; Zhou, Jingtian; Hallen, Mark; Donald, Bruce R; Zeng, Jianyang; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Finding the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) of a huge combinatorial search space is the key challenge in computational protein design (CPD) problems. Traditional algorithms lack a scalable and efficient distributed design scheme, preventing researchers from taking full advantage of current cloud infrastructures. We design cloud OSPREY (cOSPREY), an extension to a widely used protein design software OSPREY, to allow the original design framework to scale to the commercial cloud infrastructures. We propose several novel designs to integrate both algorithm and system optimizations, such as GMEC-specific pruning, state search partitioning, asynchronous algorithm state sharing, and fault tolerance. We evaluate cOSPREY on three different cloud platforms using different technologies and show that it can solve a number of large-scale protein design problems that have not been possible with previous approaches. PMID:27154509

  12. Principals Make Assignments Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    The inner-city high school in Washington, DC, that Guillaume Gendre joined as an assistant principal had a modest reputation for achievement but was nevertheless challenged to raise expectations for student work. In other schools, Gendre had used assignments--a specific kind of instructional task in which students are charged to think about an…

  13. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  14. A large scale membrane-binding protein conformational change that initiates at small length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandpre, Trevor; Andorf, Matthew; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Lamb, Robert; Poor, Taylor; Landahl, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The fusion (F) protein of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a membrane-bound, homotrimeric glycoprotein located on the surface of PIV5 viral envelopes. Upon being triggered by the receptor-binding protein (HN), F undergoes a greater than 100Å ATP-independent refolding event. This refolding event results in the insertion of a hydrophobic fusion peptide into the membrane of the target cell, followed by the desolvation and subsequent fusion event as the two membranes are brought together. Isothermal calorimetry and hydrophobic dye incorporation experiments indicate that the soluble construct of the F protein undergoes a conformational rearrangement event at around 55 deg C. We present the results of an initial Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (TR-SAXS) study of this large scale, entropically driven conformational change using a temperature jump. Although we the measured radius of gyration of this protein changes on a 110 second timescale, we find that the x-ray scattering intensity at higher angles (corresponding to smaller length scales in the protein) changes nearly an order of magnitude faster. We believe this may be a signature of entropically-driven conformational change. To whom correspondence should be addressed

  15. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H.; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P.; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in over-expression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection, size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8 tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI− (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture, and over-express the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks. PMID:25299155

  16. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  17. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  18. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation.

    PubMed

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M; Kirti, P B

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2-3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in rice

  19. Isolation, cloning and large scale expression of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) protein of Polymyxa betae.

    PubMed

    Safarpour, H; Safarnejad, M R

    2012-01-01

    The plasmodiophoromycete Polymyxa betae, an obligate parasite of sugar-beet roots, is a natural vector of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV). To develop protein based diagnosis for any pathogenic agents including P. betae, a specific immunogenic protein has to be prepared. The glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is expressed in all the morphologically different stages of the pathogen's life cycle, and then it is a good candidate as an immunogenic agent for developing of specific antibodies and diagnostic purposes. The present study describes isolation, cloning and large scale expression and purification of P. betae GST protein. For this aim, total RNA was initially isolated from infected plants and corresponding cDNA was constructed by using reverse transcriptase and oligo-dT primer as well as mRNA as a template. The gene encoding GST was isolated and PCR-amplified from the synthesized cDNA by using specific primers. The amplified fragments were preliminary cloned into pTZ57R/T cloning vector. Intact clone containing right sequence was selected after digestion, PCR amplification and subsequent sequencing analysis. Next, GST encoding region having right sequence was recovered and sub-cloned into pET28a bacterial expression vector. Large scale expression of recombinant protein was performed in BL21-de3 strain of E. coli and purification was carried out under native situation through Immobolized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) in column containing Ni-NTA agarose beads. Successful expression and purification steps were confirmed by SDS-PAGE followed by western blotting analysis. These results confirmed the high purity and integrity of GST protein which was around 21 kDa. Generally, the total yield of the purified protein in the culture medium was estimated at around 3.5 mg/mL. After purification, a major part of the purified proteins was precipitated identified as excess GST. To improve the solubility, the final concentration of purified protein was reduced

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  1. Optimal processor assignment for pipeline computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Simha, Rahul; Choudhury, Alok N.; Narahari, Bhagirath

    1991-01-01

    The availability of large scale multitasked parallel architectures introduces the following processor assignment problem for pipelined computations. Given a set of tasks and their precedence constraints, along with their experimentally determined individual responses times for different processor sizes, find an assignment of processor to tasks. Two objectives are of interest: minimal response given a throughput requirement, and maximal throughput given a response time requirement. These assignment problems differ considerably from the classical mapping problem in which several tasks share a processor; instead, it is assumed that a large number of processors are to be assigned to a relatively small number of tasks. Efficient assignment algorithms were developed for different classes of task structures. For a p processor system and a series parallel precedence graph with n constituent tasks, an O(np2) algorithm is provided that finds the optimal assignment for the response time optimization problem; it was found that the assignment optimizing the constrained throughput in O(np2log p) time. Special cases of linear, independent, and tree graphs are also considered.

  2. Utility of inline milk fat and protein ratio to diagnose subclinical ketosis and to assign propylene glycol treatment in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nicholas T; Peña, Gustavo; Risco, Carlos; Barbosa, Carolina C; Vieira-Neto, Achilles; Galvão, Klibs N

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to identify a fat-to-protein ratio (FPR) cut-off to diagnose subclinical ketosis (SCK) and to evaluate the effect of propylene glycol (PPG) treatment of cows with high FPR. The optimized cut-off was > 1.42; sensitivity (Se) = 92%; specificity (Sp) = 65%. A cut-off > 1.5 was selected for the PPG trial for balanced Se-Sp. Fat-to-protein ratio cut-offs > 1.25, 1.35, 1.50, 1.60, and 1.70 resulted in Se-Sp of 100% to 49%, 96% to 59%, 75% to 78%, 33% to 90%, and 8% to 96%, respectively. The proportions of cows with FPR > 1.25, 1.35, 1.42, 1.50, 1.60, and 1.70 were 60%, 50%, 44%, 30%, 14%, and 6%, respectively. Incidences of clinical ketosis and milk yield were similar between cows that received 400 mL of PPG (n = 34) and control cows (n = 38). Prevalence of SCK at enrollment was 29.2%; therefore, FPR > 1.5 is not indicated for treatment. Lower cut-offs should be used for screening.

  3. Utility of inline milk fat and protein ratio to diagnose subclinical ketosis and to assign propylene glycol treatment in lactating dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Nicholas T.; Peña, Gustavo; Risco, Carlos; Barbosa, Carolina C.; Vieira-Neto, Achilles; Galvão, Klibs N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to identify a fat-to-protein ratio (FPR) cut-off to diagnose subclinical ketosis (SCK) and to evaluate the effect of propylene glycol (PPG) treatment of cows with high FPR. The optimized cut-off was > 1.42; sensitivity (Se) = 92%; specificity (Sp) = 65%. A cut-off > 1.5 was selected for the PPG trial for balanced Se-Sp. Fat-to-protein ratio cut-offs > 1.25, 1.35, 1.50, 1.60, and 1.70 resulted in Se-Sp of 100% to 49%, 96% to 59%, 75% to 78%, 33% to 90%, and 8% to 96%, respectively. The proportions of cows with FPR > 1.25, 1.35, 1.42, 1.50, 1.60, and 1.70 were 60%, 50%, 44%, 30%, 14%, and 6%, respectively. Incidences of clinical ketosis and milk yield were similar between cows that received 400 mL of PPG (n = 34) and control cows (n = 38). Prevalence of SCK at enrollment was 29.2%; therefore, FPR > 1.5 is not indicated for treatment. Lower cut-offs should be used for screening. PMID:26246632

  4. Gain weighted eigenspace assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the development of the gain weighted eigenspace assignment methodology. This provides a designer with a systematic methodology for trading off eigenvector placement versus gain magnitudes, while still maintaining desired closed-loop eigenvalue locations. This is accomplished by forming a cost function composed of a scalar measure of error between desired and achievable eigenvectors and a scalar measure of gain magnitude, determining analytical expressions for the gradients, and solving for the optimal solution by numerical iteration. For this development the scalar measure of gain magnitude is chosen to be a weighted sum of the squares of all the individual elements of the feedback gain matrix. An example is presented to demonstrate the method. In this example, solutions yielding achievable eigenvectors close to the desired eigenvectors are obtained with significant reductions in gain magnitude compared to a solution obtained using a previously developed eigenspace (eigenstructure) assignment method.

  5. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin.

  6. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin. PMID:21818779

  7. Performance of hybrid methods for large-scale unconstrained optimization as applied to models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, B; Meirovitch, H; Navon, I M

    2003-07-30

    Energy minimization plays an important role in structure determination and analysis of proteins, peptides, and other organic molecules; therefore, development of efficient minimization algorithms is important. Recently, Morales and Nocedal developed hybrid methods for large-scale unconstrained optimization that interlace iterations of the limited-memory BFGS method (L-BFGS) and the Hessian-free Newton method (Computat Opt Appl 2002, 21, 143-154). We test the performance of this approach as compared to those of the L-BFGS algorithm of Liu and Nocedal and the truncated Newton (TN) with automatic preconditioner of Nash, as applied to the protein bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and a loop of the protein ribonuclease A. These systems are described by the all-atom AMBER force field with a dielectric constant epsilon = 1 and a distance-dependent dielectric function epsilon = 2r, where r is the distance between two atoms. It is shown that for the optimal parameters the hybrid approach is typically two times more efficient in terms of CPU time and function/gradient calculations than the two other methods. The advantage of the hybrid approach increases as the electrostatic interactions become stronger, that is, in going from epsilon = 2r to epsilon = 1, which leads to a more rugged and probably more nonlinear potential energy surface. However, no general rule that defines the optimal parameters has been found and their determination requires a relatively large number of trial-and-error calculations for each problem.

  8. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    SciTech Connect

    Galat, Andrzej Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  9. Large scale crystallization of protein pharmaceuticals in microgravity via temperature change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Marianna M.

    1992-01-01

    The major objective of this research effort is the temperature driven growth of protein crystals in large batches in the microgravity environment of space. Pharmaceutical houses are developing protein products for patient care, for example, human insulin, human growth hormone, interferons, and tissue plasminogen activator or TPA, the clot buster for heart attack victims. Except for insulin, these are very high value products; they are extremely potent in small quantities and have a great value per gram of material. It is feasible that microgravity crystallization can be a cost recoverable, economically sound final processing step in their manufacture. Large scale protein crystal growth in microgravity has significant advantages from the basic science and the applied science standpoints. Crystal growth can proceed unhindered due to lack of surface effects. Dynamic control is possible and relatively easy. The method has the potential to yield large quantities of pure crystalline product. Crystallization is a time honored procedure for purifying organic materials and microgravity crystallization could be the final step to remove trace impurities from high value protein pharmaceuticals. In addition, microgravity grown crystals could be the final formulation for those medicines that need to be administered in a timed release fashion. Long lasting insulin, insulin lente, is such a product. Also crystalline protein pharmaceuticals are more stable for long-term storage. Temperature, as the initiation step, has certain advantages. Again, dynamic control of the crystallization process is possible and easy. A temperature step is non-invasive and is the most subtle way to control protein solubility and therefore crystallization. Seeding is not necessary. Changes in protein and precipitant concentrations and pH are not necessary. Finally, this method represents a new way to crystallize proteins in space that takes advantage of the unique microgravity environment. The results

  10. Large-Scale Cultivation of Acidophilic Hyperthermophiles for Recovery of Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Penny; Blum, Paul; Perez-Pomares, Francisco; Elthon, Tom

    2003-01-01

    An electric water heater was modified for large-scale cultivation of aerobic acidophilic hyperthermophiles to enable recovery of secreted proteins. Critical changes included thermostat replacement, redesign of the temperature control circuit, and removal of the cathodic anticorrosion system. These alterations provided accurate temperature and pH control. The bioreactor was used to cultivate selected strains of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus and other species within this genus. Reformulation of a basal salts medium facilitated preparation of large culture volumes and eliminated sterilization-induced precipitation of medium components. Substrate induction of synthesis of the S. solfataricus-secreted alpha-amylase during growth in a defined medium supported the utility of the bioreactor for studies of physiologically regulated processes. An improved purification strategy was developed by using strong cation-exchange chromatography for recovery of the alpha-amylase and the processing of large sample volumes of acidic culture supernatant. These findings should simplify efforts to study acidophilic hyperthermophilic microbes and their secreted proteins. PMID:12514002

  11. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  12. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasviki, K.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Yannakopoulou, E.; Papadopoulou, P.; Kalef-Ezra, J.

    2007-10-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv.

  13. A new algorithm for reliable and general NMR resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The new FLYA automated resonance assignment algorithm determines NMR chemical shift assignments on the basis of peak lists from any combination of multidimensional through-bond or through-space NMR experiments for proteins. Backbone and side-chain assignments can be determined. All experimental data are used simultaneously, thereby exploiting optimally the redundancy present in the input peak lists and circumventing potential pitfalls of assignment strategies in which results obtained in a given step remain fixed input data for subsequent steps. Instead of prescribing a specific assignment strategy, the FLYA resonance assignment algorithm requires only experimental peak lists and the primary structure of the protein, from which the peaks expected in a given spectrum can be generated by applying a set of rules, defined in a straightforward way by specifying through-bond or through-space magnetization transfer pathways. The algorithm determines the resonance assignment by finding an optimal mapping between the set of expected peaks that are assigned by definition but have unknown positions and the set of measured peaks in the input peak lists that are initially unassigned but have a known position in the spectrum. Using peak lists obtained by purely automated peak picking from the experimental spectra of three proteins, FLYA assigned correctly 96-99% of the backbone and 90-91% of all resonances that could be assigned manually. Systematic studies quantified the impact of various factors on the assignment accuracy, namely the extent of missing real peaks and the amount of additional artifact peaks in the input peak lists, as well as the accuracy of the peak positions. Comparing the resonance assignments from FLYA with those obtained from two other existing algorithms showed that using identical experimental input data these other algorithms yielded significantly (40-142%) more erroneous assignments than FLYA. The FLYA resonance assignment algorithm thus has the

  14. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form.

  15. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part II: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV).

    PubMed

    Makrynitsa, Garyfallia I; Ntonti, Dioni; Marousis, Konstantinos D; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    Macro domains consist of 130-190 amino acid residues and appear to be highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. Intense research on this field has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other similar molecules, but their exact function still remains intangible. Macro domains are highly conserved in the Alphavirus genus and the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a member of this genus that causes fatal encephalitis to equines and humans. In this study we report the high yield recombinant expression and preliminary solution NMR study of the macro domain of VEEV. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure predicted by TALOS+. The protein shows a unique mixed α/β-fold.

  16. Assessment of a Diversity Assignment in a PR Principles Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallicano, Tiffany Derville; Stansberry, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses an assignment for incorporating diversity into the principles of public relations course. The assignment is tailored to the challenges of using an active learning approach in a large lecture class. For the assignment, students write a goal, objectives, strategies, an identification of tactics, and evaluation plans for either…

  17. Hydrogen-1, carbon-13, and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin: Assignment of. beta. -sheet and flavin binding site resonances and analysis of protein-flavin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L. ); Leonhardt, K.G.; Straus, N.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR assignments have been made for residues that form the five-stranded parallel {beta}-sheet and the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding site of oxidized Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin. Interstrand nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) indicate that the {beta}-sheet arrangement is similar to that observed in the crystal structure of the 70% homologous long-chain flavodoxin from Anacystis nidulans. A total of 62 NOEs were identified: 8 between protons of bound FMN, 29 between protons of the protein in the flavin binding site, and 25 between protons of bound FMN and protons of the protein. These constraints were used to determine the localized solution structure of the FMN binding site. The electronic environment and conformation of the protein-bound flavin isoalloxazine ring were investigated by determining {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H coupling constants. The carbonyl edge of the flavin ring was found to be slightly polarized. The xylene ring was found to be nonplanar. Tyrosine 94, located adjacent to the flavin isoalloxazine ring, was shown to have a hindered aromatic ring flip rate.

  18. A large iris-like expansion of a mechanosensitive channel protein induced by membrane tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betanzos, Monica; Chiang, Chien-Sung; Guy, H. Robert; Sukharev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    MscL, a bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, is the first structurally characterized mechanosensor protein. Molecular models of its gating mechanisms are tested here. Disulfide crosslinking shows that M1 transmembrane alpha-helices in MscL of resting Escherichia coli are arranged similarly to those in the crystal structure of MscL from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An expanded conformation was trapped in osmotically shocked cells by the specific bridging between Cys 20 and Cys 36 of adjacent M1 helices. These bridges stabilized the open channel. Disulfide bonds engineered between the M1 and M2 helices of adjacent subunits (Cys 32-Cys 81) do not prevent channel gating. These findings support gating models in which interactions between M1 and M2 of adjacent subunits remain unaltered while their tilts simultaneously increase. The MscL barrel, therefore, undergoes a large concerted iris-like expansion and flattening when perturbed by membrane tension.

  19. Automated Assignment of Proposals to Reviewers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil; Kantak, Anil

    2006-01-01

    A computer program automates the process of selecting unbiased peer reviewers of research proposals submitted to NASA. Heretofore, such selection has been performed by manual searching of two large databases subject to a set of assignment rules. One database lists proposals and proposers; the other database lists potential reviewers. The manual search takes an average of several weeks per proposal. In contrast, the present software can perform the selection in seconds. The program begins by selecting one entry from each database, then applying the assignment rules to this pair of entries. If and only if all the assignment rules are satisfied, the chosen reviewer is assigned to the chosen proposal. The assignment rules enforced by the program are (1) a maximum allowable number of proposals assigned to a single reviewer; (2) a maximum allowable number of reviewers assigned to a single proposal; (3) if the proposing team includes a member affiliated with an industry, then the reviewer must not be affiliated with any industry; and (4) the reviewer must not be a member of the proposing team or affiliated with the same institution as that of a member of the proposing team.

  20. Pathways to assignment of payees.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc I; Ablondi, Karen; Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Rowe, Michael

    2014-04-01

    How clients come to be assigned representative payees and/or conservators to manage their funds is not well understood. We compared clients assigned a payee during a clinical trial of a money management-based intervention to those not assigned payees and examined antecedents to payee assignment. One year after randomization, significantly more clients assigned to the advisor teller money manager (ATM) money management intervention were assigned payees than participants in the control condition (10 of 47 vs. 2 of 43; p = .02); those assigned payees had lower baseline GAF scores and participated more in study therapies. Several ATM clients were assigned payees after third parties paid more attention to clients' finances, and others after having negotiated storage of their funds with the ATM money manager during the study. Assignment of payees appears to be influenced by whether third parties critically attend to how clients' manage funds and by clients' receptiveness to having a payee.

  1. A constraint logic programming approach to associate 1D and 3D structural components for large protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Dal Palù, Alessandro; Pontelli, Enrico; He, Jing; Lu, Yonggang

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a novel framework, constructed using Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) and parallelism, to determine the association between parts of the primary sequence of a protein and alpha-helices extracted from 3D low-resolution descriptions of large protein complexes. The association is determined by extracting constraints from the 3D information, regarding length, relative position and connectivity of helices, and solving these constraints with the guidance of a secondary structure prediction algorithm. Parallelism is employed to enhance performance on large proteins. The framework provides a fast, inexpensive alternative to determine the exact tertiary structure of unknown proteins.

  2. A large family of divergent Drosophila odorant-binding proteins expressed in gustatory and olfactory sensilla.

    PubMed

    Galindo, K; Smith, D P

    2001-11-01

    We identified a large family of putative odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Some of these genes are present in large clusters in the genome. Most members are expressed in various taste organs, including gustatory sensilla in the labellum, the pharyngeal labral sense organ, dorsal and ventral cibarial organs, as well as taste bristles located on the wings and tarsi. Some of the gustatory OBPs are expressed exclusively in taste organs, but most are expressed in both olfactory and gustatory sensilla. Multiple binding proteins can be coexpressed in the same gustatory sensillum. Cells in the tarsi that express OBPs are required for normal chemosensation mediated through the leg, as ablation of these cells dramatically reduces the sensitivity of the proboscis extension reflex to sucrose. Finally, we show that OBP genes expressed in the pharyngeal taste sensilla are still expressed in the poxneuro genetic background while OBPs expressed in the labellum are not. These findings support a broad role for members of the OBP family in gustation and olfaction and suggest that poxneuro is required for cell fate determination of labellar but not pharyngeal taste organs. PMID:11729153

  3. mBeRFP, an improved large stokes shift red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Liang; Yang, Fei; Luo, Haiming; Xu, Lingling; Lu, Jinling; Zeng, Shaoqun; Zhang, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe the generation of a monomeric large Stokes shift (LSS) red fluorescent protein, mBeRFP, with excitation and emission peaks at 446 and 615 nm, respectively. Compared with two previously reported LSS-RFPs (mKeima and LSS-mKate2), mBeRFP is approximately three times brighter. In addition, mBeRFP is characterized by improved photostability, rapid maturation, an extended lifetime, and a monomeric nature. Additionally, mBeRFP can be paired with the Alexa 647 dye as a FRET donor to detect caspase 3 activity. This FRET pair has an extremely dynamic range and a large Förster radius (approximately 6.5 nm). To demonstrate the applicability of mBeRFP for imaging in living cells, we performed dual-color imaging of mBeRFP and CFP simultaneously excited by a single excitation source, and we demonstrated that these fluorescent proteins allow the clear visualization of the dynamics of Bax during cancer cell apoptosis. Thus, mBeRFP appears to be particularly useful for cellular imaging applications.

  4. Frustration, specific sequence dependence, and nonlinearity in large-amplitude fluctuations of allosteric proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfei; Wolynes, Peter G; Takada, Shoji

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have often evolved sequences so as to acquire the ability for regulation via allosteric conformational change. Here we investigate how allosteric dynamics is designed through sequences with nonlinear interaction features. First, for 71 allosteric proteins of which two, open and closed, structures are available, a statistical survey of interactions using an all-atom model with effective solvation shows that those residue contact interactions specific to one of the two states are significantly weaker than are the contact interactions shared by the two states. This interaction feature indicates there is underlying sequence design to facilitate conformational change. Second, based on the energy landscape theory, we implement these interaction features into a new atomic-interaction-based coarse-grained model via a multiscale simulation protocol (AICG). The AICG model outperforms standard coarse-grained models for predictions of the native-state mean fluctuations and of the conformational change direction. Third, using the new model for adenylate kinase, we show that intrinsic fluctuations in one state contain rare and large-amplitude motions nearly reaching the other state. Such large-amplitude motions are realized partly by sequence specificity and partly by the nonlinear nature of contact interactions, leading to cracking. Both features enhance conformational transition rates.

  5. Protein crystal growth in microgravity: Temperature induced large scale crystallization of insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Marianna M.; Delucas, Larry J.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Moore, K.; Harrington, Michael D.; Pillion, D. J.; Bishop, S. P.; Rosenblum, W. M.; Naumann, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the major stumbling blocks that prevents rapid structure determination using x-ray crystallography is macro-molecular crystal growth. There are many examples where crystallization takes longer than structure determination. In some cases, it is impossible to grow useful crystals on earth. Recent experiments conducted in conjuction with NASA on various Space Shuttle missions have demonstrated that protein crystals often grow larger and display better internal molecular order than their earth-grown counterparts. This paper reports results from three Shuttle flights using the Protein Crystallization Facility (PCF). The PCF hardware produced large, high-quality insulin crystals by using a temperature change as the sole means to affect protein solubility and thus, crystallization. The facility consists of cylinders/containers with volumes of 500, 200, 100, and 50 ml. Data from the three Shuttle flights demonstrated that larger, higher resolution crystals (as evidenced by x-ray diffraction data) were obtained from the microgravity experiments when compared to earth-grown crystals.

  6. Inhibition of bromodomain proteins for the treatment of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Trabucco, Sally E.; Gerstein, Rachel M.; Evens, Andrew M.; Bradner, James E.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 50% of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) enter long-term remission after standard chemotherapy. DLBCL patients who do not respond to chemotherapy have few treatment options. There remains a critical need to identify effective and targeted therapeutics for DLBCL. Experimental Design Recent studies have highlighted the incidence of increased c-MYC protein in DLBCL and the correlation between high levels of c-MYC protein and poor survival prognosis of DLBCL patients, suggesting that c-MYC is a compelling target for DLBCL therapy. The small molecule JQ1 suppresses c-MYC expression through inhibition of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of bromodomain proteins. We investigated whether JQ1 can inhibit proliferation of DLBCL cells in culture and xenograft models in vivo. Results We show that JQ1 at nanomolar concentrations efficiently inhibited proliferation of human DLBCL cells in a dose-dependent manner regardless of their molecular subtypes, suggesting a broad effect of JQ1 in DLBCL. The initial G1 arrest induced by JQ1 treatment in DLBCL cells was followed by either apoptosis or senescence. The expression of c-MYC was suppressed as a result of JQ1 treatment from the natural, chromosomally-translocated or amplified loci. Furthermore, JQ1 treatment significantly suppressed growth of DLBCL cells engrafted in mice and improved survival of engrafted mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the BET family of bromodomain proteins by JQ1 has potential clinical utility in the treatment of DLBCL. PMID:25009295

  7. Involving Students in Assignment Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rademacher, Joyce A.

    2000-01-01

    The first part of this article explains the connection between planning, presenting, and evaluating assignments for students who demonstrate ineffective assignment completion strategies. The second part offers specific guidelines for teaching students to check their own finished assignments according to a set of quality work criteria. (Contains…

  8. Structural Case Assignment in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koak, Heeshin

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I aim to provide a theory on the distribution of structural Case in Korean. I propose the following Structural Case Assignment Hypothesis (SCAH) regarding the assignment of structural Case: "Structural Case is assigned by phase heads (C: nominative; v: accusative) to every argument in the c-command domain of the phase…

  9. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation.

    PubMed

    Rogala, Kacper B; Dynes, Nicola J; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Yan, Jun; Pong, Sheng Kai; Robinson, Carol V; Deane, Charlotte M; Gönczy, Pierre; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2015-05-29

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles crucial for cell division, sensing and motility. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the onset of centriole formation requires notably the proteins SAS-5 and SAS-6, which have functional equivalents across eukaryotic evolution. Whereas the molecular architecture of SAS-6 and its role in initiating centriole formation are well understood, the mechanisms by which SAS-5 and its relatives function is unclear. Here, we combine biophysical and structural analysis to uncover the architecture of SAS-5 and examine its functional implications in vivo. Our work reveals that two distinct self-associating domains are necessary to form higher-order oligomers of SAS-5: a trimeric coiled coil and a novel globular dimeric Implico domain. Disruption of either domain leads to centriole duplication failure in worm embryos, indicating that large SAS-5 assemblies are necessary for function in vivo.

  10. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation

    PubMed Central

    Rogala, Kacper B; Dynes, Nicola J; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Yan, Jun; Pong, Sheng Kai; Robinson, Carol V; Deane, Charlotte M; Gönczy, Pierre; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles crucial for cell division, sensing and motility. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the onset of centriole formation requires notably the proteins SAS-5 and SAS-6, which have functional equivalents across eukaryotic evolution. Whereas the molecular architecture of SAS-6 and its role in initiating centriole formation are well understood, the mechanisms by which SAS-5 and its relatives function is unclear. Here, we combine biophysical and structural analysis to uncover the architecture of SAS-5 and examine its functional implications in vivo. Our work reveals that two distinct self-associating domains are necessary to form higher-order oligomers of SAS-5: a trimeric coiled coil and a novel globular dimeric Implico domain. Disruption of either domain leads to centriole duplication failure in worm embryos, indicating that large SAS-5 assemblies are necessary for function in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07410.001 PMID:26023830

  11. Semi-rigidity vs. flexibility in collective variables preselection for metadynamics studies of large proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, N.; Lilkova, E.; Petkov, P.; Litov, L.

    2016-10-01

    In silico investigations of biological molecules rely on the adequate sampling of the systems' conformation space. In the case of large systems, this is a highly non trivial task, which requires the development and refinement of enhanced sampling techniques. Metadynamics — one of these techniques — is based on computation of the free energy of the system as a function of a small set of collective variables (CVs) that are assumed to be able to adequately describe the investigated process. No standard procedures or selection criteria exist for the selection of the optimal set of collective variables. The purpose of our work is to develop a CV selection protocol based on the conformational rigidity of the protein in the most sensitive for the investigated process domains. The structure identification is performed using the spatiotemporal multistage consensus clustering (SMCC), with an appropriate selection of the algorithm parameters.

  12. Expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins predict clinical outcome in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    ten Berge, Rosita L; Meijer, Chris J L M; Dukers, Danny F; Kummer, J Alain; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Vos, Wim; Hack, C Erik; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Oudejans, Joost J

    2002-06-15

    In vitro studies suggest that resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis might explain poor response to therapy in fatal cases. Actual execution of apoptosis depends on proper functioning of effector caspases, particularly caspase 3, and on the expression levels of apoptosis-regulating proteins, including Bcl-2 and the recently identified granzyme B- specific protease inhibitor 9 (PI9). Thus, high levels of caspase 3 activation should reflect proper functioning of the apoptosis pathways, resulting in chemotherapy-sensitive neoplastic cells and a favorable prognosis. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying numbers of tumor cells positive for active caspase 3, Bcl-2, and PI9, respectively, in pretreatment biopsies of systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients and by comparing these numbers with clinical outcome. Activation of caspase 3 in more than 5% of the tumor cells was strongly correlated with a highly favorable outcome. High numbers of Bcl-2- and PI9-positive tumor cells were found to predict unfavorable prognosis. This prognostic effect was strongly related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) status: ALK-positive ALCL had significantly higher levels of active caspase 3, while high expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and PI9 was almost completely restricted to ALK-negative cases. In conclusion, high numbers of active caspase 3-positive tumor cells predict a highly favorable prognosis in systemic ALCL patients. Poor prognosis is strongly related to high numbers of Bcl-2- and PI9-positive neoplastic cells. These data support the notion that a favorable response to chemotherapy depends on an intact apoptosis cascade. Moreover, these data indicate that differences in prognosis between ALK-positive and ALK-negative ALCL might be explained by differences in expression of apoptosis-inhibiting proteins.

  13. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed.

  14. Characterizing detergent mediated reconstitution of viral protein M2 in large unilamellar vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyre, Mariel; Grossman, Carl; Crouch, Catherine; Howard, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Influenza M2 is a model membrane protein whose function is to induce curvature and vesicle formation in the process of viral infection. To study embedded M2 in synthetic phospholipid vesicles (large unilamellar vesicles or LUVs), a concentration of detergent and buffer is optimized to balance protein solubility, proteolipid concentration, and LUV stability. Adding detergent also causes the LUVs to partially disassemble and form micelles, which warrants detergent removal to restore LUV integrity. We explore methods of measuring the coexistence of detergent micelles and LUVs to track the different phases of the system as detergent is removed. A combination of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and chemical analysis are used to measure the properties of this system. With detergent/LUV number densities as high as 5 we find coexistence of micelles and LUVs at 50% to 60%. As the detergent is removed, the micelle concentration drops to lower than 30% while detergent levels drop to nearly zero. These results may indicate a polydispersed LUV size distribution after detergent mediated reconstitution. Supported by HHMI and Swarthmore College.

  15. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer–surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer–surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. PMID:26080734

  16. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  17. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.-G.; Dong, M.; Liu, H.; Camp, L.; Geller, J.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Choi, M.; Witkowska, H. E.; Ball, D. A.; Typke, D.; Downing, K. H.; Shatsky, M.; Brenner, S. E.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Biggin, M. D.; Glaeser, R. M.

    2009-08-15

    An unbiased survey has been made of the stable, most abundant multi-protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) that are larger than Mr {approx} 400 k. The quaternary structures for 8 of the 16 complexes purified during this work were determined by single-particle reconstruction of negatively stained specimens, a success rate {approx}10 times greater than that of previous 'proteomic' screens. In addition, the subunit compositions and stoichiometries of the remaining complexes were determined by biochemical methods. Our data show that the structures of only two of these large complexes, out of the 13 in this set that have recognizable functions, can be modeled with confidence based on the structures of known homologs. These results indicate that there is significantly greater variability in the way that homologous prokaryotic macromolecular complexes are assembled than has generally been appreciated. As a consequence, we suggest that relying solely on previously determined quaternary structures for homologous proteins may not be sufficient to properly understand their role in another cell of interest.

  18. Vertebrate Protein CTCF and its Multiple Roles in a Large-Scale Regulation of Genome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, L.G; Akopov, S.B; Didych, D.A; Sverdlov, E.D

    2009-01-01

    The CTCF transcription factor is an 11 zinc fingers multifunctional protein that uses different zinc finger combinations to recognize and bind different sites within DNA. CTCF is thought to participate in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains and regulation of imprinting. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites in the human and other genomes within a framework of the loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. We also tried to formulate possible lines of studies on a variety of CTCF functions which probably depend on its ability to specifically bind DNA, interact with other proteins and form di- and multimers. These three fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator and a constitutive dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s). PMID:20119526

  19. Vertebrate Protein CTCF and its Multiple Roles in a Large-Scale Regulation of Genome Activity.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, L G; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Sverdlov, E D

    2009-08-01

    The CTCF transcription factor is an 11 zinc fingers multifunctional protein that uses different zinc finger combinations to recognize and bind different sites within DNA. CTCF is thought to participate in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains and regulation of imprinting. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites in the human and other genomes within a framework of the loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. We also tried to formulate possible lines of studies on a variety of CTCF functions which probably depend on its ability to specifically bind DNA, interact with other proteins and form di- and multimers. These three fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator and a constitutive dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s). PMID:20119526

  20. Large Variation in Detection of Histidine-Rich Protein 2 in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Pava, Zuleima; Echeverry, Diego F.; Díaz, Gustavo; Murillo, Claribel

    2010-01-01

    Most rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) available use histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) as a target. However, it has been reported that sequence variations of this protein affects its sensitivity. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for HRP2 variability in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Colombia and its relationship with RDT performance. To determine possible geographic differences and their effects on the performance of RDTs, 22 blood samples from patients with P. falciparum malaria from Tumaco and Buenaventura, Colombia were assessed by measurement of HRP2 concentration by an HRP2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, RDTs, and thick blood smear. Statistical analysis showed an association between RDT performance and HRP2 concentrations. No significant difference was found between locations. A large variation of antigen concentration in samples was found at same parasitemia. In contrast to previously reports, there was no correlation between initial parasitemia and HRP2 concentration. Our results indicate that antigen quantity should be studied more carefully because the sensitivity of the RDT is affected more by antigen concentration than by parasitemia. PMID:20889875

  1. A general path for large-scale solubilization of cellular proteins: From membrane receptors to multiprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Pullara, Filippo; Guerrero-Santoro, Jennifer; Calero, Monica; Zhang, Qiangmin; Peng, Ye; Spåhr, Henrik; Kornberg, Guy L.; Cusimano, Antonella; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Santamaria-Suarez, Hugo; Reynolds, Shelley L.; Brown, Ian S.; Monga, Satdarshan P.S.; Van Houten, Bennett; Rapić-Otrin, Vesna; Calero, Guillermo; Levine, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins in bacterial or eukaryotic systems often results in aggregation rendering them unavailable for biochemical or structural studies. Protein aggregation is a costly problem for biomedical research. It forces research laboratories and the biomedical industry to search for alternative, more soluble, non-human proteins and limits the number of potential “druggable” targets. In this study we present a highly reproducible protocol that introduces the systematic use of an extensive number of detergents to solubilize aggregated proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic systems. We validate the usefulness of this protocol by solubilizing traditionally difficult human protein targets to milligram quantities and confirm their biological activity. We use this method to solubilize monomeric or multimeric components of multi-protein complexes and demonstrate its efficacy to reconstitute large cellular machines. This protocol works equally well on cytosolic, nuclear and membrane proteins and can be easily adapted to a high throughput format. PMID:23137940

  2. Small-Scale Screening to Large-Scale Over-Expression of Human Membrane Proteins for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarika; Saha, Sukanya; Thamminana, Sobrahani; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein structural studies are frequently hampered by poor expression. The low natural abundance of these proteins implies a need for utilizing different heterologous expression systems. E. coli and yeast are commonly used expression systems due to rapid cell growth at high cell density, economical production, and ease of manipulation. Here we report a simplified, systematically developed robust strategy from small-scale screening to large-scale over-expression of human integral membrane proteins in the mammalian expression system for structural studies. This methodology streamlines small-scale screening of several different constructs utilizing fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) towards optimization of buffer, additives, and detergents for achieving stability and homogeneity. This is followed by the generation of stable clonal cell lines expressing desired constructs, and lastly large-scale expression for crystallization. These techniques are designed to rapidly advance the structural studies of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins including that of human membrane proteins. PMID:27485338

  3. Identification of a cytoplasmic interaction partner of the large regulatory proteins Rep78/Rep68 of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.weger@charite.de; Hammer, Eva; Goetz, Anne; Heilbronn, Regine

    2007-05-25

    Through yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we have identified a novel cellular AAV-2 Rep78/Rep68 interaction partner located predominantly in the cytoplasm. In public databases, it has been assigned as KCTD5, because of a region of high similarity to the cytoplasmic tetramerization domain of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas Rep/KCTD5 interaction relied on the region surrounding the Rep nuclear localization signal, nuclear accumulation of Rep was not required. Wildtype Rep78/Rep68 proteins induced the translocation of large portions of KCTD5 into the nucleus pointing to functional interactions both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In line with an anticipated functional interference in the cytoplasm, KCTD5 overexpression completely abrogated Rep68-mediated posttranscriptional activation of a HIV-LTR driven luciferase reporter gene. Our study expands the panel of already identified nuclear Rep interaction partners to a cytoplasmic protein, which raises the awareness that important steps in the AAV life cycle may be regulated in this compartment.

  4. Large-scale analysis of macromolecular crowding effects on protein aggregation using a reconstituted cell-free translation system

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Tatsuya; Sugimoto, Ryota; Watanabe, Lisa; Nakamura, Shugo; Ueda, Takuya; Taguchi, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Proteins must fold into their native structures in the crowded cellular environment, to perform their functions. Although such macromolecular crowding has been considered to affect the folding properties of proteins, large-scale experimental data have so far been lacking. Here, we individually translated 142 Escherichia coli cytoplasmic proteins using a reconstituted cell-free translation system in the presence of macromolecular crowding reagents (MCRs), Ficoll 70 or dextran 70, and evaluated the aggregation propensities of 142 proteins. The results showed that the MCR effects varied depending on the proteins, although the degree of these effects was modest. Statistical analyses suggested that structural parameters were involved in the effects of the MCRs. Our dataset provides a valuable resource to understand protein folding and aggregation inside cells. PMID:26500644

  5. istar: a web platform for large-scale protein-ligand docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Ballester, Pedro J; Wong, Man-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a key computational method in the design of starting points for the drug discovery process. We are motivated by the desire to automate large-scale docking using our popular docking engine idock and thus have developed a publicly-accessible web platform called istar. Without tedious software installation, users can submit jobs using our website. Our istar website supports 1) filtering ligands by desired molecular properties and previewing the number of ligands to dock, 2) monitoring job progress in real time, and 3) visualizing ligand conformations and outputting free energy and ligand efficiency predicted by idock, binding affinity predicted by RF-Score, putative hydrogen bonds, and supplier information for easy purchase, three useful features commonly lacked on other online docking platforms like DOCK Blaster or iScreen. We have collected 17,224,424 ligands from the All Clean subset of the ZINC database, and revamped our docking engine idock to version 2.0, further improving docking speed and accuracy, and integrating RF-Score as an alternative rescoring function. To compare idock 2.0 with the state-of-the-art AutoDock Vina 1.1.2, we have carried out a rescoring benchmark and a redocking benchmark on the 2,897 and 343 protein-ligand complexes of PDBbind v2012 refined set and CSAR NRC HiQ Set 24Sept2010 respectively, and an execution time benchmark on 12 diverse proteins and 3,000 ligands of different molecular weight. Results show that, under various scenarios, idock achieves comparable success rates while outperforming AutoDock Vina in terms of docking speed by at least 8.69 times and at most 37.51 times. When evaluated on the PDBbind v2012 core set, our istar platform combining with RF-Score manages to reproduce Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's correlation coefficient of as high as 0.855 and 0.859 respectively between the experimental binding affinity and the predicted binding affinity of the docked conformation. istar

  6. Expanding the chemical toolbox for the synthesis of large and uniquely modified proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondalapati, Somasekhar; Jbara, Muhammad; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    Methods to prepare proteins that include a specific modification at a desired position are essential for understanding their cellular functions and physical properties in living systems. Chemical protein synthesis, which relies on the chemoselective ligation of unprotected peptides, enables the preparation of modified proteins that are not easily fabricated by other methods. In contrast to recombinant approaches, chemical synthesis can be used to prepare protein analogues such as D-proteins, which are useful in protein structure determination and the discovery of novel therapeutics. Post-translationally modifying proteins is another example where chemical protein synthesis proved itself as a powerful approach for preparing samples with high homogeneity and in workable quantities. In this Review, we discuss the basic principles of the field, focusing on novel chemoselective peptide ligation approaches such as native chemical ligation and the recent advances based on this method with a proven record of success in the synthesis of highly important protein targets.

  7. Assignment to database industy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kohichiroh

    Various kinds of databases are considered to be essential part in future large sized systems. Information provision only by databases is also considered to be growing as the market becomes mature. This paper discusses how such circumstances have been built and will be developed from now on.

  8. Identification of the p53 protein domain involved in formation of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen-p53 protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, T H; Wallis, J; Levine, A J

    1986-01-01

    An expression vector utilizing the enhancer and promoter region of the simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA regulating a murine p53 cDNA clone was constructed. The vector produced murine p53 protein in monkey cells identified by five different monoclonal antibodies, three of which were specific for the murine form of p53. The murine p53 produced in monkey cells formed an oligomeric protein complex with the SV40 large tumor antigen. A large number of deletion mutations, in-frame linker insertion mutations, and linker insertion mutations resulting in a frameshift mutation were constructed in the cDNA coding portion of the p53 protein expression vector. The wild-type and mutant p53 cDNA vectors were expressed in monkey cells producing the SV40 large T antigen. The conformation and levels of p53 protein and its ability to form protein complexes with the SV40 T antigen were determined by using five different monoclonal antibodies with quite distinct epitope recognition sites. Insertion mutations between amino acid residues 123 and 215 (of a total of 390 amino acids) eliminated the ability of murine p53 to bind to the SV40 large T antigen. Deletion (at amino acids 11 through 33) and insertion mutations (amino acids 222 through 344) located on either side of this T-antigen-binding protein domain produced a murine p53 protein that bound to the SV40 large T antigen. The same five insertion mutations that failed to bind with the SV40 large T antigen also failed to react with a specific monoclonal antibody, PAb246. In contrast, six additional deletion and insertion mutations that produced p53 protein that did bind with T antigen were each recognized by PAb246. The proposed epitope for PAb246 has been mapped adjacent (amino acids 88 through 109) to the T-antigen-binding domain (amino acids 123 through 215) localized by the mutations mapped in this study. Finally, some insertion mutations that produced a protein that failed to bind to the SV40 T antigen appeared to have an enhanced

  9. Balanced input-output assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Actuator/sensor locations and balanced representations of linear systems are considered for a given set of controllability and observability grammians. The case of equally controlled and observed states is given special attention. The assignability of grammians is examined, and the conditions for their existence are presented, along with several algorithms for their determination. Although an arbitrary positive semidefinite matrix is not always assignable, the identity grammian is shown to be always assignable. The results are extended to the case of flexible structures.

  10. Multipole-storage-assisted dissociation for the characterization of large proteins and simple protein mixtures by ESI-FTICR-MS.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L

    2005-05-15

    In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) typically is accomplished within the analyzer ion cell. An alternative approach of multipole-storage-assisted dissociation (MSAD) has previously been demonstrated by inducing collisional fragmentation in the external multipole that is usually employed for ion accumulation. To explore the utility of MSAD for interrogating intact proteins and simple protein mixtures in a multiplexed manner, we have investigated the means of controlling the collisional energy and the fragmentation pattern for this experimental approach. With protein samples in the low micromolar concentration range, the two major experimental parameters affecting MSAD in the hexapole region were found to be the dc offset voltage and accumulation time. While low-energy MSAD of intact proteins yields fragment ions similar to sustained off resonance irradiation collision-activated dissociation (SORI-CAD), high-energy MSAD induces sequential fragmentation for intact proteins to yield a rich variety of singly charged ions in the m/z 600-1200 Da region. Each of the seven proteins (Mr range of 8.5-116 kDa) examined in this study exhibited their own characteristic MSAD fragmentation pattern, which could be used as a signature of the presence of a given protein, even in a mixture. In addition, any MSAD fragment can be isolated and dissociated further by SORI-CAD in an MS3-type experiment inside the FTICR analyzer cell. This presents a novel way to interrogate the identities of these fragment ions as well as obtain amino acid sequence tag information that can be used to identify proteins from mixtures.

  11. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Third Party...

  12. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Third Party...

  13. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Third Party...

  14. Analyzing Large-Scale Structural Change in Proteins: Comparison of Principal Component Projection and Sammon Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2006-04-01

    Effective analysis of large-scale conformational transitions in macromolecules requires transforming them into a lower dimensional representation that captures the dominant motions. Herein, we apply and compare two different dimensionality reduction techniques, namely, principal component analysis (PCA), a linear method, and Sammon mapping, which is nonlinear. The two methods are used to analyze four different protein transition pathways of varying complexity, obtained by using either the conjugate peak refinement method or constrained molecular dynamics. For the return-stroke in myosin, both Sammon mapping and PCA show that the conformational change is dominated by a simple rotation of a rigid body. Also, in the case of the T{yields}R transition in hemoglobin, both methods are able to identify the two main quaternary transition events. In contrast, in the cases of the unfolding transition of staphylococcal nuclease or the signaling switch of Ras p21, which are both more complex conformational transitions, only Sammon mapping is able to identify the distinct phases of motion.

  15. Large-Scale Identification of Putative Exported Proteins in Candida albicans by Genetic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, L.; López Matas, M.; Gil, C.; Nombela, C.; Pla, J.

    2002-01-01

    In all living organisms, secreted proteins play essential roles in different processes. Of special interest is the construction of the fungal cell wall, since this structure is absent from mammalian cells. The identification of the proteins involved in its biogenesis is therefore a primary goal in antifungal research. To perform a systematic identification of such proteins in Candida albicans, we carried out a genetic screening in which in-frame fusions with an intracellular allele of invertase gene SUC2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to select and identify putatively exported proteins in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Eighty-three clones were selected, including 11 previously identified genes from C. albicans as well as 41 C. albicans genes that encode proteins homologous to already described proteins from related organisms. They include enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and protein secretion. We also found membrane receptors and transporters presumably related to the interaction of C. albicans with the environment as well as extracellular enzymes and proteins involved in different morphological transitions. In addition, 11 C. albicans open reading frames (ORFs) identified in this screening encode proteins homologous to unknown or putative proteins, while 5 ORFs encode novel secreted proteins without known homologues in other organisms. This screening procedure therefore not only identifies a set of targets of interest in antifungal research but also provides new clues for understanding the topological locations of many proteins involved in processes relevant to the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:12456000

  16. NMR sequential assignment of Escherichia coli thioredoxin utilizing random fractional deuteriation

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.; Richards, F.M.

    1988-01-12

    All non-proline residues except for the N-terminal dipeptide have been assigned in the 108-residue protein Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Central to these experiments has been the use of protein samples in which all carbon-bound hydrogen positions are substituted to 75% with deuterium by bacterial growth on partially deuteriated carbon sources and media. The dilution of the local proton density gives rise to narrower line widths with little loss in sensitivity. In addition, passive or secondary coupling to protons not directly involved in the coherence transfer process of correlation experiments is largely suppressed, thus significantly improving the resolution for side-chain couplings. Simultaneous multiresidue-type assignments have been obtained by incorporation of several amino acids with differing selective ..cap alpha.. and/or ..beta..-deuteriation into a fractionally deuteriated background. Combined with several single residue type labeling experiments, these selective labelings have yielded direct residue type assignments for two-thirds of the protein. In addition to improved resolution, the amide to carbon-bound proton NOESY spectra offered equivalent sensitivity while the amide to amide NOESY spectra offered superior sensitivity to that observed for natural abundance samples. The resultant sequential assignment has an average number of nearest-neighbor NOE connectivities of 2.35 out of the possible 3 ..cap alpha..-amide, ..beta..-amide, and amide-amide connectivities.

  17. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described.

  18. FLAMEnGO 2.0: an enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  19. FLAMEnGO 2.0: An enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  20. Thrombin mitogenic responses and protein phosphorylation are different in cultured human endothelial cells derived from large and microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, E.; Bikfalvi, A.; Rendu, F.; Toledano, S.L.; Tobelem, G. )

    1989-12-01

    It is well established that thrombin induces various biological responses in endothelial cells derived from large vessels. However, little is known about the effects of thrombin on the microvasculature. Protein phosphorylation may be one of the mechanisms by which an extracellular stimulus initiates cellular events like proliferation. Therefore, we have compared the effects of either human alpha-thrombin or phorbol esters (TPA) on the proliferation or protein phosphorylation in endothelial cells derived from large vessels (umbilical vein, HUVEC) or microvessels (omental tissue, HOMEC). In HOMEC, thrombin did not stimulate cell proliferation and protein phosphorylation while TPA slightly reduced the cell proliferation and induced the phosphorylation of a 27-kDa protein. In contrast, in HUVEC, thrombin or TPA markedly enhanced the cell proliferation and stimulated the phosphorylation of a 59-kDa protein. These data indicate that endothelial cells from large and small vessels respond differently to thrombin and there is a complex and as yet unclear relationship between the proliferation and the protein phosphorylation induced by thrombin.

  1. Efficient large-scale protein production of larvae and pupae of silkworm by Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus bacmid system.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y

    2005-01-21

    Silkworm is one of the most attractive hosts for large-scale production of eukaryotic proteins as well as recombinant baculoviruses for gene transfer to mammalian cells. The bacmid system of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) has already been established and widely used. However, the AcNPV does not have a potential to infect silkworm. We developed the first practical Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus bacmid system directly applicable for the protein expression of silkworm. By using this system, the green fluorescence protein was successfully expressed in silkworm larvae and pupae not only by infection of its recombinant virus but also by direct injection of its bacmid DNA. This method provides the rapid protein production in silkworm as long as 10 days, is free from biohazard, thus will be a powerful tool for the future production factory of recombinant eukaryotic proteins and baculoviruses. PMID:15596136

  2. Key Words in Instruction Assignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Discusses library-based assignments for information literacy and suggests the focus needs to change from information location to information use. Topics include online searching; reporting facts; more thoughtful research projects to develop skills; pitfalls of library assignments; and how to make information sources play a secondary role. (LRW)

  3. Fast and Accurate Protein False Discovery Rates on Large-Scale Proteomics Data Sets with Percolator 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, Matthew; MacCoss, Michael J.; Noble, William S.; Käll, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    Percolator is a widely used software tool that increases yield in shotgun proteomics experiments and assigns reliable statistical confidence measures, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, to peptides and peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from such experiments. Percolator's processing speed has been sufficient for typical data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of PSMs. With our new scalable approach, we can now also analyze millions of PSMs in a matter of minutes on a commodity computer. Furthermore, with the increasing awareness for the need for reliable statistics on the protein level, we compared several easy-to-understand protein inference methods and implemented the best-performing method—grouping proteins by their corresponding sets of theoretical peptides and then considering only the best-scoring peptide for each protein—in the Percolator package. We used Percolator 3.0 to analyze the data from a recent study of the draft human proteome containing 25 million spectra (PM:24870542). The source code and Ubuntu, Windows, MacOS, and Fedora binary packages are available from http://percolator.ms/ under an Apache 2.0 license.

  4. Fast and Accurate Protein False Discovery Rates on Large-Scale Proteomics Data Sets with Percolator 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, Matthew; MacCoss, Michael J.; Noble, William S.; Käll, Lukas

    2016-11-01

    Percolator is a widely used software tool that increases yield in shotgun proteomics experiments and assigns reliable statistical confidence measures, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, to peptides and peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from such experiments. Percolator's processing speed has been sufficient for typical data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of PSMs. With our new scalable approach, we can now also analyze millions of PSMs in a matter of minutes on a commodity computer. Furthermore, with the increasing awareness for the need for reliable statistics on the protein level, we compared several easy-to-understand protein inference methods and implemented the best-performing method—grouping proteins by their corresponding sets of theoretical peptides and then considering only the best-scoring peptide for each protein—in the Percolator package. We used Percolator 3.0 to analyze the data from a recent study of the draft human proteome containing 25 million spectra (PM:24870542). The source code and Ubuntu, Windows, MacOS, and Fedora binary packages are available from http://percolator.ms/ under an Apache 2.0 license.

  5. Accelerated simulation of unfolding and refolding of a large single chain globular protein

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Gavin M.; Bywater, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel strategies for contracting simulation times in protein dynamics that enable us to study a complex protein with molecular weight in excess of 34 kDa. Starting from a crystal structure, we produce unfolded and then refolded states for the protein. We then compare these quantitatively using both established and new metrics for protein structure and quality checking. These include use of the programs Concoord and Darvols. Simulation of protein-folded structure well beyond the molten globule state and then recovery back to the folded state is itself new, and our results throw new light on the protein-folding process. We accomplish this using a novel cooling protocol developed for this work. PMID:22870389

  6. Mitochondrial protein import receptors in Kinetoplastids reveal convergent evolution over large phylogenetic distances

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Jan; Desy, Silvia; Niemann, Moritz; Chanfon, Astrid; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Gerbeth, Carolin; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein import is essential for all eukaryotes and mediated by hetero-oligomeric protein translocases thought to be conserved within all eukaryotes. We have identified and analysed the function and architecture of the non-conventional outer membrane (OM) protein translocase in the early diverging eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei. It consists of six subunits that show no obvious homology to translocase components of other species. Two subunits are import receptors that have a unique topology and unique protein domains and thus evolved independently of the prototype receptors Tom20 and Tom70. Our study suggests that protein import receptors were recruited to the core of the OM translocase after the divergence of the major eukaryotic supergroups. Moreover, it links the evolutionary history of mitochondrial protein import receptors to the origin of the eukaryotic supergroups. PMID:25808593

  7. Accelerated simulation of unfolding and refolding of a large single chain globular protein.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Gavin M; Bywater, Robert P

    2012-07-01

    We have developed novel strategies for contracting simulation times in protein dynamics that enable us to study a complex protein with molecular weight in excess of 34 kDa. Starting from a crystal structure, we produce unfolded and then refolded states for the protein. We then compare these quantitatively using both established and new metrics for protein structure and quality checking. These include use of the programs Concoord and Darvols. Simulation of protein-folded structure well beyond the molten globule state and then recovery back to the folded state is itself new, and our results throw new light on the protein-folding process. We accomplish this using a novel cooling protocol developed for this work. PMID:22870389

  8. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  9. Machine Learning-based Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Patients by Their Protein Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Sally J; Tyanova, Stefka; Hummel, Michael; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of tumors at the molecular level has improved our knowledge of cancer causation and progression. Proteomic analysis of their signaling pathways promises to enhance our understanding of cancer aberrations at the functional level, but this requires accurate and robust tools. Here, we develop a state of the art quantitative mass spectrometric pipeline to characterize formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of patients with closely related subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We combined a super-SILAC approach with label-free quantification (hybrid LFQ) to address situations where the protein is absent in the super-SILAC standard but present in the patient samples. Shotgun proteomic analysis on a quadrupole Orbitrap quantified almost 9,000 tumor proteins in 20 patients. The quantitative accuracy of our approach allowed the segregation of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients according to their cell of origin using both their global protein expression patterns and the 55-protein signature obtained previously from patient-derived cell lines (Deeb, S. J., D'Souza, R. C., Cox, J., Schmidt-Supprian, M., and Mann, M. (2012) Mol. Cell. Proteomics 11, 77-89). Expression levels of individual segregation-driving proteins as well as categories such as extracellular matrix proteins behaved consistently with known trends between the subtypes. We used machine learning (support vector machines) to extract candidate proteins with the highest segregating power. A panel of four proteins (PALD1, MME, TNFAIP8, and TBC1D4) is predicted to classify patients with low error rates. Highly ranked proteins from the support vector analysis revealed differential expression of core signaling molecules between the subtypes, elucidating aspects of their pathobiology. PMID:26311899

  10. A general Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm for resonance assignment in NMR of uniformly labeled biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We describe a general computational approach to site-specific resonance assignments in multidimensional NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled biopolymers, based on a simple Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm contained in the program MCASSIGN2. Input to MCASSIGN2 includes lists of multidimensional signals in the NMR spectra with their possible residue-type assignments (which need not be unique), the biopolymer sequence, and a table that describes the connections that relate one signal list to another. As output, MCASSIGN2 produces a high-scoring sequential assignment of the multidimensional signals, using a score function that rewards good connections (i.e., agreement between relevant sets of chemical shifts in different signal lists) and penalizes bad connections, unassigned signals, and assignment gaps. Examination of a set of high-scoring assignments from a large number of independent runs allows one to determine whether a unique assignment exists for the entire sequence or parts thereof. We demonstrate the MCSA algorithm using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) solid state NMR spectra of several model protein samples (α-spectrin SH3 domain and protein G/B1 microcrystals, HET-s218–289 fibrils), obtained with magic-angle spinning and standard polarization transfer techniques. The MCSA algorithm and MCASSIGN2 program can accommodate arbitrary combinations of NMR spectra with arbitrary dimensionality, and can therefore be applied in many areas of solid state and solution NMR. PMID:21710190

  11. On Automated Grading of Programming Assignments in an Academic Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheang, Brenda; Kurnia, Andy; Lim, Andrew; Oon, Wee-Chong

    2003-01-01

    Practise is one of the most important steps in learning the art of computer programming. Unfortunately, human grading of programming assignments is a tedious and error-prone task, a problem compounded by the large enrolments of many programming courses. As a result, students in such courses tend to be given fewer programming assignments than…

  12. Biphasic Synthesis of Large-Pore and Well-Dispersed Benzene Bridged Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yannan; Niu, Yuting; Zhang, Jun; Meka, Anand Kumar; Zhang, Hongwei; Xu, Chun; Lin, Chun Xiang Cynthia; Yu, Meihua; Yu, Chengzhong

    2015-06-01

    Large pore (4.6-7.6 nm) and well-dispersed benzene bridged mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles with uniform particle size of ≈50 nm are prepared via a biphasic approach. They can be directly used as nanocarriers without surface modification for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins.

  13. A large dataset of protein dynamics in the mammalian heart proteome.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edward; Cao, Quan; Ng, Dominic C M; Bleakley, Brian J; Dincer, T Umut; Bot, Brian M; Wang, Ding; Liem, David A; Lam, Maggie P Y; Ge, Junbo; Ping, Peipei

    2016-03-15

    Protein stability is a major regulatory principle of protein function and cellular homeostasis. Despite limited understanding on mechanisms, disruption of protein turnover is widely implicated in diverse pathologies from heart failure to neurodegenerations. Information on global protein dynamics therefore has the potential to expand the depth and scope of disease phenotyping and therapeutic strategies. Using an integrated platform of metabolic labeling, high-resolution mass spectrometry and computational analysis, we report here a comprehensive dataset of the in vivo half-life of 3,228 and the expression of 8,064 cardiac proteins, quantified under healthy and hypertrophic conditions across six mouse genetic strains commonly employed in biomedical research. We anticipate these data will aid in understanding key mitochondrial and metabolic pathways in heart diseases, and further serve as a reference for methodology development in dynamics studies in multiple organ systems.

  14. A large dataset of protein dynamics in the mammalian heart proteome

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Edward; Cao, Quan; Ng, Dominic C.M.; Bleakley, Brian J.; Dincer, T. Umut; Bot, Brian M.; Wang, Ding; Liem, David A.; Lam, Maggie P.Y.; Ge, Junbo; Ping, Peipei

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is a major regulatory principle of protein function and cellular homeostasis. Despite limited understanding on mechanisms, disruption of protein turnover is widely implicated in diverse pathologies from heart failure to neurodegenerations. Information on global protein dynamics therefore has the potential to expand the depth and scope of disease phenotyping and therapeutic strategies. Using an integrated platform of metabolic labeling, high-resolution mass spectrometry and computational analysis, we report here a comprehensive dataset of the in vivo half-life of 3,228 and the expression of 8,064 cardiac proteins, quantified under healthy and hypertrophic conditions across six mouse genetic strains commonly employed in biomedical research. We anticipate these data will aid in understanding key mitochondrial and metabolic pathways in heart diseases, and further serve as a reference for methodology development in dynamics studies in multiple organ systems. PMID:26977904

  15. Node assignment in heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Som, Sukhamoy

    1993-01-01

    A number of node assignment schemes, both static and dynamic, are explored for the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM). The architecture under consideration consists of heterogeneous processors and implements dataflow models of real-time applications. Terminology is developed for heterogeneous computing. New definitions are added to the ATAMM for token and assignment classifications. It is proved that a periodic execution is possible for dataflow graphs. Assignment algorithms are developed and proved. A design procedure is described for satisfying an objective function in an heterogeneous architecture. Several examples are provided for illustration.

  16. Very large G protein-coupled receptor 1 regulates myelin-associated glycoprotein via Gαs/Gαq-mediated protein kinases A/C

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daesung; Lin, Shu-Ting; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    VLGR1 (very large G protein-coupled receptor 1), also known as MASS1 (monogenic audiogenic seizure susceptible 1), is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that contains a large extracellular N terminus with 35 calcium-binding domains. A truncating mutation in the Mass1 gene causes autosomal recessive, sound-induced seizures in the Frings mouse. However, the function of MASS1 and the mechanism underlying Frings mouse epilepsy are not known. Here, we found that MASS1 protein is enriched in the myelinated regions of the superior and inferior colliculi, critical areas for the initiation and propagation of audiogenic seizures. Using a panel of myelin antibodies, we discovered that myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) expression is dramatically decreased in Frings mice. MASS1 inhibits the ubiquitylation of MAG, thus enhancing the stability of this protein, and the calcium-binding domains of MASS1 are essential for this regulation. Furthermore, MASS1 interacts with Gαs/Gαq and activates PKA and PKC in response to extracellular calcium. Suppression of signaling by MASS1 RNAi or a specific inhibitor abrogates MAG up-regulation. We postulate that MASS1 senses extracellular calcium and activates cytosolic PKA/PKC pathways to regulate myelination by means of MAG protein stability in myelin-forming cells of the auditory pathway. Further work is required to determine whether MAG dysregulation is a cause or consequence of audiogenic epilepsy and whether there are other pathways regulated by MASS1. PMID:24191038

  17. Cryptosporidium parvum possesses a short-type replication protein A large subunit that differs from its host.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G; Marchewka, M J; Keithly, J S

    1999-07-15

    Replication protein A (RPA) consisting of three subunits is a eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein involved in DNA replication, repair and recombination. We report here the identification and characterization of a RPA large subunit (CpRPA1) gene from the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum. The CpRPA1 gene encodes a 53.9-kDa peptide that is remarkably smaller than that from other eukaryotes (i.e. approximately 70 kDa) and is actively expressed in both free sporozoites and parasite intracellular stages. This short-type RPA large subunit has also been characterized from one other protist, Crithidia fasciculata. Three distinct domains have been identified in the RPA large subunit of humans and yeasts: an N-terminal protein interaction domain, a central ssDNA-binding area, and a C-terminal subunit-interacting region. Sequence analysis reveals that the short-type RPA large subunit differs from that of other eukaryotes in that only the domains required for ssDNA binding and heterotrimer formation are present. It lacks the N-terminal domain necessary for the binding of proteins mainly involved in DNA repair and recombination. This major structural difference suggests that the mechanism for DNA repair and recombination in some protists differs from that of other eukaryotes. Since replication proteins play an essential role in the cell cycle, the fact that RPA proteins of C. parvum differ from those of its host suggests that RPA be explored as a potential chemotherapeutic target for controlling cryptosporidiosis and/or diseases caused by other apicomplexans.

  18. Maize (Zea mays)-derived bovine trypsin: characterization of the first large-scale, commercial protein product from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Susan L; Mayor, Jocelyne M; Bailey, Michele R; Barker, Donna K; Love, Robert T; Lane, Jeffrey R; Delaney, Donna E; McComas-Wagner, Janet M; Mallubhotla, Hanuman D; Hood, Elizabeth E; Dangott, Lawrence J; Tichy, Shane E; Howard, John A

    2003-10-01

    Bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) is an enzyme that is widely used for commercial purposes to digest or process other proteins, including some therapeutic proteins. The biopharmaceutical industry is trying to eliminate animal-derived proteins from manufacturing processes due to the possible contamination of these products by human pathogens. Recombinant trypsin has been produced in a number of systems, including cell culture, bacteria and yeast. To date, these expression systems have not produced trypsin on a scale sufficient to fulfill the need of biopharmaceutical manufacturers where kilogram quantities are often required. The present paper describes commercial-level production of trypsin in transgenic maize (Zea mays) and its physical and functional characterization. This protease, the first enzyme to be produced on a large-scale using transgenic plant technology, is functionally equivalent to native bovine pancreatic trypsin. The availability of this reagent should allow for the replacement of animal-derived trypsin in the processing of pharmaceutical proteins.

  19. Robotic large-scale application of wheat cell-free translation to structural studies including membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Emily T; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Nozawa, Akira; Matsubara, Yuko; Frederick, Ronnie O; Primm, John G; Goren, Michael A; Fox, Brian G

    2011-04-30

    The use of the Protemist XE, an automated discontinuous-batch protein synthesis robot, in cell-free translation is reported. The soluble Galdieria sulphuraria protein DCN1 was obtained in greater than 2mg total synthesis yield per mL of reaction mixture from the Protemist XE, and the structure was subsequently solved by X-ray crystallography using material from one 10 mL synthesis (PDB ID: 3KEV). The Protemist XE was also capable of membrane protein translation. Thus human sigma-1 receptor was translated in the presence of unilamellar liposomes and bacteriorhodopsin was translated directly into detergent micelles in the presence of all-trans-retinal. The versatility, ease of use, and compact size of the Protemist XE robot demonstrate its suitability for large-scale synthesis of many classes of proteins.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Pure Human Airway Gland Mucus Reveals a Large Component of Protective Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Nam Soo; Evans, Idil Apak T.; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Park, Il-Ho; Engelhardt, John F.; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269–319 proteins per subject). We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38%) had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican). A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment. PMID:25706550

  1. Exploring Symmetry as an Avenue to the Computational Design of Large Protein Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Carie; Bowman, Elizabeth Anne; Proffitt, Will; Dorr, Brent; Combs, Steven; Harp, Joel; Mizoue, Laura; Meiler, Jens

    2012-03-15

    It has been demonstrated previously that symmetric, homodimeric proteins are energetically favored, which explains their abundance in nature. It has been proposed that such symmetric homodimers underwent gene duplication and fusion to evolve into protein topologies that have a symmetric arrangement of secondary structure elements - 'symmetric superfolds'. Here, the ROSETTA protein design software was used to computationally engineer a perfectly symmetric variant of imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase and its corresponding symmetric homodimer. The new protein, termed FLR, adopts the symmetric ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} TIM-barrel superfold. The protein is soluble and monomeric and exhibits two-fold symmetry not only in the arrangement of secondary structure elements but also in sequence and at atomic detail, as verified by crystallography. When cut in half, FLR dimerizes readily to form the symmetric homodimer. The successful computational design of FLR demonstrates progress in our understanding of the underlying principles of protein stability and presents an attractive strategy for the in silico construction of larger protein domains from smaller pieces.

  2. Controlled Charge Trapping and Retention in Large-Area Monodisperse Protein Metal-Nanoparticle Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Junghee; Sung, Sujin; Park, Sungjun; Paik, Seung R; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2016-05-18

    Here, we report on charge-retention transistors based on novel protein-mediated Au nanoparticle (NP) arrays, with precise control over dimension and distribution. Individual NPs are coated with alpha-synuclein, an amyloidogenic protein responsible for Lewy body formation in Parkinson's disease. Subsequently, a monolayer of protein-NP conjugates is successfully created via a simple and scalable solution deposition to function as distributed nanoscale capacitors. Controllability over the film structure translates into the tunability of the electrical performance; pentacene-based organic transistors feature widely varying programmability and relaxation dynamics, providing versatility for various unconventional memory applications. PMID:27144458

  3. Identifying Cognate Binding Pairs among a Large Set of Paralogs: The Case of PE/PPE Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Robert; Pellegrini, Matteo; Eisenberg, David

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of how to detect cognate pairs of proteins that bind when each belongs to a large family of paralogs. To illustrate the problem, we have undertaken a genomewide analysis of interactions of members of the PE and PPE protein families of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our computational method uses structural information, operon organization, and protein coevolution to infer the interaction of PE and PPE proteins. Some 289 PE/PPE complexes were predicted out of a possible 5,590 PE/PPE pairs genomewide. Thirty-five of these predicted complexes were also found to have correlated mRNA expression, providing additional evidence for these interactions. We show that our method is applicable to other protein families, by analyzing interactions of the Esx family of proteins. Our resulting set of predictions is a starting point for genomewide experimental interaction screens of the PE and PPE families, and our method may be generally useful for detecting interactions of proteins within families having many paralogs. PMID:18787688

  4. Structure of subcomplex Iβ of mammalian respiratory complex I leads to new supernumerary subunit assignments

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiapeng; King, Martin S.; Yu, Minmin; Klipcan, Liron; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Hirst, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is an essential respiratory enzyme. Mammalian complex I contains 45 subunits: 14 conserved “core” subunits and 31 “supernumerary” subunits. The structure of Bos taurus complex I, determined to 5-Å resolution by electron cryomicroscopy, described the structure of the mammalian core enzyme and allowed the assignment of 14 supernumerary subunits. Here, we describe the 6.8-Å resolution X-ray crystallography structure of subcomplex Iβ, a large portion of the membrane domain of B. taurus complex I that contains two core subunits and a cohort of supernumerary subunits. By comparing the structures and composition of subcomplex Iβ and complex I, supported by comparisons with Yarrowia lipolytica complex I, we propose assignments for eight further supernumerary subunits in the structure. Our new assignments include two CHCH-domain containing subunits that contain disulfide bridges between CX9C motifs; they are processed by the Mia40 oxidative-folding pathway in the intermembrane space and probably stabilize the membrane domain. We also assign subunit B22, an LYR protein, to the matrix face of the membrane domain. We reveal that subunit B22 anchors an acyl carrier protein (ACP) to the complex, replicating the LYR protein–ACP structural module that was identified previously in the hydrophilic domain. Thus, we significantly extend knowledge of how the mammalian supernumerary subunits are arranged around the core enzyme, and provide insights into their roles in biogenesis and regulation. PMID:26371297

  5. The Emerging Role of Large Immunophilin FK506 Binding Protein 51 in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romano, S; Sorrentino, A; Di Pace, AL; Nappo, G; Mercogliano, C; Romano, MF

    2011-01-01

    FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is an immunophilin physiologically expressed in lymphocytes. Very recently, aberrant expression of this protein was found in melanoma; FKBP51 expression correlates with melanoma aggressiveness and is maximal in metastatic lesions. FKBP51 promotes NF-κB activation and is involved in the resistance to genotoxic agents, including anthracyclines and ionizing radiation. FKBP51 is a cochaperone with peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity that regulates several biological processes through protein-protein interaction. There is increasing evidence that FKBP51 hyperexpression is associated with cancer and this protein has a relevant role in sustaining cell growth, malignancy, and resistance to therapy. There is also evidence that FKBP ligands are potent anticancer agents, in addition to their immunosuppressant activity. In particular, rapamycin and its analogs have shown antitumor activity across a variety of human cancers in clinical trials. Although, classically, rapamycin actions are ascribed to inhibition of mTOR, recent studies indicate FKBP51 is also an important molecular determinant of the drug’s anticancer activity. The aim of this article is to review the functions of FKBP51, especially in view of the recent findings that this protein is a potential oncogene when deregulated and a candidate target for signaling therapies against cancer. PMID:22087835

  6. The protein-protein interaction map of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Selig, L; De Reuse, H; Battaglia, V; Reverdy, C; Simon, S; Lenzen, G; Petel, F; Wojcik, J; Schächter, V; Chemama, Y; Labigne, A; Legrain, P

    2001-01-11

    With the availability of complete DNA sequences for many prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, and soon for the human genome itself, it is important to develop reliable proteome-wide approaches for a better understanding of protein function. As elementary constituents of cellular protein complexes and pathways, protein-protein interactions are key determinants of protein function. Here we have built a large-scale protein-protein interaction map of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We have used a high-throughput strategy of the yeast two-hybrid assay to screen 261 H. pylori proteins against a highly complex library of genome-encoded polypeptides. Over 1,200 interactions were identified between H. pylori proteins, connecting 46.6% of the proteome. The determination of a reliability score for every single protein-protein interaction and the identification of the actual interacting domains permitted the assignment of unannotated proteins to biological pathways.

  7. Hepatitis B virus large surface protein is not secreted but is immunogenic when selectively expressed by recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K C; Smith, G L; Moss, B

    1986-01-01

    The envelope region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome contains an open reading frame that begins upstream of the major surface protein gene. The two minor proteins that are initiated within this pre-s segment are immunogenic and may be involved in virus attachment to hepatocytes. We have constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus that contains the predicted coding segment for the large surface protein (LS) under control of a vaccinia virus that contains the predicted coding segment for the large surface protein (LS) under control of a vaccinia virus promoter. Cells infected with the recombinant virus synthesized HBV polypeptides of 39 and 42 kilodaltons, corresponding to the unglycosylated and glycosylated forms of LS, respectively. The presence of pre-s epitopes in the 39- and 42-kilodalton polypeptides was demonstrated by binding of antibody prepared against a synthetic peptide. Synthesis of the 42-kilodalton species was specifically inhibited by tunicamycin, suggesting that it is N-glycosylated. Despite apparent glycosylation, LS was not secreted into the medium of infected cells. Nevertheless, rabbits vaccinated with the purified recombinant virus made antibodies that recognized s and pre-s epitopes. Antibody to the NH2 terminus of LS appeared before or simultaneously with antibody that bound to the major surface protein. The additional immunogenicity provided by expression of LS may be advantageous for the development of an HBV vaccine. Images PMID:2430108

  8. The Bacterial Intimins and Invasins: A Large and Novel Family of Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jennifer C.; Yen, Ming-Ren; Castillo, Rostislav; Leyton, Denisse L.; Henderson, Ian R.; Saier, Milton H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gram-negative bacteria have developed a limited repertoire of solutions for secreting proteins from the cytoplasmic compartment to the exterior of the cell. Amongst the spectrum of secreted proteins are the intimins and invasins (the Int/Inv family; TC# 1.B.54) which are characterized by an N-terminal β-barrel domain and a C-terminal surface localized passenger domain. Despite the important role played by members of this family in diseases mediated by several species of the Enterobacteriaceae, there has been little appreciation for the distribution and diversity of these proteins amongst Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the molecular events governing secretion of these proteins to the extracellular milieu. Principal Findings In silico approaches were used to analyze the domain organization and diversity of members of this secretion family. Proteins belonging to this family are predominantly associated with organisms from the γ-proteobacteria. Whilst proteins from the Chlamydia, γ-, β- and ε-proteobacteria possess β-barrel domains and passenger domains of various sizes, Int/Inv proteins from the α-proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and chlorobi possess only the predicted β-barrel domains. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that with few exceptions these proteins cluster according to organismal type, indicating that divergence occurred contemporaneously with speciation, and that horizontal transfer was limited. Clustering patterns of the β-barrel domains correlate well with those of the full-length proteins although the passenger domains do so with much less consistency. The modular subdomain design of the passenger domains suggests that subdomain duplication and deletion have occurred with high frequency over evolutionary time. However, all repeated subdomains are found in tandem, suggesting that subdomain shuffling occurred rarely if at all. Topological predictions for the β-barrel domains are presented. Conclusion

  9. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom. PMID:24426280

  10. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom.

  11. Evidence for an inhibitory feedback loop regulating simian virus 40 large T-antigen fusion protein nuclear transport.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, U; Jans, D A

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear protein import is central to eukaryotic cell function. It is dependent on ATP, temperature and cytosolic factors, and requires specific targeting sequences called nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Nuclear import kinetics was studied in vitro using digitonin-permeabilized cells of the HTC rat hepatoma cell line and a fluorescently labelled beta-galactosidase fusion protein carrying amino acids 111-135 of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen (T-ag), including the NLS. Nuclear accumulation was rapid, reaching steady-state after about 80 min at 37 degrees C (t1/2 at about 17 min). Surprisingly, maximal nuclear concentration was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of the cytosolic extract and of cytoplasmic T-ag protein. Neither preincubation of cells for 1 h at 37 degrees C before the addition of T-ag protein nor the addition of fresh transport medium after 1 h and continuation of the incubation for another hour affected the maximal nuclear concentration. If cells were allowed to accumulate T-ag protein for 1 h before the addition of fresh transport medium containing different concentrations of T-ag protein and incubated for a further hour, the maximal nuclear concentration did not change unless the concentration of T-ag protein in the second transport mixture exceeded that in the first, in which case the nuclear concentration increased. Nuclear import of T-ag thus appeared (i) to be strictly unidirectional over 2 h at 37 degrees C and (ii) to be regulated by an inhibitory feedback loop, whereby the cytosolic concentration of protein appears to determine directly the precise end point of nuclear accumulation. This study represents the first characterization of this previously undescribed mechanism of regulation of nuclear protein import. PMID:8670127

  12. Oncogenic activation of the human trk proto-oncogene by recombination with the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.

    PubMed Central

    Ziemiecki, A; Müller, R G; Fu, X C; Hynes, N E; Kozma, S

    1990-01-01

    The trk-2h oncogene, isolated from the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB 231 by genomic DNA-transfection into NIH3T3 cells, consists of the trk proto-oncogene receptor kinase domain fused to a N-terminal 41 amino acid activating sequence (Kozma, S.C., Redmond, S.M.S., Xiao-Chang, F., Saurer, S.M., Groner, B. and Hynes, N.E. (1988) EMBO J., 7, 147-154). Antibodies raised against a bacterially produced beta gal-trk receptor kinase fusion protein recognized a 44 kd phosphoprotein phosphorylated on serine, threonine and tyrosine in extracts of trk-2h transformed NIH3T3 cells. In vitro, in the presence of Mn2+/gamma ATP, this protein became phosphorylated extensively on tyrosine. Cells transformed by trk-2h did not, however, show an elevation in total phosphotyrosine. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA encoding the amino terminal activating sequences of trk-2h (Kozma et al., 1988). The encoded protein has a high basic amino acid content and the gene is expressed as an abundant 1.2 kb mRNA in human, rat and mouse cells. Antipeptide antibodies raised against a C-terminal peptide recognized specifically a 30 kd protein on Western blots of human, rat and mouse cell extracts. Immunofluorescence revealed, in addition to granular cytoplasmic fluorescence, intense nucleolar staining. The high basic amino acid content and nucleolar staining prompted us to investigate whether the 30 kd protein could be a ribosomal protein. Western immunoblotting analysis of 2D-electrophoretically resolved ribosomal proteins indicated that the 30 kd protein is the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. PMID:2403926

  13. Drug Transporters and Na+/H+ Exchange Regulatory Factor PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/ZO-1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Dustin R.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug transporters govern the absorption, distribution, and elimination of pharmacologically active compounds. Members of the solute carrier and ATP binding-cassette drug transporter family mediate cellular drug uptake and efflux processes, thereby coordinating the vectorial movement of drugs across epithelial barriers. To exert their physiologic and pharmacological function in polarized epithelia, drug transporters must be targeted and stabilized to appropriate regions of the cell membrane (i.e., apical versus basolateral). Despite the critical importance of drug transporter membrane targeting, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are largely unknown. Several clinically significant drug transporters possess a recognition sequence that binds to PSD-95/Drosophila discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) proteins. PDZ proteins, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) family, act to stabilize and organize membrane targeting of multiple transmembrane proteins, including many clinically relevant drug transporters. These PDZ proteins are normally abundant at apical membranes, where they tether membrane-delimited transporters. NHERF expression is particularly high at the apical membrane in polarized tissue such as intestinal, hepatic, and renal epithelia, tissues important to drug disposition. Several recent studies have highlighted NHERF proteins as determinants of drug transporter function secondary to their role in controlling membrane abundance and localization. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that NHERF proteins may have clinically significant roles in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several pharmacologically active compounds and may affect drug action in cancer and chronic kidney disease. For these reasons, NHERF proteins represent a novel class of post-translational mediators of drug transport and novel targets for new drug development. PMID:26092975

  14. Systematic Analysis of Bacterial Effector-Postsynaptic Density 95/Disc Large/Zonula Occludens-1 (PDZ) Domain Interactions Demonstrates Shigella OspE Protein Promotes Protein Kinase C Activation via PDLIM Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E.; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E.; Baxt, Leigh A.; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain. PMID:25124035

  15. Systematic analysis of bacterial effector-postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain interactions demonstrates Shigella OspE protein promotes protein kinase C activation via PDLIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E; Baxt, Leigh A; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2014-10-24

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain.

  16. Robust classification of protein variation using structural modelling and large-scale data integration.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Evan H; Simmons-Edler, Riley; Müller, Christian L; Alford, Rebecca F; Volfovsky, Natalia; Lash, Alex E; Bonneau, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Existing methods for interpreting protein variation focus on annotating mutation pathogenicity rather than detailed interpretation of variant deleteriousness and frequently use only sequence-based or structure-based information. We present VIPUR, a computational framework that seamlessly integrates sequence analysis and structural modelling (using the Rosetta protein modelling suite) to identify and interpret deleterious protein variants. To train VIPUR, we collected 9477 protein variants with known effects on protein function from multiple organisms and curated structural models for each variant from crystal structures and homology models. VIPUR can be applied to mutations in any organism's proteome with improved generalized accuracy (AUROC .83) and interpretability (AUPR .87) compared to other methods. We demonstrate that VIPUR's predictions of deleteriousness match the biological phenotypes in ClinVar and provide a clear ranking of prediction confidence. We use VIPUR to interpret known mutations associated with inflammation and diabetes, demonstrating the structural diversity of disrupted functional sites and improved interpretation of mutations associated with human diseases. Lastly, we demonstrate VIPUR's ability to highlight candidate variants associated with human diseases by applying VIPUR to de novo variants associated with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26926108

  17. Robust classification of protein variation using structural modelling and large-scale data integration

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Evan H.; Simmons-Edler, Riley; Müller, Christian L.; Alford, Rebecca F.; Volfovsky, Natalia; Lash, Alex E.; Bonneau, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for interpreting protein variation focus on annotating mutation pathogenicity rather than detailed interpretation of variant deleteriousness and frequently use only sequence-based or structure-based information. We present VIPUR, a computational framework that seamlessly integrates sequence analysis and structural modelling (using the Rosetta protein modelling suite) to identify and interpret deleterious protein variants. To train VIPUR, we collected 9477 protein variants with known effects on protein function from multiple organisms and curated structural models for each variant from crystal structures and homology models. VIPUR can be applied to mutations in any organism's proteome with improved generalized accuracy (AUROC .83) and interpretability (AUPR .87) compared to other methods. We demonstrate that VIPUR's predictions of deleteriousness match the biological phenotypes in ClinVar and provide a clear ranking of prediction confidence. We use VIPUR to interpret known mutations associated with inflammation and diabetes, demonstrating the structural diversity of disrupted functional sites and improved interpretation of mutations associated with human diseases. Lastly, we demonstrate VIPUR's ability to highlight candidate variants associated with human diseases by applying VIPUR to de novo variants associated with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26926108

  18. Structural rigidity of a large cavity-containing protein revealed by high-pressure crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Marcus D.; Quillin, Michael L.; Hummer, Gerhard; Matthews, Brian W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2007-01-01

    Steric constraints, charged interactions and many other forces important to protein structure and function can be explored by mutagenic experiments. Research of this kind has led to a wealth of knowledge about what stabilizes proteins in their folded states. To gain a more complete picture requires that we perturb these structures in a continuous manner, something mutagenesis cannot achieve. With high pressure crystallographic methods it is now possible to explore the detailed properties of proteins while continuously varying thermodynamic parameters. In this paper, we detail the structural response of the cavity-containing mutant L99A of T4 lysozyme, as well as its pseudo wild-type (WT*) counterpart, to hydrostatic pressure. Surprisingly, the cavity has almost no effect on the pressure response: virtually the same changes are observed in WT* as in L99A under pressure. The cavity is most rigid, while other regions deform substantially. This implies that while some residues may increase the thermodynamic stability of a protein, they may also be structurally irrelevant. As recently shown, the cavity fills with water at pressures above 100 MPa while retaining its overall size. The resultant picture of the protein is one in which conformationally fluctuating side groups provide a liquid-like environment, but which also contribute to the rigidity of the peptide backbone. PMID:17292912

  19. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely ‘paints’ entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  20. Shifting transition states in the unfolding of a large ankyrin repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Rowling, Pamela J. E.; Chellamuthu, Vasuki R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2008-01-01

    The 33-amino-acid ankyrin motif comprises a β-turn followed by two anti-parallel α-helices and a loop and tandem arrays of the motif pack in a linear fashion to produce elongated structures characterized by short-range interactions. In this article we use site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the kinetic unfolding mechanism of D34, a 426-residue, 12-ankyrin repeat fragment of the protein ankyrinR. The data are consistent with a model in which the N-terminal half of the protein unfolds first by unraveling progressively from the start of the polypeptide chain to form an intermediate; in the next step, the C-terminal half of the protein unfolds via two pathways whose transition states have either the early or the late C-terminal ankyrin repeats folded. We conclude that the two halves of the protein unfold by different mechanisms because the N-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of a folded C-terminal moiety, which therefore acts as a “seed” and confers a unique directionality on the process, whereas the C-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of an unfolded N-terminal moiety and therefore behaves like a single-domain ankyrin repeat protein, having a high degree of symmetry and consequently more than one unfolding pathway accessible to it. PMID:18632570

  1. Single-Molecule Analysis of Protein Large-Amplitude Conformational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haw

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have evolved to harness thermal fluctuations, rather than frustrated by them, to carry out chemical transformations and mechanical work. What are, then, the operation and design principles of protein machines? To frame the problem in a tractable way, several basic questions have been formulated to guide the experimental design: (a) How many conformational states can a protein sample on the functionally important timescale? (b) What are the inter-conversion rates between states? (c) How do ligand binding or interactions with other proteins modulate the motions? (d) What are the structural basis of flexibility and its underlying molecular mechanics? Guided by this framework, we have studied protein tyrosine phosphatase B, PtpB, from M. tuberculosis (a virulence factor of tuberculosis and a potential drug target) and adenylate kinase, AK, from E. coli (a ubiquitous energy-balancing enzyme in cells). These domain movements have been followed in real time on their respective catalytic timescales using high-resolution single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. It is shown quantitatively that both PtpB and AK are capable of dynamically sampling two distinct states that correlate well with those observed by x-ray crystallography. Integrating these microscopic dynamics into macroscopic kinetics allows us to place the experimentally measured free-energy landscape in the context of enzymatic turnovers.

  2. Comparative Large Scale Characterization of Plant versus Mammal Proteins Reveals Similar and Idiosyncratic N-α-Acetylation Features*

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenut, Willy V.; Sumpton, David; Martinez, Aude; Lilla, Sergio; Espagne, Christelle; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal modifications play a major role in the fate of proteins in terms of activity, stability, or subcellular compartmentalization. Such modifications remain poorly described and badly characterized in proteomic studies, and only a few comparison studies among organisms have been made available so far. Recent advances in the field now allow the enrichment and selection of N-terminal peptides in the course of proteome-wide mass spectrometry analyses. These targeted approaches unravel as a result the extent and nature of the protein N-terminal modifications. Here, we aimed at studying such modifications in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to compare these results with those obtained from a human sample analyzed in parallel. We applied large scale analysis to compile robust conclusions on both data sets. Our data show strong convergence of the characterized modifications especially for protein N-terminal methionine excision, co-translational N-α-acetylation, or N-myristoylation between animal and plant kingdoms. Because of the convergence of both the substrates and the N-α-acetylation machinery, it was possible to identify the N-acetyltransferases involved in such modifications for a small number of model plants. Finally, a high proportion of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins feature post-translational N-α-acetylation of the mature protein after removal of the transit peptide. Unlike animals, plants feature in a dedicated pathway for post-translational acetylation of organelle-targeted proteins. The corresponding machinery is yet to be discovered. PMID:22223895

  3. Large protein analysis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry using amoxicillin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazim; Guo, Zhongxian; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria or their protein and peptide entity enrichment using biomolecules-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, and analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is a promising technique to analyze microorganisms. High and low molecular weight proteins like penicillin-binding proteins are responsible for final step synthesis of peptidoglycan biosynthesis; those are the target of lactam antibiotics. In this paper, we synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (mag-NPs) and further modified them with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and then the β-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin was covalently linked to their surface. β-Lactam group attributes as penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) in bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were used as model bacteria for enrichment based on the β-lactam affinity of magnetic nanoparticles, and then the bacteria were easily separated by an external magnet. Several high molecular weight penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) were detected by MALDI MS containing 10(4) and 10(3) colony-forming unit (cfu) per milileter (mL) of S. aureus and E. coli, respectively. In the case of E. coli, higher molecular weight PBPs were observed at 20 to 55 kDa in MALDI mass spectra. However, S. aureus bacteria resulted with femAB operon-based proteins, with molecular weight of 49570.4 Da, by MALDI MS after using amoxicillin functionalized-mag-NPs. The current approach provides an effective bacteria detection and preconcentration method that has high potential in the near future for fast and sensitive diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria infection. Graphical Abstract Schematic for large proteins analysis by MALDI TOF MS (a) mag-NPs and bacterial interaction (b) Penicillin binding proteins trapping by Amox-mag-NPs. PMID:27565791

  4. Obligate Insect Endosymbionts Exhibit Increased Ortholog Length Variation and Loss of Large Accessory Proteins Concurrent with Genome Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Laura J.; Sabree, Zakee L.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme genome reduction has been observed in obligate intracellular insect mutualists and is an assumed consequence of fixed, long-term host isolation. Rapid accumulation of mutations and pseudogenization of genes no longer vital for an intracellular lifestyle, followed by deletion of many genes, are factors that lead to genome reduction. Size reductions in individual genes due to small-scale deletions have also been implicated in contributing to overall genome shrinkage. Conserved protein functional domains are expected to exhibit low tolerance for mutations and therefore remain relatively unchanged throughout protein length reduction while nondomain regions, presumably under less selective pressures, would shorten. This hypothesis was tested using orthologous protein sets from the Flavobacteriaceae (phylum: Bacteroidetes) and Enterobacteriaceae (subphylum: Gammaproteobacteria) families, each of which includes some of the smallest known genomes. Upon examination of protein, functional domain, and nondomain region lengths, we found that proteins were not uniformly shrinking with genome reduction, but instead increased length variability and variability was observed in both the functional domain and nondomain regions. Additionally, as complete gene loss also contributes to overall genome shrinkage, we found that the largest proteins in the proteomes of nonhost-restricted bacteroidetial and gammaproteobacterial species often were inferred to be involved in secondary metabolic processes, extracellular sensing, or of unknown function. These proteins were absent in the proteomes of obligate insect endosymbionts. Therefore, loss of genes encoding large proteins not required for host-restricted lifestyles in obligate endosymbiont proteomes likely contributes to extreme genome reduction to a greater degree than gene shrinkage. PMID:24671745

  5. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  6. Refinement of the primary hydration shell model for molecular dynamics simulations of large proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hamaneh, Mehdi Bagheri; Buck, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    A realistic representation of water molecules is important in molecular dynamics simulation of proteins. However, the standard method of solvating biomolecules, i.e. immersing them in a box of water with periodic boundary conditions, is computationally expensive. The primary hydration shell (PHS) method, developed more than a decade ago and implemented in CHARMM, uses only a thin shell of water around the system of interest, and so greatly reduces the computational cost of simulations. Applying the PHS method, especially to larger proteins, revealed that further optimization and a partial reworking was required and here we present several improvements to its performance. The model is applied to systems with different sizes, and both water and protein behaviors are compared with those observed in standard simulations with periodic boundary conditions and, in some cases, with experimental data. The advantages of the modified PHS method over its original implementation are clearly apparent when it is applied to simulating the 82 KD protein Malate Synthase G. PMID:19382175

  7. CASP10-BCL::Fold efficiently samples topologies of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Sten; Putnam, Daniel K; Fischer, Axel W; Kohlmann, Tim; Weiner, Brian E; Meiler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    During CASP10 in summer 2012, we tested BCL::Fold for prediction of free modeling (FM) and template-based modeling (TBM) targets. BCL::Fold assembles the tertiary structure of a protein from predicted secondary structure elements (SSEs) omitting more flexible loop regions early on. This approach enables the sampling of conformational space for larger proteins with more complex topologies. In preparation of CASP11, we analyzed the quality of CASP10 models throughout the prediction pipeline to understand BCL::Fold's ability to sample the native topology, identify native-like models by scoring and/or clustering approaches, and our ability to add loop regions and side chains to initial SSE-only models. The standout observation is that BCL::Fold sampled topologies with a GDT_TS score > 33% for 12 of 18 and with a topology score > 0.8 for 11 of 18 test cases de novo. Despite the sampling success of BCL::Fold, significant challenges still exist in clustering and loop generation stages of the pipeline. The clustering approach employed for model selection often failed to identify the most native-like assembly of SSEs for further refinement and submission. It was also observed that for some β-strand proteins model refinement failed as β-strands were not properly aligned to form hydrogen bonds removing otherwise accurate models from the pool. Further, BCL::Fold samples frequently non-natural topologies that require loop regions to pass through the center of the protein.

  8. Hammock: a hidden Markov model-based peptide clustering algorithm to identify protein-interaction consensus motifs in large datasets

    PubMed Central

    Krejci, Adam; Hupp, Ted R.; Lexa, Matej; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Muller, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Proteins often recognize their interaction partners on the basis of short linear motifs located in disordered regions on proteins’ surface. Experimental techniques that study such motifs use short peptides to mimic the structural properties of interacting proteins. Continued development of these methods allows for large-scale screening, resulting in vast amounts of peptide sequences, potentially containing information on multiple protein-protein interactions. Processing of such datasets is a complex but essential task for large-scale studies investigating protein-protein interactions. Results: The software tool presented in this article is able to rapidly identify multiple clusters of sequences carrying shared specificity motifs in massive datasets from various sources and generate multiple sequence alignments of identified clusters. The method was applied on a previously published smaller dataset containing distinct classes of ligands for SH3 domains, as well as on a new, an order of magnitude larger dataset containing epitopes for several monoclonal antibodies. The software successfully identified clusters of sequences mimicking epitopes of antibody targets, as well as secondary clusters revealing that the antibodies accept some deviations from original epitope sequences. Another test indicates that processing of even much larger datasets is computationally feasible. Availability and implementation: Hammock is published under GNU GPL v. 3 license and is freely available as a standalone program (from http://www.recamo.cz/en/software/hammock-cluster-peptides/) or as a tool for the Galaxy toolbox (from https://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/hammock/hammock). The source code can be downloaded from https://github.com/hammock-dev/hammock/releases. Contact: muller@mou.cz Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26342231

  9. Protein crystal growth in microgravity review of large scale temperature induction method: bovine insulin, human insulin and human alpha interferon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Marianna M.; Bishop, John Bradford; Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Smith, G. David; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-10-01

    The protein crystal growth facility (PCF) is space-flight hardware that accommodates large scale protein crystal growth experiments using temperature change as the inductive step. Recent modifications include specialized instrumentation for monitoring crystal nucleation with laser light scattering. This paper reviews results from the PCF's first seven flights on the Space Shuttle, the last with laser light scattering instrumentation. The PCF's objective is twofold: (1) production of high quality protein crystals for X-ray analysis and subsequent structure based drug design and (2) preparation of a large quantity of relatively contaminant free crystals for use as time-release protein pharmaceuticals. The first three Shuttle flights with bovine insulin constituted the PCF's proof of concept, demonstrating that the space-grown crystals were larger and diffracted to higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts. The later four PCF missions were used to grow recombinant human insulin crystals for X-ray analysis and to continue productions trials aimed at the development of a processing facility for crystalline recombinant alpha interferon.

  10. Expert systems for personnel assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, J.L.; Liepins, G.

    1986-01-01

    In order to reduce stress on assignment personnel (detailers) and ensure maximum fairness and consistency in the Navy's personnel assignment process, The Navy Military Personnel Command (NMPC) has begun to explore the potential use of expert systems to supplement current manual and computerized distribution methods. The Detailer's Assistant expert system is being developed to improve the detailers' ability to satisfy the needs of their constituents and Navy management. An initial prototype of the Detailer's Assistant is now being evaluated. Numerous upgrades and extensions should lead to an operational system in the near future. Further development to a production system will involve additional research in machine learning, intelligent database methods, and cooperating expert systems.

  11. Assignment of phycocyanobilin in HMPT using triple resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Röben, Marco; Schmieder, Peter

    2011-09-01

    A complete assignment of all resonances of a small organic molecule is a prerequisite for a structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. This is conventionally obtained using a well-established strategy based on COSY, HMQC and HMBC spectra. In case of phycocyanobilin (PCB) in HMPT this strategy was unsuccessful due to the symmetry of the molecule and extreme signal overlap. Since (13)C and (15)N labeled material was available, an alternative strategy for resonance assignment was used. Triple resonance experiments derived from experiments conventionally performed for proteins are sensitive and easy to analyze. Their application led to a complete and unambiguous assignment using three types of experiments. PMID:21815209

  12. Pseudocontact Shift-Driven Iterative Resampling for 3D Structure Determinations of Large Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) induced by paramagnetic lanthanides produce pronounced effects in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which are easily measured and which deliver valuable long-range structure restraints. Even sparse PCS data greatly enhance the success rate of 3D (3-dimensional) structure predictions of proteins by the modeling program Rosetta. The present work extends this approach to 3D structures of larger proteins, comprising more than 200 residues, which are difficult to model by Rosetta without additional experimental restraints. The new algorithm improves the fragment assembly method of Rosetta by utilizing PCSs generated from paramagnetic lanthanide ions attached at four different sites as the only experimental restraints. The sparse PCS data are utilized at multiple stages, to identify native-like local structures, to rank the best structural models and to rebuild the fragment libraries. The fragment libraries are refined iteratively until convergence. The PCS-driven iterative resampling algorithm is strictly data dependent and shown to generate accurate models for a benchmark set of eight different proteins, ranging from 100 to 220 residues, using solely PCSs of backbone amide protons.

  13. Distribution of circular proteins in plants: large-scale mapping of cyclotides in the Violaceae

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Robert; Yeshak, Mariamawit Y.; Larsson, Sonny; Craik, David J.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing interest in small circular proteins found in plants of the violet family (Violaceae). These so-called cyclotides consist of a circular chain of approximately 30 amino acids, including six cysteines forming three disulfide bonds, arranged in a cyclic cystine knot (CCK) motif. In this study we map the occurrence and distribution of cyclotides throughout the Violaceae. Plant material was obtained from herbarium sheets containing samples up to 200 years of age. Even the oldest specimens contained cyclotides in the preserved leaves, with no degradation products observable, confirming their place as one of the most stable proteins in nature. Over 200 samples covering 17 of the 23–31 genera in Violaceae were analyzed, and cyclotides were positively identified in 150 species. Each species contained a unique set of between one and 25 cyclotides, with many exclusive to individual plant species. We estimate the number of different cyclotides in the Violaceae to be 5000–25,000, and propose that cyclotides are ubiquitous among all Violaceae species. Twelve new cyclotides from six phylogenetically dispersed genera were sequenced. Furthermore, the first glycosylated derivatives of cyclotides were identified and characterized, further increasing the diversity and complexity of this unique protein family. PMID:26579135

  14. Exploiting Image Registration for Automated Resonance Assignment in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stephens, Thomas; Liu, Jian; Tjandra, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analysis of protein NMR data involves the assignment of resonance peaks in a number of multidimensional data sets. To establish resonance assignment a three-dimensional search is used to match a pair of common variables, such as chemical shifts of the same spin system, in different NMR spectra. We show that by displaying the variables to be compared in two-dimensional plots the process can be simplified. Moreover, by utilizing a fast Fourier transform (FFT) cross-correlation algorithm, more common to the field of image registration or pattern matching, we can automate this process. Here, we use sequential NMR backbone assignment as an example to show that the combination of correlation plots and segmented pattern matching establishes fast backbone assignment in fifteen proteins of varying sizes. For example, the 265-residue RalBP1 protein was 95.4% correctly assigned in 10 seconds. The same concept can be applied to any multidimensional NMR data set where analysis comprises the comparison of two variables. This modular and robust approach offers high efficiency with excellent computational scalability and could be easily incorporated into existing assignment software. PMID:25828257

  15. Some remarks on assignment maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masillo, F.; Scolarici, G.; Solombrino, L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of general linear assignment maps, showing that positivity axiom can be suitably relaxed, and propose a new class of dynamical maps (generalized dynamics). A puzzling result, arising in such a context in quantum information theory, is also discussed.

  16. Who Benefits from Homework Assignments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronning, Marte

    2011-01-01

    Using Dutch data on pupils in elementary school this paper is the first empirical study to analyze whether assigning homework has a heterogeneous impact on pupil achievement. Addressing potential biases by using a difference-in-difference approach, I find that the test score gap is larger in classes where everybody gets homework than in classes…

  17. The Year of Secret Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Jaclyn

    2004-01-01

    The path to "novelist" was a convoluted one for Moriarty, who began writing fiction as doctoral student at Cambridge University. Her interest in young adults stems from an appreciation for the "troubles, strengths, and surprises of that age group." Now, in a uniquely formatted book titled "The Year of Secret Assignments," we peek inside the mind…

  18. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  19. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups. PMID:21809957

  20. Protein Biomarkers for Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Two Large Community Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Christoph; Sundström, Johan; Gustafsson, Stefan; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Fall, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a precursor of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and improved risk prediction and understanding of the pathogenesis are needed. We used a novel high-throughput 92-protein assay to identify circulating biomarkers for HOMA of IR in two cohorts of community residents without diabetes (n = 1,367) (mean age 73 ± 3.6 years). Adjusted linear regression identified cathepsin D and confirmed six proteins (leptin, renin, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist [IL-1ra], hepatocyte growth factor, fatty acid-binding protein 4, and tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) as IR biomarkers. Mendelian randomization analysis indicated a positive causal effect of IR on t-PA concentrations. Two biomarkers, IL-1ra (hazard ratio [HR] 1.28, 95% CI 1.03-1.59) and t-PA (HR 1.30, 1.02-1.65) were associated with incident T2D, and t-PA predicted 5-year transition to hyperglycemia (odds ratio 1.30, 95% CI 1.02-1.65). Additional adjustment for fasting glucose rendered both coefficients insignificant and revealed an association between renin and T2D (HR 0.79, 0.62-0.99). LASSO regression suggested a risk model including IL-1ra, t-PA, and the Framingham Offspring Study T2D score, but prediction improvement was nonsignificant (difference in C-index 0.02, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.12) over the T2D score only. In conclusion, proteomic blood profiling indicated cathepsin D as a new IR biomarker and suggested a causal effect of IR on t-PA. PMID:26420861

  1. The Ogura sterility-inducing protein forms a large complex without interfering with the oxidative phosphorylation components in rapeseed mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Duroc, Yann; Hiard, Sophie; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Ragu, Sandrine; Budar, Françoise

    2009-05-01

    The Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility causing protein, ORF138, was found to be part of a complex with an apparent size of over 750 kDa in the inner membrane of mitochondria of sterile plants. ORF138 did not colocalize with any of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes, nor did its presence modify their apparent size or amount, compared to samples from fertile isogenic plants. We attempted to detect potential proteins or nucleic acids that could be involved in the large ORF138 complex by 2D PAGE, immunoprecipitation and nuclease treatments of native extracts. All our results suggest that the ORF138 protein is the main, if not only, component of this large complex. The capacities of complexes I, II, IV, and ATP synthase were identical in samples from sterile and fertile plants. Isolated mitochondria from sterile plants showed a higher oxygen consumption than those from fertile plants. In vivo respiration measurements suggest that the difference in O(2) consumption measured at the organelle level is compensated at the cell/tissue level, completely in leaves, but only partially in male reproductive organs.

  2. Muted protein is involved in the targeting of CD63 to large dense-core vesicles of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Zhenhua, Hao; Wei, Li

    2016-08-01

    Large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are characterized as a class of lysosome-related organelles (LROs), which undergo regulated release and play important roles in development, metabolism and homeostasis. The Muted protein is a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), which functions in the biogenesis of lysosomes and LROs. CD63 is a membrane component of lysosomes and LROs. Whether and how CD63 is sorted into LDCVs is largely unknown. In this study, we aim to identify the localization of CD63 in chromaffin cells by colocalization, living cell imaging and cell fractionation. We found that a proportion of CD63-YFP colocalized with NPY-dsRed labeled LDCVs. By sucrose density gradient fractionation, a proportion of CD63 was found to be highly enriched in LDCVs fractions. The Muted mutant mouse is a model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). We also found that the level of CD63 was significantly decreased in Muted-deficient adrenal glands, suggesting that the Muted protein is important for the steady-state level of CD63. Our results suggest that CD63 is a membrane component of LDCVs and the stability of CD63 is dependent on the Muted protein, which provides a clue to the pathogenesis of LRO defects in HPS. PMID:27531610

  3. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Galietta, Annamaria; Gunby, Rosalind H; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W; Tartari, Carmen J; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK(+) ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK(+) cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells.

  4. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gunby, Rosalind H.; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W.; Tartari, Carmen J.; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G.; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK+ ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK+ cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells. PMID:17537995

  5. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Galietta, Annamaria; Gunby, Rosalind H; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W; Tartari, Carmen J; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK(+) ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK(+) cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells. PMID:17537995

  6. DBC1/CCAR2 and CCAR1 Are Largely Disordered Proteins that Have Evolved from One Common Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jia; Westerheide, Sandy D.; Xue, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1, CCAR2, KIAA1967) is a large, predominantly nuclear, multidomain protein that modulates gene expression by inhibiting several epigenetic modifiers, including the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3, and the methyltransferase SUV39H1. DBC1 shares many highly conserved protein domains with its paralog cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1, CARP-1). In this study, we examined the full-length sequential and structural properties of DBC1 and CCAR1 from multiple species and correlated these properties with evolution. Our data shows that the conserved domains shared between DBC1 and CCAR1 have similar domain structures, as well as similar patterns of predicted disorder in less-conserved intrinsically disordered regions. Our analysis indicates similarities between DBC1, CCAR1, and the nematode protein lateral signaling target 3 (LST-3), suggesting that DBC1 and CCAR1 may have evolved from LST-3. Our data also suggests that DBC1 emerged later in evolution than CCAR1. DBC1 contains regions that show less conservation across species as compared to the same regions in CCAR1, suggesting a continuously evolving scenario for DBC1. Overall, this study provides insight into the structure and evolution of DBC1 and CCAR1, which may impact future studies on the biological functions of these proteins. PMID:25610865

  7. Calibrated peer review assignments for the earth sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudd, J.A.; Wang, V.Z.; Cervato, C.; Ridky, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review ??? (CPR), a web-based instructional tool developed as part of the National Science Foundation reform initiatives in undergraduate science education, allows instructors to incorporate multiple writing assignments in large courses without overwhelming the instructor. This study reports successful implementation of CPR in a large, introductory geology course and student learning of geoscience content. For each CPR assignment in this study, students studied web-based and paper resources, wrote an essay, and reviewed seven essays (three from the instructor, three from peers, and their own) on the topic. Although many students expressed negative attitudes and concerns, particularly about the peer review process of this innovative instructional approach, they also recognized the learning potential of completing CPR assignments. Comparing instruction on earthquakes and plate boundaries using a CPR assignment vs. an instructional video lecture and homework essay with extensive instructor feedback, students mastered more content via CPR instruction.

  8. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2010-08-17

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  9. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  10. Fleet Assignment Using Collective Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, Nicolas E.; Bieniawski, Stefan R.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Product distribution theory is a new collective intelligence-based framework for analyzing and controlling distributed systems. Its usefulness in distributed stochastic optimization is illustrated here through an airline fleet assignment problem. This problem involves the allocation of aircraft to a set of flights legs in order to meet passenger demand, while satisfying a variety of linear and non-linear constraints. Over the course of the day, the routing of each aircraft is determined in order to minimize the number of required flights for a given fleet. The associated flow continuity and aircraft count constraints have led researchers to focus on obtaining quasi-optimal solutions, especially at larger scales. In this paper, the authors propose the application of this new stochastic optimization algorithm to a non-linear objective cold start fleet assignment problem. Results show that the optimizer can successfully solve such highly-constrained problems (130 variables, 184 constraints).

  11. Fleet Assignment Using Collective Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, Nicolas E.; Bieniawski, Stefan R.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Airline fleet assignment involves the allocation of aircraft to a set of flights legs in order to meet passenger demand, while satisfying a variety of constraints. Over the course of the day, the routing of each aircraft is determined in order to minimize the number of required flights for a given fleet. The associated flow continuity and aircraft count constraints have led researchers to focus on obtaining quasi-optimal solutions, especially at larger scales. In this paper, the authors propose the application of an agent-based integer optimization algorithm to a "cold start" fleet assignment problem. Results show that the optimizer can successfully solve such highly- constrained problems (129 variables, 184 constraints).

  12. Mining Large Scale Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data for Protein Modifications Using Spectral Libraries.

    PubMed

    Horlacher, Oliver; Lisacek, Frederique; Müller, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Experimental improvements in post-translational modification (PTM) detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has allowed the identification of vast numbers of PTMs. Open modification searches (OMSs) of MS/MS data, which do not require prior knowledge of the modifications present in the sample, further increased the diversity of detected PTMs. Despite much effort, there is still a lack of functional annotation of PTMs. One possibility to narrow the annotation gap is to mine MS/MS data deposited in public repositories and to correlate the PTM presence with biological meta-information attached to the data. Since the data volume can be quite substantial and contain tens of millions of MS/MS spectra, the data mining tools must be able to cope with big data. Here, we present two tools, Liberator and MzMod, which are built using the MzJava class library and the Apache Spark large scale computing framework. Liberator builds large MS/MS spectrum libraries, and MzMod searches them in an OMS mode. We applied these tools to a recently published set of 25 million spectra from 30 human tissues and present tissue specific PTMs. We also compared the results to the ones obtained with the OMS tool MODa and the search engine X!Tandem.

  13. Large-scale co-aggregation of fluorescent lipid probes with cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Large scale aggregation of fluorescein-labeled immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor complexes on the surface of RBL cells results in the co- aggregation of a large fraction of the lipophilic fluorescent probe 3,3'-dihexadecylindocarbocyanine (diI) that labels the plasma membranes much more uniformly in the absence of receptor aggregation. Most of the diI molecules that are localized in patches of aggregated receptors have lost their lateral mobility as determined by fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The diI outside of patches is mobile, and its mobility is similar to that in control cells without receptor aggregates. It is unlikely that the co-aggregation of diI with IgE receptors is due to specific interactions between these components, as two other lipophilic probes of different structures are also observed to redistribute with aggregated IgE receptors, and aggregation of two other cell surface antigens also results in the coredistribution of diI at the RBL cell surface. Quantitative analysis of CCD images of labeled cells reveals some differences in the spatial distributions of co- aggregated diI and IgE receptors. The results indicate that cross- linking of specific cell surface antigens causes a substantial change in the organization of the plasma membrane by redistributing pre- existing membrane domains or causing their formation. PMID:8188747

  14. Mining Large Scale Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data for Protein Modifications Using Spectral Libraries.

    PubMed

    Horlacher, Oliver; Lisacek, Frederique; Müller, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Experimental improvements in post-translational modification (PTM) detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has allowed the identification of vast numbers of PTMs. Open modification searches (OMSs) of MS/MS data, which do not require prior knowledge of the modifications present in the sample, further increased the diversity of detected PTMs. Despite much effort, there is still a lack of functional annotation of PTMs. One possibility to narrow the annotation gap is to mine MS/MS data deposited in public repositories and to correlate the PTM presence with biological meta-information attached to the data. Since the data volume can be quite substantial and contain tens of millions of MS/MS spectra, the data mining tools must be able to cope with big data. Here, we present two tools, Liberator and MzMod, which are built using the MzJava class library and the Apache Spark large scale computing framework. Liberator builds large MS/MS spectrum libraries, and MzMod searches them in an OMS mode. We applied these tools to a recently published set of 25 million spectra from 30 human tissues and present tissue specific PTMs. We also compared the results to the ones obtained with the OMS tool MODa and the search engine X!Tandem. PMID:26653734

  15. 5 CFR 870.901 - Assignments permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE PROGRAM Assignments of Life Insurance § 870.901..., and compensationers. (2) An individual may assign ownership of all life insurance under this part.../she must assign all the insurance; an individual cannot assign only a portion of the coverage....

  16. biGBac enables rapid gene assembly for the expression of large multisubunit protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Florian; Petzold, Georg; VanderLinden, Ryan; Huis In 't Veld, Pim J; Brown, Nicholas G; Lampert, Fabienne; Westermann, Stefan; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Analyses of protein complexes are facilitated by methods that enable the generation of recombinant complexes via coexpression of their subunits from multigene DNA constructs. However, low experimental throughput limits the generation of such constructs in parallel. Here we describe a method that allows up to 25 cDNAs to be assembled into a single baculoviral expression vector in only two steps. This method, called biGBac, uses computationally optimized DNA linker sequences that enable the efficient assembly of linear DNA fragments, using reactions developed by Gibson for the generation of synthetic genomes. The biGBac method uses a flexible and modular "mix and match" approach and enables the generation of baculoviruses from DNA constructs at any assembly stage. Importantly, it is simple, efficient, and fast enough to allow the manual generation of many multigene expression constructs in parallel. We have used this method to generate and characterize recombinant forms of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, cohesin, and kinetochore complexes.

  17. Field-flow fractionation of nucleic acids and proteins under large-scale gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2007-05-01

    For the purpose of developing techniques for separating biological macromolecules, the present study reports a magnetic chromatography system employing high performance liquid chromatography and superconducting magnets of 14 and 5T. We observed chromatograms of catalase and albumin, which were eluded from columns that were exposed to magnetic fields of up to 14T with a maximum gradient of 90T/m. Without the magnetic fields, the chromatograms of the macromolecules showed a clear peak, while the chromatograms changed to have separated peaks for the same molecules after exposure to gradient magnetic fields. When the chromatocolumn was placed so the magnetic forces were opposite to the direction of flow, the albumin molecules separated into two groups. In addition, the chromatograms of catalase exposed to the magnetic fields indicated that the retention times of the two kinds of magnetically separated catalase were relatively changed if the column-field configuration was changed. Probably, the balance of paramagnetism in the heme and diamagnetism in the protein controlled the transport velocity under the influence of the gradient magnetic fields. In addition, the transport velocity of DNA molecules in the flow with a high gradient magnetic field was observed using a time-resolved spectrophotometric system.

  18. biGBac enables rapid gene assembly for the expression of large multisubunit protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Florian; Petzold, Georg; VanderLinden, Ryan; Huis in 't Veld, Pim J.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Lampert, Fabienne; Westermann, Stefan; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of protein complexes are facilitated by methods that enable the generation of recombinant complexes via coexpression of their subunits from multigene DNA constructs. However, low experimental throughput limits the generation of such constructs in parallel. Here we describe a method that allows up to 25 cDNAs to be assembled into a single baculoviral expression vector in only two steps. This method, called biGBac, uses computationally optimized DNA linker sequences that enable the efficient assembly of linear DNA fragments, using reactions developed by Gibson for the generation of synthetic genomes. The biGBac method uses a flexible and modular “mix and match” approach and enables the generation of baculoviruses from DNA constructs at any assembly stage. Importantly, it is simple, efficient, and fast enough to allow the manual generation of many multigene expression constructs in parallel. We have used this method to generate and characterize recombinant forms of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, cohesin, and kinetochore complexes. PMID:27114506

  19. Membrane-localized extra-large G proteins and Gbg of the heterotrimeric G proteins form functional complexes engaged in plant immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Brenya, Eric; Parekh, Urvi; Botella, José Ramón

    2015-03-01

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising Ga, Gb, and Gg subunits, are molecular switches whose function tightly depends on Ga and Gbg interaction. Intriguingly, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), multiple defense responses involve Gbg, but not Ga. We report here that the Gbg dimer directly partners with extra-large G proteins (XLGs) to mediate plant immunity. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in XLGs, Gb, and Gg are similarly compromised in several pathogen defense responses, including disease development and production of reactive oxygen species. Genetic analysis of double, triple, and quadruple mutants confirmed that XLGs and Gbg functionally interact in the same defense signaling pathways. In addition, mutations in XLG2 suppressed the seedling lethal and cell death phenotypes of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-associated receptor kinase1-interacting receptor-like kinase1 mutants in an identical way as reported for Arabidopsis Gb-deficient mutants. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays revealed that XLG2 physically interacts with all three possible Gbg dimers at the plasma membrane. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close relationship between XLGs and plant Ga subunits, placing the divergence point at the dawn of land plant evolution. Based on these findings, we conclude that XLGs form functional complexes with Gbg dimers, although the mechanism of action of these complexes, including activation/deactivation, must be radically different form the one used by the canonical Ga subunit and are not likely to share the same receptors. Accordingly, XLGs expand the repertoire of heterotrimeric G proteins in plants and reveal a higher level of diversity in heterotrimeric G protein signaling.

  20. Membrane-Localized Extra-Large G Proteins and Gβγ of the Heterotrimeric G Proteins Form Functional Complexes Engaged in Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Natsumi; Trusov, Yuri; Brenya, Eric; Parekh, Urvi

    2015-01-01

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are molecular switches whose function tightly depends on Gα and Gβγ interaction. Intriguingly, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), multiple defense responses involve Gβγ, but not Gα. We report here that the Gβγ dimer directly partners with extra-large G proteins (XLGs) to mediate plant immunity. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in XLGs, Gβ, and Gγ are similarly compromised in several pathogen defense responses, including disease development and production of reactive oxygen species. Genetic analysis of double, triple, and quadruple mutants confirmed that XLGs and Gβγ functionally interact in the same defense signaling pathways. In addition, mutations in XLG2 suppressed the seedling lethal and cell death phenotypes of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-associated receptor kinase1-interacting receptor-like kinase1 mutants in an identical way as reported for Arabidopsis Gβ-deficient mutants. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays revealed that XLG2 physically interacts with all three possible Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close relationship between XLGs and plant Gα subunits, placing the divergence point at the dawn of land plant evolution. Based on these findings, we conclude that XLGs form functional complexes with Gβγ dimers, although the mechanism of action of these complexes, including activation/deactivation, must be radically different form the one used by the canonical Gα subunit and are not likely to share the same receptors. Accordingly, XLGs expand the repertoire of heterotrimeric G proteins in plants and reveal a higher level of diversity in heterotrimeric G protein signaling. PMID:25588736

  1. Yeast V-ATPase Proteolipid Ring Acts as a Large-conductance Transmembrane Protein Pore

    PubMed Central

    Couoh-Cardel, Sergio; Hsueh, Yi-Ching; Wilkens, Stephan; Movileanu, Liviu

    2016-01-01

    The vacuolar H+ -ATPase (V-ATPase) is a rotary motor enzyme that acidifies intracellular organelles and the extracellular milieu in some tissues. Besides its canonical proton-pumping function, V-ATPase’s membrane sector, Vo, has been implicated in non-canonical functions including membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. Here, we report purification and biophysical characterization of yeast V-ATPase c subunit ring (c-ring) using electron microscopy and single-molecule electrophysiology. We find that yeast c-ring forms dimers mediated by the c subunits’ cytoplasmic loops. Electrophysiology measurements of the c-ring reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer revealed a large unitary conductance of ~8.3 nS. Thus, the data support a role of V-ATPase c-ring in membrane fusion and neuronal communication. PMID:27098228

  2. Error tolerant NMR backbone resonance assignment and automated structure generation.

    PubMed

    Alipanahi, Babak; Gao, Xin; Karakoc, Emre; Li, Shuai Cheng; Balbach, Frank; Feng, Guangyu; Donaldson, Logan; Li, Ming

    2011-02-01

    Error tolerant backbone resonance assignment is the cornerstone of the NMR structure determination process. Although a variety of assignment approaches have been developed, none works sufficiently well on noisy fully automatically picked peaks to enable the subsequent automatic structure determination steps. We have designed an integer linear programming (ILP) based assignment system (IPASS) that has enabled fully automatic protein structure determination for four test proteins. IPASS employs probabilistic spin system typing based on chemical shifts and secondary structure predictions. Furthermore, IPASS extracts connectivity information from the inter-residue information and the (automatically picked) (15)N-edited NOESY peaks which are then used to fix reliable fragments. When applied to automatically picked peaks for real proteins, IPASS achieves an average precision and recall of 82% and 63%, respectively. In contrast, the next best method, MARS, achieves an average precision and recall of 77% and 36%, respectively. The assignments generated by IPASS are then fed into our protein structure calculation system, FALCON-NMR, to determine the 3D structures without human intervention. The final models have backbone RMSDs of 1.25Å, 0.88Å, 1.49Å, and 0.67Å to the reference native structures for proteins TM1112, CASKIN, VRAR, and HACS1, respectively. The web server is publicly available at http://monod.uwaterloo.ca/nmr/ipass.

  3. Disulphide bond assignment in human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP).

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R A; Marston, F A; Angal, S; Koklitis, P; Panico, M; Morris, H R; Carne, A F; Smith, B J; Harris, T J; Freedman, R B

    1990-01-01

    Disulphide bonds in human recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) were assigned by resolving proteolytic digests of TIMP on reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and sequencing those peaks judged to contain disulphide bonds by virtue of a change in retention time on reduction. This procedure allowed the direct assignment of Cys-145-Cys-166 and the isolation of two other peptides containing two disulphide bonds each. Further peptide cleavage in conjunction with fast-atom-bombardment m.s. analysis permitted the assignments Cys-1-Cys-70, Cys-3-Cys-99, Cys-13-Cys-124 and Cys-127-Cys-174 from these peptides. The sixth bond Cys-132-Cys-137 was assigned by inference, as the native protein has no detectable free thiol groups. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2163605

  4. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  5. Resonance assignments of a VapC family toxin from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2016-10-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems widely exist in bacterial plasmids, phages, and chromosomes and play important roles in growth persistence and host-pathogen interaction. Virulence associated protein BC (VapBC) family TAs are the most abundant TAs in bacteria and many pathogens contain a large number of vapBC loci in the genome which have been extensively studied. Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic anaerobic gram-positive bacterium with promising applications in biofuel production, also contains a VapBC TA in the genome. Despite the structures of several VapBC family TAs have been determined, the toxin and anti-toxin components of C. thermocellum VapBC have very low sequence identity to the proteins in PDB. Therefore, the structure and functional mechanism of this TA is largely unknown. Here we reported the NMR resonance assignments of the VapC toxin from C. thermocellum as a basis for further structural and functional studies. PMID:27386855

  6. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Marcotte, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35–40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes. PMID:21152998

  7. Effects of fish protein hydrolysate on growth performance and humoral immune response in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.)* §

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hong-gang; Wu, Tian-xing; Zhao, Zhan-yu; Pan, Xiao-dong

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) on growth performance and humoral immune response of the large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.). One thousand and two hundred large yellow croakers [initial average weight: (162.75±23.85) g] were divided into four groups and reared in floating sea cages (3 m×3 m×3 m). The animals were fed with 4 diets: basal diet only (control) or diets supplemented with 5%, 10% and 15% (w/w) FPH. The results show that dietary FPH levels significantly influenced the growth and immunity of the large yellow croaker. Compared with the control group, total weight gain (TWG) in all treatment groups, relative weight gain (RWG) and specific growth rate (SGR) in fish fed with diets supplemented with 10% and 15% FPH were significantly increased (P<0.05). Similar results were observed in immune parameters [lysozyme activity, serum complements, immunoglobulin M (IgM)]. Lysozyme activity, complement C4 and IgM were also significantly increased (P<0.05) in fish fed with diets supplemented with 10% and 15% FPH, while complement C3 level was significantly increased (P<0.05) in all treatment groups. In general, with the supplementation of FPH, particularly at dose of 10%, the growth performance and immunity of the large yellow croaker can be improved effectively. PMID:18763300

  8. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  9. Large-Scale Quantitative Assessment of Binding Preferences in Protein-Nucleic Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jakubec, Dávid; Hostas, Jirí; Laskowski, Roman A; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrásek, Jirí

    2015-04-14

    The growing number of high-quality experimental (X-ray, NMR) structures of protein–DNA complexes has sufficient enough information to assess whether universal rules governing the DNA sequence recognition process apply. While previous studies have investigated the relative abundance of various modes of amino acid–base contacts (van der Waals contacts, hydrogen bonds), relatively little is known about the energetics of these noncovalent interactions. In the present study, we have performed the first large-scale quantitative assessment of binding preferences in protein–DNA complexes by calculating the interaction energies in all 80 possible amino acid–DNA base combinations. We found that several mutual amino acid–base orientations featuring bidentate hydrogen bonds capable of unambiguous one-to-one recognition correspond to unique minima in the potential energy space of the amino acid–base pairs. A clustering algorithm revealed that these contacts form a spatially well-defined group offering relatively little conformational freedom. Various molecular mechanics force field and DFT-D ab initio calculations were performed, yielding similar results. PMID:26894243

  10. Automatic identification of large collections of protein-coding or rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Arigon, Anne-Muriel; Perrière, Guy; Gouy, Manolo

    2008-04-01

    The number of available genomic sequences is growing very fast, due to the development of massive sequencing techniques. Sequence identification is needed and contributes to the assessment of gene and species evolutionary relationships. Automated bioinformatics tools are thus necessary to carry out these identification operations in an accurate and fast way. We developed HoSeqI (Homologous Sequence Identification), a software environment allowing this kind of automated sequence identification using homologous gene family databases. HoSeqI is accessible through a Web interface (http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/software/HoSeqI/) allowing to identify one or several sequences and to visualize resulting alignments and phylogenetic trees. We also implemented another application, MultiHoSeqI, to quickly add a large set of sequences to a family database in order to identify them, to update the database, or to help automatic genome annotation. Lately, we developed an application, ChiSeqI (Chimeric Sequence Identification), to automate the processes of identification of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequences and of detection of chimeric sequences.

  11. NMR resonance assignments of the major apple allergen Mal d 1.

    PubMed

    Ahammer, Linda; Grutsch, Sarina; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The major apple allergen Mal d 1 is the predominant cause of apple (Malus domestica) allergies in large parts of Europe and Northern America. Allergic reactions against this 17.5 kDa protein are the consequence of initial sensitization to the structurally homologous major allergen from birch pollen, Bet v 1. Consumption of apples can subsequently provoke immunologic cross-reactivity of Bet v 1-specific antibodies with Mal d 1 and trigger severe oral allergic syndroms, affecting more than 70 % of all individuals that are sensitized to birch pollen. While the accumulated immunological data suggest that Mal d 1 has a three-dimensional fold that is similar to Bet v 1, experimental structural data for this protein are not available to date. In a first step towards structural characterization of Mal d 1, backbone and side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts of the isoform Mal d 1.0101 were assigned. The NMR-chemical shift data show that this protein is composed of seven β-strands and three α-helices, which is in accordance with the reported secondary structure of the major birch pollen allergen, indicating that Mal d 1 and Bet v 1 indeed have similar three-dimensional folds. The next stage in the characterization of Mal d 1 will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein. PMID:27165578

  12. Identification and characterization of a differentially expressed protein (CAPZB) in skeletal muscle between Meishan and Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjie; Xu, Yongjie; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Tao; Tang, Guoqing; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Xiong, Yuanzhu

    2014-07-10

    Actin capping protein beta (CAPZB) protein was identified with considerable differences in the longissimus dorsi muscle between Large White and Meishan pigs using proteomics approach. However, in pigs, the information on CAPZB is very limited. In this study, we cloned and characterized the porcine actin capping protein beta (CAPZB) gene. In addition, we present two novel porcine CAPZB splice variants CAPZB1 and CAPZB2. CAPZB1 was expressed in all twenty tissues. However, CAPZB2 was predominantly expressed in the skeletal muscle and heart. In addition, the two isoforms had different expression profiles during the skeletal muscle development and between breeds. Moreover, the SNP T394G was identified in the coding region of the CAPZB gene, which was significantly associated with the carcass traits including the LFW, CFW, SFT and LEA. Data presented in our study suggests that the CAPZB gene may be a candidate gene of meat production trait and provides useful information for further studies on its roles in porcine skeletal muscle.

  13. The experimental folding landscape of monomeric lactose repressor, a large two-domain protein, involves two kinetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Das, Payel; Clementi, Cecilia; Matthews, Kathleen S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2005-10-11

    To probe the experimental folding behavior of a large protein with complex topology, we created a monomeric variant of the lactose repressor protein (MLAc), a well characterized tetrameric protein that regulates transcription of the lac operon. Purified MLAc is folded, fully functional, and binds the inducer isopropyl beta-d-thiogalactoside with the same affinity as wild-type LacI. Equilibrium unfolding of MLAc induced by the chemical denaturant urea is a reversible, apparent two-state process (pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). However, time-resolved experiments demonstrate that unfolding is single-exponential, whereas refolding data indicate two transient intermediates. The data reveal the initial formation of a burst-phase (tau < ms) intermediate that corresponds to approximately 50% of the total secondary-structure content. This step is followed by a rearrangement reaction that is rate-limited by an unfolding process (tau approximately 3 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C) and results in a second intermediate. This MLAc intermediate converts to the native structure (tau approximately 30 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). Remarkably, the experimental folding-energy landscape for MLAc is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using a simple topology-based C(alpha)-model as presented in a companion article in this issue. PMID:16203983

  14. Separate contributions of large- and small-scale dynamics to the heat capacity of proteins. A new viscosity approach.

    PubMed

    Käiväräinen, A; Fradkova, L; Korpela, T

    1993-05-01

    We present here a theoretical description and experimental verification of a novel method of separating large-scale (LS) and small-scale (SS) dynamics contributions to the heat capacities of proteins in solution by using viscosity dependences. It was assumed that the LS dynamics, related to the thermal fluctuations of domains and subunits, is dependent on solvent viscosity within a sucrose concentration of 0-15% w/v, in contrast with the SS dynamics, which are related to fluctuations of atoms and amino acid residues. The results obtained with immunoglobulin G, hemoglobin and cytochrome c were in reasonable accordance with the previous data achieved by a spin-label method: the LS dynamics decrease, whereas the SS dynamics increase within the temperature elevation. The changes are dependent on the stage of the active sites of the proteins. The internal compensation of molecular dynamics between the LS and SS fluctuations may be an important factor in the design of thermostable enzymes and proteins. A new phenomenon concerning the ability of macromolecules to increase free volume in water as a result of ice-like clusters stabilization is revealed. PMID:8489854

  15. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites.

  16. Identification of a large protein network involved in epigenetic transmission in replicating DNA of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Ernfors, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is maintained by transcriptional activities and chromatin modifying complexes highly organized within the chromatin. Although much effort has been focused on identifying genome-binding sites, little is known on their dynamic association with chromatin across cell divisions. Here, we used a modified version of the iPOND (isolation of proteins at nascent DNA) technology to identify a large protein network enriched at nascent DNA in ESCs. This comprehensive and unbiased proteomic characterization in ESCs reveals that, in addition to the core replication machinery, proteins relevant for pluripotency of ESCs are present at DNA replication sites. In particular, we show that the chromatin remodeller HDAC1–NuRD complex is enriched at nascent DNA. Interestingly, an acute block of HDAC1 in ESCs leads to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 at nascent DNA together with a concomitant loss of methylation. Consistently, in contrast to what has been described in tumour cell lines, these chromatin marks were found to be stable during cell cycle progression of ESCs. Our results are therefore compatible with a rapid deacetylation-coupled methylation mechanism during the replication of DNA in ESCs that may participate in the preservation of pluripotency of ESCs during replication. PMID:24852249

  17. Relationship between C - Reactive Protein and Stroke: A Large Prospective Community Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Chunxue; Wu, Jianwei; Zhou, Yong; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Anxin; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP) was associated with risk of stroke. There were few studies in Asian population, or on stroke subtypes other than ischemic stroke. We thus investigated the relationship between CRP and the risks of all stroke and its subtypes in a Chinese adult population. Methods In the current study, we included 90,517 Chinese adults free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline (June 2006 to October 2007) in analyses. Strokes were classified as ischemic stroke (IS), intracranial heamorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid heamorrhage (SAH). High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) were categorized into three groups: <1 mg/L, 1 to 3 mg/L, and >3 mg/L. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the association between hs-CRP concentrations and all stroke, as well as its subtypes. Results During a median follow-up time of 49 months, we documented 1,472 incident stroke cases. Of which 1,049 (71.3%) were IS, 383 (26.0%) were ICH, and 40 (2.7%) were SAH. After multivariate adjustment, hs-CRP concentrations ≥1 mg/L were associated with increased risks of all stroke (hs-CRP 1–3 mg/L: hazard ratio (HR) 1.17, 95% confidential interval (CI) 1.03–1.33; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07–1.46) and IS (hs-CRP 1–3 mg/L: HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.36; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11–1.60), but not with ICH and SAH. Subgroup analyses showed that higher hs-CRP concentration was more prone to be a risk factor for all stroke and IS in non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive participants. Conclusion We found that higher hs-CRP concentrations were associated with a higher risk of IS, particularly for non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive subjects. In contrast, we did not observe significant associations between hs-CRP and ICH/SAH. PMID:25191699

  18. Biochemical Large-Scale Interaction Analysis of Murine Olfactory Receptors and Associated Signaling Proteins with Post-Synaptic Density 95, Drosophila Discs Large, Zona-Occludens 1 (PDZ) Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Scholz, Paul; Fränzel, Benjamin; Osterloh, Markus; Wolters, Dirk; Hatt, Hanns; Neuhaus, Eva Maria; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family among mammalian membrane proteins and are capable of initiating numerous essential signaling cascades. Various GPCR-mediated pathways are organized into protein microdomains that can be orchestrated and regulated through scaffolding proteins, such as PSD-95/discs-large/ZO1 (PDZ) domain proteins. However, detailed binding characteristics of PDZ–GPCR interactions remain elusive because these interactions seem to be more complex than previously thought. To address this issue, we analyzed binding modalities using our established model system. This system includes the 13 individual PDZ domains of the multiple PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1; the largest PDZ protein), a broad range of murine olfactory receptors (a multifaceted gene cluster within the family of GPCRs), and associated olfactory signaling proteins. These proteins were analyzed in a large-scale peptide microarray approach and continuative interaction studies. As a result, we demonstrate that canonical binding motifs were not overrepresented among the interaction partners of MUPP1. Furthermore, C-terminal phosphorylation and distinct amino acid replacements abolished PDZ binding promiscuity. In addition to the described in vitro experiments, we identified new interaction partners within the murine olfactory epithelium using pull-down-based interactomics and could verify the partners through co-immunoprecipitation. In summary, the present study provides important insight into the complexity of the binding characteristics of PDZ–GPCR interactions based on olfactory signaling proteins, which could identify novel clinical targets for GPCR-associated diseases in the future. PMID:25979994

  19. Large-format imaging plate and weissenberg camera for accurate protein crystallographic data collection using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, K; Sasaki, K; Watanabe, N; Suzuki, M; Wang, Z G; Miyahara, J; Sakabe, N

    1997-05-01

    Off-line and on-line protein data-collection systems using an imaging plate as a detector are described and their components reported. The off-line scanner IPR4080 was developed for a large-format imaging plate ;BASIII' of dimensions 400 x 400 mm and 400 x 800 mm. The characteristics of this scanner are a dynamic range of 10(5) photons pixel(-1), low background noise and high sensitivity. A means of reducing electronic noise and a method for finding the origin of the noise are discussed in detail. A dedicated screenless Weissenberg camera matching IPR4080 with synchrotron radiation was developed and installed on beamline BL6B at the Photon Factory. This camera can attach one or two sheets of 400 x 800 mm large-format imaging plate inside the film cassette by evacuation. The positional reproducibility of the imaging plate on the cassette is so good that the data can be processed by batch job. Data of 93% completeness up to 1.6 A resolution were collected on a single axis rotation and the value of R(merge) becomes 4% from a tetragonal lysozyme crystal using a set of two imaging-plate sheets. Comparing two types of imaging plates, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ST-VIP-type imaging plate is 25% better than that of the BASIII-type imaging plate for protein data collection using 1.0 and 0.7 A X-rays. A new on-line protein data-collection system with imaging plates is specially designed to use synchrotron radiation X-rays at maximum efficiency.

  20. A Peer-Reviewed Research Assignment for Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, LaRhee; Buising, Charisse

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a writing exercise students work on in collaborative groups. Aims to enhance students' scientific research paper writing skills and provide experience working in collaborative groups. Presents evaluation criteria for peer-group evaluation of a poster presentation, intra-group evaluation of peer performance, and peer-group evaluation of…

  1. Vibrational assignments of 2-iodopyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortur, Veenasangeeta; Yenagi, Jayashree; Tonannavar, J.

    2008-02-01

    A review of the vibrational assignments for 2-iodopyridine has been proposed based on the FT-Raman (3500-50 cm -1) and IR (4000-400 cm -1) spectral measurements. Equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies have been computed from a variety of electronic structure methods: the ab initio (RHF), six DFT (BLYP, BP86, B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 and SVWN) and MP2 methods using 3-21G*, LANL2DZ and DGDZVP basis sets. A normal coordinate analysis has been carried out: the normal modes and their couplings are characterized in terms of potential energy distributions (PEDs). The comparison of assignments for pyridine and halopyridines shows that several of the normal modes arise from coupled vibrations in 2-iodopyridine. The BP86 and B3LYP methods with LANL2DZ basis set have performed reasonably well in reproducing the observed spectra, demonstrating that the LANL2DZ basis set (with effective core potential representations of electrons near the nuclei for post-third row atoms) is suitable for 2-iodopyridine.

  2. Structural analysis and identification of gel-purified proteins, available in the femtomole range, using a novel computer program for peptide sequence assignment, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-reflectron time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, K; Verschelde, J L; Puype, M; Van Damme, J; Goethals, M; De Boeck, S; Vandekerckhove, J

    1996-05-01

    A procedure is described for structural characterization and identification of proteins, purified by either one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in the low picomole to femtomole range. The purified proteins are first detected in the primary gels by the sensitive reverse staining procedure described by Fernandez-Patron et al. (Anal. Biochem. 1995, 224, 203-211) and consecutively reeluted from combined get pieces and concentrated in the tip of a Pasteur pipette in a secondary gel matrix consisting of either sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide or agarose. The concentrated proteins are in-matrix-digested and the resulting peptides are separated by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with microsequencing or analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--time of flight--mass spectrometry. Protein identification is based on sequence homology or on the peptide mass pattern. The matching peptide sequences can additionally be verified by matching their measured post-source decay spectra with the calculated fragmentation patterns of the isobaric candidate peptides appearing on the search list. This is done by a computer program referred to as MassFrag, described in this paper. We demonstrate that it is possible to identify protein that are only available in the femtomole range and whose sequences are stored in nonredundant protein databases or nucleotide and expressed sequence tag databases.

  3. Assignment Choice, Effort, and Assignment Completion: Does Work Ethic Predict Those Who Choose Higher-Effort Assignments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkhurst, John T.; Fleisher, Matthew S.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Woehr, David J.; Hawthorn-Embree, Meredith L.

    2011-01-01

    After completing the Multidimensional Work-Ethic Profile (MWEP), 98 college students were given a 20-problem math computation assignment and instructed to stop working on the assignment after completing 10 problems. Next, they were allowed to choose to finish either the partially completed assignment that had 10 problems remaining or a new…

  4. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in vivo by entry inhibitors derived from the large envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Joerg; Dandri, Maura; Mier, Walter; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Haberkorn, Uwe; Fischer, Lutz; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias; Erbes, Berit; Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    360 million people are chronically infected with the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and are consequently prone to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. As approved therapeutic regimens-which modulate patients' antiviral defenses or inhibit the viral reverse transcriptase-are generally noncurative, strategies interfering with other HBV replication steps are required. Expanding on our demonstration that acylated peptides derived from the large HBV envelope protein block virus entry in vitro, we show their applicability to prevent HBV or woolly monkey hepatitis B virus infection in vivo, using immunodeficient urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) mice repopulated with primary human or Tupaia belangeri hepatocytes. Accumulation of the peptides in the liver, their extraordinary inhibitory potency and specific mode of action permit subcutaneous delivery at very low doses. Inhibition of hepadnavirus entry thus constitutes a therapeutic approach to prevent primary HBV infection, such as after liver transplantation, and might also restrain virus spread in chronically infected patients. PMID:18297057

  5. Large-scale proteomic analysis of the grapevine leaf apoplastic fluid reveals mainly stress-related proteins and cell wall modifying enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The extracellular space or apoplast forms a path through the whole plant and acts as an interface with the environment. The apoplast is composed of plant cell wall and space within which apoplastic fluid provides a means of delivering molecules and facilitates intercellular communications. However, the apoplastic fluid extraction from in planta systems remains challenging and this is particularly true for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), a worldwide-cultivated fruit plant. Large-scale proteomic analysis reveals the protein content of the grapevine leaf apoplastic fluid and the free interactive proteome map considerably facilitates the study of the grapevine proteome. Results To obtain a snapshot of the grapevine apoplastic fluid proteome, a vacuum-infiltration-centrifugation method was optimized to collect the apoplastic fluid from non-challenged grapevine leaves. Soluble apoplastic protein patterns were then compared to whole leaf soluble protein profiles by 2D-PAGE analyses. Subsequent MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry of tryptically digested protein spots was used to identify proteins. This large-scale proteomic analysis established a well-defined proteomic map of whole leaf and leaf apoplastic soluble proteins, with 223 and 177 analyzed spots, respectively. All data arising from proteomic, MS and MS/MS analyses were deposited in the public database world-2DPAGE. Prediction tools revealed a high proportion of (i) classical secreted proteins but also of non-classical secreted proteins namely Leaderless Secreted Proteins (LSPs) in the apoplastic protein content and (ii) proteins potentially involved in stress reactions and/or in cell wall metabolism. Conclusions This approach provides free online interactive reference maps annotating a large number of soluble proteins of the whole leaf and the apoplastic fluid of grapevine leaf. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed proteome study of grapevine apoplastic fluid providing a comprehensive overview of

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus Capsid-Organelle Association in the Absence of the Large Tegument Protein UL36p

    PubMed Central

    Kharkwal, Himanshu; Furgiuele, Sara Shanda; Smith, Caitlin G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT UL36p (VP1/2) is the largest protein encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and resides in the innermost layer of the viral tegument, lying between the capsid and the envelope. UL36p performs multiple functions in the HSV life cycle, including an essential role in cytoplasmic envelopment. We earlier described the isolation of a virion-associated cytoplasmic membrane fraction from HSV-infected cells. Biochemical and ultrastructural analyses showed that the organelles in this buoyant fraction contain enveloped infectious HSV particles in their lumens and naked capsids docked to their cytoplasmic surfaces. These organelles can also recruit molecular motors and transport their cargo virions along microtubules in vitro. Here we examine the properties of these HSV-associated organelles in the absence of UL36p. We find that while capsid envelopment is clearly defective, a subpopulation of capsids nevertheless still associate with the cytoplasmic faces of these organelles. The existence of these capsid-membrane structures was confirmed by subcellular fractionation, immunocytochemistry, lipophilic dye fluorescence microscopy, thin-section electron microscopy, and correlative light and electron microscopy. We conclude that capsid-membrane binding can occur in the absence of UL36p and propose that this association may precede the events of UL36p-driven envelopment. IMPORTANCE Membrane association and envelopment of the HSV capsid are essential for the assembly of an infectious virion. Envelopment involves the complex interplay of a large number of viral and cellular proteins; however, the function of most of them is unknown. One example of this is the viral protein UL36p, which is clearly essential for envelopment but plays a poorly understood role. Here we demonstrate that organelles utilized for HSV capsid envelopment still accumulate surface-bound capsids in the absence of UL36p. We propose that UL36p-independent binding of capsids to organelles occurs prior to

  7. NUP-1 Is a Large Coiled-Coil Nucleoskeletal Protein in Trypanosomes with Lamin-Like Functions

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Kelly N.; Alsford, Sam; Holden, Jennifer M.; Buisson, Johanna; Swiderski, Michal; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Wan, Yakun; Bastin, Philippe; Barry, J. David; Navarro, Miguel; Horn, David; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    A unifying feature of eukaryotic nuclear organization is genome segregation into transcriptionally active euchromatin and transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin. In metazoa, lamin proteins preserve nuclear integrity and higher order heterochromatin organization at the nuclear periphery, but no non-metazoan lamin orthologues have been identified, despite the likely presence of nucleoskeletal elements in many lineages. This suggests a metazoan-specific origin for lamins, and therefore that distinct protein elements must compose the nucleoskeleton in other lineages. The trypanosomatids are highly divergent organisms and possess well-documented but remarkably distinct mechanisms for control of gene expression, including polycistronic transcription and trans-splicing. NUP-1 is a large protein localizing to the nuclear periphery of Trypanosoma brucei and a candidate nucleoskeletal component. We sought to determine if NUP-1 mediates heterochromatin organization and gene regulation at the nuclear periphery by examining the influence of NUP-1 knockdown on morphology, chromatin positioning, and transcription. We demonstrate that NUP-1 is essential and part of a stable network at the inner face of the trypanosome nuclear envelope, since knockdown cells have abnormally shaped nuclei with compromised structural integrity. NUP-1 knockdown also disrupts organization of nuclear pore complexes and chromosomes. Most significantly, we find that NUP-1 is required to maintain the silenced state of developmentally regulated genes at the nuclear periphery; NUP-1 knockdown results in highly specific mis-regulation of telomere-proximal silenced variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites and procyclin loci, indicating a disruption to normal chromatin organization essential to life-cycle progression. Further, NUP-1 depletion leads to increased VSG switching and therefore appears to have a role in control of antigenic variation. Thus, analogous to vertebrate lamins, NUP-1 is a

  8. Protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin selectively inhibits the growth of CD79 mutant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Tara L; Tang, Huaping; Ratsch, Boris A; Enns, Andreas; Loo, Alice; Chen, Liqing; Lenz, Peter; Waters, Nigel J; Schuler, Walter; Dörken, Bernd; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Lenz, Georg; Stegmeier, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The ABC subtype of DLBCL is associated with constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, and oncogenic lesions have been identified in its regulators, including CARD11/CARMA1 (caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11), A20/TNFAIP3, and CD79A/B. In this study, we offer evidence of therapeutic potential for the selective PKC (protein kinase C) inhibitor sotrastaurin (STN) in preclinical models of DLBCL. A significant fraction of ABC DLBCL cell lines exhibited strong sensitivity to STN, and we found that the molecular nature of NF-κB pathway lesions predicted responsiveness. CD79A/B mutations correlated with STN sensitivity, whereas CARD11 mutations rendered ABC DLBCL cell lines insensitive. Growth inhibitory effects of PKC inhibition correlated with NF-κB pathway inhibition and were mediated by induction of G₁-phase cell-cycle arrest and/or cell death. We found that STN produced significant antitumor effects in a mouse xenograft model of CD79A/B-mutated DLBCL. Collectively, our findings offer a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of STN in ABC DLBCL patients who harbor CD79 mutations also illustrating the necessity to stratify DLBCL patients according to their genetic abnormalities.

  9. Chromosomal assignment of the gene encoding the human 58-kDa inhibitor (PRKRI) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase to chromosome 13q32

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, M.J.; Katze, M.G.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.

    1996-01-15

    The 58-kDa inhibitor (p58) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a cellular protein recruited by the influenza virus to down-regulate the activity of PKR during virus infection. The inhibitor also appears to play a role in the regulation of cellular gene expression in the absence of viral infection and has oncogenic properties when overexpressed. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the p58 gene (PRKRI) to human chromosome 13 band q32. Aberrations in the structure or number of chromosome 13 have been identified in a variety of human cancers, particularly in acute leukemia. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Development, social norms, and assignment to task

    PubMed Central

    Fafchamps, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Economic development involves a structural transformation in the way people are allocated to tasks. There is a shift from self-provision to market exchange, facilitating specialization. There is also a shift from self-employment to wage employment in large firms and organizations, driven by innovation and increasing returns to scale. Changes in allocation mechanisms require changes in norms and attitudes. Because different labor assignment domains coexist, conflicts arise among norms that apply to different domains, possibly resulting in dysfunctional outcomes. I argue that religion, humanism, and schools have all played an important historical role in fostering the changes in social norms and attitudes that are needed to accompany structural changes in the way economies allocate workers to tasks. PMID:22198757

  11. Y(4260) and possible charmonium assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2005-08-01

    The newly reported Y(4260) becomes the second most massive state in the charmonium family. We argue that it displaces the {psi}(4415) as the (largely) 4s vector charmonium state, recall s-d wave interference to explain the lack of a signal in e{sup -}e{sup +}{yields}hadrons and suggest some further study avenues that can exclude exotic meson assignments. The absence of a J/{psi}KK mode can be understood, beyond phase space suppression, to be a consequence of chiral symmetry. We also provide a model calculation in this sector showing that, although forcing the fit somewhat (which suggests a small sea quark wave function component), the state can be incorporated in a standard scheme.

  12. Overcoming the overlap problem in the assignment of 1H NMR spectra of larger proteins by use of three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H-15N Hartmann-Hahn-multiple quantum coherence and nuclear Overhauser-multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy: application to interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Marion, D; Driscoll, P C; Kay, L E; Wingfield, P T; Bax, A; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1989-07-25

    The application of three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to the sequential assignment of the 1H NMR spectra of larger proteins is presented, using uniformly labeled (approximately 95%) [15N]interleukin 1 beta, a protein of 153 residues and molecular mass of 17.4 kDa, as an example. The two-dimensional (2D) 600-MHz spectra of interleukin 1 beta are too complex for complete analysis, owing to extensive cross-peak overlap and chemical shift degeneracy. We show that the combined use of 3D 1H-15N Hartmann-Hahn-multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC) and nuclear Overhauser-multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC) spectroscopy, designed to provide the necessary through-bond and through-space correlations for sequential assignment, provides a practical general-purpose method for resolving ambiguities which severely limit the analysis of conventional 2D NMR spectra. The absence of overlapping cross-peaks in these 3D spectra allows the unambiguous identification of C alpha H(i)-NH(i+1) and NH(i)-NH(i+1) through-space nuclear Overhauser connectivities necessary for connecting a particular C alpha H(i)-NH(i) through-bond correlation with its associated through-space sequential cross-peak The problem of amide NH chemical shift degeneracy in the 1H NMR spectrum is therefore effectively removed, and the assignment procedure simply involves inspecting a series of 2D 1H-1H slices edited by the chemical shift of the directly bonded 15N atom. Connections between residues can be identified almost without any knowledge of the spin system types involved, though this type of information is clearly required for the eventual placement of the connected residues within the primary sequence.

  13. The Mechanism Design Approach to Student Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathak, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism design approach to student assignment involves the theoretical, empirical, and experimental study of systems used to allocate students into schools around the world. Recent practical experience designing systems for student assignment has raised new theoretical questions for the theory of matching and assignment. This article reviews…

  14. Assigning Homework to Couples and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilio, Frank M.; Dickson, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Homework assignments, or "out-of-session assignments," have gained popularity among couple and family therapists due to their potential to solidify the work achieved during the course of therapy and to help clients take responsibility for their own change. Homework assignments also serve as a testing ground in therapy to determine what works and…

  15. 7 CFR 1437.104 - Assigned production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assigned production. 1437.104 Section 1437.104... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.104 Assigned production. (a) When determining losses under this section, assigned production will be used to offset the loss of production...

  16. 31 CFR 337.5 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assignments. 337.5 Section 337.5... ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.5 Assignments. (a) If the registered payee, or an assignee holding a certificated debenture under proper assignment from the registered payee, desires...

  17. 28 CFR 548.17 - Work assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work assignments. 548.17 Section 548.17... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.17 Work assignments. When the religious tenets of an inmate's faith are violated or jeopardized by a particular work assignment,...

  18. 28 CFR 548.17 - Work assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work assignments. 548.17 Section 548.17... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.17 Work assignments. When the religious tenets of an inmate's faith are violated or jeopardized by a particular work assignment,...

  19. 28 CFR 548.17 - Work assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work assignments. 548.17 Section 548.17... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.17 Work assignments. When the religious tenets of an inmate's faith are violated or jeopardized by a particular work assignment,...

  20. 28 CFR 548.17 - Work assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work assignments. 548.17 Section 548.17... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.17 Work assignments. When the religious tenets of an inmate's faith are violated or jeopardized by a particular work assignment,...

  1. 28 CFR 548.17 - Work assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work assignments. 548.17 Section 548.17... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.17 Work assignments. When the religious tenets of an inmate's faith are violated or jeopardized by a particular work assignment,...

  2. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  3. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  4. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  5. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  6. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  7. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  8. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  9. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  10. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  11. Lexical Stress Assignment in Italian Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paizi, Despina; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi; Burani, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Stress assignment to Italian polysyllabic words is unpredictable, because stress is neither marked nor predicted by rule. Stress assignment, especially to low frequency words, has been reported to be a function of stress dominance and stress neighbourhood. Two experiments investigate stress assignment in sixth-grade, skilled and dyslexic, readers.…

  12. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)'s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG. PMID:26899177

  13. Analysis of tandem mass spectra by FTMS for improved large-scale proteomics with superior protein quantification

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Phanstiel, Doug; Wenger, Craig D.; Lee, M. Violet; Coon, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Using a newly developed dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer (dcQLT-orbitrap), we demonstrate the utility of collecting high-resolution tandem mass spectral data for large-scale shotgun proteomics. Multiple nanoLC-MS/MS experiments on both an older generation quadrupole linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid (QLT-orbitrap) and the dcQLT-orbitrap, using both resonant-excitation CAD and beam-type CAD (HCD) were performed. Resulting from various technological advances (e.g., a stacked ring ion guide AP inlet, a dual cell QLT, etc.), the dcQLT-orbitrap exhibited increased duty cycle (~1.5–2×) and sensitivity for both CAD (ion trap detection) and HCD (orbitrap detection) methods. As compared to the older system, the dcQLT-orbitrap produced significantly more unique peptide identification for both methods (~30% improvement for CAD and ~115% improvement for HCD). The sizeable improvement of the HCD method on the dcQLT-orbitrap system, outperforms the current standard method of CAD with ion trap detection for large-scale analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased HCD performance translates to a direct and substantial improvement in protein quantitation precision using isobaric tags. PMID:19938823

  14. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG. PMID:26899177

  15. GASA: a graph-based automated NMR backbone resonance sequential assignment program.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Lin, Guohui

    2007-04-01

    The success in backbone resonance sequential assignment is fundamental to three dimensional protein structure determination via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Such a sequential assignment can roughly be partitioned into three separate steps: grouping resonance peaks in multiple spectra into spin systems, chaining the resultant spin systems into strings, and assigning these strings to non-overlapping consecutive amino acid residues in the target protein. Separately dealing with these three steps has been adopted in many existing assignment programs, and it works well on protein NMR data with close-to-ideal quality, while only moderately or even poorly on most real protein datasets, where noises as well as data degeneracies occur frequently. We propose in this work to partition the sequential assignment not by physical steps, but only virtual steps, and use their outputs to cross validate each other. The novelty lies in the places, where the ambiguities at the grouping step will be resolved in finding the highly confident strings at the chaining step, and the ambiguities at the chaining step will be resolved by examining the mappings of strings at the assignment step. In this way, all ambiguities at the sequential assignment will be resolved globally and optimally. The resultant assignment program is called Graph-based Approach for Sequential Assignment (GASA), which has been compared to several recent similar developments including PACES, RANDOM, MARS, and RIBRA. The performance comparisons with these works demonstrated that GASA is more promising for practical use.

  16. Identification of T cell receptor signaling pathway proteins in a feline large granular lymphoma cell line by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Manfred; Huber, Katharina; Rydzewski, Lena; Kirsten, Svenja; Spengler, Bernhard; Römpp, Andreas; Reinacher, Manfred

    2014-09-15

    Tryptic peptides of a feline large granular lymphoma cell line were analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Seventeen proteins of the T cell receptor signaling pathway could be identified by this approach. So far the existence of these proteins has only been postulated in the protein databases while experimental proof of their expression is predominantly pending. This article suggests where these proteins are located within the T cell receptor signaling pathway, thereby giving a short overview of the structure and function of this cascade. PMID:25017708

  17. Integrated assignment and path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  18. Effects of spontaneous heating on forage protein fractions and in situ disappearance kinetics of crude protein for alfalfa-orchardgrass hays packaged in large round bales.

    PubMed

    Coblentz, W K; Hoffman, P C; Martin, N P

    2010-03-01

    During 2006 and 2007, forages from 3 individual hay harvests were used to assess the effects of spontaneous heating on concentrations of crude protein (CP), neutral detergent insoluble CP (NDICP), acid detergent insoluble CP (ADICP), and in situ disappearance kinetics of CP and NDICP for large round bales of mixed alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.). Over the 3 harvests, 96 large round bales were made at preset bale diameters of 0.9, 1.2, or 1.5m and at moisture concentrations ranging from 9.3 to 46.6%. Internal bale temperatures were monitored daily during an outdoor storage period. The change in concentrations of NDICP (poststorage - prestorage) increased with heating degree days (HDD) >30 degrees C in a relationship best explained with a nonlinear model {Y=24.9 - [22.7 x (e(-0.000010 x x x x))]; R(2)=0.892} that became asymptotic at +24.9 percentage units of CP, thereby indicating that NDICP increases rapidly within bales that heat spontaneously. When maximum internal bale temperature (MAX) was used as the independent variable, the best regression model was quadratic and the coefficient of determination was still relatively high (R(2)=0.716). The change in concentrations of ADICP (poststorage - prestorage; DeltaADICP) also increased with HDD and was best fitted to a nonlinear model {Y=14.9 - [15.7 x (e(-0.0000019 x x x x))]} with a very high coefficient of determination (R(2)=0.934). A similar quartic response was observed for the regression of DeltaADICP on MAX (R(2)=0.975). Increases in DeltaADICP as a result of heating (HDD or MAX) were paralleled by concurrent increases in hemicellulose at relatively low increments of heating, but the inverse relationship was observed as hemicelluloses likely became reactive and concentrations decreased in more severely heated hays. Changes in ruminal disappearance rate of CP were best fitted to cubic models for regressions on both HDD (R(2)=0.939) and MAX (R(2)=0.876); these changes

  19. Library-Based Assignments That Enrich the Business Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemstra, Kathleen M.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the benefits of library work (and some cautions) before describing four assignments that exploit library resources: a business report assignment; a professional journal assignment; a style manual format assignment; and an international business communication assignment. (SG)

  20. Using Clouds for MapReduce Measurement Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Ariel; Reiss, Charles; Katz, Randy; Patterson, David

    2013-01-01

    We describe our experiences teaching MapReduce in a large undergraduate lecture course using public cloud services and the standard Hadoop API. Using the standard API, students directly experienced the quality of industrial big-data tools. Using the cloud, every student could carry out scalability benchmarking assignments on realistic hardware,…

  1. Perceiving patient assignment methods through a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, B K; Duquette, A; Kérouac, S

    1991-01-01

    For several decades, the nursing process has been the central issue for numerous nursing discussions. Definitions, meanings, sequences and steps as well as their significance have been presented within the context of given clinically oriented conceptual frameworks. On the other hand, the nursing process could be largely influenced by the organizational context in which it is exercised. This article shows how analyzing patient assignment methods through a conceptual framework permits a better understanding of the ways organizational factors impact upon nursing process quality. Nursing care is the central issue of nursing modalities which characterize the organization and provision of its delivery. In this analysis, these modalities are renamed patient assignment methods. They refer to the tasks, roles, policy and structure for allocating nursing personnel to patients for the provision of nursing care in a hospital unit (Kérouac, Duquette & Sandhu, 1990; Nunson, Beckman, Clinton, Kever & Simms, 1980). The synonyms for patient assignment method found in the literature are: nursing assignment patterns, nursing assignment systems, and organization mode of nursing care (McLennan, 1983). Whatever its name, a given modality does not occur by chance but, rather is a product of specific characteristics. Some of these characteristics pertain to the nursing process. These characteristics can be identified and better understood through a conceptual framework. Historically, patient assignment methods have been extensively described in the literature. The descriptions usually focus on their merits and limitations or their comparisons with one and another. To the best of our knowledge, they have not been analysed using a conceptual framework. This article demonstrates how patient assignment methods could be better understood through an analysis using a conceptual framework. This analysis aims to systematically examine the commonly used patient assignment methods: case, functional

  2. 48 CFR 211.274-5 - Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.274-5 Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers. It is DoD policy that contractors apply Government-assigned serial numbers, such as tail... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Policy for assignment...

  3. 48 CFR 211.274-5 - Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.274-5 Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers. It is DoD policy that contractors apply Government-assigned serial numbers, such as tail... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Policy for assignment...

  4. 48 CFR 211.274-5 - Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.274-5 Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers. It is DoD policy that contractors apply Government-assigned serial numbers, such as tail... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Policy for assignment...

  5. 48 CFR 211.274-5 - Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.274-5 Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers. It is DoD policy that contractors apply Government-assigned serial numbers, such as tail... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Policy for assignment...

  6. 48 CFR 211.274-5 - Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.274-5 Policy for assignment of Government-assigned serial numbers. It is DoD policy that contractors apply Government-assigned serial numbers, such as tail... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Policy for assignment...

  7. An Investigation of the Partial-Assignment Completion Effect on Students' Assignment Choice Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorn-Embree, Meredith L.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Parkhurst, John; Conley, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the partial assignment completion effect. Seventh-grade students were given a math assignment. After working for 5 min, they were interrupted and their partially completed assignments were collected. About 20 min later, students were given their partially completed assignment and a new, control assignment…

  8. Sequence analysis of the large polymerase (L) protein of the US strain of avian metapneumovirus indicates a close resemblance to that of the human metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Samal, Siba K

    2004-09-15

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the large polymerase (L) protein of the avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain Colorado was determined. The L protein gene of avian pneumovirus Colorado isolate (APV-C) was 6173 nucleotides in length from the gene-start to the gene-end and encoded a polypeptide of 2005 amino acids in length. The length of the L protein of APV-C was exactly the same as that of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and one amino acid longer than the L protein of APV subgroup A. The L protein of APV-C showed 80% amino acid identity with the L protein of hMPV, but only 64% amino acid identity with the L protein of APV-A. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were compared with the corresponding sequences of eleven other paramyxoviruses. All six domains characteristic of paramyxovirus L proteins were also observed in the L protein of APV-C. All the polymerase core motifs in domain III were conserved to nearly 100% in the metapneumoviruses. Similarly, the putative ATP-binding motif in domain VI was completely conserved among the metapneumoviruses and differed in length, by one intermediate residue, from other paramyxoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the different L proteins also revealed a closer relationship between APV-C and hMPV.

  9. Evolution of the 14-3-3 protein family: does the large number of isoforms in multicellular organisms reflect functional specificity?

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, M; Sehnke, P; Ferl, R J; Sommarin, M; Larsson, C

    2000-11-01

    14-3-3 proteins constitute a family of eukaryotic proteins that are key regulators of a large number of processes ranging from mitosis to apoptosis. 14-3-3s function as dimers and bind to particular motifs in their target proteins. To date, 14-3-3s have been implicated in regulation or stabilization of more than 35 different proteins. This number is probably only a fraction of the number of proteins that 14-3-3s bind to, as reports of new target proteins have become more frequent. An examination of 14-3-3 entries in the public databases reveals 153 isoforms, including alleloforms, reported in 48 different species. The number of isoforms range from 2, in the unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to 12 in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that there are four major evolutionary lineages: Viridiplantae (plants), Fungi, Alveolata, and Metazoa (animals). A close examination of the aligned amino acid sequences identifies conserved amino acid residues and regions of importance for monomer stabilization, dimer formation, target protein binding, and the nuclear export function. Given the fact that 53% of the protein is conserved, including all amino acid residues in the target binding groove of the 14-3-3 monomer, one might expect little to no isoform specificity for target protein binding. However, using surface plasmon resonance we show that there are large differences in affinity between nine 14-3-3 isoforms of A. thaliana and a target peptide representing a novel binding motif present in the C terminus of the plant plasma membrane H(+)ATPase. Thus, our data suggest that one reason for the large number of isoforms found in multicellular organisms is isoform-specific functions. PMID:11080367

  10. Query Networks for Medical Information Retrieval-Assigning Probabilistic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Steve B.; Silverstein, Jonathan C.; Frisse, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Query networks are specializations of Belief networks used in information retrieval. We hypothesize that query networks can be incorporated into medical information systems in at least two ways: First, the relative values of nodes in the query networks can be used to initiate searches based on query term-weights. Second, query models can incorporate reader feedback and can become simple task-specific user models. If large query networks are to be useful, one must find means to assign reasonable “default” values to those nodes and edges which are not explicitly defined by some other means. This paper presents preliminary data assessing the suitability of various default heuristic query network edge assignment functions. Early evidence suggests that query networks using default assignment functions exhibit behavior consistent with that expected from an information retrieval aid.

  11. Static assignment of complex stochastic tasks using stochastic majorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David; Simha, Rahul; Towsley, Don

    1992-01-01

    We consider the problem of statically assigning many tasks to a (smaller) system of homogeneous processors, where a task's structure is modeled as a branching process, and all tasks are assumed to have identical behavior. We show how the theory of majorization can be used to obtain a partial order among possible task assignments. Our results show that if the vector of numbers of tasks assigned to each processor under one mapping is majorized by that of another mapping, then the former mapping is better than the latter with respect to a large number of objective functions. In particular, we show how measurements of finishing time, resource utilization, and reliability are all captured by the theory. We also show how the theory may be applied to the problem of partitioning a pool of processors for distribution among parallelizable tasks.

  12. Accurate and Rigorous Prediction of the Changes in Protein Free Energies in a Large-Scale Mutation Scan.

    PubMed

    Gapsys, Vytautas; Michielssens, Servaas; Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L

    2016-06-20

    The prediction of mutation-induced free-energy changes in protein thermostability or protein-protein binding is of particular interest in the fields of protein design, biotechnology, and bioengineering. Herein, we achieve remarkable accuracy in a scan of 762 mutations estimating changes in protein thermostability based on the first principles of statistical mechanics. The remaining error in the free-energy estimates appears to be due to three sources in approximately equal parts, namely sampling, force-field inaccuracies, and experimental uncertainty. We propose a consensus force-field approach, which, together with an increased sampling time, leads to a free-energy prediction accuracy that matches those reached in experiments. This versatile approach enables accurate free-energy estimates for diverse proteins, including the prediction of changes in the melting temperature of the membrane protein neurotensin receptor 1. PMID:27122231

  13. Wildlife forensic science: A review of genetic geographic origin assignment.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Rob; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-09-01

    Wildlife forensic science has become a key means of enforcing legislation surrounding the illegal trade in protected and endangered species. A relatively new dimension to this area of forensic science is to determine the geographic origin of a seized sample. This review focuses on DNA testing, which relies on assignment of an unknown sample to its genetic population of origin. Key examples of this are the trade in timber, fish and ivory and these are used only to illustrate the large number of species for which this type of testing is potentially available. The role of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers is discussed, alongside a comparison of neutral markers with those exhibiting signatures of selection, which potentially offer much higher levels of assignment power to address specific questions. A review of assignment tests is presented along with detailed methods for evaluating error rates and considerations for marker selection. The availability and quality of reference data are of paramount importance to support assignment applications and ensure reliability of any conclusions drawn. The genetic methods discussed have been developed initially as investigative tools but comment is made regarding their use in courts. The potential to compliment DNA markers with elemental assays for greater assignment power is considered and finally recommendations are made for the future of this type of testing.

  14. Characterization of Thylakoid-Derived Lipid-Protein Particles Bearing the Large Subunit of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. D.; Ghosh, S.; Dumbroff, E. B.; Thompson, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Lipid-protein particles bearing the 55-kD ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (EC 4.1.1.39) large subunit (RLSU) and no detectable corresponding Rubisco small subunit (RSSU) were isolated from the stroma of intact chloroplasts by flotation centrifugation. Stromal RLSU-bearing particles appear to originate from thylakoids because they can also be generated in vitro by illumination of isolated thylakoids. Their formation in vitro is largely heat denaturable and is facilitated by light or ATP. RLSU-containing lipid-protein particles range from 0.05 to 0.10 [mu]m in radius, contain the same fatty acids as thylakoids, but have a 10- to 15-fold higher free-to-esterified fatty acid ratio than thylakoids. RLSU-bearing lipid-protein particles with no detectable RSSU were also immunopurified from the populations of both stromal lipid-protein particles and those generated in vitro from illuminated thylakoids. Protease shaving indicated that the RLSU is embedded in the lipid-protein particles and that there is also a protease-protected RLSU in thylakoids. These observations collectively indicate that the RLSU associated with thylakoids is released into the stroma by light-facilitated blebbing of lipid-protein particles. The release of RLSU-containing particles may in turn be coordinated with the assembly of Rubisco holoenzyme because chaperonin 60 is also associated with lipid-protein particles isolated from stroma. PMID:12223858

  15. Engineering ESPT pathways based on structural analysis of LSSmKate red fluorescent proteins with large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Almo, Steven C; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-08-11

    LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2 are monomeric red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with large Stokes shifts (LSSs), which allows for efficient separation of absorbance and emission maxima, as well as for excitation with conventional two-photon laser sources. These LSSmKates differ by a single amino acid substitution at position 160 and exhibit absorbance maxima around 460 nm, corresponding to a neutral DsRed-like chromophore. However, excitation at 460 nm leads to fluorescence emission above 600 nm. Structures of LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2, determined at resolutions of 2.0 and 1.5 A, respectively, revealed that the predominant DsRed-chromophore configurations are cis for LSSmKate1 but trans for LSSmKate2. Crystallographic and mutagenesis analyses, as well as isotope and temperature dependences, suggest that an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) is responsible for the LSSs observed in LSSmKates. Hydrogen bonding between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu160 in LSSmKate1 and a proton relay involving the chromophore tyrosine hydroxyl, Ser158, and the Asp160 carboxylate in LSSmKate2 represent the putative ESPT pathways. Comparisons with mKeima LSS RFP suggest that similar proton relays could be engineered in other FPs. Accordingly, we mutated positions 158 and 160 in several conventional red-shifted FPs, including mNeptune, mCherry, mStrawberry, mOrange, and mKO, and the resulting FP variants exhibited LSS fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths from 560 to 640 nm. These data suggest that different chromophores formed by distinct tripeptides in different environments can be rationally modified to yield RFPs with novel photochemical properties.

  16. Engineering ESPT pathways based on structural analysis of LSSmKate red fluorescent proteins with large Stokes shift

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Almo, Steven C.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2 are monomeric red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with large Stokes shifts (LSSs) which allows for efficient separation of absorbance and emission maxima, as well as for excitation with conventional two-photon laser sources. These LSSmKates differ by a single amino acid substitution at position 160 and exhibit absorbance maxima around 460 nm, corresponding to a neutral DsRed-like chromophore. However, excitation at 460 nm leads to fluorescence emission above 600 nm. Structures of LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2, determined at resolutions of 2.0 Å and 1.5 Å, respectively, revealed that the predominant DsRed-chromophore configurations are cis for LSSmKate1 but trans for LSSmKate2. Crystallographic and mutagenesis analyses, as well as isotope and temperature dependences suggest that an excited state proton transfer (ESPT) is responsible for the LSSs observed in LSSmKates. Hydrogen bonding between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu160 in LSSmKate1 and a proton relay involving the chromophore tyrosine hydroxyl, Ser158 and the Asp160 carboxylate in LSSmKate2 represent the putative ESPT pathways. Comparisons with mKeima LSS RFP suggest that similar proton relays could be engineered in other FPs. Accordingly, we mutated positions 158 and 160 in several conventional red-shifted FPs, including mNeptune, mCherry, mStrawberry, mOrange and mKO, and the resulting FP variants exhibited LSS fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths from 560 to 640 nm. These data suggest that different chromophores formed by distinct tripeptides in different environments can be rationally modified to yield RFPs with novel photochemical properties. PMID:20681709

  17. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-06

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics.

  18. 47 CFR 74.702 - Channel assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.702 Channel assignments. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV or TV translator... standard VHF Channels (2 to 13 inclusive) may be assigned to a VHF low power TV or TV translator...

  19. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  20. Scaling Preference Data for Program Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carifio, James

    The present study devised a computerized assignment-by-preference algorithm for a ninth-grade exploratory curriculum. The problem addressed was one of maximally mapping all students into 8 of 12 vocational programs in terms of their preferences for studying each of the programs and the assignment restrictions established by the school. To minimize…

  1. 25 CFR 214.18 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Assignments. 214.18 Section 214.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.18 Assignments. Approved leases or any interest therein...

  2. 25 CFR 214.18 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assignments. 214.18 Section 214.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.18 Assignments. Approved leases or any interest therein...

  3. 25 CFR 214.18 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assignments. 214.18 Section 214.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.18 Assignments. Approved leases or any interest therein...

  4. 25 CFR 214.18 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assignments. 214.18 Section 214.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.18 Assignments. Approved leases or any interest therein...

  5. Using Cognitive Science to Assign Test Weights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhaskar, R.; Dillard, Jesse F.

    1983-01-01

    Description of an objective method for assigning weights to questions on examinations includes discussions of classical test theory, knowledge organization, and how task analysis can be used to identify knowledge elements required to solve specific problems, rank them, and assign objective weights to exam questions using a Pareto distribution (7…

  6. 32 CFR 241.3 - Assignment authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS PILOT PROGRAM FOR TEMPORARY EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PERSONNEL § 241.3 Assignment authority. The Secretary of Defense may with the agreement, of the private sector organization concerned, arrange for the temporary assignment of a DoD employee to a private sector organization or accept...

  7. Detecting Plagiarism in MS Access Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Assurance of individual effort from students in computer-based assignments is a challenge. Due to digitization, students can easily use a copy of their friend's work and submit it as their own. Plagiarism in assignments puts students who cheat at par with those who work honestly and this compromises the learning evaluation process. Using a…

  8. 7 CFR 623.19 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assignments. 623.19 Section 623.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 623.19 Assignments. Any participant...

  9. 7 CFR 1467.17 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Assignments. 1467.17 Section 1467.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 1467.17 Assignments. Any...

  10. Effects of Individualized Assignments on Biology Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer, Philip L.

    1983-01-01

    Compared detailed (favoring field dependence and induction) and nondetailed (favoring field dependence and deduction) assignments on biology achievement of grade 10 male students (N=95) over a seven-month period. Detailed assignments, employing pictorial and verbal block diagrams and high structure, significantly enhanced learning among some…

  11. 7 CFR 623.19 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assignments. 623.19 Section 623.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 623.19 Assignments. Any participant...

  12. 7 CFR 625.17 - Assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assignments. 625.17 Section 625.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES HEALTHY FORESTS RESERVE PROGRAM § 625.17 Assignments. Any person entitled to...

  13. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz—(channel...

  14. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz—(channel...

  15. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz—(channel...

  16. 47 CFR 74.1202 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.1202 Section 74.1202... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1202 Frequency assignment. (a) An applicant for a new FM broadcast... stations. The application must be specific with regard to the frequency requested. Only one output...

  17. 47 CFR 78.18 - Frequency assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... channel. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 78.18, see the List of CFR Sections... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignments. 78.18 Section 78.18... SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.18 Frequency assignments. (a) The Cable Television Relay Service...

  18. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  19. 47 CFR 74.502 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.502 Section 74.502... § 74.502 Frequency assignment. (a) Except as provided in NG30, broadcast auxiliary stations licensed as... Frequency Allocations. These stations will be protected from possible interference caused by new users...

  20. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07 MHz, 26.11 MHz, and 26.45 MHz, and frequencies listed in paragraphs (a)(4) and (c)(1) of this...