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Sample records for assistive technologies aat

  1. Ambient Assistive Technologies (AAT): socio-technology as a powerful tool for facing the inevitable sociodemographic challenges?

    PubMed

    Schülke, Astrid M; Plischke, Herbert; Kohls, Niko B

    2010-06-07

    Due to the socio-demographic change in most developed western countries, elderly populations have been continuously increasing. Therefore, preventive and assistive systems that allow elderly people to independently live in their own homes as long as possible will become an economical if not ethical necessity. These respective technologies are being developed under the term "Ambient Assistive Technologies" (AAT). The EU-funded AAT-project Ambient Lighting Assistance for an Ageing Population (ALADIN) has established the long-term goal to create an adaptive system capable of improving the residential lighting conditions of single living elderly persons also aiming at supporting the preservation of their independence.Results of an earlier survey revealed that the elderly perceived their current lighting situation as satisfactory, whereas interviewers assessed in-house lighting as too dark and risk-laden. The overall results of ALADIN showed a significant increase in well-being from the baseline final testing with the new adaptive lighting system.Positive results for wellbeing and life quality suggest that the outcome effects may be attributed to the introduction of technology as well as to social contacts arising from participating in the study. The technological guidance of the study supervisors, in particular, may have produced a strong social reactivity effect that was first observed in the famous Hawthorne experiments in the 1930s. As older adults seem to benefit both from meaningful social contacts as well as assistive technologies, the question arises how assistive technology can be socially embedded to be able to maximize positive health effects. Therefore ethical guidelines for development and use of new assistive technologies for handicapped/older persons have to be developed and should be discussed with regard to their applicability in the context of AAT.

  2. Questionnaire on animal-assisted therapy (AAT): The expectation for AAT as a day-care program for Japanese schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Waga, Chikako; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2007-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) was developed to promote human social and emotional functioning as a day-care program for psychiatric patients. In this study, we determined which animals 481 schizophrenic patients liked and what they thought about AAT, using an original questionnaire. It was found that more than 80% of the present patients liked animals and that they thought contact with animals was useful as a novel therapy. They had much interest in, and many hopes, for AAT.

  3. A day care program and evaluation of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) for the elderly with senile dementia.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, M; Suzuki, M; Yamamoto, K; Kanda, M; Matsui, Y; Kojima, E; Fukawa, H; Sugita, T; Oshiro, H

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a survey to clarify the evaluation methods of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) for the elderly with senile dementia in an adult day care center. AAT was implemented for a total of six biweekly sessions. The AAT group consisted of seven subjects and the control group numbered 20 subjects. In a comparison between Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores at baseline and those measured three months later, the average MMSE score before AAT (baseline) was 11.43 (+/- 9.00), and three months later it was 12.29(+/- 9.69). In the AAT group, the average score on Nishimura's Activities of Daily Living (N-ADL) at baseline was 28.43(+/- 14.00), and after ATT it was 29.57(+/- 14.47). In the AAT group, the average baseline score on behavioral pathology of Alzheimer's disease (Behave-AD) was 11.14(+/- 4.85), and three months after AAT it was 7.29(+/- 7.11) (p < 0.05). In the control group, the average baseline score was 5.45(+/- 3.27) and three months later it was 5.63(+/- 3.59). The evaluation of salivary CgA, as a mental stress index, showed a decreasing tendency in the AAT group. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of using several methods for evaluation of the changes in patients given AAT.

  4. Evaluation of cerebral activity in the prefrontal cortex in mood [affective] disorders during animal-assisted therapy (AAT) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Jun; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Ishigooka, Jun; Fukamauchi, Fumihiko; Numajiri, Maki; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2012-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the possibility that animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is useful for promoting the recovery of a patient's psychological, social, and physiological aspect. As a pilot study, we measured the effect that AAT had on cerebral activity using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and examined whether or not NIRS be used to evaluate the effect of AAT biologically and objectively. Two patients with mood [affective] disorders and a healthy subject participated in this study. We performed two AAT and the verbal fluency task (VFT). The NIRS signal during AAT showed great [oxy-Hb] increases in most of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the two patients. When the NIRS pattern during AAT was compared with that during VFT, greater or lesser differences were observed between them in all subjects. The present study suggested that AAT possibly causes biological and physiological changes in the PFC, and that AAT is useful for inducing the activity of the PFC in patients with depression who have generally been said to exhibit low cerebral activity in the PFC. In addition, the possibility was also suggested that the effect of AAT can be evaluated using NIRS physiologically and objectively.

  5. Assistive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader new achievements within the Assistive Technology field made by worldwide experts, covering aspects such as assistive technology focused on teaching and education, mobility, communication and social interactivity, among others. Each chapter included in this book covers one particular aspect of Assistive Technology that…

  6. Assistive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader new achievements within the Assistive Technology field made by worldwide experts, covering aspects such as assistive technology focused on teaching and education, mobility, communication and social interactivity, among others. Each chapter included in this book covers one particular aspect of Assistive Technology that…

  7. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice-weekly 1-h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  8. Assistive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... at3center.net/home . Some Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) have programs or link to services that assist ... obtain low-cost assistive technology. To locate your AAA, call the Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677- ...

  9. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R.; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L.; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J.; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human–animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6–month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre–program with post–program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre–session with post–session salivary cortisol and alpha–amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty–two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6–month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT–treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice–weekly 1–h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT–treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT–treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology

  10. Hearing Assistive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Hearing Assistive Technology Hearing Assistive Technology: FM Systems | Infrared Systems | Induction Loop Systems | One-to-One ...

  11. Assistive technology--behaviourally assisted.

    PubMed

    Benton, S; Manning, B

    2006-01-01

    In considering the recurrent problems involved in technology led initiatives within the public sector, this paper seeks to identify change management requirements needed to help avoid these latent pitfalls in the widespread introduction of Assistive Technology. It develops a change process approach based on current clinical psychology techniques used in assessing sources and level of resistance to behavioural change and applies them to managing effective benefits realisation.

  12. AAT as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Lisowska-Myjak, Barbara

    2005-02-01

    Serum alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) concentration can be affected by both inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions. This paper characterizes the nature of AAT in physiology and pathologic deficiency and increasing states. The relationships between the AAT concentration in different clinical materials (serum, urine, faeces) and various diseases connected with different organs were analyzed.

  13. Structure and characterization of AAT-1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eiko; Ishizaki, Ray; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-05-01

    A novel protein, AAT-1, was identified as a AMY-1-binding protein and three splicing variants of AAT-1, AAT-1alpha, -beta and -gamma were identified. The function of AAT-1 is thought to be related to spermatogenesis. In this study, we further identified other splicing isoforms of AAT-1, AAT-1L, AAT-1M and AAT-1S, consisting of 767, 603 and 252 amino acids, respectively. These isoforms were found to use a promoter different from that used by AAT-1alpha, -beta and -gamma in the aat-1 gene, which contains 20 exons. Only 60 amino acids in the C-terminal portion of AAT-1 derived from exons 15-17 are common among AAT-1L, AAT-1M, AAT-1S and AAT-1alpha. While AAT-1alpha is specifically expressed in the testis, AAT-1L, AAT-1M, AAT-1S were found to be differentially expressed in human tissues. All of the isoforms of AAT-1 were found to bind to and colocalized with AMY-1 in human cells. While AAT-1L and AAT-1M were found to be localized diffusely in the cytoplasm, AAT-1S, like AAT-1alpha, was found to be localized in the mitochondria-like structure, suggesting different roles of AAT-1 isoforms in cells.

  14. Overcoming Barriers in the Use of Adaptive and Assistive Technology in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushrow, Kathy M.; Turner, Keith D.

    This paper examines change and change facilitators as they affect full use of adaptive and assistive technology (AAT) in special education, and compares qualitative versus quantitative methods of researching the change process. Four administrators and two teachers from a rural school district completed the Stages of Concern Questionnaire, which…

  15. Assistive Technologies for Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselbring, Ted S.; Bausch, Margaret E.

    2006-01-01

    Although approximately half of the six million students receiving specialized services for an identified disability are learning disabled, research shows that assistive technologies are far more commonly used with students who manifest physical or sensory disabilities than they are with those with learning disabilities. Assistive technology can…

  16. Assistive Technologies for Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffin, Tiece M.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-first century teachers working with diverse readers are often faced with the question of how to integrate technology in reading instruction that meets the needs of the techno-generation. Are today's teachers equipped with the knowledge of how to effectively use Assistive Technologies (AT) for reading? This position paper discusses AT for…

  17. Assistive Technologies, Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wobschall, Rachel, Ed.; Lakin, Charlie, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This feature issue of a newsletter on community integration of individuals with developmental disabilities considers the role of assistive technologies. It describes efforts to utilize consumer direction, public policy, creativity, energy, and professional know-how in the pursuit of technology-based opportunities to enhance community inclusion,…

  18. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology PATIENTS Patient Information What Is SART? Risks of IVF Third Party Reproduction A ... Read Article View All News ©1996 - 2016 SART, Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology . All Rights Reserved. ASRM/ ...

  19. Assistive Technology: Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marcia J.

    This paper discusses current issues regarding assistive technology devices and services, especially in relation to the roles and responsibilities of the rehabilitation psychologist. Following an introductory section which defines an assistive technology device and an assistive technology service, the following sections discuss: (1) past…

  20. Assistive Technology and Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpan, Joseph P.; Beard, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Educators and caregivers now have the opportunity to individualize and differentiate instructions with many technological devices never before available. Assistive Technology is being introduced in the classroom at all levels as a tool for teachers to help deliver instruction to all students. Assistive Technology is widely used to ensure…

  1. Assistive Technologies Meet Students' Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grisham, Kenneth L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of institutions of higher education in the provision of assistive technology to meet students' needs. New forms of assistive technology, especially digital applications, are raising new issues of accessibility. Professionals at institutions of higher education must be well informed about technology changes to enable students and…

  2. Assistive Technology Devices and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Explains and supports the policy statement on assistive technology devices and services approved by the Council for Exceptional Children's Division on Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities. The need for the identification of appropriate assistive technology devices and services subsequent to examination of factors across multiple…

  3. Ethnicity and assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alicia; Plowden, Torie C

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Racial and ethnic disparities have been reported in every field of medicine. High costs associated with infertility treatment and restricted access to care has made assisted reproductive technologies particularly susceptible and vulnerable to disparity. Despite advances in the field, emerging literature has continued to demonstrate poorer outcomes in minority women receiving treatment with assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:23505610

  4. The Shift in Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasak, Erin; Ranaldo, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that executive functioning deficits are a common area of concern for students and young adults with a variety of different intellectual disabilities. Assistive technology can be invaluable in aiding students and young adults in compensating for these deficits. The Assistive Technology Act of 1998, and the IDEA…

  5. Assistive technology for disabled clients.

    PubMed

    Bergen, A F

    1998-01-01

    Numerous resources exist for consumers who wish to explore the benefits of assistive technology. Consumers can tap into the knowledge base of rehabilitation technology suppliers, therapists, and physicians, and follow a step-by-step process to use new technologies to improve their daily lives.

  6. Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affairs NGO Status with the WHO Contact Us Social Media Donate News & Publications Publications Overview News and Research Fertility and Sterility Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics Coding Ethics Committee Opinions and Webinars Practice Committee Documents Newsletters ...

  7. Rehabilitative and Assistive Technology: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... links Share this: Page Content Rehabilitative and assistive technology refers to tools, equipment, or products that can help a person with a disability to function successfully at school, home, work, and in the community. Disabilities are ...

  8. Assistive Technology Comes into Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Describes how, with a push from federal legislation in the form of the Section 508 amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, colleges and universities are providing assistive technology to make electronic and information technology (such as the World Wide Web) accessible to students with disabilities. (EV)

  9. Assistive Technology Comes into Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Describes how, with a push from federal legislation in the form of the Section 508 amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, colleges and universities are providing assistive technology to make electronic and information technology (such as the World Wide Web) accessible to students with disabilities. (EV)

  10. 34 CFR 300.105 - Assistive technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assistive technology. 300.105 Section 300.105 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.105 Assistive technology. (a) Each public agency must ensure that assistive technology devices or assistive technology services, or both, as those terms...

  11. 34 CFR 300.105 - Assistive technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assistive technology. 300.105 Section 300.105 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.105 Assistive technology. (a) Each public agency must ensure that assistive technology devices or assistive technology services, or both, as those terms...

  12. 34 CFR 300.105 - Assistive technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Assistive technology. 300.105 Section 300.105 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.105 Assistive technology. (a) Each public agency must ensure that assistive technology devices or assistive technology services, or both, as those terms...

  13. 34 CFR 300.105 - Assistive technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Assistive technology. 300.105 Section 300.105 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.105 Assistive technology. (a) Each public agency must ensure that assistive technology devices or assistive technology services, or both, as those terms...

  14. 34 CFR 300.105 - Assistive technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assistive technology. 300.105 Section 300.105 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.105 Assistive technology. (a) Each public agency must ensure that assistive technology devices or assistive technology services, or both, as those terms...

  15. Assistive Technology & Inclusion. Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sax, Caren; And Others

    This paper uses a case study of the inclusion of a deaf-blind child with cognitive disabilities to explain principles of applying assistive technology in inclusive educational settings. The 12-year-old's progress from a special school four years previously to full inclusion is recounted with emphasis on use of such adaptive equipment as adapted…

  16. [Assisted reproductive technologies and ethics].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Since the first birth after in vitro fertilization more than 5 million of IVF babies are born in the world. Assisted reproductive technologies captivate the public, they allow maternity without ovary (oocyte donation), without uterus (surrogate mother), paternity without spermatozoids (sperm donation), parentality without limits of age, parentality after death and homoparentality. These technologies arise a lot of ethics questions, the problem is that the answers are not the same all-round the world, laws are based on morals, beliefs, faiths, and convictions. Theses variations arise themselves questions on the value of these non-universal answers.

  17. Federal Policy Barriers to Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This report identifies barriers in federal assistive technology (AT) policy to increasing the availability of and access to assistive technology devices and assistive technology services for people with disabilities. The report is the result of a review of the professional literature, a review of federal policies and two stakeholder surveys, one…

  18. Using Assistive Technology for Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wepner, Shelley B.; Bowes, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Assistive Technology--as defined by the ?"Tech Act?" (Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act, Public Law 100-407)?is any item, piece of equipment, or product system that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities. While the term assistive technology is new, the…

  19. Issues and Applications in Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Anthony J.; And Others

    This collection of four reports focuses on the provision of assistive technology for individuals with disabilities. The first report, "Making More Effective Use of Assistive Technology in the Vocational Evaluation Process" (Anthony J. Langton), discusses how integrating assistive technology into the vocational evaluation process will…

  20. [Assisted reproductive technologies in urology].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Segal, A S; Pushkar', D Iu; Zdanovskiĭ, V M; Tagobetskiĭ, A S; Iudovskiĭ, S O; Epifanova, E A

    2001-01-01

    Since 1996 the authors have examined and treated 42 infertile married couples (the husbands had azoospermia). To obtain spermatozoa directly from the testes or epididymis and subsequent ICSI, 42 patients underwent 53 interventions: TESE (n = 38), PESA (n = 10), MESA (n = 5). Spermatozoa were obtained from 32(76.1%) of 42 patients, fertilization occurred in 21(50%) cases, 10(23.8%) wives got pregnant. Assisted reproductive technologies expand potentialities of correcting severe forms of male infertility including azoospermia. The armory of the operative procedures in male infertility was replenished with MESA, TESE, PESA.

  1. Guidelines: Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Bismarck. Div. of Special Education.

    These guidelines were developed to address training and planning needs for North Dakota educators in the area of assistive technology for students with disabilities. The guidelines provide recommended practices to assist teams in making decisions about an individual student's need for assistive technology using a decision-making process that meets…

  2. Assistive Technology: Enhancement for Daily Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue of a newsletter that focuses on transition of youths who are deaf-blind discusses the topic of assistive technology. An introduction introduces the issue and notes the vast array of homemade low technology and commercially available high technology assistive aids and devices that enable adults with sensory disabilities to live,…

  3. Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the application of assistive and universally designed technologies in real world environments, ... Interdisciplinary teams from the Schools of Industrial Design and Computer Science win first ...

  4. Reports on Assistive Technology Financial Loan Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Marka G.

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study designed to identify the reasons that individuals with disabilities use the assistive technology loan programs offered by state assistive technology projects. The study aimed to identify the types of devices that were purchased through the loan programs and the effects of these devices on the lives of…

  5. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews relevant theory and the practical implications of measuring assistive technology outcomes of students with disabilities. Rasch Measurement Scaling, Time Series Concurrent and Differential Approach, and the Multi-Attribute Utility Model are proposed for potential use in assistive technology outcome measurement and future…

  6. Genetics and assisted reproduction technology.

    PubMed

    Aittomäki, Kristiina; Bergh, Christina; Hazekamp, Johan; Nygren, Karl-Gösta; Selbing, Anders; Söderström-Anttila, Viveca; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt

    2005-05-01

    In the past 20 years, a significant improvement has been shown in the treatment for infertility in both women and men through the development of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Only donated sperm could be previously used for treatment; now oocytes can also be donated. Furthermore, the combination of IVF and ICSI with advanced genetic methods has made preimplantation genetic diagnosis possible for many genetic conditions. These methods enable genetic testing of the early human embryo by using only a single cell, one blastomere biopsied from the embryo, as the sample from which the diagnosis of many chromosome rearrangements and other inherited diseases can be made. It has also been established that a considerable proportion of infertility is caused by genetic defects, which have several implications for infertility treatment. The purpose of this review is to give a concise introduction on how genetics is involved in assisted reproduction technology to specialists who may not be working in this particular field of gynecology, but who would need some knowledge of this for proper care of their patients.

  7. Epigenetics and assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne; Romundstad, Liv B; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt; Söderström-Anttila, Viveca; Bergh, Christina; Aittomäki, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modification controls gene activity without changes in the DNA sequence. The genome undergoes several phases of epigenetic programming during gametogenesis and early embryo development, coinciding with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) treatments. Imprinting disorders have been associated with ART techniques, but disentangling the influence of the ART procedures per se from the effect of the reproductive disease of the parents is a challenge. Epidemiological human studies have shown altered birthweight profiles in ART compared with spontaneously conceived singletons. Conception with cryopreserved/thawed embryos results in a higher risk of large-for-gestational-age babies, which may be due to epigenetic modification. Further animal studies have shown altered gene expression profiles in offspring conceived by ART related to altered glucose metabolism. It is controversial whether human adolescents conceived by ART have altered lipid and glucose profiles and thereby a higher long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This commentary describes the basic concepts of epigenetics and gives a short overview of the existing literature on the association between imprinting disorders, epigenetic modification and ART.

  8. Performance Evaluation Methods for Assistive Robotic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Katherine M.; Feil-Seifer, David J.; Matarić, Maja J.; Yanco, Holly A.

    Robots have been developed for several assistive technology domains, including intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders, eldercare, and post-stroke rehabilitation. Assistive robots have also been used to promote independent living through the use of devices such as intelligent wheelchairs, assistive robotic arms, and external limb prostheses. Work in the broad field of assistive robotic technology can be divided into two major research phases: technology development, in which new devices, software, and interfaces are created; and clinical, in which assistive technology is applied to a given end-user population. Moving from technology development towards clinical applications is a significant challenge. Developing performance metrics for assistive robots poses a related set of challenges. In this paper, we survey several areas of assistive robotic technology in order to derive and demonstrate domain-specific means for evaluating the performance of such systems. We also present two case studies of applied performance measures and a discussion regarding the ubiquity of functional performance measures across the sampled domains. Finally, we present guidelines for incorporating human performance metrics into end-user evaluations of assistive robotic technologies.

  9. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Rachel E; Fregly, Benjamin J; Boninger, Michael L; Chan, Leighton; Rodgers, Mary M; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2012-04-20

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments.

  10. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  11. Evaluating, Selecting, and Using Appropriate Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Jan C.; Scherer, Marcia J.

    This book addresses all aspects of assistive technology for individuals with disabilities, including policy, legislation, funding, evaluation, selection, and maintenance. Ten of the 15 chapters are written by individuals with disabilities and cover topics related to the use of technology in education, employment, and play. Specific chapters…

  12. Users of assistive technology also require assistance with ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Long, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This case study describes an ergonomics workstation assessment conducted for an administrative worker with vision impairment due to keratoconus. The worker, PT, was provided with multiple assistive technology devices to help her with her work, but this resulted in an overcrowded workspace. The purpose of the workstation assessment was to assist the worker with her workstation arrangement to make it more comfortable and efficient. During the assessment, a range of physical, cognitive and organisational ergonomics issues were identified and addressed. Multidisciplinary teams are often used in the rehabilitation of workers with complex medical problems. An ergonomist can play a valuable role on this team.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-08-25

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames.

  14. Assistive Technology for Every Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Barbara Foulks

    2008-01-01

    The Montessori philosophy advocates that the classroom be a reflection of the home, the community, and the world. Now, a century after Maria Montessori founded her Casa dei Bambini, the world is becoming a high-technology society, with computers a part of everyday American lives. Computers are almost a household necessity, and basic…

  15. Assistive Technology for Every Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Barbara Foulks

    2008-01-01

    The Montessori philosophy advocates that the classroom be a reflection of the home, the community, and the world. Now, a century after Maria Montessori founded her Casa dei Bambini, the world is becoming a high-technology society, with computers a part of everyday American lives. Computers are almost a household necessity, and basic…

  16. Computer-assisted abdominal surgery: new technologies.

    PubMed

    Kenngott, H G; Wagner, M; Nickel, F; Wekerle, A L; Preukschas, A; Apitz, M; Schulte, T; Rempel, R; Mietkowski, P; Wagner, F; Termer, A; Müller-Stich, Beat P

    2015-04-01

    Computer-assisted surgery is a wide field of technologies with the potential to enable the surgeon to improve efficiency and efficacy of diagnosis, treatment, and clinical management. This review provides an overview of the most important new technologies and their applications. A MEDLINE database search was performed revealing a total of 1702 references. All references were considered for information on six main topics, namely image guidance and navigation, robot-assisted surgery, human-machine interface, surgical processes and clinical pathways, computer-assisted surgical training, and clinical decision support. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Based on their respective field of expertise, the authors chose 64 publications relevant for the purpose of this review. Computer-assisted systems are increasingly used not only in experimental studies but also in clinical studies. Although computer-assisted abdominal surgery is still in its infancy, the number of studies is constantly increasing, and clinical studies start showing the benefits of computers used not only as tools of documentation and accounting but also for directly assisting surgeons during diagnosis and treatment of patients. Further developments in the field of clinical decision support even have the potential of causing a paradigm shift in how patients are diagnosed and treated.

  17. Technology-assisted dietary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fengqing; Mariappan, Anand; Boushey, Carol J.; Kerr, Deb; Lutes, Kyle D.; Ebert, David S.; Delp, Edward J.

    2008-02-01

    Dietary intake provides valuable insights for mounting intervention programs for prevention of disease. With growing concern for adolescent obesity, the need to accurately measure diet becomes imperative. Assessment among adolescents is problematic as this group has irregular eating patterns and have less enthusiasm for recording food intake. Preliminary studies among adolescents suggest that innovative use of technology may improve the accuracy of diet information from young people. In this paper, we propose a novel food record method using a mobile device that will provide an accurate account of daily food and nutrient intake among adolescents. Our approach includes the use of image analysis tools for identification and quantification of food consumption. Images obtained before and after food is consumed can be used to estimate the diet of an individual. In this paper we describe our initial results and indicate the potential of the proposed system.

  18. Technology-Assisted Dietary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fengqing; Mariappan, Anand; Boushey, Carol J.; Kerr, Deb; Lutes, Kyle D.; Ebert, David S.; Delp, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary intake provides valuable insights for mounting intervention programs for prevention of disease. With growing concern for adolescent obesity, the need to accurately measure diet becomes imperative. Assessment among adolescents is problematic as this group has irregular eating patterns and have less enthusiasm for recording food intake. Preliminary studies among adolescents suggest that innovative use of technology may improve the accuracy of diet information from young people. In this paper, we propose a novel food record method using a mobile device that will provide an accurate account of daily food and nutrient intake among adolescents. Our approach includes the use of image analysis tools for identification and quantification of food consumption. Images obtained before and after food is consumed can be used to estimate the diet of an individual. In this paper we describe our initial results and indicate the potential of the proposed system. PMID:22128303

  19. 34 CFR 300.6 - Assistive technology service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Assistive technology service. 300.6 Section 300.6... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.6 Assistive technology service. Assistive technology service means any service that directly assists a child with a disability in...

  20. 34 CFR 300.6 - Assistive technology service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assistive technology service. 300.6 Section 300.6... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.6 Assistive technology service. Assistive technology service means any service that directly assists a child with a disability in the...

  1. 34 CFR 300.6 - Assistive technology service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assistive technology service. 300.6 Section 300.6... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.6 Assistive technology service. Assistive technology service means any service that directly assists a child with a disability in...

  2. Assistive Technology for the Disabled Computer User.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Linda

    Assistive technology that can help disabled computer users is described, and a resource guide to computer help for the disabled is presented. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 has broad implications for higher education, in that it mandates that colleges and universities give disabled students equal access to computers on public…

  3. Selecting Assistive Technology for Greater Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lueck, Amanda Hall; Dote-Kwan, Jamie; Senge, Jeffrey C.; Clarke, Linda

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses a systematic method for selecting assistive technology that enhances or enables people with visual impairments to perform literacy skills. The method identifies critical tasks, personal preferences and abilities, and the relationship of visual, auditory, or tactile media needs to the critical tasks and personal preferences.…

  4. Assistive Technologies: A Lifeline for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg

    2015-01-01

    As students with disabilities increasingly are included into the general education classroom, teachers at all grade levels need to be knowledgeable about supports that promote student success. An assistive technology (AT) is any device or program that promotes the success of students with disabilities. This article provides an overview of ATs and…

  5. Assistive Technologies for College Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Ismahan; Inan, Fethi A.; Ozel, Claire Thomas; Wells, Anita G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the needs and availability of assistive technologies for university students with disabilities. The study also explored attitudes toward computers and the extent computers are utilized by students with disabilities. The participants were university students from one private and four public universities in…

  6. Children's Voices: Perspectives on Using Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Robin E.; Lee, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rarely are the views of children with learning disabilities elicited. In this study, we used focus groups involving eight students with learning disabilities to explore their self-perceptions as learners and writers using assistive technology (AT). Three groups of two to three Grade 4-8 students and their parents participated in the qualitative…

  7. Directory of Assistive Technology: Data Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    The annotated directory describes in detail both on-line and print databases in the area of assistive technology for individuals with disabilities. For each database, the directory provides the name, address, and telephone number of the sponsoring organization; disability areas served; number of hardware and software products; types of information…

  8. Using Assistive Technology To Facilitate Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Brian R.; Rivera, Diane Pedrotty

    This conference paper describes the cooperative learning structure; presents the elements of cooperative learning; discusses how to plan, implement, and evaluate using the cooperative learning structure; introduces assistive technology services for students with disabilities; and examines how devices and services can be used to facilitate active…

  9. Assistive Technologies: A Lifeline for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg

    2015-01-01

    As students with disabilities increasingly are included into the general education classroom, teachers at all grade levels need to be knowledgeable about supports that promote student success. An assistive technology (AT) is any device or program that promotes the success of students with disabilities. This article provides an overview of ATs and…

  10. Assistive Technology: 10 Things to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Janet

    2006-01-01

    An accessible library media center (LMC) offers many benefits for the school community. Library media specialists can support their education colleagues in delivering inclusive learning opportunities to a wide range of students. Assistive technology (AT) deployment in the LMC can benefit students and teachers by spotlighting low-, mid-, and…

  11. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  12. Children's Voices: Perspectives on Using Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Robin E.; Lee, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rarely are the views of children with learning disabilities elicited. In this study, we used focus groups involving eight students with learning disabilities to explore their self-perceptions as learners and writers using assistive technology (AT). Three groups of two to three Grade 4-8 students and their parents participated in the qualitative…

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency - what are the treatment options?

    PubMed

    Modrykamien, Ariel; Stoller, James K

    2009-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an under-recognized genetic condition that predisposes to liver disease and early-onset emphysema. Although AAT is mainly produced in the liver, its main function is to protect the lung against proteolytic damage from neutrophil elastase. The most common mutation responsible for severe AAT deficiency, the so-called Z variant, reduces serum levels by promoting polymerization of the molecule within the hepatocyte, thereby reducing secretion. Serum levels below the putative protective threshold level of 11 micromolar (mumol/L) increase the risk of emphysema. In addition to the usual treatments for emphysema, infusion of purified AAT from pooled human plasma represents a specific therapy for AAT deficiency and raises serum and epithelial lining fluid levels above the protective threshold. Substantial evidence supports the biochemical efficacy of this approach, particularly for the weekly infusion regimen. Definitive evidence of clinical efficacy is still needed, as the two available randomized controlled trials showed non-significant trends towards slowing rates of loss of lung density on lung computerized axial tomography. However, concordant results of prospective cohort studies suggest that augmentation therapy has efficacy in slowing the rate of decline of lung function in patients with moderate airflow obstruction and severe deficiency of AAT. Overall, augmentation therapy is well-tolerated and, despite its failure to satisfy criteria for cost-effectiveness, is recommended because it is the only currently available specific therapy for AAT deficiency.

  14. Assistive technology outcomes in work settings.

    PubMed

    Schwanke, Todd D; Smith, Roger O

    2005-01-01

    Successfully documenting the outcomes of assistive technology (AT) interventions in the workplace benefits people with disabilities, service providers and agencies. However, no work related system currently exists that comprehensively collects the data needed to analyze such outcomes. Part of the reason for this absence of an outcome system is that, while the concept is simple, the process is complex and depends on the acquisition of data that represent many outcomes related variables. This article describes the exploratory work of the NIDRR (National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research) funded ATOMS Project (Assistive Technology Outcomes Measurement System) and its efforts to identify existing data that might be used as the basis for an outcomes measurement system. Sample records from four assistive technology service programs were acquired and evaluated for the data they housed. This study discovered that AT service programs fail to collect consistent or sufficient data for outcomes analysis. However, discussions with AT programs that provided services to State vocational rehabilitation agencies revealed an interesting potential. Assistive technology service data in combination with data collected by State vocational rehabilitation departments might coalesce the needed data. The Federal Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) 911 Report aggregates many variables of outcomes related information including employment status and the success of the vocational rehabilitation investment. This combined database could answer a range of assistive technology outcomes related questions of interest to service providers, people with disabilities, and vocational rehabilitation State agencies. This paper describes the data needed in an outcomes system, reviews the data that appear to be available today related to AT outcomes, and projects how data from two diverse programs might be used together to create a significant outcomes database.

  15. Mobile assistive technologies for the visually impaired.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Lumsden, Jo; O'Sullivan, Dympna; Bartlett, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    There are around 285 million visually impaired people worldwide, and around 370,000 people are registered as blind or partially sighted in the UK. Ongoing advances in information technology (IT) are increasing the scope for IT-based mobile assistive technologies to facilitate the independence, safety, and improved quality of life of the visually impaired. Research is being directed at making mobile phones and other handheld devices accessible via our haptic (touch) and audio sensory channels. We review research and innovation within the field of mobile assistive technology for the visually impaired and, in so doing, highlight the need for successful collaboration between clinical expertise, computer science, and domain users to realize fully the potential benefits of such technologies. We initially reflect on research that has been conducted to make mobile phones more accessible to people with vision loss. We then discuss innovative assistive applications designed for the visually impaired that are either delivered via mainstream devices and can be used while in motion (e.g., mobile phones) or are embedded within an environment that may be in motion (e.g., public transport) or within which the user may be in motion (e.g., smart homes).

  16. Integrating the HERMES spectrograph for the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, Jeroen; Asplund, Martin; Barden, Sam; Birchall, Michael; Carollo, Daniela; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brzeski, Jurek; Case, Scott; Churilov, Vladimir; Colless, Matthew; Dean, Robert; De Silva, Gayandhi; Farrell, Tony; Fiegert, Kristin; Freeman, Kenneth; Gers, Luke; Goodwin, Michael; Gray, Doug; Heald, Ron; Heng, Anthony; Jones, Damien; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Klauser, Urs; Kondrat, Yuriy; Lawrence, Jon; Lee, Steve; Mathews, Darren; Mayfield, Don; Miziarski, Stan; Monnet, Guy J.; Muller, Rolf; Pai, Naveen; Patterson, Robert; Penny, Ed; Orr, David; Sheinis, Andrew; Shortridge, Keith; Smedley, Scott; Smith, Greg; Stafford, Darren; Staszak, Nicholas; Vuong, Minh; Waller, Lewis; Whittard, Denis; Wylie de Boer, Elisabeth; Xavier, Pascal; Zheng, Jessica; Zhelem, Ross; Zucker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph, HERMES is an optical spectrograph designed primarily for the GALAH, Galactic Archeology Survey, the first major attempt to create a detailed understanding of galaxy formation and evolution by studying the history of our own galaxy, the Milky Way1. The goal of the GALAH survey is to reconstruct the mass assembly history of the of the Milky way, through a detailed spatially tagged abundance study of one million stars in the Milky Way. The spectrograph will be based at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) and be fed with the existing 2dF robotic fibre positioning system. The spectrograph uses VPH-gratings to achieve a spectral resolving power of 28,000 in standard mode and also provides a high resolution mode ranging between 40,000 to 50,000 using a slit mask. The GALAH survey requires a SNR greater than 100 aiming for a star brightness of V=14. The total spectral coverage of the four channels is about 100nm between 370 and 1000nm for up to 392 simultaneous targets within the 2 degree field of view. Current efforts are focused on manufacturing and integration. The delivery date of spectrograph at the telescope is scheduled for 2013. A performance prediction is presented and a complete overview of the status of the HERMES spectrograph is given. This paper details the following specific topics: The approach to AIT, the manufacturing and integration of the large mechanical frame, the opto-mechanical slit assembly, collimator optics and cameras, VPH gratings, cryostats, fibre cable assembly, instrument control hardware and software, data reduction.

  17. 34 CFR 300.5 - Assistive technology device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Assistive technology device. 300.5 Section 300.5... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.5 Assistive technology device. Assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether...

  18. Using an Assistive Technology Toolkit to Promote Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Sharon; Floyd, Kim; Jeffs, Tara

    2008-01-01

    Although the use of assistive technology for young children is increasing, the lack of awareness and the lack of training continue to act as major barriers to providers using assistive technology. This article describes an assistive technology toolkit designed for use with young children with disabilities that can be easily assembled and…

  19. Accessing and Funding Assistive Technology for Young Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Sharon Lesar

    2000-01-01

    Asserts that as the number of young children using assistive technology increases, four areas emerge as particularly important: (1) accessing assistive technology; (2) matching needs of children to technology; (3) funding assistive devices and services; and (4) training early childhood education professionals and family members. Addresses…

  20. 34 CFR 300.5 - Assistive technology device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assistive technology device. 300.5 Section 300.5... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.5 Assistive technology device. Assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired...

  1. 34 CFR 300.5 - Assistive technology device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assistive technology device. 300.5 Section 300.5... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.5 Assistive technology device. Assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether...

  2. Assistive technology for children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Isabelle, Selena; Bessey, S Fiona; Dragas, Kathryn Lawrence; Blease, Patricia; Shepherd, Jayne T; Lane, Shelly J

    2003-01-01

    Through The Rehabilitation Act, the Technology Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (The Tech Act), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the federal government broadened the states' roles in increasing awareness and accessibility of assistive technology (AT) devices and services to children with disabilities. As a member of the AT team, the occupational therapy practitioner plays an integral role in selecting the most appropriate device, and working with parents and other professionals to integrate the device into a child's daily routines. This literature review presents a summary of available information on AT materials and strategies that assist infants, toddlers, and school-aged children with disabilities. We begin with a brief look at legislation affecting the provision of AT. Issues concerning the use of Electronic Aides of Daily Living (EADL), and strategies for successful manipulation are presented; followed by a discussion of play and leisure, mobility, and communication devices. Finally, we conclude with a discussion concerning the importance of measuring the effectiveness of AT devices and services.

  3. Discovering Hidden Resources: Assistive Technology Recycling, Refurbishing, and Redistribution. RESNA Technical Assistance Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This monograph discusses the benefits of recycling and reusing assistive technology for students with disabilities. It begins by discussing the benefits of recycled assistive technology for suppliers, students, and consumers, and then profiles programmatic models for assistive technology recycling programs. The advantages and disadvantages for…

  4. AAtS over AeroMACS Technology Trials on the Airport Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apaza, Rafael; Abraham, Biruk; Maeda, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Air-Ground component of SWIM; Enables enhanced two-way information exchanges between flight operators, aircrew, and ATSP (TFM); Used in all flight domains including pre-departure and post-arrival; Aircrew active in CDM; For strategic planning, advisory information; Not for command control (data voice) Wireless communications system for airport surface; Family member of Mobile WiMAX: (IEEE802.16e), Band 5091-5150 MHz, Bandwidth 5 MHz - TDDOFDMA - Adaptive Modulation and Coding - Quality of Service (QoS)

  5. Assistive technology for memory support in dementia.

    PubMed

    Van der Roest, Henriëtte G; Wenborn, Jennifer; Pastink, Channah; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Orrell, Martin

    2017-06-11

    The sustained interest in electronic assistive technology in dementia care has been fuelled by the urgent need to develop useful approaches to help support people with dementia at home. Also the low costs and wide availability of electronic devices make it more feasible to use electronic devices for the benefit of disabled persons. Information Communication Technology (ICT) devices designed to support people with dementia are usually referred to as Assistive Technology (AT) or Electronic Assistive Technology (EAT). By using AT in this review we refer to electronic assistive devices. A range of AT devices has been developed to support people with dementia and their carers to manage their daily activities and to enhance safety, for example electronic pill boxes, picture phones, or mobile tracking devices. Many are commercially available. However, the usefulness and user-friendliness of these devices are often poorly evaluated. Although reviews of (electronic) memory aids do exist, a systematic review of studies focusing on the efficacy of AT for memory support in people with dementia is lacking. Such a review would guide people with dementia and their informal and professional carers in selecting appropriate AT devices. Primary objectiveTo assess the efficacy of AT for memory support in people with dementia in terms of daily performance of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL), level of dependency, and admission to long-term care. Secondary objectiveTo assess the impact of AT on: users (autonomy, usefulness and user-friendliness, adoption of AT); cognitive function and neuropsychiatric symptoms; need for informal and formal care; perceived quality of life; informal carer burden, self-esteem and feelings of competence; formal carer work satisfaction, workload and feelings of competence; and adverse events. We searched ALOIS, the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (CDCIG), on 10 November 2016. ALOIS is

  6. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology and assisted reproductive technology in the United States: a 2016 update.

    PubMed

    Toner, James P; Coddington, Charles C; Doody, Kevin; Van Voorhis, Brad; Seifer, David B; Ball, G David; Luke, Barbara; Wantman, Ethan

    2016-09-01

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) was established within a few years of assisted reproductive technology (ART) in the United States, and has not only reported on the evolution of infertility care, but also guided it toward improved success and safety. Moving beyond its initial role as a registry, SART has expanded its role to include quality assurance, data validation, practice and advertising guidelines, research, patient education and advocacy, and membership support. The success of ART in this country has greatly benefited from SART's role, as highlighted by a series of graphs. SART continues to set the standard and lead the way.

  7. 15 CFR 1160.3 - Assistance to industrial technology partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Assistance to industrial technology... Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PRODUCTIVITY, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION Promotion of Private Sector Industrial Technology Partnerships § 1160.3 Assistance to...

  8. Bioethics for clinicians: 26. Assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    Shanner, Laura; Nisker, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES (ARTs) can be very helpful for certain patients, but ethical concerns have been raised about the inherent nature of specific techniques and the contexts in which many techniques are used. Physicians play important roles in supporting those who wish to become parents and in educating patients about impediments to fertilization and ways to promote conception. We discuss various ethical issues surrounding ARTs, including family relationships, informed choice, gender issues, embryo status and the commercialization of reproduction, as well as legal and policy issues. We examine the empirical evidence of the effectiveness of ARTs and suggest ways to approach ARTs in practice. PMID:11402801

  9. Integrating medical, assistive, and universally designed products and technologies: assistive technology device classification (ATDC).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Stephen; Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne

    2012-09-01

    ISO26000:2010 International Guidance Standard on Organizational Social Responsibility requires that effective organizational performance recognize social responsibility, including the rights of persons with disabilities (PWD), engage stakeholders and contribute to sustainable development. Millennium Development Goals 2010 notes that the most vulnerable people require special attention, while the World Report on Disability 2011 identifies improved data collection and removal of barriers to rehabilitation as the means to empower PWD. The Assistive Technology Device Classification (ATDC), Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM) and Matching Person and Technology models provide an evidence-based, standardized, internationally comparable framework to improve data collection and rehabilitation interventions. The ATDC and ATSM encompass and support universal design (UD) principles, and use the language and concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Use ATDC and ICF concepts to differentiate medical, assistive and UD products and technology; relate technology "types" to markets and costs; and support provision of UD products and technologies as sustainable and socially responsible behavior. Supply-side and demand-side incentives are suggested to foster private sector development and commercialization of UD products and technologies. Health and health-related professionals should be knowledgeable of UD principles and interventions.

  10. Modeling the Human Knee for Assistive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Massimo; Reggiani, Monica; Pagello, Enrico; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we use motion capture technology together with an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee joint to predict muscle behavior during human dynamic movements. We propose a muscle model based on infinitely stiff tendons and show this allows speeding up 250 times the computation of muscle force and the resulting joint moment calculation with no loss of accuracy with respect to the previously developed elastictendon model. We then integrate our previously developed method for the estimation of 3-D musculotendon kinematics in the proposed EMG-driven model. This new code enabled the creation of a standalone EMG-driven model that was implemented and run on an embedded system for applications in assistive technologies such as myoelectrically controlled prostheses and orthoses. PMID:22911539

  11. The Assistive Technology Assessment: An Instrument for Team Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuster, Nancy E.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the stages of an assistive technology (AT) assessment process and use of an Assistive Technology Referral Format for use with students who have disabilities. Emphasis is on assisting teams to identify AT objectives within the student's present skills and curriculum and plan for the appropriate use of AT. The relevant forms…

  12. Assistive Technology For Students With Disabilities. Information for Parents & Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copenhaver, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this brochure is to inform parents and educators regarding the use of assistive technology devices and services in the special education evaluation process and programming. As defined in the federal special education regulations, an assistive technology service means any service that directly assists a child with a disability in…

  13. Obesity and assisted reproductive technology outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bellver, José; Busso, Cristiano; Pellicer, Antonio; Remohí, José; Simón, Carlos

    2006-05-01

    Obesity is a rising health problem in Western societies. It has been related to increased morbidity and mortality rates due to several pathologies. In the field of gynaecology and reproduction, obesity is associated with menstrual disorders, hirsutism, infertility, miscarriage and obstetric complications. It is known to impair human reproduction through different mechanisms such as insulin resistance, hyperandrogenism and elevated leptin levels. Weight management and dietary intervention can reverse this situation and improve reproductive function. Obesity can also impair the outcome of assisted reproductive technologies. The lower probability of a healthy live birth described in obese women seems to be the result of a combination of lower implantation and pregnancy rates, higher preclinical and clinical miscarriage rates and increased complications during pregnancy for both mother and fetus. Studies performed in infertile women undergoing assisted reproduction technologies indicate that the ovary plays a leading, but not exclusive, role in the fertility prognosis of these patients. The endocrine and metabolic environment may affect oocyte quality and, therefore, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy outcome. The endometrium seems to play a subtle role in the more negative reproductive outcome of obese women, according to recent studies based on the ovum donation model.

  14. The Thai version of Aachen aphasia test (THAI-AAT).

    PubMed

    Pracharitpukdee, N; Phanthumchinda, K; Huber, W; Willmes, K

    2000-06-01

    The lack of a standardized Thai Language aphasia test raises difficulties not only with the assessment and treatment planning for the clinical but also with the accurate diagnosis and the reliable incidence for research on aphasiology in Thailand. This study aimed to use the Thai version of German Aachen aphasia (THAI-AAT), which is systematically adapted according to well-defined linguistic criteria and psychometric requirement, to assess the language deficit of Thai aphasic patients. The subjects participating in this study were 125 aphasia patients, 60 non-aphasic brain damaged patients and 120 normal subjects. The result revealed that the THAI-AAT is linguistically parallel in test design and fulfills the same psychometric properties as the original. The THAI-AAT obtains the goals: to differential diagnosis of aphasia distinguishing it from non-aphasic disturbance and to identify the type of aphasic syndrome.

  15. Assistive Technology in Special Education: Policy & Practice. CASE/TAM Assistive Technology Policy and Practice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Diane

    This monograph provides an overview of critical policy and practice issues facing educators in the area of assistive technology (AT) for students with disabilities and discusses emerging policy directives and best practices for service delivery in a way that is supportive of quality AT programs in schools. Following an introduction, Section 2…

  16. NASA's southeast technology transfer alliance: A cooperative technology assistance initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Harry G.; Sheehan, William; Johnson, Anne

    1996-03-01

    Since 1958, NASA has been charged with actively assisting in the transfer of technologies derived from the United States space program into the industrial sector of the U.S. economy. This has historically been accomplished through technology transfer offices working independently at each NASA field center. NASA recently restructured the program to provide regional coordination, maximize efficiencies, eliminate redundancies, and capitalize on each center's fundamental technology strengths. The nation is divided into six NASA technology transfer geographical regions with each region containing one or more NASA field centers and a regional technology transfer center. The southeast region includes the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The NASA field centers in this region are: the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama; the Kennedy Space Center in Florida; and the Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The centers have teamed to focus primarily on regional industries and businesses, to provide a wide range of resources for U.S. industries, including access to unique government facilities, regional workshops, and technical problem solving. Hundreds of American businesses have benefited from this new regional initiative, as evidenced by reports of over 10,500 added or saved jobs and over 988 million worth of economic impacts as a result of their technology transfer activities.

  17. Lessons for new large telescopes from the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, P. R.

    1989-10-01

    When it began operating in 1975, the Anglo-Australian Telescope set new standards for pointing, tracking, and efficient observing. Since then, several large telescopes with more advanced control systems and on better sites have come into competition but the AAT retains the reputation of having the best overall observing efficiency. A number of organizational factors in the design and construction phase and in the Anglo-Australian Observatory's operational years have contributed to the AAT's success. Careful consideration of these factors should help groups planning the construction and operation of new telescopes.

  18. Integrating medical, assistive, and universal design products and technologies: Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM).

    PubMed

    Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne; Bauer, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    ISO26000 provides guidance on effective organizational performance that recognizes social responsibility (including rights of persons with disabilities (PWD)), engages stakeholders, and contributes to sustainable development [1]. Millennium Development Goals 2010 state: while progress has been made, insufficient dedication to sustainable development, and inequalities to the most vulnerable people require attention [2]. World Report on Disability 2011 recommendations includes improved data collection and removal of barriers to rehabilitation that empower PWD [3]. The Assistive Technology Service Method (ATSM), Assistive Technology Device Classification (ATDC) and Matching Person and Technology (MPT) provide an evidence-based, standardized, internationally comparable framework to improve rehabilitation interventions [4-6]. The ATSM and ATDC support universal design (UD) principles and provision of universal technology. The MPT assures interventions are effective and satisfactory to end-users [7]. The ICF conceptual framework and common language are used throughout [8]. Research findings on healthcare needs are translated. ATSM applications in support of these findings are presented. National initiatives demonstrate the need and value of the ATSM as an evidence-based, user-centric, interdisciplinary method to improve individual and organizational performance for rehabilitation [including AT] services. Two Disability & Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology articles demonstrate ATSM and ATDC use to strengthen rehabilitation services and integrate Universal Design principles for socially responsible behavior.

  19. Assistive Technology and Mathematics Education: Reports from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics is a critical content area and assistive technology can benefit students with high incidence disabilities in accessing and achieving in this domain. Yet, the field lacks awareness of how often teachers use assistive technology in mathematics and what types of technology they are using. This study sought to understand teachers' self…

  20. [Continuity of care: assistive technology at home].

    PubMed

    Villar, Alfredo; Federici, Alessia; Tini, Nadia; Barrué, Cristian; Cortés, Ulises; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the possibility of introducing the Assistive Technology for elderly persons at home in order to provide intermediate care as the range of services aimed at facilitating the transfer from hospital, and the transition from a situation of dependency on the medical staff to a situation of functional independence. Improvements in this area would allow an approach focused on the user and reduce the waste of economic resources. Once it achieves the objectives of strictly medical care, the discharge of patients can be anticipated. We believe that one possible solution is represented by the introduction and use of the intelligent agents for the support of the activities of daily living. We report some examples.

  1. Assistive Technology Provision Within the Navajo Nation

    PubMed Central

    Ripat, Jacquie D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explored the factors that affect assistive technology (AT) provision within the Navajo Nation using a qualitative approach to inquiry. Focus groups were held in which AT users discussed their awareness of AT and their need for, use of, and satisfaction with AT devices and services. Twenty-eight individuals who used wheelchairs, orthotics or prosthetics, hearing aids, communication aids, vision aids, and other AT participated in one of seven focus groups. Seven AT providers discussed the facilitators and barriers that affect AT provision. The findings revealed six themes common to both stakeholder groups and two additional themes for AT users. The central theme for AT users centered on (not) feeling understood; the central theme for AT providers revolved around the processes, activities, and roles the providers engaged in at times for different clients. Activities to increase awareness and to promote successful AT provision and satisfaction with AT devices were proposed. PMID:25147224

  2. Use of animal-assisted therapy with psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Jeanette; King, Camille

    2010-11-01

    The use of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) as an adjunct treatment approach in psychiatric settings has received much attention in the literature. This article explores the use of AAT with psychiatric patients. The authors performed a literature review and found that AAT can have a significant effect on the improvement of psychiatric patients' socialization and provides a variety of psychological benefits. Nurses can benefit from learning about the potential benefits of AAT for psychiatric patients.

  3. Consumer perspectives on assistive technology outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lenker, James A; Harris, Frances; Taugher, Mary; Smith, Roger O

    2013-09-01

    The current study explored domains of assistive technology (AT) device outcomes that are most valued by AT users. A secondary objective was to identify elements in the device acquisition process that affect outcomes. Focus groups were conducted at geographically dispersed locations within the USA. The groups were moderated by experienced AT practitioners who followed a detailed procedure emphasizing a nominal group facilitation technique. Twenty-four adult AT users, representing a range of ages and disability populations, participated in four focus groups. Many had over 15 years of experience with multiple device types. Qualitative analysis yielded 13 threads that embodied salient outcome domains (e.g. independence, subjective well-being, participation in work and school, cost-effectiveness) and key factors associated with the device acquisition process (e.g. lengthy periods of frustration, variable quality of service providers). Ironically, these data were evoked only after the term "outcomes" was omitted from focus group questions. AT outcomes studies are needed that report data regarding (a) the impact of AT on participation, (b) costs of AT provision and (c) key elements in the AT service delivery process. Future studies will be further strengthened to the extent that their methodologies actively assimilate consumer perspectives. Implications for Rehabilitation Consumers highly value the impact of AT devices on their independence, subjective well-being and participation in work and school. The process of acquiring assistive technology devices is often lengthy and frustrating for consumers. Future AT outcomes research should report descriptive data regarding service delivery processes, as well as long-term impacts for consumers. Practitioners and researchers should avoid the use of potentially confusing professional jargon when administering surveys to consumers.

  4. Cancer in women after assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Spector, Logan G; Missmer, Stacey A; Leach, Richard E; Williams, Melanie; Koch, Lori; Smith, Yolanda; Stern, Judy E; Ball, G David; Schymura, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the risk of cancer after assisted reproductive technology (ART) therapy. Longitudinal cohort study. Not applicable. New York, Texas, and Illinois residents between 2004 and 2009, treated with ART, comprising cycles of 113,226 women, including 53,859 women without prior ART treatment, who were linked to their respective state cancer registries and whose cycles were reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS). None. Diagnosis of cancer, as reported to the state cancer registry; standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and their 95% confidence intervals, comparing the observed to expected cancer cases based on age-specific cancer rates in the general population of each state. Among the cohort of women without prior ART therapy, hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for treatment parameters and reproductive history factors. The mean follow-up period was 4.87 years; among women without prior ART, 450 women developed 460 cancers. Women treated with ART had a statistically significantly lower risk for all cancers (for all women: SIR 0.78; CI, 0.73-0.83; women without prior ART: SIR 0.75; CI, 0.68-0.82), breast cancer, and all female genital cancers; a non-statistically-significant lower risk for endocrine and uterine cancer; and a non-statistically-significant higher risk for melanoma and ovarian cancer. Among women without prior ART, we found no statistically significant increased HR by parity, number of cycles, cumulative follicle-stimulating hormone dosage, or cycle outcome. Women initiating ART treatment have no greater risk for developing cancer after nearly 5 years of follow-up compared with the general population and with other women treated with ART. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 15 CFR 1160.3 - Assistance to industrial technology partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... resources including, for example: Technologies available for licensing; markets for new technology-based... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assistance to industrial technology... Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PRODUCTIVITY, TECHNOLOGY AND...

  6. Quantification of Z-AAT by a Z-Specific "Sandwich" ELISA.

    PubMed

    Borel, Florie; Tang, Qiushi; Mueller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to specifically detect Z-alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), the most common protein variant associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. This "sandwich" ELISA relies on an anti-Z-AAT specific capture antibody and a HRP-conjugated anti-AAT detection antibody. This method would be of interest to identify and quantify Z-AAT in a variety of samples such as cell culture medium, cell or tissue lysate, animal or patient serum. Because this method is specific and sensitive, it would be particularly valuable for detection of Z-AAT in the presence of background M-AAT, for instance when quantifying silencing of Z-AAT in patients undergoing M-AAT augmentation therapy.

  7. Principles for fostering the transdisciplinary development of assistive technologies.

    PubMed

    Boger, Jennifer; Jackson, Piper; Mulvenna, Maurice; Sixsmith, Judith; Sixsmith, Andrew; Mihailidis, Alex; Kontos, Pia; Miller Polgar, Janice; Grigorovich, Alisa; Martin, Suzanne

    2016-04-07

    Developing useful and usable assistive technologies often presents complex (or "wicked") challenges that require input from multiple disciplines and sectors. Transdisciplinary collaboration can enable holistic understanding of challenges that may lead to innovative, impactful and transformative solutions. This paper presents generalised principles that are intended to foster transdisciplinary assistive technology development. The paper introduces the area of assistive technology design before discussing general aspects of transdisciplinary collaboration followed by an overview of relevant concepts, including approaches, methodologies and frameworks for conducting and evaluating transdisciplinary working and assistive technology design. The principles for transdisciplinary development of assistive technologies are presented and applied post hoc to the COACH project, an ambient-assisted living technology for guiding completion of activities of daily living by older adults with dementia as an illustrative example. Future work includes the refinement and validation of these principles through their application to real-world transdisciplinary assistive technology projects. Implications for rehabilitation Transdisciplinarity encourages a focus on real world 'wicked' problems. A transdisciplinary approach involves transcending disciplinary boundaries and collaborating with interprofessional and community partners (including the technology's intended users) on a shared problem. Transdisciplinarity fosters new ways of thinking about and doing research, development, and implementation, expanding the scope, applicability, and commercial viability of assistive technologies.

  8. Funding for Assistive Technology: A Guide and Directory for Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Marilyn; And Others

    This guide identifies sources of funding for purchasing assistive technology for people with disabilities. It outlines eligibility requirements, specifies which devices can be obtained from which sources of funding, and discusses how to effectively approach the funding process. It begins by defining assistive technology categories, describing the…

  9. Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derrick W.; Kelley, Pat; Maushak, Nancy J.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using the expert opinion of more than 30 professionals, this Delphi study set out to develop a set of assistive technology competencies for teachers of students with visual impairments. The result of the study was the development of a highly reliable and valid set of 111 assistive technology competencies. (Contains 2 tables.)

  10. Rehabilitation Counselors' Perceptions of Importance and Competence of Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Hung Jen

    2013-01-01

    Assistive technology (AT) has been identified as one of the most effective interventions for rehabilitation purposes of individuals with disabilities. Due to the positive potentials, assistive technology has attracted tremendous attention among the rehabilitation counselors during the past decades. As a result, numerous AT devices have been…

  11. Legal Issues in Special Education: Assistive Technology and Supportive Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Keith E.; Dykes, Mary Kay

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the legal issues surrounding the provision of school support services and assistive technology for children with disabilities. The definition of assistive technology and related services is examined, with findings from relevant case law provided. Information is provided on interpretation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973…

  12. School Library Accessibility: The Role of Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Janet

    2004-01-01

    While doing research into the topic of assistive technology in libraries, Janet Hopkins, found many examples of libraries providing assistive technology and special services for clients with disabilities. However, most of those examples are in post-secondary and public libraries. It was difficult to identify K-12 school libraries that are…

  13. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Schools Using Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michelle Kaye; Stratman, Kristine Freiberg; Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    Activities of Project OATS (Outcomes of Assistive Technology in the Schools) are described, including identification and piloting of existing assessment instruments for use as an outcome measure, examining the validity of the School Function Assessment, and field testing the School Function Assessment-Assistive Technology Version, an adaptation of…

  14. The Provision of Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copenhaver, John

    This paper provides information on the use of assistive technology devices and services in the special education evaluation process and programming for students with disabilities. The legal responsibilities of the school district to consider assistive technology for the student during the evaluation process and as a possible service on the…

  15. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Schools Using Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michelle Kaye; Stratman, Kristine Freiberg; Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    Activities of Project OATS (Outcomes of Assistive Technology in the Schools) are described, including identification and piloting of existing assessment instruments for use as an outcome measure, examining the validity of the School Function Assessment, and field testing the School Function Assessment-Assistive Technology Version, an adaptation of…

  16. Informed Consumer Guide to Information on Funding Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABLEDATA, Silver Spring, MD.

    This directory lists sources for the funding of assistive technology for people with disabilities. Introductory information urges determination of what assistive technology is needed and the gathering of all necessary information (such as primary and secondary disabilities, employment history, income and expenses, and health insurance) prior to…

  17. Rehabilitation Counselors' Perceptions of Importance and Competence of Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Hung Jen

    2013-01-01

    Assistive technology (AT) has been identified as one of the most effective interventions for rehabilitation purposes of individuals with disabilities. Due to the positive potentials, assistive technology has attracted tremendous attention among the rehabilitation counselors during the past decades. As a result, numerous AT devices have been…

  18. Assistive Technology Competencies for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derrick W.; Kelley, Pat; Maushak, Nancy J.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using the expert opinion of more than 30 professionals, this Delphi study set out to develop a set of assistive technology competencies for teachers of students with visual impairments. The result of the study was the development of a highly reliable and valid set of 111 assistive technology competencies. (Contains 2 tables.)

  19. Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology Services in School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabala, Joy; Blunt, Merv; Carl, Diana; Davis, Sharon; Deterding, Cheryl; Foss, Teresa; Hamman, Terry; Bowser, Gayl; Hartsell, Kim; Korsten, Jane; Marfilius, Scott; McCloskey-Dale, Susan; Nettleton, Sandra; Reed, Penny

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the activities of a national group of assistive technology professionals known as the Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology Services (QIAT) Consortium. The work of the Consortium is discussed and the current set of indicators is included. Processes used in the development of the indicators are described. (Contains…

  20. Assistive technology and universal design in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Mueller, J L

    1998-01-01

    The terms assistive technology and universal design challenge designers, engineers, and technologists to consider the broadest possible use for the things they create, to make assistive technology as useful to nondisabled persons as to those with disabilities, and to make the products and environments we design as usable as possible for everyone, regardless of age or ability.

  1. Automated Apprenticeship Training (AAT). A Systematized Audio-Visual Approach to Self-Paced Job Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, William J.; And Others

    Two Automated Apprenticeship Training (AAT) courses were developed for Air Force Security Police Law Enforcement and Security specialists. The AAT was a systematized audio-visual approach to self-paced job training employing an easily operated teaching device. AAT courses were job specific and based on a behavioral task analysis of the two…

  2. Childhood outcomes of assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Savage, Tim; Peek, John; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2011-09-01

    There is a large population of children conceived via assisted reproductive technology (ART), which continues to increase worldwide, without a clear understanding of associated long-term outcomes. ART children are more likely to be the result of multiple pregnancies, and thus to be born prematurely or low birthweight. There is growing evidence that ART children are phenotypically and biochemically different from naturally conceived children, but the mechanism(s) leading to these changes have not been elucidated. There is a possible increased risk of rare imprinted gene disorders in these children. However, it remains unclear whether more subtle changes in DNA methylation occur commonly, leading to differences in gene expression and phenotype in ART children. Although an increased risk of cancer among ART children has been reported, the role of ART in the development of cancer has not been demonstrated. Further research and ongoing surveillance of ART children is essential to better understand the possible effects of ART on the long-term health of this population.

  3. Pregnancy outcomes after assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Victoria M; Wilson, R Douglas; Cheung, Anthony

    2006-03-01

    To review the effect of assisted reproductive technology (ART) on perinatal outcomes, to provide guidelines to optimize obstetrical management and counselling of Canadian women using ART, and to identify areas specific to birth outcomes and ART requiring further research. Perinatal outcomes of ART pregnancies in subfertile women are compared with those of spontaneously conceived pregnancies. Perinatal outcomes are compared between different types of ART. This guideline discusses the adverse outcomes that have been recorded in association with ART, including obstetrical complications, adverse perinatal outcomes, multiple gestations, structural congenital abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities, imprinting disorders, and childhood cancer. The Cochrane Library and MEDLINE were searched for English-language articles from 1990 to February 2005, relating to assisted reproduction and perinatal outcomes. Search terms included assisted reproduction, assisted reproductive technology, ovulation induction, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), embryo transfer, and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Additional publications were identified from the bibliographies of these articles as well as the Science Citation Index. Studies assessing gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) and zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) were excluded since they are rarely used in Canada. All study types were reviewed. Randomized controlled trials were considered evidence of the highest quality, followed by cohort studies. Key studies and supporting data for each recommendation are summarized with evaluative comments and referenced. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Genetics Committee and the Reproductive Endocrinology Infertility Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the Evaluation of Evidence Guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. The type and magnitude of benefits, harms, and costs

  4. Sustained miRNA-mediated knockdown of mutant AAT with simultaneous augmentation of wild-type AAT has minimal effect on global liver miRNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christian; Tang, Qiushi; Gruntman, Alisha; Blomenkamp, Keith; Teckman, Jeffery; Song, Lina; Zamore, Phillip D; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-03-01

    α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency can exhibit two pathologic states: a lung disease that is primarily due to the loss of AAT's antiprotease function, and a liver disease resulting from a toxic gain-of-function of the PiZ-AAT (Z-AAT) mutant protein. We have developed several recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors that incorporate microRNA (miRNA) sequences targeting the AAT gene while also driving the expression of miRNA-resistant wild-type AAT-PiM (M-AAT) gene, thus achieving concomitant Z-AAT knockdown in the liver and increased expression of M-AAT. Transgenic mice expressing the human PiZ allele treated with dual-function rAAV9 vectors showed that serum PiZ was stably and persistently reduced by an average of 80%. Treated animals showed knockdown of Z-AAT in liver and serum with concomitant increased serum M-AAT as determined by allele-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). In addition, decreased globular accumulation of misfolded Z-AAT in hepatocytes and a reduction in inflammatory infiltrates in the liver was observed. Results from microarray studies demonstrate that endogenous miRNAs were minimally affected by this treatment. These data suggests that miRNA mediated knockdown does not saturate the miRNA pathway as has been seen with viral vector expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). This safe dual-therapy approach can be applied to other disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington disease, cerebral ataxia, and optic atrophies.

  5. Establishing Nonprofit Foundations To Pay for Assistive Technology. RESNA Technical Assistance Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Witt, John C.; Mendelsohn, Steven

    This guide examines the incorporation of nongovernmental funding streams into state-wide programs of technology-related assistance under Title I of the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988. It examines underlying philosophical, structural, and legal issues involved in the formation and effective use of a…

  6. Involvement of AAT transporters in methylmercury toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel W; Zhang, Yaofang; Aschner, Michael

    2013-06-14

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin that enters mammalian cells as a conjugate with L-cysteine through L-type large neutral amino acid transporter, LAT1, by a molecular mimicry mechanism by structurally resembling L-methionine. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has been increasingly used to study the neurotoxic effects of MeHg, but little is known about uptake and transport of MeHg in the worm. This study examined whether MeHg uptake through LAT1 is evolutionarily conserved in nematodes. MeHg toxicity in C. elegans was blocked by pre-treatment of worms with l-methionine, suggesting a role for amino acid transporters in MeHg transport. Knockdown of aat-1, aat-2, and aat-3, worm homologues to LAT1, increased the survival of C. elegans following MeHg treatment and significantly attenuated MeHg content following exposure. These results indicate that MeHg is transported in the worm by a conserved mechanism dependent on functioning amino acid transporters.

  7. Model of Providing Assistive Technologies in Special Education Schools.

    PubMed

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-05-14

    Most students diagnosed with disabilities in Thai special education schools received assistive technologies, but this did not guarantee the greatest benefits. The purpose of this study was to survey the provision, use and needs of assistive technologies, as well as the perspectives of key informants regarding a model of providing them in special education schools. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, and they comprised 120 students with visual, physical, hearing or intellectual disabilities from four special education schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand; and 24 key informants such as parents or caregivers, teachers, school principals and school therapists. The instruments consisted of an assistive technology checklist and a semi-structured interview. Results showed that a category of assistive technologies was provided for students with disabilities, with the highest being "services", followed by "media" and then "facilities". Furthermore, mostly students with physical disabilities were provided with assistive technologies, but those with visual disabilities needed it more. Finally, the model of providing assistive technologies was composed of 5 components: Collaboration; Holistic perspective; Independent management of schools; Learning systems and a production manual for users; and Development of an assistive technology center, driven by 3 major sources such as Government and Private organizations, and Schools.

  8. Model of Providing Assistive Technologies in Special Education Schools

    PubMed Central

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2016-01-01

    Most students diagnosed with disabilities in Thai special education schools received assistive technologies, but this did not guarantee the greatest benefits. The purpose of this study was to survey the provision, use and needs of assistive technologies, as well as the perspectives of key informants regarding a model of providing them in special education schools. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, and they comprised 120 students with visual, physical, hearing or intellectual disabilities from four special education schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand; and 24 key informants such as parents or caregivers, teachers, school principals and school therapists. The instruments consisted of an assistive technology checklist and a semi-structured interview. Results showed that a category of assistive technologies was provided for students with disabilities, with the highest being “services”, followed by “media” and then “facilities”. Furthermore, mostly students with physical disabilities were provided with assistive technologies, but those with visual disabilities needed it more. Finally, the model of providing assistive technologies was composed of 5 components: Collaboration; Holistic perspective; Independent management of schools; Learning systems and a production manual for users; and Development of an assistive technology center, driven by 3 major sources such as Government and Private organizations, and Schools. PMID:26234984

  9. Caregivers' experiences with the selection and use of assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, W Ben; Pysklywec, Alex; Fuhrer, Marcus J; Jutai, Jeffrey W; Plante, Michelle; Demers, Louise

    2017-08-02

    Qualitative data from a mixed-methods clinical trial are used to examine caregivers' experiences with the selection and use of assistive technology to facilitate care recipients' independence. Through a thematic analysis of interviews from 27 caregivers, three broad themes were identified. "A partial peace of mind" described the generally positive psychological impacts from assistive technology, mainly reduced stress and a shift in caregiving labour from physical tasks to a monitoring role. "Working together" explored the caregivers' experiences of receiving assistive technology and the sense of collaboration felt by caregivers during the intervention process. Finally, "Overcoming barriers" addressed two impediments to accessing assistive technology: lack of funding and appointment wait times for service providers. The findings suggest that assistive technology provision by prescribers plays a beneficial role in the lives of caregivers, but access to such benefits can be hampered by contextual constraints. Implications for rehabilitation The study findings have a number of implications for rehabilitation practice: Family caregivers can be instrumental in determining what assistive technology is needed and then procured. Their involvement in the selection process is desirable because assistive technology may have both positive and negative impacts on them, and they themselves may use the devices chosen. Involving family caregivers as more active partners in the process of assistive technology provision may represent a greater time investment in the short term, but may contribute to better long-term outcomes for care recipients and caregivers as well. Limited access to funding and long appointment wait times are potential barriers to obtaining necessary assistive technologies.

  10. Use of assistive technologies in academic libraries: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manorama; Shukla, Archana

    2014-01-01

    The present article attempts to highlight the use of assistive technologies in academic libraries in India, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada. It dwells upon the use and importance of assistive technologies in general and their use for visually challenged learners in particular. Further, it gives suggestions for implementing assistive technologies in academic libraries for making visually challenged students self-reliant learners in accomplishing their academic and research pursuits. The present study adopted convenience sampling for collecting the data, which was collected between December 15, 2012 and January 18, 2013.

  11. 15 CFR 1160.3 - Assistance to industrial technology partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assistance to industrial technology partnerships. 1160.3 Section 1160.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PRODUCTIVITY, TECHNOLOGY AND...

  12. 15 CFR 1160.3 - Assistance to industrial technology partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assistance to industrial technology partnerships. 1160.3 Section 1160.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PRODUCTIVITY, TECHNOLOGY AND...

  13. New Technologies to Assist Training in Hospitality Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balta, Sabah

    2007-01-01

    Hospitality sector needs new technological training tools, which can assist to improve sector employees' skills and services quality. The sector might be more interactive when these technological training tools used on the job-training program. This study addresses to issue of illumination of new technologic tools that enforce training in which…

  14. Computer-Assisted Technology for the Twice Exceptional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizza, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Technology helps students develop coping strategies to deal with various learning differences. Assistive technology is a common intervention provided to students with disabilities and generally varies depending on student need. Within gifted education, the use of computers and technology is concentrated on curricular applications and activities…

  15. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) anomalies are associated with lung disease due to rapidly growing mycobacteria and AAT inhibits Mycobacterium abscessus infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward D; Kaminska, Aleksandra M; Gill, Wendy; Chmura, Kathryn; Feldman, Nicole E; Bai, Xiyuan; Floyd, Corinne M; Fulton, Kayte E; Huitt, Gwen A; Strand, Matthew J; Iseman, Michael D; Shapiro, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are ubiquitous in the environment but cause lung disease in only a fraction of exposed individuals. This variable susceptibility to disease implies vulnerability to RGM infection due to weakness in host defense. Since most persons who contract RGM lung disease have no known host defense defect, it is likely that uncharacterized host deficiencies exist that predispose to RGM infection. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a host factor that may protect individuals from respiratory infections. Therefore, we assessed AAT protein anomalies as a risk factor for RGM lung disease. In a cohort of 100 patients with RGM lung disease, Mycobacterium (M.) abscessus was the most prevalent organism, isolated in 64 (64%) subjects. Anomalous AAT proteins were present in 27% of the cohort, which is 1.6 times the estimated prevalence of anomalous AAT proteins in the United States population (p=0.008). In in vitro studies, both AAT and a synthetic inhibitor of serine proteases suppressed M. abscessus infection of monocyte-derived macrophages by up to 65% (p<0.01). AAT may be an anti-RGM host-defense factor, and anomalous AAT phenotypes or AAT deficiency may constitute risk factors for pulmonary disease due to RGM.

  16. Intellectual Disability and Assistive Technology: Opening the GATE Wider.

    PubMed

    Boot, Fleur Heleen; Dinsmore, John; Khasnabis, Chapal; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization has launched a program to promote Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE). The objective of the GATE program is to improve access to high quality, affordable assistive technology for people with varying disabilities, diseases, and age-related conditions. As a first step, GATE has developed the assistive products list, a list of priority assistive products based on addressing the greatest need at population level. A specific group of people who can benefit from user appropriate assistive technology are people with intellectual disabilities. However, the use of assistive products by people with intellectual disabilities is a neglected area of research and practice, and offers considerable opportunities for the advancement of population health and the realization of basic human rights. It is unknown how many people with intellectual disabilities globally have access to appropriate assistive products and which factors influence their access. We call for a much greater focus on people with intellectual disabilities within the GATE program. We present a framework for understanding the complex interaction between intellectual disability, health and wellbeing, and assistive technology.

  17. Intellectual Disability and Assistive Technology: Opening the GATE Wider

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Fleur Heleen; Dinsmore, John; Khasnabis, Chapal; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization has launched a program to promote Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE). The objective of the GATE program is to improve access to high quality, affordable assistive technology for people with varying disabilities, diseases, and age-related conditions. As a first step, GATE has developed the assistive products list, a list of priority assistive products based on addressing the greatest need at population level. A specific group of people who can benefit from user appropriate assistive technology are people with intellectual disabilities. However, the use of assistive products by people with intellectual disabilities is a neglected area of research and practice, and offers considerable opportunities for the advancement of population health and the realization of basic human rights. It is unknown how many people with intellectual disabilities globally have access to appropriate assistive products and which factors influence their access. We call for a much greater focus on people with intellectual disabilities within the GATE program. We present a framework for understanding the complex interaction between intellectual disability, health and wellbeing, and assistive technology. PMID:28275593

  18. 34 CFR 300.6 - Assistive technology service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Assistive technology service. 300.6 Section 300.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  19. 34 CFR 300.6 - Assistive technology service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assistive technology service. 300.6 Section 300.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  20. 34 CFR 300.5 - Assistive technology device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assistive technology device. 300.5 Section 300.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  1. 34 CFR 300.5 - Assistive technology device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Assistive technology device. 300.5 Section 300.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  2. Correct coding for laboratory procedures during assisted reproductive technology cycles.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document provides updated coding information for services related to assisted reproductive technology procedures. This document replaces the 2012 ASRM document of the same name. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How Does Rehabilitative & Assistive Technology Benefit People With Disabilities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to disease, injury, or aging. Rehabilitative and assistive technology can enable individuals to: Care for themselves and their families Work Learn in schools and other educational institutions Access information through computers ...

  4. Children with Disabilities Who Use Assistive Technology: Ethical Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder-Brown, Loreta; Parette, Howard P. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses some of the ethical concerns that early childhood professionals should consider when identifying or adapting assistive technologies for young children with such disabilities as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, visual impairments, and hearing impairments. (BB)

  5. "The lion, the witch and the wardrobe": impact on sibs of individuals with AAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fanos, Joanna H; Strange, Charlie

    2004-10-15

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a genetic disorder that may cause serious pulmonary or liver impairment in children or adults. Although genetic sequencing of the AAT gene has only been available for 20 years, analysis of the amount and electrophoretic mobility of the AAT protein has allowed clinical phenotyping for more than 40 years. There have been no studies assessing the psychological impact of having a sib affected by AAT deficiency. Twenty-five participants drawn from the Alpha-1 Research Registry completed a questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Respondents were supportive of testing prior to adulthood for AAT status; 18 thought it was a good idea to test a child, three did not know, and four said children should not be tested, primarily citing insurance concerns. Of those 18 who stated it was a good idea, 14 would test at birth. Knowledge of genetics of AAT deficiency was limited; only 44% of respondents understood the inheritance pattern. We recommend: (1) parents and sibs need help in mourning the loss of children with AAT deficiency; young sibs are at risk for trauma and long-term developmental problems. (2) Teams evaluating donors for liver transplantation should be aggressive in ruling out AAT deficiency prior to invasive testing. (3) Testing should be offered to individuals with a family history of AAT deficiency to obtain the health benefits of lifestyle modification and limit the burden of disease discovery in symptomatic relatives. (4) Awareness of liver disease from AAT deficiency should be increased.

  6. Aromatic amino acid transporter AAT-9 of Caenorhabditis elegans localizes to neurons and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Emilija; Bacconi, Andrea; Stetak, Attila; Hajnal, Alex; Stasiuk, Susan; Skelly, Patrick J; Forster, Ian; Shoemaker, Charles B; Verrey, Francois

    2004-11-19

    The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes nine homologues of mammalian glycoprotein-associated amino acid transporters. Two of these C. elegans proteins (AAT-1 and AAT-3) have been shown to function as catalytic subunits (light chains) of heteromeric amino acid transporters. These proteins need to associate with a glycoprotein heavy chain subunit (ATG-2) to reach the cell surface in a manner similar to that of their mammalian homologues. AAT-1 and AAT-3 contain a cysteine residue in the second putative extracellular loop through which a disulfide bridge can form with a heavy chain. In contrast, six C. elegans members of this family (AAT-4 to AAT-9) lack such a cysteine residue. We show here that one of these transporter proteins, AAT-9, reaches the cell surface in Xenopus oocytes without an exogenous heavy chain and that it functions as an exchanger of aromatic amino acids. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments demonstrate that AAT-9 displays a substrate-activated conductance. Immunofluorescence shows that it is expressed close to the pharyngeal bulbs within C. elegans neurons. The selective expression of an aat-9 promoter-green fluorescent protein construct in several neurons of this region and in wall muscle cells around the mouth supports and extends these localization data. Taken together, the results show that AAT-9 is expressed in excitable cells of the nematode head and pharynx in which it may provide a pathway for aromatic amino acid transport.

  7. An overview of assistive technology for persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blake, Donna Jo; Bodine, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurologic disease clinically characterized by episodes of focal disorder of the cranial nerves, spinal cord, and the brain. MS affects a significant number of young adults, and they most often face a future of progressive functional losses as more of their central nervous system and cranial nerves are affected. As the disease progresses, they have new impairments with accompanying limitations in activities, restrictions to their participation in life, and compromised quality of life. Assistive technology includes any item that is used to maintain or improve functional capabilities. The rehabilitation healthcare provider has many opportunities to intervene with assistive technologies to decrease activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this article is to (1) review the impairments and associated activity limitations and participations restrictions experienced by persons with MS, (2) provide an overview of high- and low-tech assistive technologies appropriate for persons with MS, (3) discuss funding opportunities for assistive technologies, (4) review current studies of assistive technology used for persons with MS and discuss future research directions, and (5) consider assistive technology as an intervention for disability prevention.

  8. Assistive technology: a health care reform for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Pintor, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, María; Correa-Colón, Angela; Méndez-Fernández, Héctor L

    2009-03-01

    Assistive technology has become one of the most powerful tools in assisting people with disabilities fight for social equality both in Puerto Rico as well as in other cities worldwide. In spite of this, the availability of assistive technology equipment does not constitute reason enough for people with disabilities to have all the technology resources for making them independent and productive in a society as competitive as ours. An assistive technology evaluation process is recommended in order to achieve an optimum level of self-sufficiency in people with disabilities. The evaluation process should take into consideration both the individual's needs and strength and the advantages and disadvantages of the equipment. The main purpose of this research was to determine the satisfaction level of 69 consumers evaluated at the Assistive Technology Integrated Services Center. These evaluations were conducted during 2001-2005. Statistical tests including distribution of frequencies, chi-square, bivariate and variance analysis were produced in order to determine if a scientific association existed between the consumers' level of satisfaction with the services and the assisted conditions. The data analysis results showed a significant difference between the satisfaction level with consumer's age, type of disability, and recommended equipment acquisition. Besides, statistical associations were established between general satisfaction concept dimensions, type of disability, and consumers' particular characteristics.

  9. RESNA Conference Explores New Horizons in Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Susan Gilbert

    1996-01-01

    In June 1996, the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, whose mission is to help people with disabilities achieve their life goals with technology, met in Salt Lake City (Utah). This article provides an overview of the conference, describing product exhibits, courses, meetings, and particularly research…

  10. Collision of Media Positions on Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emelyanova, T. P.; Vopilova, I. E.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of the discourse on assisted reproductive technologies (ART) indicates the predominance of conservative representations of the family. The appearance of new technologies does not change the image of a "normal" family, because concepts connected with surrogate mothers and egg donors are minimally present in the discourse. In…

  11. Employment Barriers: Access to Assistive Technology and Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Stacy E.; Crudden, Adele; Sansing, William K.; LeJeune, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the underemployment of individuals with visual impairments and technological barriers to employment. It then presents an overview of legislation, public and private rehabilitation agency programs, and federal agency programs that have an impact on the distribution and use of assistive technology to individuals with…

  12. Using Assistive Technology to Meet Diverse Learner Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtts, Stephanie; Dobbins, Nicole; Takemae, Natsuko

    2012-01-01

    Implementing new and advanced technology for instruction and access to the curriculum for the increasingly diverse student populations in schools can be a daunting task for even the most tech-savvy school personnel. This task can be even more challenging when devices, tools, and systems associated with assistive, or adaptive, technology are part…

  13. Instructional Technology in International Teaching Assistant (ITA) Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumley, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the range of instructional technology use in international teaching assistant (ITA) programs in U.S. universities and the perceptions ITA professionals have of this use. It consisted of two phases of data collection: telephone interviews and a web-based survey. The study identified and rank ordered 15 technology practices; the…

  14. Assistive Technology and Emergent Literacy for Preschoolers: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kimberly Kris; Smith Canter, Lora Lee; Jeffs, Tara; Judge, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the legislative mandate for assistive technology (AT) consideration and the tenacity of researchers, educators, and practitioners to develop more proficient readers at younger ages, cohesive and comprehensive emergent literacy technology planning has not been sufficiently developed for preschool children with disabilities. The purpose of…

  15. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2017-04-19

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  16. Technology-assisted congestive heart failure care.

    PubMed

    Iyngkaran, P; Toukhsati, S R; Biddagardi, N; Zimmet, H; J Atherton, J; Hare, D L

    2015-04-01

    The interface between eHealth technologies and disease management in chronic conditions such as chronic heart failure (CHF) has advanced beyond the research domain. The substantial morbidity, mortality, health resource utilization and costs imposed by chronic disease, accompanied by increasing prevalence, complex comorbidities and changing client and health staff demographics, have pushed the boundaries of eHealth to alleviate costs whilst maintaining services. Whilst the intentions are laudable and the technology is appealing, this nonetheless requires careful scrutiny. This review aims to describe this technology and explore the current evidence and measures to enhance its implementation.

  17. First light results from the HERMES spectrograph at the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinis, Andrew I.

    2016-08-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph, HERMES is a facility-class optical spectrograph for the AAT. It is designed primarily for Galactic Archeology, the first major attempt to create a detailed understanding of galaxy formation and evolution by studying the history of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. The goal of the Galactic Archeology with Hermes (GALAH) survey is to reconstruct the mass assembly history of the Milky Way, through a detailed spatially tagged abundance study of one million stars. The spectrograph is based at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) and is fed by the existing 2dF robotic fiber positioning system. The spectrograph uses VPH-gratings to achieve a spectral resolving power of 28,000 in standard mode and also provides a high-resolution mode ranging between 40,000 to 50,000 using a slit mask. The GALAH survey requires a SNR greater than 100 for a star brightness of V=14. The total spectral coverage of the four channels is about 100nm between 370 and 1000nm for up to 392 simultaneous targets within the 2- degree field of view. Hermes was commissioned in late 2013, with the GALAH Pilot starting in parallel with the commissioning. The GALAH survey started in early 2014 is currently about 33% complete. We present a description of the motivating science; an overview the instrument; and a status report on GALAH Survey.

  18. International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies world report: Assisted Reproductive Technology 2008, 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Dyer, S; Chambers, G M; de Mouzon, J; Nygren, K G; Zegers-Hochschild, F; Mansour, R; Ishihara, O; Banker, M; Adamson, G D

    2016-07-01

    What were utilization, outcomes and practices in assisted reproductive technology (ART) globally in 2008, 2009 and 2010? Global utilization and effectiveness remained relatively constant despite marked variations among countries, while the rate of single and frozen embryo transfers (FETs) increased with a concomitant slight reduction in multiple birth rates. ART is widely practised in all regions of the world. Monitoring utilization, an approximation of availability and access, as well as effectiveness and safety is an important component of universal access to reproductive health. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional survey on utilization, effectiveness and safety of ART procedures performed globally from 2008 to 2010. Between 58 and 61 countries submitted data from a total of nearly 2500 ART clinics each year. Aggregate country data were processed and analyzed based on forms and methods developed by the International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART). Results are presented at country, regional and global level. For the years 2008, 2009 and 2010, >4 461 309 ART cycles were initiated, resulting in an estimated 1 144 858 babies born. The number of aspirations increased by 6.4% between 2008 and 2010, while FET cycles increased by 27.6%. Globally, ART utilization remained relatively constant at 436 cycles/million in 2008 and 474 cycles/million population in 2010, but with a wide country range of 8-4775 cycles/million population. ICSI remained constant at around 66% of non-donor aspiration cycles. The IVF/ICSI combined delivery rate (DR) per fresh aspiration was 19.8% in 2008; 19.7% in 2009 and 20.0% in 2010, with corresponding DRs for FET of 18.8, 19.7 and 20.7%. In fresh non-donor cycles, single embryo transfer increased from 25.7% in 2008 to 30.0% in 2010, while the average number of embryos transferred fell from 2.1 to 1.9, again with wide regional variation. The rates of twin deliveries following fresh non-donor transfers

  19. New assistive technology for passive standing.

    PubMed

    Gear, A J; Suber, F; Neal, J G; Nguyen, W D; Edlich, R F

    1999-01-01

    The anesthetic skin of patients with spinal cord injuries makes these patients a high-risk population for burn injuries. Innovations in rehabilitation engineering can now provide the disabled with mechanical devices that allow for passive standing. Passive standing has been shown to counteract many of the effects of chronic immobilization and spinal cord injury, including bone demineralization, urinary calculi, cardiovascular instability, and reduced joint range of motion and muscular tone. This article will describe several unique assistive devices that allow for passive standing and an improvement in daily living for people with disabilities.

  20. Driving, brain injury and assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Amy K; Benoit, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with brain injury often present with cognitive, physical and emotional impairments which impact their ability to resume independence in activities of daily living. Of those activities, the resumption of driving privileges is cited as one of the greatest concerns by survivors of brain injury. The integration of driving fundamentals within the hierarchical model proposed by Keskinen represents the complexity of skills and behaviors necessary for driving. This paper provides a brief review of specific considerations concerning the driver with TBI and highlights current vehicle technology which has been developed by the automotive industry and by manufacturers of adaptive driving equipment that may facilitate the driving task. Adaptive equipment technology allows for compensation of a variety of operational deficits, whereas technological advances within the automotive industry provide drivers with improved safety and information systems. However, research has not yet supported the use of such intelligent transportation systems or advanced driving systems for drivers with brain injury. Although technologies are intended to improve the safety of drivers within the general population, the potential of negative consequences for drivers with brain injury must be considered. Ultimately, a comprehensive driving evaluation and training by a driving rehabilitation specialist is recommended for individuals with brain injury. An understanding of the potential impact of TBI on driving-related skills and knowledge of current adaptive equipment and technology is imperative to determine whether return-to-driving is a realistic and achievable goal for the individual with TBI.

  1. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance -- United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara; Anderson, John E; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2013-12-06

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information on U.S. ART procedures performed in 2010 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2010 (resulting from procedures performed in 2009 and 2010) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2010. 2010. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States and U.S. territories, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. In 2010, a total of 147,260 ART procedures performed in 443 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 47,090 live-birth deliveries and 61,564 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (18,524), New York (excluding New York City) (14,212), Illinois (10,110), Massachusetts (9,854), New Jersey (8,783), and Texas (8,754). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART procedures and together accounted for 48.0% of all ART procedures performed, 45.0% of all infants born

  2. Assistive Technology for People with Mental Retardation. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This fact sheet on assistive technology for people with mental retardation (MR) defines assistive technology, notes how it can benefit people with MR, discusses how it is used by people with MR, lists factors to consider before using assistive technology, outlines barriers in obtaining assistive technology for people with MR, and mentions two…

  3. Shared Decisions & Technology-Assisted Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mary

    2005-01-01

    In this short article, the author discusses how Henderson Middle School in Jackson, Georgia used shared decision making to improve student achievement through the use of laptop computers. With effective use of technology and shared decision making, administrators at Henderson believe that they can continue to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress under…

  4. Assistive Technology: Empowering Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgrave, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses three technological innovations that hold promise for middle and high school students with learning disabilities in reading and writing: speech synthesis programs (text-to-speech); organizational software; and voice recognition software. Examines advantages and disadvantages of each. Outlines considerations for the successful adoption of…

  5. Assistive Technology Developments in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lizama, Mauricio A.; Mendez, Hector L.

    Recent efforts to develop Spanish-based adaptations for alternate computer input devices are considered, as are their implications for Hispanics with disabilities and for the development of language sensitive devices worldwide. Emphasis is placed on the particular need to develop low-cost high technology devices for Puerto Rico and Latin America…

  6. Technical Assistance for Southwest Solar Technologies Inc. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Ramos, Karina; Brainard, James Robert; McIntyre, Annie; Bauer, Stephen J.; Akin, Lili A.; Nicol, Katherine; Hayden, Herb

    2012-07-01

    Southwest Solar Technologies Inc. is constructing a Solar-Fuel Hybrid Turbine energy system. This innovative energy system combines solar thermal energy with compressed air energy storage and natural gas fuel backup capability to provide firm, non-intermittent power. In addition, the energy system will have very little impact on the environment since, unlike other Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies, it requires minimal water. In 2008 Southwest Solar Technologies received a Solar America Showcase award from the Department of Energy for Technical Assistance from Sandia National Laboratories. This report details the work performed as part of the Solar America Showcase award for Southwest Solar Technologies. After many meetings and visits between Sandia National Labs and Southwest Solar Technologies, several tasks were identified as part of the Technical Assistance and the analysis and results for these are included here.

  7. Middle school special education teachers' perceptions and use of assistive technology in literacy instruction.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Emily C; Richardson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In this research the authors examined middle school special education teachers' perceptions of assistive technology during literacy instruction with students with high incidence disabilities. A survey explored the use, effectiveness, and factors impacting use or effectiveness of assistive technology for literacy teaching and learning. Results suggested teachers' perceived assistive technology to be an effective tool for literacy, but use it minimally. When assistive technology was used, teachers indicated it was an effective literacy support. Teachers also reported barriers to using assistive technology in literacy including cost, usability, and lack of training/experience. However, factors such as previous successful experiences with assistive technology and assistive technology supporting students' learning encouraged assistive technology use. The consistency of teachers' reports of needing more experience and knowledge in assistive technology to fully use it suggests implications for preservice preparation such as providing additional experiences and information on assistive technology.

  8. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2017-02-10

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2014 and compares birth outcomes that occurred in 2014 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2013 and 2014) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2014. 2014. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico). In 2014, a total of 169,568 ART procedures (range: 124 in Wyoming to 21,018 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 458 U.S. fertility clinics and reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 56,028 live-birth deliveries (range: 52 in Wyoming to 7,230 in California) and 68,782 infants born (range: 64 in Wyoming to 8,793 in California). Nationally, the total number of ART procedures performed per million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART usage rate, was 2,647 (range: 364 in Puerto Rico

  9. NRFL-1, the C. elegans NHERF orthologue, interacts with amino acid transporter 6 (AAT-6) for age-dependent maintenance of AAT-6 on the membrane.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kohei; Nagamori, Shushi; Umemura, Yasuhiro M; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Murata, Daisuke; Nakagomi, Saya; Nomura, Kazuko H; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Mitani, Shohei; Nomura, Kazuya; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2012-01-01

    The NHERF (Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor) family has been proposed to play a key role in regulating transmembrane protein localization and retention at the plasma membrane. Due to the high homology between the family members, potential functional compensations have been a concern in sorting out the function of individual NHERF numbers. Here, we studied C. elegans NRFL-1 (C01F6.6) (nherf-like protein 1), the sole C. elegans orthologue of the NHERF family, which makes worm a model with low genetic redundancy of NHERF homologues. Integrating bioinformatic knowledge of C. elegans proteins into yeast two-hybrid scheme, we identified NRFL-1 as an interactor of AAT-6, a member of the C. elegans AAT (amino acid transporter) family. A combination of GST pull-down assay, localization study, and co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the binding and characterized the PDZ interaction. AAT-6 localizes to the luminal membrane even in the absence of NRFL-1 when the worm is up to four-day old. A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis suggested that NRFL-1 immobilizes AAT-6 at the luminal membrane. When the nrfl-1 deficient worm is six-day or older, in contrast, the membranous localization of AAT-6 is not observed, whereas AAT-6 tightly localizes to the membrane in worms with NRFL-1. Sorting out the in vivo functions of the C. elegans NHERF protein, we found that NRFL-1, a PDZ-interactor of AAT-6, is responsible for the immobilization and the age-dependent maintenance of AAT-6 on the intestinal luminal membrane.

  10. The moral basis of animal-assisted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Tzachi

    2006-01-01

    Is nonhuman animal-assisted therapy (AAT) a form of exploitation? After exploring possible moral vindications of AAT and after establishing a distinction between "use" and "exploitation," the essay distinguishes between forms of animal-assisted therapy that are morally unobjectionable and those modes of it that ought to be abolished.

  11. First light results from the Hermes spectrograph at the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinis, Andrew; Barden, Sam; Birchall, Michael; Carollo, Daniela; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brzeski, Jurek; Case, Scott; Cannon, Russell; Churilov, Vladimir; Couch, Warrick; Dean, Robert; De Silva, Gayandhi; D'Orazi, Valentina; Farrell, Tony; Fiegert, Kristin; Freeman, Kenneth; Frost, Gabriella; Gers, Luke; Goodwin, Michael; Gray, Doug; Heald, Ron; Heijmans, Jeroen; Jones, Damien; Keller, Stephan; Klauser, Urs; Kondrat, Yuriy; Lawrence, Jon; Lee, Steve; Mali, Slavko; Martell, Sarah; Mathews, Darren; Mayfield, Don; Miziarski, Stan; Muller, Rolf; Pai, Naveen; Patterson, Robert; Penny, Ed; Orr, David; Shortridge, Keith; Simpson, Jeffrey; Smedley, Scott; Smith, Greg; Stafford, Darren; Staszak, Nicholas; Vuong, Minh; Waller, Lewis; Wylie de Boer, Elizabeth; Xavier, Pascal; Zheng, Jessica; Zhelem, Ross; Zucker, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph, HERMES is an facility-class optical spectrograph for the AAT. It is designed primarily for Galactic Archeology [21], the first major attempt to create a detailed understanding of galaxy formation and evolution by studying the history of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. The goal of the GALAH survey is to reconstruct the mass assembly history of the of the Milky Way, through a detailed spatially tagged abundance study of one million stars. The spectrograph is based at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) and is fed by the existing 2dF robotic fiber positioning system. The spectrograph uses VPH-gratings to achieve a spectral resolving power of 28,000 in standard mode and also provides a high-resolution mode ranging between 40,000 to 50,000 using a slit mask. The GALAH survey requires a SNR greater than 100 for a star brightness of V=14. The total spectral coverage of the four channels is about 100nm between 370 and 1000nm for up to 392 simultaneous targets within the 2 degree field of view. Hermes has been commissioned over 3 runs, during bright time in October, November and December 2013, in parallel with the beginning of the GALAH Pilot survey starting in November 2013. In this paper we present the first-light results from the commissioning run and the beginning of the GALAH Survey, including performance results such as throughput and resolution, as well as instrument reliability. We compare the abundance calculations from the pilot survey to those in the literature.

  12. KAO and AAT observations of the Galactic Center filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.; Haas, Michael R.; Morris, M.; Cotera, A. S.; Allen, David A.; Burton, Michael G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) to investigate the nature of the filamentary radio emission from the Galactic center region. KAO observations of the FIR line and continuum emission from the radio peak G0.095+0.012 and the E2 thermal radio filament northeast of the Galactic center can be produced by numerous nearby stars with T(sub eff) approx. 35,000 K; these can account for both the FIR luminosity and the excitation of the gas. Much of the FIR continuum and most of the strong (Si II) (34.8 micron) line emission are probably produced in the ionized gas of the filament. The FIR (O III) 52 and 88 micron lines imply an electron density of a few hundred; when compared with the radio emission measure, this implies the filament is roughly tubular or somewhat flattened in the plane of the sky. The (O III) and (S III) lines show higher excitation associated with the filament, and suggest that exciting stars may be located within the filaments and/or southeast of the E2 filament. AAT observations in the near infrared (NIR) in fact reveal a nearby cluster of hot stars southeast of the E2 filament. Additional hot stars, not identifiable from their NIR spectra, are likely to be present. These stars and those in the cluster can plausibly produce the observed radio and FIR emission in the region. The morphology of the filament is not explained by existing information however.

  13. Commercialization of Plasma-Assisted Technologies: The Indian Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, P. I.

    The paper describes an initiative by the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India in establishing links with the Indian industry for developing and commercialising advanced plasma-based industrial technologies. This has culminated in the creation of a self-financing technology development, incubation, demonstration and delivery facility. A business plan for converting the knowledge base to commercially viable technologies conceived technology as a product and the industry as the market and addressed issues like resistance to new technologies, the key role of entrepreneur, thrust areas and the necessity of technology incubation and delivery. Success of this strategy is discussed in a few case studies. We conclude by identifying the cost, environmental, strategic and techno-economic aspects, which would be the prime drivers for plasma-assisted manufacturing technology in India.

  14. Assistive technologies in reducing caregiver burden among informal caregivers of older adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Madara Marasinghe, Keshini

    2016-01-01

    The world population is rapidly ageing. As population age, the incidence of functional limitations increases, demanding higher levels of care from caregivers. Assistive technologies improve individuals' functioning, independence, well-being and quality of life. By increasing independence of older adults, assistive technologies decrease workloads required from informal caregivers. This review investigates, evaluates, and synthesises existing findings to examine whether and how assistive technologies reduce caregiver burden. Databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Three groups of keywords were combined: those relating to assistive technology, caregiver burden, and older adults. Two theories emerged from the analysis of study results. Caregivers reported that assistive technologies decrease caregiver burden. However, caregivers had concerns that assistive technologies could add to caregiver burden, highlighting the limitations of assistive technology. As suggested by a majority of the studies in this review, assistive technologies contribute to reducing caregiver burden among caregivers of older adults. Assistive technologies assisted caregivers by reducing time, levels of assistance and energy put towards caregiving, anxiety and fear, task difficulty, safety risk particularly for activities requiring physical assistance and increasing the independence of the users. Further research is required to better understand limitations of assistive technologies. Implications for Rehabilitation Support for informal caregivers of older adults need more attention and recognition. Assistive technologies can reduce caregiver burden among informal caregivers of older adults. Further research is required to better understand the effectiveness of assistive technologies in reducing caregiver burden as well as limitations and barriers associated with using assistive technologies.

  15. International committee for monitoring assisted reproductive technologies: world report on assisted reproductive technologies, 2007.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Osamu; Adamson, G David; Dyer, Silke; de Mouzon, Jacques; Nygren, Karl G; Sullivan, Elizabeth A; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Mansour, Ragaa

    2015-02-01

    To analyze information on assisted reproductive technology (ART) performed worldwide, and trends in outcomes over successive years. Cross-sectional survey on access, efficiency, and safety of ART procedures performed in 55 countries during 2007. Not applicable. Infertile women and men undergoing ART globally. Collection and analysis of international ART data. Number of cycles performed, by country and region, including pregnancies, single and multiple birth rates, and perinatal mortality. Overall, >1,251,881 procedures with ART were reported, and resulted in 229,442 reported babies born. The availability of ART varied by country, from 12 to 4,140 treatments per million population. Of all aspiration cycles, 65.2% (400,617 of 614,540) were intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The overall delivery rate per fresh aspiration was 20.3%, and for frozen-embryo transfer (FET), 18.4%, with a cumulative delivery rate of 25.8%. With wide regional variations, single-embryo transfer represented 23.4% of fresh transfers, and the proportion of deliveries with twins and triplets from fresh transfers was 22.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The perinatal mortality rate was 19.9 per 1,000 births for fresh in vitro fertilization using intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and 9.6 per 1,000 for FET. The proportion of women aged ≥40 years increased to 19.8% from 15.5% in 2006. The international trend toward <3 transferred embryos continued, as did the wider uptake of FET. This was achieved without compromising delivery rates. The application of ART for women aged >40 years was a major component of ART services in some regions and countries. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perinatal outcomes associated with assisted reproductive technology: the Massachusetts Outcomes Study of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (MOSART).

    PubMed

    Declercq, Eugene; Luke, Barbara; Belanoff, Candice; Cabral, Howard; Diop, Hafsatou; Gopal, Daksha; Hoang, Lan; Kotelchuck, Milton; Stern, Judy E; Hornstein, Mark D

    2015-04-01

    To compare on a population basis the birth outcomes of women treated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), women with indicators of subfertility but without ART, and fertile women. Longitudinal cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 334,628 births and fetal deaths to Massachusetts mothers giving birth in a Massachusetts hospital from July 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008, subdivided into three subgroups for comparison: ART 11,271, subfertile 6,609, and fertile 316,748. None. Four outcomes-preterm birth, low birth weight, small for gestational age, and perinatal death-were modeled separately for singletons and twins with the use of logistic regression for the primary comparison between ART births and those to the newly created population-based subgroup of births to women with indicators of subfertility but no ART. For singletons, the risks for both preterm birth and low birth weight were higher for the ART group (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] 1.23 and 1.26, respectively) compared with the subfertile group, and risks in both the ART and the subfertile groups were higher than those among the fertile births group. For twins, the risk of perinatal death was significantly lower among ART births than fertile (AOR 0.55) or subfertile (AOR 0.15) births. The use of a population-based comparison group of subfertile births without ART demonstrated significantly higher rates of preterm birth and low birth weight in ART singleton births, but these differences are smaller than differences between ART and fertile births. Further refinement of the measurement of subfertile births and examination of the independent risks of subfertile births is warranted. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assistive Technology and Play for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Laura Fowler; And Others

    This booklet provides information regarding how to incorporate assistive technology into developmentally appropriate play activities for infants and toddlers. A brief overview of normal development is given, from birth through 36 months. Specific ideas for adapting standard play activities for the enjoyment and education of children with physical…

  18. The Role of Assistive Technology in Self-Perceived Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripat, Jacquie D.; Woodgate, Roberta L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of how assistive technology (AT) contributes to self-perceived participation for individuals with spinal cord injuries and to propose a revised definition of AT in light of the findings. A grounded theory study of 19 adults with spinal cord injuries was conducted. Participants engaged in…

  19. Assessment Models and Software Support for Assistive Technology Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Len; Sanche, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews requirements for considering the need for assistive technology (AT) services within the Individualized Education Program process and highlights the importance of collaborative teamwork. Current AT models are described, along with the AT Co-Planner. The use of a software version of the model is discussed. (Contains references.)…

  20. Technology Enhanced Accent Modification (TEAM) for International Teaching Assistants (ITAs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Arthur H.

    The Technology Enhanced Accent Modification (TEAM) project created multimedia software to improve the oral proficiency of international teaching assistants (ITAs). Objectives were to: (1) develop reliable accent modification software that would operate on computers found at most colleges; (2) determine how TEAM-based accent modification…

  1. Making Decisions about Assistive Technology with Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Lauren M.; Campbell, Philippa H.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined and contrasted beliefs and decision-making practices concerning the use of assistive technology (AT) with infants and toddlers. Participants were 424 multidisciplinary early intervention providers drawn from across the United States. A majority of professionals disagreed with proposed belief statements about AT with…

  2. Creating an Assistive Technology Outcomes Measurement System: Validating the Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edyburn, Dave L.; Smith, Roger O.

    2004-01-01

    The topic of assistive technology (AT) outcomes has only recently received attention in the professional literature. As a result, there is a considerable void in the profession's ability to address contemporary questions about the value and use of AT. The purpose of this article is to highlight the theory, development, and research efforts of the…

  3. Assistive Technology for Young Children: Creating Inclusive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadao, Kathleen C.; Robinson, Nancy B.

    2010-01-01

    Assistive technology (AT) can help young children with disabilities fully participate in natural, inclusive learning environments--but many early childhood professionals don't get the training they need to harness the power of AT. Fill that gap with this unintimidating, reader-friendly resource, the go-to guide to recommended AT practice for…

  4. Modified Test Administration Using Assistive Technology: Preliminary Psychometric Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschausky, Seth; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Asbell, Shana; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Ayyangar, Rita; Donders, Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of test presentation and response formats that were modified to be accessible with the use of assistive technology (AT). First, the stability of psychometric properties was examined in 60 children, ages 6 to 12, with no significant physical or communicative impairments. Population-specific…

  5. Approaches for Evaluating the Usability of Assistive Technology Product Prototypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi; Sprigle, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    User input is an important component to help guide designers in producing a more usable product. Evaluation of prototypes is one method of obtaining this input, but methods for evaluating assistive technology prototypes during design have not been adequately described or evaluated. This project aimed to compare different methods of evaluating…

  6. Assistive Technology: Tips, Tools, and Techniques. A Parent Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Norman-Murch, Trudi; Oberstein, Jill S.; Volkmann, Melody A.; Wagner, Deanna K.; Musselwhite, Caroline Ramsey; Malena, Edye; Weber, Carolyn A.

    Designed for parents of children who have a wide variety of disabilities, this manual discusses the ways in which assistive technology can facilitate the child's active participation in developmentally appropriate activities and offers ideas for incorporating devices and strategies into daily school and home routines. The manual attempts to…

  7. A Pilot Course in Teaching Skills for Assistive Technology Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candela, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a train-the-trainers course that provided training in sound instructional strategies to 10 assistive technology specialists who work with people who are visually impaired. Topics included conducting assessments, writing training proposals, developing the curriculum, planning lessons, and analyzing learning styles. All…

  8. Improving Vocabulary Skills through Assistive Technology: Rick's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey-Glenn, Pam F.; Gentry, James E.

    2008-01-01

    This case study examines the use of two assistive technologies, the Franklin Language Master 6000b and Microsoft PowerPoint 2003, as visual support systems to aid in the vocabulary acquisition skills of a student with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The intervention used children's literature and best practices in teaching vocabulary skills in…

  9. Assistive Technology and Academic Libraries: Legal Issues and Problem Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.

    2009-01-01

    Legal issues have increasingly come to the forefront in academic libraries in recent years. Most of these issues involve The Rehabilitation Act, Section 504 (1973) or Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), complaints related to discriminatory practices with regard to accommodations or assistive technologies. This article provides a brief synopsis…

  10. Assistive Technology for Young Children: Creating Inclusive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadao, Kathleen C.; Robinson, Nancy B.

    2010-01-01

    Assistive technology (AT) can help young children with disabilities fully participate in natural, inclusive learning environments--but many early childhood professionals don't get the training they need to harness the power of AT. Fill that gap with this unintimidating, reader-friendly resource, the go-to guide to recommended AT practice for…

  11. Assistive Technology in Rehabilitation: Improving Impact through Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Allen N.; Cooper, Rory A.; Seelman, Kate D.; Cooper, Rosemarie; Schein, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the topic of assistive technology (AT) to offer a direction for its future role within the rehabilitation profession. A brief overview of the five AT legislative acts to date is provided. Next, future considerations for AT are offered in the context of what we know within the U.S. and global communities followed by the…

  12. Assistive Technology and Academic Libraries: Legal Issues and Problem Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.

    2009-01-01

    Legal issues have increasingly come to the forefront in academic libraries in recent years. Most of these issues involve The Rehabilitation Act, Section 504 (1973) or Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), complaints related to discriminatory practices with regard to accommodations or assistive technologies. This article provides a brief synopsis…

  13. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: Information for Parents & Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Bismarck.

    This brochure is intended to inform parents and educators regarding the use of assistive technology devices and services in the special education evaluation process and programming. It is designed to help team participants develop the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP). Topics covered include: (1) the federal definition of assistive…

  14. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  15. Supported eText: Assistive Technology through Text Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Inman, Lynne; Horney, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    To gain meaningful access to the curriculum, students with reading difficulties must overcome substantial barriers imposed by the printed materials they are asked to read. Technology can assist students to overcome these challenges by enabling a shift from printed text to electronic text. By electronic text it means textual material read using a…

  16. Assisted Reproductive Technology and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachor, Ditza A.; Itzchak, E. Ben

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on maternal and pregnancy risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including use of assisted reproductive technology (ART), found conflicting results. This study included the following aims: to assess frequencies of ART in a large ASD group; to examine confounding birth and familial risk factors in the ASD with ART…

  17. Emergent Legal Definitions of Parentage in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cherylon; Miller, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    State statutes and court cases involving Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) are examined to determine legal definitions of father and mother. While traditional definitions are not disturbed overall by statutes and cases involving use of artificial insemination by donor among married couples, complications and disputes between parties involved…

  18. The Role of Assistive Technology in Self-Perceived Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripat, Jacquie D.; Woodgate, Roberta L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of how assistive technology (AT) contributes to self-perceived participation for individuals with spinal cord injuries and to propose a revised definition of AT in light of the findings. A grounded theory study of 19 adults with spinal cord injuries was conducted. Participants engaged in…

  19. Emergent Legal Definitions of Parentage in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cherylon; Miller, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    State statutes and court cases involving Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) are examined to determine legal definitions of father and mother. While traditional definitions are not disturbed overall by statutes and cases involving use of artificial insemination by donor among married couples, complications and disputes between parties involved…

  20. Assistive Technology User Group Perspectives of Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P.; Stoner, Julia B.; Watts, Emily H.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing usage of assistive technology (AT) usage in early childhood education settings serving children who are at-risk or who have developmental disabilities, there is a corresponding need for effective professional development experiences such as user groups to develop skills in using AT. Using a collective case study approach, 10…

  1. Effective Assistive Technology Consideration and Implications for Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Vita L.; Hinesmon-Matthews, Lezlee J.

    2014-01-01

    Often the consideration of assistive technology devices and services during the individualized education program (IEP) process is overlooked. Because the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) authorized this consideration, IEP team members must be keenly aware of the importance they hold in providing this valuable input. Thus, IEP…

  2. Assessment Models and Software Support for Assistive Technology Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Len; Sanche, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews requirements for considering the need for assistive technology (AT) services within the Individualized Education Program process and highlights the importance of collaborative teamwork. Current AT models are described, along with the AT Co-Planner. The use of a software version of the model is discussed. (Contains references.)…

  3. Effective Assistive Technology Consideration and Implications for Diverse Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Vita L.; Hinesmon-Matthews, Lezlee J.

    2014-01-01

    Often the consideration of assistive technology devices and services during the individualized education program (IEP) process is overlooked. Because the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) authorized this consideration, IEP team members must be keenly aware of the importance they hold in providing this valuable input. Thus, IEP…

  4. Modified Test Administration Using Assistive Technology: Preliminary Psychometric Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschausky, Seth; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Asbell, Shana; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Ayyangar, Rita; Donders, Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of test presentation and response formats that were modified to be accessible with the use of assistive technology (AT). First, the stability of psychometric properties was examined in 60 children, ages 6 to 12, with no significant physical or communicative impairments. Population-specific…

  5. Survey of University of Toledo Legal Assisting Technology Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robon, Nancy C.

    Graduates of the Legal Assisting Technology program at the University of Toledo were surveyed in 1981, as part of the requirement of the American Bar Association Approval Process. Questionnaires, which are appended, were sent to graduates and employers. In addition to curriculum, information was gathered with respect to the job placement,…

  6. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  7. Funding Assistive Technology and Related Health Services in Service Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Crystal E.; Parette, Howard P.; Hourcade, Jack J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the options for securing funding to provide assistive technology devices and services in service settings. Options include Medicaid, The School Health and Related Services Program, and The Early Periodic, Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program. Considers Medicaid payment requirements and private insurance as a funding source.…

  8. Improving Instructional Development of Industrial Technology Graduate Teaching Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brauchle, Paul E.; Jerich, Kenneth F.

    1998-01-01

    Six industrial-technology graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) with prior teaching experience and 11 who took a course on instruction were rated by 140 and 106 undergraduates respectively, with no significant differences in instructor effectiveness. Exit interviews with GTAs led to a recommendation that all GTAs, even those with prior teaching…

  9. Approaches for Evaluating the Usability of Assistive Technology Product Prototypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi; Sprigle, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    User input is an important component to help guide designers in producing a more usable product. Evaluation of prototypes is one method of obtaining this input, but methods for evaluating assistive technology prototypes during design have not been adequately described or evaluated. This project aimed to compare different methods of evaluating…

  10. The provision of assistive technology products and services for people with dementia in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Grant; Newton, Lisa; Pritchard, Gary; Finch, Tracy; Brittain, Katie; Robinson, Louise

    2016-07-01

    In this review we explore the provision of assistive technology products and services currently available for people with dementia within the United Kingdom. A scoping review of assistive technology products and services currently available highlighted 171 products or product types and 331 services. In addition, we assimilated data on the amount and quality of information provided by assistive technology services alongside assistive technology costs. We identify a range of products available across three areas: assistive technology used 'by', 'with' and 'on' people with dementia. Assistive technology provision is dominated by 'telecare' provided by local authorities, with services being subject to major variations in pricing and information provision; few currently used available resources for assistive technology in dementia. We argue that greater attention should be paid to information provision about assistive technology services across an increasingly mixed economy of dementia care providers, including primary care, local authorities, private companies and local/national assistive technology resources.

  11. Enhancing public involvement in assistive technology design research.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Tracey; Kenney, Laurence; Barker, Anthony T; Cooper, Glen; Good, Tim; Healey, Jamie; Heller, Ben; Howard, David; Matthews, Martin; Prenton, Sarah; Ryan, Julia; Smith, Christine

    2015-05-01

    To appraise the application of accepted good practice guidance on public involvement in assistive technology research and to identify its impact on the research team, the public, device and trial design. Critical reflection and within-project evaluation were undertaken in a case study of the development of a functional electrical stimulation device. Individual and group interviews were undertaken with lay members of a 10 strong study user advisory group and also research team members. Public involvement was seen positively by research team members, who reported a positive impact on device and study designs. The public identified positive impact on confidence, skills, self-esteem, enjoyment, contribution to improving the care of others and opportunities for further involvement in research. A negative impact concerned the challenge of engaging the public in dissemination after the study end. The public were able to impact significantly on the design of an assistive technology device which was made more fit for purpose. Research team attitudes to public involvement were more positive after having witnessed its potential first hand. Within-project evaluation underpins this case study which presents a much needed detailed account of public involvement in assistive technology design research to add to the existing weak evidence base. The evidence base for impact of public involvement in rehabilitation technology design is in need of development. Public involvement in co-design of rehabilitation devices can lead to technologies that are fit for purpose. Rehabilitation researchers need to consider the merits of active public involvement in research.

  12. Impact of Aging and Cognition on Hearing Assistive Technology Use.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Lindsey E; Messersmith, Jessica J

    2015-08-01

    Many factors go into appropriate recommendation and use of hearing assistive technology (HAT). The aging auditory system presents with its own complications and intricacies; there are many types of age-related hearing loss, and it is possible that the underlying cause of hearing loss can significantly impact the recommendations and performance with HATs. The audiologist should take into consideration peripheral and central auditory function when selecting HATs for the aging adult population as well as when selecting appropriate types of technology including personal sound amplification products, hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive technology. The cognitive ability of the patient plays a central role in the recommendations of HAT. It is possible that the use of HATs could mitigate some of the effects of cognitive decline and thus should be considered as early as possible. Assessment of ability and appropriate recommendations are crucial to consistent use of HAT devices.

  13. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Assisting Technology Programs (CIP: 51.0801--Medical Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the medical assisting technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  14. Has Technology Been Considered? A Guide for IEP Teams. CASE/TAM Assistive Technology Policy and Practice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, A. C.

    This guide compiles information essential to a working knowledge of assistive technology for children with disabilities. It addresses the definition of assistive technology and provides information on laws which direct the provision of assistive technology. The manual provides a framework to guide the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team as…

  15. Assistive technologies for visually impaired individuals in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bengisu, Murat

    2010-01-01

    A phone survey was conducted with 80 visually impaired people in Turkey to understand what types of assistive products are used and to what extent. The perceived utility of selected products and reasons for nonuse were investigated. Descriptions of products that would be useful for the participants but may not be available on the market were also obtained. The three most used assistive products were found to be computer screen readers (46%), talking watches (26%), and screen readers for cellular phones (21%). Cellular phones with screen reading capability are the most desired assistive products among the visually impaired community, but their high cost is a major barrier. Most of the relevant technologies are available but some product development, such as adaptation to the Turkish language, is necessary. The three products most frequently requested are bus station/destination announcement systems, devices that warn the person about barriers, and devices that read printed documents and signs.

  16. Ensuring Equal Access to Technology: Providing Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hwa; Templeton, Rosalyn

    2008-01-01

    With the passage of landmark federal laws, equal access to technology for all students, regardless of their abilities, has been getting increasing attention in the field of education. Although considering a continuum of assistive technology (AT) items and services for individuals with disabilities is a mandated practice, education and…

  17. Use of assistive technology devices in mainstream schools: students' perspective.

    PubMed

    Hemmingsson, Helena; Lidström, Helene; Nygård, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The use and nonuse of assistive technology devices in school by students with physical disabilities was investigated, and the students' experiences in using these devices is described. We used a mixed-methods approach with predominantly qualitative methods to collect and analyze data, which included observations of and interviews with 20 students with physical disabilities and the number and type of assistive technology devices provided. It is vital that devices be integrated into educational practice and that students experience immediate benefits for their function in everyday school activities without detrimental effects on their social participation. The latter was often more important than being able to perform activities independently. The students adopted both a functional and a psychosocial perspective of their devices, and providers should neglect neither. Children and youth need both verbal information and practical experience using devices to be able to make informed decisions.

  18. Assistive/rehabilitation technology, disability, and service delivery models.

    PubMed

    Adya, Meera; Samant, Deepti; Scherer, Marcia J; Killeen, Mary; Morris, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    The United Nation's Millennium Development Goals do not explicitly articulate a focus on disability; similar failures in the past resulted in research, policy, and practice that are not generalizable and did not meet the needs of persons with disabilities since they were developed for an "average" population. Academics and professionals in health and other disciplines should have a knowledge base in evidence-based practices that improve well-being and participation of people with disabilities through effective service delivery of assistive technology. Grounded by a theoretical framework that incorporates a multivariate perspective of disability that is acknowledged in the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities and the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, we present a review of models of assistive technology service delivery and call for future syntheses of the fragmented evidence base that would permit a comparative effectiveness approach to evaluation.

  19. Impact of monitoring technology in assisted living: outcome pilot.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Majd; Dalal, Siddharth; Mack, David; Kell, Steven W; Turner, Beverely; Leachtenauer, Jon; Felder, Robin

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a study designed to assess the acceptance and some psychosocial impacts of monitoring technology in assisted living. Monitoring systems were installed in 22 assisted living units to track the activities of daily living (ADLs) and key alert conditions of residents (15 of whom were nonmemory care residents). Activity reports and alert notifications were sent to professional caregivers who provided care to residents participating in the study. Diagnostic use of the monitoring data was assessed. Nonmemory care residents were surveyed and assessed using the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) instrument. Pre- and post-installation SWLS scores were compared. Older adult participants accepted monitoring. The results suggest that monitoring technologies could provide care coordination tools that are accepted by residents and may have a positive impact on their quality of life.

  20. Outcomes from infancy to adulthood after assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Seetha

    2014-05-01

    The outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART) should be not only the evaluation of successful initiation of pregnancy but also the birth of healthy infants and the evaluation of long-term outcomes of the offspring of the couple undergoing therapy. Maternal and neonatal outcomes are reported in another article in this series. This article will review the infant, childhood, adolescent, and young adult outcomes published after ART. The recent literature will be reviewed.

  1. Assistive technology and supplementary treatment for individuals with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Meir

    2007-06-12

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurological disorder, affecting mainly females, caused by MECP2 mutations usually resulting in severe physical disability. Due to the physical challenges faced by the individual with RS and her family, her rehabilitation program should support her throughout different daily activities, contexts, and surroundings. Rehabilitation interventions to reverse physical impairments include exercise of various types and different physical modalities. Nevertheless, in the vast majority of cases, hands-on therapeutic intervention opportunities are available for the client through a minute part of her waking hours. Hence, a supplementary system is required in order to engulf the child with a comprehensive network of support. Supplementary intervention can support physical impairment by introducing adaptive techniques, environmental modifications, and assistive technologies. The therapy program of an individual with RS should include the use of assistive technology when such devices improve the user's performance. The term "supplementary management" relates to the fact that this intervention may be performed by nonprofessionals with the supervision of a qualified therapist. Such an intervention can further support the therapeutic goals of the child, at a time when direct intervention is not supplied. The present article will review the available literature on the topic of assistive technology, incorporating the clinical knowledge of the author in the field of RS.

  2. Quality of assistive technologies in the home care for elderly.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Due to demographic changes, the number of elderly people who are in need of care is increasing. Assistive technologies make it possible for many elderly people to remain home despite their health conditions, which many prefer. Quality is an essential element of nursing care, and the elderly are becoming increasingly aware of this and are beginning to make high demands. The aims of this paper, which is based on a master's thesis, were to identify quality criteria in the field of assistive technologies and to present indicators for measuring quality. An extensive literature research was conducted for the theoretical part, and the empirical part employed a qualitative survey. The results show that the elderly's contentment and quality of life are the decisive factors for quality. A catalogue of quality indicators was developed by merging the results from literature with those from the expert consultation. To conclude, further research in this context, based on the results of this paper, is needed, in order to support the increasing use of assistive technologies.

  3. Phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 alphal-antitrypsin (AAT) vector in AAT-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Brantly, Mark L; Spencer, L Terry; Humphries, Margaret; Conlon, Thomas J; Spencer, Carolyn T; Poirier, Amy; Garlington, Wendy; Baker, Dawn; Song, Sihong; Berns, Kenneth I; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Snyder, Richard O; Byrne, Barry J; Flotte, Terence R

    2006-12-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) vector was performed in 12 AAT-deficient adults, 10 of whom were male. All subjects were either homozygous for the most common AAT mutation (a missense mutation designated PI*Z) or compound heterozygous for PI*Z and another mutation known to cause disease. There were four dose cohorts, ranging from 2.1 x 10(12) vector genomes (VG) to 6.9 x 10(13) VG, with three subjects per cohort. Subjects were injected sequentially in a dose-escalating fashion with a minimum of 14 days between patients. Subjects who had been receiving AAT protein replacement discontinued that therapy 28 days before vector administration. There were no vector-related serious adverse events in any of the 12 participants. Vector DNA sequences were detected in the blood between 1 and 3 days after injection in nearly all patients receiving doses of 6.9 x 10(12) VG or higher. Anti-AAV2 capsid antibodies were present and rose after vector injection, but no other immune responses were detected. One subject who had not been receiving protein replacement exhibited low-level expression of wild-type M-AAT in the serum (82 nM), which was detectable 30 days after receiving an injection of 2.1 x 10(13) VG. Unfortunately, residual but declining M-AAT levels from the washout of the protein replacement elevated background levels sufficiently to obscure any possible vector expression in that range in most of the other individuals in the higher dose cohorts.

  4. Teams, Networks, and Assistive Technology: Training Special Educators in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Cheryl; Kyger, Maggie; Guarino-Murphey, Dana

    Assistive technology is equipment that improves the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities. Using assistive technology, children discover they have control over their environment and develop a sense of competence and independence. As special education enrollments increase, more students are using assistive technology, but many…

  5. Enhancing the Assistive Technology Workforce State by State. The TAP Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This paper offers suggestions for state systems change activities to enhance the assistive technology (AT) workforce funded under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988. Nationally, the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America AT has begun to credential AT practitioners…

  6. The Great Equalizer: Assistive Technology Launches a New Era in Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how assistive technology can be used to facilitate the mainstreaming of students with disabilities, focusing on: different types of technology that are useful; the importance of mainstreaming; how to learn what assistive choices are available; and how inclusive education is enhanced by assistive technology in one California school…

  7. The Great Equalizer: Assistive Technology Launches a New Era in Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how assistive technology can be used to facilitate the mainstreaming of students with disabilities, focusing on: different types of technology that are useful; the importance of mainstreaming; how to learn what assistive choices are available; and how inclusive education is enhanced by assistive technology in one California school…

  8. Using Animal-assisted Therapy to Enrich Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amerine, Jeanne Louise; Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of many psychological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). AAT can be used as an adjunct to other forms of psychotherapy. With AAT, the animal becomes a part of the treatment plan. Outcomes for clients that are associated with the use of AAT include (1) increased sense of comfort and safety, (2) increased motivation, (3) enhanced self-esteem, (4) increased prosocial behaviors, and (5) decreased behavioral problems. AAT provides a bridge for the therapist to develop a therapeutic relationship with a client, and the animal can provide supportive reassurance for the therapist. The amount of data that supports the benefits of AAT for the treatment of those with mental illnesses is growing, but evidence-based research that supports its use is lacking. Further research is needed.

  9. Disparities in usage of assistive technology among people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kaye, H Stephen; Yeager, Patricia; Reed, Myisha

    2008-01-01

    Assistive technology is essential to the lives of many people with disabilities, but disparities in usage put certain segments of the disability population at a particular disadvantage. This article uses survey data and statistical modeling to explore differences in technology usage across disability subpopulations. Responses to a 2005 survey of nearly 2,000 adult consumers of California Independent Living Centers reveal large differences in technology usage by age, race, ethnicity, education, income, and type and severity of disability. Statistical modeling of overall device usage, number of devices used, and usage of high-, medium-, and low-tech devices reveals several factors that appear to put people with disabilities at a disadvantage in accessing and using assistive devices. These factors include lower educational attainment, racial or ethnic minority status, lower household income, later disability onset, and disability related to mental as opposed to physical or sensory functioning. Findings highlight approaches needed to expand usage of and to promote equal access to technologies that enable greater social and economic participation for people with disabilities.

  10. Using engineering and assistive technologies for rehabilitation after electrical trauma.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C J

    1999-10-30

    A framework is presented for judging when, how, and why rehabilitation engineering and its related assistive technologies are appropriate interventions following electrically induced trauma or burns. Instead of relying on the World Health Organization's medically based classification scheme of "Impairment, Disability, and Handicap," this newer framework is built on a rational demarcation proposed by the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation and Research at the U.S. National Institutes of Health. This latter client-centered framework encompasses pathophysiology, impairment, functional limitations, "disability", and societal limitations. This framework is well suited to handle the varied sequelae of electrical trauma and burn injuries and provides guidance towards the most effective use of traditional rehabilitation interventions and of assistive technologies. For electrical injuries, rehabilitative technologies can be classified as those promoting job accommodations (i.e., that help an individual return to active employment, albeit possibly in a different role) or as aids to the other activities of daily living (ADLs) that provide an enhanced quality of life to the individual with disability. While the traditional rehabilitative focus has been on return-to-work, especially among professional tradesmen, a more productive rehabilitative effort in some cases may occur through psychosocial adjustments achieved via effective technological interventions that enhance ADLs.

  11. Assistive Technology Needs and Measurement of the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Technologies for Independent Living of Older Hispanics: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M; Jutai, Jeffrey; Santiago, Angélica; Torres, Víctor; Benítez, Keyla; Torres, Mayra

    2016-09-01

    (1) Knowledge about the assistive technology (AT) needs and psychosocial impact of AT in different populations is needed because the adoption, retention, or abandonment of AT may be influenced by the psychosocial impact that AT has on its users. The aims of this study were to: (a) identify the AT needs of a sample of Hispanic older adults with functional limitations, (b) describe the psychosocial impact of these technologies on the sample's quality of life, and (c) describe the methodological challenges in using the Puerto Rican version of the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Device Scale (PR-PIADS) with a Hispanic sample. (2) Methods: This study used a cross-sectional design conducted with a sample of 60 participants. Data was collected using the Assistive Technology Card Assessment Questionnaire (ATCAQ) and the PR-PIADS. Data analyses included descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis. (3) Results: The sample's most frequently reported needs for AT devices were in the areas of cooking, home tasks, and home safety activities. The sample reported a positive impact of AT use in their quality of life. Several methodological challenges of the PIADS were identified. (4) Conclusions: The sample has unmet needs for using AT devices to overcome difficulties in daily living activities.

  12. Assistive Technology Needs and Measurement of the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Technologies for Independent Living of Older Hispanics: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M.; Jutai, Jeffrey; Santiago, Angélica; Torres, Víctor; Benítez, Keyla; Torres, Mayra

    2016-01-01

    (1) Knowledge about the assistive technology (AT) needs and psychosocial impact of AT in different populations is needed because the adoption, retention, or abandonment of AT may be influenced by the psychosocial impact that AT has on its users. The aims of this study were to: (a) identify the AT needs of a sample of Hispanic older adults with functional limitations, (b) describe the psychosocial impact of these technologies on the sample’s quality of life, and (c) describe the methodological challenges in using the Puerto Rican version of the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Device Scale (PR-PIADS) with a Hispanic sample. (2) Methods: This study used a cross-sectional design conducted with a sample of 60 participants. Data was collected using the Assistive Technology Card Assessment Questionnaire (ATCAQ) and the PR-PIADS. Data analyses included descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis. (3) Results: The sample’s most frequently reported needs for AT devices were in the areas of cooking, home tasks, and home safety activities. The sample reported a positive impact of AT use in their quality of life. Several methodological challenges of the PIADS were identified. (4) Conclusions: The sample has unmet needs for using AT devices to overcome difficulties in daily living activities. PMID:27695688

  13. Characterization and functional analysis of AatB, a novel autotransporter adhesin and virulence factor of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Xiangkai; Wang, Shaohui; Fan, Hongjie; Pan, Zihao; Ren, Jianluan; Yi, Li; Meng, Qingmei; Yang, Xuqiu; Lu, Chengping; Dai, Jianjun

    2013-07-01

    Autotransporter (AT) proteins constitute a large family of extracellular proteins that contribute to bacterial virulence. A novel AT adhesin gene, aatB, was identified in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) DE205B via genomic analyses. The open reading frame of aatB was 1,017 bp, encoding a putative 36.3-kDa protein which contained structural motifs characteristic for AT proteins: a signal peptide, a passenger domain, and a translocator domain. The predicted three-dimensional structure of AatB consisted of two distinct domains, the C-terminal β-barrel translocator domain and an N-terminal passenger domain. The prevalence analyses of aatB in APEC indicated that aatB was detected in 26.4% (72/273) of APEC strains and was strongly associated with phylogenetic groups D and B2. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that AatB expression was increased during infection in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, AatB could elicit antibodies in infected ducks, suggesting that AatB is involved in APEC pathogenicity. Thus, APEC DE205B strains with a mutated aatB gene and mutated strains complemented with the aatB gene were constructed. Inactivation of aatB resulted in a reduced capacity to adhere to DF-1 cells, defective virulence capacity in vivo, and decreased colonization capacity in lung during systemic infection compared with the capacities of the wild-type strain. Furthermore, these capacities were restored in the complementation strains. These results indicated that AatB makes a significant contribution to APEC virulence through bacterial adherence to host tissues in vivo and in vitro. In addition, biofilm formation assays with strain AAEC189 expressing AatB indicated that AatB mediates biofilm formation.

  14. Characterization and Functional Analysis of AatB, a Novel Autotransporter Adhesin and Virulence Factor of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    ZhuGe, Xiangkai; Wang, Shaohui; Fan, Hongjie; Pan, Zihao; Ren, Jianluan; Yi, Li; Meng, Qingmei; Yang, Xuqiu; Lu, Chengping

    2013-01-01

    Autotransporter (AT) proteins constitute a large family of extracellular proteins that contribute to bacterial virulence. A novel AT adhesin gene, aatB, was identified in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) DE205B via genomic analyses. The open reading frame of aatB was 1,017 bp, encoding a putative 36.3-kDa protein which contained structural motifs characteristic for AT proteins: a signal peptide, a passenger domain, and a translocator domain. The predicted three-dimensional structure of AatB consisted of two distinct domains, the C-terminal β-barrel translocator domain and an N-terminal passenger domain. The prevalence analyses of aatB in APEC indicated that aatB was detected in 26.4% (72/273) of APEC strains and was strongly associated with phylogenetic groups D and B2. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that AatB expression was increased during infection in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, AatB could elicit antibodies in infected ducks, suggesting that AatB is involved in APEC pathogenicity. Thus, APEC DE205B strains with a mutated aatB gene and mutated strains complemented with the aatB gene were constructed. Inactivation of aatB resulted in a reduced capacity to adhere to DF-1 cells, defective virulence capacity in vivo, and decreased colonization capacity in lung during systemic infection compared with the capacities of the wild-type strain. Furthermore, these capacities were restored in the complementation strains. These results indicated that AatB makes a significant contribution to APEC virulence through bacterial adherence to host tissues in vivo and in vitro. In addition, biofilm formation assays with strain AAEC189 expressing AatB indicated that AatB mediates biofilm formation. PMID:23630958

  15. Assistive Technology Addressing Safety Issues in Dementia: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Gagnon-Roy, Mireille; Bourget, Annick; Stocco, Stéphanie; Courchesne, Annie-Claude Lemieux; Kuhne, Nicolas; Provencher, Véronique

    Safety is an issue for older adults with dementia because they are at risk for various incidents. Intelligent assistive technology (IAT) may mitigate risks while promoting independence and reducing the impact on the caregiver of supporting a relative with dementia. The aim of this scoping review was to describe IATs and to identify factors to consider when selecting one. A systematic search was performed of the scientific and gray literature published between 2000 and 2015. A total of 31 sources were included. Four types of IATs were identified as addressing safety issues in dementia: monitoring technologies, tracking and tagging technologies, smart homes, and cognitive orthoses. Characteristics of the device and ethical considerations emerged as key factors to consider when selecting one. IATs yield promising results but pose various challenges, such as adapting to the evolution of dementia. Further research on their actual impact is needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  16. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1B associated with assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Monica; Zambrano, Maria Jose; Riquelme, Joel; Castiglioni, Claudia; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Jüppner, Harald; Mericq, Veronica

    2017-10-26

    Evidence suggests an increased incidence of imprinting disorders in children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Maternal loss-of-methylation at GNAS exon A/B, observed in pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (PHP1B), leads to decreased expression of the stimulatory Gsα. We present a patient conceived by ART, who presented at age 4 years with delayed neurocognitive development and persistently increased creatine kinase (CK). At 6 years an elevated PTH was detected with normal calcium and a low 25(OH) vitamin D level (25OHD). Physical exam showed a narrow forehead, nasal bridge hypoplasia and micropenis. After normalizing vitamin D, PTH remained elevated and PHP1B was therefore considered as the underlying diagnosis. An almost complete loss-of-methylation was observed at GNAS exons A/B and AS, but not at exon XL, which was associated with a gain-of-methylation at exon NESP. There was no evidence of a microdeletion within the GNAS/STX16 region and analysis of several microsatellite markers for the GNAS region on Chr.20q revealed no evidence for paternal uniparental disomy (patUPD20q). Established facts Increased incidence of imprinting disorders in children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies (ART) Pseudohypoparathyroidism is caused by imprinting abnormalities. Novel Insights First report of a possible association between a methylation defects that causes PHP1B and assisted conception Increased creatine kinase level was associated with an increase in PTH concentration.

  17. Enhancing human-animal relationships through veterinary medical instruction in animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activities.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Caroline Brunsman

    2008-01-01

    Instruction in animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and animal-assisted activities (AAAs) teaches veterinary medical students to confidently and assertively maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of this union of animals and people. Instruction in AAT/AAA also addresses requirements by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education that accredited schools/colleges of veterinary medicine include in their standard curriculum the topics of the human-animal bond, behavior, and the contributions of the veterinarian to the overall public and professional health care teams. Entry-level veterinarians should be prepared to: (1) assure that animals who provide AAT/AAA are healthy enough to visit nursing homes, hospitals, or other institutions; (2) promote behavior testing that selects animals who will feel safe, comfortable, and connected; (3) advise facilities regarding infection control and ways to provide a safe environment where the animals, their handlers, and the people being visited will not be injured or become ill; and (4) advocate for their patients and show compassion for their clients when animals are determined to be inappropriate participants in AAT/AAA programs. This article presents AAT/AAA terminology, ways in which veterinarians can advocate for AAT/AAA, the advantages of being involved in AAT/AAA, a model AAT/AAA practicum from Tuskegee University's School of Veterinary Medicine (TUSVM), and examples of co-curricular activities in AAT/AAA by TUSVM's student volunteers.

  18. Assistive technologies after stroke: self-management or fending for yourself? A focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assistive Technologies, defined as “electrical or mechanical devices designed to help people recover movement” have demonstrated clinical benefits in upper-limb stroke rehabilitation. Stroke services are becoming community-based and more reliant on self-management approaches. Assistive technologies could become important tools within self-management, however, in practice, few people currently use assistive technologies. This study investigated patients’, family caregivers and health professionals’ experiences and perceptions of stroke upper-limb rehabilitation and assistive technology use and identified the barriers and facilitators to their use in supporting stroke self-management. Methods A three-day exhibition of assistive technologies was attended by 204 patients, family caregivers/friends and health professionals. Four focus groups were conducted with people purposively sampled from exhibition attendees. They included i) people with stroke who had used assistive technologies (n = 5), ii) people with stroke who had not used assistive technologies (n = 6), iii) family caregivers (n = 5) and iv) health professionals (n = 6). The audio-taped focus groups were facilitated by a moderator and observer. All participants were asked to discuss experiences, strengths, weaknesses, barriers and facilitators to using assistive technologies. Following transcription, data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results All respondents thought assistive technologies had the potential to support self-management but that this opportunity was currently unrealised. All respondents considered assistive technologies could provide a home-based solution to the need for high intensity upper-limb rehabilitation. All stakeholders also reported significant barriers to assistive technology use, related to i) device design ii) access to assistive technology information and iii) access to assistive technology provision. The lack of and need for a coordinated

  19. Assistive technologies after stroke: self-management or fending for yourself? A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Demain, Sara; Burridge, Jane; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Yardley, Lucy; Tedesco-Triccas, Lisa; Swain, Ian

    2013-08-22

    Assistive Technologies, defined as "electrical or mechanical devices designed to help people recover movement" have demonstrated clinical benefits in upper-limb stroke rehabilitation. Stroke services are becoming community-based and more reliant on self-management approaches. Assistive technologies could become important tools within self-management, however, in practice, few people currently use assistive technologies. This study investigated patients', family caregivers and health professionals' experiences and perceptions of stroke upper-limb rehabilitation and assistive technology use and identified the barriers and facilitators to their use in supporting stroke self-management. A three-day exhibition of assistive technologies was attended by 204 patients, family caregivers/friends and health professionals. Four focus groups were conducted with people purposively sampled from exhibition attendees. They included i) people with stroke who had used assistive technologies (n = 5), ii) people with stroke who had not used assistive technologies (n = 6), iii) family caregivers (n = 5) and iv) health professionals (n = 6). The audio-taped focus groups were facilitated by a moderator and observer. All participants were asked to discuss experiences, strengths, weaknesses, barriers and facilitators to using assistive technologies. Following transcription, data were analysed using thematic analysis. All respondents thought assistive technologies had the potential to support self-management but that this opportunity was currently unrealised. All respondents considered assistive technologies could provide a home-based solution to the need for high intensity upper-limb rehabilitation. All stakeholders also reported significant barriers to assistive technology use, related to i) device design ii) access to assistive technology information and iii) access to assistive technology provision. The lack of and need for a coordinated system for assistive technology

  20. An Exploratory Study of Animal-Assisted Interventions Utilized by Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Dana M.; Chandler, Cynthia K.

    2011-01-01

    This study implemented an exploratory analysis to examine how a sample of mental health professionals incorporates specific animal-assisted techniques into the therapeutic process. An extensive review of literature related to animal-assisted therapy (AAT) resulted in the identification of 18 techniques and 10 intentions for the practice of AAT in…

  1. An Exploratory Study of Animal-Assisted Interventions Utilized by Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Dana M.; Chandler, Cynthia K.

    2011-01-01

    This study implemented an exploratory analysis to examine how a sample of mental health professionals incorporates specific animal-assisted techniques into the therapeutic process. An extensive review of literature related to animal-assisted therapy (AAT) resulted in the identification of 18 techniques and 10 intentions for the practice of AAT in…

  2. Left Ventricular Assist Devices: The Adolescence of a Disruptive Technology.

    PubMed

    Pinney, Sean P

    2015-10-01

    Clinical outcomes for patients with advanced heart failure receiving left ventricular assist devices are driven by appropriate patient selection, refined surgical technique, and coordinated medical care. Perhaps even more important is innovative pump design. The introduction and widespread adoption of continuous-flow ventricular assist devices has led to a paradigm shift within the field of mechanical circulatory support, making the promise of lifetime device therapy closer to reality. The disruption caused by this new technology, on the one hand, produced meaningful improvements in patient survival and quality of life, but also introduced new clinical challenges, such as bleeding, pump thrombosis, and acquired valvular heart disease. Further evolution within this field will require financial investment to sustain innovation leading to a fully implantable, durable, and cost-effective pump for a larger segment of patients with advanced heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Should HIV discordant couples have access to assisted reproductive technologies?

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, M; Charles, T

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we identify and evaluate arguments for and against offering assisted reproductive technologies (ART), specifically IVF, to HIV discordant couples (male partner HIV positive, female partner HIV negative). The idea of offering ART to HIV discordant couples generates concerns about safety and public health and raises questions such as: what is an acceptable level of risk to offspring and should couples who want this assistance be subject to selection criteria; should they undergo scrutiny about their suitability as parents when those who are able to conceive naturally face no such scrutiny and people with other illnesses are given access to ART? We conclude that offering ART to HIV discordant couples is likely to produce more benefit than harm and violates no ethical principles. Nevertheless, a decision to deny treatment need not constitute unjustified discrimination. PMID:14662810

  4. Cognitive function and assistive technology for cognition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Alex; Best, Catherine; O'Neill, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between assistive technology for cognition (ATC) and cognitive function was examined using a systematic review. A literature search identified 89 publications reporting 91 studies of an ATC intervention in a clinical population. The WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was used to categorize the cognitive domains being assisted and the tasks being performed. Results show that ATC have been used to effectively support cognitive functions relating to attention, calculation, emotion, experience of self, higher level cognitive functions (planning and time management) and memory. The review makes three contributions: (1) It reviews existing ATC in terms of cognitive function, thus providing a framework for ATC prescription on the basis of a profile of cognitive deficits, (2) it introduces a new classification of ATC based on cognitive function, and (3) it identifies areas for future ATC research and development.

  5. Challenges of technology integration and computer-assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Gurion; Liebergall, Meir

    2009-02-01

    The rapid progress of modern computerized capabilities has not been paralleled by a similar progress in the operating room setting and in operating techniques. The major advance in orthopaedic surgery during the past fifty years has been the introduction of intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging, while surgical techniques have remained mostly unchanged. Orthopaedic procedures dealing with bones--a nondeformable tissue--are suitable for computerized guidance based on preoperatively and intraoperatively obtained images. Computer-assisted surgery progressed from the first-generation systems of the 1990 s to the present third-generation systems, enabling surgeons to implant a knee or hip prosthesis with high precision. However, most orthopaedic surgeons avoid using computer-navigation surgical techniques. Why has the implementation of computer-assisted surgery procedures met so many hurdles and obstacles? The factors that make up the answer to this question can be grouped into three categories: human, technological, and financial. Computer-assisted surgery has the potential to revolutionize orthopaedic surgery just as fluoroscopy did a few decades ago; however, its widespread use has been hampered by a lack of sufficient clinical data on the one hand and by a reluctance to use the technique and thereby collect and share data on the other. The challenge is to overcome the human, technological, and financial hurdles. Once these obstacles are addressed, we believe that computer-assisted surgery will set a new standard of care. Until that time, some will be willing to lead the revolution and pay the price of progress, and others will be reluctant to take part in this endeavor.

  6. The passage of Florida's Statute on Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    PubMed

    Maun, A R; Williams, R S; Graber, B; Myers, W G

    1994-11-01

    Until 1993, there were no statutes in the United States covering gestational surrogacy contracts, disposition of stored embryos and gametes, parentage of children born from donated gametes and embryos, and the inheritance rights of cryopreserved embryos of deceased donors. In March 1993, the Florida Assisted Reproductive Technology Act was passed to address some of these issues and to minimize the expense and emotional cost of related courtroom proceedings. Authors of the bill believed that motherhood of a newborn in the eyes of the law should be determined by two factors: genetic inheritance and the original intent of the woman to become the parent of record. The bill included the assumption that, in the cases of children born of gestational surrogacy, the commissioning genetic parents would be the "natural parents" of the child. Some of the reasons for legislative success of the statute include: 1) clear need for statutory guidance in cases involving reproductive technology, 2) relevance of the issue to cost containment (ie, judicial costs) in an era of health care reform, 3) careful use of scientific terminology and the support of the medical community, 4) involvement of a skilled legislative team, 5) participation of physician specialists in the development of the bill (ie, practicing gynecologists in assisted reproductive technology programs), 6) participation of the State of Florida legislative staff, and 7) consultation with appropriate lobbying groups (eg, Florida Catholic Conference). The successful legislative process that was followed to achieve passage of this bill can serve as an example for other states to emulate.

  7. Inclusive design--assistive technology for people with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Regina; Bassani, Patrícia

    2012-01-01

    The first sentence of the Abstract should follow the word "Abstract." on the same line. The abstract should be clear, descriptive, self-explanatory and no longer than 200 words. It should also be suitable for publication in abstracting services. Do not include references or formulae in the abstract. This study reports the work of the Inclusive Design research project conducted with a group of children with cerebral palsy Our project has been working with Assistive Technology and has been developing an expanded mouse and a keyboard. Nowadays, we are working as a researcher of Cognitive Ergonomics and of Inclusive Education. The goal of our project is to establish an interdisciplinary study that focus the developing of a research in Ergonomics Design, contributing to improve the assistance to people with special needs. One applied the pedagogical approach, using Vygotsky's Social-historic Theory that advocates the concept of each individual's experiences are important to improve them. The development methodology was based on user-centered design. The results showed that as long as the students applied the new technologies they developed superior psychological processes towards social interaction, autonomy, taking part in class activities more efficiently. Also, we verified how important the new technologies in class were, considering the methodologies, objectives full and effective described on this study. This way, we do hope, from the data obtained on this research, to contribute with the ones who believe that the improvement of handicap students' inclusion in class is a reality.

  8. "Baby oh baby"--advances in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Solursh, D S; Schorer, J W; Solursh, L P

    1997-01-01

    It is estimated that one couple in six in the United States has to deal with issues of infertility. It is assumed that worldwide rates are comparable. In 35% of cases, the infertility is caused by female reproductive problems, in 35% by male reproductive problems, in 15% by multiple factors and in 15% the cause is unknown. Medical and scientific advances in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) have created 12 different pregnancy producing options for infertile couples. An ART infant could have as many as five parents (i.e. a donor father, a donor mother, a surrogate or gestational mother, and the couple actually rearing the child). These technical, medical, and moral complexities have resulted in a nightmare of accompanying legal complexities: anonymous donors versus those with identification disclosed, parental rights, grandparental rights, the rights of siblings and of the extended families; sperm, ovum and embryo "ownership", custody, visitation and inheritance rights and multiple other issues challenge a system of laws that evolves far slower than the technological realities to which it applies. This presentation will describe Assisted Reproductive Technology advances and the legal implications inherent in them. Case histories will be discussed.

  9. The future of male infertility management and assisted reproduction technology.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, D

    2000-12-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is undoubtedly a powerful, and sometimes the only effective, form of infertility treatment. Nonetheless, it is a non-specific treatment that, combined with increasingly heroic techniques to recover male germinal cells, has led to perceptions of men as just providers of gametes in the infertility equation. In response to this nihilist attitude, where women are investigated extensively and scant attention is paid to men, there is a re-emerging awareness of andrology--particularly in countries with limited healthcare resources. Structured management strategies, using diagnostic information to recognize causative factors amenable to simpler, even systemic, therapies with reasonable chances of pregnancy rather than resorting prematurely to assisted reproduction technology, represent rational, cost-effective approaches to infertility management. Furthermore, genetic testing (particularly cystic fibrosis gene defects and Y-chromosome microdeletions) is essential for couples to make fully informed decisions on their options. Recognition that free radical-induced damage to the sperm genome (e.g. from smoking or in-vitro sperm manipulation) underlies deleterious paternal effects on preimplantation development promotes further synergy between andrology and embryology. Although societies strike different balances between considerations of affordability and cost-effectiveness of assisted reproduction technology, ICSI represents a last resort, to be used when less-invasive, lower-cost treatments have been deemed inappropriate or have failed. Consequently, rather than assisted reproduction technology eliminating the need for andrology, the future will see increasingly tighter integration of multidisciplinary infertility care, embracing careful diagnosis and patient education before obtaining truly informed consent and embarking upon cost-effective treatment.

  10. Molecular cloning and expression of a gene encoding alcohol acyltransferase (MdAAT2) from apple (cv. Golden Delicious).

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Xu, Yunfeng; Xu, Gangming; Gu, Lingkun; Li, Dequan; Shu, Huairui

    2006-04-01

    Volatile esters are major aroma components of apple, and an alcohol acyltransferase (AAT) catalyzes the final step in ester biosynthesis. The gene MdAAT2, which encodes a predicted 51.2 kDa protein containing features of other acyl transferases, was isolated from Malus domestica Borkh. (cv. Golden Delicious). In contrast to other apple varieties, the MdAAT2 gene of Golden Delicious is exclusively expressed in the fruit. The MdAAT2 protein is about 47.9 kDa and mainly localized in the fruit peel, as indicated by immunoblot and immunolocalization analysis. Northern blot and immunoblot analysis showed that the transcription and translation of MdAAT2 have a positive correlation with apple AAT enzyme activity and ester production, except in the later ripening stage, suggesting that MdAAT2 is involved in the regulation of ester biosysthesis and that a post-translation modification may be involved in regulation of AAT enzyme activity. Tissue disk assays of fruit peel revealed that using extraneous alcohols can recover the corresponding ester formation. Transcription and translation of MdAAT2 were both depressed by 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment and subsequent ester production was also prevented. These results suggest that: (1) ester production is mainly regulated by MdAAT2; (2) ethylene is also involved in this regulatory progress and (3) ester compounds rely principally on the availability of substrates.

  11. Experience with ISO quality control in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Alper, Michael M

    2013-12-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs are complex organizations requiring the integration of multiple disciplines. ISO 9001:2008 is a quality management system that is readily adaptable to an ART program. The value that ISO brings to the entire organization includes control of documents, clear delineation of responsibilities of staff members, documentation of the numerous processes and procedures, improvement in tracking and reducing errors, and overall better control of systems. A quality ART program sets quality objectives and monitors their progress. ISO provides a sense of transparency within the organization and clearer understanding of how service is provided to patients. Most importantly, ISO provides the framework to allow for continual improvement.

  12. Assistive technology and home modification for people with neurovisual deficits.

    PubMed

    Copolillo, Al; Ivanoff, Synneve Dahlin

    2011-01-01

    People with neurovisual deficits from acquired brain injuries and other neurological disabilities can benefit from the array of assistive technologies and home modifications available to the larger vision impairment population, especially when symptoms are mild and associated neurological conditions are few. Optics, proper lighting, and magnification to increase the perceived size of both objects and reading material and to improve contrast sensitivity have been shown to be beneficial. Innovative technologies, universally designed for safe independent living and community participation are gradually developing and show promise for addressing the needs of this population. This article highlights technologies that may be useful for people with neurovisual deficits and describes the evidence to support their training and use. The use of various types of eyewear to reduce falls; prisms and telescopic lenses to improve visual attention and minimize the impact of visual field deficits; and technologies to improve computer use, wayfinding, and home safety are discussed. While there remains substantial need for further research and development focusing on the needs of people with vision impairments from neurological conditions, practitioners can use technology with caution to improve functional outcomes.

  13. Accomplishments of State Assistive Technology Projects, 1999-2001: Providing Assistive Technology for Employment, Community Living, Telecommunications, Education, and Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This paper summarizes accomplishments of state assistive technology (AT) projects for people with disabilities during 1999-2001. An introductory section reviews the growth and scope of assistive technology projects. This section is followed by one on the effect of state AT projects on the lives of individuals with disabilities and the increasing…

  14. [Cognitive remediation and cognitive assistive technologies in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Sablier, J; Stip, E; Franck, N

    2009-04-01

    Cognitive impairments are a core feature in schizophrenia. They impact several cognitive abilities but most importantly attention, memory and executive functions, consequently leading to great difficulties in everyday life. Most schizophrenia patients need assurance and require assistance and help from care workers, family members and friends. Family members taking care of a patient have additional daily work burden, and suffer psychological anguish and anxiety. Therefore, improving cognitive functions in schizophrenia patients is essential for the well-being of patients and their relatives. Reducing these deficits may decrease the economic burden to the health care system through lower numbers of hospital admissions and shorter hospitalisation periods, for example. Cognitive rehabilitation was developed to address the limited benefits of conventional treatments on cognitive deficits through the use of assistive technology as a means of enhancing memory and executive skills in schizophrenia patients. To provide clinicians with comprehensive knowledge on cognitive trainings, programs of remediation, and cognitive assistive technologies. Literature review. A search in the electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Index Medicus) for recent articles in the last 10 years related to cognitive remediation published in any language using the words: cognitive and remediation or rehabilitation and schizophrenia, and a search for chapters in psychiatry and rehabilitation textbooks. We found 392 articles and 112 review paper mainly in English. First, we identified cognitive remediation programs that were beneficial to schizophrenia patients. Programs available in French (IPT, RECOS, and RehaCom) and others (CET, NET, CRT, NEAR, APT and CAT) were identified. In addition, since memory and executive function impairments could be present in people without schizophrenia, we reviewed inventories of cognitive assistive technologies proven to enhance cognitive skills in other populations

  15. Synergies between assisted reproduction technologies and functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Toschi, Paola; Zacchini, Federica; Ptak, Grazyna; Scapolo, Pier A; Capra, Emanuele; Stella, Alessandra; Marsan, Paolo Ajmone; Williams, John L

    2016-08-01

    This review, is a synopsis of advanced reproductive technologies in farm animals, including the discussion of their limiting factors as revealed by the study of offspring derived from embryos produced in vitro and through cloning. These studies show that the problems of epigenetic mis-programming, which were reported in the initial stages of assisted reproduction, still persist. The importance of whole-genome analyses, including the methylome and transcriptome, in improving embryo biotechnologies in farm animals, are discussed. Genome editing approaches for the improvement of economically-relevant traits in farm animals are also described. Efficient farm animal embryo biotechnologies, including cloning and the most recent technologies such as genome editing, will effectively complement the latest strategies to accelerate genetic improvement of farm animals.

  16. Rethinking radical politics in the context of assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Parks, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Radical feminists have argued for both the radical potential of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and its oppressive and damaging effects for women. This paper will address the question of what constitutes a radical feminist position on ART; I will argue that the very debate over whether ART liberates or oppresses women is misguided, and that instead the issue should be understood dialectically. Reproductive technologies are neither inherently liberating nor entirely oppressive: we can only understand the potential and effects by considering how they are actually taken up within a culture. The internal contradictions, tensions, and inconsistencies within ART and the way it is addressed within the law points to a dialectic that resists a simple reductivist understanding.

  17. Assisted reproductive technologies and the Iranian community attitude towards infertility.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Aliyar; Bamdad, Sara

    2017-09-01

    Since the late 1990s, assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) have been legitimized in Iran through an official religious endorsement. Iran, under the dominant authority of the Shia sect, is now the most enthusiastic adopter of ARTs in the Muslim world, permitting all forms of treatments, including third party donation. This study examined the public perception of assisted conception and its influence on the adoption of these methods in Iran. The study was questionnaire-based and conducted in 2012 in Shiraz, the most populated city in the south of Iran. It included 405 Iranian residents selected through the cluster sampling method. The results indicated that respondents did not support all types of assisted reproduction. Amongst modern infertility treatment methods, IVF (using husband's sperm and wife's egg) was the most widely accepted. Gestational surrogacy and the use of donated gametes were less accepted. Demographic variables including gender, marital status, age, education and employment status were linked to significant differences in public opinion. It was concluded that members of the public require better information about gamete donation and surrogacy, as this could shape infertile couples' decision-making.

  18. Writing Good-Quality Assistive Technology Assessment Reports.

    PubMed

    Andrich, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    The study reported in this paper developed criteria and guidelines for writing up a good-quality AT Assessment Report - a document which is often required to activate an assistive technology intervention for an individual client. The Report should provide precise recommendations about the assistive solutions that best meet the client's needs, explain the underlying reasoning, provide evidence of appropriateness for the funding agency and set the baseline for later measurement of the outcomes of the intervention. Within this study, forty-eight clients with severe disability conditions were recruited in nine rehabilitation Centers in various regions of Italy. They were assessed for assistive solutions by their rehabilitation teams according to a common protocol; assessment Reports were produced for each client according to the same template, and individual AT interventions were activated following the recommendations. Then the Reports underwent a blind peer-review exercise involving over fifty professionals, who evaluated their quality against ten criteria; based on the findings, the template of the AT Assessment Report was revised and good-practice guidelines were inferred for the contents of each field. Now the final version is freely downloadable and is being used routinely in the Centers that participated in the study.

  19. Assisted reproductive technology after the birth of louise brown.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Remah Moustafa

    2013-07-01

    Public interest in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) has remained high since the birth of the world's first in vitro fertilization baby, Louise Brown, in the United Kingdom. ART allows scientists to manipulate the fertilization process in order to bypass some pathological obstacles such as blocked fallopian tubes and non-functioning ovaries in the females, and blocked vas deferens and low sperm count in the males. The purpose was to provide a historical outline and identify the researches that most contributed to ART. A review of published experimental and clinical studies of assisted reproduction carried out at the University of Bristol library website (MetaLib(®)). A cross-search of seven different medical databases (AMED-Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, BIOSIS Previews on Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, Embase, and the Medline on Web of Knowledge, OvidSP and PubMed) was completed by using the key words to explore the major milestones and progress in the development and implementation of ART. A speedy advancement in the development of different assisted reproductive techniques makes infertility problem more treatable than it ever had been. Although no other field in the medicine has integrated new knowledge into the daily practice more quickly than ART yet, there is a need for social research to counterbalance the dominance of biomedical one, in particular the people's actual experiences and expectations of ART.

  20. [Parenting stress in women who concieved using assisted reproductive technology].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y C; Kuo, B J

    2001-06-01

    Infertile women suffer chronic stress, which may negatively impact their parenting relationships if they later succeed in bearing children. The purpose of this study was to explore the parenting stress of mothers attending assisted an reproductive program and to compare it with the parenting stress of mothers with natural pregnancies. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit 54 mothers attending an In Vitro Fertilization/Embryo Transfer and Tubal Embryo Transfer program at an infertility center in central Taiwan. Three instruments were used to collect data: the Demographic Data Form, Parenting Stress Index-Short Form and Family Adaptation Partnership Growth Affective Relation Index. The data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistical methods. (1) The results indicated that the highest average score in parenting stress for mothers receiving reproductive technology was for "parental distress". These results revealed that the main source of parenting stress was their parental role. (2) Family function varied significantly with parenting stress. (3) Parenting stress was significantly greater in mothers with natural pregnancy than in mothers attending the assisted reproductive program. Recommendations for clinical application and future research are also made. The implications of the study may be used to assist infertile women in coping with parenting roles. Furthermore, a qualitative study is suggested to understand the factors which cause parenting stress.

  1. Assisted Reproductive Technology after the Birth of Louise Brown

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Remah Moustafa

    2013-01-01

    Background Public interest in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) has remained high since the birth of the world’s first in vitro fertilization baby, Louise Brown, in the United Kingdom. ART allows scientists to manipulate the fertilization process in order to bypass some pathological obstacles such as blocked fallopian tubes and non-functioning ovaries in the females, and blocked vas deferens and low sperm count in the males. The purpose was to provide a historical outline and identify the researches that most contributed to ART. Methods A review of published experimental and clinical studies of assisted reproduction carried out at the University of Bristol library website (MetaLib®). A cross-search of seven different medical databases (AMED-Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, BIOSIS Previews on Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, Embase, and the Medline on Web of Knowledge, OvidSP and PubMed) was completed by using the key words to explore the major milestones and progress in the development and implementation of ART. Results A speedy advancement in the development of different assisted reproductive techniques makes infertility problem more treatable than it ever had been. Conclusion Although no other field in the medicine has integrated new knowledge into the daily practice more quickly than ART yet, there is a need for social research to counterbalance the dominance of biomedical one, in particular the people’s actual experiences and expectations of ART. PMID:24163793

  2. Hearing assistive technologies in developing countries: background, achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Bradley

    2014-09-01

    The burden of hearing impairment and disability is substantial in the developing world. This review outlines the associated need for amplification devices in low and medium income countries and some of the initiatives that have been taken to improve access to such devices, particularly hearing aids. The main observed barriers to access are listed and possible ways to improve access are considered. Prevalence estimates for disabling hearing impairment are reviewed and a number of national and international examples of initiatives to facilitate use of hearing assistive devices in low and medium income countries are provided. Technologies that are potentially appropriate for hearing instruments in developing countries are suggested, as well as fitting programs that are more likely to be maintained over the long term. Challenges to successful hearing instrument fitting in low and medium income countries are many. However, some programs point the way to improved access to such devices. Successful hearing aid fitting programs in developing countries have typically combined appropriate technology with a sustainable local support base. With a rising middle class in many developing countries, advances in technology, and ongoing training programs for those involved in amplification fitting, hearing device usage rates may eventually reach parity with those in developed economies. The historical development of affordable hearing device fitting provision in low and middle income countries is outlined. Three key barriers to widespread access to hearing device provision in many low and middle income countries (LMICs) are identified: lack of trained personnel, the high cost of many existing devices marketed in LMICs and limited public awareness of the benefits of hearing assistive technologies. Examples of programs that have sought to overcome these barriers in LMICs are given and may influence the ways in which future hearing health care is provided.

  3. Exploring the Impact of an Animal Assisted Therapy Dog upon the Emotional, Educational, and Social Actualization of Middle School Students Receiving Counseling Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Christie D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine animal assisted therapy (AAT) in the school setting. This study reviewed the potential social, emotional, and educational benefits that children and adolescents may gain from utilizing an animal assisted therapy dog. This study utilized The Relationship Inventory and The AAT (Animal Assisted Therapy)…

  4. Exploring the Impact of an Animal Assisted Therapy Dog upon the Emotional, Educational, and Social Actualization of Middle School Students Receiving Counseling Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Christie D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine animal assisted therapy (AAT) in the school setting. This study reviewed the potential social, emotional, and educational benefits that children and adolescents may gain from utilizing an animal assisted therapy dog. This study utilized The Relationship Inventory and The AAT (Animal Assisted Therapy)…

  5. Job Roles of Assistive Technology Service Providers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaeda, Jun; Rubin, Stanford E.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 791 professionals involved in delivering assistive technology to individuals with disabilities found 6 major job roles: (1) device selection and maintenance; (2) environmental modification; (3) dissemination of information on assistive technology; (4) evaluation of suitability of assistive device; (5) administration; and (6) product…

  6. Assisted reproductive technology (ART) in humans: facts and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Ménézo, Y J; Veiga, A; Pouly, J L

    2000-01-15

    Since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) in human, the number of patients using Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) has increased tremendously. ART technologies have increased in number and their spectrum has also widened. The first IVF babies are now more than 20 years old. All the retrospective analyses have demonstrated that the obstetrical and pediatrical impact has not really affected single births. The main problems observed occur with multiple pregnancies, including high costs for the couples and for society. The decrease in the number of embryos transferred has improved the situation and moreover does not impair the final results. IntraCytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) is a more debatable and questionable technique with a real negative genetic impact. The main problem is chromosome abnormalities more specifically related to the sex chromosomes. The question of a systematic genetic work-up on the patients entering ICSI programs is discussed. No negative impact of cryopreservation has been demonstrated even though some controversy arises from time to time. Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is now a interesting tool for patients carrying genetic defects. Blastocyst biopsy now has a future role in reproductive medicine. Gender selection through sperm sorting is also now a reality. As with the other developing bio-technologies related to reproduction, there are ethical questions. The decisions concerning these technologies do not belong solely to scientists but are rather a matter for society to decide.

  7. Pervasive assistive technology for people with dementia: a UCD case

    PubMed Central

    Rønn-Andersen, Kristoffer V.H.; Bień, Paulina; Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Forchhammer, Birgitte Hysse; Maier, Anja M.

    2016-01-01

    Smart mobile and wearable technology offers exciting opportunities to support people with dementia (PwD). Its ubiquity and popularity could even benefit user adoption – a great challenge for assistive technology (AT) for PwD that calls for user-centred design (UCD) methods. This study describes a user-centred approach to developing and testing AT based on off-the-shelf pervasive technologies. A prototype is created by combining a smartphone, smartwatch and various applications to offer six support features. This is tested among five end-users (PwD) and their caregivers. Controlled usability testing was followed by field testing in a real-world context. Data is gathered from video recordings, interaction logs, system usability scale questionnaires, logbooks, application usage logs and interviews structured on the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model. The data is analysed to evaluate usability, usefulness and user acceptance. Results show some promise for user adoption, but highlight challenges to be overcome, emphasising personalisation and familiarity as key considerations. The complete findings regarding usability issues, usefulness of support features and four identified adoption profiles are used to provide a set of recommendations for practitioners and further research. These contribute toward UCD practices for improved smart, pervasive AT for dementia. PMID:28008366

  8. Pervasive assistive technology for people with dementia: a UCD case.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Rønn-Andersen, Kristoffer V H; Bień, Paulina; Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Forchhammer, Birgitte Hysse; Maier, Anja M

    2016-12-01

    Smart mobile and wearable technology offers exciting opportunities to support people with dementia (PwD). Its ubiquity and popularity could even benefit user adoption - a great challenge for assistive technology (AT) for PwD that calls for user-centred design (UCD) methods. This study describes a user-centred approach to developing and testing AT based on off-the-shelf pervasive technologies. A prototype is created by combining a smartphone, smartwatch and various applications to offer six support features. This is tested among five end-users (PwD) and their caregivers. Controlled usability testing was followed by field testing in a real-world context. Data is gathered from video recordings, interaction logs, system usability scale questionnaires, logbooks, application usage logs and interviews structured on the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model. The data is analysed to evaluate usability, usefulness and user acceptance. Results show some promise for user adoption, but highlight challenges to be overcome, emphasising personalisation and familiarity as key considerations. The complete findings regarding usability issues, usefulness of support features and four identified adoption profiles are used to provide a set of recommendations for practitioners and further research. These contribute toward UCD practices for improved smart, pervasive AT for dementia.

  9. Acoustic user interfaces for ambient-assisted living technologies.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Stefan; Moritz, Niko; Appell, Jens-E; Meis, Markus; Bartsch, Christian; Bitzer, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    This contribution discusses technologies for acoustic user interaction in ambient-assisted living (AAL) scenarios. Acoustic user interfaces allow for a natural and convenient way to interact with technical systems e.g. via sound or speech presentation or via speech input by means of automatic speech recognition (ASR) as well as by detection and classification of acoustic events. Older persons targeted by AAL technologies especially need more easy-to-use methods to interact with inherently complex supporting technology. As an example we designed and evaluated an application for acoustic user interaction with a multi-media reminder and calendar system. For this purpose, mainly older participants were involved in user studies to continuously evaluate and support the development strictly following a user-centred design process. The results suggest a wide acceptance of acoustic user interfaces by older users either for controlling inherently complex AAL systems by using robust ASR technologies or as a natural and ambient way of presenting information to the user. However, further research is needed to increase the robustness of ASR systems when using hands-free equipment, i.e. to provide a real ambient way of interaction, and to introduce personalised speech and sound presentation schemes accounting for the individual hearing capabilities and sound preferences.

  10. Second try: who returns for additional assisted reproductive technology treatment and the effect of a prior assisted reproductive technology birth.

    PubMed

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Wantman, Ethan; Baker, Valerie L; Grow, Daniel R; Stern, Judy E

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of a prior assisted reproductive technology (ART) live birth on subsequent live-birth rates. Historical cohort study. Clinic-based data. The study population included 297,635 women with 549,278 cycles from 2004 to 2010 from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. Try 1 refers to ART cycles up to and including the first live birth, try 2 to ART cycles after a first live birth. None. Live-birth rates by cycle number, try number, and oocyte source. Younger women at try 1 are more likely to return for try 2. Women returning for try 2 were more likely to have had an ART singleton versus multiple birth (33.2% after a try 1 singleton versus 8.1% after twins and 4.9% after triplets) and were less likely to have a diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve or tubal factors. Live-birth rates were significantly higher for try 2 compared with try 1 for autologous fresh cycles, averaging 7.7 percentage points higher over five cycles. Live-birth rates were not significantly different for try 2 versus try 1 with thawed autologous cycles or either fresh or thawed donor cycles. These results indicate that when fresh autologous oocytes can be used, live-birth rates per cycle are significantly greater after a prior history of an ART live birth. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Filing Basics: A Computer-Assisted Instruction Program for Library Student Assistants in New York Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aranov, Mildred

    A computer assisted instructional program was developed for teaching the rules of filing to library student assistants in the New York Institute of Technology. The procedure used in developing the program was based upon the Interservice Model of Instructional Systems Design (ISD) developed at Florida State University. The first of seven chapters…

  12. Technohubs in Teacher Education: The Lived Experience of Assisting Peers with Instructional Technology Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rook, Michael Montalto

    2014-01-01

    This study examined prospective teachers' lived experiences of assisting peers with instructional technology issues. The study built upon one of ISTE's (2003) essential conditions for integrating technology in education: technical assistance for using technology. Through a review of relevant literature, an argument was made for the study based on…

  13. Preferences and Practices among Students Who Read Braille and Use Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Frances Mary

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Students who read braille use assistive technology to engage in literacy tasks and to access the general curriculum. There is little research on the ways in which technology has changed the reading and writing practices and preferences of students who use braille, nor is there much research on how assistive technology is learned by…

  14. Assistive Technology Approaches for Large-Scale Assessment: Perceptions of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Christopher; Thurlow, Martha; Altman, Jason; Timmons, Joe; Kato, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Assistive technology approaches to aid students with visual impairments are becoming commonplace in schools. These approaches, however, present challenges for assessment because students' level of access to different technologies may vary by school district and state. To better understand what assistive technology tools are used in reading…

  15. New Literacy Studies: An Alternative Frame for Preparing Teachers to Use Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naraian, Srikala; Surabian, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Even as research continues to suggest the potential of assistive technology for improving student outcomes, it remains under-utilized in schools. Among numerous challenges to the effective utilization of assistive technology, research has suggested that educators are inadequately prepared to consider and implement the use of such technologies. In…

  16. Using Technology to Assist Disabled Students in Their Quest for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Marcia L.; Meske, Margaret Way

    1998-01-01

    The use of assistive technology that increases the functional capabilities of persons with disabilities is specified in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988. Business educators should help students with disabilities learn to use these technologies to enhance…

  17. New Literacy Studies: An Alternative Frame for Preparing Teachers to Use Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naraian, Srikala; Surabian, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Even as research continues to suggest the potential of assistive technology for improving student outcomes, it remains under-utilized in schools. Among numerous challenges to the effective utilization of assistive technology, research has suggested that educators are inadequately prepared to consider and implement the use of such technologies. In…

  18. Technohubs in Teacher Education: The Lived Experience of Assisting Peers with Instructional Technology Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rook, Michael Montalto

    2014-01-01

    This study examined prospective teachers' lived experiences of assisting peers with instructional technology issues. The study built upon one of ISTE's (2003) essential conditions for integrating technology in education: technical assistance for using technology. Through a review of relevant literature, an argument was made for the study based on…

  19. An Assistive Technology Toolkit: Type II Applications for Students with Mild Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puckett, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article describes possibilities for technology use among students with mild disabilities. It considers characteristics of assistive technology from the standpoint of strategies associated with universal design for learning and Type I and Type II software applications. After a brief description of assistive technology definitions, legislation,…

  20. Mobile Learning as Alternative to Assistive Technology Devices for Special Needs Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismaili, Jalal; Ibrahimi, El Houcine Ouazzani

    2017-01-01

    Assistive Technology (AT) revolutionized the process of learning for special needs students during the past three decades. Thanks to this technology, accessibility and educational inclusion became attainable more than any time in the history of special education. Meanwhile, assistive technology devices remain unreachable for a large number of…

  1. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are.

  2. Combatting African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) in livestock: The potential role of trypanotolerance.

    PubMed

    Yaro, M; Munyard, K A; Stear, M J; Groth, D M

    2016-07-30

    African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) is endemic in at least 37 of the 54 countries in Africa. It is estimated to cause direct and indirect losses to the livestock production industry in excess of US$ 4.5 billion per annum. A century of intervention has yielded limited success, owing largely to the extraordinary complexity of the host-parasite interaction. Trypanotolerance, which refers to the inherent ability of some African livestock breeds, notably Djallonke sheep, N'Dama cattle and West African Dwarf goats, to withstand a trypanosomiasis challenge and still remain productive without any form of therapy, is an economically sustainable option for combatting this disease. Yet trypanotolerance has not been adequately exploited in the fight against AAT. In this review, we describe new insights into the genetic basis of trypanotolerance and discuss the potential of exploring this phenomenon as an integral part of the solution for AAT, particularly, in the context of African animal production systems.

  3. Assistive technology evaluations: Remote-microphone technology for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Erin C; Wright, Suzanne; Anderson, Christine; Jones, Jessalyn; Pitts, Katie; Bryant, Danielle; Watson, Melissa; Box, Jerrica; Neve, Melissa; Mathews, Lauren; Reed, Mary Pat

    The goal of this study was to conduct assistive technology evaluations on 12 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to evaluate the potential benefits of remote-microphone (RM) technology. A single group, within-subjects design was utilized to explore individual and group data from functional questionnaires and behavioral test measures administered, designed to assess school- and home-based listening abilities, once with and once without RM technology. Because some of the children were unable to complete the behavioral test measures, particular focus was given to the functional questionnaires completed by primary teachers, participants, and parents. Behavioral test measures with and without the RM technology included speech recognition in noise, auditory comprehension, and acceptable noise levels. The individual and group teacher (n=8-9), parent (n=8-9), and participant (n=9) questionnaire ratings revealed substantially less listening difficulty when RM technology was used compared to the no-device ratings. On the behavioral measures, individual data revealed varied findings, which will be discussed in detail in the results section. However, on average, the use of the RM technology resulted in improvements in speech recognition in noise (4.6dB improvement) in eight children, higher auditory working memory and comprehension scores (12-13 point improvement) in seven children, and acceptance of poorer signal-to-noise ratios (8.6dB improvement) in five children. The individual and group data from this study suggest that RM technology may improve auditory function in children with ASD in the classroom, at home, and in social situations. However, variability in the data and the inability of some children to complete the behavioral measures indicates that individualized assistive technology evaluations including functional questionnaires will be necessary to determine if the RM technology will be of benefit to a particular child who has ASD.

  4. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Connor J.

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. More information about the instrument can be found through the manufacturer’s website. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. Calibrated sky radiance spectra are produced on cycle of about 141 seconds with a group of 6 radiance spectra zenith having dwell times of about 14 seconds each interspersed with 55 seconds of calibration and mirror motion. The ASSIST data is comparable to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data and can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  5. Assisted reproductive technologies: professional and legal restrictions in Australian clinics.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kerry; Baker, H W G; Pitts, Marian; Thorpe, Rachel

    2005-02-01

    The professional and legal regulation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in Australia is a vast maze of intersecting laws and guidelines which place restrictions on the provision of services such as infertility treatment, surrogacy, sex selection for social reasons, donor insemination, pre-implantation diagnosis and human embryo research. This study investigated the application of these restrictions on clinical practice in New South Wales, a relatively unregulated State, and Victoria, a relatively highly regulated State. The results of the survey indicate that the range of ART services in Victorian clinics was far more limited than in New South Wales clinics. The Victorian clinics uniformly restricted access of single and lesbian women and did not offer social sex selection procedures. The New South Wales clinics adopted different polices regarding these services. It was found that restrictive laws governing "social" issues have a significant impact on the availability of ART services and some respondents seemed unclear about the nature of restrictions and laws relevant to their work. It was also found that "reproductive tourism" is prevalent and restrictions were circumnavigated by patients with assistance from clinics. It was concluded that more evidence is required to evaluate regulation in this field of medicine.

  6. Trends in Global Assisted Reproductive Technologies Research: a Scientometrics study.

    PubMed

    Okhovati, Maryam; Zare, Morteza; Zare, Fatemeh; Bazrafshan, Maliheh Sadat; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2015-12-01

    This study illustrated the global contribution to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) research in MEDLINE database from 1998 to 2014. In March 2015, the MEDLINE database was searched for research publications indexed under 'reproductive techniques, assisted' (including the following MeSH headings: in vitro fertilization [IVF]; intracytoplasmic sperm injections; cryopreservation; and ovulation induction), with the following expressions in the fields of title or abstract: intrauterine insemination; sperm donation; embryo/egg donation and surrogate mothers. The number of publications in MEDLINE database was recorded for each individual year, 1998-2014, and for each country. The following countries were arbitrarily selected for data retrieval: United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Canada, Italy, Japan (G7 countries), Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC countries), Egypt, Turkey, Israel and Iran. The absolute number of publications for each country from 1998 to 2014 ranged from 75 to 16453, with a median of 2024. The top five countries were the US (16453 publications), the UK (5427 publications), Japan (4805), China (4660) and France (3795). ART (20277), cryopreservation (11623) and IVF (11209) were the most researched areas. Global research on ARTs were geographically distributed and highly concentrated among the world's richest countries. Cryopreservation and IVF were the most productive research domains among ARTs.

  7. Personal data assistants: using new technology to enhance nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Judith A; Sommers, Catherine O

    2003-01-01

    This article explains how the new technology of personal data assistants can be used to enhance and augment comprehensive nursing care. Nurses are constantly challenged in their need for current, reliable, and accurate information at the point of patient care. Professional books and journals, by the very nature of their print format, have been prepared long before they can be actually used in practice. More current information is available from the World Wide Web, but it is often impractical for a nurse to access a computer during a patient encounter. Personal data assistants [PDAs] allow clinicians to access and document absolutely current information at the moment the patient is being seen. There are many general applications for PDAs that nurses might use such as keeping electronic calendars, address books, and reminder lists. In addition, however, there are even more actual healthcare applications, including patient tracking systems, access to pharmacologic databases, and a variety of clinical decision-making support tools. This article describes the wide variety of PDAs, along with the factors a nurse should consider in the decision of whether to purchase a PDA, and which type of device is best suited for which application.

  8. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  9. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalvins, T.

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  10. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalvins, T.

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  11. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  12. Cost effectiveness and efficiency in assistive technology service delivery.

    PubMed

    Warren, C G

    1993-01-01

    In order to develop and maintain a viable service delivery program, the realities of cost effectiveness and cost efficiency in providing assistive technology must be addressed. Cost effectiveness relates to value of the outcome compared to the expenditures. Cost efficiency analyzes how a provider uses available resources to supply goods and services. This paper describes how basic business principles of benefit/cost analysis can be used to determine cost effectiveness. In addition, basic accounting principles are used to illustrate methods of evaluating a program's cost efficiency. Service providers are encouraged to measure their own program's effectiveness and efficiency (and potential viability) in light of current trends. This paper is meant to serve as a catalyst for continued dialogue on this topic.

  13. Spermbots: potential impact for drug delivery and assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Magdanz, Veronika; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2014-08-01

    Micromotors and nanomotors are an emerging research field that aims at achieving locomotion on the microscale for a variety of applications such as drug delivery, single cell manipulation, microsensors and lab-on-a-chip devices, just to point out a few. The enthusiastic development of hybrid micromotors harnessing biological power sources for physiologically compatible nano/microdevices has recently brought a lot of attention to the international research community that is looking for a solution for the actuation and locomotion on the microscale. This article describes the potential of sperm-driven micro-bio-robots in the biomedical field such as drug delivery or single cell manipulation. Herein, a specific potential of the sperm-driven micro-bio-robot is described that might have impact on the development of assisted reproductive technologies.

  14. Effect of assistive technology in a public school setting.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne H; Ito, Max; Smith, Roger O; Andersen, Lori T

    2010-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) requires assistive technology (AT) be considered at the yearly individualized education program (IEP) meeting of every student in special education. IDEA also directs that AT be implemented on the basis of peer-reviewed literature despite a paucity of research on AT's effectiveness in the public schools. This repeated-measures quasi-experimental study explored AT's effect in a public school special education setting. Participants (N=13) were a heterogeneous group of students in 1 school system who had newly provided AT to address academic and communication goals in one school year. Results suggest that relative to other interventions, AT provided by a multidisciplinary team may have a significant effect on IEP goal improvement (t[12] = 5.54, p= .00) for students in special education (F[2] = 9.35, p= .00), which may support AT's use in special education by occupational therapists as directed by IDEA.

  15. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  16. Assistive technology in resource-limited environments: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Matter, Rebecca; Harniss, Mark; Oderud, Tone; Borg, Johan; Eide, Arne H

    2017-02-01

    It is estimated that only 5-15% of people in low and middle income countries (LMICs) who need assistive technologies (AT) have access to them. This scoping review was conducted to provide a comprehensive picture of the current evidence base on AT within LMICs and other resource limited environments. The scoping review involved locating evidence, extracting data, and summarizing characteristics of all included research publications. Of the 252 publications included, over 80% focused on types of AT that address mobility (45.2%) and vision (35.5%) needs, with AT types of spectacles and prosthetics comprising over 50% of all publications. Evidence on AT that addresses hearing, communication, and cognition is the most underrepresented within the existing evidence base. The vast majority of study designs are observational (63%). Evidence on AT in resource-limited environments is limited in quantity and quality, and not evenly distributed across types of AT. To advance this field, we recommend using appropriate evidence review approaches that allow for heterogeneous study designs, and developing a common language by creating a typology of AT research focus areas. Funders and researchers must commit much greater resources to the AT field to ameliorate the paucity of evidence available. Implications for Rehabilitation An increase in the quality and quantity of research is required in resource limited environments, where 80% of the global population of people with disabilities reside. Improved and increased evidence is needed to identify and understand needs, inform policy and practice, and assess progress made in increasing access to and availability of appropriate AT. Over 80% of the existing research publications on assistive technologies in resource limited environments address mobility and vision. More research is needed on AT that address hearing, communication and cognition. The use of a common language would facilitate the advancement of the global AT research field

  17. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyu Sup; Choi, Young Min

    2015-03-01

    Great advances have been made in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby was born in Korea. This study was designed to report on the current status of ART therapy in South Korea between January 1 and December 31 of 2010. A revised survey, originally developed by the International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies, was sent to all available ART centers via email in 2013. Fresh embryo transfer (FET) cases were categorized into standard IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injections. These cases, the thawing embryo transfer (TET) cases, and other related procedures were surveyed. Data from 30,785 ART procedures were provided by 78 clinics. Of the 28,200 cycles in which oocytes were retrieved, 92.2% of these cycles were completely transferred. In addition, 8,075 cycles were confirmed to be clinical pregnancies in the FET cycles, which represent a pregnancy rate of 28.6% per oocyte pick-up and 31.1% per embryo transfer. The most common number of embryos transferred in the FET was three embryos (37.3%) followed by two embryos (36.3%) and one embryo (14.0%). Of the 6,648 TET cycles transferred, 2,356 clinical pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography. The most common number of embryos in the TET group was two embryos (43.4%) followed by three embryos (25.4%) and one embryo (18.9%). The clinical pregnancy rate per transfer in the FET cycles was similar in 2009 and 2010. Among the FET cycles where one or two embryos were transferred, the clinical pregnancy rate per transfer slightly increased from 2009 (28.7%) to 2010 (32.9%).

  18. The status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea in 2012.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Song, Hyun Jin; Choi, Young Min; Han, Hyuck Dong

    2017-03-01

    This study was designed to report the status of assisted reproductive technology (ART) therapy in South Korea between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. A localized online survey, originally developed by the International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies, was first launched and provided to all available ART centers via email in 2015. Fresh embryo transfer (FET) cases were categorized as standard in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or half-ICSI. Thawed embryo transfer (TET) and other related procedures, including surgical sperm retrieval, were surveyed. Data from 33,956 ovum pick-up procedures were provided by 75 clinics in 2012. Of the 33,088 cycles in which ovums were retrieved, a complete transfer was performed in 90.5% (29,932 cycles). In addition, 10,079 FET cycles were confirmed to have resulted in clinical pregnancy, representing a pregnancy rate of 30.5% per ovum pick-up and 33.7% per ET. The most common number of embryos transferred in FET was 2 (41.6%), followed by 3 (34.0%), and non-elective single ETs (10.0%). Of the 10,404 TET cycles in which transfer was completed, 3,760 clinical pregnancies (36.1%) were confirmed by ultrasonography. The overall clinical pregnancy rate for FET and TET cycles in 2012 was higher than in 2011 (33.7% vs. 33.2% and 36.1% vs. 31.1%, respectively). The most common number of embryos transferred in FET cycles was 2, unlike in 2011.

  19. Assistive technology for children and young people with low vision.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rachel; Barker, Lucy; Rubin, Gary; Dahlmann-Noor, Annegret

    2015-06-18

    Recent technological developments, such as the near universal spread of mobile phones and portable computers and improvements in the accessibility features of these devices, give children and young people with low vision greater independent access to information. Some electronic technologies, such as closed circuit TV, are well established low vision aids and newer versions, such as electronic readers or off-the shelf tablet computers, may offer similar functionalities with easier portability and at lower cost. To assess the effect of electronic assistive technologies on reading, educational outcomes and quality of life in children and young people with low vision. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2014), the Health Technology Assessment Programme (HTA) (www.hta.ac.uk/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 30 October 2014. We intended to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in this review. We planned to include trials involving children between the ages of 5 and 16 years with low vision as defined by, or equivalent to, the WHO 1992 definition of low vision. We planned to include studies that explore the use of assistive technologies (ATs). These could include all types of closed circuit television/electronic vision enhancement systems (CCTV/EVES), computer technology including tablet computers and adaptive technologies such as screen readers, screen magnification and

  20. Raising awareness of assistive technology in older adults through a community-based, cooperative extension program.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Debra M; Markham, Melinda Stafford

    2012-01-01

    The Fashion an Easier Lifestyle with Assistive Technology (FELAT) curriculum was developed as a needs-based, community educational program provided through a state Cooperative Extension Service. The overall goal for participants was to raise awareness of assistive technology. Program evaluation included a postassessment and subsequent interview to determine short-term knowledge gain and longer term behavior change. The sample consisted of mainly older, married females. The FELAT program was effective at raising awareness and increasing knowledge of assistive technology, and for many participants, the program acted as a catalyst for planning to or taking action related to assistive technology.

  1. Fix It with TAPE: Repurposing Technology to Be Assistive Technology for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Shurr, Jordan C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Bassette, Laura; Miller, Bridget; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how practitioners can repurpose technology--common and socially desirable technology in particular--to be assistive technology for students with high-incidence disabilities. The authors provide a framework for practitioners to consider technology for repurposing: TAPE (Transportable, Available, Practical, Engaging) and…

  2. A technology roadmap of assistive technologies for dementia care in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Taro; Fujinami, Tsutomu; Phaal, Robert; Ikawa, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The number of elderly people in Japan is growing, which raises the issue of dementia, as the probability of becoming cognitively impaired increases with age. There is an increasing need for caregivers, who are well-trained, experienced and can pay special attention to the needs of people with dementia. Technology can play an important role in helping such people and their caregivers. A lack of mutual understanding between caregivers and researchers regarding the appropriate uses of assistive technologies is another problem. A vision of person-centred care based on the use of information and communication technology to maintain residents' autonomy and continuity in their lives is presented. Based on this vision, a roadmap and a list of challenges to realizing assistive technologies have been developed. The roadmap facilitates mutual understanding between caregivers and researchers, resulting in appropriate technologies to enhance the quality of life of people with dementia. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. The impact of assistive technologies on formal and informal home care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2015-06-01

    Assistive technologies help people with disabilities compensate for their impairments. This study assessed which of 5 categories of assistive technologies-indoor/outdoor mobility, bed transfer, bathing, toileting, and telephone assistance-were substitutes or complements for human personal assistance by differentiating between total and formal personal assistance service (PAS) hours. The study analyzed 2004 National Long-Term Care Survey community-dwelling respondents receiving assistance with activities of daily living. Ordinary least squares (OLS) on total PAS hours was estimated on the entire sample, and logit and OLS models were estimated on the likelihood and hours of formal PAS, respectively. Assistive technology for indoor/outdoor mobility, bed transfer, and bathing was found to be substitutes for total PAS, whereas assistive technology for bed transfer and toileting was found to be complements for the use of formal PAS. Telephone assistance was not significant for either total or formal PAS hours. The use of some assistive technologies by older people with disabilities appears to reduce the amount of informal care provided, but not the amount of paid PAS. Thus, this study does not provide support for the hypothesis that the use of assistive technologies will reduce use of paid care and, therefore, spending for long-term care. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Effectiveness of Animal Assisted Therapy after brain injury: A bridge to improved outcomes in CRT.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Mary

    2016-06-18

    Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) has been widely used as a complementary therapy in mental health treatment especially to remediate social skill deficits. The goal of AAT is to improve social, emotional, and cognitive functioning. The purpose of this article is to draw upon the literature on AAT and explore specific applications to cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) and social skills training. This study provides a systematic review of most of the available literature on ATT and assesses that potential uses of ATT for brain injury rehabilitation. Although the efficacy of AAT is not currently well documented by rigorous research, (Kazin, 2010) anecdotal evidence suggests that brain injury survivors may benefit from the combination of AAT and cognitive rehabilitation techniques. Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) survivors with cognitive impairments can benefit from AAT as part of a comprehensive and holistic rehabilitation treatment plan.

  5. Establishment of resource portal of assistive technology in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shwn-Jen; Yang, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Ping-Chin; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Horong; Wang, Tzyy-Jiuan

    2008-11-01

    To establish an Assistive Technology (AT) resource portal for users, professionals and policy-makers in Taiwan to provide a new and versatile information network for AT popularization. The Centre for AT Resources and Popularization (CATR@P), integrated the resources primarily from five AT Resource Centres of the Ministry of Interior in Taiwan. CATR@P invited representatives of organizations for people with disabilities, AT specialists and policy-makers to join the task force. A web company was responsible for website software design and collaboration with CATR@P, which included planning portal functions, all user-friendly interfaces and pilot testing. The Resource Portal of AT was officially online in October 2006. The portal was structured with 19 main functions and the contents of this new portal are versatile and multifunctional. It contains vast amounts of national and international resources such as archives of AT centres, AT products, a professionals directory, websites linkage, full text of the AT Companion Journal, E-paper, on-line consultation services, frequently asked questions, and on-line questionnaires. Integration of Taiwan AT resources in conjunction with the internet technology has made resources more available for people with disabilities and society.

  6. Failures of reproduction: problematising 'success' in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kathleen; Jackson, Debra; Rudge, Trudy

    2007-06-01

    This paper scrutinises the many ways in which 'success' is portrayed in representing assisted reproductive technology (ART) services and illuminates how these definitions differ from those held by participant couples. A qualitative approach informed by feminist perspectives guided this study and aimed to problematise the concept of 'success' by examining literature from ART clinics, government reports on ART, and by analysing narratives of couples who have accessed ART services. As many ART services have varying definitions of 'success' and as statistics are manipulated to promote further patronage of ART services, the likelihood of 'success' is often overstated. This paper is concerned with the effects this promotion has on the participants. We suggest that this very mobilisation of statistical success changes the ability of those who access ART services to make productive decisions about themselves inside these treatment regimes, as the basis for decision-making is hidden by the way numbers, objectivity and clinical reasoning operate to maintain participation in the program. In such an operation, the powerful mix of hope and technology kept participants enrolled far longer than they originally planned. Moreover, how success rates are manipulated raises ethical issues for all involved: clients, counsellors, and nursing and medical professionals.

  7. Improving Assistive Technology Service by Using 3D Printing: Three Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Takuro; Tomiita, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Assistive technology services are essential for adapting assistive devices to the individual needs of users with disabilities. In this study, we attempted to apply three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to three actual cases, and to study its use, effectiveness, and future applications. We assessed the usefulness of 3D printing technology by categorizing its utilization after reviewing the outcomes of these case studies. In future work, we aim to gather additional case studies and derive information on using 3D printing technology that will enable its effective application in the process of assistive technology services.

  8. Geographic variability in expression of the sex-linked AAT-1 gene of the bell-ring frog, Buergeria buergeri.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Masayuki; Ohta, Shigeru; Atsumi, Shigeru; Fujii, Tamotsu

    2004-03-15

    Cytological observation and artificial crossing experiments were used to examine the geographic differences in the sex-determining mechanism and mode of inheritance of the sex-linked AAT-1 gene in the bell-ring frog, Buergeria buergeri. The AAT-1 phenotypes were also examined by allozyme analysis using field-caught females and males collected from 19 populations from the Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu islands of Japan, in order to comprehensively elucidate the geographic variability in the expression of the sex-linked AAT-1 gene of B. buergeri. The results showed that the Aomori population of B. buergeri from the northern end of Honshu was female heterogametic in sex determination, that chromosome No. VII was a sex chromosome of the ZZ/ZW type, and that the sex-linked AAT-1 gene was expressed on both the Z and W chromosomes. This mode of AAT-1 expression in the Aomori population was different from that in the Hiroshima population from western Honshu, in which the AAT-1 gene was expressed on the Z chromosome but not on the W chromosome. The results also showed that there was no differentiation among populations in the expression of the AAT-1 genes on the Z chromosome, whereas two populations, the Hiroshima and Aomori frogs, exhibited distinct modes of expression of the AAT-1 gene on the W chromosome. These two modes of expression may be widely distributed in western and eastern Japan, and coexist in the central part of Honshu.

  9. Children's Satisfaction with Assistive Technology Solutions for Schoolwork Using the Quest 2.1: Children's Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murchland, Sonya; Kernot, Jocelyn; Parkyn, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the levels of satisfaction children 8-18 years experienced with assistive technology items used to assist them in their schoolwork. Modified from the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction (QUEST 2.0), the QUEST 2.1: Children's Version was developed to enable scoring by children with or without parent assistance. The QUEST 2.1:…

  10. A Quality-of-Life Scale for Assistive Technology: Results of a Pilot Study of Aging and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Vicki A.

    2011-01-01

    Background In an aging society, it is increasingly important to understand how assistive devices can be used by older people to maintain quality of life despite chronic disabilities. Assistive technology is a mainstay of physical therapist practice, but the potential for device use to affect psychosocial well-being is not yet understood at the population level. Objective The objective of this study was to develop a parsimonious indicator that can be used in population-based surveys to represent the effect of assistive technologies on quality of life for older people, separate from personal assistance. Design This study was a cross-sectional survey. Methods The methods used in this study were psychometric scale development and structural equation modeling. Results The results indicated that a parsimonious, valid, and reliable scale reflecting quality of life related to assistive device use can be created from 3 questions designed to measure improvements in safety, control, and participation due to technology. The findings also suggested that assistive technology may more effectively improve quality of life for people with greater levels of functional limitations. Limitations The data were derived from a cross-sectional survey conducted by telephone. The use of personal assistance, on average, was low; thus, the applicability to a population with more profound care needs has yet to be confirmed. Conclusions Determining the broader impact of assistive technology on quality of life with population-level measures may provide insight into how best to leverage technologies to prevent dependence in aging adults. PMID:22003159

  11. A quality-of-life scale for assistive technology: results of a pilot study of aging and technology.

    PubMed

    Agree, Emily M; Freedman, Vicki A

    2011-12-01

    In an aging society, it is increasingly important to understand how assistive devices can be used by older people to maintain quality of life despite chronic disabilities. Assistive technology is a mainstay of physical therapist practice, but the potential for device use to affect psychosocial well-being is not yet understood at the population level. The objective of this study was to develop a parsimonious indicator that can be used in population-based surveys to represent the effect of assistive technologies on quality of life for older people, separate from personal assistance. This study was a cross-sectional survey. /b> The methods used in this study were psychometric scale development and structural equation modeling. The results indicated that a parsimonious, valid, and reliable scale reflecting quality of life related to assistive device use can be created from 3 questions designed to measure improvements in safety, control, and participation due to technology. The findings also suggested that assistive technology may more effectively improve quality of life for people with greater levels of functional limitations. The data were derived from a cross-sectional survey conducted by telephone. The use of personal assistance, on average, was low; thus, the applicability to a population with more profound care needs has yet to be confirmed. Determining the broader impact of assistive technology on quality of life with population-level measures may provide insight into how best to leverage technologies to prevent dependence in aging adults.

  12. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2009.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Min; Chun, Sang Sik; Han, Hyuck Dong; Hwang, Jung Hye; Hwang, Kyung Joo; Kang, In Soo; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Ki Chul; Kim, Tak; Kwon, Hyuck Chan; Lee, Won Don; Lee, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyu Sup; Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Yu Il; Min, Eung Gi; Moon, Hwa Sook; Moon, Shin Yong; Roh, Sung Il; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-11-01

    Great advances have been made in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) since the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby was born in Korea in the year of 1985. However, it deserve to say that the invaluable data from fertility centers may serve as a useful source to find out which factors affect successful IVF outcome and to offer applicable information to infertile patients and fertility clinics. This article intended to report the status of ART in 2009 Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology surveyed. The current survey was performed to assess the status and success rate of ART performed in Korea, between January 1 and December 31, 2009. Reporting forms had been sent out to IVF centers via e-mail, and collected by e-mail as well in 2012. With International Committee Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies recommendation, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and non-ICSI cases have been categorized and also IVF-ET cases involving frozen embryo replacement have been surveyed separately. Seventy-four centers have reported the treatment cycles initiated in the year of 2009, and had performed a total of 27,947 cycles of ART treatments. Among a total of 27,947 treatment cycles, IVF and ICSI cases added up to 22,049 (78.9%), with 45.3% IVF without ICSI and 54.7% IVF with ICSI, respectively. Among the IVF and ICSI patients, patients confirmed to have achieved clinical pregnancy was 28.8% per cycle with oocyte retrieval, and 30.9% per cycle with embryo transfer. The most common number of embryos transferred in 2009 is three embryos (40.4%), followed by 2 embryos (28.4%) and a single embryo transferred (13.6%). Among IVF and ICSI cycles that resulted in multiple live births, twin pregnancy rate was 45.3% and triple pregnancy rate was 1.1%. A total of 191 cases of oocyte donation had been performed to result in 25.0% of live birth rate. Meanwhile, a total of 5,619 cases of frozen embryo replacement had been performed with 33.7% of clinical

  13. FLOYDS Classification of KAIT-17A/AT 2017be as an LBV Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, G.; McCully, C.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Valenti, S.

    2017-01-01

    We obtained a spectrum of KAIT-17A/AT 2017be, discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, on 2017 January 10.4 UT with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the Las Cumbres Observatory 2-meter telescope on Haleakala, Hawai'i.

  14. Current and future assisted reproductive technologies for mammalian farm animals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    technologies that have the potential to improve efficiency of livestock production. The focus will be on technologies that manipulate male and female gametes as well as the stem cells from which they are derived and the preimplantation embryo. While technology is crucial to other interventions in the reproductive process like control of seasonal breeding, hormonal regulation of ovulation, estrous cyclicity and pregnancy establishment, feeding to optimize reproduction, minimizing environmental stress, and selection of genes controlling reproduction, these will not be considered here. Rather the reader is directed to other chapters in this volume as well as some reviews on other aspects of artificial manipulation of reproduction (Reprod Fertil Dev 24:258-266, 2011; Reprod Domest Anim 43:40-47, 2008; Reprod Domest Anim 43:122-128, 2008; Soc Reprod Fertil Suppl 66:87-102, 2009; Comprehensive biotechnology, Amsterdam, pp 477-485; Dairy production medicine, Chichester, pp 153-163; Theriogenology 76:1619-1631, 2011; Theriogenology 76:1568-1582, 2011; Theriogenology 77:1-11, 2012). Given the large number of mammalian species used for production of products useful for man and the diversity in their biology and management, the review will not be comprehensive but instead will use results from species that are most illustrative of the opportunities generated by assisted reproductive technologies.

  15. Impact of Animal Assisted Therapy Reading Instruction on Reading Performance of Homeschooled Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    While animal assisted therapy (AAT) has been a successful part of treatment plans within the medical field for several decades, AAT has not been quantitatively researched as a viable instructional tool that can be used in conjunction with other reading intervention strategies. With over one-third of elementary school aged children experiencing…

  16. Impact of Animal Assisted Therapy Reading Instruction on Reading Performance of Homeschooled Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    While animal assisted therapy (AAT) has been a successful part of treatment plans within the medical field for several decades, AAT has not been quantitatively researched as a viable instructional tool that can be used in conjunction with other reading intervention strategies. With over one-third of elementary school aged children experiencing…

  17. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Cindy; Rishworth, Josephine R; Brown, Julie; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2013-08-22

    As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex, and each ART cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step of the ART cycle is supported by good evidence from well-designed studies. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on procedures and treatment options available to couples with subfertility undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Published Cochrane systematic reviews of couples undergoing ART (in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation, for future inclusion.The outcomes of the overview were live birth (primary outcome), clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (secondary outcomes). Studies of intrauterine insemination and ovulation induction were excluded.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed by using the AMSTAR tool. Reviews were organised by their relevance to specific stages in the ART cycle. Their findings were summarised in the text and data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Fifty-four systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library were included. All were high quality. Thirty reviews identified interventions that were effective (n = 18) or promising (n = 12), 13 reviews identified interventions that were either ineffective (n = 3) or possibly ineffective (n=10), and 11 reviews were unable to draw conclusions due to

  18. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane reviews.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Cindy; Rishworth, Josephine R; Brown, Julie; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2014-12-23

    As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex, and each ART cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step of the ART cycle is supported by good evidence from well-designed studies. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on procedures and treatment options available to couples with subfertility undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Published Cochrane systematic reviews of couples undergoing ART (in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation, for future inclusion.The outcomes of the overview were live birth (primary outcome), clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (secondary outcomes). Studies of intrauterine insemination and ovulation induction were excluded.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed by using the AMSTAR tool. Reviews were organised by their relevance to specific stages in the ART cycle. Their findings were summarised in the text and data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Fifty-eight systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library were included. All were high quality. Thirty-two reviews identified interventions that were effective (n = 19) or promising (n = 13), 14 reviews identified interventions that were either ineffective (n = 3) or possibly ineffective (n=11), and 12 reviews were unable to draw conclusions

  19. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Cindy; Rishworth, Josephine R; Brown, Julie; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2015-07-15

    As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex, and each ART cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step of the ART cycle is supported by good evidence from well-designed studies. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on procedures and treatment options available to couples with subfertility undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Published Cochrane systematic reviews of couples undergoing ART (in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation, for future inclusion.The outcomes of the overview were live birth (primary outcome), clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (secondary outcomes). Studies of intrauterine insemination and ovulation induction were excluded.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed by using the AMSTAR tool. Reviews were organised by their relevance to specific stages in the ART cycle. Their findings were summarised in the text and data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Fifty-nine systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library up to July 2015 were included. All were high quality. Thirty-two reviews identified interventions that were effective (n = 19) or promising (n = 13), 14 reviews identified interventions that were either ineffective (n = 2) or possibly ineffective (n = 12), and 13 reviews were unable to

  20. Improving Access, Provision, and Funding for Assistive Technology Devices and Services. Tech Act Projects Accomplishments Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This report describes individual state projects under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act) that are improving access, provision, and funding of assistive technology (AT) for individuals with disabilities. The beginning of the report describes regional projects that are providing statewide information…

  1. Using Assistive Technology in Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adebisi, Rufus Olanrewaju; Liman, Nalado Abubakar; Longpoe, Patricia Kwalzoom

    2015-01-01

    This paper was written to expose the meaning, benefits, and answer why the use of assistive technology for children with learning disabilities. The paper discussed the various types of assistive technology devices that were designed and used to solve written language, reading, listening, memory and mathematic problems of children with learning…

  2. Reflections of Teachers of Visually Impaired Students on Their Assistive Technology Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajuwon, Paul M.; Meeks, Melanie Kalene; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Okungu, Phoebe A.

    2016-01-01

    Central to the issues of assistive technology utilization and competency is the need to understand how in-service and preservice teachers feel about their knowledge and skill levels. In order to identify teachers of students with visual impairments' perceptions of their mastery of assistive technology devices and services, two studies were…

  3. Special Education Teachers' Use of Assistive Technology with Students Who Have Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Cynthia; Snell, Martha; Gansneder, Bruce; Dexter, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' integration of computer-based assistive technology has been linked to positive educational outcomes for students with disabilities. This study was conducted to identify factors that are predictive of integrating assistive technology into teaching practices among general and special education teachers of students with severe disabilities.…

  4. Evaluating Assistive Technology in Early Childhood Education: The Use of a Concurrent Time Series Probe Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P.; Blum, Craig; Boeckmann, Nichole M.

    2009-01-01

    As assistive technology applications are increasingly implemented in early childhood settings for children who are at risk or who have disabilities, it is critical that teachers utilize observational approaches to determine whether targeted assistive technology-supported interventions make a difference in children's learning. One structured…

  5. Provider Perspectives on the Use of Assistive Technology for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Guimond, Amy; Campbell, Philippa H.; Moore, Heather Weintraub

    2006-01-01

    A random sample of 967 early intervention providers in 33 different states completed a telephone survey that was conducted with computer-assisted telephone interview technology. The survey solicited information about the service providers' views of assistive technology (AT) for infants and toddlers with disabilities. In particular, questions…

  6. Individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities Use of Assistive Technology Devices in Support Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Brian R.; Seok, Soonwha; Ok, Minwook; Bryant, Diane Pedrotty

    2012-01-01

    During a four-year period, from 1988-1992, two significant events occurred that greatly influenced assistive technology (AT) and intellectual disability: the passage by Congress of the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988 and publication by the American Association on Intellectual and Development Disabilities…

  7. Students with Special Educational Needs and Assistive Technologies: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdem, Raziye

    2017-01-01

    The term "assistive technologies" refers to the equipment, devices and apparatus, and the services, systems, processes and adaptations made to the environment that support and facilitate their functions, used by persons with special education needs. This study is a literature review of the use of assistive technologies in the education…

  8. Evaluation of Individuals with Visual Impairment for Educational and Vocational Applications of Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Brian T.

    This paper offers a method for evaluating individuals with visual impairments to determine the use of appropriate assistive technologies. The method is based on the HAAT model, which concentrates on the interaction of three factors: Human, Activity, and Assistive Technology. The evaluation process involves six steps: referral and intake, initial…

  9. Assistive Technology for Students with Visual Impairments: Challenges and Needs in Teachers' Preparation Programs and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Li; Parker, Amy T.; Smith, Derrick W.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of 165 teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas to examine their perceptions of their knowledge of assistive technology. The results showed that they had significant deficits in knowledge in 55 (74.32%) of the 74 assistive technology competencies that were examined and that 57.5% of them lacked…

  10. A Question of Assistive Technology and Services for Young Children with Physical Disabilities. Project TAARK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    A statewide survey of the technology needs of 104 children with physical disabilities aged 0-5 years was conducted in Arkansas as a component of the grant application process of Public Law 100-407 (the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988). The survey analyzed satisfaction with assistive devices technology…

  11. Exploring assistive technology and post-school outcomes for students with severe disabilities.

    PubMed

    Bouck, Emily C; Flanagan, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to understand the extent to which students with severe disabilities receive assistive technology in school and out-of-school, and the relationship between receipt of assistive technology in school and post-school outcomes for these students. This study was a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) from the USA. To analyze the data in this correlational study, researchers conducted frequency distributions, Chi Square Tests of Associations, significance tests and logistic regressions. The main results suggest (a) receipt of assistive technology in school varied greatly by disability identification; (b) receipt of assistive technology post-school also varied by disability identification, but receipt was generally lower; and (c) few statistically significant post-school outcome differences existed between students who received assistive technology and those who did not. An under-utilization of assistive technology exists in practice in the USA for students with severe disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation An under-utilization of assistive technology for secondary students and adults with severe disabilities likely exists. A need exists for improved collaboration between professionals in rehabilitation and professionals in schools to ensure continuation of needed services or aids, such as assistive technology. Additional research is needed to better understand the adult life (or post-school) outcomes of individuals with severe disabilities, factors from PK-12 schooling or post-school services that positively and negative impact those outcomes.

  12. Four Models of Assistive Technology Consideration: How Do They Compare to Recommended Educational Assessment Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Emily H.; O'Brian, Mary; Wojcik, Brian W.

    2004-01-01

    Although the concept of assistive technology has been around for some time in the fields of study for rehabilitation, communication as it relates to speech and language (Bryant & Bryant, 2003; Church & Glennen, 1992) and medicine (Porter, Haynie, Bierle, Caldwell, & Palfrey, 2001), assistive technology pedagogy is relatively new to the field of…

  13. The Assistive Technology Act of 2004: What Does It Say and What Does It Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Margaret E.; Mittler, Joel E.; Hasselbring, Ted S.; Cross, Donald P.

    2005-01-01

    On October 25, 2004, President Bush signed into law the reauthorization of the Assistive Technology Act (AT Act). The new law provides a far more optimistic future for assistive technology (AT) and modifies the primary purpose of the previous law. The new AT Act provides "birth to death" legislation and is fundamentally different from…

  14. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: Resources and Challenges Encountered by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Dawn LaRae

    2012-01-01

    Assistive technology may be a solution for students with disabilities who are struggling to achieve academic growth; however, the consideration for assistive technology process is not prevalent in schools. The purpose of this qualitative study was to take an in-depth look at the processes and factors that teachers of students with disabilities…

  15. Assistive Technology for Students with Visual Impairments: Challenges and Needs in Teachers' Preparation Programs and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Li; Parker, Amy T.; Smith, Derrick W.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of 165 teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas to examine their perceptions of their knowledge of assistive technology. The results showed that they had significant deficits in knowledge in 55 (74.32%) of the 74 assistive technology competencies that were examined and that 57.5% of them lacked…

  16. "Learning to Assess" and "Assessing to Learn": The Construction of Knowledge about Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkes, Clare; Carmichael, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A key role in the development and deployment of Assistive Technology solutions is that of the "assessor-consultant". Assessor-consultants for the UK-based charity Abilitynet work with clients to develop customized computer-based assistive technology systems and draw on a range of shared knowledge from the assessor-consultant community.…

  17. State Leadership Assistance for Technology in Education (Project SLATE). Final Report. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Blair; And Others

    Project SLATE (State Leadership Assistance for Technology in Education) was designed to assist state-level policy makers plan effective uses of emerging electronic learning technology in education within their respective states. In addition to providing custom-designed workshops in 20 states focusing upon state-level priority issues and needs for…

  18. Reading, Writing, and Assistive Technology: An Integrated Developmental Curriculum for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Ellen Urquhart

    2005-01-01

    The recent emergence of assistive technology encourages researchers and educators to explore its possible benefits for students who lack the reading and writing skills necessary for success in higher education. Assistive technologies include text-to-speech software, word-processing programs, voice-recognition software, and software for organizing…

  19. The Effectiveness of Video Tutorials for Teaching Preservice Educators to Use Assistive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Laarhoven, Toni; Munk, Dennis D.; Zurita, Leslie M.; Lynch, Kathleen; Zurita, Brian; Smith, Thomas; Chandler, Lynette

    2009-01-01

    Students with disabilities are guaranteed access to assistive technologies (AT) by provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) (2004) and its predecessor, the Technology Related Assistance Act (Tech Act) (1988). Design and development of AT, including devices and software programs, has burgeoned to a point…

  20. "Learning to Assess" and "Assessing to Learn": The Construction of Knowledge about Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkes, Clare; Carmichael, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A key role in the development and deployment of Assistive Technology solutions is that of the "assessor-consultant". Assessor-consultants for the UK-based charity Abilitynet work with clients to develop customized computer-based assistive technology systems and draw on a range of shared knowledge from the assessor-consultant community.…

  1. Middle School Special Education Teachers' Perceptions and Use of Assistive Technology in Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Emily C.; Richardson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In this research the authors examined middle school special education teachers' perceptions of assistive technology during literacy instruction with students with high incidence disabilities. A survey explored the use, effectiveness, and factors impacting use or effectiveness of assistive technology for literacy teaching and learning. Results…

  2. Middle School Special Education Teachers' Perceptions and Use of Assistive Technology in Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Emily C.; Richardson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In this research the authors examined middle school special education teachers' perceptions of assistive technology during literacy instruction with students with high incidence disabilities. A survey explored the use, effectiveness, and factors impacting use or effectiveness of assistive technology for literacy teaching and learning. Results…

  3. Preschool Teachers' Perception and Use of Hearing Assistive Technology in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lauri H.; Poole, Bridget; Munoz, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored how often sound-field amplification and personal frequency-modulated (FM) systems are used in preschool classrooms, teacher perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using hearing assistive technology, and teacher recommendations for hearing assistive technology use. Method: The study used a cross-sectional survey…

  4. Evaluating Assistive Technology in Early Childhood Education: The Use of a Concurrent Time Series Probe Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P.; Blum, Craig; Boeckmann, Nichole M.

    2009-01-01

    As assistive technology applications are increasingly implemented in early childhood settings for children who are at risk or who have disabilities, it is critical that teachers utilize observational approaches to determine whether targeted assistive technology-supported interventions make a difference in children's learning. One structured…

  5. Preschool Teachers' Perception and Use of Hearing Assistive Technology in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lauri H.; Poole, Bridget; Munoz, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored how often sound-field amplification and personal frequency-modulated (FM) systems are used in preschool classrooms, teacher perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using hearing assistive technology, and teacher recommendations for hearing assistive technology use. Method: The study used a cross-sectional survey…

  6. Perceptions of Disability-Services Administrators about Assistive Technology at Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the manifestation of assistive technology at postsecondary institutions from the perspectives of disability-services administrators, through their personal experiences. Exploration of assistive-technology-related experiences presents the potential to improve understanding of the operation of this vital…

  7. RESNA Resource Guide for Assistive Technology Outcomes: Measurement Tools. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This resource guide, the first of three volumes, lays out the fundamentals of outcome measurements for assistive technology. It includes the whys and hows of gathering data so that assistive technology practitioners can integrate outcomes measurement activities in their daily practice. Chapters include: (1) "Concepts and Rationale for…

  8. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: Resources and Challenges Encountered by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Dawn LaRae

    2012-01-01

    Assistive technology may be a solution for students with disabilities who are struggling to achieve academic growth; however, the consideration for assistive technology process is not prevalent in schools. The purpose of this qualitative study was to take an in-depth look at the processes and factors that teachers of students with disabilities…

  9. Assistive Technology for Students with Mild Disabilities: Update 2002. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrmann, Michael; Jerome, Marci Kinas

    This digest discusses six identified areas of instruction in which assistive technology can aid students with mild disabilities. It begins by discussing how assistive technology can help the student's organization. Low-tech solutions are explained, including teaching students to organize their thoughts or work using flow-charting, task analysis,…

  10. Assistive Technology: Legal Issues for Students with Disabilities and Their Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Janice Neibaur; Huefner, Dixie Snow

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines federal policy, legislation, and adjudication related to assistive technology for students with disabilities. It considers the expanded mandate for assistive technology in IDEA 1997 and its implications, including costs and benefits. Recent federal court decisions, hearing decisions, and Section 504 rulings addressing assistive…

  11. Raising Awareness of Assistive Technology in Older Adults through a Community-Based, Cooperative Extension Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Debra M.; Markham, Melinda Stafford

    2012-01-01

    The Fashion an Easier Lifestyle with Assistive Technology (FELAT) curriculum was developed as a needs-based, community educational program provided through a state Cooperative Extension Service. The overall goal for participants was to raise awareness of assistive technology. Program evaluation included a postassessment and subsequent interview to…

  12. Individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities Use of Assistive Technology Devices in Support Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Brian R.; Seok, Soonwha; Ok, Minwook; Bryant, Diane Pedrotty

    2012-01-01

    During a four-year period, from 1988-1992, two significant events occurred that greatly influenced assistive technology (AT) and intellectual disability: the passage by Congress of the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988 and publication by the American Association on Intellectual and Development Disabilities…

  13. Users' perspectives on the provision of assistive technologies in Bangladesh: awareness, providers, costs and barriers.

    PubMed

    Borg, Johan; Östergren, Per-Olof

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to contribute to a better understanding of challenges and solutions to equitable provision of assistive technologies in resource limited environments by (i) describing sources of awareness, types of providers and costs of assistive technologies; (ii) describing common reasons for not possessing assistive technologies; and (iii) comparing these sources, providers, costs and reasons among younger and older men and women living in urban and rural settings. Descriptive and analytic statistics were used to analyze cross-sectional data from a total sample of 581 hearing aid users, wheelchair users, individuals with hearing impairments not using hearing aids and individuals with ambulatory impairments not using wheelchairs living in eight districts of Bangladesh. Major sources of awareness, types of providers and costs paid varied between users of different types of assistive technology. Lack of affordability was the main reason for not possessing assistive technology. Outcome differences were found between younger and older groups, men and women, and literate and illiterate respondents, while no differences related to place of living were identified. Age, gender, type of impairment and socioeconomic status need to be considered when planning and implementing equitable provision of assistive technologies. Implications for Rehabilitation Provision of assistive technologies needs to be made affordable as lack of affordability was the major reason for not possessing such technologies. To ensure equitable provision of assistive technology, services ought to consider age, gender, impairment and socioeconomic status of their target groups. This includes offering a range of products of different sizes provided by culturally appropriate personnel at affordable cost, which to many may be at no or reduced cost. To cater to the assistive technology needs among the most vulnerable groups, assistive technology providers may learn from CBR strategies, such

  14. Assistive Technology in Australia: Integrating theory and evidence into action.

    PubMed

    Steel, Emily J; Layton, Natasha A

    2016-12-01

    Occupational therapists use a range of strategies to influence the relationship between person, environment and occupation and facilitate people's participation and inclusion in society. Technology is a fundamental environmental factor capable of enabling inclusion, and occupational therapy models articulate a role for assistive technology (AT) devices and services, but there is a gap between theory, research and practice. The context of AT provision in Australia presents systemic barriers that prevent optimal application of AT devices and services for societal health promotion and in individualised solutions. The Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method (ITEA) was used to answer the question 'How can occupational therapy support AT provision to enable older people and people with disability?' A wide range of sources were systematically analysed to explore the complexities of AT provision in Australia. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and IMPACT(2) model are used as frameworks to reconstruct evidence into statements that summarise the theory, process and outcomes of AT provision. Analysis of the influence of the global disability rights and local policies and AT provision systems is used to highlight important aspects for occupational therapists to consider in research and practice. Pragmatic recommendations are provided to enable practitioners to translate theory and evidence into action. AT provision can be improved by focusing on evidence for and congruence between theory, process and outcomes, rather than isolated interventions. Occupational therapists should consider the influence of contextual factors on practice, and work with consumers to improve access and equity in AT provision systems. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  15. Public attitudes in Edmonton toward assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, S J; Chang, W C; Genuis, S K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine public attitudes toward the use and possible limitations of assisted reproductive technology (ART). DESIGN: Mail survey based on telephone numbers selected at random by computer. SETTING: Edmonton. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 602 Edmonton residents aged 16 years or more (57% of eligible subjects) reached by telephone agreed to participate. Completed questionnaires were received from 455 subjects (76%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Attitudes toward egg donation, sperm donation, selective fetal reduction, embryo freezing and experimentation, and surrogacy, as determined through responses to five cases. Comments and demographic data were also solicited. MAIN RESULTS: Overall, 66% and 63% respectively of the respondents would donate an egg or sperm to a sibling; the corresponding rates for donation to a stranger were 41% and 44%. Selective fetal reduction was supported by 47% of the respondents, although only 24% would support fetal reduction to eliminate fetuses of an undesired sex. Most (64%) thought that live embryo freezing should be permitted by law. A total of 74% agreed with surrogacy if done for medical reasons, but 85% opposed its use for reasons of convenience. Overall, 72% of the respondents thought that ART should be regulated. A total of 58% felt that physicians should be primarily responsible for determining the allowable limits of this technology, and 38% felt that the public should be primarily responsible. Only 21% agreed with public funding of ART. Religious affiliation strongly influenced attitudes toward ART. CONCLUSIONS: Public support for ART varies depending on the circumstances of its use. Education is needed to make the general community aware of the various aspects of ART. The results of this survey should help physicians and governing bodies make informed decisions about the future directions of ART in Canada. PMID:8324713

  16. Barriers to the use of assistive technology for children with multiple disabilities.

    PubMed

    Copley, Jodie; Ziviani, Jenny

    2004-01-01

    Assistive technology has aided children with multiple disabilities to improve access and participation in their school and home environments. Effective educational outcomes from assistive technology use are dependent upon a coordinated assessment and implementation process. The literature on assistive technology with children was reviewed in order to identify current barriers to its effective integration within schools. These barriers were found to include lack of appropriate staff training and support, negative staff attitudes, inadequate assessment and planning processes, insufficient funding, difficulties procuring and managing equipment, and time constraints. A team model for assistive technology assessment and planning is proposed to optimize the educational goal achievement of children with multiple disabilities. Such a model can help target the allocation of occupational therapy resources in schools to best promote educational and broader functional outcomes from assistive technology use.

  17. Instructional Technology Assistance Project. Evaluation Report: Year Two, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Paul

    An evaluation was conducted of the Instructional Technology Assistance Project. Its goals were to promote learning in technologically enhanced classrooms; support adult education (AE) teachers in developing skills and confidence in integrating technology into instruction; and identify exemplary practices in technology enhanced AE. Data sources…

  18. Multiple stakeholder perceptions of assistive technology for individuals with cerebral palsy in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Sarvnaz; Davies, Claire

    2017-08-23

    This study sought to gain an understanding of the experiences and perspectives of assistive technology from different stakeholders in technology adoption, in the New Zealand context. A focus group was held with individuals with cerebral palsy (n = 5), service providers (n = 4), caregivers (n = 3) and a biomechanical engineer. The data recordings from the focus group were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Themes emerged around barriers imposed by the assessment process and training in assistive technology procedures, the influence of family members, the environment that assistive technology is used in, and psychosocial aspects of being able to participate and integrate into society. The results are similar to other literature, suggesting new innovations and changes are in dire need, to improve assistive technology experiences for all stakeholders. Implications for Research Service providers for assistive technology desire more effective training and support of existing and emerging technologies. Although the set procedure for acquiring assistive technology in New Zealand is comprehensive, incorporating multiple perspectives, it is difficult to follow through in practice. More innovative procedures are needed. The movement of Universal Design is significantly improving the perception of individuals with disabilities, and has enabled greater social inclusion. More assistive technology developers need to ensure that they incorporate these principles in their design process.

  19. Risk of peripartum hysterectomy in births after assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Cromi, Antonella; Candeloro, Ilario; Marconi, Nicola; Casarin, Jvan; Serati, Maurizio; Agosti, Massimo; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether women who conceive after assisted reproductive technology (ART) are at higher risk for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. A case-control study using a prospectively maintained institutional database. A tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Thirty-one women who underwent peripartum hysterectomy for management of hemorrhage, and 19,902 control women. None. Association between potential predictors and peripartum hysterectomy. The incidence of peripartum hysterectomy was 1.7 cases per 1,000 births (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.4). After adjustment for maternal age and twin pregnancy, placenta previa (odds ratio [OR] 50.78, 95% CI 23.30-110.68), prior cesarean delivery (OR 6.72, 95% CI 2.99-15.09 for one cesarean; OR 6.80, 95% CI 1.45-31.90 for two or more cesareans), previous myomectomy (OR 24.59, 95% CI 6.70-90.19), and ART conception (OR 5.98, 95% CI 2.18-16.40) were all antenatal predictors for peripartum hysterectomy. In women having a peripartum hysterectomy, 13.4% of the risk is attributable to mode of conception. A history of ART increases the likelihood of needing a peripartum hysterectomy to control hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to determine whether ART conception should be included in algorithms of risk stratification for emergency cesarean hysterectomy and plan of care be modified accordingly. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of competition on assisted reproductive technology outcomes.

    PubMed

    Henne, Melinda B; Bundorf, M Kate

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the relationship between competition among fertility clinics and assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment outcomes, particularly multiple births. Using clinic-level data from 1995 to 2001, we examined the relationship between competition and clinic-level ART outcomes and practice patterns. National database registry. Clinics performing ART. The number of clinics within a 20-mile (32.19-km) radius of a given clinic. Clinic-level births, singleton births, and multiple births per ART cycle; multiple births per ART birth; average number of embryos transferred per cycle; and the proportion of cycles for women under age 35 years. The number of competing clinics is not strongly associated with ART birth and multiple birth rates. Relative to clinics with no competitors, the rate of multiple births per cycle is lower (-0.03 percentage points) only for clinics with more than 15 competitors. Embryo transfer practices are not statistically significantly associated with the number of competitors. Clinic-level competition is strongly associated with patient mix. The proportion of cycles for patients under 35 years old is 6.4 percentage points lower for clinics with more than 15 competitors than for those with no competitors. Competition among fertility clinics does not appear to increase rates of multiple births from ART by promoting more aggressive embryo transfer decisions. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Hormonal effects in infants conceived by assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Marcos, Patricia Martin; David, Raphael; Kohn, Brenda

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe 7 infants conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART) who presented with breast development and/or pubic hair. The clinical presentation in these infants raises awareness that an altered intrauterine hormonal milieu may impact the fetal and infant stages of children conceived by ART. Between May 2001 and April 2004, 7 children between the ages of 5 and 21 months conceived by ART were referred by their pediatricians to the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology at the New York University School of Medicine for evaluation of possible precocious puberty. Patients were evaluated for the possibility of centrally mediated precocious puberty and pseudoprecocious puberty, with a possible ovarian or adrenal origin. Endocrine evaluation in all patients indicated sex-steroid and hormone levels in the prepubertal range; pelvic sonography confirmed prepubertal ovaries with unstimulated uteri. Clinical follow-up of our patients thus far has not revealed progression of breast development, pubarche, or elevation in sex steroids. It is well established that the developing endocrine system in the fetus and maturation of endocrine-control systems are influenced by hormone concentrations in the fetus. Whether ART alters the intrauterine hormonal milieu for the growing fetus conceived by ART is as yet unknown and is an area of ongoing investigation. Patients conceived through ART, including our patients who presented with hormonal manifestations, will need to be monitored throughout childhood and into adolescence and adulthood to determine if any perturbation exists on the timing of puberty and later fertility.

  2. Assistive technology training: diverse audiences and multidisciplinary content.

    PubMed

    Jans, Lita H; Scherer, Marcia J

    2006-01-01

    This study surveyed US programmes that train professionals in assistive technology (AT). Surveys contained questions regarding programme characteristics, audiences, training content, and approaches. This multi-method, longitudinal study gathered information from 55 programmes in 27 states concerning their courses, curricula, and training audiences in 2002 and again in 2004. The study focused on 45 unique programmes conducting AT training for formal credit, which included graduate or undergraduate credit or degrees, continuing education units (CEUs), and/or AT credential. Twenty-five programmes at universities and colleges (average age 10 years) trained mainly graduate students, and typically offered five or six three-unit AT courses. Twenty community-based programmes (average age 7 years) offered mainly 1- or 2-day workshops. Special educators represented the largest group of trainees. Thirty-two training directors and 135 instructors described training barriers, curriculum issues, distance and hands-on learning methods, and future AT training directions. Multidisciplinary AT training not only reaches core audiences of disability-related professionals, but has expanded to include new audiences. Special and general educator training may be a model for inclusion. Although distance learning can reach diverse audiences, faculty in training programmes also emphasised hands-on training. AT training programmes experience considerable turnover and remain vulnerable to funding losses.

  3. Association between Thrombophilia and Repeated Assisted Reproductive Technology Failures

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Kobra; Vaezi, Maryam; Dagigazar, Behrooz; Mehrzad Sadagiani, Mahzad; Farzadi, Laya; Pashaei-Asl, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to investigate the incidence of thrombophilic gene mutations in repeated assisted reproductive technology (ART) failures. Methods: The prevalence of mutated genes in the patients with a history of three or more previous ART failures was compared with the patients with a history of successful pregnancy following ARTs. The study group included 70 patients, 34 with three or more previously failed ARTs (A) and control group consisted of 36 patients with successful pregnancy following ARTs (B). All patients were tested for the presence of mutated thrombophilic genes including factor V Leiden (FVL), Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and Prothrombin (G20210A) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). Results: Mutation of FVL gene was detected in 5.9% women of group A (2 of 34) compared with 2.8% women (1 of 36) of control group (P = 0.6). Mutation of MTHFR gene was found in 35.3% (12 cases) as compared with 50% (18 cases) of control (35.3% versus 50%; P = 0.23). Regarding Prothrombin, only control group had 5.6% mutation (P = 0.49). No significant differences were detected in the incidences of FVL, Prothrombin and MTHFR in the study group A compared with the control group B. Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that thrombophilia does not have a significant effect in ART failures. PMID:24312798

  4. Barriers and facilitators to community mobility for assistive technology users.

    PubMed

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy.

  5. Assisted reproductive technology in China: compliance and non-compliance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the WHO, infertility and sterility will be the third-most serious disease worldwide in the 21st century, after cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast to developed countries, assisted reproductive technology (ART) were not offered in China until the mid-1980s with the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) infant born in Taiwan in 1985, then Hong Kong in 1986, and mainland China in 1988, respectively. Since those inceptions, the practice of ART in China has evoked a variety of social, cultural, political and one-child policy responses that have resulted in restrictions on the number of IVF cycles performed annually. According to recent survey, an estimate 40-50 million women and 45 million men suffered from infertility, which is estimated that more than ten million Chinese infertile couples require ART treatment. However, it has limited access to ART facilities, many of them may not have a child are whirling to all types of fertility therapies. Exposure to radiation, pesticides and other environmental pollutants, work-related stress and unhealthy lifestyles are believed to contribute to the increasing incidence of infertility in China. The aim of this first report is to provide China nationwide ART data and government policy in compliance and 
non-compliance, particularly related to family plan policy in China. PMID:26835327

  6. Command Detection and Classification in Tongue Drive Assistive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Elnaz Banan; Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-01-01

    Tongue Drive System (TDS) is a new assistive technology that enables individuals with severe disabilities such as those with spinal cord injury (SCI) to regain environmental control using their tongue motion. We have developed a new sensor signal processing (SSP) algorithm which uses four 3-axial magneto-resistive sensor outputs to accurately detect and classify between seven different user-control commands in stationary as well as mobile conditions. The new algorithm employs a two-stage classification method with a combination of 9 classifiers to discriminate between 4 commands on the left or right side of the oral cavity (one neutral command shared on both sides). Evaluation of the new SSP algorithm on five able-bodied subjects resulted in true positive rates in the range of 70–99% with corresponding false positive rates in the range of 5–7%, showing a notable improvement in the resulted true-false (TF) differences when compared to the previous algorithm. PMID:22255574

  7. Assisted reproductive technologies and equity of access issues.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M M

    2005-05-01

    In Australia and other countries, certain groups of women have traditionally been denied access to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs). These typically are single heterosexual women, lesbians, poor women, and those whose ability to rear children is questioned, particularly women with certain disabilities or who are older. The arguments used to justify selection of women for ARTs are most often based on issues such as scarcity of resources, and absence of infertility (in lesbians and single women), or on social concerns: that it "goes against nature"; particular women might not make good mothers; unconventional families are not socially acceptable; or that children of older mothers might be orphaned at an early age. The social, medical, legal, and ethical reasoning that has traditionally promoted this lack of equity in access to ARTs, and whether the criteria used for client deselection are ethically appropriate in any particular case, are explored by this review. In addition, the issues of distribution and just "gatekeeping" practices associated with these sensitive medical services are examined.

  8. The role of assistive technology in self-perceived participation.

    PubMed

    Ripat, Jacquie D; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of how assistive technology (AT) contributes to self-perceived participation for individuals with spinal cord injuries and to propose a revised definition of AT in light of the findings. A grounded theory study of 19 adults with spinal cord injuries was conducted. Participants engaged in individual in-depth interviews and took photographs of the role of AT in their own environments. Analysis consisted of an inductive process of constant comparison. Participants attended a follow-up focus group intended to verify and contribute to the credibility of the findings. The primary theme identified was AT as a means to participation. Three categories served to identify the decision-making processes that individuals underwent to select AT that would promote positive participation experiences: inclusion versus autonomy and accomplishment, availability and cost and contexts of use. A new definition of AT was proposed; this definition identifies AT as a means to enable occupation, emphasizes the relevance of the environment and highlights the importance placed on self-perceived participation. AT recommendations must be based on a thorough understanding of the role that AT plays in the lives of clients. Future research will further develop and validate the definition proposed in this study.

  9. The assisted reproductive technology laboratory: toward evidence-based practice?

    PubMed

    Sunde, Arne; Balaban, Basak

    2013-08-01

    In the past decades, the efficiency of human assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has improved. We have witnessed important new developments such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, blastocyst culture, vitrification, and methods for genetic analysis of human embryos. Despite these improvements, current ART laboratories are to a large extent composed of general laboratory equipment that is not designed and manufactured especially for human ART. Human reproductive cells have different physiochemical requirements than somatic cells. We encourage the development of laboratory equipment, utensils, and consumables that are designed specifically for human ART. In addition, the quality and consistency of commercially available culture media have improved, but the composition of commercially available ART culture media varies considerably. It is difficult to see the scientific rationale for this variation. Currently it is not known which of these formulations gives the best clinical results. Finally, selection of embryos in routine ART should be done with the use of variables that have been shown to have statistically independent selection power. With the advent of automatic and objective methods for recording morphology and growth kinetics of human embryos, there is a possibility to pool data sets from many different clinics. This may enable the construction of selection algorithms based on objectively recorded embryo parameters. New methods for the genetic analysis of chromosomal status of embryos may prove to be useful, but they should be tested in controlled randomized trials before being introduced for routine use in ART. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent cigarette smoking and assisted reproductive technologies outcome.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Ariel; Muñoz, Alex; Barnhart, Kurt; Argüello, Begoña; Díaz, Marina; Pommer, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the association between recent cigarette smoking (CS) in female and male partners and assisted reproduction technology (ART) outcomes. Cohort prospective study. University ART program in Chile. One hundred sixty-six couples seeking pregnancy through ART. Follicular fluid (FF) and serum cotinine concentrations were measured in female partners. Self-reported CS data were collected through personal interviews. The association between female recent smoking, assessed by FF and serum cotinine concentrations, and ART outcomes, such as number of ova retrieved and implantation rates, and the association between self-reported male recent smoking and live birth rates. A significant age-adjusted association between increased FF cotinine level and decreased number of ova retrieved was found. The male partner's smoking habit significantly decreased the live birth rate from 21.1% to 7.8%. Serum cotinine concentrations paralleled those of FF. The hypothesis of a detrimental effect of recent female smoking over implantation rates is rejected. However, recent male smoking is associated with significantly decreased live birth rates even after adjusting for confounders. Female recent smoking was significantly associated with decreased number of retrieved ova. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. User involvement in assisted reproductive technologies: England and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Samorinha, Catarina; Lichon, Mateusz; Silva, Susana; Dent, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare user involvement in the case of assisted reproductive technologies in England and Portugal through the concepts of voice, choice and co-production, assessing the implications for user empowerment. This qualitative study draws primarily on policy review and uses exploratory semi-structured interviews with key informants as a way of illustrating points. Data on the following themes was compared: voice (users' representativeness on licensing bodies and channels of communication between users and doctors); choice (funding and accessibility criteria; choice of fertility centres, doctors and level of care); and co-production (criteria through which users actively engage with health professionals in planning the treatment). Inter- and intra-healthcare systems variations between the two countries on choice and co-production were identified. Differences between funding and accessibility, regions, public and private sectors and attitudes towards doctor-patient relationship (paternalistic/partnership) were the key issues. Although consumer choice and indicators of co-production are evident in treatment pathways in both countries, user empowerment is not. This is limited by inequalities in accessibility criteria, dependence on doctors' individual perspectives and lack of genuine and formal hearing of citizens' voice. Enhancing users' involvement claims for individual and organizational cultures reflecting user-centred values. Effective ways to incorporate users' knowledge in shared decision making and co-design are needed to empower patients and to improve the delivery of care.

  12. Best practices for team-based assistive technology design courses.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Mary R; Pearlman, Jonathan L

    2013-09-01

    Team-based design courses focused on products for people with disabilities have become relatively common, in part because of training grants such as the NSF Research to Aid Persons with Disabilities course grants. An output from these courses is an annual description of courses and projects but has yet to be complied into a "best practices guide," though it could be helpful for instructors. To meet this need, we conducted a study to generate best practices for assistive technology product development courses and how to use these courses to teach students the fundamentals of innovation. A full list of recommendations is comprised in the manuscript and include identifying a client through a reliable clinical partner; allowing for transparency between the instructors, the client, and the team(s); establishing multi-disciplinary teams; using a process-oriented vs. solution-oriented product development model; using a project management software to facilitate and archive communication and outputs; facilitating client interaction through frequent communication; seeking to develop professional role confidence to inspire students' commitment to engineering and (where applicable) rehabilitation field; publishing student designs on repositories; incorporating both formal and informal education opportunities related to design; and encouraging students to submit their designs to local or national entrepreneurship competitions.

  13. Health and functioning of adolescents conceived by assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Fruchter, Eyal; Beck-Fruchter, Ronit; Hourvitz, Ariel; Weiser, Mark; Goldberg, Shira; Fenchel, Daphna; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the general health, mental health, and cognitive ability of assisted reproductive technology (ART)-conceived adolescents. A nested case-control study within a historic cohort. Not applicable. A total of 253 ART-conceived adolescents born between 1982 and 1993 and 253 matched references according to birth year, gender, and the high-school they attended. None. Medical and psychiatric diagnoses, and cognitive ability recorded at the military preinduction screening (ages 16-17 years) and doctor's appointments throughout the military service. No differences were detected in general and mental health of ART adolescents or cognitive ability, compared with the reference group. Similar results were obtained after stratification for gender and singleton births. The ART adolescents had fewer cases of discharge from military service due to health reasons (4% vs. 8.3%). Follow-up during the military service revealed that male ART adolescents had significantly more doctor's appointments compared with the reference group (23.80 ± 15.59 vs. 19.95 ± 13.79). Our preliminary results provide reassurance that in the long-run health and functioning of ART-conceived adolescents is not compromised. Further studies with larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epigenetics and assisted reproductive technology: a call for investigation.

    PubMed

    Niemitz, Emily L; Feinberg, Andrew P

    2004-04-01

    A surprising set of recent observations suggests a link between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and epigenetic errors--that is, errors involving information other than DNA sequence that is heritable during cell division. An apparent association with ART was found in registries of children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and retinoblastoma. Here, we review the epidemiology and molecular biology behind these studies and those of relevant model systems, and we highlight the need for investigation of two major questions: (1) large-scale case-control studies of ART outcomes, including long-term assessment of the incidence of birth defects and cancer, and (2) investigation of the relationship between epigenetic errors in both offspring and parents, the specific methods of ART used, and the underlying infertility diagnoses. In addition, the components of proprietary commercial media used in ART procedures must be fully and publicly disclosed, so that factors such as methionine content can be assessed, given the relationship in animal studies between methionine exposure and epigenetic changes.

  15. DNA methylation errors in imprinting disorders and assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Hatsune; Hiura, Hitoshi; Okae, Hiroaki; Miyauchi, Naoko; Sato, Fumi; Sato, Akiko; Arima, Takahiro

    2013-10-01

    There have been increased incident reports of rare imprinting disorders associated with assisted reproductive technology (ART). ART is an important treatment for infertile people of reproductive age and is increasingly common. The identification of epigenetic changes at imprinted loci in ART infants has led to the suggestion that the techniques themselves may predispose embryos to acquisition of imprinting errors and disease. It is still unknown, however, at what point(s) these imprinting errors arise, or the risk factors. In this review it was hypothesized that the particular steps of the ART process may be prone to induction of imprinting methylation errors during gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic development. In addition, imprinting diseases and their causes are explained. Moreover, using a Japanese nationwide epidemiological study of imprinting diseases, their association with ART is determined. Epigenetic studies are required to understand the pathogenesis of this association; the ART-related risk factor(s); and the precautions that can be taken to prevent the occurrence of these syndromes. It is hoped that the constitution of children born after ART will indicate the safest and most ethical approach to use, which will be invaluable for the future development of standard ART treatment.

  16. Trends in Global Assisted Reproductive Technologies Research: a Scientometrics study

    PubMed Central

    Okhovati, Maryam; Zare, Morteza; Zare, Fatemeh; Bazrafshan, Maliheh Sadat; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study illustrated the global contribution to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) research in MEDLINE database from 1998 to 2014. Methods In March 2015, the MEDLINE database was searched for research publications indexed under ‘reproductive techniques, assisted’ (including the following MeSH headings: in vitro fertilization [IVF]; intracytoplasmic sperm injections; cryopreservation; and ovulation induction), with the following expressions in the fields of title or abstract: intrauterine insemination; sperm donation; embryo/egg donation and surrogate mothers. The number of publications in MEDLINE database was recorded for each individual year, 1998–2014, and for each country. The following countries were arbitrarily selected for data retrieval: United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Canada, Italy, Japan (G7 countries), Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC countries), Egypt, Turkey, Israel and Iran. Results The absolute number of publications for each country from 1998 to 2014 ranged from 75 to 16453, with a median of 2024. The top five countries were the US (16453 publications), the UK (5427 publications), Japan (4805), China (4660) and France (3795). ART (20277), cryopreservation (11623) and IVF (11209) were the most researched areas. Conclusion Global research on ARTs were geographically distributed and highly concentrated among the world’s richest countries. Cryopreservation and IVF were the most productive research domains among ARTs. PMID:26813255

  17. Passive wireless tags for tongue controlled assistive technology interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rakibet, Osman O; Horne, Robert J; Kelly, Stephen W; Batchelor, John C

    2016-03-01

    Tongue control with low profile, passive mouth tags is demonstrated as a human-device interface by communicating values of tongue-tag separation over a wireless link. Confusion matrices are provided to demonstrate user accuracy in targeting by tongue position. Accuracy is found to increase dramatically after short training sequences with errors falling close to 1% in magnitude with zero missed targets. The rate at which users are able to learn accurate targeting with high accuracy indicates that this is an intuitive device to operate. The significance of the work is that innovative very unobtrusive, wireless tags can be used to provide intuitive human-computer interfaces based on low cost and disposable mouth mounted technology. With the development of an appropriate reading system, control of assistive devices such as computer mice or wheelchairs could be possible for tetraplegics and others who retain fine motor control capability of their tongues. The tags contain no battery and are intended to fit directly on the hard palate, detecting tongue position in the mouth with no need for tongue piercings.

  18. Emerging issues and current trends in assistive technology use 2007-2010: practising, assisting and enabling learning for all.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Chris; Brown, David; Evett, Lindsay; Standen, Penny

    2014-11-01

    Following an earlier review in 2007, a further review of the academic literature relating to the uses of assistive technology (AT) by children and young people was completed, covering the period 2007-2011. As in the earlier review, a tripartite taxonomy: technology uses to train or practise, technology uses to assist learning and technology uses to enable learning, was used in order to structure the findings. The key markers for research in this field and during these three years were user involvement, AT on mobile mainstream devices, the visibility of AT, technology for interaction and collaboration, new and developing interfaces and inclusive design principles. The paper concludes by locating these developments within the broader framework of the Digital Divide.

  19. Technology-assisted education in graduate medical education: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jwayyed, Sharhabeel; Stiffler, Kirk A; Wilber, Scott T; Southern, Alison; Weigand, John; Bare, Rudd; Gerson, Lowell W

    2011-08-08

    Studies on computer-aided instruction and web-based learning have left many questions unanswered about the most effective use of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. We conducted a review of the current medical literature to report the techniques, methods, frequency and effectiveness of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. A structured review of MEDLINE articles dealing with "Computer-Assisted Instruction," "Internet or World Wide Web," "Education" and "Medical" limited to articles published between 2002-2007 in the English language was performed. The two literature searches returned 679 articles; 184 met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. In 87 articles, effectiveness was measured primarily using self-reported results from a survey of subjects. Technology-assisted education was superior to traditional methods in 42 of the 64 direct comparison articles (66%, 95% CI 53-77%). Traditional teaching methods were superior to technology-assisted education in only 3/64 (5%, 95% CI 1-13%). The remaining 19 direct comparison articles showed no difference. A detailed review of the 64 comparative studies (technology-assisted education versus traditional teaching methods) also failed to identify a best method or best uses for technology-assisted education. Technology-assisted education is used in graduate medical education across a variety of content areas and participant types. Knowledge gain was the predominant outcome measured. The majority of studies that directly compared knowledge gains in technology-assisted education to traditional teaching methods found technology-assisted education equal or superior to traditional teaching methods, though no "best methods" or "best use" was found within those studies. Only three articles were specific to Emergency Medicine, suggesting further research in our specialty is warranted.

  20. Investigating the effectiveness of technologies applied to assist seniors: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Pouria; Ghapanchi, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a number of Information and Communication Technologies have emerged with the aim to provide innovative and efficient ways to help seniors in their daily life and to reduce the cost of healthcare. Studies have been conducted to introduce an assistive technology to support seniors and to investigate the acceptance of these assistive technologies; however, research illustrating the effectiveness of assistive technologies is scant. This study undertakes a systematic literature review of ScienceDirect, PubMed, ProQuest and IEEE Explore databases to investigate current empirical studies on the assistive technologies applied in aged care. Our systematic review of an initial set of 2035 studies published from 2000 to 2014 examines the role of assistive technologies in seniors' daily lives, from enhancements in their mobility to improvements in the social connectedness and decreases in readmission to hospitals. This study found eight key issues in aged care that have been targeted by researchers from different disciplines (e.g., ICT, health and social science), namely, dependent living, fall risk, chronic disease, dementia, social isolation, depression, poor well-being, and poor medication management. This paper also identified the assistive technologies that have been proposed to overcome those problems, and we categorised these assistive technologies into six clusters, namely, general ICT, robotics, telemedicine, sensor technology, medication management applications, and video games. In addition, we analyzed the effectiveness of the identified technologies and noted that some technologies can change and enhance seniors' daily lives and relieve their problems. Our analysis showed a significant growth in the number of publications in this area in the past few years. It also showed that most of the studies in this area have been conducted in North America. Assistive technologies are a reality and can be applied to improve quality of life, especially among older age

  1. Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine; Djalalov, Sandjar; Xie, Xuanqian; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)—using a catheter to place a stent to keep blood vessels open—is increasingly used for high-risk patients who cannot undergo surgery. Cardiogenic shock (when the heart suddenly cannot pump enough blood) is associated with a high mortality rate. The percutaneous ventricular assist device can help control blood pressure and increase blood flow in these high-risk conditions. This health technology assessment examined the benefits, harms, and budget impact of the Impella percutaneous ventricular assist device in high-risk PCI and cardiogenic shock. We also analyzed cost-effectiveness of the Impella device in high-risk PCI. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Impella percutaneous ventricular assist device in high-risk PCI and cardiogenic shock, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on hemodynamic stability, mortality, major adverse cardiac events, bleeding, and vascular complications. We developed a Markov decision-analytical model to assess the cost- effectiveness of Impella devices versus intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs), calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) using a 10-year time horizon, and conducted sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the estimates. The economic model was conducted from the perspective of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Results Eighteen studies (one randomized controlled trial and 10 observational studies for high-risk PCI, and one randomized controlled trial and six observational studies for cardiogenic shock) were included in the clinical review. Compared with IABPs, Impella 2.5, one model of the device, improved hemodynamic parameters (GRADE low–very low) but showed no significant difference in mortality (GRADE low), major adverse cardiac events (GRADE low

  2. Assisted Reproductive Technology and Early Intervention Program Enrollment

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Daksha; Cabral, Howard; Belanoff, Candice; Declercq, Eugene R.; Kotelchuck, Milton; Luke, Barbara; Stern, Judy E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We examined the prevalence of Early Intervention (EI) enrollment in Massachusetts comparing singleton children conceived via assisted reproductive technology (ART), children born to mothers with indicators of subfertility but no ART (Subfertile), and children born to mothers who had no indicators of subfertility and conceived naturally (Fertile). We assessed the natural direct effect (NDE), the natural indirect effect (NIE) through preterm birth, and the total effect of ART and subfertility on EI enrollment. METHODS: We examined maternal and infant characteristics among singleton ART (n = 6447), Subfertile (n = 5515), and Fertile (n = 306 343) groups and characteristics associated with EI enrollment includingpreterm birth using χ2 statistics (α = 0.05). We estimated the NDE and NIE of the ART–EI enrollment relationship by fitting a model for enrollment, conditional on ART, preterm and the ART-preterm delivery interaction, and covariates. Similar analyses were conducted by using Subfertile as the exposure. RESULTS: The NDE indicated that the odds of EI enrollment were 27% higher among the ART group (odds ratioNDE = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19 – 1.36) and 20% higher among the Subfertilegroup (odds ratioNDE = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.12 – 1.29) compared with the Fertile group, even if the rate of preterm birth is held constant. CONCLUSIONS: Singleton children conceived through ART and children of subfertile mothers both have elevated risks of EI enrollment. These findings have implications for clinical providers as they counsel women about child health outcomes associated with ART or subfertility. PMID:26908668

  3. Ocular Manifestations in Infants Resulted from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

    PubMed

    Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Kermani, Ramin Mozafari; Mohhamadi, Ali Reza; Nateghi, Mohammad Reza; Fazeli, Abolhasan Shahzade; Kashi, Khashayar Mehdizadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, many infertile couples can have child by assistant reproductive technology (ART). Always the undesirable effects of these methods on newborn are considered and are evaluated. The aim of this study is to describe the impact of ART on ocular and visual performances of infants born by these methods. In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 479 infants aged three-nine months presented to an optometry clinic of Child Health and Development Research Department (CHDRD), Tehran, Iran. Static retinoscopy, qualitative fixation evaluation, Hirschberg test, red reflex assessment and external eye examination were carried out. Other information such as birth weight and maturity of the infants was recorded. It was possible to assess only 320 out of 479 infants due to general condition of some participants. Comparison of mean refractive error in infants' right and left eyes did not show any significant difference. Our findings confirmed that 20.3% had poor fixation, while 2.9% revealed manifest strabismus. The results also revealed the prevalences of myopia, hyperopia and emmetropia are 2.9%, 87%, and 10.1%, respectively. Red reflex abnormalities were significantly found in boys and in preterm infants (p < 0.05). Failure of fixation control was seen more frequently with increasing refractive error, which significantly developed in preterm infants (p < 0.001). These results reflect the necessity of more comprehensive assessments and further follow-up of infants born by ART, especially for premature male ART infants. These results also suggest the probability of fixation condition and visual deficiencies in these infants. It is recommended to pay close attention to this preliminary report about the refractive and fixation condition of the infants born after ART.

  4. A survey of assistive technology service providers in the USA.

    PubMed

    Arthanat, Sajay; Elsaesser, Linda-Jeanne; Bauer, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates perspectives of assistive technology service (ATS) providers regarding their education and training, interdisciplinary standards of practice, use of a common language framework, funding policies, utilization of evidence and outcomes measurement. A survey underpinned by AT legislations and established guidelines for practice was completed by 318 certified AT providers. More than 30% of the providers reported their education and training as inadequate to fulfil four of the seven primary roles of ATS. Nearly 90% of providers expressed awareness of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains for interdisciplinary communication. However, only 45% felt that they could effectively utilize the ICF in their documentation. About 75% of the providers acknowledged the lack of a recognized standard for the provision of services. Prevailing inadequacies in funding were negatively impacting the quality of ATS, as expressed by 88% of respondents. Translation of evidence to practice was identified as a major challenge by 41% of service providers. Providers were predominantly documenting outcomes through informal interviews (54%) or non-standard instruments (26%). Findings support the need for strengthening professional curriculum, pre-service and in-service training and an established standard to support effective, interdisciplinary AT services and data collection to support public policy decisions. Implications for Rehabilitation This study validates the need to strengthen education and training of AT service providers by enhancing professional curriculum as well as their engagement in pre-service and in-service training activities. This study draws attention to health care funding policies and practices that critically impact the quality of AT services. This study signifies the need for an established interdisciplinary standard among AT professionals to support effective communication, service coordination and

  5. Mole modifications following controlled ovarian stimulation for assisted reproduction technologies.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, M; Di Nicola, M; Varrati, S; Carbone, A; Pamio, A; Capo, A; Tracanna, M; Castigliego, A P; Tiboni, G M; Amerio, P

    2015-10-01

    The role of estrogens on moles biology remains undefined although estrogenic receptors have been found on melanocytes. It has been postulated that supraphysiological estrogen levels could promote the progression of moles to melanoma. Women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) for assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are exposed to high levels of estrogens, produced by the ovary in response to exogenous gonadotropin administration. The aim of this study is to assess whether COS for ART may have an impact on mole structure and/or characteristics. Women undergoing to ART for various infertility conditions were included in the study. Personal and clinical data were collected. Dermatoscopic features and scores (total dermoscopy score--TDS) were statistically compared before COS and after a 6-month follow-up period. Statistical correlation was performed between estradiol, FSH blood levels and relative variation in moles dimensions. A total of 46 patients were included in the study. One hundred and seventy-five melanocytic lesions from 31 patients were evaluated at both time points. Although statistically significant differences were found in mole dimension and TDS between the two time points, these differences had no relevance in the clinical setting not suggesting the need for mole excision. Moreover, the only statistically significant correlation with estradiol blood concentration on hCG administration day was found with one-axis dimensional variation. To our knowledge this is the first work to evaluate the effect of COS on moles. The obtained results do not support a causal relation between the supraphysiological hormone levels stimulation and worsening of clinical and dermoscopical features of moles. Further study is needed to clarify whether estrogens plays a role in melanoma. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Current status of assisted reproductive technology in Korea, 2011.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyoung Hoon; Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyu Sup; Choi, Young Min

    2016-03-01

    The number of assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics, ART cycles, clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), and number of newborns conceived using ART have steadily increased in South Korea. This aim of this study was to describe the status of ART in South Korea between January 1 and December 31, 2011. A localized online survey was created and sent to all available ART centers via email in 2015. Fresh embryo transfer (FET) cases were categorized depending on whether standard in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or half-ICSI procedures were used. Thawed embryo transfer (TET) and other related procedures were surveyed. Data from 36,990 ART procedures were provided by 74 clinics. Of the 30,410 cycles in which oocytes were retrieved, a complete transfer was performed in 91.0% (n=27,683). In addition, 9,197 cycles were confirmed to be clinical pregnancies in the FET cycles, representing a pregnancy rate of 30.2% per oocyte pick-up and 33.2% per ET. The most common number of embryos transferred in the FET procedures was three (38.1%), followed by two (34.7%) and one (14.3%). Of the 8,826 TET cycles, 3,137 clinical pregnancies (31.1%) were confirmed by ultrasonography. While the overall clinical pregnancy rate for the TET cycles performed was lower than the rate reported in 2010 (31.1% vs. 35.4%), the overall CPR for the FET cycles was higher than in 2010 (33.2% in 2011 and 32.9% in 2010). The most common number of embryos transferred in FET cycles was three, as was the case in 2010.

  7. A survey of assisted reproductive technology births and imprinting disorders.

    PubMed

    Bowdin, Sarah; Allen, Cathy; Kirby, Gail; Brueton, Louise; Afnan, Masoud; Barratt, Christopher; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Harrison, Robert; Maher, Eamonn R; Reardon, William

    2007-12-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic process in which allele-specific gene expression is dependent on the parental inheritance. Although only a minority of human genes are imprinted, those that have been identified to date have been preferentially implicated in prenatal growth and neurodevelopment. Mutations or epimutations in imprinted genes or imprinting control centres are associated with imprinting disorders such as Angelman syndrome (AS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). Recently, an increased frequency of assisted reproductive technology (ART) conceptions has been reported in children with BWS and AS. However, the risk of imprinting disorders in ART children is unknown. We undertook a survey of 2492 children born after ART in the Republic of Ireland and Central England with the aim of detecting cases (both clinically diagnosed and previously unrecognized) of BWS and AS in this cohort. The response rate to an initial questionnaire was 61%, corresponding to data for 1524 children. After evaluation of the questionnaire, 70 children were invited for a detailed clinical assessment, and 47 accepted (response rate of 67%). In this entire cohort, we detected one case of BWS and no cases of AS. We did not find evidence that there exists a significant group of ART children with unrecognized milder forms of AS or BWS. Although previous studies have suggested an increased relative risk of BWS and AS after ART, our findings suggest that the absolute risk of imprinting disorders in children conceived by ART is small (<1%). Precise risk estimates of risk are difficult to define because of the rarity of the conditions and incomplete response rates to the questionnaire and clinical examination invitations. Hence further investigations are indicated to (i) refine the absolute and relative risks of imprinting disorders after ART and (ii) ensure that changes in ART protocols are not associated with increased frequencies of epigenetic changes and imprinting disorders in

  8. Tubal Factor Infertility and Perinatal Risk After Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Session, Donna R.; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). METHODS We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02–14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of pre-term birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20–1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20–1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. CONCLUSION Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART. PMID:23812461

  9. Vitamin D and assisted reproduction technologies: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Valeria S; Vigano', Paola; Somigliana, Edgardo; Papaleo, Enrico; Paffoni, Alessio; Pagliardini, Luca; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-05-31

    Accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that vitamin D is involved in many functions of the human reproductive system in both genders, but no comprehensive analysis of the potential relationship between vitamin D status and Assisted Reproduction Technologies (ART) outcomes is currently available. On this basis, the purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to perform an in-depth evaluation of clinical studies assessing whether vitamin D status of patients undergoing ART could be related to cycle outcome variables. This issue is of interest considering that vitamin D deficiency is easily amenable to correction and oral vitamin D supplementation is cheap and without significant side effects. Surprisingly, no studies are currently available assessing vitamin D status among male partners of couples undergoing ART, while seven studies on vitamin D status of women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for ART were found and included in the review. Results show that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among women undergoing COH, ranging from 21% to 31% across studies conducted in Western countries and reaching 75-99% in Iranian studies. Data on vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels <20 ng/ml) in relation to ART outcomes could be extracted from three studies and included in the meta-analysis, yielding a common risk ratio (RR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.53-1.49) and showing a lower but not statistically significant likelihood of clinical pregnancy for vitamin-D-deficient women compared with vitamin-D-sufficient patients. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence to support the routine assessment of vitamin D status to predict the clinical pregnancy rate in couples undergoing ART. The partly conflicting results of the available studies, potentially explaining the lack of statistical significance for a negative influence of vitamin D deficiency on clinical pregnancy rate, are likely secondary to confounders

  10. Indicators of perceived useful dementia care assistive technology: Caregivers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hui-Fen; Chang, Ling-Hui; Yao, Grace; Chen, Wan-Yin; Huang, Wen-Ni Wennie

    2015-08-01

    The study aims to investigate the caregivers' context-specific perceived usefulness of available assistive technology (AT) devices and the professionals' perspectives on the usefulness indicators of AT devices for home-dwelling individuals with mild-to-moderate dementia. A total of 72 caregivers completed a questionnaire rating 82 AT devices with a high-perceived usefulness (HPU) or low-perceived usefulness (LPU). A total of 21 experts rated 10 usefulness indicators of these devices. We compared the mean of each indicator between the HPU and LPU groups. Most caregivers, who are generally amenable to using AT devices, thought they were useful for helping to care for home-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia. The level of perceived usefulness from the experts' perspectives depends on specific design indicators (e.g. familiarity) and the context in which the AT is used (e.g. in everyday life or in emergencies). Indicators for HPU devices were: allows selective accident prevention, has an intuitive interface, is familiar, offers ease of use and simplifies activities. LPU devices featured client prompting. There were no significant differences between HPU and LPU devices with indicators of: is automated, informs caregiver, preserves privacy and preserves autonomy. Safety issues were considered important, and sometimes overshadowed ethical dilemmas, such as privacy and autonomy concern. The present study provides insight into how caregivers perceived the usefulness of AT devices, and how that varied with context. Indicators of devices perceived as useful can serve as guidelines for modifying existing devices and designing new devices. Future application could also incorporate the points of view from the persons with dementia. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Regulatory framework in assisted reproductive technologies, relevance and main issues.

    PubMed

    Merlet, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have changed life for the past 25 years and many ethical and social issues have emerged following this new method of conception. In order to protect individuals against scientific and ethical abuses without inhibiting scientific progress, a specific legal framework is necessary. The first French law on Bioethics was voted after an extensive debate in 1994 then reviewed in 2004. This review previously scheduled every five years is currently being discussed. Legal provisions applying to ART are part of a large framework including the protection of the patients' rights and biomedical research. The key principles consist of respect for human life and ban on commercial practices of human body parts, eugenic practices and any kind of cloning. These key principles apply to ART. Donation is anonymous and free. Created in 2004, the Agence de la biomédecine is a government agency and one of the main tools of the French regulations. The missions focus on improving the quality and the safety of the management of ART. Evaluation of activities is available to all from the annual report. The agency represents the French competent authority for medical and scientific aspects of ART. Substantial differences in European legislations exist from the open-up "laissez faire" to the most restrictive one. As a consequence a large reproductive tourism has developed particularly for egg donation or surrogacy. The medical and ethical conditions of management of patients and donors represent the main critical points. In order to avoid ethical abuses, homogenization regarding the key principles is necessary in Europe. It is an opportunity to reassert that human body parts should not be a source of financial gain.

  12. [Blighted ovum in subfertile patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology].

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing-Wen; Hua, Rui; Zhou, Yao; Li, Hong; Yu, Yan-Hong

    2017-07-20

    To explore the incidence and risk factors of blighted ovum in subfertile patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). This retrospective analysis was conducted among 2378 patients who were pregnant following embryo transfer at our center from January, 2012 to December, 2015, including cases of early pregnancy losses and simultaneous live births. The cases with early pregnancy losses were divided into embryonic pregnancy and blighted ovum groups based on the presence or absence of an embryonic pole before dilation and curettage. The clinical data of the 3 groups were analyzed for comparisons of the maternal age, paternal age, BMI, AFC, basal FSH, bFSH/bLH, duration of infertility, Gn dosage, Gn days, serum estradiol on the day of HCG administration, endometrium thickness, number of oocyte retrieved, proportion of high-quality embryos transferred, serum β-HCG value on the 10th to 14th days of embryo transfer, infertility type and miscarriage times. The incidences of blighted ovum were compared between cases with different cycles, embryo stages, infertile factors and methods of fertilization. Maternal age and paternal age, BMI, duration of infertility, infertility type and miscarriage times differed significantly between cases with blighted ovum and those with live births. Serum β-HCG level was the lowest in blighted ovum group followed by embryonic pregnancy group and then by live birth group. Blastocyst transfer was associated with a significantly higher incidence of blighted ovum as compared with cleavage embryo transfer (11.6% vs 5.6%, P=0.000). No significant difference was found in the other parameters among the 3 groups (P>0.05). Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that maternal age, β-HCG level and blastocyst transfer were risk factors of blighted ovum. Advanced maternal age, low β-HCG level and blastocyst transfer may increase the risk of blighted ovum possibly in association with gene imprinting errors during the early stage of

  13. Vitrification assistance program: international co-operation on vitrification technology

    SciTech Connect

    Penrice, Ch.; McGowan, B.; Garth, B.; Reed, J.; Prod'homme, A.; Sartelet, S.; Guerif, H.N.; Hollebecque, J.F.; Flament, T.; Prod'homme, A.

    2008-07-01

    With 10 vitrification lines in operation (3 on WVP in Sellafield, 1 on AVM in Marcoule and 6 on AVH in La Hague), Sellafield Ltd and Areva NC benefit from the most in-depth experience worldwide in the vitrification of highly active liquors within a framework of commercial operations. Based on the two-step process design, using a calciner and an induction-heated hot melter, which was initially deployed in Marcoule in 1978, core vitrification equipment has been continuously improved by the independent development programmes of the two companies. In March 2005, Sellafield Ltd and Areva NC signed the Vitrification Assistance Program (hereafter referred to as VAP); a co-operative project lasting 4 years during which Areva NC is to share some areas of their experience and expertise with Sellafield Ltd. Now at the halfway point of this project, this paper summarises the work performed by the VAP team to date, highlighting the early benefits and lessons learned. The following points will be developed: - Equipment delivery and preparation for implementation on WVP - Training organization and dissemination to WVP teams - Lessons learned from the early changes implemented in operations (Calciner, Melter, Dust Scrubber and Primary off gas system), and initial feedback from the first campaign using a VAP equipped line. In conclusion: The vitrification process and technology implemented at Sellafield and at La Hague, based on the two-step process, have proved to be efficient in treating high active liquor of various types. Ten lines based on this principle have been successfully operated for more than 15 years in France and in the UK. The process has also been demonstrated to be sufficiently versatile to benefit from continuous improvement and development programmes. VAP, as a complete package to support vitrification technology and knowledge transfer from AREVA NC to Sellafield Ltd, has provided the framework for fruitful technical exchanges and discussions between the two

  14. Biological versus chronological ovarian age: implications for assisted reproductive technology

    PubMed Central

    Alviggi, Carlo; Humaidan, Peter; Howles, Colin M; Tredway, Donald; Hillier, Stephen G

    2009-01-01

    Background Women have been able to delay childbearing since effective contraception became available in the 1960s. However, fertility decreases with increasing maternal age. A slow but steady decrease in fertility is observed in women aged between 30 and 35 years, which is followed by an accelerated decline among women aged over 35 years. A combination of delayed childbearing and reduced fecundity with increasing age has resulted in an increased number and proportion of women of greater than or equal to 35 years of age seeking assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. Methods Literature searches supplemented with the authors' knowledge. Results Despite major advances in medical technology, there is currently no ART treatment strategy that can fully compensate for the natural decline in fertility with increasing female age. Although chronological age is the most important predictor of ovarian response to follicle-stimulating hormone, the rate of reproductive ageing and ovarian sensitivity to gonadotrophins varies considerably among individuals. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to depletion of the ovarian oocyte pool and reduction in oocyte quality. Thus, biological and chronological ovarian age are not always equivalent. Furthermore, biological age is more important than chronological age in predicting the outcome of ART. As older patients present increasingly for ART treatment, it will become more important to critically assess prognosis, counsel appropriately and optimize treatment strategies. Several genetic markers and biomarkers (such as anti-Müllerian hormone and the antral follicle count) are emerging that can identify women with accelerated biological ovarian ageing. Potential strategies for improving ovarian response include the use of luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH). When endogenous LH levels are heavily suppressed by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues, LH supplementation may help to optimize treatment

  15. Application of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for occupational therapy research.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Ed

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical models provide a framework for describing practice and integrating evidence into systematic research. There are few models that relate specifically to the provision of assistive technology in occupational therapy practice. The Human Activity Assistive Technology model is an enduring example that has continued to develop by integrating a social model of disability, concepts from occupational therapy theory and principles of assistive technology adoption and abandonment. This study first describes the core concepts of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model and reviews its development over three successive published versions. A review of the research literature reflects application of the model to clinical practice, study design, outcome measure selection and interpretation of results, particularly among occupational therapists. An evaluative framework is used to critique the adequacy of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for practice and research, exploring attributes of clarity, simplicity, generality, accessibility and importance. Finally, recommendations are proposed for continued development of the model and research applications. Most of the existing research literature employs the Human Activity Assistive Technology model for background and study design; there is emerging evidence to support the core concepts as predictive factors. Although the concepts are generally simple, clear and applicable to occupational therapy practice and research, evolving terminology and outcomes become more complex with the conflation of integrated theories. The development of the Human Activity Assistive Technology model offers enhanced access and application for occupational therapists, but poses challenges to clarity among concepts. Suggestions are made for further development and applications of the model. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  16. Factors that influence the use of assistance technologies by older adults who have a hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Southall, Kenneth; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Leroux, Tony

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and better understand the factors that influence the use of assistance technologies by older adults who have a hearing loss. We were interested in adopting a methodological approach that would provide an in-depth account of individual experiences related to the use of these technologies. A qualitative research design was therefore selected. Audio-recorded interviews were conducted with ten individuals who were 65 years of age or older and were current successful assistance technology users. Thematic analysis was used to draw meaning from the interview transcripts. The results suggest that successful use of these assistance technologies involves the recognition of hearing difficulties, an awareness that technological solutions exist, consultation for and acquisition of devices, and adapting to device use and modified behaviour. These four landmarks seem to be crucial stages when people either move toward successful assistance technology use or are discouraged from assistance technology use. Based on these results, a representative model of assistance technology awareness, acquisition and utilization is proposed.

  17. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Dental Assisting Technology Programs (Program CIP: 51.0601--Dental Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the dental assisting technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies. Section II…

  18. Animal-Assisted Therapies for Youth with or at Risk for Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Acri, Mary; Morrissey, Meghan; Peth-Pierce, Robin

    2017-01-01

    To systematically review experimental evidence regarding animal-assisted therapies (AAT) for children or adolescents with or at risk for mental health conditions, we reviewed all experimental AAT studies published between 2000-2015, and compared studies by animal type, intervention, and outcomes. Studies were included if used therapeutically for…

  19. Animal-Assisted Therapies for Youth with or at Risk for Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Acri, Mary; Morrissey, Meghan; Peth-Pierce, Robin

    2017-01-01

    To systematically review experimental evidence regarding animal-assisted therapies (AAT) for children or adolescents with or at risk for mental health conditions, we reviewed all experimental AAT studies published between 2000-2015, and compared studies by animal type, intervention, and outcomes. Studies were included if used therapeutically for…

  20. Exploring the experience of clients with tetraplegia utilizing assistive technology for computer access.

    PubMed

    Folan, Alyce; Barclay, Linda; Cooper, Cathy; Robinson, Merren

    2015-01-01

    Assistive technology for computer access can be used to facilitate people with a spinal cord injury to utilize mainstream computer applications, thereby enabling participation in a variety of meaningful occupations. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the experiences of clients with tetraplegia trialing assistive technologies for computer access during different stages in a public rehabilitation service. In order to explore the experiences of clients with tetraplegia trialing assistive technologies for computer use, qualitative methodology was selected. Data were collected from seven participants using semi-structured interviews, which were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed thematically. Three main themes were identified. These were: getting back into life, assisting in adjusting to injury and learning new skills. The findings from this study demonstrated that people with tetraplegia can be assisted to return to previous life roles or engage in new roles, through developing skills in the use of assistive technology for computer access. Being able to use computers for meaningful activities contributed to the participants gaining an enhanced sense of self-efficacy, and thereby quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Findings from this pilot study indicate that people with tetraplegia can be assisted to return to previous life roles, and develop new roles that have meaning to them through the use of assistive technologies for computer use. Being able to use the internet to socialize, and complete daily tasks, contributed to the participants gaining a sense of control over their lives. Early introduction to assistive technology is important to ensure sufficient time for newly injured people to feel comfortable enough with the assistive technology to use the computers productively by the time of discharge. Further research into this important and expanding area is indicated.

  1. Examination of Studies on Technology-Assisted Collaborative Learning Published between 2010-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnavut, Ahmet; Özdamli, Fezile

    2016-01-01

    This study is a content analysis of the articles about technology-assisted collaborative learning published in Science Direct database between the years of 2010 and 2014. Developing technology has become a topic that we encounter in every aspect of our lives. Educators deal with the contribution and integration of technology into education.…

  2. Turning Lemons into Lemonade: Teaching Assistive Technology through Wikis and Embedded Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreon, Oliver, Jr.; Dietrich, Nanette I.

    2009-01-01

    The authors teach instructional technology courses to pre-service teachers at Millersville University of Pennsylvania. The focus of the instructional technology courses is on the authentic use of instructional and assistive technology in the K-12 classroom. In this article, the authors describe how they utilize streaming videos in an educational…

  3. Teaching for Application: A Model for Assisting Pre-Service Teachers with Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hur, Jung Won; Cullen, Theresa; Brush, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a technology integration model designed to assist pre-service teachers to learn meaningful uses of technology in K-12 classrooms. Based on studies in teacher education, learning theory, and technology integration, the authors define five essential characteristics necessary for pre-service teacher…

  4. Turning Lemons into Lemonade: Teaching Assistive Technology through Wikis and Embedded Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreon, Oliver, Jr.; Dietrich, Nanette I.

    2009-01-01

    The authors teach instructional technology courses to pre-service teachers at Millersville University of Pennsylvania. The focus of the instructional technology courses is on the authentic use of instructional and assistive technology in the K-12 classroom. In this article, the authors describe how they utilize streaming videos in an educational…

  5. Development of a security system for assisted reproductive technology (ART).

    PubMed

    Hur, Yong Soo; Ryu, Eun Kyung; Park, Sung Jin; Yoon, Jeong; Yoon, San Hyun; Yang, Gi Deok; Hur, Chang Young; Lee, Won Don; Lim, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    In the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART), medical accidents can result in serious legal and social consequences. This study was conducted to develop a security system (called IVF-guardian; IG) that could prevent mismatching or mix-ups in ART. A software program was developed in collaboration with outside computer programmers. A quick response (QR) code was used to identify the patients, gametes and embryos in a format that was printed on a label. There was a possibility that embryo development could be affected by volatile organic components (VOC) in the printing material and adhesive material in the label paper. Further, LED light was used as the light source to recognize the QR code. Using mouse embryos, the effects of the label paper and LED light were examined. The stability of IG was assessed when applied in clinical practice after developing the system. A total of 104 cycles formed the study group, and 82 cycles (from patients who did not want to use IG because of safety concerns and lack of confidence in the security system) to which IG was not applied comprised the control group. Many of the label paper samples were toxic to mouse embryo development. We selected a particular label paper (P touch label) that did not affect mouse embryo development. The LED lights were non-toxic to the development of the mouse embryos under any experimental conditions. There were no differences in the clinical pregnancy rates between the IG-applied group and the control group (40/104 = 38.5 % and 30/82 = 36.6 %, respectively). The application of IG in clinical practice did not affect human embryo development or clinical outcomes. The use of IG reduces the misspelling of patient names. Using IG, there was a disadvantage in that each treatment step became more complicated, but the medical staff improved and became sufficiently confident in ART to offset this disadvantage. Patients who received treatment using the IG system also went through a somewhat

  6. Basic Technology Competencies, Attitude towards Computer Assisted Education and Usage of Technologies in Turkish Lesson: A Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özdemir, Serpil

    2017-01-01

    The present research was done to determine the basic technology competency of Turkish teachers, their attitude towards computer-assisted education, and their technology operation level in Turkish lessons, and to designate the relationship between them. 85 Turkish teachers studying in public schools in Bartin participated in the research. The…

  7. Assistive Technology Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kurt L.; Dudgeon, Brian; Kuehn, Carrie; Walker, William

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine the use of assistive technology among a population of individuals with spina bifida. Methods. We performed a descriptive analysis of individuals aged 13 to 27 years diagnosed with myelomeningocele (n=348) using data obtained from an existing database at Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. We summarized disease characteristics, utilization of assistive technology, community and self-care independence, and other variables. Results. Eighty-four percent of the respondents lived with at least 1 of their natural parents. Fifty-seven percent used wheelchairs, 35% used braces, and 23% used walking aids. Independent self-care was a common skill, but 72% reported limited participation in structured activities. Half were aged 18 years or older; of those, only 50% had completed high school and 71% were unemployed. Those aged younger than 18 years were all still in school (100%). Conclusions. Adolescents and young adults with spina bifida rely on assistive technology and specialized care routines to maintain their health. Assistive technology use for mobility is common; little is known about secondary complications associated with use of these technologies or the use of assistive technology to address learning disabilities and other societal barriers. Underutilization of assistive technology could delay successful transitions to independent living and community participation. PMID:17194874

  8. Effect of recombinant α1-antitrypsin Fc-fused (AAT-Fc)protein on the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production and streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siyoung; Lee, Youngmin; Hong, Kwangwon; Hong, Jaewoo; Bae, Suyoung; Choi, Jida; Jhun, Hyunjhung; Kwak, Areum; Kim, Eunsom; Jo, Seunghyun; Dinarello, Charles A; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-05-20

    α1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor family that impedes the enzymatic activity of serine proteinases, including human neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and neutrophil proteinase 3. Here, we expressed recombinant AAT by fusing the intact AAT gene to the constant region of IgG1 to generate soluble recombinant AAT-Fc protein. The recombinant AAT-Fc protein was produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and purified using mini-protein A affinity chromatography. Recombinant AAT-Fc protein was tested for antiinflammatory function and AAT-Fc sufficiently suppressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced interleukin (IL)-6 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and inhibited cytokine-induced TNFα by different cytokines in mouse macrophage Raw 264.7 cells. However, AAT-Fc failed to suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production in both PBMCs and macrophages. In addition, our data showed that AAT-Fc blocks the development of hyperglycemia in a streptozotocin-induced mouse model of diabetes. Interestingly, we also found that plasma-derived AAT specifically inhibited the enzymatic activity of elastase but that AAT-Fc had no inhibitory effect on elastase activity.

  9. Palliative care and use of animal-assisted therapy.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Suzanne R

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research and clinical reports support the benefits of utilizing animal-assisted therapy (AAT) as a complementary, transdisciplinary treatment intervention in medical settings. However, fewer articles are found demonstrating AAT's use in palliative care settings. This article is a study of the effects of AAT in palliative care situations, presenting one anecdotal clinical vignette. In this way, the efficacy of this technique in decreasing patient pain, thereby increasing patient quality of life, and lowering staff stress levels may be illustrated.

  10. The effects of upaB deletion and the double/triple deletion of upaB, aatA, and aatB genes on pathogenicity of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Ge, Xiang-Kai; Pan, Zi-Hao; Tang, Fang; Mao, Xiang; Hu, Lin; Wang, Shao-Hui; Xu, Bin; Lu, Cheng-Ping; Fan, Hong-Jie; Dai, Jian-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are associated with pathogenesis of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). The molecular characterization of APEC ATs can provide insights about their relevance to APEC pathogenesis. Here, we characterized a conventional autotransporter UpaB in APEC DE205B genome. The upaB existed in 41.9 % of 236 APEC isolates and was predominantly associated with ECOR B2 and D. Our studies showed that UpaB mediates the DE205B adhesion in DF-1 cells, and enhances autoaggregation and biofilm formation of fimbria-negative E. coli AAEC189 (MG1655Δfim) in vitro. Deletion of upaB of DE205B attenuates the virulence in duck model and early colonization in the duck lungs during APEC systemic infection. Furthermore, double and triple deletion of upaB, aatA, and aatB genes cumulatively attenuated DE205B adhesion in DF-1 cells, accompanying with decreased 50 % lethal dose (LD50) in duck model and the early colonization in the duck lungs. However, DE205BΔupaB/ΔaatA/ΔaatB might "compensate" the influence of gene deletion by upregulating the expression of fimbrial adhesin genes yqiL, yadN, and vacuolating autotransporter vat during early colonization of APEC. Finally, we demonstrated that vaccination with recombinant UpaB, AatA, and AatB proteins conferred protection against colisepticemia caused by DE205B infection in duck model.

  11. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  12. Navajo-ABLE: Replication Model Navajo Assistive Technology Loan Program. Final Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Katie Jebb

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of the Navajo Assistive Bank of Loanable Equipment (Navajo-ABLE), a federally funded program designed to provide assistive technology (AT) devices, services, technical information, funding information, and training for Navajo children and youth with disabilities. The program was operated and…

  13. Building an Initial Information Base: Assistive Technology Funding Resources for School-Aged Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Crystal E.; Hourcade, Jack J.; Parette, Howard P.

    2000-01-01

    This article provides an overview of several funding sources for assistive technology devices, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Medicaid, the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act Amendments of 1987, vocational rehabilitation services, and private insurance. Suggestions for making successful claims…

  14. The Use of Assistive Technology for Symbol Identification by Children with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzroni, Orit; Rubin, Corinne; Konkol, Orna

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated whether the use of assistive technology would assist in the ability to identify symbols by three girls (ages 8-10) with Rett syndrome. Individualized multimedia programs resulted in a steady learning curve across symbol sets and a partial retention of knowledge throughout maintenance probes. (Contains references.) (CR)

  15. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  16. Internet-Assisted Technologies for English Language Teaching in Turkish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Although the enormous potential of the Internet has gained attention in Internet-assisted language teaching (IALT), a solid background of research is still lacking about/investigating English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' use of Internet assistive technologies. This study set out to determine Turkish university level EFL instructors'…

  17. Internet-Assisted Technologies for English Language Teaching in Turkish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Although the enormous potential of the Internet has gained attention in Internet-assisted language teaching (IALT), a solid background of research is still lacking about/investigating English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' use of Internet assistive technologies. This study set out to determine Turkish university level EFL instructors'…

  18. Using assistive technology for schoolwork: the experience of children with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Murchland, Sonya; Parkyn, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the experience of children with physical disabilities using assistive technology for participation with schoolwork to gain a greater understanding of their perspectives and subjective experiences. A qualitative study involving thematic analysis of in-depth interviews of the child with a parent or significant adult. Purposeful sampling from a larger study recruited five children aged between 10 and 14 years, with differing physical disabilities who attended mainstream schools. All children used computer-based assistive technology. All of the children recognised that assistive technology enabled them to participate and reduced the impact of their physical disability, allowing independent participation, and facilitated higher learning outcomes. Issues related to ease of use, social implications and assistive technology systems are discussed.

  19. A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Claudia; Riccio, Angela; Leotta, Francesco; Hillian-Tress, Sandra; Halder, Sebastian; Holz, Elisa; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Desideri, Lorenzo; Mattia, Donatella; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Recently brain-computer interface (BCI) control was integrated into the commercial assistive technology product QualiWORLD (QualiLife Inc., Paradiso-Lugano, CH). Usability of the first prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate and subjective workload/NASA Task Load Index) and user satisfaction (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology, QUEST 2.0) by four end-users with severe disabilities. Three assistive technology experts evaluated the device from a third person perspective. The results revealed high performance levels in communication and internet tasks. Users and assistive technology experts were quite satisfied with the device. However, none could imagine using the device in daily life without improvements. Main obstacles were the EEG-cap and low speed.

  20. Attitudes to and beliefs about animal assisted therapy for children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Yap, Esther; Scheinberg, Adam; Williams, Katrina

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the attitudes and beliefs surrounding animal-assisted therapy (AAT) for the rehabilitation of children with disabilities at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH), focusing specifically on cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and acquired brain injury (ABI). This was an initial step to inform future AAT research and to understand the feasibility of interventions. An online survey asking participants their opinions about the inclusion of AAT, and potential barriers to its introduction in a tertiary hospital setting was advertised on the RCH Intranet from 3 March 2015 to 3 April 2015. A total of 128 participants responded to the survey request, from a range of specialties and departments. Almost all survey respondents reported that animal-assisted therapy would be helpful in the physical or behavioral management of children affected by CP (98%), ASD (99%) and ABI (96%), and 98% of survey respondents supported the inclusion of AAT in the RCH. Ninety-two percent recommended AAT in the inpatient setting and 52% of the respondents suggest that it should be administered as a pre-determined program with set activities. Additionally, qualitative responses provided suggestions that AAT should be used to provide comfort in high stress environments such as prior to medical and surgical procedures. The majority of staff are supportive of the inclusion of AAT in the RCH, indicating more research is needed to establish whether AAT is acceptable to children and families as part of their care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk disparities in the globalisation of assisted reproductive technology: the case of Asia.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Ok

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the disparities in risks associated with biomedical technology focusing on the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART). ART among biomedical technologies transferred to Asia is a representative case that reveals in its clinical use and related scientific research the global politics of technology. This study notes the global politics at work in the recognition of and reaction to such risks. While many Asian countries aggressively pursue technological development, weak legislative and administrative regulations have created various problems and controversial cases. This study asserts that risks associated with technology are characterised as social facts not natural ones or mere 'side effects', since technological development and risk are closely intertwined.

  2. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance--United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Flowers, Lisa; Anderson, John E; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2012-11-02

    Since the birth of the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in 1981, use of advanced technologies to overcome the problem of infertility has increased steadily, as has the number of fertility clinics providing ART services in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report presents the most recent data on ART use and birth outcomes for U.S. states and territories. 2009. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in the United States, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493 [October 24, 1992]). ART data for 1995-2003 were obtained from the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) through its proprietary Clinical Outcomes Reporting System data base (SART CORS). Since 2004, CDC has contracted with Westat, Inc., a statistical survey research organization, to obtain data from fertility clinics in the United States through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. In 2009, a total of 146,244 ART procedures were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 45,870 live-birth deliveries and 60,190 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of California (18,405), New York (14,539), Illinois (10,192), Massachusetts (9,845), New Jersey (9,146), and Texas (8,244). Together, these six states reported the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART and accounted for 48% of all ART procedures initiated, 46% of all infants born from ART, and 45

  3. A Brief Introduction of Assistive Technology Service Delivery System in Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, MyungJoon; Jung, SungMin

    2015-01-01

    Social participation of People with Disability in Republic of Korea has been grown last few years. Also demand of Assistive Technology has been increased as well. Responding these needs, the public benefits of Assistive Technology Device in Republic of Korea in 2014 was USD 1.7 billion which had been increased by 27 percent during the last five years. Despite an increase in the budget, effort to build Assistive Technology Service Delivery System (ATSDS) was not enough. Therefore, Ministry of Health and Welfare in Korea decided to build ATSDS in Republic of Korea in 2009. In this paper, the process of establishing ATSDS and 2014 outcomes of ATSDS are presented in details. For more than six years efforts of establishing national-wide ATSDS, nine Assistive Technology Centers were actively running in their delivery of service in 2014. As of 2014 outcomes of ATSDS, 14,056 cases were delivered through nine Assistive Technology Centers. The presence of ATSDS proved increase in accessibility for Assistive Technology for People with Disability followed by improvement of the quality of life of them.

  4. Characteristics of assistive technology service delivery models: stakeholder perspectives and preferences.

    PubMed

    Ripat, Jacquie; Booth, Ann

    2005-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to identify the key characteristics of an assistive technology service delivery model preferred by the various stakeholders in Manitoba, Canada. A descriptive, exploratory approach consistent with qualitative research design was used to explore this issue. Three focus groups were held using a semi-structured interview guide and a hypothetical case study to guide the discussion. Eighteen adults participated in the study, each representing one of three groups of stakeholders (assistive technology service providers, funders and users). Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using an inductive process to develop categories and themes. Three primary themes emerged from the data: the user of assistive technology is a unique individual; a decision-making process exists; and, assistive technology devices and services are complex. Based on the study results, recommendations for the delivery of assistive technology services are outlined. The results of this study may be useful for developing funding guidelines, supporting the importance of assistive technology in enabling meaningful activities, and examining current delivery of services in different contexts.

  5. Socio-economic disparities in access to assisted reproductive technologies in Australia.

    PubMed

    Harris, Katie; Burley, Hugh; McLachlan, Robert; Bowman, Mark; Macaldowie, Alan; Taylor, Kate; Chapman, Michael; Chambers, Georgina Mary

    2016-11-01

    Women from disadvantaged socio-economic groups access assisted reproductive technology treatment less than women from more advantaged groups. However, women from disadvantaged groups tend to start families younger, making them less likely to suffer from age-related subfertility and potentially have less need for fertility treatment. Whether socio-economic disparities in access to assisted reproductive technology treatment persist after controlling for the need for treatment, has not been previously explored. This population based study demonstrates that socio-economic disparities in access to assisted reproductive technology treatment persist after adjusting for several confounding factors, including age at first birth (used as a measure of delayed childbearing, hence a proxy for need for fertility treatment), geographic remoteness and Australian jurisdiction. Assisted reproductive technology access progressively decreased as socio-economic quintiles became more disadvantaged, with a 15.8% decrease in access in the most disadvantaged quintile compared with the most advantaged quintile after controlling for confounding factors. The adjusted rate of access to assisted reproductive technology treatment also decreased by 12.3% for women living in regional and remote areas compared with those in major cities. These findings indicate that financial and sociocultural barriers to assisted reproductive technology treatment remain in disadvantaged groups after adjusting for need. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sustained transgene expression despite T lymphocyte responses in a clinical trial of rAAV1-AAT gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Brantly, Mark L; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Wang, Lili; Mueller, Christian; Humphries, Margaret; Spencer, L Terry; Rouhani, Farshid; Conlon, Thomas J; Calcedo, Roberto; Betts, Michael R; Spencer, Carolyn; Byrne, Barry J; Wilson, James M; Flotte, Terence R

    2009-09-22

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is well-suited as a target for human gene transfer. We performed a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation clinical trial of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing normal (M) AAT packaged into serotype 1 AAV capsids delivered by i.m. injection. Nine AAT-deficient subjects were enrolled sequentially in cohorts of 3 each at doses of 6.9 x 10(12), 2.2 x 10(13), and 6.0 x 10(13) vector genome particles per patient. Four subjects receiving AAT protein augmentation discontinued therapy 28 or 56 days before vector administration. Vector administration was well tolerated, with only mild local reactions and 1 unrelated serious adverse event (bacterial epididymitis). There were no changes in hematology or clinical chemistry parameters. M-specific AAT was expressed above background in all subjects in cohorts 2 and 3 and was sustained at levels 0.1% of normal for at least 1 year in the highest dosage level cohort, despite development of neutralizing antibody and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses to AAV1 capsid at day 14 in all subjects. These findings suggest that immune responses to AAV capsid that develop after i.m. injection of a serotype 1 rAAV vector expressing AAT do not completely eliminate transduced cells in this context.

  7. Sustained transgene expression despite T lymphocyte responses in a clinical trial of rAAV1-AAT gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brantly, Mark L.; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Lili; Mueller, Christian; Humphries, Margaret; Spencer, L. Terry; Rouhani, Farshid; Conlon, Thomas J.; Calcedo, Roberto; Betts, Michael R.; Spencer, Carolyn; Byrne, Barry J.; Wilson, James M.; Flotte, Terence R.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is well-suited as a target for human gene transfer. We performed a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation clinical trial of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing normal (M) AAT packaged into serotype 1 AAV capsids delivered by i.m. injection. Nine AAT-deficient subjects were enrolled sequentially in cohorts of 3 each at doses of 6.9 × 1012, 2.2 × 1013, and 6.0 × 1013 vector genome particles per patient. Four subjects receiving AAT protein augmentation discontinued therapy 28 or 56 days before vector administration. Vector administration was well tolerated, with only mild local reactions and 1 unrelated serious adverse event (bacterial epididymitis). There were no changes in hematology or clinical chemistry parameters. M-specific AAT was expressed above background in all subjects in cohorts 2 and 3 and was sustained at levels 0.1% of normal for at least 1 year in the highest dosage level cohort, despite development of neutralizing antibody and IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot responses to AAV1 capsid at day 14 in all subjects. These findings suggest that immune responses to AAV capsid that develop after i.m. injection of a serotype 1 rAAV vector expressing AAT do not completely eliminate transduced cells in this context. PMID:19706466

  8. Assistive technology pricing in Australia: is it efficient and equitable?

    PubMed

    Summers, Michael P; Verikios, George

    2017-02-06

    Objective To examine available systematically collected evidence regarding prices for assistive technology (AT; e.g. disability aids and equipment) in Australia with other comparable countries. Issues of appropriate AT pricing are coming to the fore as a consequence of efforts to move to consumer-centric purchasing decisions with the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and also in the recent aged care reforms.Methods We identified and present three sets of AT price comparisons. Two comparisons were based solely on the lowest prices advertised on the internet, and one comparison examined recommended retail prices. Variables essential to ensuring accurate comparisons, as well as significant supply-chain issues were also examined and considered in the analyses.Results The first internet-only price comparison found that overall AT prices were 38% higher in Australia compared to other countries, but did not factor in shipping and other related costs that are essential to include given that most AT is imported. The second internet-only price comparison found that overall Australian prices were 24% lower when shipping and related costs were included. The recommended retail price comparisons found that Australian prices were between 14% and 27% lower. Prices for internet-only retailers (those with no bricks-and-mortar presence) are consistently lower for all products than those sold by retailers with actual shop-fronts. Further, there is no evidence of suppliers earning supranormal profits in Australia.Conclusions The results indicate that AT prices in Australia are efficient and equitable, with no significant indicators of market failure which would require government intervention. Efforts to reduce prices through the excessive use of large-scale government procurement programs are likely to reduce diversity and innovation in AT and raise AT prices over time. Open markets and competition with centralised tracking of purchases and providers to minimise possible

  9. Cancer risk among parous women following assisted reproductive technology

    PubMed Central

    Reigstad, M.M.; Larsen, I.K.; Myklebust, T.Å.; Robsahm, T.E.; Oldereid, N.B.; Omland, A.K.; Vangen, S.; Brinton, L.A.; Storeng, R.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do women who give birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer compared with women who give birth without ART? SUMMARY ANSWER Without correction, the results indicate an increase in overall cancer risk, as well as a 50% increase in risk of CNS cancer for women giving birth after ART, however the results were not significant after correcting for multiple analyses. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Studies regarding the effects of hormonal treatments involved with ART on subsequent cancer risk have provided inconsistent results, and it has also been suggested that infertility itself could be a contributory factor. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A population-based cohort consisting of all women registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway as having given birth between 1 January 1984 and 31 December 2010 was assembled (n = 812 986). Cancers were identified by linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Study subjects were followed from start of first pregnancy during the observational period until the first cancer, death, emigration, or 31 December 2010. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Of the total study population (n = 806 248), 16 525 gave birth to a child following ART. Cox regression analysis computed hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing cancer risk between ART women and non-ART women; for overall cancer, and for cervical, ovarian, uterine, central nervous system (CNS), colorectal and thyroid cancers, and for malignant melanoma. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE A total of 22 282 cohort members were diagnosed with cancer, of which 338 were ART women and 21 944 non-ART women. The results showed an elevated risk in one out of seven sites for ART women. The HR for cancer of the CNS was 1.50 (95% CI 1.03– 2.18), and among those specifically subjected to IVF (without ICSI) the HR was 1.83 (95% CI 1.22–2.73). Analysis of risk of overall cancer gave an HR of 1.16 (95% CI 1.04–1

  10. School, Family and Other Influences on Assistive Technology Use: Access and Challenges for Students with Visual Impairment in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Meng Ee; Cohen, Libby

    2011-01-01

    Assistive technologies are essential enablers for individuals with visual impairments, but although Singapore is technologically advanced, students with visual impairments are not yet full participants in this technological society. This study investigates the barriers and challenges to the use of assistive technologies by students with visual…

  11. School, Family and Other Influences on Assistive Technology Use: Access and Challenges for Students with Visual Impairment in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Meng Ee; Cohen, Libby

    2011-01-01

    Assistive technologies are essential enablers for individuals with visual impairments, but although Singapore is technologically advanced, students with visual impairments are not yet full participants in this technological society. This study investigates the barriers and challenges to the use of assistive technologies by students with visual…

  12. The "Second Place" Problem: Assistive Technology in Sports and (Re) Constructing Normal.

    PubMed

    Baker, D A

    2016-02-01

    Objections to the use of assistive technologies (such as prostheses) in elite sports are generally raised when the technology in question is perceived to afford the user a potentially "unfair advantage," when it is perceived as a threat to the purity of the sport, and/or when it is perceived as a precursor to a slippery slope toward undesirable changes in the sport. These objections rely on being able to quantify standards of "normal" within a sport so that changes attributed to the use of assistive technology can be judged as causing a significant deviation from some baseline standard. This holds athletes using assistive technologies accountable to standards that restrict their opportunities to achieve greatness, while athletes who do not use assistive technologies are able to push beyond the boundaries of these standards without moral scrutiny. This paper explores how constructions of fairness and "normality" impact athletes who use assistive technology to compete in a sporting venue traditionally populated with "able-bodied" competitors. It argues that the dynamic and obfuscated construction of "normal" standards in elite sports should move away from using body performance as the measuring stick of "normal," toward alternate forms of constructing norms such as defining, quantifying, and regulating the mechanical actions that constitute the critical components of a sport. Though framed within the context of elite sports, this paper can be interpreted more broadly to consider problems with defining "normal" bodies in a society in which technologies are constantly changing our abilities and expectations of what normal means.

  13. Assistive technologies to address capabilities of people with dementia: From research to practice.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Alain; Brémond, François; Charras, Kevin; Dening, Tom; Droës, Rose-Marie; Gzil, Fabrice; Hicks, Ben; Innes, Anthea; Nguyen, Mai; Nygård, Louise; Pino, Maribel; Sacco, Guillaume; Salmon, Eric; van der Roest, Henriëtte; Villet, Hervé; Villez, Marion; Robert, Philippe; Manera, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Assistive technologies became pervasive and virtually present in all our life domains. They can be either an enabler or an obstacle leading to social exclusion. The Fondation Médéric Alzheimer gathered international experts of dementia care, with backgrounds in biomedical, human and social sciences, to analyze how assistive technologies can address the capabilities of people with dementia, on the basis of their needs. Discussion covered the unmet needs of people with dementia, the domains of daily life activities where assistive technologies can provide help to people with dementia, the enabling and empowering impact of technology to improve their safety and wellbeing, barriers and limits of use, technology assessment, ethical and legal issues. The capability approach (possible freedom) appears particularly relevant in person-centered dementia care and technology development. The focus is not on the solution, rather on what the person can do with it: seeing dementia as disability, with technology as an enabler to promote capabilities of the person, provides a useful framework for both research and practice. This article summarizes how these concepts took momentum in professional practice and public policies in the past 15 years (2000-2015), discusses current issues in the design, development and economic model of assistive technologies for people with dementia, and covers how these technologies are being used and assessed.

  14. Assistive Technology and Dolphin Therapy: A Wonderful Combination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Eli; Thomasson, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    Madison is a four-year-old child who was born with cerebral palsy and cortical vision impairment. As a result, she has limited use of her extremities and is just starting to walk with assistance. She is predominately non-verbal, with the exception of a few words. This article describes how Island Dolphin Care (IDC), a nonprofit agency in Key…

  15. Microwave assisted synthesis of technologically important transition metal silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidhyanathan, B.; Rao, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    A novel, simple, clean and fast microwave assisted method of preparing important transition metal silicides (MoSi{sub 2}, WSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, and TiSi{sub 2}) has been described. Amorphous carbon is used both as a microwave susceptor and as a preventer of oxidation. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  16. Assistive Technology and Dolphin Therapy: A Wonderful Combination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Eli; Thomasson, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    Madison is a four-year-old child who was born with cerebral palsy and cortical vision impairment. As a result, she has limited use of her extremities and is just starting to walk with assistance. She is predominately non-verbal, with the exception of a few words. This article describes how Island Dolphin Care (IDC), a nonprofit agency in Key…

  17. Mainstreaming animal-assisted therapy.

    PubMed

    Palley, Lori S; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Niemi, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    The term animal-assisted therapy (AAT) commonly refers to the presentation of an animal to one or more persons for the purpose of providing a beneficial impact on human health or well-being. AAT is an ideal example of "One Health" because of numerous studies and widespread testimonials indicating that many humans feel better in the presence of pets and other domesticated animals, and, conversely, that some of those creatures appear to respond positively to human company for their emotional and perhaps physical betterment. Many AAT studies have claimed a wide range of human health benefits, but much of the research is characterized by small-scale interventions among disparate fields, resulting in criticisms about weak study design or inconsistent methodology. Such criticisms contrast with the strongly held belief among many that interaction with friendly animals has a strong and innate value for the persons involved. Consequently the appeal of AAT in human medicine today may be generally characterized as a "push" by enthusiastic advocates rather than a "pull" by prescribing physicians. To fully integrate AAT into conventional medical practice as an accepted therapeutic modality, more convincing intervention studies are necessary to confirm its clinical merits, along with an understanding of the underlying mechanism of the human response to the company of friendly animals.

  18. Sources of payment for assistive technology: findings from a national survey of persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dawn; Ehrlich, Nat

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an overview of who pays for the most commonly used assistive technology devices, special adaptations, and environmental accommodations by persons with disabilities in the United States. The latest findings from the 2001 survey of Use and Need of Assistive Technology and Information Technology by Persons With Disabilities in the United States conducted by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, and the University of Michigan will be presented and compared to findings from earlier research and reviews of the literature. A modified discriminant function analysis was performed to determine the interaction between the source of payment for assistive technology used by persons with disabilities. In the sample of 1,414 such persons, 901 were found to use some form of assistive technology in their daily lives. Ten distinct sources of payment were specified. Respondents were able to mention up to three sources of payment for each example of assistive technology used. A total of 1,877 sources were mentioned. Overall, the most mentioned payment source was self or other family member in household, accounting for nearly 40% of all sources mentioned. The variables tested were found to have varying levels of interactive potency. Occupational status, education level, severity of impairment, opinion as to the effectiveness of assistive technology, and personal income were significant, whereas age, family income, opinion as to improvement over the past decade, and race were statistically unrelated to source of payment. From the perspective of relative discrimination on the basis of payment source, Medicare stands as the lone significant discriminant source of payment. The authors offer a summary and conclusion based on an integrated view of all available sources of information about payment.

  19. Research on benefits of canine-assisted therapy for adults in nonmilitary settings.

    PubMed

    Knisely, Janet S; Barker, Sandra B; Barker, Randolph T

    2012-01-01

    Research has examined the physiological and psychosocial impact of animal-assisted activities (AAA) and animal-assisted therapy (AAT). The current review article summarizes the benefits of AAA and AAT for hospitalized patients with medical disorders, psychiatric patients, and residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities. The literature regarding inclusion of animals in business and organizational settings is also reviewed. Although there is clear evidence of improved physical and psychological health from AAA and AAT in the civilian population, there is a dearth of published findings of the evaluation of such benefits for military personnel.

  20. Prescribing assistive-technology systems: focus on children with impaired communication.

    PubMed

    Desch, Larry W; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2008-06-01

    This clinical report defines common terms of use and provides information on current practice, research, and limitations of assistive technology that can be used in systems for communication. The assessment process to determine the best devices for use with a particular child (ie, the best fit of a device) is also reviewed. The primary care pediatrician, as part of the medical home, plays an important role in the interdisciplinary effort to provide appropriate assistive technology and may be asked to make a referral for assessment or prescribe a particular device. This report provides resources to assist pediatricians in this role and reviews the interdisciplinary team functional evaluation using standardized assessments; the multiple funding opportunities available for obtaining devices and ways in which pediatricians can assist families with obtaining them; the training necessary to use these systems once the devices are procured; the follow-up evaluation to ensure that the systems are meeting their goals; and the leadership skills needed to advocate for this technology. The American Academy of Pediatrics acknowledges the need for key resources to be identified in the community and recognizes that these resources are a shared medical, educational, therapeutic, and family responsibility. Although this report primarily deals with assistive technology specific for communication impairments, many of the details in this report also can aid in the acquisition and use of other types of assistive technology.

  1. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  2. Assistive Technology: Meeting the Needs of Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riviere, Adrienne

    This monograph briefly describes a sampling of tools and technologies that can be used by adults with learning disabilities to improve their functional capabilities in employment, educational, or personal settings. Stressed is the importance of evaluating each technology in terms of the individual's unique profile, the function to be performed,…

  3. Increasing Meaningful Assistive Technology Use in the Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Cynthia; Beard, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Although personal technology is consistently used by students and teachers, meaningful use of technology for instruction may not be feasible without providing teachers specific training and support. One university is providing workshops, feedback through coursework, and hands-on training to teacher candidates and local area teachers. In addition,…

  4. Validating a measure to assess factors that affect assistive technology use by students with disabilities in elementary and secondary education.

    PubMed

    Zapf, Susan A; Scherer, Marcia J; Baxter, Mary F; H Rintala, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the predictive validity, internal consistency and clinical utility of the Matching Assistive Technology to Child & Augmentative Communication Evaluation Simplified (MATCH-ACES) assessment. Twenty-three assistive technology team evaluators assessed 35 children using the MATCH-ACES assessment. This quasi-experimental study examined the internal consistency, predictive validity and clinical utility of the MATCH-ACES assessment. The MATCH-ACES assessment predisposition scales had good internal consistency across all three scales. A significant relationship was found between (a) high student perseverance and need for assistive technology and (b) high teacher comfort and interest in technology use (p = (0).002). Study results indicate that the MATCH-ACES assessment has good internal consistency and validity. Predisposition characteristics of student and teacher combined can influence the level of assistive technology use; therefore, assistive technology teams should assess predisposition factors of the user when recommending assistive technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Educational and medical professionals should be educated on evidence-based assistive technology assessments. Personal experience and psychosocial factors can influence the outcome use of assistive technology. Assistive technology assessments must include an intervention plan for assistive technology service delivery to measure effective outcome use.

  5. A Systematic Review of Technology-assisted Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Pain: Looking Across Treatment Modalities.

    PubMed

    Heapy, Alicia A; Higgins, Diana M; Cervone, Dana; Wandner, Laura; Fenton, Brenda T; Kerns, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    The use of technology to provide chronic pain self-management interventions has increased in the recent years. Individual studies have primarily focused on a single technology-assisted modality and direct comparisons of different technology-assisted modalities are rare. Thus, little is known about the relative strengths and weaknesses of each technology-assisted modality. This article is a systematic review of technology-assisted self-management interventions for chronic nonheadache, noncancer pain in adults. We examined 3 treatment modalities: telephone, interactive voice response, and Internet. Electronic searches of OVID MEDLINE, OVID PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were conducted. Forty-four articles including 9890 participants were reviewed. Across modalities, the existing evidence suggests that technology-assisted psychological interventions are efficacious for improving self-management of chronic pain in adults. All modalities have been shown to provide benefit and no clearly superior modality has emerged. The primary gaps in the literature are lack of in-person comparison groups, lack of direct comparison among technology-assisted modalities, and heterogeneity of methods and interventions that limit comparability across studies and modalities. Future trials should focus on direct comparisons of technology-assisted interventions with in-person treatment and head to head comparisons of different technology-assisted modalities. Additional areas of focus include quantifying the cost of technology-assisted interventions, examining the effect of treatment "dose" on outcomes, and establishing guidelines for developing treatments for the technology-assisted environment.

  6. Mobile Assisted Language Learning: Review of the Recent Applications of Emerging Mobile Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-01-01

    As mobile computing technologies have been more powerful and inclusive in people's daily life, the issue of mobile assisted language learning (MALL) has also been widely explored in CALL research. Many researches on MALL consider the emerging mobile technologies have considerable potentials for the effective language learning. This review study…

  7. Assistive Technologies for Students with Disabilities: A Survey of Access and Use in Turkish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ari, Ismahan Arslan; Inan, Fethi A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the assistive technology needs of university students with disabilities and the availability of these technologies. It also explored the attitudes of the students with disabilities toward computers and the extent to which these are used by students with disabilities. Data was collected through a questionnaire, from 22…

  8. Children and Youth Assisted by Medical Technology in Educational Settings: Guidelines for Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephanie, Ed.; Haynie, Marilynn, Ed.; Bierle, Timaree, Ed.; Caldwell, Terry Heintz, Ed.; Palfrey, Judith S., Ed.

    This manual is intended to provide specific guidelines for meeting the needs of students who are assisted by medical technology in the educational setting. The manual is divided into two sections: Section 1 discusses principles and issues concerned with applying medical technology in schools, and Section 2 details the various procedures and…

  9. The Use of Assistive Technology for People with Special Needs in the UAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almekhalfi, Abdurrahman Ghaleb; Tibi, Sana

    2012-01-01

    Today, technology has become an essential part of the everyday educational setting. Its use has proven to facilitate learning and communication of many students with and without disabilities. Assuredly, assistive technology (AT) has transformed education and empowered students with disabilities. In spite of the rapid changes taking place in all…

  10. The Use of Assistive Technology for People with Special Needs in the UAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almekhalfi, Abdurrahman Ghaleb; Tibi, Sana

    2010-01-01

    Today, technology has become an essential part of the everyday educational setting. Its use has proven to facilitate learning and communication of many students with and without disabilities. Assuredly, assistive technology (AT) has transformed education and empowered students with disabilities. However, research studies investigating AT for…

  11. Speech Technology in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Strengths and Limitations of a New CALL Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehsani, Farzad; Knodt, Eva

    1998-01-01

    Investigates suitability of deploying speech technology in computer-based systems that can be used to teach foreign language skills. In reviewing the current state of speech recognition and speech processing technology and by examining a number of voice-interactive computer-assisted language learning applications, suggests how to create robust…

  12. Constructing an Assistive Technology Toolkit for Young Children: Views from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Assistive technology is guaranteed by law to be included when appropriate on individualized education plans (IEP) for young children with disabilities. Yet, the full potential of technology remains unfulfilled due to insufficient knowledge of options available, limited professional development, and a dearth of evidence on its effectiveness for…

  13. Assistive Technology in Special Education and the Universal Design for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb

    2014-01-01

    Using technology can help students with disabilities to enhance and improve their independence in academic and employment tasks, their participation in classroom discussions, along with helping them to accomplish some difficult academic tasks. This paper discusses the role and benefits of using assistive technology in the Universal Design for…

  14. Using the iPhone for Assistive Technology: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Chelsea; Rabe, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Parent and teacher collaborated to use the Apple iPhone as assistive technology to meet the needs of Bill, a 20-year-old student in the Saline Young Adult program, part of the Saline Michigan School System. Bill has an intellectual disability and this technology provided an effective, flexible and moderate cost solution that helped him meet his…

  15. Differentiated Instructional Strategies and Assistive Technology in Brazil: Are We Talking about the Same Subject?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourenco, Gerusa Ferreira; Goncalves, Adriana Garcia; Elias, Nassim Chamel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the association of educational strategies and differentiated instructions with assistive technology for special education students. The use of technology is an important ally for mediation among teachers, students and academic content. For special education students, there is a need to promote general…

  16. Using the iPhone for Assistive Technology: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Chelsea; Rabe, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Parent and teacher collaborated to use the Apple iPhone as assistive technology to meet the needs of Bill, a 20-year-old student in the Saline Young Adult program, part of the Saline Michigan School System. Bill has an intellectual disability and this technology provided an effective, flexible and moderate cost solution that helped him meet his…

  17. 76 FR 28426 - Applications for New Awards; Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as Amended (AT Act)-National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Applications for New Awards; Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as Amended (AT Act)--National Activities--Data... and Reporting Assistance Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2011... collection and reporting. Statutory Requirements--Assistive Technology Act Data Collection and Reporting...

  18. Reports on Progress and Outcomes: A Report on the State Assistive Technology Act Projects, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This paper reports on progress and outcomes of state assistive technology (AT) projects for people with disabilities during 2000-2001. Data are based on the annual reports submitted by 34 state AT projects. Introductory material describes the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, which provided financial assistance to states working to maintain and…

  19. Assistive Technology and Older Adults in Disasters: Implications for Emergency Management.

    PubMed

    McSweeney-Feld, Mary Helen

    2017-02-01

    This article identifies concepts, trends, and policy gaps in the availability and service delivery of assistive technology utilized by older adults in disasters, as well as implications for emergency management planning and shelter administration. Definitions of types of assistive technology, as well as views of older adults using technology as at-risk individuals for emergency management service provision, are provided. An overview of peer-reviewed articles and gray literature is conducted, focusing on publications from 2001 to the present in the United States. Analytical frameworks used by emergency management organizations as well as regulations such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and recent court decisions on emergency shelter accessibility in disasters are reviewed. Research on the use of assistive technology by older adults during disasters is a neglected issue. The current and potential benefits of defining standards for provision and use of assistive technology for older adults during disasters has received limited recognition in emergency management planning. Older adults with disabilities utilize assistive technology to maintain their independence and dignity, and communities as well as emergency services managers need to become more aware of the needs and preferences of these older adults in their planning processes and drills as well as in service delivery during actual events. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:135-139).

  20. Security System Technologies Applied to Ambient Assisted Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villacorta, Juan J.; Del Val, Lara; Jimenez, Ma Isabel; Izquierdo, Alberto

    The increasing elderly population has increased interest in the Ambient Assisted Living systems. This article presents a system for monitoring the disabled or elderly developed from an existing surveillance system. The modularity and adaptability characteristics of the system allow an easy adaptation for a different purpose. The proposed system uses a network of sensors capable of motion detection that includes fall warning, identification of persons and a configurable control system which allows its use in different scenarios.

  1. Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, MP

    2001-12-05

    A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

  2. Helping Children with Disabilities through Animal-Assisted Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Katie; Everly, Janet Stout

    2009-01-01

    The Delta Society defines animal-assisted therapy as "a goal-directed intervention in which an animal is incorporated as an integral part of the clinical healthcare treatment process." Unlike other animal-assisted activities, animal-assisted therapy, or AAT, is led by a professional such as a physical therapist, occupational therapist,…

  3. Helping Children with Disabilities through Animal-Assisted Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Katie; Everly, Janet Stout

    2009-01-01

    The Delta Society defines animal-assisted therapy as "a goal-directed intervention in which an animal is incorporated as an integral part of the clinical healthcare treatment process." Unlike other animal-assisted activities, animal-assisted therapy, or AAT, is led by a professional such as a physical therapist, occupational therapist,…

  4. Technology-assisted Interventions for Parents of Young Children: Emerging Practices, Current Research, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Cristin M; Bierman, Karen L

    Technology can potentially expand the reach and cut the costs of providing effective, evidence-based interventions. This paper reviews existing publications that describe the application and evaluation of technology-assisted interventions for parents of young children. A broad review of the early childhood literature revealed 48 studies describing technology-assisted parent education and interventions. Across these studies, multiple forms of technology were used, including web-based platforms, discussion forums, mobile devices, and video conferencing. Results are described moving from feasibility and acceptability of technology-based delivery systems to more rigorous evaluations examining their impact on parent and child outcomes. Potential exists for technology to deliver interventions to parents. Limitations are discussed including differential acceptability and elevated attrition associated with internet-only intervention delivery.

  5. Technology-assisted Interventions for Parents of Young Children: Emerging Practices, Current Research, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Cristin M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Technology can potentially expand the reach and cut the costs of providing effective, evidence-based interventions. This paper reviews existing publications that describe the application and evaluation of technology-assisted interventions for parents of young children. A broad review of the early childhood literature revealed 48 studies describing technology-assisted parent education and interventions. Across these studies, multiple forms of technology were used, including web-based platforms, discussion forums, mobile devices, and video conferencing. Results are described moving from feasibility and acceptability of technology-based delivery systems to more rigorous evaluations examining their impact on parent and child outcomes. Potential exists for technology to deliver interventions to parents. Limitations are discussed including differential acceptability and elevated attrition associated with internet-only intervention delivery. PMID:27773964

  6. Discovery of AAT-008, a novel, potent, and selective prostaglandin EP4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yoshiyuki; Yamagishi, Tatsuya; Nukui, Seiji; Nakao, Kazunari

    2017-03-01

    Starting from acylsufonamide HTS hit 2, a novel series of para-N-acylaminomethylbenzoic acids was identified and developed as selective prostaglandin EP4 receptor antagonists. Structural modifications on lead compound 4a were explored with the aim of improving potency, physicochemical properties, and animal PK predictive of QD (once a day) dosing regimen in human. These efforts led to the discovery of the clinical candidate AAT-008 (4j), which exhibited significantly improved pharmacological profiles over grapiprant (1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Arranging for personal assistance services and assistive technology at work. A report of the rehabilitation research and training center on personal assistance services.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Susan; Kraus, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    For an employee with a disability, reasonable accommodation can make the difference in finding work, maintaining employment, and succeeding on the job. Today, employers and employees alike are more aware that appropriate accommodation, including workplace personal assistance services (PAS) as well as assistive technology, improves an employee's ability to succeed. While assistive technology is in widespread use as an accommodation, workplace personal assistance is less understood. The goal of the study was to learn more about how workplace PAS and AT are arranged for in the workplace, and the issues that arise. Structured phone interviews were conducted with 20 workplace PAS users, 21 employers familiar with workplace PAS, and 19 employment organizations. Interview transcripts are the basis for the qualitative analysis of findings. Requirements for personal assistance accommodations focus on task-related needs. Personal care needs at work are not included in the Americans with Disabilities act but may be needed by the employee. Employers and PAS users have developed many creative ways to address PAS need. Organizations can construct an approach that fits the needs, abilities, and constraints of each organization. The interview respondents have identified a number of practices that are succeeding, including establishment of policies for arranging for PAS; centralization of accommodation budgets to remove work unit disincentives; and providing a shared personal assistant for interpreting or for task-related and personal care tasks. A number of important research questions remain. What is the extent of the need for PAS in the workplace? Will an expanded PAS supply increase the employment opportunities for people with disabilities? Will better models of workplace PAS be adopted by employers?

  8. Current and future assisted reproductive technologies for fish species.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gregory M; Lee, Cheng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimates that in 2012 aquaculture production of fish will meet or exceed that of the capture fisheries for the first time. Thus, we have just turned the corner from a predominantly hunting gathering approach to meeting our nutritional needs from fish, to a farming approach. In 2012, 327 finfish species and five hybrids were covered by FAO aquaculture statistics, although farming of carps, tilapias, salmonids, and catfishes account for most of food-fish production from aquaculture. Although for most major species at least part of production is based on what might be considered domesticated animals, only limited production in most species is based on farming of improved lines of fish or is fully independent of wild seedstock. Consistent with the infancy of most aquaculture industries, much of the development and implementation of reproductive technologies over the past 100 years has been directed at completion of the life cycle in captivity in order to increase seed production and begin the process of domestication. The selection of species to farm and the emphasis of selective breeding must also take into account other ways to modify performance of an animal. Reproductive technologies have also been developed and implemented to affect many performance traits among fishes. Examples include technologies to control gender, alter time of sexual maturation, and induce sterilization. These technologies help take advantage of sexually dimorphic growth, overcome problems with growth performance and flesh quality associated with sexual maturation, and genetic containment. Reproductive technologies developed to advance aquaculture and how these technologies have been implemented to advance various sectors of the aquaculture industry are discussed. Finally, we will present some thoughts regarding future directions for reproductive technologies and their applications in finfish aquaculture.

  9. Assisted reproductive technology: perspectives in Halakha (Jewish religious law).

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2008-01-01

    The Jewish religion is characterized by a strict association between faith and practical precepts. In principle, Jewish law has two divisions, the Written and the Oral traditions. The foundation of the Written Law and the origin of authority is the Torah, the first five books of the Scripture. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish religion to assisted reproductive therapeutic procedures such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection and reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  10. A plug-and-play brain-computer interface to operate commercial assistive technology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David E.; Gruis, Kirsten L.; Huggins, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if a brain-computer interface (BCI) could be used as a plug-and-play input device to operate commercial assistive technology, and to quantify the performance impact of such operation. Method Using a hardware device designed in our lab, participants (11 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 22 controls) were asked to operate two devices using a BCI. Results were compared to traditional BCI operation by the same users. Performance was assessed using both accuracy and BCI Utility, a throughput metric. 95% confidence bounds on performance differences were developed using a linear mixed model. Results The observed differences in accuracy and throughput were small and not statistically significant. The confidence bounds indicate that if there is a performance impact of using a BCI to control an assistive technology device, the impact could easily be overcome by the benefits of the assistive technology device itself. Conclusions BCI control of assistive technology devices is possible, and the performance difference appears to be very small. BCI designers are encouraged to incorporate standard outputs into their design, to enable future users to interface with familiar assistive technology devices. PMID:23590556

  11. Development of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST).

    PubMed

    Demers, L; Weiss-Lambrou, R; Ska, B

    1996-01-01

    This study's purpose was to develop a clinical instrument designed to evaluate user satisfaction with assistive technology devices. This paper describes the methodology used to develop the instrument entitled the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST). Based on the theoretical and practical foundations of assistive technology as well as on the concept of satisfaction, preliminary versions of the instrument were created and examined by a panel of team participants. After the panel's recommendations were incorporated, a pretest of the revised instrument was conducted and the final French version of QUEST emerged. The originality of QUEST lies in its inter-activeness and user-directed approach to assessing satisfaction with assistive technology. From a set of 27 variables, the user is asked to indicate the degree of importance he/she attributes to each of the satisfaction variables and then to rate his/her degree of satisfaction with each of the variables considered (quite or very) important. While QUEST remains a clinical instrument undergoing pilot testing, it holds much promise in our quest for a reliable and valid means of assessing assistive technology outcome from the user's perspective.

  12. Item analysis of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST).

    PubMed

    Demers, L; Weiss-Lambrou, R; Ska, B

    2000-01-01

    The Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) is an outcomes assessment tool designed to measure satisfaction with assistive technology in a structured and standardized way. The purpose of this article is to present the results of an analysis of the 24 items comprising QUEST and to explain how a subset of items demonstrating optimal measurement performance was selected. The criteria against which the items were measured were general acceptability, content validity, contribution to internal consistency, test-retest stability, and sensitivity. The items that ranked best in terms of these measurement properties were submitted to factorial analysis in order to complete the item selection. The first series of analyses reduced the item pool approximately by half, and the second series of analyses led to the final selection of 12 items. Factor analysis results suggested a bidimensional structure of satisfaction with assistive technology related to the assistive technology device (eight items) and services (four items). The 12-item revised version that will result from this study should prove to be a reliable and valid instrument for measuring outcomes in the field of assistive technology.

  13. Using assistive technology outcomes research to inform policy related to the employment of individuals with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Steven; Edyburn, Dave L; Rust, Kathy L; Schwanke, Todd D; Smith, Roger O

    2008-01-01

    We know that work is recognized as a central component of life for individuals with and without disabilities. It yields many physical and psychological benefits to the individual while simultaneously contributing numerous benefits to society. Lawmakers have enacted a plethora of laws designed to prevent discrimination, provide incentives for employers to hire individuals with disabilities, and facilitate job training/career preparation. Assistive technology figures prominently in disability employment law as a critical strategy for gaining access and supporting employment and upward mobility in the workplace. However, little systematic effort has been devoted to examining assistive technology use and outcomes as they relate to the employment of individuals with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to articulate a series of issues that permeate assistive technology outcome measurement in employment settings and subsequently affect the use of research knowledge for federal and state policy makers. For each issue, the authors pose three questions for critical analysis: Does the law compel the provision of assistive technology? Does outcome data play any part in the operation of the law? When it does, what kind of data would be useful to collect and where could it be found? Finally, the authors provide a brief glimpse of the current and future research efforts concerning the RSA-911 database. The recent database summaries exemplify the importance of such a national data collection system for informing federal policy, particularly concerning the contributions of assistive technology device use and services on improving the employment of individuals with disabilities.

  14. Assisted reproductive technology surveillance--United States, 2011.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Barfield, Wanda D

    2014-11-21

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which both eggs and embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely to deliver multiple-birth infants than those who conceive naturally because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information on U.S. ART procedures performed in 2011 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2011 (resulting from procedures performed in 2010 and 2011) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2011. 2011. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on all ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. In 2011, a total of 151,923 ART procedures performed in 451 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 47,818 live-birth deliveries and 61,610 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (18,808), New York (excluding New York City) (14,576), Massachusetts (10,106), Illinois (9,886), Texas (9,576), and New Jersey (8,698). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of ART procedures and together accounted for 47.2% of all ART procedures performed, 45.3% of all infants born from ART, and 45.1% of

  15. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance — United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2015-08-14

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of advanced technologies to overcome infertility and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Because more than one embryo might be transferred during a procedure, women who undergo ART procedures, compared with those who conceive naturally, are more likely to deliver multiple birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2012 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2012 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2011 and 2012) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2012. 2012. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States, as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System, a web-based data collecting system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia [DC], and Puerto Rico). In 2012, a total of 157,635 ART procedures performed in 456 U.S. fertility clinics were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 51,261 live-birth deliveries and 65,151 infants. The largest numbers of ART procedures were performed among residents of six states: California (20,241), New York (19,618), Illinois (10,449), Texas (10,281), Massachusetts (9,754), and New Jersey (8,590). These six states also had the highest number of live-birth deliveries as a result of

  16. New Technology/Assistive Technology and the Arts. Proceedings of the National Institute, July 29--August 1, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Charles R., Ed.

    This document is prefaced with a descriptive introduction to the "Access to the Arts Through Assistive Technology Project." The contents that follow are organized in 5 parts. Part 1 includes: "Introduction" (Betsy Foley), and "My Voice Has Wings" (Jeff Moyer). Part 2, "Major Addresses," presents: (1) "Welcome from the Wisconsin Department of…

  17. Knowledge from Research and Practice on the Barriers and Carriers to Successful Technology Transfer for Assistive Technology Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, James A.; Lane, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the assistive technology (AT) industry is made up of small to medium size companies serving relatively small markets with products characterized as "niche" or "orphan" products. Presenting opportunities to AT companies that are created by outside sources is difficult. Presenting such opportunities to companies serving larger markets…

  18. New Technology/Assistive Technology and the Arts. Proceedings of the National Institute, July 29--August 1, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Charles R., Ed.

    This document is prefaced with a descriptive introduction to the "Access to the Arts Through Assistive Technology Project." The contents that follow are organized in 5 parts. Part 1 includes: "Introduction" (Betsy Foley), and "My Voice Has Wings" (Jeff Moyer). Part 2, "Major Addresses," presents: (1) "Welcome from the Wisconsin Department of…

  19. The Use of Assistive Technology by High School Students with Visual Impairments: A Second Look at the Current Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Stacy M.

    2011-01-01

    Even though a wide variety of assistive technology tools and devices are available in the marketplace, many students with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) have not yet benefitted from using this specialized technology. This article presents a study that assessed the use of assistive technology by high school…

  20. Enhancing Learning with the Use of Assistive Technology for Children on the Autism Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Tin

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to understand the effective learning of the iPad and the use of the system to assist elementary-age students with learning. The research literature promotes different types of assistive technology used for learning and suggests a few applications to use for the iPad. Four students with autism learned to use an iPad tablet…

  1. Development of NASA-DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device Using Numerical Aerospace Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2000-01-01

    Over three million Americans and 20 million people worldwide suffer from some form of heart failure. Mechanical heart assist devices are being used as a temporary support to sick ventricle and valves as a bridge-to-transplant or bridge-to-recovery. This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the development of NASA-DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) using numerical aerospace simulation technology.

  2. Virtual reality: an assistive technology in neurological rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rose, F D; Attree, E A; Johnson, D A

    1996-12-01

    The need for improved neurological rehabilitation strategies is self-evident. Recent developments in the computer technology of virtual reality hold the promise of exciting progress in this area. In this paper four areas of potential application of virtual reality to neurological rehabilitation are reviewed.

  3. The use of assistive technologies after stroke is debunking the myths about the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tomšič, Marija; Domajnko, Barbara; Zajc, Melita

    2017-09-22

    Background Through the concept of ageism, we highlight and explain how the society prejudices the elderly. WHO classifies 12 most common stereotypes pertaining to old age. Elderly people are being excluded from social life due to their chronological age rather than any actual reduced physical and/or mental ability. Some of these stereotypes are directly related to the (un)willingness and the ability of the elderly to use technology in everyday life. Objectives The study presented in this article aims to explain the phenomenon of technology use among elderly people who had had a stroke. Method A qualitative study, namely a qualitative content analysis, was performed. Six in-depth interviews with older people who have suffered a stroke were conducted and explored their views on the daily use of technology. Results All older people included in this study used different technologies, which have been divided into technologies that support mobility, technologies for personal care, technologies that support household chores, and technologies for maintaining a social network. An elderly person's attitude toward the use of technology is connected to their social network and assistance from professional staff, as well as the severity of their physical disability. We have found that using various technologies, elderly people are developing various coping strategies. Conclusions After a stroke, a certain degree of physical deterioration can be expected. Nonetheless, our participants managed to compensate for this also with the help of assistive devices and technologies, which negates the myth of simply "surrendering" to the aging process.

  4. Cross linguistic aphasia testing: the Portuguese version of the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT).

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Martin; Martins, Isabel Pavão; Garcia, Paula; Cabeça, Joana; Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Willmes, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    We report the adaptation of the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) to the Portuguese language (PAAT) and the results of its standardization in 125 persons with aphasia and 153 healthy controls. Patients with aphasia had a previous syndromic diagnosis, obtained through a Portuguese aphasia battery, which served as a reference. The control group was stratified by age and educational level. Hierarchical cluster analyses showed good construct validity. The increasing degree of difficulty and complexity throughout the item sets comprising subtests was confirmed. The discriminatory power of the PAAT for the selection of aphasic from non-aphasic persons proved to be as high as for the AAT versions in other languages. Classification of standard aphasic syndromes by means of discriminant analyses was good. Internal consistency, measured by means of Cronbach's alpha coefficient, was high to very high for the different PAAT subtests. Performance differences caused by age or educational level among the healthy control persons emphasized the need for correction factors. In conclusion, the PAAT showed robust psychometric properties, comparable to the original German and to adaptations to other languages. It constitutes a useful tool for cross-linguistic and multicenter studies.

  5. Assistive technologies along supply chains in health care and in the social services sector.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Peter; Hauer, Katharina; Schloffer, Evelyn; Leyrer, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in Austria and Slovenia are currently facing challenges due to scarce resources and demographic change which can be seen especially along the supply chains. The main objective of this paper is to present an option to improve the use of assistive technologies. An extensive literature research for the theoretic part as well as a qualitative survey for the empiric part focusing on short-term care were carried out. Results show that there is a lack of information and training on assistive technologies. As a consequence, their full potential cannot be exploited. Therefore a guideline for nursing consultations was developed. To conclude, both the literature research and the qualitative survey show that assistive technologies have high potentials to improve the supply chains in the health care and social services sector, but there is a lot of information and training on them needed.

  6. Infusing a teacher preparation program in learning disabilities with assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Bryant, D P; Erin, J; Lock, R; Allan, J M; Resta, P E

    1998-01-01

    A recent trend in the fields of special education, rehabilitation, and technology is the development and implementation of assistive technology (AT) devices and services to assist individuals in compensating for disabilities and/or utilizing functional capabilities to meet environmental demands. AT devices and services have major implications for individuals with learning disabilities (LD) regarding life span issues, environmental and curricular accessibility, and compensatory strategies. Faculty members in higher education who are responsible for designing teacher preparation programs in LD must explore ways to structure curricula, methodologies, and practica to better prepare teachers to work with students who use AT devices to compensate for their specific learning disabilities. The purpose of this article is to describe curriculum design steps and barriers to and solutions for infusing LD teacher preparation programs with assistive technology.

  7. Diffusion of robotic-assisted laparoscopic technology across specialties: a national study from 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Juo, Yen-Yi; Mantha, Aditya; Abiri, Ahmad; Lin, Anne; Dutson, Erik

    2017-08-25

    Robotic-assisted procedures were frequently found to have similar outcomes and indications to their laparoscopic counterparts, yet significant variation existed in the acceptance of robotic-assisted technology between surgical specialties and procedures. We performed a retrospective cohort study investigating factors associated with the adoption of robotic assistance across the United States from 2008 to 2013. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, patient- and hospital-level variables were examined for differential distribution between robotic-assisted and conventional laparoscopic procedures. Multilevel logistic regression models were constructed to identify independent factors associated with robotic adoption. Furthermore, cases were stratified by procedure and specialty before being ranked according to proportion of robotic-assistance adoption. Correlation was examined between robotic-assistance adoption and relative outcome in comparison with conventional laparoscopic procedures. The national robotic case volume doubled over the five-year period while a gradual decline in laparoscopic case volume was observed, resulting in an increase in the proportion of procedures performed with robotic assistance from 6.8 to 17%. Patients receiving robotic procedures were more likely to be younger, males, white, privately insured, more affluent, and with less comorbidities. These differences have been decreasing over the study period. The three specialties with the highest proportion of robotic-assisted laparoscopic procedures were urology (34.1%), gynecology (11.0%), and endocrine surgery (9.4%). However, no significant association existed between the frequency of robotic-assistance usage and relative outcome statistics such as mortality, charge, or length of stay. The variation in robotic-assistance adoption between specialties and procedures could not be attributable to clinical outcomes alone. Cultural readiness toward adopting new technology within specialty

  8. Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance - 
United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Saswati; Kissin, Dmitry M; Crawford, Sara B; Folger, Suzanne G; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee; Barfield, Wanda D

    2015-12-04

    Since the first U.S. infant conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) was born in 1981, both the use of ART and the number of fertility clinics providing ART services have increased steadily in the United States. ART includes fertility treatments in which eggs or embryos are handled in the laboratory (i.e., in vitro fertilization [IVF] and related procedures). Women who undergo ART procedures are more likely than women who conceive naturally to deliver multiple-birth infants. Multiple births pose substantial risks to both mothers and infants, including obstetric complications, preterm delivery, and low birthweight infants. This report provides state-specific information for the United States (including Puerto Rico) on ART procedures performed in 2013 and compares infant outcomes that occurred in 2013 (resulting from ART procedures performed in 2012 and 2013) with outcomes for all infants born in the United States in 2013. 2013. In 1996, CDC began collecting data on ART procedures performed in fertility clinics in the United States as mandated by the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 (FCSRCA) (Public Law 102-493). Data are collected through the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), a web-based data collection system developed by CDC. This report includes data from 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, the District of Columbia [DC], and Puerto Rico). In 2013, a total of 160,521 ART procedures (range: 109 in Wyoming to 20,299 in California) with the intent to transfer at least one embryo were performed in 467 U.S. fertility clinics and were reported to CDC. These procedures resulted in 53,252 live-birth deliveries (range: 47 in Alaska to 6,979 in California) and 66,691 infants (range: 61 in Alaska to 8,649 in California). Nationally, the total number of ART procedures performed per million women of reproductive age (15-44 years), a proxy measure of the ART usage rate, was 2,521 (range: 352 in Puerto Rico to 7,688 in DC). ART use

  9. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Dental Assisting Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0601 - Dental Assisting/Assistant)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Emily; Bokros, Christy; Gavant, H. Richard; Johnson, Robin

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  10. 2006 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Dental Assisting Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0601 - Dental Assisting/Assistant)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Emily; Gavant, H. Richard

    2006-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  11. Assistive Technologies and Issues Relating to Privacy, Ethics and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Suzanne; Bengtsson, Johan E.; Dröes, Rose-Marie

    Emerging technologies provide the opportunity to develop innovative sustainable service models, capable of supporting adults with dementia at home. Devices range from simple stand-alone components that can generate a responsive alarm call to complex interoperable systems that even can be remotely controlled. From these complex systems the paradigm of the ubiquitous or ambient smart home has emerged, integrating technology, environmental design and traditional care provision. The service context is often complex, involving a variety of stakeholders and a range of interested agencies. Against this backdrop, as anecdotal evidence and government policies spawn further innovation it is critical that due consideration is given to the potential ethical ramifications at an individual, organisational and societal level. Well-grounded ethical thinking and proactive ethical responses to this innovation are required. Explicit policy and practice should therefore emerge which engenders confidence in existing supported living option schemes for adults with dementia and informs further innovation.

  12. Technological advances in robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gerald Y; Goel, Raj K; Kaouk, Jihad H; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2009-05-01

    In this article, the authors describe the evolution of urologic robotic systems and the current state-of-the-art features and existing limitations of the da Vinci S HD System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc.). They then review promising innovations in scaling down the footprint of robotic platforms, the early experience with mobile miniaturized in vivo robots, advances in endoscopic navigation systems using augmented reality technologies and tracking devices, the emergence of technologies for robotic natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery and single-port surgery, advances in flexible robotics and haptics, the development of new virtual reality simulator training platforms compatible with the existing da Vinci system, and recent experiences with remote robotic surgery and telestration.

  13. Signals of opportunity assisted ubiquitous geolocation and navigation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Mok, Esmond; Xia, Linyuan; Wu, Zhongyi

    2008-10-01

    The desire of geolocation and navigation technologies that provide precise, fast and reliable geo-services has exploded in the recent years, and there is a dramatic increase in the geo-service market varies from mass market applications to the new and innovative applications. The lack of reliable GNSS signals in the NLOS environment confronts many innovative ideas related to mass market location-based applications. But there is an optimized way to provide the ubiquitous geolocation services via exploitation of signals of opportunity (SoOP). The core concept of ubiquitous geolocation and navigation is provide globally available geo-services by giving the mobile terminal the ability to acquire their location information, this technology can be applied at all scales geo-reference by sharing some simple, inexpensive, robust geolocation and navigation algorisms for different technology such as GNSS and other emerging technology, and the goals of the ubiquitous geolocation and navigation service are reliable availability, transparency, seamlessness, awareness, and trustworthiness. SoOP are primarily envisioned to be man-made radio emitters not originally intended for geolocation and navigation, but may be extended to active beacons purposely deployed in an emergency situation, in this paper, we also regarded the signals of different wireless network those defined by the IEEE 802.11, IEEE 802.15 and IEEE 802.16 as an important part of SoOP. The use of widely available, powerful, and economically important SoOP in Hong Kong will provide a robust geolocation and navigation capability. We made some initial investigation into the use of the SoOP through feasibility studies and prototype investigations of the use of wireless local area network (WLAN), ultra-wide band (UWB) and ZigBee.

  14. Community Hazard Vulnerability Assessments: How Technology Can Assist in Comprehension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    kinesthetic learners want to move physically to learn. Permitting them to use technology to manipulate a simulation or to enter data into a model...when they are forced to think about it through questioning. Finally, kinesthetic learners need to move their bodies to process information. Rostan...2003) provides the examples of pianists and dancers who exemplify kinesthetic learners Nixon (2004) studied brain activity, reporting on how each

  15. Audio based surveillance forcognitive assistance using a CMT microphone within socially assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Rougui, J E; Istrate, D; Souidene, W; Opitz, M; Riemann, M

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes a system for Acoustic Event Detection and Classification (AEDC) using enhanced audio signal provided by a CMT (Coincidence Microphone Technology) microphone. The CMT microphone through signal processing algorithm provides an enhanced signal in several azimuths with a step of 15 degrees . The AEC module exploits this technology to increase classification performance. The automatic detection system based on DWT uses an adaptive threshold for a different energy level and sampling rate quality. The classification system is based on an unsupervised order estimation of Gaussian mixture model adapted to the variability of sound event acoustic information and the representation cost.

  16. [Use of conventional assisted reproductive technologies and history of cancer: what are the results?].

    PubMed

    Robin, G; Decanter, C

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic advances in oncology have improved the prognosis for long-term survival of children and young adults. As well as other couples or because of adverse side effects of cancer treatments on reproductive function, some cancer survivors will therefore be brought to use assisted reproductive technologies (intrauterine inseminations, in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, oocyte or sperm donation…). The purpose of this review is to summarize available scientific datas regarding success rate of assisted reproductive technologies in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Prognostic factors for assisted reproductive technology in women with endometriosis-related infertility.

    PubMed

    Maignien, Chloé; Santulli, Pietro; Gayet, Vanessa; Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine; Korb, Diane; Bourdon, Mathilde; Marcellin, Louis; de Ziegler, Dominique; Chapron, Charles

    2017-03-01

    Assisted reproductive technology is one of the therapeutic options offered for managing endometriosis-associated infertility. Yet, published data on assisted reproductive technology outcome in women affected by endometriosis are conflicting and the determinant factors for pregnancy chances unclear. We sought to evaluate assisted reproductive technology outcomes in a series of 359 endometriosis patients, to identify prognostic factors and determine if there is an impact of the endometriosis phenotype. This was a retrospective observational cohort study, including 359 consecutive endometriosis patients undergoing in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, from June 2005 through February 2013 at a university hospital. Endometriotic lesions were classified into 3 phenotypes-superficial peritoneal endometriosis, endometrioma, or deep infiltrating endometriosis-based on imaging criteria (transvaginal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging); histological proof confirmed the diagnosis in women with a history of surgery for endometriosis. Main outcome measures were clinical pregnancy rates and live birth rates per cycle and per embryo transfer. Prognostic factors of assisted reproductive technology outcome were identified by comparing women who became pregnant and those who did not, using univariate and adjusted multiple logistic regression models. In all, 359 endometriosis patients underwent 720 assisted reproductive technology cycles. In all, 158 (44%) patients became pregnant, and 114 (31.8%) had a live birth. The clinical pregnancy rate and the live birth rate per embryo transfer were 36.4% and 22.8%, respectively. The endometriosis phenotype (superficial endometriosis, endometrioma, or deep infiltrating endometriosis) had no impact on assisted reproductive technology outcomes. After multivariate analysis, history of surgery for endometriosis (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence ratio, 0.06-0.38) or past surgery for endometrioma (odds ratio, 0.39; 95

  18. The Thai version of the German Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT): description of the test and performance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Pracharitpukdee, N; Phanthumchinda, K; Huber, W; Willmes, K

    1998-06-01

    The Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT), originally developed as a test for aphasia language disorders in Germany, consists of six spontaneous speech rating scales and five subtests: Token Test, Repetition, Written Language, Confronting Naming and Comprehension. The study aimed to describe the linguistic properties of the AAT Thai version and to investigate the test performances of the normal subjects. In this study some problems of linguistic changes in the construction of the Thai version were discussed. The results revealed that the normal subjects' performances on the test were independent of age, sex and education level. Therefore, the Thai version of AAT is applicable to the differential diagnosis of the communicative abilities of Thai aphasic patients.

  19. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Medical Assisting Technology. (Program CIP-51.0801 - Medical /Clinical Assisting)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Kaye; King, Christine

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  20. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.