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Sample records for association scan reveals

  1. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  2. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  3. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  4. A genome-wide linkage and association scan reveals novel loci for autism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lauren A; Arking, Dan E; Daly, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2009-10-01

    Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success. Genome-wide association studies using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits. Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed an SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 x 10(-7)). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening whereas the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants.

  5. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  6. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  7. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  8. A Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Scan Reveals Novel Loci for Hypertension and Blood Pressure Traits

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youling; Tomlinson, Brian; Chu, Tanya; Fang, Yu Jing; Gui, Hongsheng; Tang, Clara S.; Yip, Benjamin H.; Cherny, Stacey S.; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Sham, Pak Chung; Lam, Tai Hing; Thomas, Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is caused by the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The condition which is very common, with about 18% of the adult Hong Kong Chinese population and over 50% of older individuals affected, is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. To identify genes influencing hypertension and blood pressure, we conducted a combined linkage and association study using over 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 328 individuals comprising 111 hypertensive probands and their siblings. Using a family-based association test, we found an association with SNPs on chromosome 5q31.1 (rs6596140; P<9×10−8) for hypertension. One candidate gene, PDC, was replicated, with rs3817586 on 1q31.1 attaining P = 2.5×10−4 and 2.9×10−5 in the within-family tests for DBP and MAP, respectively. We also identified regions of significant linkage for systolic and diastolic blood pressure on chromosomes 2q22 and 5p13, respectively. Further family-based association analysis of the linkage peak on chromosome 5 yielded a significant association (rs1605685, P<7×10−5) for DBP. This is the first combined linkage and association study of hypertension and its related quantitative traits with Chinese ancestry. The associations reported here account for the action of common variants whereas the discovery of linkage regions may point to novel targets for rare variant screening. PMID:22384028

  9. Ancient Pb and Ti mobilization revealed by Scanning Ion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiak, Monika A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.

    2014-05-01

    Zircons from strongly layered early Archean ortho- and paragneisses in ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic rocks of the Napier Complex, Enderby Land, East Antarctica are characterized by complex U-Th-Pb systematics [1,2,3]. A large number of zircons from three samples, Gage Ridge, Mount Sones and Dallwitz Nunatak, are reversely discordant (U/Pb ages older than 207Pb/206Pb ages) with the oldest date of 3.9 Ga [4] (for the grain from Gage Ridge orthogneiss). To further investigate this process, we utilized a novel high spatial resolution Scanning Ion Imaging technique on the CAMECA IMS 1280 at the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. Areas of 70 μm x 70 μm were selected for imaging in mono- and multicollection modes using a ~2 μm rastered primary beam to map out the distribution of 48Ti, 89Y, 180Hf, 232Th, 238U, 204Pb, 206Pb and 207Pb. The ion maps reveal variable distribution of certain elements within analysed grains that can be compared to their CL response. Yttrium, together with U and Th, exhibits zonation visible on the CL images, Hf shows expected minimal variation. Unusual patchiness is visible in the map for Ti and Pb distribution. The bright patches with enhanced signal do not correspond to any zones or to crystal imperfections (e.g. cracks). The presence of patchy titanium is likely to affect Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and patchy Pb affecting 207Pb/206Pb ages, usually considered as more robust for Archean zircons. Using the WinImage program, we produced 207Pb/206Pb ratio maps that allow calculation of 207Pb/206Pb ages for spots of any size within the frame of the picture and at any time after data collection. This provides a new and unique method for obtaining age information from zircon. These maps show areas of enhanced brightness where the 207Pb/206Pb ratio is higher and demonstrate that within these small areas (μm scale) the apparent 207Pb/206Pb age is older, in some of these patches even > 4 Ga. These data are a result of ancient Pb

  10. Family-based association tests for genomewide association scans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Min; Abecasis, Goncalo R

    2007-11-01

    With millions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified and characterized, genomewide association studies have begun to identify susceptibility genes for complex traits and diseases. These studies involve the characterization and analysis of very-high-resolution SNP genotype data for hundreds or thousands of individuals. We describe a computationally efficient approach to testing association between SNPs and quantitative phenotypes, which can be applied to whole-genome association scans. In addition to observed genotypes, our approach allows estimation of missing genotypes, resulting in substantial increases in power when genotyping resources are limited. We estimate missing genotypes probabilistically using the Lander-Green or Elston-Stewart algorithms and combine high-resolution SNP genotypes for a subset of individuals in each pedigree with sparser marker data for the remaining individuals. We show that power is increased whenever phenotype information for ungenotyped individuals is included in analyses and that high-density genotyping of just three carefully selected individuals in a nuclear family can recover >90% of the information available if every individual were genotyped, for a fraction of the cost and experimental effort. To aid in study design, we evaluate the power of strategies that genotype different subsets of individuals in each pedigree and make recommendations about which individuals should be genotyped at a high density. To illustrate our method, we performed genomewide association analysis for 27 gene-expression phenotypes in 3-generation families (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain pedigrees), in which genotypes for ~860,000 SNPs in 90 grandparents and parents are complemented by genotypes for ~6,700 SNPs in a total of 168 individuals. In addition to increasing the evidence of association at 15 previously identified cis-acting associated alleles, our genotype-inference algorithm allowed us to identify associated alleles at 4

  11. Temperature-scan cryocrystallography reveals reaction intermediates in bacteriophytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhong; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2012-03-27

    Light is a fundamental signal that regulates important physiological processes such as development and circadian rhythm in living organisms. Phytochromes form a major family of photoreceptors responsible for red light perception in plants, fungi and bacteria. They undergo reversible photoconversion between red-absorbing (Pr) and far-red-absorbing (Pfr) states, thereby ultimately converting a light signal into a distinct biological signal that mediates subsequent cellular responses. Several structures of microbial phytochromes have been determined in their dark-adapted Pr or Pfr states. However, the structural nature of initial photochemical events has not been characterized by crystallography. Here we report the crystal structures of three intermediates in the photoreaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome (PaBphP). We used cryotrapping crystallography to capture intermediates, and followed structural changes by scanning the temperature at which the photoreaction proceeded. Light-induced conformational changes in PaBphP originate in ring D of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore, and E-to-Z isomerization about the C{sub 15} = C{sub 16} double bond between rings C and D is the initial photochemical event. As the chromophore relaxes, the twist of the C{sub 15} methine bridge about its two dihedral angles is reversed. Structural changes extend further to rings B and A, and to the surrounding protein regions. These data indicate that absorption of a photon by the Pfr state of PaBphP converts a light signal into a structural signal via twisting and untwisting of the methine bridges in the linear tetrapyrrole within the confined protein cavity.

  12. Snow metamorphism as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominé, Florent; Lauzier, Thomas; Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Kuhs, Werner F; Techmer, Kirsten; Heinrichs, Till

    2003-09-01

    Current theories of snow metamorphism indicate that sublimating snow crystals have rounded shapes, while growing crystals have shapes that depend on growth rates. At slow growth rates, crystals are rounded. At moderate rates, they have flat faces with rounded edges. At fast growth rates, crystals have flat faces with sharp edges, and they have hollow faces at very fast growth rates. The main growth/sublimation mechanism is thought to be by the homogeneous nucleation of new layers at or near crystal edges. It was also suggested that the equilibrium shape of snow crystals would be temperature dependent: rounded above -10.5 degrees C, and faceted below. To test these paradigms, we have performed SEM investigations of snow samples having undergone metamorphism under natural conditions, and of snow samples subjected to isothermal metamorphism at -4 degrees and -15 degrees C in the laboratory. In general, current theories predicting crystal shapes as a function of growth rates, and of whether crystals are growing or sublimating, are verified. However, the transition in equilibrium shapes from rounded to faceted at -10.5 degrees C is not observed in our isothermal experiments that reveal a predominance of rounded shapes after more than a month of metamorphism at -4 and -15 degrees C. Some small crystals with flat faces that also have sharp angles at -15 degrees C, are observed in our isothermal experiments. These faces are newly formed, and contradict current theory. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain their occurrence. One is that they are due to sublimation at emerging dislocations. PMID:12938116

  13. Snow metamorphism as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominé, Florent; Lauzier, Thomas; Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Kuhs, Werner F; Techmer, Kirsten; Heinrichs, Till

    2003-09-01

    Current theories of snow metamorphism indicate that sublimating snow crystals have rounded shapes, while growing crystals have shapes that depend on growth rates. At slow growth rates, crystals are rounded. At moderate rates, they have flat faces with rounded edges. At fast growth rates, crystals have flat faces with sharp edges, and they have hollow faces at very fast growth rates. The main growth/sublimation mechanism is thought to be by the homogeneous nucleation of new layers at or near crystal edges. It was also suggested that the equilibrium shape of snow crystals would be temperature dependent: rounded above -10.5 degrees C, and faceted below. To test these paradigms, we have performed SEM investigations of snow samples having undergone metamorphism under natural conditions, and of snow samples subjected to isothermal metamorphism at -4 degrees and -15 degrees C in the laboratory. In general, current theories predicting crystal shapes as a function of growth rates, and of whether crystals are growing or sublimating, are verified. However, the transition in equilibrium shapes from rounded to faceted at -10.5 degrees C is not observed in our isothermal experiments that reveal a predominance of rounded shapes after more than a month of metamorphism at -4 and -15 degrees C. Some small crystals with flat faces that also have sharp angles at -15 degrees C, are observed in our isothermal experiments. These faces are newly formed, and contradict current theory. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain their occurrence. One is that they are due to sublimation at emerging dislocations.

  14. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  15. SCAN+

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  16. Photoreceptor perturbation around subretinal drusenoid deposits revealed by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaolin; Rivero, Ernesto Blanco; Clark, Mark E; Witherspoon, Clark Douglas; Spaide, Richard F; Girkin, Christopher A.; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the microscopic structure of photoreceptors impacted by subretinal drusenoid deposits, also called pseudodrusen, an extracellular lesion associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Design Observational case series. Methods Fifty-three patients with AMD and 10 age-similar subjects in normal retinal health were recruited. All subjects underwent color fundus photography, infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subretinal drusenoid deposits were classified with a 3-stage OCT-based grading system. Lesions and surrounding photoreceptors were examined with AOSLO. Results Subretinal drusenoid deposits were found in 26 eyes of 13 patients with AMD and imaged by AOSLO and SD-OCT in 18 eyes (n=342 lesions). SD-OCT showed subretinal drusenoid deposits as highly reflective material accumulated internal to the retinal pigment epithelium. AOSLO revealed that photoreceptor reflectivity was qualitatively reduced by stage 1 subretinal drusenoid deposits and greatly reduced by stage 2. AOSLO presented a distinct structure in stage 3, a hyporeflective annulus consisting of deflected, degenerated or absent photoreceptors. A central core with a reflectivity superficially resembling photoreceptors is formed by the lesion material itself. A hyporeflective gap in the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone on either side of this core shown in SD-OCT corresponded to the hyporeflective annulus seen by AOSLO. Conclusions AOSLO and multimodal imaging of subretinal drusenoid deposits indicate solid, space filling lesions in the subretinal space. Associated retinal reflectivity changes are related to lesion stages and are consistent with perturbations to photoreceptors, as suggested by histology. PMID:24907433

  17. Single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    An, B.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Egashira, M.; Korai, Y.; Mochida, I.

    2001-06-04

    The electronic structure of a single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice has been revealed on an atomic scale by scanning tunneling microscopy. The pentagon is located at the apex of the conical protuberance of the graphitic particle. The enhanced charge density localized at each carbon atom in the pentagon is identified, and the ringlike pattern of the ({radical}3{times}{radical}3)R30{degree} superstructure of graphite is clearly observed around the pentagon. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Color-shape associations revealed with implicit association tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky's color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky's theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people's color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods.

  19. Color-Shape Associations Revealed with Implicit Association Tests

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky’s color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky’s theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people’s color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods. PMID:25625717

  20. Dissociable Modulation of Overt Visual Attention in Valence and Arousal Revealed by Topology of Scan Path

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianguang; Jiang, Huihui; Jin, Yixiang; Chen, Nanhui; Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Zhengbo; Luo, Yuejia; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2011-01-01

    Emotional stimuli have evolutionary significance for the survival of organisms; therefore, they are attention-grabbing and are processed preferentially. The neural underpinnings of two principle emotional dimensions in affective space, valence (degree of pleasantness) and arousal (intensity of evoked emotion), have been shown to be dissociable in the olfactory, gustatory and memory systems. However, the separable roles of valence and arousal in scene perception are poorly understood. In this study, we asked how these two emotional dimensions modulate overt visual attention. Twenty-two healthy volunteers freely viewed images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) that were graded for affective levels of valence and arousal (high, medium, and low). Subjects' heads were immobilized and eye movements were recorded by camera to track overt shifts of visual attention. Algebraic graph-based approaches were introduced to model scan paths as weighted undirected path graphs, generating global topology metrics that characterize the algebraic connectivity of scan paths. Our data suggest that human subjects show different scanning patterns to stimuli with different affective ratings. Valence salient stimuli (with neutral arousal) elicited faster and larger shifts of attention, while arousal salient stimuli (with neutral valence) elicited local scanning, dense attention allocation and deep processing. Furthermore, our model revealed that the modulatory effect of valence was linearly related to the valence level, whereas the relation between the modulatory effect and the level of arousal was nonlinear. Hence, visual attention seems to be modulated by mechanisms that are separate for valence and arousal. PMID:21494331

  1. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  2. 75 FR 70290 - In the Matter of Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...''). 75 FR. 34482 (Jun. 17, 2010). Complainant Cross Match Technologies, Inc. of Palm Beach Gardens... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and... the United States after importation of certain biometric scanning devices, components...

  3. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone. PMID:25759085

  4. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone.

  5. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model.

  6. Dynamics of ribosome scanning and recycling revealed by translation complex profiling.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Regulation of messenger RNA translation is central to eukaryotic gene expression control. Regulatory inputs are specified by them RNA untranslated regions (UTRs) and often target translation initiation. Initiation involves binding of the 40S ribosomal small subunit (SSU) and associated eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs)near the mRNA 5′ cap; the SSU then scans in the 3′ direction until it detects the start codon and is joined by the 60S ribosomal large subunit (LSU) to form the 80S ribosome. Scanning and other dynamic aspects of the initiation model have remained as conjectures because methods to trap early intermediates were lacking. Here we uncover the dynamics of the complete translation cycle in live yeast cells using translation complex profile sequencing (TCP-seq), a method developed from the ribosome profiling approach. We document scanning by observing SSU footprints along 5′ UTRs. Scanning SSU have 5′-extended footprints (up to~75 nucleotides), indicative of additional interactions with mRNA emerging from the exit channel, promoting forward movement. We visualized changes in initiation complex conformation as SSU footprints coalesced into three major sizes at start codons (19, 29 and 37 nucleotides). These share the same 5′ start site but differ at the 3′ end, reflecting successive changes at the entry channel from an open to a closed state following start codon recognition. We also observe SSU 'lingering' at stop codons after LSU departure. Our results underpin mechanistic models of translation initiation and termination, built on decades of biochemical and structural investigation, with direct genome-wide in vivo evidence. Our approach captures ribosomal complexes at all phases of translation and will aid in studying translation dynamics in diverse cellular contexts. Dysregulation of translation is common in disease and, for example, SSU scanning is a target of anti-cancer drug development. TCP-seq will prove useful in discerning differences

  7. A Golden Drachma From Bruttia: Counterfeit Money Revealed By Scanning Electron Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, Valentino; Barberio, Marianna; Oliva, Antonino; Noce, Nicoletta; Gattuso, Caterina; Davoli, Mariano

    Diagnostic studies performed on an ancient coin are presented in order to find if the coin is authentic or is a coinage proof. Our investigation includes Scanning Electron Microscopy - Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) and Cathodoluminescence (CL). The coin is a Drachma representing on the obverse the portrait of Poseidon and, on the reverse the figure of Anfitrite riding a seahorse while Eros is shooting an arrow. The coin is well known in the numismatic studies and originals can also be found in Catanzaro, Naples or Milan museums. The EDX analysis, executed on narrow points of the surface, revealed Pb and Cu as main components of the coin on both sides: 51% of Pb and 35% of Cu their weight and surprisingly on both sides traces of gold was found. The maximum dimensions and the percentage in weight of the small revealed gold spots were respectively on the order of 20 μm and 95%. At the same time luminescence emission induced by electron bombardment (CL) on these spots was executed. This analysis confirmed SEM results, though the presence of Au was more evident than in SEM analysis. In fact CL analysis showed a little presence of Au throughout the sample surface.

  8. Evolutionary change driven by metal exposure as revealed by coding SNP genome scan in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Bélanger-Deschênes, Sébastien; Couture, Patrice; Campbell, Peter G C; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Pollution can drive rapid evolutionary change in wild populations. This study targets functional polymorphisms of chronically metal-contaminated wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A de novo transcriptome scan contrasted subsets of individuals from clean (n = 16) and contaminated (n = 16) lakes to identify 87 candidate annotated coding SNPs. Candidate genotypes and liver [metal] were obtained in 10 populations (n = 1,052) and a genome scan distinguished outliers: one nuclear (cyclin G1 gene) and two mitochondrial (cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes) also displaying allelic correlation to mean population [cadmium]. Whole mtDNA and 17 kb surrounding cyclin G1 were characterised through 454 sequencing thus revealing two non-synonymous substitutions involving dissimilar amino acids. Based on associated functions and inter-population differentiation, contaminated perch may have been selected for fast life cycle completion (p53 pathway) and memorization impairment mitigation (long-term potentiation pathway). In accordance with predicted evolutionary trajectory for stressed and energy deprived organisms, adapted perch would not compensate for repair mechanism inhibition, instead reallocating energy towards growth and favouring inexpensive impairment mitigation adaptations over costly detoxification. Overall, 85 years of selection could have driven rapid, potentially adaptive evolution by selecting alleles increasing perch fitness in polluted environments.

  9. Functioning of the dimeric GABA(B) receptor extracellular domain revealed by glycan wedge scanning.

    PubMed

    Rondard, Philippe; Huang, Siluo; Monnier, Carine; Tu, Haijun; Blanchard, Bertrand; Oueslati, Nadia; Malhaire, Fanny; Li, Ying; Trinquet, Eric; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Liu, Jianfeng

    2008-05-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by the neurotransmitter GABA is made up of two subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2). GABA(B1) binds agonists, whereas GABA(B2) is required for trafficking GABA(B1) to the cell surface, increasing agonist affinity to GABA(B1), and activating associated G proteins. These subunits each comprise two domains, a Venus flytrap domain (VFT) and a heptahelical transmembrane domain (7TM). How agonist binding to the GABA(B1) VFT leads to GABA(B2) 7TM activation remains unknown. Here, we used a glycan wedge scanning approach to investigate how the GABA(B) VFT dimer controls receptor activity. We first identified the dimerization interface using a bioinformatics approach and then showed that introducing an N-glycan at this interface prevents the association of the two subunits and abolishes all activities of GABA(B2), including agonist activation of the G protein. We also identified a second region in the VFT where insertion of an N-glycan does not prevent dimerization, but blocks agonist activation of the receptor. These data provide new insight into the function of this prototypical GPCR and demonstrate that a change in the dimerization interface is required for receptor activation.

  10. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology. PMID:24639675

  11. Scanning electron microscopic study of flowing erythrocytes in hepatic sinusoids as revealed by 'in vivo cryotechnique'.

    PubMed

    Terada, N; Kato, Y; Fuji, Y; Ueda, H; Baba, T; Ohno, S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for stabilizing erythrocytes under flowing condition in living livers, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After the procedure of the 'in vivo cryotechnique', both freeze-substitution and subsequent t-butyl alcohol freeze-drying methods were used for preparing SEM specimens. By freeze-fracturing with a scalpel in liquid nitrogen before the freeze-substitution, better preserved surface tissues were obtained for examination. Erythrocytes in hepatic sinusoids were clearly detected without plasma components by the freeze-substitution method, and well preserved in parts where they were flowing with their original shapes. Some were accumulated in sinusoids, especially injunctioning areas of sinusoidal networks, as compared with those in narrow lumens between hepatocyte plates. Shapes of such erythrocytes were various, locating along endothelial cells. After stopping the blood supply into livers by artificial cardiac arrest, their shapes were dramatically changed into biconcaves and they became aggregated side by side to be packed in the sinusoids. The three-dimensional shapes of flowing erythrocytes in hepatic sinusoids were demonstrated for the first time by the 'in vivo cryotechnique' combined with SEM. PMID:9602528

  12. BstYI bound to noncognate DNA reveals a "hemispecific" complex: implications for DNA scanning.

    PubMed

    Townson, Sharon A; Samuelson, James C; Bao, Yongming; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2007-04-01

    DNA recognition by proteins is essential for specific expression of genes in a living organism. En route to a target DNA site, a protein will often sample noncognate DNA sites through nonspecific protein-DNA interactions, resulting in a variety of conformationally different binding states. We present here the crystal structure of endonuclease BstYI bound to a noncognate DNA. Surprisingly, the structure reveals the enzyme in a "hemispecific" binding state on the pathway between nonspecific and specific recognition. A single base pair change in the DNA abolishes binding of only one monomer, with the second monomer bound specifically. We show that the enzyme binds essentially as a rigid body, and that one end of the DNA is accommodated loosely in the binding cleft while the other end is held tightly. Another intriguing feature of the structure is Ser172, which has a dual role in establishing nonspecific and specific contacts. Taken together, the structure provides a snapshot of an enzyme in a "paused" intermediate state that may be part of a more general mechanism of scanning DNA. PMID:17437717

  13. BstYI bound to noncognate DNA reveals a "hemispecific" complex: implications for DNA scanning.

    PubMed

    Townson, Sharon A; Samuelson, James C; Bao, Yongming; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2007-04-01

    DNA recognition by proteins is essential for specific expression of genes in a living organism. En route to a target DNA site, a protein will often sample noncognate DNA sites through nonspecific protein-DNA interactions, resulting in a variety of conformationally different binding states. We present here the crystal structure of endonuclease BstYI bound to a noncognate DNA. Surprisingly, the structure reveals the enzyme in a "hemispecific" binding state on the pathway between nonspecific and specific recognition. A single base pair change in the DNA abolishes binding of only one monomer, with the second monomer bound specifically. We show that the enzyme binds essentially as a rigid body, and that one end of the DNA is accommodated loosely in the binding cleft while the other end is held tightly. Another intriguing feature of the structure is Ser172, which has a dual role in establishing nonspecific and specific contacts. Taken together, the structure provides a snapshot of an enzyme in a "paused" intermediate state that may be part of a more general mechanism of scanning DNA.

  14. Anchoring structure of the calvarial periosteum revealed by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Shingo; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Uemura, Kei-ichiro; Togo, Akinobu; Yoshitomi, Munetake; Okayama, Satoko; Kusukawa, Jingo; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    An important consideration in regeneration therapy is the fact that the tissue surrounding an organ supports its function. Understanding the structure of the periosteum can contribute to more effective bone regeneration therapy. As a cellular source, the periosteum also assists bone growth and fracture healing; this further necessitates its direct contact with the bone. However, its anchoring strength appears to be inexplicably stronger than expected. In this study, we used focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography to investigate ultrathin serial sections as well as the three dimensional ultrastructure of the periosteum to clarify the architecture of its anchoring strength, as such assessments are challenging using conventional methods. We discovered perforating fibres that arise from the bone surface at 30 degree angles. Additionally, the fibres across the osteoblast layer were frequently interconnected to form a net-like structure. Fibroblast processes were observed extending into the perforating fibres; their morphologies were distinct from those of typical fibroblasts. Thus, our study revealed novel ultrastructures of the periosteum that support anchorage and serve as a cellular source as well as a mechanical stress transmitter. PMID:26627533

  15. Revealing the Secrets of Stonehenge Through the Application of Laser Scanning, Photogrammetry and Visualisation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, P. G.; Abbott, M.; Dodson, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Stonehenge is perhaps the most famous prehistoric monument in the world. Begun as a simple earthwork enclosure, it was built in several stages with the unique lintelled stone circle being erected in the Neolithic period in around 2,500 BC. Today Stonehenge, together with Avebury and other associated sites, form the heart of a World Heritage Site (WHS) with a unique and dense concentration of outstanding prehistoric monuments. In 2011 English Heritage (EH) embarked on a new survey of the monument. Undertaken by the Greenhatch Group, a commercial survey company based near Derby, a combination of laser scanning and photogrammetric approaches were used to generate the required scale and detailed level of output required by English Heritage. This paper will describe the background to this project and its context within previous survey activities at this World Heritage Site. It will explain the data acquisition technology and processes undertaken on site, the datasets derived from post-processing and their filtering and analysis within both subsequent research projects. Alongside a description of how the data is currently being exploited and proposed future applications within the conservation and management of the site, it will finish by considering the impact of developing geospatial imaging technologies.

  16. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  17. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  18. Tension zones of deep-seated rockslides revealed by thermal anomalies and airborne laser scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Bečkovský, David; Gajdošík, Juraj; Opálka, Filip; Plan, Lukas; Winkler, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Open cracks, tension fractures and crevice caves are important diagnostic features of gravitationally deformed slopes. When the cracks on the upper part of the slope open to the ground surface, they transfer relatively warm and buoyant air from the underground in cold seasons and thus could be detected by the infrared thermography (IRT) as warmer anomalies. Here we present two IRT surveys of deep-seated rockslides in Austria and the Czech Republic. We used thermal imaging cameras Flir and Optris, manipulated manually from the ground surface and also from unmanned aerial vehicle and piloted ultralight-plane platforms. The surveys were conducted during cold days of winter 2014/2015 and early in the morning to avoid the negative effect of direct sunshine. The first study site is the Bad Fischau rockslide in the southern part of the Vienna Basin (Austria). It was firstly identified by the morphostructural analysis of 1-m digital terrain model from the airborne laser scan data. The rockslide is superimposed on, and closely related to the active marginal faults of the Vienna basin, which is a pull apart structure. There is the 80-m-deep Eisenstein Show Cave situated in the southern lateral margin of the rockslide. The cave was originally considered to be purely of hydrothermal (hypogene) karstification; however its specific morphology and position within the detachment zone of the rockslide suggests its relation to gravitational slope-failure. The IRT survey revealed the Eisenstein Cave at the ground surface and also several other open cracks and possible cleft caves along the margins, headscarp, and also within the body of the rockslide. The second surveyed site was the Kněhyně rockslide in the flysch belt of the Outer Western Carpathians in the eastern Czech Republic. This deep-seated translational rockslide formed about eight known pseudokarst crevice caves, which reach up to 57 m in depth. The IRT survey recognized several warm anomalies indicating very deep

  19. Rime and graupel: Description and characterization as revealed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rango, A.; Foster, J.; Josberger, E.G.; Erbe, E.F.; Pooley, C.; Wergin, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    Snow crystals, which form by vapor deposition, occasionally come in contact with supercooled cloud droplets during their formation and descent. When this occurs, the droplets adhere and freeze to the snow crystals in a process known as accretion. During the early stages of accretion, discrete snow crystals exhibiting frozen cloud droplets are referred to as rime. If this process continues, the snow crystal may become completely engulfed in frozen cloud droplets. The resulting particle is known as graupel. Light microscopic investigations have studied rime and graupel for nearly 100 years. However, the limiting resolution and depth of field associated with the light microscope have prevented detailed descriptions of the microscopic cloud droplets and the three-dimensional topography of the rime and graupel particles. This study uses low-temperature scanning electron microscopy to characterize the frozen precipitates that are commonly known as rime and graupel. Rime, consisting of frozen cloud droplets, is observed on all types of snow crystals including needles, columns, plates, and dendrites. The droplets, which vary in size from 10 to 100 μm, frequently accumulate along one face of a single snow crystal, but are found more randomly distributed on aggregations consisting of two or more snow crystals (snowflakes). The early stages of riming are characterized by the presence of frozen cloud droplets that appear as a layer of flattened hemispheres on the surface of the snow crystal. As this process continues, the cloud droplets appear more sinuous and elongate as they contact and freeze to the rimed crystals. The advanced stages of this process result in graupel, a particle 1 to 3 mm across, composed of hundreds of frozen cloud droplets interspersed with considerable air spaces; the original snow crystal is no longer discernible. This study increases our knowledge about the process and characteristics of riming and suggests that the initial appearance of the

  20. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  1. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  2. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  3. Ureteroenteric Fistula Revealed by 99mTc-DTPA Renal Scan.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weifang; Zhang, Yanyan

    2016-10-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a history of cervical carcinoma, status post hysterectomy and radiation therapy 8 years prior, presented worsening back pain for 9 months. The patient underwent a Tc-DTPA renal scan, which showed that a vertically linear tracer distribution was seen alongside the right ureter. Ureteroenteric fistula was confirmed and repaired by surgery. PMID:27454590

  4. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. PMID:25956335

  5. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites.

  6. Activating Mutations of the TRPML1 Channel Revealed by Proline-scanning Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xian-ping; Wang, Xiang; Shen, Dongbiao; Chen, Su; Liu, Meiling; Wang, Yanbin; Mills, Eric; Cheng, Xiping; Delling, Markus; Xu, Haoxing

    2009-01-01

    The mucolipin TRP (TRPML) proteins are a family of endolysosomal cation channels with genetically established importance in humans and rodent. Mutations of human TRPML1 cause type IV mucolipidosis, a devastating pediatric neurodegenerative disease. Our recent electrophysiological studies revealed that, although a TRPML1-mediated current can only be recorded in late endosome and lysosome (LEL) using the lysosome patch clamp technique, a proline substitution in TRPML1 (TRPML1V432P) results in a large whole cell current. Thus, it remains unknown whether the large TRPML1V432P-mediated current results from an increased surface expression (trafficking), elevated channel activity (gating), or both. Here we performed systemic Pro substitutions in a region previously implicated in the gating of various 6 transmembrane cation channels. We found that several Pro substitutions displayed gain-of-function (GOF) constitutive activities at both the plasma membrane (PM) and endolysosomal membranes. Although wild-type TRPML1 and non-GOF Pro substitutions localized exclusively in LEL and were barely detectable in the PM, the GOF mutations with high constitutive activities were not restricted to LEL compartments, and most significantly, exhibited significant surface expression. Because lysosomal exocytosis is Ca2+-dependent, constitutive Ca2+ permeability due to Pro substitutions may have resulted in stimulus-independent intralysosomal Ca2+ release, hence the surface expression and whole cell current of TRPML1. Indeed, surface staining of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (Lamp-1) was dramatically increased in cells expressing GOF TRPML1 channels. We conclude that TRPML1 is an inwardly rectifying, proton-impermeable, Ca2+ and Fe2+/Mn2+ dually permeable cation channel that may be gated by unidentified cellular mechanisms through a conformational change in the cytoplasmic face of the transmembrane 5 (TM5). Furthermore, activation of TRPML1 in LEL may lead to the appearance of TRPML

  7. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Falchook, Aaron D.; Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  8. How to reveal metastable skyrmionic spin structures by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Kruse, C. N.; Dornheim, T.; Heinze, S.

    2016-05-01

    We predict the occurrence of metastable skyrmionic spin structures such as antiskyrmions and higher-order skyrmions in ultra-thin transition-metal films at surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian parametrized from density functional theory calculations. We show that such spin structures will appear with a similar contrast in spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy images. Both skyrmions and antiskyrmions display a circular shape for out-of-plane magnetized tips and a two-lobe butterfly contrast for in-plane tips. An unambiguous distinction can be achieved by rotating the tip magnetization direction without requiring the information of all components of the magnetization.

  9. Impaired Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in Live Cardiomyocytes Revealed by Rapid Line Scan Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, David M.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    Altered intracellular Ca2+ dynamics are characteristically observed in cardiomyocytes from failing hearts. Studies of Ca2+ handling in myocytes predominantly use Fluo-3 AM, a visible light excitable Ca2+ chelating fluorescent dye in conjunction with rapid line-scanning confocal microscopy. However, Fluo-3 AM does not allow for traditional ratiometric determination of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and has required the use of mathematic correction factors with values obtained from separate procedures to convert Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to appropriate Ca2+ concentrations. This study describes methodology to directly measure intracellular Ca2+ levels using inactivated, Fluo-3-AM-loaded cardiomyocytes equilibrated with Ca2+ concentration standards. Titration of Ca2+ concentration exhibits a linear relationship to increasing Fluo-3 AM fluorescence intensity. Images obtained from individual myocyte confocal scans were recorded, average pixel intensity values were calculated, and a plot is generated relating the average pixel intensity to known Ca2+ concentrations. These standard plots can be used to convert transient Ca2+ fluorescence obtained with experimental cells to Ca2+ concentrations by linear regression analysis. Standards are determined on the same microscope used for acquisition of unknown Ca2+ concentrations, simplifying data interpretation and assuring accuracy of conversion values. This procedure eliminates additional equipment, ratiometric imaging, and mathematic correction factors and should be useful to investigators requiring a straightforward method for measuring Ca2+ concentrations in live cells using Ca2+-chelating dyes exhibiting variable fluorescence intensity.

  10. Roller Coaster Scanning reveals spontaneous triggering of dendritic spikes in CA1 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Turi, Gergely F; Hájos, Norbert; Tamás, Gábor; Vizi, E Sylvester; Rózsa, Balázs

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the controlling units of neural networks, despite their sparse number and unique morphological characteristics compared with excitatory pyramidal cells. Although pyramidal cell dendrites have been shown to display local regenerative events--dendritic spikes (dSpikes)--evoked by artificially patterned stimulation of synaptic inputs, no such studies exist for interneurons or for spontaneous events. In addition, imaging techniques have yet to attain the required spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of spontaneously occurring events that trigger dSpikes. Here we describe a high-resolution 3D two-photon laser scanning method (Roller Coaster Scanning) capable of imaging long dendritic segments resolving individual spines and inputs with a temporal resolution of a few milliseconds. By using this technique, we found that local, NMDA receptor-dependent dSpikes can be observed in hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons during spontaneous network activities in vitro. These NMDA spikes appear when approximately 10 spatially clustered inputs arrive synchronously and trigger supralinear integration in dynamic interaction zones. In contrast to the one-to-one relationship between computational subunits and dendritic branches described in pyramidal cells, here we show that interneurons have relatively small (∼14 μm) sliding interaction zones. Our data suggest a unique principle as to how interneurons integrate synaptic information by local dSpikes. PMID:21224413

  11. Ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy reveals distorted liver mitochondrial morphology in murine methylmalonic acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Gavin E.; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Zerfas, Patricia M.; Chandler, Randy J.; Venditti, Charles P.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is a lethal inborn error of metabolism that causes mitochondrial impairment, multi-organ dysfunction and a shortened lifespan. Previous transmission electron microscope studies of thin sections from normal (Mut+/+) and diseased (Mut −/−) tissue found that the mitochondria appear to occupy a progressively larger volume of mutant cells with age, becoming megamitochondria. To assess changes in shape and volume of mitochondria resulting from the mutation, we carried out ion-abrasion–scanning electron microscopy (IA–SEM), a method for 3D imaging that involves the iterative use of a focused gallium ion beam to abrade the surface of the specimen, and a scanning electron beam to image the newly exposed surface. Using IA–SEM, we show that mitochondria are more convoluted and have a broader distribution of sizes in the mutant tissue. Compared to normal cells, mitochondria from mutant cells have a larger surface-area-to-volume ratio, which can be attributed to their convoluted shape and not to their elongation or reduced volume. The 3D imaging approach and image analysis described here could therefore be useful as a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of disease progression in aberrant cells at resolutions higher than that currently achieved using confocal light microscopy. PMID:20399866

  12. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M.; Marti, X.; Holy, V.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-03-12

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

  14. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  15. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  16. The dermoepidermal junction in psoriatic skin as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, M; Pergolizzi, S; Mondello, M R; Santoro, G; Cannavò, S P; Guarneri, B; Magaudda, L

    1999-01-01

    Our previous ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies, in vivo and in vitro, have shown important modifications of the basement membrane of psoriatic skin, which could play a key role in the alterations of keratinocyte adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. In order to complete the morphological examination of all the structures in the dermoepidermal junction of psoriatic skin, we carried out a scanning electron microscopic study using biopsies taken from eight psoriatic patients. The biopsies were fixed in a mixture of 0.2% paraformaldehyde and 0.25% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer at pH 7.4. The specimens were then frozen in liquid nitrogen and fractured following the natural cleavage planes and observed under a Jeol JSM-6301F field emission scanning electron microscope operating at 1.8-2.0 kV. The basal keratinocytes observed showed pore-like depressions on the lateral plasmalemma and villous-like projections in very dilated intercellular spaces. Moreover the basal cell plasma membrane was seen to rest on the papillary dermis without interposition of the lamina densa. The detachment of some keratinocytes enabled the examination of the lamina densa, which appeared slightly granular with numerous focal interruptions through which it was possible to observe the underlying collagen fibres. These findings, together with previously reported findings, support the hypothesis that in psoriasis molecular and structural alterations of the dermoepidermal junction are present, that could fundamentally alter the regulation of the cytomorphological processes and the normal functions of the basement membrane. PMID:10482008

  17. Morphology of central California continental margin, revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; McCulloch, D.S.; Eittreim, S.L.; Masson, D.G.

    1985-02-01

    Leg 2 of the 4-leg USGS EEZ-SCAN 84 program used GLORIA long-range side-scan sonar to survey the region from Pt. Conception to just south of Pt. Arena, from the shelf break to the 200-nmi coverage. The overlapping digital sonographs were slant-range and anamorphically corrected, and a photomosaic of the sonographs was constructed at a scale of 1:375,000 (1 in. = 11.1 km). The underlying bed rock appears to be an important control in shaping the morphology of this margin. Several faults have sea-floor expression and lie subparallel to the margin. The density of canyons and gullies on the slope varies from south to north, probably because of variations in the characteristics of the bed rock. The slope west of San Francisco is the most dissected segment of the central California slope. Monterey Fan is covered by large-scale bed forms (5-15 m amplitude and 1.5-2.0 km wavelength) over much of its surface. Monterey channel crosses southwestward across the fan, but abruptly turns south along a 40-km long surface fault that coincides with a well-mapped meander loop. The channel loops to the north then turns southward crossing the entire Monterey Fan, at its distal reaches, changes to a broad, braided pattern. Major slumps on the margin have long (> 30 km) scarps, some have slump folds, and one has a debris-flow deposit that can be acoustically traced for more than 75 km. Seventeen new seamounts were mapped. Taney Seamounts are large, rimmed, calderas with diameters of about 15 km each; these appear to be very large explosive or summit-collapse features.

  18. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W.; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  19. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  20. Magnetoelectric coupling in supercoducting Sr2 VO3 FeAs revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seokhwan; Choi, Hyunwoo; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Jin-Oh; Son, Donghyun; Kim, Jun Sung; Ok, Jong Mok; Lee, Jhinhwan

    2015-03-01

    Sr2VO3FeAs is known to exhibit high Tc (~ 37K) superconductivity with no magnetic ordering in the FeAs layer but weak magnetic moment in the V sublattice. An angle resolved photo emission spectroscopy also shows the non-trivial Fermi surface due to the V 3d orbitals. We have studied on Sr2VO3FeAs single crystal using spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) with variable temperature from 4.6K to 100K, and magnetic field up to 7T. Our results show that Sr2VO3FeAs has charge density wave (CDW) modulation in the V sublattice with the same wave vector observed in the neutron scattering experiment. The modulation strength is reduced with applying magnetic field. An electronic Fermi surface with largest V 3d character shows suppressed superconductivity possibly due to strong V-site correlation. However the multi-orbital nature of FeAs allows overall unsuppressed superconductivity at high Tc.

  1. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of Anti-TRAP (AT) Reveals Residues Involved in Binding to TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free L-tryptophan in many gram positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT3) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT12) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the “top” region of AT3, which are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation. PMID:18334255

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production. PMID:26898901

  3. Wigner and Kondo physics in quantum point contacts revealed by scanning gate microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brun, B; Martins, F; Faniel, S; Hackens, B; Bachelier, G; Cavanna, A; Ulysse, C; Ouerghi, A; Gennser, U; Mailly, D; Huant, S; Bayot, V; Sanquer, M; Sellier, H

    2014-06-30

    Quantum point contacts exhibit mysterious conductance anomalies in addition to well-known conductance plateaus at multiples of 2e(2)/h. These 0.7 and zero-bias anomalies have been intensively studied, but their microscopic origin in terms of many-body effects is still highly debated. Here we use the charged tip of a scanning gate microscope to tune in situ the electrostatic potential of the point contact. While sweeping the tip distance, we observe repetitive splittings of the zero-bias anomaly, correlated with simultaneous appearances of the 0.7 anomaly. We interpret this behaviour in terms of alternating equilibrium and non-equilibrium Kondo screenings of different spin states localized in the channel. These alternating Kondo effects point towards the presence of a Wigner crystal containing several charges with different parities. Indeed, simulations show that the electron density in the channel is low enough to reach one-dimensional Wigner crystallization over a size controlled by the tip position.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy reveals severe external root resorption in the large periapical lesion.

    PubMed

    Ookubo, Kensuke; Ookubo, Atsushi; Tsujimoto, Masaki; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationships between clinicopathological findings and the resorptive conditions of root apices of teeth with periodontitis. The samples included 21 root apices with large periapical radiolucent lesions. The preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative findings were correlated with the presence, extension, and the progression pattern of periapical resorption using a scanning electron microscope. The subjects' age, gender, chief complaint, type of tooth, percussion test results, size of periapical lesion using CT, and intraoperative findings were recorded. All apicoectomies were performed under an operative microscope for endodontic microsurgery. A significant large size was observed in cystic lesions compared with granulomatous lesions. The cementum surface at the periphery of the lesion was covered with globular structures (2-3 μm in diameter). Cementum resorption started as small defect formations at the surface. As the defect formation progressed, a lamellar structure appeared at the resorption area, and the size of globular structures became smaller than that of globules at the surface. Further resorption produced typical lacuna formation, which was particularly observed in fracture cases. The most morphologically severe destructive pattern of dentin resorption was observed in large cystic lesions. This study is the first report to elucidate the relationships between three clinical types of undesirable periapical lesions: (1) undertreatment, (2) periapical fracture, (3) macro-level resorption, and the microstructure of external root resorption including from small defects at the cementum surface to a significant destructive pattern inside the dentin. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:495-500, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26957368

  5. Morphological observations of Diplodia maydis on synthetic and natural substrates as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J A; Campbell, L L; Pappelis, A J

    1974-01-01

    Mycelial and spore morphology of Diplodia maydis were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy after growth on various media and natural substrates (oat and corn kernels, and corn husks). Of several specimen preparation methods studied, Parducz fixation followed by critical-point or freeze-drying gave adequate preservation for pycnidia, mycelia, and spores. Morphological characteristics were similar in rotary and reciprocal shaker cultures and differed from that found in stationary cultures in the amount of slime-like material produced and precipitated matter on the mycelial surfaces. In general, mycelial surfaces were smooth. Large areas of coalesced material were present in all samples examined. Slime-like material produced in liquid media appeared as a finely laced net, randomly appearing throughout the mycelia with bead-like structures present along the net. A fine netting also was observed interspersed among the spores inside the pycnidia obtained from oats. Slime-like material was observed to cover the pycnidia produced on oat and corn kernels. In the latter case, the spores were less protected by the outer slime-like covering. Thickened node-like structures were observed in mycelial mats produced in modified Fries 2 medium, on potato dextrose agar plates, and on infected oats. Round and ovate thickened node-like structures were observed in mycelium produced on corn kernels. In general, node-like structures were less abundant in mycelia from naturally infected substrates. Conidia were commonly rounded to tapered and two celled, with a distinctive ridged septum at the middle. Dried spores were collapsed in a characteristic flask-like fashion. PMID:4203784

  6. Myelin organization in the nodal, paranodal, and juxtaparanodal regions revealed by scanning x-ray microdiffraction.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Hideyo; Liu, Jiliang; Makowski, Lee; Palmisano, Marilena; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has provided extensive information about the arrangement of lipids and proteins in multilamellar myelin. This information has been limited to the abundant inter-nodal regions of the sheath because these regions dominate the scattering when x-ray beams of 100 µm diameter or more are used. Here, we used a 1 µm beam, raster-scanned across a single nerve fiber, to obtain detailed information about the molecular architecture in the nodal, paranodal, and juxtaparanodal regions. Orientation of the lamellar membrane stacks and membrane periodicity varied spatially. In the juxtaparanode-internode, 198-202 Å-period membrane arrays oriented normal to the nerve fiber axis predominated, whereas in the paranode-node, 205-208 Å-period arrays oriented along the fiber direction predominated. In parts of the sheath distal to the node, multiple sets of lamellar reflections were observed at angles to one another, suggesting that the myelin multilayers are deformed at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. The calculated electron density of myelin in the different regions exhibited membrane bilayer profiles with varied electron densities at the polar head groups, likely due to different amounts of major myelin proteins (P0 glycoprotein and myelin basic protein). Scattering from the center of the nerve fibers, where the x-rays are incident en face (perpendicular) to the membrane planes, provided information about the lateral distribution of protein. By underscoring the heterogeneity of membrane packing, microdiffraction analysis suggests a powerful new strategy for understanding the underlying molecular foundation of a broad spectrum of myelinopathies dependent on local specializations of myelin structure in both the PNS and CNS.

  7. Accurate 3d Scanning of Damaged Ancient Greek Inscriptions for Revealing Weathered Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, A. I.; Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.; Prignitz, S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper two non-invasive non-destructive alternative techniques to the traditional and invasive technique of squeezes are presented alongside with specialized developed processing methods, aiming to help the epigraphists to reveal and analyse weathered letters in ancient Greek inscriptions carved in masonry or marble. The resulting 3D model would serve as a detailed basis for the epigraphists to try to decipher the inscription. The data were collected by using a Structured Light scanner. The creation of the final accurate three dimensional model is a complicated procedure requiring large computation cost and human effort. It includes the collection of geometric data in limited space and time, the creation of the surface, the noise filtering and the merging of individual surfaces. The use of structured light scanners is time consuming and requires costly hardware and software. Therefore an alternative methodology for collecting 3D data of the inscriptions was also implemented for reasons of comparison. Hence, image sequences from varying distances were collected using a calibrated DSLR camera aiming to reconstruct the 3D scene through SfM techniques in order to evaluate the efficiency and the level of precision and detail of the obtained reconstructed inscriptions. Problems in the acquisition processes as well as difficulties in the alignment step and mesh optimization are also encountered. A meta-processing framework is proposed and analysed. Finally, the results of processing and analysis and the different 3D models are critically inspected and then evaluated by a specialist in terms of accuracy, quality and detail of the model and the capability of revealing damaged and "hidden" letters.

  8. Finding needles in haystacks: scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the complex reactivity of Si(100) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, Erik S; Hines, Melissa A

    2015-07-21

    Many chemical reactions-etching, growth, and catalytic-produce highly faceted surfaces. Examples range from the atomically flat silicon surfaces produced by anisotropic etchants to the wide variety of faceted nanoparticles, including cubes, wires, plates, tetrapods, and more. This faceting is a macroscopic manifestation of highly site-specific surface reactions. In this Account, we show that these site-specific reactions literally write a record of their chemical reactivity in the morphology of the surface-a record that can be quantified with scanning tunneling microscopy. Paradoxically, the sites targeted by these highly site-specific reactions are extremely rare. This paradox can be understood from a simple kinetic argument. An etchant that produces atomically flat surfaces must rapidly etch every surface site except the terrace atoms on the perfectly flat surface. As a result, the etch morphology is dominated by the least reactive species (here, the terrace sites), not the most reactive species. In contrast, the most interesting chemical species-the site where the reaction occurs most rapidly and most selectively-is the hardest one to find. This highly reactive site, the key to the reaction, is the needle in the haystack, often occurring in densities far below 1% of a monolayer and thus invisible to surface spectroscopies. This kinetic argument is quite general and applies to a wide variety of reactions, not just etching reactions. Understanding these highly site-specific reactions requires a combination of experimental and computational techniques with both exquisite defect sensitivity and high chemical sensitivity. In this Account, we present examples of highly site-specific chemistry on the technologically important face of silicon, Si(100). In one example, we show that the high reactivity of one particular surface site, a silicon dihydride bound to a silicon monohydride, or an "α-dihydride", provides a fundamental explanation for anisotropic silicon etching

  9. Repeat Terrestrial LiDAR Scanning at Kilauea Volcano Reveals Basaltic Lava Lake Surface Slope, Structure and Micro-pistoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. W.; LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    In an attempt to better understand the spatial and temporal relationships between lava lake behavior and its surface topography, we conducted repeat, high-speed terrestrial LiDAR surveys of Kīlauea Volcano's Overlook Crater lava lake surface on January 16, 2013 and December 17, 2013. These scans revealed large- and fine-scale structure not visible in other topographic data sets. For both surveys, the LiDAR sensor was located directly above the Overlook Crater on the edge of the Halema'uma'u Crater, and was tilted 45o towards the lava lake. On January 16, 2013, five-second scans were collected every 2-minutes over 200-minutes, resulting in ~25 points/ m2, and covering the lower walls of the Overlook Crater and the lava lake surface. Similarly, on December 17, 2013, one-second scans were collected every 30-seconds over 240-minutes during a transient deflation-inflation deformation event, resulting in ~6 points/m2. In addition, high-resolution scans of the crater walls and lava lake were captured at the start of both surveys. We derived a number of products and measurements from these 3-dimensional time-lapse data. The slope of the lava lake was measured in each scan, and it fluctuates as lake convection regime, areas of upwelling and downflow, and crustal plate velocities vary. Areas of upwelling were consistently ~0.6m higher than areas of downwelling at any point in time, and the migration of areas of upwelling on the lake surface were coincident with areas of intense outgassing. Velocities of lava lake crustal plates averaged 0.354 m/s near the center of the lake surface on December 17, 2013. From the high-resolution scans collected at the start of both surveys we measured sub-meter lava lake fluctuations over time that may illustrate micro-pistoning in the magma column. These preliminary results raise several questions: 1) do lava lake slopes change spatially and temporally, and what eruption variables are linked to such changes; 2) do lava lake levels change

  10. Curved saccade trajectories reveal conflicting predictions in associative learning.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-09-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target stimulus at 1 of 3 possible locations, right (R), mid (M), or left (L), in the upper hemifield. We analyzed as measures of associative learning the frequency, latency, and curvature of saccades elicited by the cues and directed at the trained locations in anticipation of the targets. Participants were trained on two concurrent discrimination problems A+R, AC+R, AX+M, X+M and B+L, BC+L, BY+M, Y+M. From a connectionist perspective, cues were predicted to acquire associative links connecting the cues to the trained outcomes in memory. Model simulations based on the learning rule of the Rescorla and Wagner (1972) model revealed that for some cues, the prediction of the correct target location was challenged by the interfering prediction of an incorrect location. We observed that saccades directed at the correct location in anticipation of the target curved away from the location that was predicted by the interfering association. Furthermore, changes in curvature during training corresponded to predicted changes in associative memory. We propose that this curvature was caused by the inhibition of the incorrect prediction, as previously has been suggested with the concept of distractor inhibition (Sheliga, Riggio, & Rizzolatti, 1994; Tipper, Howard, & Houghton, 2000). The paradigm provides a new method to examine memory interference during associative learning.

  11. Computational models reveal genotype-phenotype associations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Mendes, Inês; Umek, Lan; Drumonde-Neves, João; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2014-07-01

    Genome sequencing is essential to understand individual variation and to study the mechanisms that explain relations between genotype and phenotype. The accumulated knowledge from large-scale genome sequencing projects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates is being used to study the mechanisms that explain such relations. Our objective was to undertake genetic characterization of 172 S. cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins and technological groups, using 11 polymorphic microsatellites, and computationally relate these data with the results of 30 phenotypic tests. Genetic characterization revealed 280 alleles, with the microsatellite ScAAT1 contributing most to intrastrain variability, together with alleles 20, 9 and 16 from the microsatellites ScAAT4, ScAAT5 and ScAAT6. These microsatellite allelic profiles are characteristic for both the phenotype and origin of yeast strains. We confirm the strength of these associations by construction and cross-validation of computational models that can predict the technological application and origin of a strain from the microsatellite allelic profile. Associations between microsatellites and specific phenotypes were scored using information gain ratios, and significant findings were confirmed by permutation tests and estimation of false discovery rates. The phenotypes associated with higher number of alleles were the capacity to resist to sulphur dioxide (tested by the capacity to grow in the presence of potassium bisulphite) and the presence of galactosidase activity. Our study demonstrates the utility of computational modelling to estimate a strain technological group and phenotype from microsatellite allelic combinations as tools for preliminary yeast strain selection.

  12. Scanning STED-FCS reveals spatiotemporal heterogeneity of lipid interaction in the plasma membrane of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Ta, Haisen; Schoenle, Andreas; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W.; Eggeling, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of lipids and proteins plays an important role in plasma membrane bioactivity, and much can be learned from their diffusion characteristics. Here we present the combination of super-resolution STED microscopy with scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (scanning STED-FCS, sSTED-FCS) to characterize the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of lipid interactions. sSTED-FCS reveals transient molecular interaction hotspots for a fluorescent sphingolipid analogue. The interaction sites are smaller than 80 nm in diameter and lipids are transiently trapped for several milliseconds in these areas. In comparison, newly developed fluorescent phospholipid and cholesterol analogues with improved phase-partitioning properties show more homogenous diffusion, independent of the preference for liquid-ordered or disordered membrane environments. Our results do not support the presence of nanodomains based on lipid-phase separation in the basal membrane of our cultured nonstimulated cells, and show that alternative interactions are responsible for the strong local trapping of our sphingolipid analogue.

  13. Dental silver tooth fillings: A source of mercury exposure revealed by whole-body image scan and tissue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1989-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) vapor is released from dental silver tooth fillings into human mouth air after chewing, but its possible uptake routes and distribution among body tissues are unknown. This investigation demonstrates that when radioactive 203Hg is mixed with dental Hg/silver fillings (amalgam) and placed in teeth of adult sheep, the isotope will appear in various organs and tissues within 29 days. Evidence of Hg uptake, as determined by whole-body scanning and measurement of isotope in specific tissues, revealed three uptake sites: lung, gastrointestinal, and jaw tissue absorption. Once absorbed, high concentrations of dental amalgam Hg rapidly localize in kidneys and liver. Results are discussed in view of potential health consequences from long-term exposure to Hg from this dental material.

  14. Thermal stability and molecular microstructure of heat-induced cereal grains, revealed with Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Majibur Rahman; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to use Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to reveal molecular thermal stability and thermal degradation behavior of heat-induced cereal grains and reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein structures of cereal grain tissues affected by heat processing and to quantify the protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modeling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were also conducted to identify molecular differences in the Raman spectra. Three cereal grain seeds, wheat, triticale, and corn, were used as the model for feed protein in the experiment. The specimens were autoclaved (moist heating) and dry-heated (roasted) at 121 °C for 80 min, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results revealed that there are marked differences in the secondary structures of the proteins subjected to various heating treatments of different cereals. The sensitivity of cereals to moist heating was much higher than the sensitivity to dry heating. The multivariate analyses (CLA and PCA) showed that heat treatment was significantly isolated between the different Raman raw spectra. The DSC study revealed that the thermal degradation behavior of cereals was significantly changed after moist- and dry-heat treatments. The position of the major endothermic peak of dry-heated cereals shifted toward a higher temperature, from 131.7 to 134.0 °C, suggesting the high thermal stability of dry-heated cereals. In contrast, the endothermic peak position was slightly decreased to 132.1 °C in the case of moist autoclaved heating. The digestive behavior and nutritive value of rumen-undegradable protein in animals may be related to the changes of the protein secondary molecular structure and thermal stability of the cereal grain materials, which is attributed by Raman microspectroscopy and DSC endotherm profiles.

  15. Association Between a Quantitative CT Scan Measure of Brain Edema and Outcome After Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Metter, Robert B.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Guyette, Francis X.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cerebral edema is one physical change associated with brain injury and decreased survival after cardiac arrest. Edema appears on computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as decreased x-ray attenuation by gray matter. This study tested whether the gray matter attenuation to white matter attenuation ratio (GWR) was associated with survival and functional recovery. Methods Subjects were patients hospitalized after cardiac arrest at a single institution between 1/1/2005 and 7/30/2010. Subjects were included if they had non-traumatic cardiac arrest and a non-contrast CT scan within 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Attenuation (Hounsfield Units) was measured in gray matter (caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, and cortex) and in white matter (internal capsule, corpus callosum and centrum semiovale). The GWR was calculated for basal ganglia and cerebrum. Outcomes included survival and functional status at hospital discharge. Results For 680 patients, 258 CT scans were available, but 18 were excluded because of hemorrhage (10), intravenous contrast (3) or technical artifact (5), leaving 240 CT scans for analysis. Lower GWR values were associated with lower initial Glasgow Coma Scale motor score. Overall survival was 36%, but decreased with decreasing GWR. The average of basal ganglia and cerebrum GWR provided the best discrimination. Only 2/58 subjects with average GWR<1.20 survived and both were treated with hypothermia. The association of GWR with functional outcome was completely explained by mortality when GWR<1.20. Conclusions Subjects with severe cerebral edema, defined by GWR<1.20, have very low survival with conventional care, including hypothermia. GWR estimates pre-treatment likelihood of survival after cardiac arrest. PMID:21592642

  16. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence analysis of quartz reveals complex growth histories in veins from the Butte porphyry copper deposit, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusk, Brian; Reed, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis of quartz reveals textures that cannot be observed using optical microscopy or backscattered electrons. These cryptic textures yield insight into timing and physical conditions of quartz growth, especially in environments with multiple quartz-precipitation events. Hydrothermal quartz from quartz-sulfide veins in the porphyry copper deposit in Butte, Montana, was analyzed by SEM-CL, revealing the following textures: euhedral growth zones, wide nonluminescing bands that cut across multiple quartz grains, rounded luminescent quartz grain cores with euhedral overgrowths, nonluminescing “splatters” of quartz connected by networks of cobweb-like nonluminescing quartz in otherwise luminescent quartz, concentric growth zones, and wide nonluminescent grain boundaries. These textures indicate that many veins have undergone fracturing, dilation, growth of quartz into fluid-filled space, quartz dissolution, and recrystallization of quartz. Precipitation and dissolution textures indicate that early quartz-molybdenite veins formed as a result of pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic at high temperatures, and later pyrite-quartz veins formed near hydrostatic pressure in response to temperature decrease through and beyond the field of retrograde quartz solubility.

  17. Marine bacterial, archaeal and protistan association networks reveal ecological linkages.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joshua A; Countway, Peter D; Xia, Li; Vigil, Patrick D; Beman, J Michael; Kim, Diane Y; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Sachdeva, Rohan; Jones, Adriane C; Schwalbach, Michael S; Rose, Julie M; Hewson, Ian; Patel, Anand; Sun, Fengzhu; Caron, David A; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2011-09-01

    Microbes have central roles in ocean food webs and global biogeochemical processes, yet specific ecological relationships among these taxa are largely unknown. This is in part due to the dilute, microscopic nature of the planktonic microbial community, which prevents direct observation of their interactions. Here, we use a holistic (that is, microbial system-wide) approach to investigate time-dependent variations among taxa from all three domains of life in a marine microbial community. We investigated the community composition of bacteria, archaea and protists through cultivation-independent methods, along with total bacterial and viral abundance, and physico-chemical observations. Samples and observations were collected monthly over 3 years at a well-described ocean time-series site of southern California. To find associations among these organisms, we calculated time-dependent rank correlations (that is, local similarity correlations) among relative abundances of bacteria, archaea, protists, total abundance of bacteria and viruses and physico-chemical parameters. We used a network generated from these statistical correlations to visualize and identify time-dependent associations among ecologically important taxa, for example, the SAR11 cluster, stramenopiles, alveolates, cyanobacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Negative correlations, perhaps suggesting competition or predation, were also common. The analysis revealed a progression of microbial communities through time, and also a group of unknown eukaryotes that were highly correlated with dinoflagellates, indicating possible symbioses or parasitism. Possible 'keystone' species were evident. The network has statistical features similar to previously described ecological networks, and in network parlance has non-random, small world properties (that is, highly interconnected nodes). This approach provides new insights into the natural history of microbes.

  18. Genomewide linkage scan reveals novel loci modifying age of onset of Huntington's disease in the Venezuelan HD kindreds.

    PubMed

    Gayán, Javier; Brocklebank, Denise; Andresen, J Michael; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Zameel Cader, M; Roberts, Simone A; Cherny, Stacey S; Wexler, Nancy S; Cardon, Lon R; Housman, David E

    2008-07-01

    The age of onset of Huntington's disease (HD) is inversely correlated with the CAG length in the HD gene. The CAG repeat length accounts for 70% of the variability in HD age of onset. However, 90% of individuals worldwide with expanded alleles possess between 40 and 50 CAG repeat lengths in their HD gene. For these people, the size of their repeat only determines 44% of the variability in their age of onset. Once the effect of the CAG repeat has been accounted for, the residual variance in age of onset is a heritable trait. Targeted candidate gene studies and a genome scan have suggested some loci as potential modifiers of the age of onset of HD. We analyzed the large Venezuelan kindreds in which the HD gene was originally identified. These kindreds offer greater analytic power than standard sib-pair designs. We developed novel pedigree-member selection procedures to maximize power. Using a 5,858-single-nucleotide-polymorphism marker panel, we performed a genomewide linkage analysis. We discovered two novel loci on chromosome 2. Chromosome 2p25 (logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD)=4.29) and 2q35 (LOD=3.39) may contain genes that modify age of onset. A third linkage peak on chromosome 6q22 (LOD=2.48) may confirm the most promising locus from a previous genome scan. Two other candidate loci are suggestive on chromosome 5 (LOD=3.31 at 5p14 and LOD=3.14 at 5q32). All these regions harbor candidate genes that are potential HD modifier genes. Finding these modifier genes can reveal accessible and promising new therapeutic pathways and targets to ameliorate and cure HD.

  19. A Unique Case of Pulmonary Hyalinizing Granuloma Associated With FDG-avid PET Scan and Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Imran; Stone, Chad; Kvale, Paul

    2009-04-01

    An 83-year-old obese woman with a 60-pack-year smoking history was referred for evaluation of an abnormal chest radiograph [chest x-ray (CXR)]. Her past medical history was significant for recurrent deep venous thrombosis without any predisposing factors. CXR showed a large mass in the right mid lung and another nodule at the right apex, highly suspicious for a neoplastic process. These were not present on a CXR from 2 years earlier. An fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan revealed that all lesions were strongly FDG-avid. Six CT-guided core-needle lung biopsy specimens were obtained from the lung mass and all contained dense, lamellar, or "ropy" keloid-like collagen bundles arranged in a haphazard pattern. The biopsy specimens lacked significant necrosis and granulomas. Congo red stain with polarization was also negative for amyloid. The diagnosis of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) was made. A complete hypercoagulable workup was performed but no underlying abnormalities were found, including a negative lupus anticoagulant and malignancy workup. The patient was maintained on warfarin and followed with serial CT scans for 1 year, with spontaneous regression in the lung mass. The case is unique as it is the first case that reports an association of PHG with recurrent deep venous thrombosis in the absence of autoimmune or procoagulant factors and emphasizes the need for life-long anticoagulation in such scenarios. Also, we report the FDG-avid PET scan findings here that are novel for this disease in adults and add PHG to the list of diseases causing false-positive PET scans when malignancy is suspected. PMID:23168510

  20. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  1. /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scanning in ampicillin-associated right-sided hemorrhagic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Saverymuttu, S.H.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1984-07-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis is a rare but well-recognized complication with ampicillin or penicillin derivative treatment. Early colonoscopy has been advocated in establishing the diagnosis by demonstrating the characteristic pattern of only right-sided involvement and so distinguishing it from other colitides. The authors report a patient who developed colitis after amoxycillin therapy in whom /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan demonstrated right-sided colitis which alerted them to the diagnosis. Discontinuation of the antibiotic resulting in rapid improvement, and return of the /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan to normal in this patient suggests that ampicillin-associated colitis should not be considered purely as a hemorrhagic disease but may in some cases have an inflammatory component.

  2. Genome-wide scan for linkage to obesity-associated hypertension in French Canadians.

    PubMed

    Pausova, Zdenka; Gaudet, Daniel; Gossard, Francis; Bernard, Manon; Kaldunski, Mary L; Jomphe, Michele; Tremblay, Johanne; Hudson, Thomas J; Bouchard, Gerard; Kotchen, Theodore A; Cowley, Allen W; Hamet, Pavel

    2005-12-01

    Essential hypertension is a heterogeneous disorder that is thought to develop because of several overlapping subsets of underlying mechanisms. One such causal pathway may involve pathophysiological alterations induced by obesity. In the present study, we examined whether investigating clinically defined subtypes of hypertension, such as obesity-associated hypertension, facilitates the search for its genes. Fifty-five extended families were selected on the basis of having > or =2 siblings affected by hypertension from a geographically remote French-Canadian population. Fifteen of these families showed a high prevalence (> or =70%) of obesity. Genome-wide scan using qualitative multipoint linkage analysis (GeneHunter 2.1; marker density <10 cM) was performed in the entire set of hypertensive families and the subset with high prevalence of obesity. In the scan involving all 55 families, the most significant loci (logarithm of odds [LOD] score=2.5) were identified on chromosomes 1 (D1S1597) and 11 (D11S1999). In the scan including only the subset of families with obesity-hypertension, the most significant locus (LOD score=3.1) was found on chromosome 1 in the same region as the scan involving all families (D1S1597). Genotyping additional markers increased the significance of this locus (LOD score=3.5) and refined its position (D1S2672). Several candidate genes of obesity-hypertension are located in close proximity; these include the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 and atrial natriuretic peptide genes. These results suggest that investigating clinically defined subtypes of hypertension, such as obesity-associated hypertension, may facilitate the search for genes of this complex disorder.

  3. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  4. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Xu, Ting; Zhou, Changle; Wang, Luoyu; Yang, Ning; Wang, Ze; Dong, Hao-Ming; Yang, Zhi; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Weng, Xu-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications.

  5. Correlations between Photovoltaic Characteristics, Adsorption Number, and Regeneration Kinetics in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Revealed by Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Masaaki; Kawano, Yuya; Mori, Kyosuke; Wakabayashi, Naoto

    2015-06-30

    Newly developed simultaneous scanning photocurrent and luminescence microscopy was applied to ruthenium-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) comprising a cover glass photoanode with a 100 nm thick TiO2 layer. Using this, we have investigated the lateral variations of several parameters of these DSCs under short-circuit conditions. Simultaneous measurement of photocurrent and luminescence images for the same area of the DSC demonstrated submicrometric lateral resolution of our photocurrent microscopy, which is approximately 10 times better than the resolution of photocurrent microscopy used in past studies. The photovoltaic parameters, such as short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, and charge-collection efficiency, were thus evaluated for local (or submicrometric) regions of the DSCs. Furthermore, the photocurrent saturation behavior of the DSCs was examined as a function of the excitation rate and analyzed on the basis of a three-state kinetic model. This protocol allowed for quantification of the dye-adsorption number and dye-regeneration rate constant for any local area of the DSCs. Consequently, the correlations between the dye adsorption number, photovoltaic parameters, and regeneration rate constant, which are difficult to address through examination of the entire cell, were revealed by the "zoom-in" approach utilizing this high-resolution photocurrent microscopy.

  6. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Changle; Wang, Luoyu; Yang, Ning; Wang, Ze; Dong, Hao-Ming; Yang, Zhi; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Weng, Xu-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications. PMID:26714192

  7. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  8. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  9. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/software/baypass/.

  10. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  11. Genome-wide association scans for Type 2 diabetes: new insights into biology and therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mark I; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2007-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex, multifactorial disease, for which genetic and environmental factors jointly determine susceptibility. Disentangling the genetic aetiology of Type 2 diabetes has proven a challenging task, rewarded, until recently, with only limited success. However, the field of Type 2 diabetes genetics has been transformed over the past few months, with the publication of six genome-wide association scans, leading to the establishment of novel genomic regions that harbour disease susceptibility loci. Here, we provide an overview of the main recent findings and discuss their significance in providing biological insights and their translational implications.

  12. [Differential diagnosis of reduced uptake images revealed by bone scan: about a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bahadi, Nisrine; Biyi, Abdelhamid; Oueriagli, Salah Nabih; Doudouh, Abderrahim

    2016-01-01

    If increased uptake during bone scan usually bring to light many bone pathologies, reduced uptakes are a rare occurrence and they require careful analysis to avoid erroneous interpretations. We report the case of a 17-year old admitted with diffuse bone pain, hypercalcemia and thrombopenia. Bone scan showed areas of low uptakes. Bone marrow tests allowed the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This case report aims to discuss the main differential diagnoses based on such bone scan abnormalities. PMID:27642484

  13. A genome-wide sib-pair scan for quantitative language traits reveals linkage to chromosomes 10 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. D.; Mueller, K. L.; Gamazon, E. R.; Cox, N. J.; Tomblin, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is considerable evidence that individual differences in language development are highly heritable, there have been few genome-wide scans to locate genes associated with the trait. Previous analyses of language impairment have yielded replicable evidence for linkage to regions on chromosomes 16q, 19q, 13q (within lab) and at 13q (between labs). Here we report the first linkage study to screen the continuum of language ability, from normal to disordered, as found in the general population. 383 children from 147 sib-ships (214 sib-pairs) were genotyped on the Illumina® Linkage IVb Marker Panel using three composite language-related phenotypes and a measure of phonological memory (PM). Two regions (10q23.33; 13q33.3) yielded genome-wide significant peaks for linkage with PM. A peak suggestive of linkage was also found at 17q12 for the overall language composite. This study presents two novel genetic loci for the study of language development and disorders, but fails to replicate findings by previous groups. Possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:25997078

  14. Mobility and age of black carbon in two temperate grassland soils revealed by differential scanning calorimetry and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Feng, Xiaojuan; Eglinton, Timothy; Wacker, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a natural component of soil organic matter (SOM) and abundant in many ecosystems. Its stability, due to its relative resistance to microbial decomposition, means it plays an important role in soil C sequestration. A recent review suggests that BC may be mobile in soil; hence, its contribution to a stable SOM pool may change over time due to its lateral or vertical reallocation (Rumpel et al. 2014). However, direct evidence of the mobility of BC, particularly with reference to its vertical mobility, is scarce. We studied the amount of BC in two temperate grassland fields (eutric clayey Camibsol,) that were established in 2001 on former cropland. Volumetric soil samples (0-50 cm, 5 cm increments) were taken at 10 spots in each field in 2001, 2006 and 2011. One of the fields was ploughed in 2007 and the sward was re-sown. BC content was measured by differential scanning calorimetry for a total number of c. 500 samples. The mean BC/OC ratio was 0.10 (±0.05) and reached 0.25 in some samples. Radiocarbon measurements from 24 bulk soil samples revealed relatively small 14C contents in 2001 (92±2.7 pMC) which increased over time (2006: 99.0±1.1 pMC; 2011: 99.1±1.1 pMC). Thermal fractionation of BC by DSC revealed calibrated BC ages of 400 to 1000 years (pMC 87-94), suggesting that BC originates from medieval and post-medieval fire clearings. The change in soil signature may have been caused by a preferential transport of old BC down the soil profile, leading to a selective enrichment of younger soil C over time. In line with this interpretation the DSC measurements suggest that in both fields, BC concentrations significantly decreased for most layers between 2001 and 2006. However, between 2006 and 2011, no further vertical reallocation was observed in the continuous grassland, whereas BC contents of the field ploughed in 2007 significantly increased in the top layers. Together, these data suggest that ploughing in 2001 triggered subsequent

  15. Thoracic ultrasound for pleural effusion: delays and cost associated with departmental scanning.

    PubMed

    Bateman, K; Downey, D G; Teare, T

    2010-04-01

    Pleural effusion is a common clinical condition on medical wards and the majority of cases undergo pleural aspiration or chest drain insertion as a diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. The use of a thoracic ultrasound scan (USS) improves diagnostic yield for pleural fluid aspiration and reduces complications and USS is increasingly recommended prior to all pleural aspirations or drains and 'real time' scanning which, as well as potentially reducing delays, enhances the safety of the procedure. In many U.K hospitals a thoracic USS is still routinely performed in the radiology department. We reviewed radiology records and case notes from hospital in-patients to assess potential delays and associated costs with departmental thoracic USS and to identify cases where physician-led portable USS would potentially have improved the patient's journey. We demonstrated delays resulting in significant financial costs to the hospital of an estimated pound17, 880 per annum. However, the cost to the patient is also significant, both in terms of patient experience (many of whom will have an underlying diagnosis of metastatic carcinoma and with a limited life expectancy) but also patient safety. Respiratory physicians are increasingly recognising the importance of portable thoracic USS to guide pleural procedures and there has been increasing use of physician-led portable thoracic USS. Hospitals should be encouraged to fund both portable thoracic USS equipment but it is also crucial that training in this area is properly supported. PMID:20097552

  16. Regarding the Credibility of Data Showing an Alleged Association of Cancer with Radiation from CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Socol, Yehoshua; Welsh, James S

    2016-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans are of high clinical value as a diagnostic technique, and new applications continue to be identified. However, their application is challenged by emerging concerns regarding carcinogenesis from their radiation. Recent articles made a significant contribution to the above-mentioned concerns by reporting evidence for direct association of the radiation from CT scans with cancer. Such interpretation of the data has already been criticized; there is the possibility of reverse causation due to confounding factors. Nevertheless, such work has had a high impact, with one article being cited more than 300 times from the Web of Science Core Collection within 2 years. However, the data points on cancer relative risk versus CT dose in that article fit straight lines corresponding to the linear no-threshold hypothesis suspiciously well. Here, by applying rigorous statistical analysis, it is shown that the probability of the fit truly being that good or better is only 2%. The results of such studies therefore appear "too good to be true" and the credibility of their conclusions must be questioned.

  17. Curved Saccade Trajectories Reveal Conflicting Predictions in Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target…

  18. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  19. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  20. A genome-wide SNP scan reveals novel loci for egg production and quality traits in white leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Chen, Sirui; Qu, Lujiang; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Availability of the complete genome sequence as well as high-density SNP genotyping platforms allows genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in chickens. A high-density SNP array containing 57,636 markers was employed herein to identify associated variants underlying egg production and quality traits within two lines of chickens, i.e., White Leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers. For each individual, age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW), and number of eggs (EN) from 21 to 56 weeks of age were recorded, and egg quality traits including egg weight (EW), eggshell weight (ESW), yolk weight (YW), eggshell thickness (EST), eggshell strength (ESS), albumen height(AH) and Haugh unit(HU) were measured at 40 and 60 weeks of age. A total of 385 White Leghorn females and 361 brown-egg dwarf dams were selected to be genotyped. The genome-wide scan revealed 8 SNPs showing genome-wise significant (P<1.51E-06, Bonferroni correction) association with egg production and quality traits under the Fisher's combined probability method. Some significant SNPs are located in known genes including GRB14 and GALNT1 that can impact development and function of ovary, but more are located in genes with unclear functions in layers, and need to be studied further. Many chromosome-wise significant SNPs were also detected in this study and some of them are located in previously reported QTL regions. Most of loci detected in this study are novel and the follow-up replication studies may be needed to further confirm the functional significance for these newly identified SNPs.

  1. A genome-wide SNP scan reveals novel loci for egg production and quality traits in white leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Chen, Sirui; Qu, Lujiang; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Availability of the complete genome sequence as well as high-density SNP genotyping platforms allows genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in chickens. A high-density SNP array containing 57,636 markers was employed herein to identify associated variants underlying egg production and quality traits within two lines of chickens, i.e., White Leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers. For each individual, age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW), and number of eggs (EN) from 21 to 56 weeks of age were recorded, and egg quality traits including egg weight (EW), eggshell weight (ESW), yolk weight (YW), eggshell thickness (EST), eggshell strength (ESS), albumen height(AH) and Haugh unit(HU) were measured at 40 and 60 weeks of age. A total of 385 White Leghorn females and 361 brown-egg dwarf dams were selected to be genotyped. The genome-wide scan revealed 8 SNPs showing genome-wise significant (P<1.51E-06, Bonferroni correction) association with egg production and quality traits under the Fisher's combined probability method. Some significant SNPs are located in known genes including GRB14 and GALNT1 that can impact development and function of ovary, but more are located in genes with unclear functions in layers, and need to be studied further. Many chromosome-wise significant SNPs were also detected in this study and some of them are located in previously reported QTL regions. Most of loci detected in this study are novel and the follow-up replication studies may be needed to further confirm the functional significance for these newly identified SNPs. PMID:22174844

  2. Genomewide Association Scan of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviour in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schosser, Alexandra; Butler, Amy W.; Ising, Marcus; Perroud, Nader; Uher, Rudolf; Ng, Mandy Y.; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.; Korszun, Ania; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian; Gill, Michael; Rice, John P.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mors, Ole; Rietschel, Marcella; Lucae, Susanne; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Preisig, Martin; Perry, Julia; Tozzi, Federica; Muglia, Pierandrea; Aitchison, Katherine J.; Breen, Gerome; Craig, Ian W.; Farmer, Anne E.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; McGuffin, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Suicidal behaviour can be conceptualised as a continuum from suicidal ideation, to suicidal attempts to completed suicide. In this study we identify genes contributing to suicidal behaviour in the depression study RADIANT. Methodology/Principal Findings A quantitative suicidality score was composed of two items from the SCAN interview. In addition, the 251 depression cases with a history of serious suicide attempts were classified to form a discrete trait. The quantitative trait was correlated with younger onset of depression and number of episodes of depression, but not with gender. A genome-wide association study of 2,023 depression cases was performed to identify genes that may contribute to suicidal behaviour. Two Munich depression studies were used as replication cohorts to test the most strongly associated SNPs. No SNP was associated at genome-wide significance level. For the quantitative trait, evidence of association was detected at GFRA1, a receptor for the neurotrophin GDRA (p = 2e-06). For the discrete trait of suicide attempt, SNPs in KIAA1244 and RGS18 attained p-values of <5e-6. None of these SNPs showed evidence for replication in the additional cohorts tested. Candidate gene analysis provided some support for a polymorphism in NTRK2, which was previously associated with suicidality. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a genome-wide assessment of possible genetic contribution to suicidal behaviour in depression but indicates a genetic architecture of multiple genes with small effects. Large cohorts will be required to dissect this further. PMID:21750702

  3. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  4. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-08-15

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10(-11), β = -0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10(-14), β = -0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), β = -1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10(-9), β = -1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity.

  5. Genomewide Scan for Anal Atresia in Swine Identifies Linkage and Association With a Chromosome Region on Sus scrofa Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Sabine; Fries, Ruedi; Thaller, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Anal atresia is a rare and severe disorder in swine occurring with an incidence of 0.1–1.0%. A whole-genome scan based on affected half-sibs was performed to identify susceptibility loci for anal atresia. The analysis included 27 families with a total of 95 animals and 65 affected piglets among them. Animals were genotyped for 126 microsatellite markers distributed across the 18 autosomal porcine chromosomes and the X chromosome, covering an estimated 2080 cM. Single-point and multipoint nonparametric linkage scores were calculated using the computer package ALLEGRO 1.0. Significant linkage results were obtained for chromosomes 1, 3, and 12. Markers on these chromosomes and additionally on chromosomes for which candidate genes have been postulated in previous studies were subjected to the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT). The test statistic exceeded the genomewide significance level for adjacent markers SW1621 (P = 7 × 10−7) and SW1902 (P = 3 × 10−3) on chromosome 1, supporting the results of the linkage analysis. A specific haplotype associated with anal atresia that could prove useful for selection against the disorder was revealed. Suggestive linkage and association were also found for markers S0081 on chromosome 9 and SW957 on chromosome 12. PMID:16020797

  6. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-07-22

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers.

  7. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P.; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-07-01

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers.

  8. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-01-01

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers. PMID:27445217

  9. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P.; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-01-01

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers. PMID:27445217

  10. Combinatorial Mismatch Scan (CMS) for loci associated with dementia in the Amish

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Jacob L; Hahs, Daniel W; Jiang, Lan; Scott, William K; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Jackson, Charles E; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2006-01-01

    Background Population heterogeneity may be a significant confounding factor hampering detection and verification of late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) susceptibility genes. The Amish communities located in Indiana and Ohio are relatively isolated populations that may have increased power to detect disease susceptibility genes. Methods We recently performed a genome scan of dementia in this population that detected several potential loci. However, analyses of these data are complicated by the highly consanguineous nature of these Amish pedigrees. Therefore we applied the Combinatorial Mismatch Scanning (CMS) method that compares identity by state (IBS) (under the presumption of identity by descent (IBD)) sharing in distantly related individuals from such populations where standard linkage and association analyses are difficult to implement. CMS compares allele sharing between individuals in affected and unaffected groups from founder populations. Comparisons between cases and controls were done using two Fisher's exact tests, one testing for excess in IBS allele frequency and the other testing for excess in IBS genotype frequency for 407 microsatellite markers. Results In all, 13 dementia cases and 14 normal controls were identified who were not related at least through the grandparental generation. The examination of allele frequencies identified 24 markers (6%) nominally (p ≤ 0.05) associated with dementia; the most interesting (empiric p ≤ 0.005) markers were D3S1262, D5S211, and D19S1165. The examination of genotype frequencies identified 21 markers (5%) nominally (p ≤ 0.05) associated with dementia; the most significant markers were both located on chromosome 5 (D5S1480 and D5S211). Notably, one of these markers (D5S211) demonstrated differences (empiric p ≤ 0.005) under both tests. Conclusion Our results provide the initial groundwork for identifying genes involved in late-onset Alzheimer's disease within the Amish community. Genes identified within

  11. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K. J.; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K.; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  12. Leukemia surfaceome analysis reveals new disease-associated features.

    PubMed

    Mirkowska, Paulina; Hofmann, Andreas; Sedek, Lukasz; Slamova, Lucie; Mejstrikova, Ester; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Schmitz, Maike; Cario, Gunnar; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Bornhauser, Beat C; Wollscheid, Bernd; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-20

    A better description of the leukemia cell surface proteome (surfaceome) is a prerequisite for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Insights into the complexity of the surfaceome have been limited by the lack of suitable methodologies. We combined a leukemia xenograft model with the discovery-driven chemoproteomic Cell Surface Capture technology to explore the B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) surfaceome; 713 cell surface proteins, including 181 CD proteins, were detected through combined analysis of 19 BCP-ALL cases. Diagnostic immunophenotypes were recapitulated in each case, and subtype specific markers were detected. To identify new leukemia-associated markers, we filtered the surfaceome data set against gene expression information from sorted, normal hematopoietic cells. Nine candidate markers (CD18, CD63, CD31, CD97, CD102, CD157, CD217, CD305, and CD317) were validated by flow cytometry in patient samples at diagnosis and during chemotherapy. CD97, CD157, CD63, and CD305 accounted for the most informative differences between normal and malignant cells. The ALL surfaceome constitutes a valuable resource to assist the functional exploration of surface markers in normal and malignant lymphopoiesis. This unbiased approach will also contribute to the development of strategies that rely on complex information for multidimensional flow cytometry data analysis to improve its diagnostic applications. PMID:23649467

  13. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  14. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  15. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  16. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  17. Association of non-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome with adenocarcinoma lung on 99mTc-MDP bone scan

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Nishikant A; Tripathi, Madhavi; Singhal, Abhinav; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Praveen; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathi; Jana, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is usually associated with trauma. Rarely, it may be seen in association with malignancies. We present here the bone scan and X-ray findings in the case of a 56-year-male-patient with adenocarcinoma lung who also had non-traumatic CRPS without involvement of the stellate ganglion. The case highlights the fact that spontaneous development of reflex sympathetic dystrophy may be associated with a neoplastic etiology. PMID:24019656

  18. Power and sample size estimation for epigenome-wide association scans to detect differential DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Bell, Jordana T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epigenome-wide association scans (EWAS) are under way for many complex human traits, but EWAS power has not been fully assessed. We investigate power of EWAS to detect differential methylation using case-control and disease-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin designs with genome-wide DNA methylation arrays. Methods and Results: We performed simulations to estimate power under the case-control and discordant MZ twin EWAS study designs, under a range of epigenetic risk effect sizes and conditions. For example, to detect a 10% mean methylation difference between affected and unaffected subjects at a genome-wide significance threshold of P = 1 × 10−6, 98 MZ twin pairs were required to reach 80% EWAS power, and 112 cases and 112 controls pairs were needed in the case-control design. We also estimated the minimum sample size required to reach 80% EWAS power under both study designs. Our analyses highlighted several factors that significantly influenced EWAS power, including sample size, epigenetic risk effect size, the variance of DNA methylation at the locus of interest and the correlation in DNA methylation patterns within the twin sample. Conclusions: We provide power estimates for array-based DNA methylation EWAS under case-control and disease-discordant MZ twin designs, and explore multiple factors that impact on EWAS power. Our results can help guide EWAS experimental design and interpretation for future epigenetic studies. PMID:25972603

  19. Recent Developments in Genomewide Association Scans: A Workshop Summary and Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W.; Duggan, David

    2005-01-01

    With the imminent availability of ultra-high-volume genotyping platforms (on the order of 100,000–1,000,000 genotypes per sample) at a manageable cost, there is growing interest in the possibility of conducting genomewide association studies for a variety of diseases but, so far, little consensus on methods to design and analyze them. In April 2005, an international group of >100 investigators convened at the University of Southern California over the course of 2 days to compare notes on planned or ongoing studies and to debate alternative technologies, study designs, and statistical methods. This report summarizes these discussions in the context of the relevant literature. A broad consensus emerged that the time was now ripe for launching such studies, and several common themes were identified—most notably the considerable efficiency gains of multistage sampling design, specifically those made by testing only a portion of the subjects with a high-density genomewide technology, followed by testing additional subjects and/or additional SNPs at regions identified by this initial scan. PMID:16080110

  20. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps and association mapping of fruit traits using microsatellite markers in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Umesh K; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5' untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness.

  1. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep.

  2. Revealing the Role of Catalysts in Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers by Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Zhong, Jun; Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Sun, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    The identification of effective components on the atomic scale in carbon nanomaterials which improve the performance in various applications remains outstanding challenges. Here the catalyst residues in individual carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) were clearly imaged with a concurrent characterization of their electronic structure by nanoscale scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Except for prominent catalyst nanoparticle at the tip, tiny catalyst clusters along the tube (fiber) were detected, indicating a migration of the catalysts with the growth of CNTs (CNFs). The observation provides the direct evidence on the atomic metal in CNT for oxygen reduction reported in the literature. Interaction between catalysts (Fe, Ni) and CNTs (CNFs) at the tip was also identified by comparing the X-ray absorption spectra. A deep understanding of catalyst residues such as Fe or Ni in carbon nanomaterials is very vital to growth mechanism development and practical applications. PMID:24398972

  3. Scanning photocurrent microscopy reveals electron-hole asymmetry in ionic liquid-gated WS{sub 2} transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ubrig, Nicolas Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Jo, Sanghyun; Morpurgo, Alberto F.; Berger, Helmuth

    2014-04-28

    We perform scanning photocurrent microscopy on WS{sub 2} ionic liquid-gated field effect transistors exhibiting high-quality ambipolar transport. By properly biasing the gate electrode, we can invert the sign of the photocurrent showing that the minority photocarriers are either electrons or holes. Both in the electron- and hole-doping regimes the photocurrent decays exponentially as a function of the distance between the illumination spot and the nearest contact, in agreement with a two-terminal Schottky-barrier device model. This allows us to compare the value and the doping dependence of the diffusion length of the minority electrons and holes on a same sample. Interestingly, the diffusion length of the minority carriers is several times larger in the hole accumulation regime than in the electron accumulation regime, pointing out an electron-hole asymmetry in WS{sub 2}.

  4. A Genomic Scan for Selection Reveals Candidates for Genes Involved in the Evolution of Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)[W

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Mark A.; Pashley, Catherine H.; Wenzler, Jessica; Hvala, John; Tang, Shunxue; Knapp, Steven J.; Burke, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic scans for selection are a useful tool for identifying genes underlying phenotypic transitions. In this article, we describe the results of a genome scan designed to identify candidates for genes targeted by selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower. This work involved screening 492 loci derived from ESTs on a large panel of wild, primitive (i.e., landrace), and improved sunflower (Helianthus annuus) lines. This sampling strategy allowed us to identify candidates for selectively important genes and investigate the likely timing of selection. Thirty-six genes showed evidence of selection during either domestication or improvement based on multiple criteria, and a sequence-based test of selection on a subset of these loci confirmed this result. In view of what is known about the structure of linkage disequilibrium across the sunflower genome, these genes are themselves likely to have been targeted by selection, rather than being merely linked to the actual targets. While the selection candidates showed a broad range of putative functions, they were enriched for genes involved in amino acid synthesis and protein catabolism. Given that a similar pattern has been detected in maize (Zea mays), this finding suggests that selection on amino acid composition may be a general feature of the evolution of crop plants. In terms of genomic locations, the selection candidates were significantly clustered near quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to phenotypic differences between wild and cultivated sunflower, and specific instances of QTL colocalization provide some clues as to the roles that these genes may have played during sunflower evolution. PMID:19017747

  5. Are Prenatal Ultrasound Scans Associated with the Autism Phenotype? Follow-Up of a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoch, Yonit K.; Williams, Cori J.; Granich, Joanna; Hunt, Anna M.; Landau, Lou I.; Newnham, John P.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2012-01-01

    An existing randomised controlled trial was used to investigate whether multiple ultrasound scans may be associated with the autism phenotype. From 2,834 single pregnancies, 1,415 were selected at random to receive ultrasound imaging and continuous wave Doppler flow studies at five points throughout pregnancy (Intensive) and 1,419 to receive a…

  6. The genetic architecture of seed composition in soybean is refined by genome-wide association scans across multiple populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to re...

  7. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  8. Observations on the micromorphology of the tropical rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Green, E D; Baker, C

    1996-09-01

    Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst) is an important parasite of rodents. The characteristic shape of the dorsal and sternal shields and gnathosoma used as taxonomic characteristics was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The anal plate is distinctly pear-shaped with a pair of adanal setae lateral to the anal valves, a single postanal seta and a distinct dentate cribrum formed by peg-like projections. In the adult mites a peritreme extends anteriorly to the 1st coxa from the spiracle situated laterally between the 3rd and 4th coxa. The peritreme is an open canal protected by an overhanging dorsal ridge and lined with short peg-like aciculae. The gnathosoma includes a pair of pedipalps, a pair of protrusile chelicerae retracted into the hypostoma, and a serrate tritosternum ventrally. A unique feature to the normal setae of the pedipalps is a golf club-shaped seta which is found medially on the palp genu. A distinctive double-bladed 'palpal claw' or apotele is directed medially from the palp tibia. The pincer-like chela consists of a spear-like prong forming the moveable digit and a curved stylus-like fixed digit used to pierce the skin. Each leg ends with a pair of hooked tarsal claws and a pair of lateral comblike pretarsal appendages adjacent to the pulvillus. The pulvillus may be retracted, allowing the pretarsal operculum to function as a 'clasping organ' that enables the mite to clasp the hairs of the host during feeding. PMID:9120855

  9. Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals differences between early and late M intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Rödig, C; Chizhov, I; Weidlich, O; Siebert, F

    1999-05-01

    In this report, from time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared investigations from 15 ns to 160 ms, we provide evidence for the subsequent rise of three different M states that differ in their structures. The first state rises with approximately 3 microseconds to only a small percentage. Its structure as judged from amide I/II bands differs in small but well-defined aspects from the L state. The next M state, which appears in approximately 40 microseconds, has almost all of the characteristics of the "late" M state, i.e., it differs considerably from the first one. Here, the L left arrow over right arrow M equilibrium is shifted toward M, although some percentage of L still persists. In the last M state (rise time approximately 130 microseconds), the equilibrium is shifted toward full deprotonation of the Schiff base, and only small additional structural changes take place. In addition to these results obtained for unbuffered conditions or at pH 7, experiments performed at lower and higher pH are presented. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular changes postulated to occur in the M intermediate to allow the shift of the L/M equilibrium toward M and possibly to regulate the change of the accessibility of the Schiff base necessary for effective proton pumping. PMID:10233083

  10. Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals differences between early and late M intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Rödig, C; Chizhov, I; Weidlich, O; Siebert, F

    1999-01-01

    In this report, from time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared investigations from 15 ns to 160 ms, we provide evidence for the subsequent rise of three different M states that differ in their structures. The first state rises with approximately 3 microseconds to only a small percentage. Its structure as judged from amide I/II bands differs in small but well-defined aspects from the L state. The next M state, which appears in approximately 40 microseconds, has almost all of the characteristics of the "late" M state, i.e., it differs considerably from the first one. Here, the L left arrow over right arrow M equilibrium is shifted toward M, although some percentage of L still persists. In the last M state (rise time approximately 130 microseconds), the equilibrium is shifted toward full deprotonation of the Schiff base, and only small additional structural changes take place. In addition to these results obtained for unbuffered conditions or at pH 7, experiments performed at lower and higher pH are presented. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular changes postulated to occur in the M intermediate to allow the shift of the L/M equilibrium toward M and possibly to regulate the change of the accessibility of the Schiff base necessary for effective proton pumping. PMID:10233083

  11. High-Resolution Imaging by Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Reveals Two Morphologically Distinct Types of Retinal Hard Exudates.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Muneo; Nakao, Shintaro; Kaizu, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Arima, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Oshima, Yuji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Shizuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Histological studies from autopsy specimens have characterized hard exudates as a composition of lipid-laden macrophages or noncellular materials including lipid and proteinaceous substances (hyaline substances). However, the characteristics of hard exudates in living patients have not been examined due to insufficient resolution of existing equipment. In this study, we used adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to examine the characteristics of hard exudates in patients with retinal vascular diseases. High resolution imaging using AO-SLO enables morphological classification of retinal hard exudates into two types, which could not be distinguished either on fundus examination or by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). One, termed a round type, consisted of an accumulation of spherical particles (average diameter of particles: 26.9 ± 4.4 μm). The other, termed an irregular type, comprised an irregularly shaped hyper-reflective deposition. The retinal thickness in regions with round hard exudates was significantly greater than the thickness in regions with irregular hard exudates (P = 0.01 →0.02). This differentiation of retinal hard exudates in patients by AO-SLO may help in understanding the pathogenesis and clinical prognosis of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27641223

  12. Monitoring Si growth on Ag(111) with scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that silicene structure involves silver atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Prévot, G.; Bernard, R.; Cruguel, H.; Borensztein, Y.

    2014-11-24

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), the elaboration of the so-called silicene layer on Ag(111) is monitored in real time during Si evaporation at different temperatures. It is shown that the growth of silicene is accompanied by the release of about 65% of the surface Ag atoms from the Si covered areas. We observe that Si islands develop on the Ag terraces and Si strips at the Ag step edges, progressively forming ordered (4×4), (√(13)×√(13)) R13.9°, and dotted phases. Meanwhile, displaced Ag atoms group to develop additional bare Ag terraces growing round the Si islands from the pristine Ag step edges. This indicates a strong interaction between Si and Ag atoms, with an important modification of the Ag substrate beneath the surface layer. This observation is in contradiction with the picture of a silicene layer weakly interacting with the unreconstructed Ag substrate, and strongly indicates that the structure of silicene on Ag(111) corresponds either to a Si-Ag surface alloy or to a Si plane covered with Ag atoms.

  13. High-Resolution Imaging by Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Reveals Two Morphologically Distinct Types of Retinal Hard Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Muneo; Nakao, Shintaro; Kaizu, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Arima, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Oshima, Yuji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Shizuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-hei

    2016-01-01

    Histological studies from autopsy specimens have characterized hard exudates as a composition of lipid-laden macrophages or noncellular materials including lipid and proteinaceous substances (hyaline substances). However, the characteristics of hard exudates in living patients have not been examined due to insufficient resolution of existing equipment. In this study, we used adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to examine the characteristics of hard exudates in patients with retinal vascular diseases. High resolution imaging using AO-SLO enables morphological classification of retinal hard exudates into two types, which could not be distinguished either on fundus examination or by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). One, termed a round type, consisted of an accumulation of spherical particles (average diameter of particles: 26.9 ± 4.4 μm). The other, termed an irregular type, comprised an irregularly shaped hyper-reflective deposition. The retinal thickness in regions with round hard exudates was significantly greater than the thickness in regions with irregular hard exudates (P = 0.01 →0.02). This differentiation of retinal hard exudates in patients by AO-SLO may help in understanding the pathogenesis and clinical prognosis of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27641223

  14. Systems Genetic Validation of the SNP-Metabolite Association in Rice Via Metabolite-Pathway-Based Phenome-Wide Association Scans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaping; Liu, Yemao; Niu, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingyong; Hu, Xuehai; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xia, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    In the post-GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Scan) era, the interpretation of GWAS results is crucial to screen for highly relevant phenotype-genotype association pairs. Based on the single genotype-phenotype association test and a pathway enrichment analysis, we propose a Metabolite-pathway-based Phenome-Wide Association Scan (M-PheWAS) to analyze the key metabolite-SNP pairs in rice and determine the regulatory relationship by assessing similarities in the changes of enzymes and downstream products in a pathway. Two SNPs, sf0315305925 and sf0315308337, were selected using this approach, and their molecular function and regulatory relationship with Enzyme EC:5.5.1.6 and with flavonoids, a significant downstream regulatory metabolite product, were demonstrated. Moreover, a total of 105 crucial SNPs were screened using M-PheWAS, which may be important for metabolite associations. PMID:26640468

  15. Systems Genetic Validation of the SNP-Metabolite Association in Rice Via Metabolite-Pathway-Based Phenome-Wide Association Scans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Liu, Yemao; Niu, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingyong; Hu, Xuehai; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xia, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    In the post-GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Scan) era, the interpretation of GWAS results is crucial to screen for highly relevant phenotype-genotype association pairs. Based on the single genotype-phenotype association test and a pathway enrichment analysis, we propose a Metabolite-pathway-based Phenome-Wide Association Scan (M-PheWAS) to analyze the key metabolite-SNP pairs in rice and determine the regulatory relationship by assessing similarities in the changes of enzymes and downstream products in a pathway. Two SNPs, sf0315305925 and sf0315308337, were selected using this approach, and their molecular function and regulatory relationship with Enzyme EC:5.5.1.6 and with flavonoids, a significant downstream regulatory metabolite product, were demonstrated. Moreover, a total of 105 crucial SNPs were screened using M-PheWAS, which may be important for metabolite associations.

  16. Alanine scan of α-conotoxin RegIIA reveals a selective α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kompella, Shiva N; Hung, Andrew; Clark, Richard J; Marí, Frank; Adams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of various conditions, including development and progression of lung cancer and in nicotine addiction. As selective α3β4 nAChR antagonists, α-conotoxins are valuable tools to evaluate the functional roles of this receptor subtype. We previously reported the discovery of a new α4/7-conotoxin, RegIIA. RegIIA was isolated from Conus regius and inhibits acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents mediated by α3β4, α3β2, and α7 nAChR subtypes. The current study used alanine scanning mutagenesis to understand the selectivity profile of RegIIA at the α3β4 nAChR subtype. [N11A] and [N12A] RegIIA analogs exhibited 3-fold more selectivity for the α3β4 than the α3β2 nAChR subtype. We also report synthesis of [N11A,N12A]RegIIA, a selective α3β4 nAChR antagonist (IC50 of 370 nM) that could potentially be used in the treatment of lung cancer and nicotine addiction. Molecular dynamics simulations of RegIIA and [N11A,N12A]RegIIA bound to α3β4 and α3β2 suggest that destabilization of toxin contacts with residues at the principal and complementary faces of α3β2 (α3-Tyr(92), Ser(149), Tyr(189), Cys(192), and Tyr(196); β2-Trp(57), Arg(81), and Phe(119)) may form the molecular basis for the selectivity shift.

  17. Alanine scan of α-conotoxin RegIIA reveals a selective α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kompella, Shiva N; Hung, Andrew; Clark, Richard J; Marí, Frank; Adams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of various conditions, including development and progression of lung cancer and in nicotine addiction. As selective α3β4 nAChR antagonists, α-conotoxins are valuable tools to evaluate the functional roles of this receptor subtype. We previously reported the discovery of a new α4/7-conotoxin, RegIIA. RegIIA was isolated from Conus regius and inhibits acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents mediated by α3β4, α3β2, and α7 nAChR subtypes. The current study used alanine scanning mutagenesis to understand the selectivity profile of RegIIA at the α3β4 nAChR subtype. [N11A] and [N12A] RegIIA analogs exhibited 3-fold more selectivity for the α3β4 than the α3β2 nAChR subtype. We also report synthesis of [N11A,N12A]RegIIA, a selective α3β4 nAChR antagonist (IC50 of 370 nM) that could potentially be used in the treatment of lung cancer and nicotine addiction. Molecular dynamics simulations of RegIIA and [N11A,N12A]RegIIA bound to α3β4 and α3β2 suggest that destabilization of toxin contacts with residues at the principal and complementary faces of α3β2 (α3-Tyr(92), Ser(149), Tyr(189), Cys(192), and Tyr(196); β2-Trp(57), Arg(81), and Phe(119)) may form the molecular basis for the selectivity shift. PMID:25411242

  18. One-Dimensional Nature of InAs/InP Quantum Dashes Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papatryfonos, Konstantinos; Rodary, Guillemin; David, Christophe; Lelarge, François; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Girard, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We report on low-temperature cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on InAs(P)/InGaAsP/InP(001) quantum dashes, embedded in a diode-laser structure. The laser active region consists of nine InAs(P) quantum dash layers separated by the InGaAsP quaternary alloy barriers. The effect of the p-i-n junction built-in potential on the band structure has been evidenced and quantified on large-scale tunneling spectroscopic measurements across the whole active region. By comparing the tunneling current onset channels, a consistent energy shift has been measured in successive quantum dash or barrier layers, either for the ground state energy of similar-sized quantum dashes or for the conduction band edge of the barriers, corresponding to the band-bending slope. The extracted values are in good quantitative agreement with the theoretical band structure calculations, demonstrating the high sensitivity of this spectroscopic measurement to probe the electronic structure of individual nanostructures, relative to local potential variations. Furthermore, by taking advantage of the potential gradient, we compared the local density of states over successive quantum dash layers. We observed that it does not vanish while increasing energy, for any of the investigated quantum dashes, in contrast to what would be expected for discrete level zero-dimensional (0D) structures. In order to acquire further proof and fully address the open question concerning the quantum dash dimensionality nature, we focused on individual quantum dashes obtaining high-energy-resolution measurements. The study of the local density of states clearly indicates a 1D quantum-wirelike nature for these nanostructures whose electronic squared wave functions were subsequently imaged by differential conductivity mapping.

  19. Associative symmetry of the memory for object-location associations as revealed by the testing effect.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Tobias; Schoell, Eszter; Büchel, Christian

    2008-06-01

    The nature of episodic associations has been subject to a long standing debate, where the two opposing positions postulate associations as either a holistic representation of the constituent elements or as independently modifiable pointers between them. In spite of a history of inconsistent findings, evidence in favour of the theory of symmetric associations has accumulated, yet only for verbal memory [Caplan, J. B., Glaholt, M. G., & McIntosh, A. R. (2006). Linking associative and serial list memory: Pairs versus triples. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 32(6), 1244-1265; Kahana, M. J. (2002). Associative symmetry and memory theory. Memory and Cognition, 30(6), 823-840]. Although object-location associations differ in several fundamental characteristics from verbal paired-associates, we recently found associative symmetry in the memory for this class of associations as well [Sommer, T., Rose, M., & Büchel, C. (2007). Associative symmetry vs. independent associations in the memory for object-location associations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33(1), 90-106]. Due to the inconsistencies in the verbal literature, we felt it to be pertinent to confirm this finding using another experimental approach. Based on recent advances in understanding the effects of successive testing, we were able to make use of this knowledge and introduce this effect as an experimental manipulation in the study of associative symmetry. In particular, we investigated whether the influence of a prior memory test on a subsequent memory test differs when the same or opposite constituent element of an object-location paired-associate cues the retrieval on each test. We observed an identical testing effect for both conditions, which was exclusively driven by reminiscence, the recovery of previously inaccessible information. This finding lends strong support in favour of holistically or symmetrically represented object

  20. Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario 2001 Environmental Scan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario, Toronto.

    The 2001 Environmental Scan for the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario is designed to assist colleges in their strategic planning processes. It provides information about economy and labor, various trends in education and training, postsecondary enrollment and demographics, transfer payments and operating grants, Ontario's…

  1. A genomic scan of porcine reproductive traits reveals possible quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for number of corpora lutea.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, P J; Paszek, A A; Beattie, C W; Alexander, L J; Wheeler, M B; Schook, L B

    1999-06-01

    Reproductive traits have low heritabilities, are expressed in only one sex, and are not measurable until sexual maturity (Avalos and Smith, Anim Prod 44:153, 1987). Using traditional methods, selection for reproductive traits is relatively less effective than selecting for growth or carcass traits. Traits most affected by a small number of genes with major effects rather than many genes with small effects are most amenable to MAS. As part of our porcine genome scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of economic importance in marker-assisted selective (MAS) breeding programs, we examined 8 reproductive and farrowing traits in the University of Illinois (UI) Meishan x Yorkshire Resource Family. Gilts were genotyped with 119 microsatellite markers (MS) with intervals averaging 24 cM over all 18 porcine autosomes. F-ratios supporting QTL location were calculated by the least squares regression method. Results suggestive of linkage at the 5% genome-wide level were observed for the number of stillborn piglets on Chromosome (Chr) 4 (SSC4) (p-value = 0.0001), corpora lutea on SSC8 (p-value = 0.00027), and gestation length on SSC9 (p-value = 0.00019). Results for additional loci relevant to litter size, number of corpora lutea on SSC15 and 7 (p-value = 0.0029 and 0.0028 at 107 and 150 cM, respectively), gestation length on SSC15 and 1 (p-value = 0.0017 and 0.0069 at 96 and 166 cM, respectively), uterine length on SSC7 and 5 (p-value = 0.0044 and 0.0075 at 148 and 1 cM, respectively) and piglets born per litter on SSC6 (p-value = 0.0075 at 102 cM), were not statistically significant at the 5% genome-wide level. Thus, the use of a linked marker to facilitate selection for reproductive traits has considerable potential. By using linked markers, selection can be applied to both sexes before sexual maturity, making genetic selection considerably more efficient and less costly.

  2. Potential for Adult-Based Epidemiological Studies to Characterize Overall Cancer Risks Associated with a Lifetime of CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor; Lubin, Jay H.; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that radiation exposure from pediatric CT scanning is associated with small excess cancer risks. However, the majority of CT scans are performed on adults, and most radiation-induced cancers appear during middle or old age, in the same age range as background cancers. Consequently, a logical next step is to investigate the effects of CT scanning in adulthood on lifetime cancer risks by conducting adult-based, appropriately designed epidemiological studies. Here we estimate the sample size required for such studies to detect CT-associated risks. This was achieved by incorporating different age-, sex-, time- and cancer type-dependent models of radiation carcinogenesis into an in silico simulation of a population-based cohort study. This approach simulated individual histories of chest and abdominal CT exposures, deaths and cancer diagnoses. The resultant sample sizes suggest that epidemiological studies of realistically sized cohorts can detect excess lifetime cancer risks from adult CT exposures. For example, retrospective analysis of CT exposure and cancer incidence data from a population-based cohort of 0.4 to 1.3 million (depending on the carcinogenic model) CT-exposed UK adults, aged 25–65 in 1980 and followed until 2015, provides 80% power for detecting cancer risks from chest and abdominal CT scans. PMID:24828111

  3. Correction of step artefact associated with MRI scanning of long bones.

    PubMed

    Rathnayaka, Kanchana; Cowin, Gary; Schuetz, Michael A; Sahama, Tony; Schmutz, Beat

    2013-07-01

    3D models of long bones are being utilised for a number of fields including orthopaedic implant design. Accurate reconstruction of 3D models is of utmost importance to design accurate implants to allow achieving a good alignment between two bone fragments. Thus for this purpose, CT scanners are employed to acquire accurate bone data exposing an individual to a high amount of ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a potential alternative to computed tomography (CT) for scanning of volunteers for 3D reconstruction of long bones, essentially avoiding the high radiation dose from CT. In MRI imaging of long bones, the artefacts due to random movements of the skeletal system create challenges for researchers as they generate inaccuracies in the 3D models generated by using data sets containing such artefacts. One of the defects that have been observed during an initial study is the lateral shift artefact occurring in the reconstructed 3D models. This artefact is believed to result from volunteers moving the leg during two successive scanning stages (the lower limb has to be scanned in at least five stages due to the limited scanning length of the scanner). As this artefact creates inaccuracies in the implants designed using these models, it needs to be corrected before the application of 3D models to implant design. Therefore, this study aimed to correct the lateral shift artefact using 3D modelling techniques. The femora of five ovine hind limbs were scanned with a 3T MRI scanner using a 3D vibe based protocol. The scanning was conducted in two halves, while maintaining a good overlap between them. A lateral shift was generated by moving the limb several millimetres between two scanning stages. The 3D models were reconstructed using a multi threshold segmentation method. The correction of the artefact was achieved by aligning the two halves using the robust iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, with the help of the overlapping

  4. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  5. Genome-wide scan reveals LEMD3 and WIF1 on SSC5 as the candidates for porcine ear size.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longchao; Liang, Jing; Luo, Weizhen; Liu, Xin; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Kebin; Shi, Huibi; Zhang, Yuebo; Wang, Ligang; Wang, Lixian

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative trait loci (QTL) for porcine ear size was previously reported to mainly focus on SSC5 and SSC7. Recently, a missense mutation, G32E, in PPARD in the QTL interval on SSC7 was identified as the causative mutation for ear size. However, on account of the large interval of QTL, the responsible gene on SSC5 has not been identified. In this study, an intercross population was constructed from the large-eared Minzhu, an indigenous Chinese pig breed, and the Western commercial Large White pig to examine the genetic basis of ear size diversity. A GWAS was performed to detect SNPs significantly associated with ear size. Thirty-five significant SNPs defined a 10.78-Mb (30.14-40.92 Mb) region on SSC5. Further, combining linkage disequilibrium and haplotype sharing analysis, a reduced region of 3.07-Mb was obtained. Finally, by using a selective sweep analysis, a critical region of about 450-kb interval containing two annotated genes LEMD3 and WIF1 was refined in this work. Functional analysis indicated that both represent biological candidates for porcine ear size, with potential application in breeding programs. The two genes could also be used as novel references for further study of the mechanism underlying human microtia.

  6. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Collins, Francis S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayes, Richard B; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E; Visscher, Peter M; Assimes, Themistocles L; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation.

  7. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  8. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Collins, Francis S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayes, Richard B; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E; Visscher, Peter M; Assimes, Themistocles L; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  9. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish.

    PubMed

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp, a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark "maze" and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. PMID:26961107

  10. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE.

  11. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Gy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  12. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) evaluation of crystal and plaque formation associated with biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Geiger, S L; Ross, T J; Barton, L L

    1993-08-01

    The biofilm attributed to Desulfovibrio vulgaris growing in the presence of ferrous metals was examined with an environmental scanning electron microscope. This novel microscope produced images of iron sulfide colloids and other iron containing structures that had not been reported previously. A plaque composed of iron sulfide enveloped the surface of the corroding metal while crystals containing magnesium, iron, sulfur, and phosphorus were present in the culture where corrosion was in progress. A structure resembling the tubercule found in aerobic corrosion was observed on stainless steel undergoing biocorrosion and the elements present in this structure included sulfur, iron, chloride, calcium, potassium, and chromium.

  13. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-03-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair.

  14. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  15. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J.; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−119), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  16. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens. PMID:26496084

  17. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens.

  18. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens. PMID:26496084

  19. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems. PMID:25754883

  20. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems.

  1. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  2. Using epigenome-wide association scans of DNA methylation in age-related complex human traits.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T

    2012-10-01

    With rapid technological advancements emerging epigenetic studies of complex traits have shifted from candidate gene analyses towards epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS). EWAS aim to systematically identify epigenetic variants across the genome that associate with complex phenotypes. Recent EWAS using case-control and disease-discordant identical twin designs have identified phenotype-associated differentially methylated regions for several traits. However, EWAS still face many challenges related to methodology, design and interpretation, owing to the dynamic nature of epigenetic variants over time. This article reviews analytical considerations in conducting EWAS and recent applications of this approach to human aging and age-related complex traits. PMID:23130833

  3. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatos-DeVito, Maura; Schipul, Sarah E.; Bulluck, John C.; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4-13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD.…

  4. Laser Scanning Tomography in the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study: Principal Components and Associations

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Anthony P.; Chan, Michelle P. Y.; Broadway, David C.; Garway-Heath, David F.; Luben, Robert; Yip, Jennifer L. Y.; Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To describe Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) measures, their principal components, and their associations in a British population. Methods. The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk Eye Study is nested within a multicenter cohort study. Measurements were taken with the HRT-2 and the software subsequently updated to yield HRT-3 parameters. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify distinct components of the HRT variables. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine associations of these components with age, sex, height, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, social class, education, alcohol intake, smoking status, axial length, IOP, and lens status. Results. Complete data were available from 10,859 eyes of 6430 participants with a mean age of 68 years. Principal components analysis identified three components with an eigenvalue greater than 1, explaining 79.9% of the variance of all the HRT measures. These were named cup, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and rim based on the factor loadings they were most correlated with. Older age was significantly associated with a greater cup (P = 0.003), smaller RNFL (P < 0.001), and smaller rim (P < 0.001). Female sex (P = 0.001), higher education (P < 0.001), and shorter axial length (P < 0.001) were associated with a greater RNFL. Lower BMI and higher IOP were associated with a greater cup (both, P < 0.001) and a smaller rim (BMI, P = 0.001; IOP, P < 0.001). Conclusions. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph measures in this cohort were largely explained by three principal components related to optic disc cup, RNFL, and rim. Associations with cup and rim were distinct to associations with RNFL, suggesting different underlying determinants. PMID:24030456

  5. Genome-wide SNP scan in a porcine Large White×Minzhu intercross population reveals a locus influencing muscle mass on chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Li Gang; Luo, Wei Zhen; Li, Yong; Liang, Jing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Ke Bin; Wang, Li Xian; Zhang, Long Chao

    2014-12-01

    A high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array containing 62 163 markers was employed for a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify variants associated with lean meat in ham (LMH, %) and lean meat percentage (LMP, %) within a porcine Large White×Minzhu intercross population. For each individual, LMH and LMP were measured after slaughter at the age of 240±7 days. A total of 557 F2 animals were genotyped. The GWAS revealed that 21 SNPs showed significant genome-wide or chromosome-wide associations with LMH and LMP by the Genome-wide Rapid Association using Mixed Model and Regression-Genomic Control approach. Nineteen significant genome-wide SNPs were mapped to the distal end of Sus Scrofa Chromosome (SSC) 2, where a major known gene responsible for muscle mass, IGF2 is located. A conditioned analysis, in which the genotype of the strongest associated SNP is included as a fixed effect in the model, showed that those significant SNPs on SSC2 were derived from a single quantitative trait locus. The two chromosome-wide association SNPs on SSC1 disappeared after conditioned analysis suggested the association signal is a false association derived from using a F2 population. The present result is expected to lead to novel insights into muscle mass in different pig breeds and lays a preliminary foundation for follow-up studies for identification of causal mutations for subsequent application in marker-assisted selection programs for improving muscle mass in pigs.

  6. Direct observation of graphene growth and associated copper substrate dynamics by in situ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Weinberg, Gisela; Zhang, Qiang; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Kurnatowska, Michalina; Plodinec, Milivoj; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng; Schloegl, R; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2015-02-24

    This work highlights the importance of in situ experiments for an improved understanding of graphene growth on copper via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene growth inside the chamber of a modified environmental scanning electron microscope under relevant low-pressure CVD conditions allows visualizing structural dynamics of the active catalyst simultaneously with graphene nucleation and growth in an unparalleled way. It enables the observation of a complete CVD process from substrate annealing through graphene nucleation and growth and, finally, substrate cooling in real time and nanometer-scale resolution without the need of sample transfer. A strong dependence of surface dynamics such as sublimation and surface premelting on grain orientation is demonstrated, and the influence of substrate dynamics on graphene nucleation and growth is presented. Insights on the growth mechanism are provided by a simultaneous observation of the growth front propagation and nucleation rate. Furthermore, the role of trace amounts of oxygen during growth is discussed and related to graphene-induced surface reconstructions during cooling. Above all, this work demonstrates the potential of the method for in situ studies of surface dynamics on active metal catalysts. PMID:25584770

  7. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective . Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent multi-site GWAS of DSM-IV-TR ADHD. Method . Families were ascertained at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH, N=309 trios), Washington University at St Louis (WASH-U, N=272 trios), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, N=156 trios). Genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip platforms. After applying quality control filters, association with ADHD was tested with 835,136 SNPs in 735 DSM-IV ADHD trios from 732 families. Results . Our smallest p-value (6.7E-07) did not reach the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance (5.0E-08) but one of the 20 most significant associations was located in a candidate gene of interest for ADHD, (SLC9A9, rs9810857, p=6.4E-6). We also conducted gene-based tests of candidate genes identified in the literature and found additional evidence of association with SLC9A9. Conclusion . We and our colleagues in the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium are working to pool together GWAS samples to establish the large data sets needed to follow-up on these results and to identify genes for ADHD and other disorders. PMID:20732626

  8. A genome-wide association study reveals genes associated with fusarium ear rot resistance in a maize core diversity panel.

    PubMed

    Zila, Charles T; Samayoa, L Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B

    2013-11-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0-100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  9. Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Weedon, Michael N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Perry, John R.B.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Shields, Beverley; Morris, Andrew P.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Harries, Lorna W.; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Owen, Katharine R.; Knight, Beatrice; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Doney, Alex S.F.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibility loci in and around the genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and IGF2BP2 and confirmed the recently described associations at HHEX/IDE and SLC30A8. Our findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, emphasizing the contribution of multiple variants of modest effect. The regions identified underscore the importance of pathways influencing pancreatic beta cell development and function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:17463249

  10. The nature of nurture: a genomewide association scan for family chaos.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Lee M; Plomin, Robert

    2008-07-01

    Widely used measures of the environment, especially the family environment of children, show genetic influence in dozens of twin and adoption studies. This phenomenon is known as gene-environment correlation in which genetically driven influences of individuals affect their environments. We conducted the first genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of an environmental measure. We used a measure called CHAOS which assesses 'environmental confusion' in the home, a measure that is more strongly associated with cognitive development in childhood than any other environmental measure. CHAOS was assessed by parental report when the children were 3 years and again when the children were 4 years; a composite CHAOS measure was constructed across the 2 years. We screened 490,041 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a two-stage design in which children in low chaos families (N = 469) versus high chaos families (N = 369) from 3,000 families of 4-year-old twins were screened in Stage 1 using pooled DNA. In Stage 2, following SNP quality control procedures, 41 nominated SNPs were tested for association with family chaos by individual genotyping an independent representative sample of 3,529. Despite having 99% power to detect associations that account for more than 0.5% of the variance, none of the 41 nominated SNPs met conservative criteria for replication. Similar to GWA analyses of other complex traits, it is likely that most of the heritable variation in environmental measures such as family chaos is due to many genes of very small effect size. PMID:18360741

  11. A twin study of breastfeeding with a preliminary genome wide association scan

    PubMed Central

    Colodro-Conde, L.; Zhu, G.; Power, R. A.; Henders, A.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Medland, S. E.; Ordoñana, J.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been an important survival trait during human history, though it has long been recognised that individuals differ in their exact breastfeeding behaviour. Here our aims were, first, to explore to what extent genetic and environmental influences contributed to the individual differences in breastfeeding behaviour; second, to detect possible genetic variants related to breastfeeding; and lastly, to test if the genetic variants associated with breastfeeding have been previously found to be related with breast size. Data were collected from a large community-based cohort of Australian twins, with 3,364 women for the twin modelling analyses and 1,521 of them included in the genome wide association study. Monozygotic twin correlations (rMZ = .52, 95% CI .46 – .57) were larger than dizygotic twin correlations (rDZ = .35, 95% CI .25 – .43) and the best-fitting model was the one composed by additive genetics and unique environmental factors, explaining 53% and 47% of the variance in breastfeeding behaviour, respectively. No breastfeeding-related genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. The polygenic risk score analyses showed no significant results, suggesting breast size does not influence breastfeeding. This study confers a replication of a previous one exploring the sources of variance of breastfeeding and, to our knowledge, is the first one to conduct a Genome-Wide Association Study on breastfeeding and look at the overlap with variants for breast size. PMID:25475840

  12. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  13. Information content in genome-wide scans: concordance between patterns of genetic differentiation and linkage mapping associations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Scanning the genome with high density SNP markers has become a standard approach for identifying regions of the genome showing substantial between-population genetic differentiation, and thus evidence of diversifying selection. Such regions may contain genes of large phenotypic effect. However, few studies have attempted to address the power or efficacy of such an approach. Results In this study, the patterns of allele frequency differences between two cattle breeds based on the Bovine HapMap study were compared with statistical evidence for QTL based on a linkage mapping study of an experimental population formed by a cross between the same breeds. Concordance between the two datasets was seen for chromosomes carrying QTL with strong statistical support, such as BTA5 and BTA18, which carry genes associated with coat color. For these chromosomes, there was a correspondence between the strength of the QTL signal along the chromosome and the degree of genetic differentiation between breeds. However, such an association was not seen in a broader comparison that also included chromosomes carrying QTL with lower significance levels. In addition, other chromosomal regions with substantial QTL effects did not include markers showing extreme between-breed genetic differentiation. Furthermore, the overall consistency between the two studies was weak, with low genome-wide correlation between the statistical values obtained in the linkage mapping study and between-breed genetic differentiation from the HapMap study. Conclusions These results suggest that genomic diversity scans are capable of detecting regions associated with qualitative traits but may be limited in their power to detect regions associated with quantitative phenotypic differences between populations, which may depend on the marker resolution of the study and the level of LD in the populations under investigation. PMID:21269469

  14. Common Trends in Mutualism Revealed by Model Associations Between Invertebrates and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaston, John; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Mutually beneficial interactions between microbes and animals are a conserved and ubiquitous feature of biotic systems. In many instances animals, including humans, are dependent on their microbial associates for nutrition, defense, or development. To maintain these vital relationships animals have evolved processes that ensure faithful transmission of specific microbial symbionts between generations. Elucidating mechanisms of transmission and symbiont specificity has been aided by the study of experimentally tractable invertebrate animals with diverse and highly evolved associations with microbes. Here we review several invertebrate model systems that are contributing to our current understanding of symbiont transmission, recognition, and specificity. Although the details of transmission and symbiont selection vary among associations, comparisons of diverse mutualistic associations are revealing a number of common themes, including restriction of symbiont diversity during transmission and glycan-lectin interactions during partner selection and recruitment. PMID:19909347

  15. [Acute intestinal obstruction revealing enteropathy associated t-cell lymphoma, about a case].

    PubMed

    Garba, Abdoul Aziz; Adamou, Harissou; Magagi, Ibrahim Amadou; Brah, Souleymane; Habou, Oumarou

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare complication of celiac disease (CD). We report a case of EATL associated with CD revealed by acute intestinal obstruction. A North African woman of 38 years old with a history of infertility and chronic abdominal pain was admitted in emergency with acute intestinal obstruction. During the surgery, we found a tumor on the small intestine with mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the specimen objectified a digestive T lymphoma CD3+ and immunological assessment of celiac disease was positive. The diagnosis of EATL was thus retained. Chemotherapy (CHOEP protocol) was established as well as gluten-free diet with a complete response to treatment. The EATL is a rare complication of CD that can be revealed by intestinal obstruction. The prognosis can be improved by early treatment involving surgery and chemotherapy. Its prevention requires early diagnosis of celiac and gluten-free diets. PMID:27217874

  16. Genome-wide transcript profiling reveals novel breast cancer-associated intronic sense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Lin, Yuefeng; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Monaghan, A Paula; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer. PMID:25798919

  17. Damage of the bacterial cell envelope by antimicrobial peptides gramicidin S and PGLa as revealed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Mareike; Berditsch, Marina; Hawecker, Jacques; Ardakani, Mohammad Fotouhi; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Ulrich, Anne S

    2010-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria induced by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Both the beta-stranded gramicidin S and the alpha-helical peptidyl-glycylleucine-carboxyamide (PGLa) are cationic amphiphilic AMPs known to interact with bacterial membranes. One representative Gram-negative strain, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and one representative Gram-positive strain, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, were exposed to the AMPs at sub-MICs and supra-MICs in salt-free medium. SEM revealed a shortening and swelling of the E. coli cells, and multiple blisters and bubbles formed on their surface. The S. aureus cells seemed to burst upon AMP exposure, showing open holes and deep craters in their envelope. TEM revealed the formation of intracellular membranous structures in both strains, which is attributed to a lateral expansion of the lipid membrane upon peptide insertion. Also, some morphological alterations in the DNA region were detected for S. aureus. After E. coli was incubated with AMPs in medium with low ionic strength, the cells appeared highly turgid compared to untreated controls. This observation suggests that the AMPs enhance osmosis through the inner membrane, before they eventually cause excessive leakage of the cellular contents. The adverse effect on the osmoregulatory capacity of the bacteria is attributed to the membrane-permeabilizing action of the amphiphilic peptides, even at low (sub-MIC) AMP concentrations. Altogether, the results demonstrate that both TEM and SEM, as well as appropriate sample preparation protocols, are needed to obtain detailed mechanistic insights into peptide function. PMID:20530225

  18. Scanning tunneling spectroscopic evidence for a magnetic field-revealed microscopic order in the high-TC superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A. D.; Grinolds, M. S.; Teague, M. L.; Yeh, N.-C.; Tajima, S.

    2009-03-01

    We present spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of YBa2Cu3O7-δ as a function of magnetic field and at T<reveals two sets of non-dispersive, field-enhanced conductance modulations with periods of 3.4+0.5 and 7.3+0.5 lattice constants. Energy histograms of QP spectra show a significant shift from SC to primarily PG-like spectra and a growing enhancement of spectral weight at δ' as magnetic field increases, implying a significant interplay between SC and a field-enhanced microscopic order. Ref.: Beyer, et.al. [arxiv:0808.3016].

  19. Anatomy and growth pattern of Amazon deep-sea fan as revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) and high-resolution seismic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Flood, R.D.; Kowsmann, R.O.; Belderson, R.H.; Gorini, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Imaging of the Amazon deep-sea fan with long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) has, for the first time, revealed the anatomy, trends, and growth pattern of distributary channels on this fan. Only one channel-levee system was active at any given time and extended from the Amazon Submarine Canyon downslope onto the lower fan (> 4,200 m). Formation of new channel-levee systems occurred when a currently active channel-levee system was cut off and abandoned through avulsion, and a new channel-levee system was established nearby. Through time, successive channel-levee formation and abandonment built two broad levee complexes consisting of groups of overlapping, coalescing segments of channel-levee systems across the present fan surface. These, plus older, now buried levee complexes, indicate that fan growth is radially outward and downslope through development of successive levee complexes. The most striking characteristic of the distributary channels is their intricate, often recurving, meanders with sinuosities of up to 2.5. Cutoffs and abandoned meander loops indicate that the channels migrate laterally through time. Channel bifurcation results predominantly from avulsion when flows breach a channel levee, thereby abandoning the present channel and establishing a new channel-levee segment nearby. No clear evidence of channel branching (i.e., division of a single channel into two active segments) or braiding was observed. 22 figs.

  20. Genome-wide association Scan of dental caries in the permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 90% of adults aged 20 years or older with permanent teeth have suffered from dental caries leading to pain, infection, or even tooth loss. Although caries prevalence has decreased over the past decade, there are still about 23% of dentate adults who have untreated carious lesions in the US. Dental caries is a complex disorder affected by both individual susceptibility and environmental factors. Approximately 35-55% of caries phenotypic variation in the permanent dentition is attributable to genes, though few specific caries genes have been identified. Therefore, we conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genes affecting susceptibility to caries in adults. Methods Five independent cohorts were included in this study, totaling more than 7000 participants. For each participant, dental caries was assessed and genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were genotyped or imputed across the entire genome. Due to the heterogeneity among the five cohorts regarding age, genotyping platform, quality of dental caries assessment, and study design, we first conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses on each of the five independent cohorts separately. We then performed three meta-analyses to combine results for: (i) the comparatively younger, Appalachian cohorts (N = 1483) with well-assessed caries phenotype, (ii) the comparatively older, non-Appalachian cohorts (N = 5960) with inferior caries phenotypes, and (iii) all five cohorts (N = 7443). Top ranking genetic loci within and across meta-analyses were scrutinized for biologically plausible roles on caries. Results Different sets of genes were nominated across the three meta-analyses, especially between the younger and older age cohorts. In general, we identified several suggestive loci (P-value ≤ 10E-05) within or near genes with plausible biological roles for dental caries, including RPS6KA2 and PTK2B, involved in p38-depenedent MAPK signaling

  1. Genomic sequencing reveals historical, demographic and selective factors associated with the diversification of the fire-associated fungus Neurospora discreta.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, Pierre; Wilson, Benjamin A; Perraudeau, Fanny; Montoya, Liliam A; Kowbel, David; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Fischer, Monika; Sylvain, Iman; Jacobson, David J; Taylor, John W

    2015-11-01

    Delineating microbial populations, discovering ecologically relevant phenotypes and identifying migrants, hybrids or admixed individuals have long proved notoriously difficult, thereby limiting our understanding of the evolutionary forces at play during the diversification of microbial species. However, recent advances in sequencing and computational methods have enabled an unbiased approach whereby incipient species and the genetic correlates of speciation can be identified by examining patterns of genomic variation within and between lineages. We present here a population genomic study of a phylogenetic species in the Neurospora discreta species complex, based on the resequencing of full genomes (~37 Mb) for 52 fungal isolates from nine sites in three continents. Population structure analyses revealed two distinct lineages in South-East Asia, and three lineages in North America/Europe with a broad longitudinal and latitudinal range and limited admixture between lineages. Genome scans for selective sweeps and comparisons of the genomic landscapes of diversity and recombination provided no support for a role of selection at linked sites on genomic heterogeneity in levels of divergence between lineages. However, demographic inference indicated that the observed genomic heterogeneity in divergence was generated by varying rates of gene flow between lineages following a period of isolation. Many putative cases of exchange of genetic material between phylogenetically divergent fungal lineages have been discovered, and our work highlights the quantitative importance of genetic exchanges between more closely related taxa to the evolution of fungal genomes. Our study also supports the role of allopatric isolation as a driver of diversification in saprobic microbes. PMID:26453896

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans cryoultramicrotomy and vesicle fractionation reveals an intimate association between membrane lipids and glucuronxylomannan

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Débora L.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Miranda, Kildare; Frases, Susana; Faull, Kym F.; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2009-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated pathogenic fungus. The cryptococcal capsule is composed of polysaccharides and is necessary for virulence. It has been previously reported that glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major capsular component, is synthesized in cytoplasmic compartments and transported to the extracellular space in vesicles, but knowledge on the organelles involved in polysaccharide synthesis and traffic is extremely limited. In this paper we report the GXM distribution in C. neoformans cells sectioned by cryoultramicrotomy and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and polysaccharide immunogold staining. Cryosections of fungal cells showed high preservation of intracellular organelles and cell wall structure. Incubation of cryosections with an antibody to GXM revealed that cytoplasmic structures associated to vesicular compartments and reticular membranes are in close proximity to the polysaccharide. GXM was generally found in association with the membrane of intracellular compartments and within different layers of the cell wall. Analysis of extracellular fractions from cryptococcal supernatants by transmission electron microscopy in combination with serologic, chromatographic and spectroscopic methods revealed fractions containing GXM and lipids. These results indicate an intimate association of GXM and lipids in both intracellular and extracellular spaces consistent with polysaccharide synthesis and transport in membrane-associated structures. PMID:19747978

  3. Cryptococcus neoformans cryoultramicrotomy and vesicle fractionation reveals an intimate association between membrane lipids and glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Débora L; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Miranda, Kildare; Frases, Susana; Faull, Kym F; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2009-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated pathogenic fungus. The cryptococcal capsule is composed of polysaccharides and is necessary for virulence. It has been previously reported that glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major capsular component, is synthesized in cytoplasmic compartments and transported to the extracellular space in vesicles, but knowledge on the organelles involved in polysaccharide synthesis and traffic is extremely limited. In this paper we report the GXM distribution in C. neoformans cells sectioned by cryoultramicrotomy and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and polysaccharide immunogold staining. Cryosections of fungal cells showed high preservation of intracellular organelles and cell wall structure. Incubation of cryosections with an antibody to GXM revealed that cytoplasmic structures associated to vesicular compartments and reticular membranes are in close proximity to the polysaccharide. GXM was generally found in association with the membrane of intracellular compartments and within different layers of the cell wall. Analysis of extracellular fractions from cryptococcal supernatants by transmission electron microscopy in combination with serologic, chromatographic and spectroscopic methods revealed fractions containing GXM and lipids. These results indicate an intimate association of GXM and lipids in both intracellular and extracellular spaces consistent with polysaccharide synthesis and transport in membrane-associated structures.

  4. The Genetic Architecture of Seed Composition in Soybean Is Refined by Genome-Wide Association Scans Across Multiple Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Justin N.; Nelson, Randall L.; Song, Qijian; Cregan, Perry B.; Li, Zenglu

    2014-01-01

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to resolve loci controlling moderately complex quantitative traits (QTL) in numerous crop species. Yet, it is still unclear how soybean’s unique population history will affect GWA scans. Using one of the populations in this study, we simulated phenotypes resulting from a range of genetic architectures. We found that with a heritability of 0.5, ∼100% and ∼33% of the 4 and 20 simulated QTL can be recovered, respectively, with a false-positive rate of less than ∼6×10−5 per marker tested. Additionally, we demonstrated that combining information from multi-locus mixed models and compressed linear-mixed models improves QTL identification and interpretation. We applied these insights to exploring seed composition in soybean, refining the linkage group I (chromosome 20) protein QTL and identifying additional oil QTL that may allow some decoupling of highly correlated oil and protein phenotypes. Because the value of protein meal is closely related to its essential amino acid profile, we attempted to identify QTL underlying methionine, threonine, cysteine, and lysine content. Multiple QTL were found that have not been observed in family-based mapping studies, and each trait exhibited associations across multiple populations. Chromosomes 1 and 8 contain strong candidate alleles for essential amino acid increases. Overall, we present these and additional data that will be useful in determining breeding strategies for the continued improvement of soybean’s nutrient portfolio. PMID:25246241

  5. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Simone; Maggioni, Davide; Arrigoni, Roberto; Seveso, Davide; Puce, Stefania; Galli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  6. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Maggioni, Davide; Arrigoni, Roberto; Seveso, Davide; Puce, Stefania; Galli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  7. Association between Periodontal Disease and Inflammatory Arthritis Reveals Modulatory Functions by Melanocortin Receptor Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F.M.; Norling, Lucy V.; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A.; da Silva, Tarcília A.; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp8–γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 μg dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 μg DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r−/− compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. PMID:24979595

  8. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J; Acemel, Rafael D; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-06-16

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  9. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J.; Acemel, Rafael D.; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  10. Signatures of selection in the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) revealed by a genome scan analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galarza, Julio; Henriques, Dora; Johnston, J Spencer; Azevedo, João C; Patton, John C; Muñoz, Irene; De la Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the genetic mechanisms of adaptive population divergence is one of the most fundamental endeavours in evolutionary biology and is becoming increasingly important as it will allow predictions about how organisms will respond to global environmental crisis. This is particularly important for the honey bee, a species of unquestionable ecological and economical importance that has been exposed to increasing human-mediated selection pressures. Here, we conducted a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome scan in honey bees collected across an environmental gradient in Iberia and used four FST -based outlier tests to identify genomic regions exhibiting signatures of selection. Additionally, we analysed associations between genetic and environmental data for the identification of factors that might be correlated or act as selective pressures. With these approaches, 4.4% (17 of 383) of outlier loci were cross-validated by four FST -based methods, and 8.9% (34 of 383) were cross-validated by at least three methods. Of the 34 outliers, 15 were found to be strongly associated with one or more environmental variables. Further support for selection, provided by functional genomic information, was particularly compelling for SNP outliers mapped to different genes putatively involved in the same function such as vision, xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune response. This study enabled a more rigorous consideration of selection as the underlying cause of diversity patterns in Iberian honey bees, representing an important first step towards the identification of polymorphisms implicated in local adaptation and possibly in response to recent human-mediated environmental changes. PMID:24118235

  11. An association network analysis among microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton reveals algal bloom dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shangjin; Zhou, Jin; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shichen; Zhan, Wugen; Wang, Bo; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-02-01

    Algal blooms are a worldwide phenomenon and the biological interactions that underlie their regulation are only just beginning to be understood. It is established that algal microorganisms associate with many other ubiquitous, oceanic organisms, but the interactions that lead to the dynamics of bloom formation are currently unknown. To address this gap, we used network approaches to investigate the association patterns among microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton in response to a natural Scrippsiella trochoidea bloom. This is the first study to apply network approaches to bloom dynamics. To this end, terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) length polymorphism analysis showed dramatic changes in community compositions of microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton over the blooming period. A variance ratio test revealed significant positive overall associations both within and between microeukaryotic and bacterioplankton communities. An association network generated from significant correlations between T-RFs revealed that S. trochoidea had few connections to other microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton and was placed on the edge. This lack of connectivity allowed for the S. trochoidea sub-network to break off from the overall network. These results allowed us to propose a conceptual model for explaining how changes in microbial associations regulate the dynamics of an algal bloom. In addition, key T-RFs were screened by principal components analysis, correlation coefficients, and network analysis. Dominant T-RFs were then identified through 18S and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Results showed that microeukaryotes clustered predominantly with Dinophyceae and Perkinsea while the majority of bacterioplankton identified were Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The ecologi-cal roles of both were discussed in the context of these findings. PMID:26986263

  12. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes.

  13. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes. PMID:25815820

  14. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, orderedmore » restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.« less

  15. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Chain, Patrick S G; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.

  16. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  17. Identification of lncRNA-associated competing triplets reveals global patterns and prognostic markers for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, Ronghong; Ye, Jingrun; Zhao, Zuxianglan; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Zheng; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can interact with microRNAs (miRNAs) and indirectly regulate miRNA targets though competing interactions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are still largely unknown. In this study, these lncRNA–miRNA–gene interactions were defined as lncRNA-associated competing triplets (LncACTs), and an integrated pipeline was developed to identify lncACTs that are active in cancer. Competing lncRNAs had sponge features distinct from non-competing lncRNAs. In the lncACT cross-talk network, disease-associated lncRNAs, miRNAs and coding-genes showed specific topological patterns indicative of their competence and control of communication within the network. The construction of global competing activity profiles revealed that lncACTs had high activity specific to cancers. Analyses of clustered lncACTs revealed that they were enriched in various cancer-related biological processes. Based on the global cross-talk network and cluster analyses, nine cancer-specific sub-networks were constructed. H19- and BRCA1/2-associated lncACTs were able to discriminate between two groups of patients with different clinical outcomes. Disease-associated lncACTs also showed variable competing patterns across normal and cancer patient samples. In summary, this study uncovered and systematically characterized global properties of human lncACTs that may have prognostic value for predicting clinical outcome in cancer patients. PMID:25800746

  18. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits.

  19. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. PMID:27091876

  20. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  1. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    PubMed

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), and this association was even more significant when comparing all parasite-positive samples with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.001). Additionally, our data revealed that a low abundance of Prevotella and a higher abundance of Clostridial cluster XIVa was associated with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Our data support the theory that Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella. PMID:27230509

  2. Association analysis reveals genetic variation altering bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Paun, Alexandra; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Tomko, Tomasz G; Haston, Christina K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a disease of significant morbidity, with an incompletely defined genetic basis. Here, we combine linkage and association studies to identify genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Mice were treated with bleomycin by osmotic minipump, and pulmonary fibrosis was histologically assessed 6 weeks later. Fibrosis was mapped in C57BL6/J (fibrosis-susceptible) × A/J (fibrosis-resistant) F2 mice, and the major identified linkage intervals were evaluated in consomic mice. Genome-wide and linkage-interval genes were assessed for their association with fibrosis, using phenotypic data from 23 inbred strains and the murine single-nucleotide polymorphism map. Susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis mapped to a locus on chromosome 17, which was verified with consomic mice, and to three additional suggestive loci that may interact with alleles on chromosome 17 to affect the trait in F2 mice. Two of the loci, including the region on chromosome 17, are homologous to previously mapped loci of human idiopathic fibrosis. Of the 23 phenotyped murine strains, four developed significant fibrosis, and the majority presented minimal disease. Genome-wide and linkage region-specific association studies revealed 11 pulmonary expressed genes (including the autophagy gene Cep55, and Masp2, which is a complement component) to contain polymorphisms significantly associated with bleomycin-induced fibrotic lung disease. In conclusion, genomic approaches were used to identify linkage intervals and specific genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis in mice. The common loci and similarities in phenotype suggest these findings to be of relevance to clinical pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Evidence for Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking of the Superconducting State near Twin-Boundary Interfaces in FeSe Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watashige, T.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Hanaguri, T.; Kohsaka, Y.; Kasahara, S.; Furusaki, A.; Sigrist, M.; Meingast, C.; Wolf, T.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Junctions and interfaces consisting of unconventional superconductors provide an excellent experimental playground to study exotic phenomena related to the phase of the order parameter. Not only does the complex structure of unconventional order parameters have an impact on the Josephson effects, but it also may profoundly alter the quasiparticle excitation spectrum near a junction. Here, by using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we visualize the spatial evolution of the LDOS near twin boundaries (TBs) of the nodal superconductor FeSe. The π /2 rotation of the crystallographic orientation across the TB twists the structure of the unconventional order parameter, which may, in principle, bring about a zero-energy LDOS peak at the TB. The LDOS at the TB observed in our study, in contrast, does not exhibit any signature of a zero-energy peak, and an apparent gap amplitude remains finite all the way across the TB. The low-energy quasiparticle excitations associated with the gap nodes are affected by the TB over a distance more than an order of magnitude larger than the coherence length ξa b. The modification of the low-energy states is even more prominent in the region between two neighboring TBs separated by a distance ≈7 ξa b . In this region, the spectral weight near the Fermi level (≈±0.2 meV ) due to the nodal quasiparticle spectrum is almost completely removed. These behaviors suggest that the TB induces a fully gapped state, invoking a possible twist of the order parameter structure, which breaks time-reversal symmetry.

  4. Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Baute, Gregory J; Kane, Nolan C; Grassa, Christopher J; Lai, Zhao; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-04-01

    The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study, we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a globally important oilseed. To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes, including wild, landrace, and modern lines of H. annuus, as well as two cross-compatible wild relatives, Helianthus argophyllus and Helianthus petiolaris. Outlier analyses identified 122 and 15 candidate genes associated with domestication and improvement, respectively. As in several previous studies, genes putatively involved in oil biosynthesis were the most extreme outliers. Additionally, several promising associations were observed with previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs), such as branching. Admixture analyses revealed that all the modern cultivar genomes we examined contained one or more introgressions from wild populations, with every chromosome having evidence of introgression in at least one modern line. Cumulatively, introgressions cover c. 10% of the cultivated sunflower genome. Surprisingly, introgressions do not avoid candidate domestication genes, probably because of the reintroduction of branching.

  5. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Murphy, Laura; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Warrier, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419) versus low (n = 183) mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5), 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6)). In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859) showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115) were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4)). Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64). The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  6. An Integrative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Potential Targets Associated with Cell Proliferation in Uterine Leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Marchi, Fábio Albuquerque; Barros Filho, Mateus de Camargo; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Jurisica, Igor; Pontes, Anagloria; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine Leiomyomas (ULs) are the most common benign tumours affecting women of reproductive age. ULs represent a major problem in public health, as they are the main indication for hysterectomy. Approximately 40–50% of ULs have non-random cytogenetic abnormalities, and half of ULs may have copy number alterations (CNAs). Gene expression microarrays studies have demonstrated that cell proliferation genes act in response to growth factors and steroids. However, only a few genes mapping to CNAs regions were found to be associated with ULs. Methodology We applied an integrative analysis using genomic and transcriptomic data to identify the pathways and molecular markers associated with ULs. Fifty-one fresh frozen specimens were evaluated by array CGH (JISTIC) and gene expression microarrays (SAM). The CONEXIC algorithm was applied to integrate the data. Principal Findings The integrated analysis identified the top 30 significant genes (P<0.01), which comprised genes associated with cancer, whereas the protein-protein interaction analysis indicated a strong association between FANCA and BRCA1. Functional in silico analysis revealed target molecules for drugs involved in cell proliferation, including FGFR1 and IGFBP5. Transcriptional and protein analyses showed that FGFR1 (P = 0.006 and P<0.01, respectively) and IGFBP5 (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.006, respectively) were up-regulated in the tumours when compared with the adjacent normal myometrium. Conclusions The integrative genomic and transcriptomic approach indicated that FGFR1 and IGFBP5 amplification, as well as the consequent up-regulation of the protein products, plays an important role in the aetiology of ULs and thus provides data for potential drug therapies development to target genes associated with cellular proliferation in ULs. PMID:23483937

  7. Identification of unstable network modules reveals disease modules associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masataka; Ogishima, Soichi; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwano, Ryozo; Nakaya, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is associated with aging, and it leads to neuron death. Deposits of amyloid β and aberrantly phosphorylated tau protein are known as pathological hallmarks of AD, but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been revealed. A high-throughput gene expression analysis previously showed that differentially expressed genes accompanying the progression of AD were more down-regulated than up-regulated in the later stages of AD. This suggested that the molecular networks and their constituent modules collapsed along with AD progression. In this study, by using gene expression profiles and protein interaction networks (PINs), we identified the PINs expressed in three brain regions: the entorhinal cortex (EC), hippocampus (HIP) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG). Dividing the expressed PINs into modules, we examined the stability of the modules with AD progression and with normal aging. We found that in the AD modules, the constituent proteins, interactions and cellular functions were not maintained between consecutive stages through all brain regions. Interestingly, the modules were collapsed with AD progression, specifically in the EC region. By identifying the modules that were affected by AD pathology, we found the transcriptional regulation-associated modules that interact with the proteasome-associated module via UCHL5 hub protein, which is a deubiquitinating enzyme. Considering PINs as a system made of network modules, we found that the modules relevant to the transcriptional regulation are disrupted in the EC region, which affects the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  8. Conformational dynamics of nonsynonymous variants at protein interfaces reveals disease association.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brandon M; Gerek, Z Nevin; Kumar, Sudhir; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein interface sites between individual monomeric units in biological assemblies are enriched in disease-associated non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs). To elucidate the mechanistic underpinning of this observation, we investigated the conformational dynamic properties of protein interface sites through a site-specific structural dynamic flexibility metric (dfi) for 333 multimeric protein assemblies. dfi measures the dynamic resilience of a single residue to perturbations that occurred in the rest of the protein structure and identifies sites contributing the most to functionally critical dynamics. Analysis of dfi profiles of over a thousand positions harboring variation revealed that amino acid residues at interfaces have lower average dfi (31%) than those present at non-interfaces (50%), which means that protein interfaces have less dynamic flexibility. Interestingly, interface sites with disease-associated nsSNVs have significantly lower average dfi (23%) as compared to those of neutral nsSNVs (42%), which directly relates structural dynamics to functional importance. We found that less conserved interface positions show much lower dfi for disease nsSNVs as compared to neutral nsSNVs. In this case, dfi is better as compared to the accessible surface area metric, which is based on the static protein structure. Overall, our proteome-wide conformational dynamic analysis indicates that certain interface sites play a critical role in functionally related dynamics (i.e., those with low dfi values), therefore mutations at those sites are more likely to be associated with disease.

  9. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid; Radioactive iodine uptake and scan test - thyroid; Nuclear scan - thyroid ... the test. Ask your provider or the radiology/nuclear medicine team performing the scan about taking precautions.

  10. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  11. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation.

  12. Live cell imaging reveals structural associations between the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  13. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  14. High Diversity Revealed in Leaf-Associated Protists (Rhizaria: Cercozoa) of Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Ploch, Sebastian; Rose, Laura E; Bass, David; Bonkowski, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The largest biological surface on earth is formed by plant leaves. These leaf surfaces are colonized by a specialized suite of leaf-inhabiting microorganisms, recently termed "phyllosphere microbiome". Microbial prey, however, attract microbial predators. Protists in particular have been shown to structure bacterial communities on plant surfaces, but virtually nothing is known about the community composition of protists on leaves. Using newly designed specific primers targeting the 18S rDNA gene of Cercozoa, we investigated the species richness of this common protist group on leaves of four Brassicaceae species from two different locations in a cloning-based approach. The generated sequences revealed a broad diversity of leaf-associated Cercozoa, mostly bacterial feeders, but also including known plant pathogens and a taxon of potential endophytes that were recently described as algal predators in freshwater systems. This initial study shows that protists must be regarded as an integral part of the microbial diversity in the phyllosphere of plants.

  15. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  16. MHC class II DRB diversity in raccoons (Procyon lotor) reveals associations with raccoon rabies virus (Lyssavirus).

    PubMed

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Castillo, Sarrah; Rosatte, Rick C; Kyle, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    In North America, the raccoon rabies virus (RRV) is an endemic wildlife disease which causes acute encephalopathies and is a strong selective force on raccoons (Procyon lotor), with estimates of ∼85% of the population succumbing to the disease when epizootic. RRV is regarded as a lethal disease if untreated; therefore, no evolutionary response would be expected of raccoon populations. However, variable immune responses to RRV have been observed in raccoons indicating a potential for evolutionary adaptation. Studies of variation within the immunologically important major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have revealed relationships between MHC alleles and diseases in humans and other wildlife species. This enhances our understanding of how hosts and pathogens adapt and co-evolve. In this study, we used RRV as a model system to study host-pathogen interaction in raccoons from a challenge study and from four wild populations that differ in exposure times and viral lineages. We investigated the potential role of Prlo-DRB polymorphism in relation to susceptibility/resistance to RRV in 113 RRV positive and 143 RRV negative raccoons. Six alleles were found to be associated with RRV negative status and five alleles with RRV positive animals. We found variable patterns of MHC associations given the relative number of selective RRV sweeps in the studied regions and correlations between MHC diversity and RRV lineages. The allelic associations established provide insight into how the genetic variation of raccoons may affect the disease outcome and this can be used to examine similar associations between other rabies variants and their hosts.

  17. Tyrosine crosslinking reveals interfacial dynamics in adeno-associated viral capsids during infection

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Eric D.; Finn, M.G.; Asokan, Aravind

    2012-01-01

    Viral capsid dynamics are often observed during infectious events such as cell surface attachment, entry and genome release. Structural analysis of adeno-associated virus (AAV), a helper-dependent parvovirus, revealed a cluster of surface-exposed tyrosine residues at the icosahedral two-fold symmetry axis. We exploited the latter observation to carry out selective oxidation of Tyr residues, which yielded crosslinked viral protein (VP) subunit dimers, effectively “stitching” together the AAV capsid two-fold interface. Characterization of different Tyr-to-Phe mutants confirmed that the formation of crosslinked VP dimers is mediated by dityrosine adducts and requires the Tyr704 residue, which crosses over from one neighboring VP subunit to the other. When compared to unmodified capsids, Tyr-crosslinked AAV displayed decreased transduction efficiency in cell culture. Surprisingly, further biochemical and quantitative microscopy studies revealed that restraining the two-fold interface hinders externalization of buried VP N-termini, which contain a phospholipase A2 domain and nuclear localization sequences critical for infection. These adverse effects caused by tyrosine oxidation support the notion that interfacial dynamics at the AAV capsid two-fold symmetry axis play a role in externalization of VP N-termini during infection. PMID:22458529

  18. The phosphoproteome of Aspergillus nidulans reveals functional association with cellular processes involved in morphology and secretion.

    PubMed

    Ramsubramaniam, Nikhil; Harris, Steven D; Marten, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    We describe the first phosphoproteome of the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide, separated using a convenient ultra-long reverse phase gradient, and identified using a "high-high" strategy (high mass accuracy on the parent and fragment ions) with higher-energy collisional dissociation. Using this approach 1801 phosphosites, from 1637 unique phosphopeptides, were identified. Functional classification revealed phosphoproteins were overrepresented under GO categories related to fungal morphogenesis: "sites of polar growth," "vesicle mediated transport," and "cytoskeleton organization." In these same GO categories, kinase-substrate analysis of phosphoproteins revealed the majority were target substrates of CDK and CK2 kinase families, indicating these kinase families play a prominent role in fungal morphogenesis. Kinase-substrate analysis also identified 57 substrates for kinases known to regulate secretion of hydrolytic enzymes (e.g. PkaA, SchA, and An-Snf1). Altogether this data will serve as a benchmark that can be used to elucidate regulatory networks functionally associated with fungal morphogenesis and secretion. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000715 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000715).

  19. Ecoinformatics Can Reveal Yield Gaps Associated with Crop-Pest Interactions: A Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheim, Jay A.; Meisner, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Farmers and private consultants execute a vast, decentralized data collection effort with each cropping cycle, as they gather pest density data to make real-time pest management decisions. Here we present a proof of concept for an ecoinformatics approach to pest management research, which attempts to harness these data to answer questions about pest-crop interactions. The impact of herbivory by Lygus hesperus on cotton is explored as a case study. Consultant-derived data satisfied a ‘positive control’ test for data quality by clearly resolving the expected negative relationship between L. hesperus density and retention of flower buds. The enhanced statistical power afforded by the large ecoinformatics dataset revealed an early-season window of crop sensitivity, during which L. hesperus densities as low as 1-2 per sample were associated with yield loss. In contrast, during the mid-season insecticide use by farmers was often unnecessary, as cotton compensated fully for moderate L. hesperus densities. Because the dataset emerged from the commercial production setting, it also revealed the limited degree to which farmers were willing to delay crop harvest to provide opportunities for compensatory fruiting. Observational approaches to pest management research have strengths and weaknesses that complement those of traditional, experimental approaches; combining these methods can contribute to enhanced agricultural productivity. PMID:24260408

  20. Genome-wide linkage scan and association study of PARL to the expression of LHON families in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phasukkijwatana, Nopasak; Kunhapan, Bussaraporn; Stankovich, Jim; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha L; Thomson, Russell; Thornton, Timothy; Bahlo, Melanie; Mushiroda, Taisei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Tun, Aung Win; Srisawat, Chatchawan; Limwongse, Chanin; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Sura, Thanyachai; Suthammarak, Wichit; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2010-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrially inherited disease causing blindness, preferentially in young adult males. Most of the patients carry the G11778A mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. However, the marked incomplete penetrance and the gender bias indicate some additional genetic and/or environmental factors to disease expression. Herein, we first conducted a genome-wide linkage scan with 400 microsatellite markers in 9 large Thai LHON G11778A pedigrees. Using an affecteds-only nonparametric linkage analysis, 4 regions on chromosomes 3, 12, 13 and 18 showed Zlr scores greater than 2 (P < 0.025), which is consistently significant across several linkage statistics. The most suggestive marker D3S1565 (Zlr > 2 in 10 of 16 allele sharing models tested) was then expanded to include the region 3q26.2-3q28 covering SLC7A14 (3q26.2), MFN1 (3q26.32), MRPL47 (3q26.33), MCCC1 (3q27.1), PARL (3q27.1) and OPA1 (3q28-q29). All of these candidate genes were selected from the Maestro database and had known to be localized in mitochondria. Sixty tag SNPs were genotyped in 86 cases, 211 of their relatives and 32 unrelated Thai controls, by multiplex-PCR-based Invader assay. Analyses using a powerful association testing tool that adjusts for relatedness (the M(QLS) statistic) showed the most evidence of association between two SNPs, rs3749446 and rs1402000 (located in PARL presenilins-associated rhomboid-like) and LHON expression (both P = 8.8 x 10(-5)). The mitochondrial PARL protease has been recently known to play a role with a dynamin-related OPA1 protein in preventing apoptotic events by slowing down the release of cytochrome c out of mitochondrial cristae junctions. Moreover, PARL is required to activate the intramembranous proteolyses resulting in the degradation of an accumulated pro-apoptotic protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Under these circumstances, variants of PARL are suggested to influence cell death by apoptosis which

  1. Revealing gene clusters associated with the development of cholangiocarcinoma, based on a time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyu; Xiao, Zhifu; Zhao, Xiulei; Wu, Xiangsong

    2015-05-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a rapidly lethal malignancy and currently is considered to be incurable. Biomarkers related to the development of CC remain unclear. The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between normal tissue and intrahepatic CC, as well as specific gene expression patterns that changed together with the development of CC. By using a two‑way analysis of variance test, the biomarkers that could distinguish between normal tissue and intrahepatic CC dissected from different days were identified. A k‑means cluster method was used to identify gene clusters associated with the development of CC according to their changing expression pattern. Functional enrichment analysis was used to infer the function of each of the gene sets. A time series analysis was constructed to reveal gene signatures that were associated with the development of CC based on gene expression profile changes. Genes related to CC were shown to be involved in 'mitochondrion' and 'focal adhesion'. Three interesting gene groups were identified by the k‑means cluster method. Gene clusters with a unique expression pattern are related with the development of CC. The data of this study will facilitate novel discoveries regarding the genetic study of CC by further work.

  2. Genetic architecture dissection by genome-wide association analysis reveals avian eggshell ultrastructure traits

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhongyi; Sun, Congjiao; Shen, ManMan; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of an eggshell is considered the major determinant of eggshell quality, which has biological and economic significance for the avian and poultry industries. However, the interrelationships and genome-wide architecture of eggshell ultrastructure remain to be elucidated. Herein, we measured eggshell thickness (EST), effective layer thickness (ET), mammillary layer thickness (MT), and mammillary density (MD) and conducted genome-wide association studies in 927 F2 hens. The SNP-based heritabilities of eggshell ultrastructure traits were estimated to be 0.39, 0.36, 0.17 and 0.19 for EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively, and a total of 719, 784, 1 and 10 genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively. ABCC9, ITPR2, KCNJ8 and WNK1, which are involved in ion transport, were suggested to be the key genes regulating EST and ET. ITM2C and KNDC1 likely affect MT and MD, respectively. Additionally, there were linear relationships between the chromosome lengths and the variance explained per chromosome for EST (R2 = 0.57) and ET (R2 = 0.67). In conclusion, the interrelationships and genetic architecture of eggshell ultrastructure traits revealed in this study are valuable for our understanding of the avian eggshell and contribute to research on a variety of other calcified shells. PMID:27456605

  3. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  4. Glycoproteomic Study Reveals Altered Plasma Proteins Associated with HIV Elite Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiming; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wendel, Sarah K.; Zhang, Bai; Sun, Shisheng; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Ao, Minghui; Moore, Richard D.; Jackson, J. Brooks; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    HIV elite suppressors (ES) or controllers are individuals achieving control of viremia by their natural immunological mechanisms without highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Study of the mechanisms responsible for the immunological suppression of viremia in ES may lead to the detection of individuals with ES and the effective control of HIV infection. We hypothesize that plasma glycoproteins play essential roles in the immune system of ES since plasma proteins are critical and highly relevant in anti-viral immunity and most plasma proteins are glycoproteins. To examine glycoproteins associated with ES, plasma samples from ES individuals (n=20), and from individuals on HAART (n=20), with AIDS (n=20), and no HIV infection (n=10) were analyzed by quantitative glycoproteomics. We found that a number of glycoproteins changed between ES versus HAART, AIDS and HIV- individuals. In sharp contrast, the level of plasma glycoproteins in the HAART cohort showed fewer changes compared with AIDS and HIV- individuals. These results showed that although both ES and HAART effectively suppress viremia, ES appeared to profoundly affect immunologically relevant glycoproteins in plasma as consequence of or support for anti-viral immunity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that altered proteins in ES plasma were mainly associated with inflammation. This analysis suggests that overlapping, while distinguishable, glycoprotein profiles for inflammation and immune activation appeared to be present between ES and non-ES (HAART+AIDS) cohorts, indicating different triggers for inflammation and immune activation between natural and treatment-related viral suppression. PMID:25285165

  5. Genetic architecture dissection by genome-wide association analysis reveals avian eggshell ultrastructure traits.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhongyi; Sun, Congjiao; Shen, ManMan; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of an eggshell is considered the major determinant of eggshell quality, which has biological and economic significance for the avian and poultry industries. However, the interrelationships and genome-wide architecture of eggshell ultrastructure remain to be elucidated. Herein, we measured eggshell thickness (EST), effective layer thickness (ET), mammillary layer thickness (MT), and mammillary density (MD) and conducted genome-wide association studies in 927 F2 hens. The SNP-based heritabilities of eggshell ultrastructure traits were estimated to be 0.39, 0.36, 0.17 and 0.19 for EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively, and a total of 719, 784, 1 and 10 genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively. ABCC9, ITPR2, KCNJ8 and WNK1, which are involved in ion transport, were suggested to be the key genes regulating EST and ET. ITM2C and KNDC1 likely affect MT and MD, respectively. Additionally, there were linear relationships between the chromosome lengths and the variance explained per chromosome for EST (R(2) = 0.57) and ET (R(2) = 0.67). In conclusion, the interrelationships and genetic architecture of eggshell ultrastructure traits revealed in this study are valuable for our understanding of the avian eggshell and contribute to research on a variety of other calcified shells. PMID:27456605

  6. Correlation of spicule sign on computed tomography scans with peripheral lung cancers associated with interstitial lung disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Gao, L; Wu, W L

    2015-03-27

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between spicular signs on computed tomography (CT) scans and peripheral lung cancer (PLC) that is associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We analyzed clinical data from 96 PLC cases and grouped patients based on whether they had interstitial pneumonia into either ILD/COPD group or non-ILD/COPD group. The occurrence rate of spicule sign was 90.3% in the ILD/COPD group and 61.8% in the non-ILD/COPD group, respectively. There was a significant difference between these groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of spicular signs among patients with different pathological types of PLC. The severity of ILD affected the spicular morphology on CT scans directly. There was a significant correlation between the appearance of spicule sign on CT scans and PLC that was associated with ILD/COPD.

  7. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Ana; Airey, David; Thompson, Brent; Zhu, C; Rinchik, Eugene M; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Erikson, Keith; Blakely, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  8. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam R; Mackey, Aaron J; Dejene, Eden A; Ramadan, James W; Langefeld, Carl D; Palmer, Nicholette D; Taylor, Kent D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Watanabe, Richard M; Rich, Stephen S; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2015-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  9. Autonomous gliders reveal features of the water column associated with foraging by adelie penguins.

    PubMed

    Kahl, L Alex; Schofield, Oscar; Fraser, William R

    2010-12-01

    Despite their strong dependence on the pelagic environment, seabirds and other top predators in polar marine ecosystems are generally studied during their reproductive phases in terrestrial environments. As a result, a significant portion of their life history is understudied which in turn has led to limited understanding. Recent advances in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technologies have allowed satellite-tagged Adélie penguins to guide AUV surveys of the marine environment at the Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on the western Antarctic Peninsula. Near real-time data sent via Iridium satellites from the AUVs to a centralized control center thousands of miles away allowed scientists to adapt AUV sampling strategies to meet the changing conditions of the subsurface. Such AUV data revealed the water masses and fine-scale features associated with Adélie penguin foraging trips. During this study, the maximum concentration of chlorophyll was between 30 and 50 m deep. Encompassing this peak in the chlorophyll concentration, within the water-column, was a mixture of nutrient-laden Upper Circumpolar Deep (UCDW) and western Antarctic Peninsula winter water (WW). Together, data from the AUV survey and penguin dives reveal that 54% of foraging by Adélie penguins occurs immediately below the chlorophyll maximum. These data demonstrate how bringing together emerging technologies, such as AUVs, with established methods such as the radio-tagging of penguins can provide powerful tools for monitoring and hypothesis testing of previously inaccessible ecological processes. Ocean and atmosphere temperatures are expected to continue increasing along the western Antarctic Peninsula, which will undoubtedly affect regional marine ecosystems. New and emerging technologies such as unmanned underwater vehicles and individually mounted satellite tracking devices will provide the tools critical to documenting and understanding the widespread ecological change

  10. Autonomous gliders reveal features of the water column associated with foraging by adelie penguins.

    PubMed

    Kahl, L Alex; Schofield, Oscar; Fraser, William R

    2010-12-01

    Despite their strong dependence on the pelagic environment, seabirds and other top predators in polar marine ecosystems are generally studied during their reproductive phases in terrestrial environments. As a result, a significant portion of their life history is understudied which in turn has led to limited understanding. Recent advances in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technologies have allowed satellite-tagged Adélie penguins to guide AUV surveys of the marine environment at the Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on the western Antarctic Peninsula. Near real-time data sent via Iridium satellites from the AUVs to a centralized control center thousands of miles away allowed scientists to adapt AUV sampling strategies to meet the changing conditions of the subsurface. Such AUV data revealed the water masses and fine-scale features associated with Adélie penguin foraging trips. During this study, the maximum concentration of chlorophyll was between 30 and 50 m deep. Encompassing this peak in the chlorophyll concentration, within the water-column, was a mixture of nutrient-laden Upper Circumpolar Deep (UCDW) and western Antarctic Peninsula winter water (WW). Together, data from the AUV survey and penguin dives reveal that 54% of foraging by Adélie penguins occurs immediately below the chlorophyll maximum. These data demonstrate how bringing together emerging technologies, such as AUVs, with established methods such as the radio-tagging of penguins can provide powerful tools for monitoring and hypothesis testing of previously inaccessible ecological processes. Ocean and atmosphere temperatures are expected to continue increasing along the western Antarctic Peninsula, which will undoubtedly affect regional marine ecosystems. New and emerging technologies such as unmanned underwater vehicles and individually mounted satellite tracking devices will provide the tools critical to documenting and understanding the widespread ecological change

  11. Kinetoplastid Phylogenomics Reveals the Evolutionary Innovations Associated with the Origins of Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew P; Otto, Thomas D; Aslett, Martin; Armstrong, Stuart D; Bringaud, Frederic; Schlacht, Alexander; Hartley, Catherine; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M; Dacks, Joel B; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Field, Mark C; Ginger, Michael L; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-25

    The evolution of parasitism is a recurrent event in the history of life and a core problem in evolutionary biology. Trypanosomatids are important parasites and include the human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp., which in humans cause African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis, respectively. Genome comparison between trypanosomatids reveals that these parasites have evolved specialized cell-surface protein families, overlaid on a well-conserved cell template. Understanding how these features evolved and which ones are specifically associated with parasitism requires comparison with related non-parasites. We have produced genome sequences for Bodo saltans, the closest known non-parasitic relative of trypanosomatids, and a second bodonid, Trypanoplasma borreli. Here we show how genomic reduction and innovation contributed to the character of trypanosomatid genomes. We show that gene loss has "streamlined" trypanosomatid genomes, particularly with respect to macromolecular degradation and ion transport, but consistent with a widespread loss of functional redundancy, while adaptive radiations of gene families involved in membrane function provide the principal innovations in trypanosomatid evolution. Gene gain and loss continued during trypanosomatid diversification, resulting in the asymmetric assortment of ancestral characters such as peptidases between Trypanosoma and Leishmania, genomic differences that were subsequently amplified by lineage-specific innovations after divergence. Finally, we show how species-specific, cell-surface gene families (DGF-1 and PSA) with no apparent structural similarity are independent derivations of a common ancestral form, which we call "bodonin." This new evidence defines the parasitic innovations of trypanosomatid genomes, revealing how a free-living phagotroph became adapted to exploiting hostile host environments.

  12. Kinetoplastid Phylogenomics Reveals the Evolutionary Innovations Associated with the Origins of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Aslett, Martin; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Bringaud, Frederic; Schlacht, Alexander; Hartley, Catherine; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Dacks, Joel B.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Field, Mark C.; Ginger, Michael L.; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Summary The evolution of parasitism is a recurrent event in the history of life and a core problem in evolutionary biology. Trypanosomatids are important parasites and include the human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp., which in humans cause African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis, respectively. Genome comparison between trypanosomatids reveals that these parasites have evolved specialized cell-surface protein families, overlaid on a well-conserved cell template. Understanding how these features evolved and which ones are specifically associated with parasitism requires comparison with related non-parasites. We have produced genome sequences for Bodo saltans, the closest known non-parasitic relative of trypanosomatids, and a second bodonid, Trypanoplasma borreli. Here we show how genomic reduction and innovation contributed to the character of trypanosomatid genomes. We show that gene loss has “streamlined” trypanosomatid genomes, particularly with respect to macromolecular degradation and ion transport, but consistent with a widespread loss of functional redundancy, while adaptive radiations of gene families involved in membrane function provide the principal innovations in trypanosomatid evolution. Gene gain and loss continued during trypanosomatid diversification, resulting in the asymmetric assortment of ancestral characters such as peptidases between Trypanosoma and Leishmania, genomic differences that were subsequently amplified by lineage-specific innovations after divergence. Finally, we show how species-specific, cell-surface gene families (DGF-1 and PSA) with no apparent structural similarity are independent derivations of a common ancestral form, which we call “bodonin.” This new evidence defines the parasitic innovations of trypanosomatid genomes, revealing how a free-living phagotroph became adapted to exploiting hostile host environments. PMID:26725202

  13. Genome-Wide Scan and Test of Candidate Genes in the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Reveal New Locus Influencing Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Johnstun, Joel A.; Yeh, Jan-Ying; Marine, Melanie; Tavalire, Hannah F.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background New strategies to combat the global scourge of schistosomiasis may be revealed by increased understanding of the mechanisms by which the obligate snail host can resist the schistosome parasite. However, few molecular markers linked to resistance have been identified and characterized in snails. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we test six independent genetic loci for their influence on resistance to Schistosoma mansoni strain PR1 in the 13-16-R1 strain of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. We first identify a genomic region, RADres, showing the highest differentiation between susceptible and resistant inbred lines among 1611 informative restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) markers, and show that it significantly influences resistance in an independent set of 439 outbred snails. The additive effect of each RADres resistance allele is 2-fold, similar to that of the previously identified resistance gene sod1. The data fit a model in which both loci contribute independently and additively to resistance, such that the odds of infection in homozygotes for the resistance alleles at both loci (13% infected) is 16-fold lower than the odds of infection in snails without any resistance alleles (70% infected). Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium is high, with both sod1 and RADres residing on haplotype blocks >2Mb, and with other markers in each block also showing significant effects on resistance; thus the causal genes within these blocks remain to be demonstrated. Other candidate loci had no effect on resistance, including the Guadeloupe Resistance Complex and three genes (aif, infPhox, and prx1) with immunological roles and expression patterns tied to resistance, which must therefore be trans-regulated. Conclusions/Significance The loci RADres and sod1 both have strong effects on resistance to S. mansoni. Future approaches to control schistosomiasis may benefit from further efforts to characterize and harness this natural genetic variation. PMID:26372103

  14. Quantitative weaknesses of the Marcus-Hush theory of electrode kinetics revealed by Reverse Scan Square Wave Voltammetry: The reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane at mercury microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborda, Eduardo; Wang, Yijun; Henstridge, Martin C.; Martínez-Ortiz, Francisco; Molina, Angela; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-08-01

    The Marcus-Hush and Butler-Volmer kinetic electrode models are compared experimentally by studying the reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane in acetonitrile at mercury microelectrodes using Reverse Scan Square Wave Voltammetry. This technique is found to be very sensitive to the electrode kinetics and to permit critical comparison of the two models. The Butler-Volmer model satisfactorily fits the experimental data whereas Marcus-Hush does not quantitatively describe this redox system.

  15. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  16. Molecular characterization of coprophilous fungal communities reveals sequences related to root-associated fungal endophytes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José; Poudel, Ravin; Khidir, Hana H

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the use of molecular methods to characterize the coprophilous fungal communities (CFC) that inhabit the dung of four species of mammalian herbivores at two sites, Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in New Mexico and Wind Cave National Park (WCNP) in South Dakota. Results reveal that CFC from domesticated cattle (Bos taurus) at SNWR, and bison (Bison bison) and black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at WCNP were diverse but dominated primarily by members within eight taxonomic orders, including the rarely cultured and anaerobic order Neocallimastigales. In addition, 7.7% (138 of 1,788) of the sequences obtained from all dung samples were at least 97% similar to root-associated fungal (RAF) sequences previously described from blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), a common forage grass found throughout North America and growing at both study sites. In contrast, 95.8% (295 of 308) of the sequences and four of the total seven operational taxonomic units obtained from pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) dung belonged to the Pleosporalean order. We hypothesize that some herbivore vectors disperse non-systemic (non-clavicipitaceous) fungal endophytes. These dispersal events, it is argued, are most likely to occur via herbivores that occasionally forage and masticate root tissue, especially in arid regions where aboveground vegetation is sparse. The results of this study suggest that some (possibly many) members of the RAF community can expand their ecological role to include colonizing dung. PMID:20842497

  17. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  18. Molecular characterization of coprophilous fungal communities reveals sequences related to root-associated fungal endophytes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José; Poudel, Ravin; Khidir, Hana H

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the use of molecular methods to characterize the coprophilous fungal communities (CFC) that inhabit the dung of four species of mammalian herbivores at two sites, Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in New Mexico and Wind Cave National Park (WCNP) in South Dakota. Results reveal that CFC from domesticated cattle (Bos taurus) at SNWR, and bison (Bison bison) and black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at WCNP were diverse but dominated primarily by members within eight taxonomic orders, including the rarely cultured and anaerobic order Neocallimastigales. In addition, 7.7% (138 of 1,788) of the sequences obtained from all dung samples were at least 97% similar to root-associated fungal (RAF) sequences previously described from blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), a common forage grass found throughout North America and growing at both study sites. In contrast, 95.8% (295 of 308) of the sequences and four of the total seven operational taxonomic units obtained from pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) dung belonged to the Pleosporalean order. We hypothesize that some herbivore vectors disperse non-systemic (non-clavicipitaceous) fungal endophytes. These dispersal events, it is argued, are most likely to occur via herbivores that occasionally forage and masticate root tissue, especially in arid regions where aboveground vegetation is sparse. The results of this study suggest that some (possibly many) members of the RAF community can expand their ecological role to include colonizing dung.

  19. Comparative secretomics reveals novel virulence-associated factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; Wang, Hua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a causative agent of serious human seafood-borne gastroenteritis disease and even death. In this study, for the first time, we obtained the secretomic profiles of seven V. parahaemolyticus strains of clinical and food origins. The strains exhibited various toxic genotypes and phenotypes of antimicrobial susceptibility and heavy metal resistance, five of which were isolated from aquatic products in Shanghai, China. Fourteen common extracellular proteins were identified from the distinct secretomic profiles using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques. Of these, half were involved in protein synthesis and sugar transport of V. parahaemolyticus. Strikingly, six identified proteins were virulence-associated factors involved in the pathogenicity of some other pathogenic bacteria, including the translation elongation factor EF-Tu, pyridoxine 5′-phosphate synthase, σ54 modulation protein, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, transaldolase and phosphoglycerate kinase. In addition, comparative secretomics also revealed several extracellular proteins that have not been described in any bacteria, such as the ribosome-recycling factor, translation elongation factor EF-Ts, phosphocarrier protein HPr and maltose-binding protein MalE. The results in this study will facilitate the better understanding of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus and provide data in support of novel vaccine candidates against the leading seafood-borne pathogen worldwide. PMID:26236293

  20. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-04-22

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as 'setae' on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in 'pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were 'delipidized' to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems.

  1. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-10-16

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa.

  2. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  3. Dose equations for tube current modulation in CT scanning and the interpretation of the associated CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} for automatic tube current modulation (TCM) has a different physical meaning from the traditional CTDI{sub vol} at constant mA, resulting in the dichotomy “CTDI{sub vol} of the first and second kinds” for which a physical interpretation is sought in hopes of establishing some commonality between the two.Methods: Rigorous equations are derived to describe the accumulated dose distributions for TCM. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of their differences. Graphical dose simulations are also provided for a variety of TCM tube current distributions (including constant mA), all having the same scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol}.Results: These convolution equations and simulations show that the local dose at z depends only weakly on the local tube current i(z) due to the strong influence of scatter from all other locations along z, and that the “local CTDI{sub vol}(z)” does not represent a local dose but rather only a relative i(z) ≡ mA(z). TCM is a shift-variant technique to which the CTDI-paradigm does not apply and its application to TCM leads to a CTDI{sub vol} of the second kind which lacks relevance.Conclusions: While the traditional CTDI{sub vol} at constant mA conveys useful information (the peak dose at the center of the scan length), CTDI{sub vol} of the second kind conveys no useful information about the associated TCM dose distribution it purportedly represents and its physical interpretation remains elusive. On the other hand, the total energy absorbed E (“integral dose”) as well as its surrogate DLP remain robust between variable i(z) TCM and constant current i{sub 0} techniques, both depending only on the total mAs =t{sub 0}=i{sub 0} t{sub 0} during the beam-on time t{sub 0}.

  4. Characterization of Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension From REVEAL

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juliana; Parsons, Lori; Hassoun, Paul M.; McGoon, Michael; Badesch, David B.; Miller, Dave P.; Nicolls, Mark R.; Zamanian, Roham T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: REVEAL (the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management) is the largest US cohort of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) confirmed by right-sided heart catheterization (RHC), providing a more comprehensive subgroup characterization than previously possible. We used REVEAL to analyze the clinical features of patients with connective tissue disease-associated PAH (CTD-APAH). Methods: All newly and previously diagnosed patients with World Health Organization (WHO) group 1 PAH meeting RHC criteria at 54 US centers were consecutively enrolled. Cross-sectional and 1-year mortality and hospitalization analyses from time of enrollment compared CTD-APAH to idiopathic disease and systemic sclerosis (SSc) to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results: Compared with patients with idiopathic disease (n = 1,251), patients with CTD-APAH (n = 641) had better hemodynamics and favorable right ventricular echocardiographic findings but a higher prevalence of pericardial effusions, lower 6-min walk distance (300.5 ± 118.0 vs 329.4 ± 134.7 m, P = .01), higher B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels (432.8 ± 789.1 vs 245.6 ± 427.2 pg/mL, P < .0001), and lower diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (Dlco) (44.9% ± 18.0% vs 63.6% ± 22.1% predicted, P < .0001). One-year survival and freedom from hospitalization were lower in the CTD-APAH group (86% vs 93%, P < .0001; 67% vs 73%, P = .03). Compared with patients with SSc-APAH (n = 399), those with other CTDs (SLE, n = 110; MCTD, n = 52; RA, n = 28) had similar hemodynamics; however, patients with SSc-APAH had the highest BNP levels (552.2 ± 977.8 pg/mL), lowest Dlco (41.2% ± 16.3% predicted), and poorest 1-year survival (82% vs 94% in SLE-APAH, 88% in MCTD-APAH, and 96% in RA-APAH). Conclusions: Patients with SSc-APAH demonstrate a unique phenotype with the highest BNP levels, lowest Dlco

  5. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  6. Sedimentary features of the south Texas continental slope as revealed by side-scan sonar and high-resolution seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, R.G.; Kenyon, N.H. ); McGregor, B.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Sedimentary provinces on the south Texas slope have been identified by their acoustic character on long-range side-scan sonar records and high-resolution seismic profiles. Probable lithofacies within these provinces have been identified by core data and by analogy with previously cored acoustic facies. In the northern part of the study area, the East Breaks Slide is a prominent mass-transport feature. Revised bathymetry shows that the slide originated on the upper slope (200-1,000 m), in front of a sandy late Wisconsinan shelf-margin delta, where the gradient is up to 3{degree}. Side-scan sonar data indicates that the slide is a strongly backscattering feature extending more than 110 km downslope from the shelf edge. it consists of two lobes that are separated by a diapiric high. Diapiric highs on the middle slope have blocked most of the flow. borehole data shows that the slide deposit contains intercalated sands and contorted bedding. The slide is therefore attributed to failure of sandy deltaic material deposited close to the shelf edge during the last period of low sea level (late Wisconsinan, circa 11-29 Ka). Core data suggests that the weakly backscattering acoustic facies adjacent to the slide are fine-grained sediments (mudturbidites and hemipelagites) of a slope mud drape. The middle slope in front of the sandy late Wisconsinan shelf-margin delta of the Rio Grande has an intermediate level of backscattering with numerous channels leading to the Sigsbee Deep. Acoustic facies mapping using long-range side-scan sonar matches well with acoustic facies mapping using 3.5-kHz high-resolution seismic profiles.

  7. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  8. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  9. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pt-miR397a and its target genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Chen, Beibei; Yang, Xiaohui; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-06-26

    Recent studies have revealed associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA (miRNA) genes and diseases. However, association studies to decipher the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes remain to be conducted. Here, we investigated the association of growth and wood traits with SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its targets, in 261 individuals from a natural population of Populus tomentosa. Of the 57 SNPs identified in Pt-miR397a, three strongly affect its secondary stability, and SNPs in target sites in Pt-LAC20 and Pt-HSP40 changed the binding affinity of Pt-miR397a. Single-SNP association analysis revealed that SNPs in Pt-miR397a significantly associated with α-cellulose content and stem volume, and SNPs in target genes also associated with growth and wood-property traits. Multi-SNP association analysis with additive and dominant models found that SNPs in six potential target genes associated with at least one trait in common with Pt-miR397a, revealing a possible genetic interaction between Pt-miR397a and its targets. Furthermore, epistasis analysis revealed epistatic interactions between SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its target genes. Thus, our study indicated that SNPs in Pt-miR397a and six target genes affect wood formation and that association studies can reveal the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes.

  10. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pt-miR397a and its target genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhui; Chen, Beibei; Yang, Xiaohui; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA (miRNA) genes and diseases. However, association studies to decipher the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes remain to be conducted. Here, we investigated the association of growth and wood traits with SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its targets, in 261 individuals from a natural population of Populus tomentosa. Of the 57 SNPs identified in Pt-miR397a, three strongly affect its secondary stability, and SNPs in target sites in Pt-LAC20 and Pt-HSP40 changed the binding affinity of Pt-miR397a. Single-SNP association analysis revealed that SNPs in Pt-miR397a significantly associated with α-cellulose content and stem volume, and SNPs in target genes also associated with growth and wood-property traits. Multi-SNP association analysis with additive and dominant models found that SNPs in six potential target genes associated with at least one trait in common with Pt-miR397a, revealing a possible genetic interaction between Pt-miR397a and its targets. Furthermore, epistasis analysis revealed epistatic interactions between SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its target genes. Thus, our study indicated that SNPs in Pt-miR397a and six target genes affect wood formation and that association studies can reveal the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes. PMID:26115173

  11. Revealing the synergetic effects in Ni nanoparticle-carbon nanotube hybrids by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and their application in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanqi; Zhong, Jun; Wang, Jian; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-06-01

    The hybrids of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the supported Ni nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and tested by the hydrolysis reaction of ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3). Data clearly showed the existence of a strong interaction between Ni NPs and thin CNTs (C-O-Ni bonds), which favored the tunable (buffer) electronic structure of Ni NPs facilitating the catalytic process. The hydrolysis process of AB confirmed the hypothesis that the hybrids with a strong interfacial interaction would show superior catalytic performance, while the hybrids with a weak interfacial interaction show poor performance. Our results provide a wealth of detailed information regarding the electronic structure of the NP-CNT hybrids and provide guidance towards the rational design of high-performance catalysts for energy applications.

  12. Mineralogical composition and phase-to-phase relationships in natural hydraulic lime and/or natural cement - raw materials and burnt products revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Racek, Martin; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to modern process of production of cement clinker, traditional burning of natural hydraulic lime below sintering temperature relied on the formation of new phases from ion migration between neighbouring mineral grains composing raw material. The importance of the mineralogical composition and spatial distribution of rock-forming minerals in impure limestones used as a raw material for natural hydraulic lime presents not well explored issue in the scientific literature. To fill this gap, the recent study focuses in detailed analysis of experimentally burnt impure limestones (mostly from Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif). The phase changes were documented by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) coupled with x-ray elemental mapping. The latest allowed for visualization of distribution of elements within raw materials and burnt products. SEM/EDS study brought valuable data on the presence of transitional and/or minor phases, which were poorly detectable by other methods.

  13. Noncytopathic hepatitis A virus induces surface alterations in LLC-MK2 cells revealed by thin sections, negative staining, and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Chavarría, Francisco; Alzamora-González, Libertad; Herrero-Uribe, Libia

    2002-06-01

    Previous electron microscope studies of ultrastructural events during hepatitis A virus replication in experimentally infected cells have used only ultrathin section techniques. Nevertheless, no important differences were observed between infected and uninfected cells. This study was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and negative staining of whole LLC-MK2 cells grown directly on grids covered with support membranes, and then infected with an hepatitis A virus strain. Thin sections of infected and uninfected controls were also analyzed. An intricate web of projections forming a net between cell interfaces was observed only in infected cells. Some of these projections were more than 700 nm long and had ballooning tips. Nevertheless, HAV particles were not visualized in the infected cells. PMID:12298282

  14. Revealing the synergetic effects in Ni nanoparticle-carbon nanotube hybrids by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and their application in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanqi; Zhong, Jun; Wang, Jian; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-05-01

    The hybrids of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the supported Ni nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and tested by the hydrolysis reaction of ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3). Data clearly showed the existence of a strong interaction between Ni NPs and thin CNTs (C-O-Ni bonds), which favored the tunable (buffer) electronic structure of Ni NPs facilitating the catalytic process. The hydrolysis process of AB confirmed the hypothesis that the hybrids with a strong interfacial interaction would show superior catalytic performance, while the hybrids with a weak interfacial interaction show poor performance. Our results provide a wealth of detailed information regarding the electronic structure of the NP-CNT hybrids and provide guidance towards the rational design of high-performance catalysts for energy applications.The hybrids of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the supported Ni nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and tested by the hydrolysis reaction of ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3). Data clearly showed the existence of a strong interaction between Ni NPs and thin CNTs (C-O-Ni bonds), which favored the tunable (buffer) electronic structure of Ni NPs facilitating the catalytic process. The hydrolysis process of AB confirmed the hypothesis that the hybrids with a strong interfacial interaction would show superior catalytic performance, while the hybrids with a weak interfacial interaction show poor performance. Our results provide a wealth of detailed information regarding the electronic structure of the NP-CNT hybrids and provide guidance towards the rational design of high-performance catalysts for energy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Magnified TEM images, high resolution TEM images and the particle size distributions of the samples, the STXM results of a thick tube at different positions, XPS results, stability test. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01168j

  15. Revealing Significant Relations between Chemical/Biological Features and Activity: Associative Classification Mining for Drug Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Pulan

    2012-01-01

    Classification, clustering and association mining are major tasks of data mining and have been widely used for knowledge discovery. Associative classification mining, the combination of both association rule mining and classification, has emerged as an indispensable way to support decision making and scientific research. In particular, it offers a…

  16. Association between Abdominal Fat (DXA) and Its Subcomponents (CT Scan) before and after Weight Loss in Obese Postmenopausal Women: A MONET Study.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Caroline Y; Brochu, Martin; Messier, Virginie; Lavoie, Marie-Ève; Faraj, May; Doucet, Eric; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Dionne, Isabelle J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Subcutaneous fat (ScF) and visceral fat (VF) measurements using CT scan are expensive and may imply significant radiation doses. Cross-sectional studies using CT scan showed that ScF and VF are significantly correlated with abdominal fat measured by DXA (AF-DXA). The association has not been studied after a weight loss. Objective. To determine (1) the associations between AF-DXA and ScF and VF before and after weight loss and (2) the associations between their changes. Methods. 137 overweight/obese postmenopausal women were divided in two groups (1-caloric restriction or 2-caloric restriction + resistance training). AF was assessed using DXA and CT scan. Results. Correlations between AF-DXA and ScF (before: r = 0.87, after; r = 0.87; P < .01) and, AF-DXA and VF (before: r = 0.61, after; r = 0.69; P < .01) are not different before and after the weight loss. Correlations between delta AF-DXA and delta ScF (r = 0.72; P < .01) or delta VF (r = 0.51; P < .01) were found. Conclusion. The use of AF-DXA as a surrogate for VF after weight loss is questionable, but may be interesting for ScF.

  17. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart.

  18. Whole-genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci associated with milk protein composition in 3 French dairy cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, M P; Govignon-Gion, A; Ferrand, M; Gelé, M; Pourchet, D; Amigues, Y; Fritz, S; Boussaha, M; Capitan, A; Rocha, D; Miranda, G; Martin, P; Brochard, M; Boichard, D

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the PhénoFinLait project, a genome-wide analysis was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect milk protein composition estimated using mid-infrared spectrometry in the Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO), and Holstein (HO) French dairy cattle breeds. The 6 main milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and αS1-, αS2-, β-, and κ-caseins) expressed as grams per 100g of milk (% of milk) or as grams per 100g of protein (% of protein) were estimated in 848,068 test-day milk samples from 156,660 cows. Genotyping was performed for 2,773 MO, 2,673 NO, and 2,208 HO cows using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Individual test-day records were adjusted for environmental effects and then averaged per cow to define the phenotypes analyzed. Quantitative trait loci detection was performed within each breed using a linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis approach. A total of 39 genomic regions distributed on 20 of the 29 Bos taurus autosomes (BTA) were significantly associated with milk protein composition at a genome-wide level of significance in at least 1 of the 3 breeds. The 9 most significant QTL were located on BTA2 (133 Mbp), BTA6 (38, 47, and 87 Mbp), BTA11 (103 Mbp), BTA14 (1.8 Mbp), BTA20 (32 and 58 Mbp), and BTA29 (8 Mbp). The BTA6 (87 Mbp), BTA11, and BTA20 (58 Mbp) QTL were found in all 3 breeds, and they had highly significant effects on κ-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin, expressed as a percentage of protein, respectively. Each of these QTL explained between 13% (BTA14) and 51% (BTA11) of the genetic variance of the trait. Many other QTL regions were also identified in at least one breed. They were located on 14 additional chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, and 27), and they explained 2 to 8% of the genetic variance of 1 or more protein composition traits. Concordance analyses, performed between QTL status and sequence-derived polymorphisms from

  19. Whole-genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci associated with milk protein composition in 3 French dairy cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, M P; Govignon-Gion, A; Ferrand, M; Gelé, M; Pourchet, D; Amigues, Y; Fritz, S; Boussaha, M; Capitan, A; Rocha, D; Miranda, G; Martin, P; Brochard, M; Boichard, D

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the PhénoFinLait project, a genome-wide analysis was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect milk protein composition estimated using mid-infrared spectrometry in the Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO), and Holstein (HO) French dairy cattle breeds. The 6 main milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and αS1-, αS2-, β-, and κ-caseins) expressed as grams per 100g of milk (% of milk) or as grams per 100g of protein (% of protein) were estimated in 848,068 test-day milk samples from 156,660 cows. Genotyping was performed for 2,773 MO, 2,673 NO, and 2,208 HO cows using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Individual test-day records were adjusted for environmental effects and then averaged per cow to define the phenotypes analyzed. Quantitative trait loci detection was performed within each breed using a linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis approach. A total of 39 genomic regions distributed on 20 of the 29 Bos taurus autosomes (BTA) were significantly associated with milk protein composition at a genome-wide level of significance in at least 1 of the 3 breeds. The 9 most significant QTL were located on BTA2 (133 Mbp), BTA6 (38, 47, and 87 Mbp), BTA11 (103 Mbp), BTA14 (1.8 Mbp), BTA20 (32 and 58 Mbp), and BTA29 (8 Mbp). The BTA6 (87 Mbp), BTA11, and BTA20 (58 Mbp) QTL were found in all 3 breeds, and they had highly significant effects on κ-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin, expressed as a percentage of protein, respectively. Each of these QTL explained between 13% (BTA14) and 51% (BTA11) of the genetic variance of the trait. Many other QTL regions were also identified in at least one breed. They were located on 14 additional chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, and 27), and they explained 2 to 8% of the genetic variance of 1 or more protein composition traits. Concordance analyses, performed between QTL status and sequence-derived polymorphisms from

  20. Genome-wide Association Study and Admixture Mapping Reveal New Loci Associated with Total IgE Levels in Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Levin, Albert M.; Campbell, Catarina D.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mohajeri, Kiana; O'Roak, Brian J.; Hu, Donglei; Mathias, Rasika A.; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Lurmann, Fred; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G.; Lenoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon M.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Borrell, Luisa N.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Sen, Saunak; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Mack, Steven J.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Eichler, Evan E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Williams, L. Keoki; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a key mediator of allergic inflammation and is frequently elevated in allergic disorders. Objective To identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3,334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1,564 European Americans, and 3,187 African Americans from independent studies. Results We confirmed associations of six genes identified by previous GWAS and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in ZNF365 with total IgE (rs200076616, p=2.3x10−8). We next identified four admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) where local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower levels of IgE (p=4.95x10−8). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and two of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified six genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, two of which replicated in European Americans. Another SNP was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, p=3.7x10−6), and replicated in non-African American samples (p=0.011). Conclusion We confirmed genetic associations at six genes, and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels. PMID:25488688

  1. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. Pathway-Based Genome-wide Association Studies Reveal That the Rac1 Pathway Is Associated with Plasma Adiponectin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Dong; Jiao, Hongxiao; Wang, Kai; Yang, Fuhua; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ahima, Rexford; Arlen Price, R.

    2015-01-01

    Pathway-based analysis as an alternative and effective approach to identify disease-related genes or loci has been verified. To decipher the genetic background of plasma adiponectin levels, we performed genome wide pathway-based association studies in extremely obese individuals and normal-weight controls. The modified Gene Set Enrichment Algorithm (GSEA) was used to perform the pathway-based analyses (the GenGen Program) in 746 European American females, which were collected from our previous GWAS in extremely obese (BMI > 35 kg/m2) and never-overweight (BMI<25 kg/m2) controls. Rac1 cell motility signaling pathway was associated with plasma adiponectin after false-discovery rate (FDR) correction (empirical P < 0.001, FDR = 0.008, family-wise error rate = 0.008). Other several Rac1-centered pathways, such as cdc42racPathway (empirical P < 0.001), hsa00603 (empirical P = 0.003) were among the top associations. The RAC1 pathway association was replicated by the ICSNPathway method, yielded a FDR = 0.002. Quantitative pathway analyses yielded similar results (empirical P = 0.001) for the Rac1 pathway, although it failed to pass the multiple test correction (FDR = 0.11). We further replicated our pathway associations in the ADIPOGen Consortium data by the GSA-SNP method. Our results suggest that Rac1 and related cell motility pathways might be associated with plasma adiponectin levels and biological functions of adiponectin. PMID:26299439

  3. External sense receptors in microdrile oligochaetes (Annelida, Clitellata) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy: Typology and patterns of distribution in the main taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Carlos; Martínez-Ansemil, Enrique

    2010-12-01

    This work summarizes the observations on 30 species of microdriles belonging to the families Naididae (Rhyacodrilinae, Pristininae, Naidinae, Phallodrilinae, and Tubificinae), Phreodrilidae, Lumbriculidae, and Enchytraeidae using scanning electron microscopy. The lumbricid Eiseniella tetraedra, a megadrile species common in typical microdrile habitats, was used for comparison. Microdriles display external ciliate sense structures along the entire body; even at the clitellum and in budding and regeneration zones. According to the shape of the cilia, these sense structures can be divided into receptors of blunt cilia, receptors of sharp cilia, and composed receptors. Sense receptors can be morphologically unconspicuous or clearly defined on sensory buds or papillae. All microdriles studied have receptors of blunt cilia. Enchytraeids have characteristic receptors of short cilia. Pristina (Pristininae), Chaetogaster, Ophidonais, and Stylaria (Naidinae) have receptors of long blunt cilia. Composed receptors were found only in some microdriles and E. tetraedra. Receptors of sharp cilia have been found in most microdriles. Enchytraeids might be the only exception, but sharp cilia are probably present in the amphibiotic Cognettia sphagnetorum. Sensory cells with long sharp cilia might play a rheoreceptor role, and their presence in E. tetraedra and C. sphagnetorum would imply the reappearing of an ancient character that was probably lost with the transit from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. Some lumbriculids have ciliated fields. Anatomically, these structures appear as intermediate between the typical isolate sensory structures of microdriles and the sensillae of the hirudineans. The general pattern in microdriles is that uniciliate receptors and multiciliate receptors are separated, which supports the presumed aquatic origin of the clitellates. PMID:20886570

  4. Combined Analysis of Genome Scans of Dutch and Finnish Families Reveals a Susceptibility Locus for High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol on Chromosome 16q

    PubMed Central

    Pajukanta, Päivi; Allayee, Hooman; Krass, Kelly L.; Kuraishy, Ali; Soro, Aino; Lilja, Heidi E.; Mar, Rebecca; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Nuotio, Ilpo; Laakso, Markku; Rotter, Jerome I.; de Bruin, Tjerk W. A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Peltonen, Leena

    2003-01-01

    Several genomewide screens have been performed to identify novel loci predisposing to unfavorable serum lipid levels and coronary heart disease (CHD). We hypothesized that the accumulating data of these screens in different study populations could be combined to verify which of the identified loci truly harbor susceptibility genes. The power of this strategy has recently been demonstrated with other complex diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. We assessed the largely unknown genetic background of CHD by investigating the most common dyslipidemia predisposing to CHD, familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL), affecting 1%–2% of Western populations and 10%–20% of families with premature CHD. To be able to perform a combined data analysis, we unified the diagnostic criteria for FCHL and its component traits and combined the data from two genomewide scans performed in two populations, the Finns and the Dutch. As a result of our pooled data analysis, we identified three chromosomal regions, on chromosomes 2p25.1, 9p23, and 16q24.1, exceeding the statistical significance level of a LOD score >2.0. The 2p25.1 region was detected for the FCHL trait, and the 9p23 and 16q24.1 regions were detected for the low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) trait. In addition, the previously recognized 1q21 region also obtained additional support in the other study sample, when the triglyceride trait was used. Analysis of the 16q24.1 region resulted in a statistically significant LOD score of 3.6 when the data from Finnish families with low HDL-C were included in the analysis. To search for the underlying gene in the 16q24.1 region, we investigated a novel functional and positional candidate gene, helix/forkhead transcription factor (FOXC2), by sequencing and by genotyping of two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the families. PMID:12638083

  5. Mobile gamma-ray scanning system for detecting radiation anomalies associated with /sup 226/Ra-bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A mobile gamma-ray scanning system has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the Department of Energy's remedial action survey programs. The unit consists of a NaI(T1) detection system housed in a specially-equipped van. The system is operator controlled through an on-board mini-computer, with data output provided on the computer video screen, strip chart recorders, and an on-line printer. Data storage is provided by a floppy disk system. Multichannel analysis capabilities are included for qualitative radionuclide identification. A /sup 226/Ra-specific algorithm is employed to identify locations containing residual radium-bearing materials. This report presents the details of the system description, software development, and scanning methods utilized with the ORNL system. Laboratory calibration and field testing have established the system sensitivity, field of view, and other performance characteristics, the results of which are also presented. Documentation of the instrumentation and computer programs are included.

  6. Green LED associated to 20% hydrogen peroxide for dental bleaching: nanomorfologic study of enamel by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    Dental bleaching is a much requested procedure in clinical dental practice and widely related to dental esthetics. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on the morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the effect of hydrogen peroxide at 20% at neutral pH, cured by the green LED, to evaluate the action of these substances on dental enamel. We selected 15 pre-molars, lingual surfaces were sectioned and previously marked with a central groove to take the experimental and control groups on the same specimen. The groups were divided as follows. The mesial hemi-faces were the experimental group and distal ones as controls. For morphological analysis were performed 75 electron micrographs SEM with an increase of X 43, X 220 and X 1000 and its images were evaluated by tree observers. Was also performed quantitative analysis of the determination of the surface atomic composition of the samples through microanalysis with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The use of hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 20% at photoactivated green LED showed no significant changes in mineral composition of the samples or the dental morphological structure of the same when compared to their controls, according to the study protocol.

  7. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10−8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  8. Osteochondral lesions in distal tarsal joints of Icelandic horses reveal strong associations between hyaline and calcified cartilage abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ley, C J; Ekman, S; Hansson, K; Björnsdóttir, S; Boyde, A

    2014-03-25

    Osteochondral lesions in the joints of the distal tarsal region of young Icelandic horses provide a natural model for the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA) in low-motion joints. We describe and characterise mineralised and non-mineralised osteochondral lesions in left distal tarsal region joint specimens from twenty-two 30 ±1 month-old Icelandic horses. Combinations of confocal scanning light microscopy, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (including, importantly, iodine staining) and three-dimensional microcomputed tomography were used on specimens obtained with guidance from clinical imaging. Lesion-types were described and classified into groups according to morphological features. Their locations in the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC), articular calcified cartilage (ACC), subchondral bone (SCB) and the joint margin tissues were identified and their frequency in the joints recorded. Associations and correlations between lesion-types were investigated for centrodistal joints only. In centrodistal joints the lesion-types HAC chondrocyte loss, HAC fibrillation, HAC central chondrocyte clusters, ACC arrest and ACC advance had significant associations and strong correlations. These lesion-types had moderate to high frequency in centrodistal joints but low frequencies in tarsometatarsal and talocalcaneal-centroquartal joints. Joint margin lesion-types had no significant associations with other lesion-types in the centrodistal joints but high frequency in both the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints. The frequency of SCB lesion-types in all joints was low. Hypermineralised infill phase lesion-types were detected. Our results emphasise close associations between HAC and ACC lesions in equine centrodistal joints and the importance of ACC lesions in the development of OA in low-motion compression-loaded equine joints.

  9. Cis-Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Reveals Replicable Associations with Heroin Addiction in OPRM1

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Hulse, Gary; Wildenauer, Dieter; Kelty, Erin; Schwab, Sibylle; Degenhardt, Louisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Kral, Alex; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Background No opioid receptor, mu 1 (OPRM1) gene polymorphisms, including the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1799971, have been conclusively associated with heroin/other opioid addiction, despite their biological plausibility. We used evidence of polymorphisms altering OPRM1 expression in normal human brain tissue to nominate and then test associations with heroin addiction. Methods We tested 103 OPRM1 SNPs for association with OPRM1 mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex from 224 European Americans and African Americans of the BrainCloud cohort. We then tested the 16 putative cis-quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) SNPs for association with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study and two replication cohorts, totaling 16,729 European Americans, African Americans, and Australians of European ancestry. Results Four putative cis-eQTL SNPs were significantly associated with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study (smallest P=8.9×10−5): rs9478495, rs3778150, rs9384169, and rs562859. Rs3778150, located in OPRM1 intron 1, was significantly replicated (P=6.3×10−5). Meta-analysis across all case-control cohorts resulted in P=4.3×10−8: the rs3778150-C allele (frequency=16%-19%) being associated with increased heroin addiction risk. Importantly, the functional SNP allele rs1799971-A was associated with heroin addiction only in the presence of rs3778150-C (P=1.48×10−6 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-C and P=0.79 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-T haplotypes). Lastly, replication was observed for six other intron 1 SNPs which had prior suggestive associations with heroin addiction (smallest P=2.7×10−8 for rs3823010). Conclusions Our findings show that common OPRM1 intron 1 SNPs have replicable associations with heroin addiction. The haplotype structure of rs3778150 and nearby SNPs may underlie the inconsistent associations between rs1799971 and heroin addiction. PMID:25744370

  10. Gel mobility shift scanning of pectin-inducible promoter from Penicillium griseoroseum reveals the involvement of a CCAAT element in the expression of a polygalacturonase gene

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have described pgg2, a polygalacturonase-encoding gene of Penicillium griseoroseum, as an attractive model for transcriptional regulation studies, due to its high expression throughout several in vitro growth conditions, even in the presence of non-inducing sugars such as sucrose. A search for regulatory motifs in the 5' upstream regulatory sequence of pgg2 identified a putative CCAAT box that could justify this expression profile. This element, located 270 bp upstream of the translational start codon, was tested as binding target for regulatory proteins. Analysis of a 170 bp promoter fragment by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts prepared from mycelia grown in pectin-containing culture medium revealed a high mobility complex that was subsequently confirmed by analyzing it with a double-stranded oligonucleotide spanning the CCAAT motif. A substitution in the core sequence for GTAGG partially abolished the formation of specific complexes, showing the involvement of the CCAAT box in the regulation of the polygalacturonase gene studied. PMID:21637657

  11. Pyrosequencing reveals diverse microbial community associated with the zoanthid Palythoa australiae from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; He, Liming; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-05-01

    Diverse sessile organisms inhabit the coral reef ecosystems, including corals, sponges, and sea anemones. In the past decades, scleractinian corals (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia) and their associated microorganisms have attracted much attention. Zoanthids (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Zoanthidea) are commonly found in coral reefs. However, little is known about the community structure of zoanthid-associated microbiota. In this study, the microbial community associated with the zoanthid Palythoa australiae in the South China Sea was investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. As a result, 2,353 bacterial, 583 archaeal, and 36 eukaryotic microbial ribotypes were detected, respectively. A total of 22 bacterial phyla (16 formally described phyla and six candidate phyla) were recovered. Proteobacteria was the most abundant group, followed by Chloroflexi and Actinobacteria. High-abundance Rhizobiales and diverse Chloroflexi were observed in the bacterial community. The archaeal population was composed of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, with Marine Group I as the dominant lineage. In particular, Candidatus Nitrosopumilus dominated the archaeal community. Besides bacteria and archaea, the zoanthid harbored eukaryotic microorganisms including fungi and algae though their diversity was very low. This study provided the first insights into the microbial community associated with P. australiae by 454 pyrosequencing, consequently laid a basis for the understanding of the association of P. australiae-microbes symbioses.

  12. A Case Control Study Reveals that Polyomaviruria Is Significantly Associated with Interstitial Cystitis and Vesical Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Benjamin J.; O'Connell, Helen E.; Bowden, Scott; Carey, Marcus; Eisen, Damon P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether polyomaviruses contribute to interstitial cystitis pathogenesis. Subjects and Methods A prospective study was performed with 50 interstitial cystitis cases compared with 50 age-matched, disease-free controls for the frequency of polyomaviruria. Associations between polyomaviruria and disease characteristics were analysed in cases. Polyomavirus in urine and bladder tissue was detected with species (JC virus vs. BK virus) specific, real-time PCR. Results Case patients were reflective of interstitial cystitis epidemiology with age range from 26–88 years (median 58) and female predominance (41/50 F). There was a significant increase in the frequency of polyomavirus shedding between cases and controls (p<0.02). Polyomavirus shedding, in particular BK viruria, was associated with vesical ulceration, a marker of disease severity, among interstitial cystitis cases after adjustment for age and sex (OR 6.8, 95% CI 1.89–24.4). There was a significant association among cases between the presence of BK viruria and response to intravesical Clorpactin therapy (OR 4.50, 95% CI 1.17–17.4). Conclusion The presence of polyomaviruria was found to be associated with the ulcerative form of interstitial cystitis. Clorpactin, which has anti-DNA virus activity, was more likely to improve symptoms in the presence of BK viruria. These data from this pilot study suggest associations between polyomaviruria and interstitial cystitis warranting further investigation. PMID:26325074

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Basis of Stalk Cell Wall Components in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojiao; Liu, Zhifang; Wu, Yujin; Huang, Changling

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose are the three main components of the plant cell wall and can impact stalk quality by affecting cell wall structure and strength. In this study, we evaluated the lignin (LIG), cellulose (CEL) and hemicellulose (HC) contents in maize using an association mapping panel that included 368 inbred lines in seven environments. A genome-wide association study using approximately 0.56 million SNPs with a minor allele frequency of 0.05 identified 22, 18 and 24 loci significantly associated with LIG, CEL and HC at P < 1.0×10−4, respectively. The allelic variation of each significant association contributed 4 to 7% of the phenotypic variation. Candidate genes identified by GWAS mainly encode enzymes involved in cell wall metabolism, transcription factors, protein kinase and protein related to other biological processes. Among the association signals, six candidate genes had pleiotropic effects on lignin and cellulose content. These results provide valuable information for better understanding the genetic basis of stalk cell wall components in maize. PMID:27479588

  14. A Genome-Wide Association Study in isolated populations reveals new genes associated to common food likings.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; Amin, Najaf; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; Van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Food preferences are the first factor driving food choice and thus nutrition. They involve numerous different senses such as taste and olfaction as well as various other factors such as personal experiences and hedonistic aspects. Although it is clear that several of these have a genetic basis, up to now studies have focused mostly on the effects of polymorphisms of taste receptor genes. Therefore, we have carried out one of the first large scale (4611 individuals) GWAS on food likings assessed for 20 specific food likings belonging to 4 different categories (vegetables, fatty, dairy and bitter). A two-step meta-analysis using three different isolated populations from Italy for the discovery step and two populations from The Netherlands and Central Asia for replication, revealed 15 independent genome-wide significant loci (p < 5 × 10(-8)) for 12 different foods. None of the identified genes coded for either taste or olfactory receptors suggesting that genetics impacts in determining food likings in a much broader way than simple differences in taste perception. These results represent a further step in uncovering the genes that underlie liking of common foods that in the end will greatly help understanding the genetics of human nutrition in general. PMID:27129595

  15. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Keyan; Tung, Chih-Wei; Eizenga, Georgia C.; Wright, Mark H.; Ali, M. Liakat; Price, Adam H.; Norton, Gareth J.; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Reynolds, Andy; Mezey, Jason; McClung, Anna M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement. PMID:21915109

  16. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling reveals parity-associated hypermethylation of FOXA1.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sagar; Gu, Fei; Wang, Chou-Miin; Lin, Chun-Lin; Liu, Joseph; Wang, Howard; Ravdin, Peter; Hu, Yanfen; Huang, Tim H M; Li, Rong

    2014-10-01

    Early pregnancy in women by the age of 20 is known to have a profound effect on reduction of lifelong breast cancer risk as compared to their nulliparous counterparts. Additional pregnancies further enhance the protection against breast cancer development. Nationwide trend of delayed pregnancy may contribute to the recently reported increase in the incidence of advanced breast cancer among young women in this country. The underlying mechanism for the parity-associated reduction of breast cancer risk is not clearly understood. The purpose of the current study is to use whole-genome DNA methylation profiling to explore a potential association between parity and epigenetic changes in breast tissue from women with early parity and nulliparity. Breast tissue was collected from age-matched cancer-free women with early parity (age < 20; n = 15) or nulliparity (n = 13). The methyl-CpG binding domain-based capture-sequencing technology was used for whole-genome DNA methylation profiling. Potential parity-associated hypermethylated genes were further verified by locus-specific pyrosequencing, using an expanded cohort of parous (n = 19) and nulliparous (n = 16) women that included the initial samples used in the global analysis. Our study identified six genes that are hypermethylated in the parous group (P < 0.05). Pyrosequencing confirmed parity-associated hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands of the FOXA1 gene, which encodes a pioneer factor that facilitates chromatin binding of estrogen receptor α. Our work identifies several potential methylation biomarkers for parity-associated breast cancer risk assessment. In addition, the results are consistent with the notion that parity-associated epigenetic silencing of FOXA1 contributes to long-term attenuation of the estrogenic impact on breast cancer development.

  17. Genome scan of hybridizing sunflowers from Texas (Helianthus annuus and H. debilis) reveals asymmetric patterns of introgression and small islands of genomic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Scascitelli, M; Whitney, K D; Randell, R A; King, Matthew; Buerkle, C A; Rieseberg, L H

    2010-02-01

    Although the sexual transfer of genetic material between species (i.e. introgression) has been documented in many groups of plants and animals, genome-wide patterns of introgression are poorly understood. Is most of the genome permeable to interspecific gene flow, or is introgression typically restricted to a handful of genomic regions? Here, we assess the genomic extent and direction of introgression between three sunflowers from the south-central USA: the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus ssp. annuus; a near-endemic to Texas, Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius; and their putative hybrid derivative, thought to have recently colonized Texas, H. annuus ssp. texanus. Analyses of variation at 88 genetically mapped microsatellite loci revealed that long-term migration rates were high, genome-wide and asymmetric, with higher migration rates from H. annuus texanus into the two parental taxa than vice versa. These results imply a longer history of intermittent contact between H. debilis and H. annuus than previously believed, and that H. annuus texanus may serve as a bridge for the transfer of alleles between its parental taxa. They also contradict recent theory suggesting that introgression should predominantly be in the direction of the colonizing species. As in previous studies of hybridizing sunflower species, regions of genetic differentiation appear small, whether estimated in terms of FST or unidirectional migration rates. Estimates of recent immigration and admixture were inconsistent, depending on the type of analysis. At the individual locus level, one marker showed striking asymmetry in migration rates, a pattern consistent with tight linkage to a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility.

  18. Bacterial Associates of Two Caribbean Coral Species Reveal Species-Specific Distribution and Geographic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Anthony G.; Chadwick, Nanette E.; Liles, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Scleractinian corals harbor microorganisms that form dynamic associations with the coral host and exhibit substantial genetic and ecological diversity. Microbial associates may provide defense against pathogens and serve as bioindicators of changing environmental conditions. Here we describe the bacterial assemblages associated with two of the most common and phylogenetically divergent reef-building corals in the Caribbean, Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides. Contrasting life history strategies and disease susceptibilities indicate potential differences in their microbiota and immune function that may in part drive changes in the composition of coral reef communities. The ribotype structure and diversity of coral-associated bacteria within the surface mucosal layer (SML) of healthy corals were assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and 454 bar-coded pyrosequencing. Corals were sampled at disparate Caribbean locations representing various levels of anthropogenic impact. We demonstrate here that M. faveolata and P. astreoides harbor distinct, host-specific bacteria but that specificity varies by species and site. P. astreoides generally hosts a bacterial assemblage of low diversity that is largely dominated by one bacterial genus, Endozoicomonas, within the order Oceanospirillales. The bacterial assemblages associated with M. faveolata are significantly more diverse and exhibit higher specificity at the family level than P. astreoides assemblages. Both corals have more bacterial diversity and higher abundances of disease-related bacteria at sites closer to the mainland than at those furthest away. The most diverse bacterial taxa and highest relative abundance of disease-associated bacteria were seen for corals near St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) (2.5 km from shore), and the least diverse taxa and lowest relative abundance were seen for corals near our most pristine site in Belize (20 km from shore). We conclude

  19. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  20. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    Leukocyte scan ... will be taken from one of your veins. White blood cells are separated from the rest of the blood ... 111. These cells are considered tagged. The tagged white blood cells are injected back into your body through a ...

  1. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P. falciparum, the limited amount of linkage disequilibrium hinders the power of traditional array-based GWAS. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility and power improvements gained by using whole-genome sequencing for association studies. We analyzed data from 45 Senegalese parasites and identified genetic changes associated with the parasites’ in vitro response to 12 different antimalarials. To further increase statistical power, we adapted a common test for natural selection, XP-EHH (cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity), and used it to identify genomic regions associated with resistance to drugs. Using this sequence-based approach and the combination of association and selection-based tests, we detected several loci associated with drug resistance. These loci included the previously known signals at pfcrt, dhfr, and pfmdr1, as well as many genes not previously implicated in drug-resistance roles, including genes in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on the success of the analysis presented in this study, and on the demonstrated shortcomings of array-based approaches, we argue for a complete transition to sequence-based GWAS for small, low linkage-disequilibrium genomes like that of P. falciparum. PMID:22826220

  2. Genetic Association Analysis Reveals Differences in the Contribution of NOD2 Variants to the Clinical Phenotypes of Orofacial Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Mentzer, Alexander; Nayee, Shalini; Omar, Yasmin; Hullah, Esther; Taylor, Kirstin; Goel, Rishi; Bye, Hannah; Shembesh, Tarik; Elliott, Timothy R.; Campbell, Helen; Patel, Pritash; Nolan, Anita; Mansfield, John; Challacombe, Stephen; Escudier, Michael; Mathew, Christopher G.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a rare, inflammatory disorder of the mouth, in which some patients also have intestinal Crohn's disease (CD). The etiology remains largely unknown, although there is a high prevalence of atopy, and oral granulomas are also seen in other immune disorders particularly CD and sarcoidosis. We investigated whether genetic variants associated with an increased risk of CD, sarcoidosis, or atopy were also associated with susceptibility to OFG. Methods: Patients were stratified clinically as isolated oral manifestations (OFG only) or concurrent intestinal CD (OFG+CD). We genotyped 201 patients and 1023 healthy controls for risk variants in NOD2, IRGM, IL23R, ATG16L1 (CD), BTNL2 (sarcoidosis), and FLG (atopy). The coding regions of the NOD2 gene were screened for rare, potentially pathogenic variants in OFG. Results: A combined analysis of 3 CD-risk variants in NOD2 showed no association with any OFG subgroup. NOD2 p.L1007insC was associated with OFG+CD (P = 0.023) and IL23R p.R381Q with all OFG (P = 0.031). The sarcoidosis risk variant rs2076530 in BTNL2 was associated with all OFG (P = 0.013). We identified 7 rare missense NOD2 alleles in 8 individuals with OFG, 4 OFG-only patients and 4 patients with OFG+CD. There was a significant enrichment of NOD2 variants in the OFG+CD group compared to the OFG-only group (P = 0.008, common variants; P = 0.04, all common and rare variants). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that genetic variants in NOD2 are only associated with OFG in patients with concurrent intestinal disease. A genome-wide association scan is needed to fully define the genetic architecture of OFG. PMID:27306066

  3. Chromatin states reveal functional associations for globally defined transcription start sites in four human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deciphering the most common modes by which chromatin regulates transcription, and how this is related to cellular status and processes is an important task for improving our understanding of human cellular biology. The FANTOM5 and ENCODE projects represent two independent large scale efforts to map regulatory and transcriptional features to the human genome. Here we investigate chromatin features around a comprehensive set of transcription start sites in four cell lines by integrating data from these two projects. Results Transcription start sites can be distinguished by chromatin states defined by specific combinations of both chromatin mark enrichment and the profile shapes of these chromatin marks. The observed patterns can be associated with cellular functions and processes, and they also show association with expression level, location relative to nearby genes, and CpG content. In particular we find a substantial number of repressed inter- and intra-genic transcription start sites enriched for active chromatin marks and Pol II, and these sites are strongly associated with immediate-early response processes and cell signaling. Associations between start sites with similar chromatin patterns are validated by significant correlations in their global expression profiles. Conclusions The results confirm the link between chromatin state and cellular function for expressed transcripts, and also indicate that active chromatin states at repressed transcripts may poise transcripts for rapid activation during immune response. PMID:24669905

  4. Whole exome resequencing reveals recessive mutations in TRAP1 in individuals with CAKUT and VACTERL association

    PubMed Central

    Saisawat, Pawaree; Kohl, Stefan; Hilger, Alina C.; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Gee, Heon Yung; Dworschak, Gabriel C.; Tasic, Velibor; Pennimpede, Tracie; Natarajan, Sivakumar; Sperry, Ethan; Matassa, Danilo S.; Stajić, Nataša; Bogdanovic, Radovan; de Blaauw, Ivo; Marcelis, Carlo L.M.; Wijers, Charlotte H.W.; Bartels, Enrika; Schmiedeke, Eberhard; Schmidt, Dominik; Mäzheuser, Stefanie; Grasshoff-Derr, Sabine; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Ludwig, Michael; Nöhen, Markus M.; Draaken, Markus; Brosens, Erwin; Heij, Hugo; Tibboel, Dick; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Solomon, Benjamin D.; de Klein, Annelies; van Rooij, Iris A.L.M.; Esposito, Franca; Reutter, Heiko M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately half of children with chronic kidney disease and they are the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in children in the US. However, its genetic etiology remains mostly elusive. VACTERL association is a rare disorder that involves congenital abnormalities in multiple organs including the kidney and urinary tract in up to 60% of the cases. By homozygosity mapping and whole exome resequencing combined with high-throughput mutation analysis by array-based multiplex PCR and next-generation sequencing, we identified recessive mutations in the gene TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) in two families with isolated CAKUT and three families with VACTERL association. TRAP1 is a heat shock protein 90-related mitochondrial chaperone possibly involved in antiapoptotic and endoplasmic reticulum-stress signaling. Trap1 is expressed in renal epithelia of developing mouse kidney E13.5 and in the kidney of adult rats, most prominently in proximal tubules and in thick medullary ascending limbs of Henle’s loop. Thus, we identified mutations in TRAP1 as highly likely causing CAKUT or CAKUT in VACTERL association. PMID:24152966

  5. Community Structure Analysis of Methanogens Associated with Rumen Protozoa Reveals Bias in Universal Archaeal Primers

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Tim A.

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of protozoan-associated methanogens in cattle was investigated using five universal archaeal small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer sets. Methanobrevibacter spp. and rumen cluster C (distantly related to Thermoplasma spp.) were predominant. Significant differences in species composition among libraries indicate that some primers used previously to characterize rumen methanogens exhibit biased amplification. PMID:22447586

  6. CNV-based genome wide association study reveals additional variants contributing to meat quality in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality is important both to the meat processing industry and consumers’ purchasing attitudes. Copy number variation (CNV) is a burgeoning kind of variant that may influence meat quality. Herein, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed between CNVs and meat quality traits in swine....

  7. Swollen eyelid reveals multiple intracranial hydatid cysts associated with a palpebral cyst.

    PubMed

    Tzili, N; Ahbeddou, S; Ahmimech, J; Abboud, H; Boutarbouch, M; El Hassan, A; Berraho, A

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a hydatid cyst of the eyelid in a 12-year-old boy associated with cerebral involvement. The patient was initially treated by neurosurgeons for brain cysts. The course after an interval of two months was marked by regression of the palpebral cyst on albendazole.

  8. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals genetic diversity in xanthomonads associated with poinsettia production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. poinsettiicola is traditionally identified as the primary causal agent of bacterial leaf spot on poinsettia (Family Euphorbiaceae). Sixty-seven strains of xanthomonads isolated from lesions associated with several species within Euphorbia were collected over a 64 year peri...

  9. Genome-wide CNV analysis reveals variants associated with growth traits in Bos indicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Apart from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), copy number variation (CNV) is another important type of genetic variation, which may affect growth traits and play key roles for the production of beef cattle. To date, no genome-wide association study (GWAS) for CNV and body traits in be...

  10. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  11. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  12. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-05-19

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  14. Association Studies and Legume Synteny Reveal Haplotypes Determining Seed Size in Vigna unguiculata.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Mitchell R; Huynh, Bao-Lam; da Silva Vinholes, Patricia; Cisse, Ndiaga; Drabo, Issa; Ehlers, Jeffrey D; Roberts, Philip A; Close, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Highly specific seed market classes for cowpea and other grain legumes exist because grain is most commonly cooked and consumed whole. Size, shape, color, and texture are critical features of these market classes and breeders target development of cultivars for market acceptance. Resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses that are absent from elite breeding material are often introgressed through crosses to landraces or wild relatives. When crosses are made between parents with different grain quality characteristics, recovery of progeny with acceptable or enhanced grain quality is problematic. Thus genetic markers for grain quality traits can help in pyramiding genes needed for specific market classes. Allelic variation dictating the inheritance of seed size can be tagged and used to assist the selection of large seeded lines. In this work we applied 1,536-plex SNP genotyping and knowledge of legume synteny to characterize regions of the cowpea genome associated with seed size. These marker-trait associations will enable breeders to use marker-based selection approaches to increase the frequency of progeny with large seed. For 804 individuals derived from eight bi-parental populations, QTL analysis was used to identify markers linked to 10 trait determinants. In addition, the population structure of 171 samples from the USDA core collection was identified and incorporated into a genome-wide association study which supported more than half of the trait-associated regions important in the bi-parental populations. Seven of the total 10 QTLs were supported based on synteny to seed size associated regions identified in the related legume soybean. In addition to delivering markers linked to major trait determinants in the context of modern breeding, we provide an analysis of the diversity of the USDA core collection of cowpea to identify genepools, migrants, admixture, and duplicates.

  15. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  18. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist–hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs. PMID:27489002

  19. A Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Important Roles of DNA Methylation in Human Longevity by Regulating Age-Related Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-Gang; Wu, Huan; Luo, Long-Hai; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2015-01-01

    It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3)] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2)] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity. PMID:25793257

  20. Multilocus sequence typing of hospital-associated Enterococcus faecium from Brazil reveals their unique evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Titze-de-Almeida, Ricardo; Van Belkum, Alex; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; Zanella, Rosemeire C; Top, Janetta; Willems, Rob J L

    2006-01-01

    We studied the genetic relationships between vancomycin-susceptible (n = 11) and -resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE, n = 20) recovered from Brazil using a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. Grouping of allelic profiles revealed six clusters of related sequence types (STs) that differ in no more than two of the seven alleles. Of these, one cluster harbored 16 of the 20 isolates recovered during the first VRE outbreak in Brazil. The ampicillin and gentamicin resistance profiles were stable in the isolates that clustered within the groups I-III. Comparison with the allelic profiles of 139 E. faecium from different geographical regions and origins found in the international database http://www.mlst.net revealed that the Brazilian outbreak clone did not cluster in the previously named complex-17. This genetic complex contains hospital epidemic and clinical isolates recovered from different countries and continents. Twenty two of the 31 Brazilian isolates, including the VRE outbreak clone, clustered apart from the E. faecium isolates from the database, suggesting that these Brazilian isolates have a distinct evolutionary history. PMID:16922628

  1. Proteome-wide analysis reveals an age-associated cellular phenotype of in situ aged human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Kalfalah, Faiza; Florea, Ana-Maria; Sass, Steffen; Kruse, Fabian; Rieder, Vera; Tigges, Julia; Fritsche, Ellen; Krutmann, Jean; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Meyer, Helmut E.; Boege, Fritz; Theis, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed an ex vivo model of in situ aged human dermal fibroblasts, obtained from 15 adult healthy donors from three different age groups using an unbiased quantitative proteome-wide approach applying label-free mass spectrometry. Thereby, we identified 2409 proteins, including 43 proteins with an age-associated abundance change. Most of the differentially abundant proteins have not been described in the context of fibroblasts’ aging before, but the deduced biological processes confirmed known hallmarks of aging and led to a consistent picture of eight biological categories involved in fibroblast aging, namely proteostasis, cell cycle and proliferation, development and differentiation, cell death, cell organization and cytoskeleton, response to stress, cell communication and signal transduction, as well as RNA metabolism and translation. The exhaustive analysis of protein and mRNA data revealed that 77% of the age-associated proteins were not linked to expression changes of the corresponding transcripts. This is in line with an associated miRNA study and led us to the conclusion that most of the age-associated alterations detected at the proteome level are likely caused post-transcriptionally rather than by differential gene expression. In summary, our findings led to the characterization of novel proteins potentially associated with fibroblast aging and revealed that primary cultures of in situ aged fibroblasts are characterized by moderate age-related proteomic changes comprising the multifactorial process of aging. PMID:25411231

  2. Optical quantal analysis reveals a presynaptic component of LTP at hippocampal Schaffer-associational synapses.

    PubMed

    Emptage, Nigel J; Reid, Christopher A; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Timothy V P

    2003-06-01

    The mechanisms by which long-term potentiation (LTP) is expressed are controversial, with evidence for both presynaptic and postsynaptic involvement. We have used confocal microscopy and Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes to study LTP at individual visualized synapses. Synaptically evoked Ca(2+) transients were imaged in distal dendritic spines of pyramidal cells in cultured hippocampal slices, before and after the induction of LTP. At most synapses, from as early as 10 min to at least 60 min after induction, LTP was associated with an increase in the probability of a single stimulus evoking a postsynaptic Ca(2+) response. These observations provide compelling evidence of a presynaptic component to the expression of early LTP at Schaffer-associational synapses. In most cases, the store-dependent evoked Ca(2+) transient in the spine was also increased after induction, a novel postsynaptic aspect of LTP.

  3. Epigenomic profiling of preterm infants reveals DNA methylation differences at sites associated with neural function

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, S; Manning, J R; Cartier, J; Anblagan, D; Bastin, M E; Piyasena, C; Pataky, R; Moore, E J; Semple, S I; Wilkinson, A G; Evans, M; Drake, A J; Boardman, J P

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation (DNAm) plays a determining role in neural cell fate and provides a molecular link between early-life stress and neuropsychiatric disease. Preterm birth is a profound environmental stressor that is closely associated with alterations in connectivity of neural systems and long-term neuropsychiatric impairment. The aims of this study were to examine the relationship between preterm birth and DNAm, and to investigate factors that contribute to variance in DNAm. DNA was collected from preterm infants (birth<33 weeks gestation) and healthy controls (birth>37 weeks), and a genome-wide analysis of DNAm was performed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data were acquired from the preterm group. The major fasciculi were segmented, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity and tract shape were calculated. Principal components (PC) analysis was used to investigate the contribution of MRI features and clinical variables to variance in DNAm. Differential methylation was found within 25 gene bodies and 58 promoters of protein-coding genes in preterm infants compared with controls; 10 of these have neural functions. Differences detected in the array were validated with pyrosequencing. Ninety-five percent of the variance in DNAm in preterm infants was explained by 23 PCs; corticospinal tract shape associated with 6th PC, and gender and early nutritional exposure associated with the 7th PC. Preterm birth is associated with alterations in the methylome at sites that influence neural development and function. Differential methylation analysis has identified several promising candidate genes for understanding the genetic/epigenetic basis of preterm brain injury. PMID:26784970

  4. Analysis of NHANES 1999-2002 data reveals noteworthy association of alcohol consumption with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    Background With the obesity pandemic sweeping the globe and alcohol use on the rise worldwide, there is growing interest in how the two might be linked epidemiologically. The aim of the study was to use data from the NHANES registry from 1999-2002 to analyze the association between obesity and alcohol use. Methods Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between alcohol use and obesity. Risk was assessed separately for men and women. Results Of the 9,193 individuals (49% males), 26.8% of males and 33.6% of females were obese. About 17% of males and 12% of females were never drinkers (less than 12 drinks in their lifetime). After adjusting for age, race, marital status, highest level of education of the individual and spouse, country of origin, annual household income and duration of physical activity in the past 30 days, the odds of obesity were higher in never drinkers compared to ever drinkers in both men and women. Consumption of alcohol for more than 45 days, binge drinking (>5 drinks/day) for more than 90 days and being “ever binge drinker” were associated with significantly higher odds of obesity (in both genders) than those who drank for shorter duration or were “never binge drinkers”. Consumption of alcohol more than the recommended limit for moderate drinking (3 drinks/day in females and 4 drinks/day in males) was associated with increased (OR 1.074, 95% CI 1.072-1.076) and decreased (OR 0.970, 95%CI 0.968-0.972) obesity in females and males respectively. Conclusion Frequent or heavy alcohol consumption is associated with greater odds of being obese. PMID:24974978

  5. Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models.

    PubMed

    Folkesson, Maggie; Sadowska, Natalia; Vikingsson, Svante; Karlsson, Matts; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Länne, Toste; Wågsäter, Dick; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development. PMID:27334697

  6. Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, Maggie; Sadowska, Natalia; Vikingsson, Svante; Karlsson, Matts; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Länne, Toste; Wågsäter, Dick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development. PMID:27334697

  7. Characterization of single disseminated prostate cancer cells reveals tumor cell heterogeneity and identifies dormancy associated pathways.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Lisly; Lam, Hung-Ming; Coleman, Ilsa; Lakely, Bryce; Coleman, Roger; Larson, Sandy; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Xia, Jing; Gulati, Roman; Nelson, Peter S; Montgomery, Bruce; Lange, Paul; Snyder, Linda A; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2014-10-30

    Cancer dormancy refers to the prolonged clinical disease-free time between removal of the primary tumor and recurrence, which is common in prostate cancer (PCa), breast cancer, esophageal cancer, and other cancers. PCa disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are detected in both patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and advanced disease (ADV). However, the molecular and cellular nature of DTC is unknown. We performed a first-in-field study of single DTC transcriptomic analyses in cancer patients to identify a molecular signature associated with cancer dormancy. We profiled eighty-five individual EpCAM⁺/CD45⁻ cells from the bone marrow of PCa patients with NED or ADV. We analyzed 44 DTC with high prostate-epithelial signatures, and eliminated 41 cells with high erythroid signatures and low prostate epithelial signatures. DTC were clustered into 3 groups: NED, ADV_1, and ADV_2, in which the ADV_1 group presented a distinct gene expression pattern associated with the p38 stress activated kinase pathway. Additionally, DTC from the NED group were enriched for a tumor dormancy signature associated with head and neck squamous carcinoma and breast cancer. This study provides the first clinical evidence of the p38 pathway as a potential biomarker for early recurrence and an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Genome-wide association study reveals five nucleotide sequence variants for carcass traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Ryu, J; Woo, J; Kim, J B; Kim, C Y; Lee, C

    2011-08-01

    Genetic associations of nucleotide sequence variants with carcass traits in beef cattle were investigated using a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay. Three hundred and thirteen Korean cattle were genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip, and 39,129 SNPs from 311 animals were analysed for each carcass phenotype after filtering by quality assurance. Five sequence markers were associated with one of the meat quantity or quality traits; rs109593638 on chromosome 3 with marbling score, rs109821175 on chromosome 11 and rs110862496 on chromosome 13 with backfat thickness (BFT), and rs110228023 on chromosome 6 and rs110201414 on chromosome 16 with eye muscle area (EMA) (P < 1.27 × 10(-6) , Bonferonni P < 0.05). The ss96319521 SNP, located within a gene with functions of muscle development, dishevelled homolog 1 (DVL1), would be a desirable candidate marker. Individuals with genotype CC at this gene appeared to have increased both EMA and carcass weight. Fine-mapping would be required to refine each of the five association signals shown in the current study for future application in marker-assisted selection for genetic improvement of beef quality and quantity.

  9. Variation in canopy duration in the perennial biofuel crop Miscanthus reveals complex associations with yield.

    PubMed

    Robson, Paul R H; Farrar, Kerrie; Gay, Alan P; Jensen, Elaine F; Clifton-Brown, John C; Donnison, Iain S

    2013-05-01

    Energy crops can provide a sustainable source of power and fuels, and mitigate the negative effects of CO2 emissions associated with fossil fuel use. Miscanthus is a perennial C4 energy crop capable of producing large biomass yields whilst requiring low levels of input. Miscanthus is largely unimproved and therefore there could be significant opportunities to increase yield. Further increases in yield will improve the economics, energy balance, and carbon mitigation of the crop, as well as reducing land-take. One strategy to increase yield in Miscanthus is to maximize the light captured through an extension of canopy duration. In this study, canopy duration was compared among a diverse collection of 244 Miscanthus genotypes. Canopy duration was determined by calculating the number of days between canopy establishment and senescence. Yield was positively correlated with canopy duration. Earlier establishment and later senescence were also both separately correlated with higher yield. However, although genotypes with short canopy durations were low yielding, not all genotypes with long canopy durations were high yielding. Differences of yield between genotypes with long canopy durations were associated with variation in stem and leaf traits. Different methodologies to assess canopy duration traits were investigated, including visual assessment, image analysis, light interception, and different trait thresholds. The highest correlation coefficients were associated with later assessments of traits and the use of quantum sensors for canopy establishment. A model for trait optimization to enable yield improvement in Miscanthus and other bioenergy crops is discussed.

  10. Variation in canopy duration in the perennial biofuel crop Miscanthus reveals complex associations with yield

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Paul R.H.; Farrar, Kerrie; Gay, Alan P.; Jensen, Elaine F.; Clifton-Brown, John C.; Donnison, Iain S.

    2013-01-01

    Energy crops can provide a sustainable source of power and fuels, and mitigate the negative effects of CO2 emissions associated with fossil fuel use. Miscanthus is a perennial C4 energy crop capable of producing large biomass yields whilst requiring low levels of input. Miscanthus is largely unimproved and therefore there could be significant opportunities to increase yield. Further increases in yield will improve the economics, energy balance, and carbon mitigation of the crop, as well as reducing land-take. One strategy to increase yield in Miscanthus is to maximize the light captured through an extension of canopy duration. In this study, canopy duration was compared among a diverse collection of 244 Miscanthus genotypes. Canopy duration was determined by calculating the number of days between canopy establishment and senescence. Yield was positively correlated with canopy duration. Earlier establishment and later senescence were also both separately correlated with higher yield. However, although genotypes with short canopy durations were low yielding, not all genotypes with long canopy durations were high yielding. Differences of yield between genotypes with long canopy durations were associated with variation in stem and leaf traits. Different methodologies to assess canopy duration traits were investigated, including visual assessment, image analysis, light interception, and different trait thresholds. The highest correlation coefficients were associated with later assessments of traits and the use of quantum sensors for canopy establishment. A model for trait optimization to enable yield improvement in Miscanthus and other bioenergy crops is discussed. PMID:23599277

  11. Rhabdovirus matrix protein structures reveal a novel mode of self-association.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stephen C; Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Verma, Anil; Gholami, Alireza; Talbi, Chiraz; Owens, Raymond J; Stuart, David I; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-12-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus) and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus), revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins.

  12. EDARV370A associated facial characteristics in Uyghur population revealing further pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianqian; Li, Jinxi; Tan, Jingze; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Manfei; Wu, Sijie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Qin, Pengfei; Guan, Yaqun; Jiao, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Sabeti, Pardis C; Tang, Kun; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive variant of human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, had undergone strong positive selection in East Asia. In mice and humans, EDARV370A was found to affect ectodermal-derived characteristics, including hair thickness, hair shape, active sweat gland density and teeth formation. Facial characteristics are also largely ectodermal derived. In this study, taking advantage of an admixed population of East Asian and European ancestry-the Uyghur, we aim to test whether EDARV370A is affecting facial characteristics and to investigate its pleiotropic nature and genetic model. In a sample of 1027 Uyghurs, we discover that EDARV370A is significantly associated with several facial characteristics, in particular shape of earlobe (P = 3.64 × 10 (-6) ) and type of chin (P = 9.23 × 10 (-5) ), with successful replication in other East Asian populations. Additionally, in this Uyghur population, we replicate previous association findings of incisors shoveling (P = 1.02 × 10 (-7) ), double incisors shoveling (P = 1.86 × 10 (-12) ) and hair straightness (P = 3.99 × 10 (-16) ), providing strong evidence supporting an additive model for the EDARV370A associations. Partial least square path model confirms EDARV370A systematically affect these weakly related ectodermal-derived characteristics, suggesting the pleiotropic effect of EDARV370A mainly plays roles in early embryo development. This study extends our knowledge about the pleiotropic nature of EDARV370A and provides potential clues to its adaptation fitness in human evolution.

  13. EDARV370A associated facial characteristics in Uyghur population revealing further pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianqian; Li, Jinxi; Tan, Jingze; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Manfei; Wu, Sijie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Qin, Pengfei; Guan, Yaqun; Jiao, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Sabeti, Pardis C; Tang, Kun; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive variant of human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, had undergone strong positive selection in East Asia. In mice and humans, EDARV370A was found to affect ectodermal-derived characteristics, including hair thickness, hair shape, active sweat gland density and teeth formation. Facial characteristics are also largely ectodermal derived. In this study, taking advantage of an admixed population of East Asian and European ancestry-the Uyghur, we aim to test whether EDARV370A is affecting facial characteristics and to investigate its pleiotropic nature and genetic model. In a sample of 1027 Uyghurs, we discover that EDARV370A is significantly associated with several facial characteristics, in particular shape of earlobe (P = 3.64 × 10 (-6) ) and type of chin (P = 9.23 × 10 (-5) ), with successful replication in other East Asian populations. Additionally, in this Uyghur population, we replicate previous association findings of incisors shoveling (P = 1.02 × 10 (-7) ), double incisors shoveling (P = 1.86 × 10 (-12) ) and hair straightness (P = 3.99 × 10 (-16) ), providing strong evidence supporting an additive model for the EDARV370A associations. Partial least square path model confirms EDARV370A systematically affect these weakly related ectodermal-derived characteristics, suggesting the pleiotropic effect of EDARV370A mainly plays roles in early embryo development. This study extends our knowledge about the pleiotropic nature of EDARV370A and provides potential clues to its adaptation fitness in human evolution. PMID:26603699

  14. Screening of Escherichia coli Species Biodiversity Reveals New Biofilm-Associated Antiadhesion Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rendueles, Olaya; Travier, Laetitia; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Fontaine, Thierry; Magnus, Julie; Denamur, Erick; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial biofilms often form multispecies communities in which complex but ill-understood competition and cooperation interactions occur. In light of the profound physiological modifications associated with this lifestyle, we hypothesized that the biofilm environment might represent an untapped source of natural bioactive molecules interfering with bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation. We produced cell-free solutions extracted from in vitro mature biofilms formed by 122 natural Escherichia coli isolates, and we screened these biofilm extracts for antiadhesion molecules active on a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using this approach, we showed that 20% of the tested biofilm extracts contained molecules that antagonize bacterial growth or adhesion. We characterized a compound, produced by a commensal animal E. coli strain, for which activity is detected only in biofilm extract. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that this compound corresponds to a new type of released high-molecular-weight polysaccharide whose biofilm-associated production is regulated by the RfaH protein. We demonstrated that the antiadhesion activity of this polysaccharide was restricted to Gram-positive bacteria and that its production reduced susceptibility to invasion and provided rapid exclusion of Staphylococcus aureus from mixed E. coli and S. aureus biofilms. Our results therefore demonstrate that biofilms contain molecules that contribute to the dynamics of mixed bacterial communities and that are not or only poorly detected in unconcentrated planktonic supernatants. Systematic identification of these compounds could lead to strategies that limit pathogen surface colonization and reduce the burden associated with the development of bacterial biofilms on medical devices. PMID:21558434

  15. A Simple Test of Class-Level Genetic Association Can Reveal Novel Cardiometabolic Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing; Nunez, Sara; Reed, Eric; Reilly, Muredach P.; Foulkes, Andrea S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterizing the genetic determinants of complex diseases can be further augmented by incorporating knowledge of underlying structure or classifications of the genome, such as newly developed mappings of protein-coding genes, epigenetic marks, enhancer elements and non-coding RNAs. Methods We apply a simple class-level testing framework, termed Genetic Class Association Testing (GenCAT), to identify protein-coding gene association with 14 cardiometabolic (CMD) related traits across 6 publicly available genome wide association (GWA) meta-analysis data resources. GenCAT uses SNP-level meta-analysis test statistics across all SNPs within a class of elements, as well as the size of the class and its unique correlation structure, to determine if the class is statistically meaningful. The novelty of findings is evaluated through investigation of regional signals. A subset of findings are validated using recently updated, larger meta-analysis resources. A simulation study is presented to characterize overall performance with respect to power, control of family-wise error and computational efficiency. All analysis is performed using the GenCAT package, R version 3.2.1. Results We demonstrate that class-level testing complements the common first stage minP approach that involves individual SNP-level testing followed by post-hoc ascribing of statistically significant SNPs to genes and loci. GenCAT suggests 54 protein-coding genes at 41 distinct loci for the 13 CMD traits investigated in the discovery analysis, that are beyond the discoveries of minP alone. An additional application to biological pathways demonstrates flexibility in defining genetic classes. Conclusions We conclude that it would be prudent to include class-level testing as standard practice in GWA analysis. GenCAT, for example, can be used as a simple, complementary and efficient strategy for class-level testing that leverages existing data resources, requires only summary level data in the form

  16. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  17. Proteomic analyses reveal distinct chromatin-associated and soluble transcription factor complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Jiadong; Malovannaya, Anna; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Wei; Guerra, Rudy; Hawke, David H; Qin, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-21

    The current knowledge on how transcription factors (TFs), the ultimate targets and executors of cellular signalling pathways, are regulated by protein-protein interactions remains limited. Here, we performed proteomics analyses of soluble and chromatin-associated complexes of 56 TFs, including the targets of many signalling pathways involved in development and cancer, and 37 members of the Forkhead box (FOX) TF family. Using tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (TAP/MS), we performed 214 purifications and identified 2,156 high-confident protein-protein interactions. We found that most TFs form very distinct protein complexes on and off chromatin. Using this data set, we categorized the transcription-related or unrelated regulators for general or specific TFs. Our study offers a valuable resource of protein-protein interaction networks for a large number of TFs and underscores the general principle that TFs form distinct location-specific protein complexes that are associated with the different regulation and diverse functions of these TFs.

  18. Tumor transcriptome sequencing reveals allelic expression imbalances associated with copy number alterations.

    PubMed

    Tuch, Brian B; Laborde, Rebecca R; Xu, Xing; Gu, Jian; Chung, Christina B; Monighetti, Cinna K; Stanley, Sarah J; Olsen, Kerry D; Kasperbauer, Jan L; Moore, Eric J; Broomer, Adam J; Tan, Ruoying; Brzoska, Pius M; Muller, Matthew W; Siddiqui, Asim S; Asmann, Yan W; Sun, Yongming; Kuersten, Scott; Barker, Melissa A; De La Vega, Francisco M; Smith, David I

    2010-02-19

    Due to growing throughput and shrinking cost, massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to microarrays for the genome-wide study of gene expression and copy number alterations in primary tumors. The sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq) should offer several advantages over microarray-based methods, including the ability to detect somatic mutations and accurately measure allele-specific expression. To investigate these advantages we have applied a novel, strand-specific RNA-Seq method to tumors and matched normal tissue from three patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas. Additionally, to better understand the genomic determinants of the gene expression changes observed, we have sequenced the tumor and normal genomes of one of these patients. We demonstrate here that our RNA-Seq method accurately measures allelic imbalance and that measurement on the genome-wide scale yields novel insights into cancer etiology. As expected, the set of genes differentially expressed in the tumors is enriched for cell adhesion and differentiation functions, but, unexpectedly, the set of allelically imbalanced genes is also enriched for these same cancer-related functions. By comparing the transcriptomic perturbations observed in one patient to his underlying normal and tumor genomes, we find that allelic imbalance in the tumor is associated with copy number mutations and that copy number mutations are, in turn, strongly associated with changes in transcript abundance. These results support a model in which allele-specific deletions and duplications drive allele-specific changes in gene expression in the developing tumor.

  19. Multi-tissue coexpression networks reveal unexpected subnetworks associated with disease

    PubMed Central

    Dobrin, Radu; Zhu, Jun; Molony, Cliona; Argman, Carmen; Parrish, Mark L; Carlson, Sonia; Allan, Mark F; Pomp, Daniel; Schadt, Eric E

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is a particularly complex disease that at least partially involves genetic and environmental perturbations to gene-networks connecting the hypothalamus and several metabolic tissues, resulting in an energy imbalance at the systems level. Results To provide an inter-tissue view of obesity with respect to molecular states that are associated with physiological states, we developed a framework for constructing tissue-to-tissue coexpression networks between genes in the hypothalamus, liver or adipose tissue. These networks have a scale-free architecture and are strikingly independent of gene-gene coexpression networks that are constructed from more standard analyses of single tissues. This is the first systematic effort to study inter-tissue relationships and highlights genes in the hypothalamus that act as information relays in the control of peripheral tissues in obese mice. The subnetworks identified as specific to tissue-to-tissue interactions are enriched in genes that have obesity-relevant biological functions such as circadian rhythm, energy balance, stress response, or immune response. Conclusions Tissue-to-tissue networks enable the identification of disease-specific genes that respond to changes induced by different tissues and they also provide unique details regarding candidate genes for obesity that are identified in genome-wide association studies. Identifying such genes from single tissue analyses would be difficult or impossible. PMID:19463160

  20. Evolutionary Metabolomics Reveals Domestication-Associated Changes in Tetraploid Wheat Kernels.

    PubMed

    Beleggia, Romina; Rau, Domenico; Laidò, Giovanni; Platani, Cristiano; Nigro, Franca; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; De Vita, Pasquale; Scossa, Federico; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran; Papa, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Domestication and breeding have influenced the genetic structure of plant populations due to selection for adaptation from natural habitats to agro-ecosystems. Here, we investigate the effects of selection on the contents of 51 primary kernel metabolites and their relationships in three Triticum turgidum L. subspecies (i.e., wild emmer, emmer, durum wheat) that represent the major steps of tetraploid wheat domestication. We present a methodological pipeline to identify the signature of selection for molecular phenotypic traits (e.g., metabolites and transcripts). Following the approach, we show that a reduction in unsaturated fatty acids was associated with selection during domestication of emmer (primary domestication). We also show that changes in the amino acid content due to selection mark the domestication of durum wheat (secondary domestication). These effects were found to be partially independent of the associations that unsaturated fatty acids and amino acids have with other domestication-related kernel traits. Changes in contents of metabolites were also highlighted by alterations in the metabolic correlation networks, indicating wide metabolic restructuring due to domestication. Finally, evidence is provided that wild and exotic germplasm can have a relevant role for improvement of wheat quality and nutritional traits. PMID:27189559

  1. Evolutionary Metabolomics Reveals Domestication-Associated Changes in Tetraploid Wheat Kernels.

    PubMed

    Beleggia, Romina; Rau, Domenico; Laidò, Giovanni; Platani, Cristiano; Nigro, Franca; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; De Vita, Pasquale; Scossa, Federico; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran; Papa, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Domestication and breeding have influenced the genetic structure of plant populations due to selection for adaptation from natural habitats to agro-ecosystems. Here, we investigate the effects of selection on the contents of 51 primary kernel metabolites and their relationships in three Triticum turgidum L. subspecies (i.e., wild emmer, emmer, durum wheat) that represent the major steps of tetraploid wheat domestication. We present a methodological pipeline to identify the signature of selection for molecular phenotypic traits (e.g., metabolites and transcripts). Following the approach, we show that a reduction in unsaturated fatty acids was associated with selection during domestication of emmer (primary domestication). We also show that changes in the amino acid content due to selection mark the domestication of durum wheat (secondary domestication). These effects were found to be partially independent of the associations that unsaturated fatty acids and amino acids have with other domestication-related kernel traits. Changes in contents of metabolites were also highlighted by alterations in the metabolic correlation networks, indicating wide metabolic restructuring due to domestication. Finally, evidence is provided that wild and exotic germplasm can have a relevant role for improvement of wheat quality and nutritional traits.

  2. Regulators Associated with Clinical Outcomes Revealed by DNA Methylation Data in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Matthew H.; Varn, Frederick S.; Lou, Shaoke; Cheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory architecture of breast cancer is extraordinarily complex and gene misregulation can occur at many levels, with transcriptional malfunction being a major cause. This dysfunctional process typically involves additional regulatory modulators including DNA methylation. Thus, the interplay between transcription factor (TF) binding and DNA methylation are two components of a cancer regulatory interactome presumed to display correlated signals. As proof of concept, we performed a systematic motif-based in silico analysis to infer all potential TFs that are involved in breast cancer prognosis through an association with DNA methylation changes. Using breast cancer DNA methylation and clinical data derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we carried out a systematic inference of TFs whose misregulation underlie different clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Our analysis identified TFs known to be associated with clinical outcomes of p53 and ER (estrogen receptor) subtypes of breast cancer, while also predicting new TFs that may also be involved. Furthermore, our results suggest that misregulation in breast cancer can be caused by the binding of alternative factors to the binding sites of TFs whose activity has been ablated. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive analysis that links DNA methylation to TF binding to patient prognosis. PMID:25996148

  3. Detection of Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogene Dysregulation in B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Russell J.H.; Drier, Yotam; Whitton, Holly; Cotton, M. Joel; Kaur, Jasleen; Issner, Robbyn; Gillespie, Shawn; Epstein, Charles B.; Nardi, Valentina; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas frequently contain genomic rearrangements that lead to oncogene activation by heterologous distal regulatory elements. We utilized a novel approach, termed ‘Pinpointing Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation’ or PEAR-ChIP, to simultaneously map enhancer activity and proximal rearrangements in lymphoma cell lines and patient biopsies. This method detects rearrangements involving known cancer genes, including CCND1, BCL2, MYC, PDCD1LG2, NOTCH1, CIITA, and SGK1, as well as novel enhancer duplication events of likely oncogenic significance. We identify lymphoma subtype-specific enhancers in the MYC locus that are silenced in lymphomas with MYC-activating rearrangements and are associated with germline polymorphisms that alter lymphoma risk. We show that BCL6-locus enhancers are acetylated by the BCL6-activating transcription factor MEF2B, and can undergo genomic duplication, or target the MYC promoter for activation in the context of a “pseudo-double-hit” t(3;8)(q27;q24) rearrangement linking the BCL6 and MYC loci. Our work provides novel insights regarding enhancer-driven oncogene activation in lymphoma. PMID:26229090

  4. Stable isotopes reveal rail-associated behavior in a threatened carnivore

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, John B.; Whittington, Jesse; Clevenger, Anthony P.; Sawaya, Michael A.; St. Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2014-01-01

    Human–wildlife conflict is a leading cause of adult mortality for large carnivores worldwide. Train collision is the primary cause of mortality for threatened grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Banff National Park. We investigated the use of stable isotope analysis as a tool for identifying bears that use the railway in Banff. Rail-associated bears had higher δ15N and δ34S values than bears sampled away from the rail, but similar δ13C values. Because elevated δ15N values are indicative of higher animal protein consumption, rail-associated bears likely preyed on ungulates that foraged along the rail or scavenged on train-killed animals. The higher δ34S values in bear hair could have resulted from bears consuming sulfur pellets spilled on the rail or through the uptake of sulfur in the plants bears or animals consumed. Similar δ13C values suggest that the two types of bears had generally similar plant-based diets. Results from this study suggest that stable isotopes analysis could be used as a non-invasive, affordable, and efficient technique to identify and monitor bears that forage on the railway in Banff and potentially other transportation corridors worldwide. PMID:24936982

  5. Evolutionary Metabolomics Reveals Domestication-Associated Changes in Tetraploid Wheat Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Beleggia, Romina; Rau, Domenico; Laidò, Giovanni; Platani, Cristiano; Nigro, Franca; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; De Vita, Pasquale; Scossa, Federico; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran; Papa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Domestication and breeding have influenced the genetic structure of plant populations due to selection for adaptation from natural habitats to agro-ecosystems. Here, we investigate the effects of selection on the contents of 51 primary kernel metabolites and their relationships in three Triticum turgidum L. subspecies (i.e., wild emmer, emmer, durum wheat) that represent the major steps of tetraploid wheat domestication. We present a methodological pipeline to identify the signature of selection for molecular phenotypic traits (e.g., metabolites and transcripts). Following the approach, we show that a reduction in unsaturated fatty acids was associated with selection during domestication of emmer (primary domestication). We also show that changes in the amino acid content due to selection mark the domestication of durum wheat (secondary domestication). These effects were found to be partially independent of the associations that unsaturated fatty acids and amino acids have with other domestication-related kernel traits. Changes in contents of metabolites were also highlighted by alterations in the metabolic correlation networks, indicating wide metabolic restructuring due to domestication. Finally, evidence is provided that wild and exotic germplasm can have a relevant role for improvement of wheat quality and nutritional traits. PMID:27189559

  6. A proteomic study reveals the diversified distribution of plasma membrane-associated proteins in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanwen; Cao, Jia; Jin, Qihui; Xie, Chunliang; He, Quanyuan; Cao, Rui; Xiong, Jixian; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the heterogeneous protein composition of highly polarized hepatocyte plasma membrane (PM), three PM-associated subfractions were obtained from freshly isolated rat hepatocytes using density gradient centrifugation. The origins of the three subfractions were determined by morphological analysis and western blotting. The proteins were subjected to either one-dimensional (1-D) SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional (2-D) benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride (BAC)/SDS-PAGE before nano-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization--tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS). A total of 613 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 371 (60.5%) proteins were classified as PM or membrane-associated proteins according to GO annotations and the literatures and 32.4% had transmembrane domains. PM proteins from microsomal portion possessed the highest percentage of transmembrane domain, about 46.5% of them containing at least one transmembrane domain. In addition to proteins known to be located at polarized liver PM regions, such as asialoglycoprotein receptor 2, desmoplakin and bile salt export pump, several proteins which had the potential to become novel subfraction-specific proteins were also identified, such as annexin a6, pannexin and radixin. Our analysis also evaluated the application of 1-D SDS-PAGE and 2-D 16-BAC/SDS-PAGE on the separation of integral membrane proteins.

  7. Association Mapping across Numerous Traits Reveals Patterns of Functional Variation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jason G.; Bradbury, Peter J.; Zhang, Nengyi; Gibon, Yves; Stitt, Mark; Buckler, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in natural populations results from a combination of genetic effects, environmental effects, and gene-by-environment interactions. Despite the vast amount of genomic data becoming available, many pressing questions remain about the nature of genetic mutations that underlie functional variation. We present the results of combining genome-wide association analysis of 41 different phenotypes in ∼5,000 inbred maize lines to analyze patterns of high-resolution genetic association among of 28.9 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ∼800,000 copy-number variants (CNVs). We show that genic and intergenic regions have opposite patterns of enrichment, minor allele frequencies, and effect sizes, implying tradeoffs among the probability that a given polymorphism will have an effect, the detectable size of that effect, and its frequency in the population. We also find that genes tagged by GWAS are enriched for regulatory functions and are ∼50% more likely to have a paralog than expected by chance, indicating that gene regulation and gene duplication are strong drivers of phenotypic variation. These results will likely apply to many other organisms, especially ones with large and complex genomes like maize. PMID:25474422

  8. Stable isotopes reveal rail-associated behavior in a threatened carnivore.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, John B; Whittington, Jesse; Clevenger, Anthony P; Sawaya, Michael A; St Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2014-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflict is a leading cause of adult mortality for large carnivores worldwide. Train collision is the primary cause of mortality for threatened grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Banff National Park. We investigated the use of stable isotope analysis as a tool for identifying bears that use the railway in Banff. Rail-associated bears had higher δ(15)N and δ(34)S values than bears sampled away from the rail, but similar δ(13)C values. Because elevated δ(15)N values are indicative of higher animal protein consumption, rail-associated bears likely preyed on ungulates that foraged along the rail or scavenged on train-killed animals. The higher δ(34)S values in bear hair could have resulted from bears consuming sulfur pellets spilled on the rail or through the uptake of sulfur in the plants bears or animals consumed. Similar δ(13)C values suggest that the two types of bears had generally similar plant-based diets. Results from this study suggest that stable isotopes analysis could be used as a non-invasive, affordable, and efficient technique to identify and monitor bears that forage on the railway in Banff and potentially other transportation corridors worldwide.

  9. Stable isotopes reveal rail-associated behavior in a threatened carnivore.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, John B; Whittington, Jesse; Clevenger, Anthony P; Sawaya, Michael A; St Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2014-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflict is a leading cause of adult mortality for large carnivores worldwide. Train collision is the primary cause of mortality for threatened grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Banff National Park. We investigated the use of stable isotope analysis as a tool for identifying bears that use the railway in Banff. Rail-associated bears had higher δ(15)N and δ(34)S values than bears sampled away from the rail, but similar δ(13)C values. Because elevated δ(15)N values are indicative of higher animal protein consumption, rail-associated bears likely preyed on ungulates that foraged along the rail or scavenged on train-killed animals. The higher δ(34)S values in bear hair could have resulted from bears consuming sulfur pellets spilled on the rail or through the uptake of sulfur in the plants bears or animals consumed. Similar δ(13)C values suggest that the two types of bears had generally similar plant-based diets. Results from this study suggest that stable isotopes analysis could be used as a non-invasive, affordable, and efficient technique to identify and monitor bears that forage on the railway in Banff and potentially other transportation corridors worldwide. PMID:24936982

  10. Neural Correlates Associated with Successful Working Memory Performance in Older Adults as Revealed by Spatial ICA

    PubMed Central

    Saliasi, Emi; Geerligs, Linda; Lorist, Monicque M.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate which neural correlates are associated with successful working memory performance, fMRI was recorded in healthy younger and older adults during performance on an n-back task with varying task demands. To identify functional networks supporting working memory processes, we used independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data. Compared to younger adults, older adults showed a larger neural (BOLD) response in the more complex (2-back) than in the baseline (0-back) task condition, in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and in the right fronto-parietal network (FPN). Our results indicated that a higher BOLD response in the VLPFC was associated with increased performance accuracy in older adults, in both the baseline and the more complex task condition. This ‘BOLD-performance’ relationship suggests that the neural correlates linked with successful performance in the older adults are not uniquely related to specific working memory processes present in the complex but not in the baseline task condition. Furthermore, the selective presence of this relationship in older but not in younger adults suggests that increased neural activity in the VLPFC serves a compensatory role in the aging brain which benefits task performance in the elderly. PMID:24911016

  11. Neural correlates associated with successful working memory performance in older adults as revealed by spatial ICA.

    PubMed

    Saliasi, Emi; Geerligs, Linda; Lorist, Monicque M; Maurits, Natasha M

    2014-01-01

    To investigate which neural correlates are associated with successful working memory performance, fMRI was recorded in healthy younger and older adults during performance on an n-back task with varying task demands. To identify functional networks supporting working memory processes, we used independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data. Compared to younger adults, older adults showed a larger neural (BOLD) response in the more complex (2-back) than in the baseline (0-back) task condition, in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and in the right fronto-parietal network (FPN). Our results indicated that a higher BOLD response in the VLPFC was associated with increased performance accuracy in older adults, in the more complex task condition. This 'BOLD-performance' relationship suggests that the neural correlates linked with successful performance in the older adults are related to specific working memory processes present in the complex but not in the baseline task condition [corrected].Furthermore, the selective presence of this relationship in older but not in younger adults suggests that increased neural activity in the VLPFC serves a compensatory role in the aging brain which benefits task performance in the elderly.

  12. Revealing disease-associated pathways by network integration of untargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Pirhaji, Leila; Milani, Pamela; Leidl, Mathias; Curran, Timothy; Avila-Pacheco, Julian; Clish, Clary B; White, Forest M; Saghatelian, Alan; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    Uncovering the molecular context of dysregulated metabolites is crucial to understand pathogenic pathways. However, their system-level analysis has been limited owing to challenges in global metabolite identification. Most metabolite features detected by untargeted metabolomics carried out by liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry cannot be uniquely identified without additional, time-consuming experiments. We report a network-based approach, prize-collecting Steiner forest algorithm for integrative analysis of untargeted metabolomics (PIUMet), that infers molecular pathways and components via integrative analysis of metabolite features, without requiring their identification. We demonstrated PIUMet by analyzing changes in metabolism of sphingolipids, fatty acids and steroids in a Huntington's disease model. Additionally, PIUMet enabled us to elucidate putative identities of altered metabolite features in diseased cells, and infer experimentally undetected, disease-associated metabolites and dysregulated proteins. Finally, we established PIUMet's ability for integrative analysis of untargeted metabolomics data with proteomics data, demonstrating that this approach elicits disease-associated metabolites and proteins that cannot be inferred by individual analysis of these data. PMID:27479327

  13. Association scan of 14,500 nsSNPs in four common diseases identifies variants involved in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We have genotyped 14,436 nsSNPs and 897 MHC tagSNPs in 1000 independent cases of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD), Multiple Sclerosis and Breast Cancer. Comparing each of these diseases against a common control set of 1500 unselected healthy British individuals, we report initial association and independent replication of two new loci for AS, ARTS1 and IL23R, and confirmation of the previously reported AITD association with TSHR and FCRL3. These findings, enabled in part by expanding the control reference group with individuals from the other disease groups to increase statistical power, highlight important new possibilities for autoimmune regulation and suggest that IL23R may be a common susceptibility factor for the major ‘seronegative’ diseases. PMID:17952073

  14. Structures of ribosome-bound initiation factor 2 reveal the mechanism of subunit association.

    PubMed

    Sprink, Thiemo; Ramrath, David J F; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kaori; Loerke, Justus; Ismer, Jochen; Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Spahn, Christian M T

    2016-03-01

    Throughout the four phases of protein biosynthesis-initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling-the ribosome is controlled and regulated by at least one specified translational guanosine triphosphatase (trGTPase). Although the structural basis for trGTPase interaction with the ribosome has been solved for the last three steps of translation, the high-resolution structure for the key initiation trGTPase, initiation factor 2 (IF2), complexed with the ribosome, remains elusive. We determine the structure of IF2 complexed with a nonhydrolyzable guanosine triphosphate analog and initiator fMet-tRNAi (Met) in the context of the Escherichia coli ribosome to 3.7-Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. The structural analysis reveals previously unseen intrinsic conformational modes of the 70S initiation complex, establishing the mutual interplay of IF2 and initator transfer RNA (tRNA) with the ribsosome and providing the structural foundation for a mechanistic understanding of the final steps of translation initiation. PMID:26973877

  15. Using State Space Methods to Reveal Dynamical Associations Between Cortisol and Depression.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Roelof B; Wardenaar, Klaas J; van Ockenburg, Sonja L; Bos, Elisabeth H; de Jonge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the link between etiological factors and depression remains poorly understood. This may in part be due to a focus on strictly linear definitions of causality, derived at the group level. However, etiological relations in depression are likely to be dynamical, nonlinear and potentially unquantifiable with traditional statistics. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the convergent cross-mapping (CCM) method in investigating possible nonlinear relationships between supposed etiological factors and depressive symptomatology. Time series data from six healthy individuals were used to model the relationship between 24-h urinary free cortisol and negative affect using CCM and dewdrop embeddings. CCM is a nonlinear measure of causality, based on state space reconstruction with lagged coordinate embeddings. The results showed that nonlinear dynamical relationships between cortisol and negative affect may be present within participants, as demonstrated by a positive cross-map convergence from negative affect to cortisol. However, analyses also showed that noise and influential points had considerable impact on the results. Convergent crossmapping can be used to reveal possible nonlinear dynamical relationships between etiological factors and psychopathology that may remain undetected with traditional linear causality measures. PMID:26639919

  16. Protein profiles of CCL5, HPGDS, and NPSR1 in plasma reveal association with childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, C; Häggmark, A; Grundström, J; Mikus, M; Lindskog, C; Konradsen, J R; Eklund, A; Pershagen, G; Wickman, M; Grunewald, J; Melén, E; Hedlin, G; Nilsson, P; van Hage, M

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease with many different phenotypes that need to be identified. We analyzed a broad range of plasma proteins in children with well-characterized asthma phenotypes to identify potential markers of childhood asthma. Using an affinity proteomics approach, plasma levels of 362 proteins covered by antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were investigated in a total of 154 children with persistent or intermittent asthma and controls. After screening, chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) were selected for further investigation. Significantly lower levels of both CCL5 and HPGDS were found in children with persistent asthma, while NPSR1 was found at higher levels in children with mild intermittent asthma compared to healthy controls. In addition, the protein levels were investigated in another respiratory disease, sarcoidosis, showing significantly higher NPSR1 levels in sera from sarcoidosis patients compared to healthy controls. Immunohistochemical staining of healthy tissues revealed high cytoplasmic expression of HPGDS in mast cells, present in stroma of both airway epithelia, lung as well as in other organs. High expression of NPSR1 was observed in neuroendocrine tissues, while no expression was observed in airway epithelia or lung. In conclusion, we have utilized a broad-scaled affinity proteomics approach to identify three proteins with altered plasma levels in asthmatic children, representing one of the first evaluations of HPGDS and NPSR1 protein levels in plasma. PMID:27145233

  17. Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Jeong Han; Iqbal, Waqas; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis are yet to be elucidated. To identify the proteins involved in the development of liver tissue inflammation, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet (MCD) developed hepatic steatosis characterized by increased free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride levels as well as alpha-SMA. Two-dimensional proteomic analysis revealed that the change from the normal diet to the MCD diet affected the expressions of 50 proteins. The most-pronounced changes were observed in the expression of proteins involved in Met metabolism and oxidative stress, most of which were significantly downregulated in NASH model animals. Peroxiredoxin (Prx) is the most interesting among the modulated proteins identified in this study. In particular, cross-regulated Prx1 and Prx6 are likely to participate in cellular defense against the development of hepatitis. Thus, these Prx isoforms may be a useful new marker for early stage steatohepatitis. Moreover, curcumin treatment results in alleviation of the severity of hepatic inflammation in steatohepatitis. Notably, curcumin administration in MCD-fed mice dramatically reduced CYP2E1 as well as Prx1 expression, while upregulating Prx6 expression. These findings suggest that curcumin may have a protective role against MCD fed-induced oxidative stress.

  18. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Alleene V.; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S.; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A.; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E.; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development (MCD), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O (CMT2O). We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore we analysed our database of 1,024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  19. Photoactivation of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 2 Reveals Rapid Cancer-Associated Metabolic and Epigenetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase is mutated at a key active site arginine residue (Arg172 in IDH2) in many cancers, leading to the synthesis of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). To investigate the early events following acquisition of this mutation in mammalian cells we created a photoactivatable version of IDH2(R172K), in which K172 is replaced with a photocaged lysine (PCK), via genetic code expansion. Illumination of cells expressing this mutant protein led to a rapid increase in the levels of 2HG, with 2HG levels reaching those measured in patient tumor samples, within 8 h. 2HG accumulation is closely followed by a global decrease in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in DNA, demonstrating that perturbations in epigenetic DNA base modifications are an early consequence of mutant IDH2 in cells. Our results provide a paradigm for rapidly and synchronously uncloaking diverse oncogenic mutations in live cells to reveal the sequence of events through which they may ultimately cause transformation. PMID:26761588

  20. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study Reveals Local Brain Structural Alterations Associated with Ambient Fine Particles in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Ramon; Wang, Xinhui; Reyes, Jeanette; Akita, Yasuyuki; Serre, Marc L.; Vizuete, William; Chui, Helena C.; Driscoll, Ira; Resnick, Susan M.; Espeland, Mark A.; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Goodwin, Mimi; DeNise, Richard; Lipton, Michael; Hannigan, James; Carpini, Anthony; Noble, David; Guzman, Wilton; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Goveas, Joseph; Kerwin, Diana; Ulmer, John; Censky, Steve; Flinton, Troy; Matusewic, Tracy; Prost, Robert; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Swope, Sue; Sawyer-Glover, Anne Marie; Hartley, Susan; Jackson, Rebecca; Hallarn, Rose; Kennedy, Bonnie; Bolognone, Jill; Casimir, Lindsay; Kochis, Amanda; Robbins, John; Zaragoza, Sophia; Carter, Cameron; Ryan, John; Macias, Denise; Sonico, Jerry; Nathan, Lauren; Voigt, Barbara; Villablanca, Pablo; Nyborg, Glen; Godinez, Sergio; Perrymann, Adele; Limacher, Marian; Anderson, Sheila; Toombs, Mary Ellen; Bennett, Jeffrey; Jones, Kevin; Brum, Sandy; Chatfield, Shane; Vantrees, Kevin; Robinson, Jennifer; Wilson, Candy; Koch, Kevin; Hart, Suzette; Carroll, Jennifer; Cherrico, Mary; Ockene, Judith; Churchill, Linda; Fellows, Douglas; Serio, Anthony; Jackson, Sharon; Spavich, Deidre; Margolis, Karen; Bjerk, Cindy; Truwitt, Chip; Peitso, Margaret; Camcrena, Alexa; Grim, Richard; Levin, Julie; Perron, Mary; Brunner, Robert; Golding, Ross; Pansky, Leslie; Arguello, Sandie; Hammons, Jane; Peterson, Nikki; Murphy, Carol; Morgan, Maggie; Castillo, Mauricio; Beckman, Thomas; Huang, Benjamin; Kuller, Lewis; McHugh, Pat; Meltzer, Carolyn; Davis, Denise; Davis, Joyce; Kost, Piera; Lucas, Kim; Potter, Tom; Tarr, Lee; Shumaker, Sally; Espeland, Mark; Coker, Laura; Williamson, Jeff; Felton, Debbie; Gleiser, LeeAnn; Rapp, Steve; Legault, Claudine; Dailey, Maggie; Casanova, Ramon; Robertson, Julia; Hogan, Patricia; Gaussoin, Sarah; Nance, Pam; Summerville, Cheryl; Peral, Ricardo; Tan, Josh; Bryan, Nick; Davatzikos, Christos; Desiderio, Lisa; Buckholtz, Neil; Molchan, Susan; Resnick, Susan; Rossouw, Jacques; Pottern, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5: PM with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 μm) has been linked with cognitive deficits in older adults. Using fine-grained voxel-wise analyses, we examined whether PM2.5 exposure also affects brain structure. Methods: Brain MRI data were obtained from 1365 women (aged 71–89) in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study and local brain volumes were estimated using RAVENS (regional analysis of volumes in normalized space). Based on geocoded residential locations and air monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we employed a spatiotemporal model to estimate long-term (3-year average) exposure to ambient PM2.5 preceding MRI scans. Voxel-wise linear regression models were fit separately to gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) maps to analyze associations between brain structure and PM2.5 exposure, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Increased PM2.5 exposure was associated with smaller volumes in both cortical GM and subcortical WM areas. For GM, associations were clustered in the bilateral superior, middle, and medial frontal gyri. For WM, the largest clusters were in the frontal lobe, with smaller clusters in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. No statistically significant associations were observed between PM2.5 exposure and hippocampal volumes. Conclusions: Long-term PM2.5 exposures may accelerate loss of both GM and WM in older women. While our previous work linked smaller WM volumes to PM2.5, this is the first neuroimaging study reporting associations between air pollution exposure and smaller volumes of cortical GM. Our data support the hypothesized synaptic neurotoxicity of airborne particles. PMID:27790103

  1. Detection of Copy Number Variants Reveals Association of Cilia Genes with Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yonghui; Zhao, Huizhi; Sheng, Xiaoming; Zou, Jizhen; Lip, Va; Xie, Hua; Guo, Jin; Shao, Hong; Bao, Yihua; Shen, Jianliang; Niu, Bo; Gusella, James F.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs) detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. Methods The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants) CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. Results Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV). Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05). Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24–5.87). Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05), corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27–8.01). Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. Conclusions Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis. PMID:23349908

  2. Gene expression profiling of canine osteosarcoma reveals genes associated with short and long survival times

    PubMed Central

    Selvarajah, Gayathri T; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha AS; Fieten, Hille; Mol, Jan A

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling of spontaneous tumors in the dog offers a unique translational opportunity to identify prognostic biomarkers and signaling pathways that are common to both canine and human. Osteosarcoma (OS) accounts for approximately 80% of all malignant bone tumors in the dog. Canine OS are highly comparable with their human counterpart with respect to histology, high metastatic rate and poor long-term survival. This study investigates the prognostic gene profile among thirty-two primary canine OS using canine specific cDNA microarrays representing 20,313 genes to identify genes and cellular signaling pathways associated with survival. This, the first report of its kind in dogs with OS, also demonstrates the advantages of cross-species comparison with human OS. Results The 32 tumors were classified into two prognostic groups based on survival time (ST). They were defined as short survivors (dogs with poor prognosis: surviving fewer than 6 months) and long survivors (dogs with better prognosis: surviving 6 months or longer). Fifty-one transcripts were found to be differentially expressed, with common upregulation of these genes in the short survivors. The overexpressed genes in short survivors are associated with possible roles in proliferation, drug resistance or metastasis. Several deregulated pathways identified in the present study, including Wnt signaling, Integrin signaling and Chemokine/cytokine signaling are comparable to the pathway analysis conducted on human OS gene profiles, emphasizing the value of the dog as an excellent model for humans. Conclusion A molecular-based method for discrimination of outcome for short and long survivors is useful for future prognostic stratification at initial diagnosis, where genes and pathways associated with cell cycle/proliferation, drug resistance and metastasis could be potential targets for diagnosis and therapy. The similarities between human and canine OS makes the dog a suitable pre

  3. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A.; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G.; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G.; Davis, Stephen R.; Spelman, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  4. Aflatoxin conducive and non-conducive growth conditions reveal new gene associations with aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael S; Conners, Shannon B; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Kelly, Robert M; Payne, Gary A

    2005-06-01

    Research on aflatoxin (AF) production has traditionally focused on defining the AF biosynthetic pathway with the goal of identifying potential targets for intervention. To understand the effect of nitrogen source, carbon source, temperature, and pH on the regulation of AF biosynthesis, a targeted cDNA microarray consisting of genes associated with AF production over time was employed. Expression profiles for genes involved in AF biosynthesis grouped into five clades. A putative regulon was identified consisting of 20 genes that were induced in the conducive nitrogen and pH treatments and the non-conducive carbon and temperature treatments, as well as four other putative regulons corresponding to each of the four variables studied. Seventeen genes exhibited consistent induction/repression profiles across all the experiments. One of these genes was consistently downregulated with AF production. Overexpression of this gene resulted in repression of AF biosynthesis. The cellular function of this gene is currently unresolved.

  5. Structure of the CIAP2 Ring Domain Reveal Conformational Changes Associated With E2 Recruitment

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Linke, K.; Feltham, R.; Schumacher, F.-R.; Smith, C.A.; Vaux, D.L.; Silke, J.; Day, C.L.

    2009-05-19

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins are key negative regulators of cell death that are highly expressed in many cancers. Cell death caused by antagonists that bind to IAP proteins is associated with their ubiquitylation and degradation. The RING domain at the C terminus of IAP proteins is pivotal. Here we report the crystal structures of the cIAP2 RING domain homodimer alone, and bound to the ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzyme UbcH5b. These structures show that small changes in the RING domain accompany E2 binding. By mutating residues at the E2-binding surface, we show that autoubiquitylation is required for regulation of IAP abundance. Dimer formation is also critical, and mutation of a single C-terminal residue abrogated dimer formation and E3 ligase activity was diminished. We further demonstrate that disruption of E2 binding, or dimerization, stabilizes IAP proteins against IAP antagonists in vivo.

  6. Deep sequencing reveals a novel closterovirus associated with wild rose leaf rosette disease.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Yang, Zuokun; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guoping; Ning, Guogui; Xu, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    A bizarre virus-like symptom of a leaf rosette formed by dense small leaves on branches of wild roses (Rosa multiflora Thunb.), designated as 'wild rose leaf rosette disease' (WRLRD), was observed in China. To investigate the presumed causal virus, a wild rose sample affected by WRLRD was subjected to deep sequencing of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for a complete survey of the infecting viruses and viroids. The assembly of siRNAs led to the reconstruction of the complete genomes of three known viruses, namely Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Blackberry chlorotic ringspot virus (BCRV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), and of a novel virus provisionally named 'rose leaf rosette-associated virus' (RLRaV). Phylogenetic analysis clearly placed RLRaV alongside members of the genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae. Genome organization of RLRaV RNA (17,653 nucleotides) showed 13 open reading frames (ORFs), except ORF1 and the quintuple gene block, most of which showed no significant similarities with known viral proteins, but, instead, had detectable identities to fungal or bacterial proteins. Additional novel molecular features indicated that RLRaV seems to be the most complex virus among the known genus members. To our knowledge, this is the first report of WRLRD and its associated closterovirus, as well as two ilarviruses and one capilovirus, infecting wild roses. Our findings present novel information about the closterovirus and the aetiology of this rose disease which should facilitate its control. More importantly, the novel features of RLRaV help to clarify the molecular and evolutionary features of the closterovirus.

  7. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  8. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants. PMID:26519390

  9. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  10. Structural analysis of coxsackievirus A7 reveals conformational changes associated with uncoating.

    PubMed

    Seitsonen, Jani J T; Shakeel, Shabih; Susi, Petri; Pandurangan, Arun P; Sinkovits, Robert S; Hyvönen, Heini; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Topf, Maya; Hyypiä, Timo; Butcher, Sarah J

    2012-07-01

    Coxsackievirus A7 (CAV7) is a rarely detected and poorly characterized serotype of the Enterovirus species Human enterovirus A (HEV-A) within the Picornaviridae family. The CAV7-USSR strain has caused polio-like epidemics and was originally thought to represent the fourth poliovirus type, but later evidence linked this strain to the CAV7-Parker prototype. Another isolate, CAV7-275/58, was also serologically similar to Parker but was noninfectious in a mouse model. Sequencing of the genomic region encoding the capsid proteins of the USSR and 275/58 strains and subsequent comparison with the corresponding amino acid sequences of the Parker strain revealed that the Parker and USSR strains are nearly identical, while the 275/58 strain is more distant. Using electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction, the structures of the CAV7-USSR virion and empty capsid were resolved to 8.2-Å and 6.1-Å resolutions, respectively. This is one of the first detailed structural analyses of the HEV-A species. Using homology modeling, reconstruction segmentation, and flexible fitting, we constructed a pseudoatomic T = 1 (pseudo T = 3) model incorporating the three major capsid proteins (VP1 to VP3), addressed the conformational changes of the capsid and its constituent viral proteins occurring during RNA release, and mapped the capsid proteins' variable regions to the structure. During uncoating, VP4 and RNA are released analogously to poliovirus 1, the interfaces of VP2 and VP3 are rearranged, and VP1 rotates. Variable regions in the capsid proteins were predicted to map mainly to the surface of VP1 and are thus likely to affect the tropism and pathogenicity of CAV7.

  11. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production.

  12. A new genome scan for primary nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux emphasizes high genetic heterogeneity and shows linkage and association with various genes already implicated in urinary tract development

    PubMed Central

    Darlow, J M; Dobson, M G; Darlay, R; Molony, C M; Hunziker, M; Green, A J; Cordell, H J; Puri, P; Barton, D E

    2014-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), the retrograde flow of urine from the bladder toward the kidneys, results from a developmental anomaly of the vesicoureteric valve mechanism, and is often associated with other urinary tract anomalies. It is the most common urological problem in children, with an estimated prevalence of 1–2%, and is a major cause of hypertension in childhood and of renal failure in childhood or adult life. We present the results of a genetic linkage and association scan using 900,000 markers. Our linkage results show a large number of suggestive linkage peaks, with different results in two groups of families, suggesting that VUR is even more genetically heterogeneous than previously imagined. The only marker achieving P < 0.02 for linkage in both groups of families is 270 kb from EMX2. In three sibships, we found recessive linkage to KHDRBS3, previously reported in a Somali family. In another family we discovered sex-reversal associated with VUR, implicating PRKX, for which there was weak support for dominant linkage in the overall data set. Several other candidate genes are suggested by our linkage or association results, and four of our linkage peaks are within copy-number variants recently found to be associated with renal hypodysplasia. Undoubtedly there are many genes related to VUR. Our study gives support to some loci suggested by earlier studies as well as suggesting new ones, and provides numerous indications for further investigations. PMID:24498626

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  14. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  15. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  16. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That Enzymes of the Ketogenic Pathway Are Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Cretu, Daniela; Musrap, Natasha; Karagiannis, George S.; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P.; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Mizokami, Atsushi; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. One common treatment is androgen-deprivation therapy, which reduces symptoms in most patients. However, over time, patients develop tumors that are androgen-independent and ultimately fatal. The mechanisms that cause this transition remain largely unknown, and as a result, there are no effective treatments against androgen-independent prostate cancer. As a model platform, we used the LNCaP cell line and its androgen-independent derivative, LNCaP-SF. Utilizing stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry, we assessed the differential global protein expression of the two cell lines. Our proteomic analysis resulted in the quantification of 3355 proteins. Bioinformatic prioritization resulted in 42 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated proteins in LNCaP-SF cells relative to LNCaP cells. Our top candidate, HMGCS2, an enzyme involved in ketogenesis, was found to be 9-fold elevated in LNCaP-SF cells, based on peptide ratios. After analyzing the remaining enzymes of this pathway (ACAT1, BDH1, HMGCL, and OXCT1), we observed increased expression of these proteins in the LNCaP-SF cells, which was further verified using Western blotting. To determine whether these enzymes were up-regulated in clinical samples, we performed quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry on human prostate cancer tissues, from which we observed significantly increased transcript and protein levels in high-grade cancer (Gleason grade ≥ 8). In addition, we observed significant elevation of these enzymes in the LuCaP 96AI castration-resistant xenograft. Further assessment of ACAT1 on human castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer tissues revealed substantially elevated expression of ACAT1 in these specimens. Taken together, our results indicate that enzymes of the ketogenic pathway are up-regulated in high-grade prostate cancer and could serve as

  17. Quantitative proteomics reveals that enzymes of the ketogenic pathway are associated with prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Saraon, Punit; Cretu, Daniela; Musrap, Natasha; Karagiannis, George S; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Mizokami, Atsushi; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. One common treatment is androgen-deprivation therapy, which reduces symptoms in most patients. However, over time, patients develop tumors that are androgen-independent and ultimately fatal. The mechanisms that cause this transition remain largely unknown, and as a result, there are no effective treatments against androgen-independent prostate cancer. As a model platform, we used the LNCaP cell line and its androgen-independent derivative, LNCaP-SF. Utilizing stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry, we assessed the differential global protein expression of the two cell lines. Our proteomic analysis resulted in the quantification of 3355 proteins. Bioinformatic prioritization resulted in 42 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated proteins in LNCaP-SF cells relative to LNCaP cells. Our top candidate, HMGCS2, an enzyme involved in ketogenesis, was found to be 9-fold elevated in LNCaP-SF cells, based on peptide ratios. After analyzing the remaining enzymes of this pathway (ACAT1, BDH1, HMGCL, and OXCT1), we observed increased expression of these proteins in the LNCaP-SF cells, which was further verified using Western blotting. To determine whether these enzymes were up-regulated in clinical samples, we performed quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry on human prostate cancer tissues, from which we observed significantly increased transcript and protein levels in high-grade cancer (Gleason grade ≥ 8). In addition, we observed significant elevation of these enzymes in the LuCaP 96AI castration-resistant xenograft. Further assessment of ACAT1 on human castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer tissues revealed substantially elevated expression of ACAT1 in these specimens. Taken together, our results indicate that enzymes of the ketogenic pathway are up-regulated in high-grade prostate cancer and could serve as

  18. Acute exercise stress reveals cerebrovascular benefits associated with moderate gains in cardiorespiratory fitness.

    PubMed

    Brugniaux, Julien V; Marley, Christopher J; Hodson, Danielle A; New, Karl J; Bailey, Damian M

    2014-12-01

    Elevated cardiorespiratory fitness improves resting cerebral perfusion, although to what extent this is further amplified during acute exposure to exercise stress and the corresponding implications for cerebral oxygenation remain unknown. To examine this, we recruited 12 moderately active and 12 sedentary healthy males. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and prefrontal cortical oxyhemoglobin (cO(2)Hb) concentration were monitored continuously at rest and throughout an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Despite a subtle elevation in the maximal oxygen uptake (active: 52±9 ml/kg per minute versus sedentary: 33±5 ml/kg per minute, P<0.05), resting MCAv was not different between groups. However, more marked increases in both MCAv (+28±13% versus +18±6%, P<0.05) and cO(2)Hb (+5±4% versus -2±3%, P<0.05) were observed in the active group during the transition from low- to moderate-intensity exercise. Collectively, these findings indicate that the long-term benefits associated with moderate increase in physical activity are not observed in the resting state and only become apparent when the cerebrovasculature is challenged by acute exertional stress. This has important clinical implications when assessing the true extent of cerebrovascular adaptation. PMID:25269518

  19. Early Miocene amber inclusions from Mexico reveal antiquity of mangrove-associated copepods

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Rony; Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Serrano-Sánchez, María de Lourdes; Centeno-García, Elena; Vega, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Copepods are aquatic microcrustaceans and represent the most abundant metazoans on Earth, outnumbering insects and nematode worms. Their position of numerical world predominance can be attributed to three principal radiation events, i.e. their major habitat shift into the marine plankton, the colonization of freshwater and semiterrestrial environments, and the evolution of parasitism. Their variety of life strategies has generated an incredible morphological plasticity and disparity in body form and shape that are arguably unrivalled among the Crustacea. Although their chitinous exoskeleton is largely resistant to chemical degradation copepods are exceedingly scarce in the geological record with limited body fossil evidence being available for only three of the eight currently recognized orders. The preservation of aquatic arthropods in amber is unusual but offers a unique insight into ancient subtropical and tropical ecosystems. Here we report the first discovery of amber-preserved harpacticoid copepods, represented by ten putative species belonging to five families, based on Early Miocene (22.8 million years ago) samples from Chiapas, southeast Mexico. Their close resemblance to Recent mangrove-associated copepods highlights the antiquity of the specialized harpacticoid fauna living in this habitat. With the taxa reported herein, the Mexican amber holds the greatest diversity of fossil copepods worldwide. PMID:27731321

  20. Genomic regions associated with the nitrogen limitation response revealed in a global wheat core collection.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Jacques; Ravel, C; Jaubertie, J P; Duperrier, B; Gardet, O; Heumez, E; Pissavy, A L; Charmet, G; Le Gouis, J; Balfourier, F

    2013-03-01

    Modern wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties in Western Europe have mainly been bred, and selected in conditions where high levels of nitrogen-rich fertilizer are applied. However, high input crop management has greatly increased the risk of nitrates leaching into groundwater with negative impacts on the environment. To investigate wheat nitrogen tolerance characteristics that could be adapted to low input crop management, we supplied 196 accessions of a wheat core collection of old and modern cultivars with high or moderate amounts of nitrogen fertilizer in an experimental network consisting of three sites and 2 years. The main breeding traits were assessed including grain yield and grain protein content. The response to nitrogen level was estimated for grain yield and grain number per m(2) using both the difference and the ratio between performance at the two input levels and the slope of joint regression. A large variability was observed for all the traits studied and the response to nitrogen level. Whole genome association mapping was carried out using 899 molecular markers taking into account the five ancestral group structure of the collection. We identified 54 main regions involving almost all chromosomes that influence yield and its components, plant height, heading date and grain protein concentration. Twenty-three regions, including several genes, spread over 16 chromosomes were involved in the response to nitrogen level. These chromosomal regions may be good candidates to be used in breeding programs to improve the performance of wheat varieties at moderate nitrogen input levels.

  1. Seahorse Brood Pouch Transcriptome Reveals Common Genes Associated with Vertebrate Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Camilla M; Griffith, Oliver W; Qi, Weihong; Thompson, Michael B; Wilson, Anthony B

    2015-12-01

    Viviparity (live birth) has evolved more than 150 times in vertebrates, and represents an excellent model system for studying the evolution of complex traits. There are at least 23 independent origins of viviparity in fishes, with syngnathid fishes (seahorses and pipefish) unique in exhibiting male pregnancy. Male seahorses and pipefish have evolved specialized brooding pouches that provide protection, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and limited nutrient provisioning to developing embryos. Pouch structures differ widely across the Syngnathidae, offering an ideal opportunity to study the evolution of reproductive complexity. However, the physiological and genetic changes facilitating male pregnancy are largely unknown. We used transcriptome profiling to examine pouch gene expression at successive gestational stages in a syngnathid with the most complex brood pouch morphology, the seahorse Hippocampus abdominalis. Using a unique time-calibrated RNA-seq data set including brood pouch at key stages of embryonic development, we identified transcriptional changes associated with brood pouch remodeling, nutrient and waste transport, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and immunological protection of developing embryos at conception, development and parturition. Key seahorse transcripts share homology with genes of reproductive function in pregnant mammals, reptiles, and other live-bearing fish, suggesting a common toolkit of genes regulating pregnancy in divergent evolutionary lineages.

  2. Transcriptome profiling of trichome-less reveals genes associated with multicellular trichome development in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Wang, Yun-Li; Yao, Dan-Qing; Zhu, Wen-Ying; Chen, Long; He, Huan-Le; Pan, Jun-Song; Cai, Run

    2015-10-01

    Trichomes on plants, similar to fine hairs on animal and human bodies, play important roles in plant survival and development. They also represent a useful model for the study of cell differentiation. Although the regulatory gene network of unicellular trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana has been well studied, the genes that regulate multicellular trichome development remain unclear. We confirmed that Cucumis sativus (cucumber) trichomes are multicellular and unbranched, but identified a spontaneous mutant, trichome-less (tril), which presented a completely glabrous phenotype. We compared the transcriptome profilings of the tril mutant and wild type using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing technology. A total of 991 genes exhibited differential expression: 518 were up-regulated and 473 were down-regulated. We further identified 62 differentially expressed genes that encoded crucial transcription factors and were subdivided into seven categories: homeodomain, MADS, MYB, and WRKY domains, ethylene-responsive, zinc finger, and other transcription factor genes. We further analyzed the tissue-expression profiles of two candidate genes, GLABRA2-like and ATHB51-like, using qRT-PCR and found that these two genes were specifically expressed in the epidermis and trichomes, respectively. These results and the tril mutant provide useful tools to study the molecular networks associated with multicellular trichome development.

  3. A Novel Method Testing the Ability to Imitate Composite Emotional Expressions Reveals an Association with Empathy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Justin H. G.; Nicolson, Andrew T. A.; Clephan, Katie J.; de Grauw, Haro; Perrett, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Social communication relies on intentional control of emotional expression. Its variability across cultures suggests important roles for imitation in developing control over enactment of subtly different facial expressions and therefore skills in emotional communication. Both empathy and the imitation of an emotionally communicative expression may rely on a capacity to share both the experience of an emotion and the intention or motor plan associated with its expression. Therefore, we predicted that facial imitation ability would correlate with empathic traits. We built arrays of visual stimuli by systematically blending three basic emotional expressions in controlled proportions. Raters then assessed accuracy of imitation by reconstructing the same arrays using photographs of participants’ attempts at imitations of the stimuli. Accuracy was measured as the mean proximity of the participant photographs to the target stimuli in the array. Levels of performance were high, and rating was highly reliable. More empathic participants, as measured by the empathy quotient (EQ), were better facial imitators and, in particular, performed better on the more complex, blended stimuli. This preliminary study offers a simple method for the measurement of facial imitation accuracy and supports the hypothesis that empathic functioning may utilise motor control mechanisms which are also used for emotional expression. PMID:23626756

  4. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooijers, Koos; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Nijtmans, Leo G.; Agami, Reuven

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations often affect components of the mitochondrial translation machinery. Here we perform ribosome profiling to measure mitochondrial translation at nucleotide resolution. Using a protocol optimized for the retrieval of mitochondrial ribosome protected fragments (RPFs) we show that the size distribution of wild-type mitochondrial RPFs follows a bimodal distribution peaking at 27 and 33 nucleotides, which is distinct from the 30-nucleotide peak of nuclear RPFs. Their cross-correlation suggests generation of mitochondrial RPFs during ribosome progression. In contrast, RPFs from patient-derived mitochondria mutated in tRNA-Tryptophan are centered on tryptophan codons and reduced downstream, indicating ribosome stalling. Intriguingly, long RPFs are enriched in mutated mitochondria, suggesting they characterize stalled ribosomes. Our findings provide the first model for translation in wild-type and disease-triggering mitochondria.

  5. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities. PMID:26584633

  6. Native molecular state of adeno-associated viral vectors revealed by single-molecule sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kapranov, Philipp; Chen, Lingxia; Dederich, Debra; Dong, Biao; He, Jie; Steinmann, Kathleen E; Moore, Andrea R; Thompson, John F; Milos, Patrice M; Xiao, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    The single-stranded genome of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is one of the key factors leading to slow-rising but long-term transgene expression kinetics. Previous molecular studies have established what is now considered a textbook molecular model of AAV genomes with two copies of inverted tandem repeats at either end. In this study, we profiled hundreds of thousands of individual molecules of AAV vector DNA directly isolated from capsids, using single-molecule sequencing (SMS), which avoids any intermediary steps such as plasmid cloning. The sequence profile at 3' ends of both the regular and oversized vector did show the presence of an inverted terminal repeat (ITR), which provided direct confirmation that AAV vector packaging initiates from its 3' end. Furthermore, the vector 5'-terminus profile showed inconsistent termination for oversized vectors. Such incomplete vectors would not be expected to undergo canonical synthesis of the second strand of their genomic DNA and thus could function only via annealing of complementary strands of DNA. Furthermore, low levels of contaminating plasmid DNA were also detected. SMS may become a valuable tool during the development phase of vectors that are candidates for clinical use and for facilitating/accelerating studies on vector biology. PMID:21875357

  7. Lesional gene expression profiling in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma reveals natural clusters associated with disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jessica; Monti, Stefano; Aires, Daniel J.; Duvic, Madeleine; Golub, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is defined by infiltration of activated and malignant T cells in the skin. The clinical manifestations and prognosis in CTCL are highly variable. In this study, we hypothesized that gene expression analysis in lesional skin biopsies can improve understanding of the disease and its management. Based on 63 skin samples, we performed consensus clustering, revealing 3 patient clusters. Of these, 2 clusters tended to differentiate limited CTCL (stages IA and IB) from more extensive CTCL (stages IB and III). Stage IB patients appeared in both clusters, but those in the limited CTCL cluster were more responsive to treatment than those in the more extensive CTCL cluster. The third cluster was enriched in lymphocyte activation genes and was associated with a high proportion of tumor (stage IIB) lesions. Survival analysis revealed significant differences in event-free survival between clusters, with poorest survival seen in the activated lymphocyte cluster. Using supervised analysis, we further characterized genes significantly associated with lower-stage/treatment-responsive CTCL versus higher-stage/treatment-resistant CTCL. We conclude that transcriptional profiling of CTCL skin lesions reveals clinically relevant signatures, correlating with differences in survival and response to treatment. Additional prospective long-term studies to validate and refine these findings appear warranted. PMID:17638852

  8. Cellar-Associated Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure Revealed High-Level Diversity and Perennial Persistence at Sauternes Wine Estates

    PubMed Central

    Börlin, Marine; Venet, Pauline; Claisse, Olivier; Salin, Franck

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three wine estates (designated A, B, and C) were sampled in Sauternes, a typical appellation of the Bordeaux wine area producing sweet white wine. From those wine estates, 551 yeast strains were collected between 2012 and 2014, added to 102 older strains from 1992 to 2011 from wine estate C. All the strains were analyzed through 15 microsatellite markers, resulting in 503 unique Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes, revealing high genetic diversity and a low presence of commercial yeast starters. Population analysis performed using Fst genetic distance or ancestry profiles revealed that the two closest wine estates, B and C, which have juxtaposed vineyard plots and common seasonal staff, share more related isolates with each other than with wine estate A, indicating exchange between estates. The characterization of isolates collected 23 years ago at wine estate C in relation to recent isolates obtained at wine estate B revealed the long-term persistence of isolates. Last, during the 2014 harvest period, a temporal succession of ancestral subpopulations related to the different batches associated with the selective picking of noble rotted grapes was highlighted. IMPORTANCE High genetic diversity of S. cerevisiae isolates from spontaneous fermentation on wine estates in the Sauternes appellation of Bordeaux was revealed. Only 7% of all Sauternes strains were considered genetically related to specific commercial strains. The long-term persistence (over 20 years) of S. cerevisiae profiles on a given wine estate is highlighted. PMID:26969698

  9. Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird.

    PubMed

    Will, Alexis; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Dale M; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ito, Motohiro; Callahan, Matt; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Hatch, Scott; Elliott, Kyle; Slater, Leslie; Takahashi, Akinori; Kitaysky, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this method to examine how changes in diet composition and prey quality affect the nutritional status of free-living rhinoceros auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata). Our study sites included the following: Teuri Is. Japan, Middleton Is. central Gulf of Alaska, and St. Lazaria Is. Southeast Alaska. In 2012 and 2013, we collected "bill loads" delivered by parents to feed their chicks (n = 758) to document dietary changes. We deployed time-depth-temperature recorders on breeding adults (n = 47) to evaluate whether changes in prey coincided with changes in foraging behavior. We measured concentrations of corticosterone in fledgling (n = 71) and adult breeders' (n = 82) feathers to determine how birds were affected by foraging conditions. We found that seasonal changes in diet composition occurred on each colony, adults dove deeper and engaged in longer foraging bouts when capturing larger prey and that chicks had higher concentrations of corticosterone in their feathers when adults brought back smaller and/or lower energy prey. Corticosterone levels in feathers of fledglings (grown during the breeding season) and those in feathers of adult breeders (grown during the postbreeding season) were positively correlated, indicating possible carryover effects. These results suggest that seabirds might experience increased levels of nutritional stress associated with moderate dietary changes and that physiological responses to changes in prey composition

  10. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hingston, Patricia A.; Piercey, Marta J.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm2 relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses. PMID:26025900

  11. A Social Network Approach Reveals Associations between Mouse Social Dominance and Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    So, Nina; Franks, Becca; Lim, Sean; Curley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Modelling complex social behavior in the laboratory is challenging and requires analyses of dyadic interactions occurring over time in a physically and socially complex environment. In the current study, we approached the analyses of complex social interactions in group-housed male CD1 mice living in a large vivarium. Intensive observations of social interactions during a 3-week period indicated that male mice form a highly linear and steep dominance hierarchy that is maintained by fighting and chasing behaviors. Individual animals were classified as dominant, sub-dominant or subordinate according to their David's Scores and I& SI ranking. Using a novel dynamic temporal Glicko rating method, we ascertained that the dominance hierarchy was stable across time. Using social network analyses, we characterized the behavior of individuals within 66 unique relationships in the social group. We identified two individual network metrics, Kleinberg's Hub Centrality and Bonacich's Power Centrality, as accurate predictors of individual dominance and power. Comparing across behaviors, we establish that agonistic, grooming and sniffing social networks possess their own distinctive characteristics in terms of density, average path length, reciprocity out-degree centralization and out-closeness centralization. Though grooming ties between individuals were largely independent of other social networks, sniffing relationships were highly predictive of the directionality of agonistic relationships. Individual variation in dominance status was associated with brain gene expression, with more dominant individuals having higher levels of corticotropin releasing factor mRNA in the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala and the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus, as well as higher levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. This study demonstrates the potential and significance of combining complex social housing and intensive

  12. Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird.

    PubMed

    Will, Alexis; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Dale M; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ito, Motohiro; Callahan, Matt; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Hatch, Scott; Elliott, Kyle; Slater, Leslie; Takahashi, Akinori; Kitaysky, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this method to examine how changes in diet composition and prey quality affect the nutritional status of free-living rhinoceros auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata). Our study sites included the following: Teuri Is. Japan, Middleton Is. central Gulf of Alaska, and St. Lazaria Is. Southeast Alaska. In 2012 and 2013, we collected "bill loads" delivered by parents to feed their chicks (n = 758) to document dietary changes. We deployed time-depth-temperature recorders on breeding adults (n = 47) to evaluate whether changes in prey coincided with changes in foraging behavior. We measured concentrations of corticosterone in fledgling (n = 71) and adult breeders' (n = 82) feathers to determine how birds were affected by foraging conditions. We found that seasonal changes in diet composition occurred on each colony, adults dove deeper and engaged in longer foraging bouts when capturing larger prey and that chicks had higher concentrations of corticosterone in their feathers when adults brought back smaller and/or lower energy prey. Corticosterone levels in feathers of fledglings (grown during the breeding season) and those in feathers of adult breeders (grown during the postbreeding season) were positively correlated, indicating possible carryover effects. These results suggest that seabirds might experience increased levels of nutritional stress associated with moderate dietary changes and that physiological responses to changes in prey composition

  13. Transcript Analysis Reveals a Specific HOX Signature Associated with Positional Identity of Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D.; Waters, John P.; Ormiston, Mark L.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole “HOX transcriptome” of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity. PMID:24651450

  14. Ovarian endometriosis-associated stromal cells reveal persistently high affinity for iron

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Masahiko; Ito, Fumiya; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yue; Ishida, Chiharu; Hattori, Yuka; Niwa, Masato; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko; Iwase, Akira; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian endometriosis is a recognized risk for infertility and epithelial ovarian cancer, presumably due to iron overload resulting from repeated hemorrhage. To find a clue for early detection and prevention of ovarian endometriosis-associated cancer, it is mandatory to evaluate catalytic (labile) ferrous iron (catalytic Fe(II)) and to study iron manipulation in ovarian endometriotic lesions. By the use of tissues from women of ovarian endometriosis as well as endometrial tissue from women with and without endometriosis, we for the first time performed histological analysis and cellular detection of catalytic Fe(II) with a specific fluorescent probe (HMRhoNox-M), and further evaluated iron transport proteins in the human specimens and in co-culture experiments using immortalized human eutopic/ectopic endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) in the presence or absence of epithelial cells (EpCs). The amounts of catalytic Fe(II) were higher in ectopic endometrial stromal cells (ecESCs) than in normal eutopic endometrial stromal cells (n-euESCs) both in the tissues and in the corresponding immortalized ESCs. ecESCs exhibited higher transferrin receptor 1 expression both in vivo and in vitro and lower ferroportin expression in vivo than n-euESCs, leading to sustained iron uptake. In co-culture experiments of ESCs with iron-loaded EpCs, ecESCs received catalytic ferrous iron from EpCs, but n-euESCs did not. These data suggest that ecESC play a protective role for cancer-target epithelial cells by collecting excess iron, and that these characteristics are retained in the immortalized ecESCs. PMID:26498255

  15. Whole-genome expression analysis reveals genes associated with treatment response to escitalopram in major depression.

    PubMed

    Pettai, Kristi; Milani, Lili; Tammiste, Anu; Võsa, Urmo; Kolde, Raivo; Eller, Triin; Nutt, David; Metspalu, Andres; Maron, Eduard

    2016-09-01

    The reasons for variability in treatment response in major depressive disorder (MDD) are not fully understood, but there is accumulating evidence suggesting that therapeutic outcomes of antidepressants can be influenced by genetic factors. In the present study we applied the microarray Illumina platform for whole genome expression profiling in depressive patients treated with escitalopram medication in order to identify genes underlying response to antidepressant treatment. The initial study sample consisted of 135 outpatients with major depressive disorder (mean age 31.1±11.6 years, 68% females) treated with escitalopram 10-20mg/day for 12 weeks, from which 87 patients (55 females) were included in gene expression analyzing. The gene expression profiles were measured on peripheral blood cells at baseline, at week 4 and at the end of treatment (week 12) using BeadChips Illumina. The fold change was used to demonstrate rate of changes in average gene expressions between studied groups. Statistical analyses were performed using the false discovery rate (FDR). The most interesting gene, which showed the predictive effect on treatment outcome by delineating low dose responders and treatment-resistant patients at the beginning of medication, was NLGN2, belonging to a family of neuronal cell surface proteins and involving in synapse formation. In addition, the several gene clusters, related to immune response, signal transduction and neurotrophin pathway, have distinguished responders from non-responders at the week 4 of treatment. After 4 weeks of escitalopram treatment (10mg/day), the YWHAZ gene has showed the highest transcriptional change in responders as compared with non-responders. Finally, at the end of the treatment we noticed that at least three genes (NR2C2, ZNF641, FKBP1A) have been strongly associated with resistance to escitalopram. Thus the results of this study support that exploration of peripheral gene expression is a useful tool in the further

  16. Drosophila host model reveals new enterococcus faecalis quorum-sensing associated virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Neuza; Varahan, Sriram; Gorman, Matthew J; Palmer, Kelli L; Zaidman-Remy, Anna; Yokohata, Ryoji; Nakayama, Jiro; Hancock, Lynn E; Jacinto, António; Gilmore, Michael S; de Fátima Silva Lopes, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis V583 is a vancomycin-resistant clinical isolate which belongs to the hospital-adapted clade, CC2. This strain harbours several factors that have been associated with virulence, including the fsr quorum-sensing regulatory system that is known to control the expression of GelE and SprE proteases. To discriminate between genes directly regulated by Fsr, and those indirectly regulated as the result of protease expression or activity, we compared gene expression in isogenic mutants of V583 variously defective in either Fsr quorum sensing or protease expression. Quorum sensing was artificially induced by addition of the quorum signal, GBAP, exogenously in a controlled manner. The Fsr regulon was found to be restricted to five genes, gelE, sprE, ef1097, ef1351 and ef1352. Twelve additional genes were found to be dependent on the presence of GBAP-induced proteases. Induction of GelE and SprE by GBAP via Fsr resulted in accumulation of mRNA encoding lrgAB, and this induction was found to be lytRS dependent. Drosophila infection was used to discern varying levels of toxicity stemming from mutations in the fsr quorum regulatory system and the genes that it regulates, highlighting the contribution of LrgAB and bacteriocin EF1097 to infection toxicity. A contribution of SprE to infection toxicity was also detected. This work brought to light new players in E. faecalis success as a pathogen and paves the way for future studies on host tolerance mechanisms to infections caused by this important nosocomial pathogen.

  17. Intravital imaging reveals distinct responses of depleting dynamic tumor-associated macrophage and dendritic cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Marja; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Olow, Aleksandra; Bonham, Lynn; Branstetter, Daniel; Weng, Ning; Smith, Jeffrey; Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells comprise a major part of the stromal microenvironment and support cancer progression by multiple mechanisms. High numbers of tumor myeloid cells correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer and are coupled with the angiogenic switch and malignant progression. However, the specific roles and regulation of heterogeneous tumor myeloid populations are incompletely understood. CSF-1 is a major myeloid cell mitogen, and signaling through its receptor CSF-1R is also linked to poor outcomes. To characterize myeloid cell function in tumors, we combined confocal intravital microscopy with depletion of CSF-1R–dependent cells using a neutralizing CSF-1R antibody in the mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal region-driven polyoma middle T antigen breast cancer model. The depleted cells shared markers of tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cells (M-DCs), matching the phenotype of tumor dendritic cells that take up antigens and interact with T cells. We defined functional subgroups within the M-DC population by imaging endocytic and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Anti–CSF-1R treatment altered stromal dynamics and impaired both survival of M-DCs and accumulation of new M-DCs, but did not deplete Gr-1+ neutrophils or block doxorubicin-induced myeloid cell recruitment, and had a minimal effect on lung myeloid cells. Nevertheless, prolonged treatment led to delayed tumor growth, reduced vascularity, and decreased lung metastasis. Because the myeloid infiltrate in metastatic lungs differed significantly from that in mammary tumors, the reduction in metastasis may result from the impact on primary tumors. The combination of functional analysis by intravital imaging with cellular characterization has refined our understanding of the effects of experimental targeted therapies on the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25385645

  18. Electron Microscopy Analysis of a Disaccharide Analog complex Reveals Receptor Interactions of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Spilman, Michael; Meyer, Nancy L.; Lerch, Thomas F.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of macromolecular complexes often feature x-ray structures of complexes with bound ligands. The attachment of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) to cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is an example that has not proven amenable to crystallography, because the binding of GAG analogs disrupts lattice contacts. The interactions of AAV with GAGs are of interest in mediating the cell specificity of AAV-based gene therapy vectors. Previous electron microscopy led to differing conclusions on the exact binding site and the existence of large ligand-induced conformational changes in the virus. Conformational changes are expected during cell entry, but it has remained unclear whether the electron microscopy provided evidence of their induction by GAG-binding. Taking advantage of automated data collection, careful processing and new methods of structure refinement, the structure of AAV-DJ complexed with sucrose octasulfate is determined by electron microscopy difference map analysis to 4.8 Å resolution. At this higher resolution, individual sulfate groups are discernible, providing a stereochemical validation of map interpretation, and highlighting interactions with two surface arginines that have been implicated in genetic studies. Conformational changes induced by the SOS are modest and limited to the loop most directly interacting with the ligand. While the resolution attainable will depend on sample order and other factors, there are an increasing number of macromolecular complexes that can be studied by cryo-electron microscopy at resolutions beyond 5 Å, for which the approaches used here could be used to characterize the binding of inhibitors and other small molecule effectors when crystallography is not tractable. PMID:24036405

  19. A Social Network Approach Reveals Associations between Mouse Social Dominance and Brain Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    So, Nina; Franks, Becca; Lim, Sean; Curley, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling complex social behavior in the laboratory is challenging and requires analyses of dyadic interactions occurring over time in a physically and socially complex environment. In the current study, we approached the analyses of complex social interactions in group-housed male CD1 mice living in a large vivarium. Intensive observations of social interactions during a 3-week period indicated that male mice form a highly linear and steep dominance hierarchy that is maintained by fighting and chasing behaviors. Individual animals were classified as dominant, sub-dominant or subordinate according to their David’s Scores and I& SI ranking. Using a novel dynamic temporal Glicko rating method, we ascertained that the dominance hierarchy was stable across time. Using social network analyses, we characterized the behavior of individuals within 66 unique relationships in the social group. We identified two individual network metrics, Kleinberg’s Hub Centrality and Bonacich’s Power Centrality, as accurate predictors of individual dominance and power. Comparing across behaviors, we establish that agonistic, grooming and sniffing social networks possess their own distinctive characteristics in terms of density, average path length, reciprocity out-degree centralization and out-closeness centralization. Though grooming ties between individuals were largely independent of other social networks, sniffing relationships were highly predictive of the directionality of agonistic relationships. Individual variation in dominance status was associated with brain gene expression, with more dominant individuals having higher levels of corticotropin releasing factor mRNA in the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala and the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus, as well as higher levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. This study demonstrates the potential and significance of combining complex social housing and intensive

  20. Genetic and genomic dissection of Prolactin revealed potential association with milk production traits in riverine buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, A; Maryam, J

    2016-08-01

    Milk yield and quality has been a major selection criterion for genetic improvement in livestock species. Role of Prolactin gene in determining milk quality in terms of protein profile, lactose, lipids and other imperative macromolecules is very important. In this context, genetic profiling of Prolactin gene in riverine buffalo of Pakistan was performed and potential genetic markers were identified illustrating worth of this gene in marker-assisted selection of superior dairy buffaloes. Series of wet and dry lab experimentation was performed starting with genomic DNA isolation from true to breed representatives of indigenous river buffalo (Nili-Ravi). After amplification of coding regions of Prolactin gene, products were eluted and sequenced by Sanger's chain termination method and aligned to get variations in genomic region. A total of 15 novel variations were identified and analyzed statistically for their significance at population level, haplotypes were constructed, and association was estimated. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to evaluate the rate of evolution for Prolactin gene in various mammalian species. Lastly, biological networking for this molecule was predicted to get the bigger pictorial of its functional machinery. Pathway analysis was performed to find its physiological mode of action in milk synthesis. This is a first report toward complete genetic screening of Prolactin gene in Pakistani buffaloes. Results of this study not only provide an insight for potential role of Prolactin gene in milk-producing abilities of buffalo but also suggest new directions for exploration of more genes that may have promising role to enhance future milk production capabilities of river buffalo breeds of Asian region through marker-assisted selection. PMID:27240674

  1. Ovarian endometriosis-associated stromal cells reveal persistently high affinity for iron.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiko; Ito, Fumiya; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yue; Ishida, Chiharu; Hattori, Yuka; Niwa, Masato; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko; Iwase, Akira; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian endometriosis is a recognized risk for infertility and epithelial ovarian cancer, presumably due to iron overload resulting from repeated hemorrhage. To find a clue for early detection and prevention of ovarian endometriosis-associated cancer, it is mandatory to evaluate catalytic (labile) ferrous iron (catalytic Fe(II)) and to study iron manipulation in ovarian endometriotic lesions. By the use of tissues from women of ovarian endometriosis as well as endometrial tissue from women with and without endometriosis, we for the first time performed histological analysis and cellular detection of catalytic Fe(II) with a specific fluorescent probe (HMRhoNox-M), and further evaluated iron transport proteins in the human specimens and in co-culture experiments using immortalized human eutopic/ectopic endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) in the presence or absence of epithelial cells (EpCs). The amounts of catalytic Fe(II) were higher in ectopic endometrial stromal cells (ecESCs) than in normal eutopic endometrial stromal cells (n-euESCs) both in the tissues and in the corresponding immortalized ESCs. ecESCs exhibited higher transferrin receptor 1 expression both in vivo and in vitro and lower ferroportin expression in vivo than n-euESCs, leading to sustained iron uptake. In co-culture experiments of ESCs with iron-loaded EpCs, ecESCs received catalytic ferrous iron from EpCs, but n-euESCs did not. These data suggest that ecESC play a protective role for cancer-target epithelial cells by collecting excess iron, and that these characteristics are retained in the immortalized ecESCs.

  2. Metagenomic Analysis Revealed Methylamine and Ureide Utilization of Soybean-Associated Methylobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Tomoyuki; Anda, Misue; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sugawara, Masayuki; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda, Seishi; Okubo, Takashi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium inhabits the phyllosphere of a large number of plants. We herein report the results of comparative metagenome analyses on methylobacterial communities of soybean plants grown in an experimental field in Tohoku University (Kashimadai, Miyagi, Japan). Methylobacterium was identified as the most dominant genus (33%) among bacteria inhabiting soybean stems. We classified plant-derived Methylobacterium species into Groups I, II, and III based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, and found that Group I members (phylogenetically close to M. extorquens) were dominant in soybean-associated Methylobacterium. By comparing 29 genomes, we found that all Group I members possessed a complete set of genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway for methylamine utilization, and genes for urea degradation (urea carboxylase, urea amidolyase, and conventional urease). Only Group I members and soybean methylobacterial isolates grew in a culture supplemented with methylamine as the sole carbon source. They utilized urea or allantoin (a urea-related compound in legumes) as the sole nitrogen source; however, group III also utilized these compounds. The utilization of allantoin may be crucial in soybean-bacterial interactions because allantoin is a transported form of fixed nitrogen in legume plants. Soybean-derived Group I strain AMS5 colonized the model legume Lotus japonicus well. A comparison among the 29 genomes of plant-derived and other strains suggested that several candidate genes are involved in plant colonization such as csgG (curli fimbriae). Genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway and curli fimbriae were more abundant in soybean microbiomes than in rice microbiomes in the field. Based on these results, we discuss the lifestyle of Methylobacterium in the legume phyllosphere. PMID:27431374

  3. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hingston, Patricia A; Piercey, Marta J; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2015-08-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm(2) relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses.

  4. Whole-genome expression analysis reveals genes associated with treatment response to escitalopram in major depression.

    PubMed

    Pettai, Kristi; Milani, Lili; Tammiste, Anu; Võsa, Urmo; Kolde, Raivo; Eller, Triin; Nutt, David; Metspalu, Andres; Maron, Eduard

    2016-09-01

    The reasons for variability in treatment response in major depressive disorder (MDD) are not fully understood, but there is accumulating evidence suggesting that therapeutic outcomes of antidepressants can be influenced by genetic factors. In the present study we applied the microarray Illumina platform for whole genome expression profiling in depressive patients treated with escitalopram medication in order to identify genes underlying response to antidepressant treatment. The initial study sample consisted of 135 outpatients with major depressive disorder (mean age 31.1±11.6 years, 68% females) treated with escitalopram 10-20mg/day for 12 weeks, from which 87 patients (55 females) were included in gene expression analyzing. The gene expression profiles were measured on peripheral blood cells at baseline, at week 4 and at the end of treatment (week 12) using BeadChips Illumina. The fold change was used to demonstrate rate of changes in average gene expressions between studied groups. Statistical analyses were performed using the false discovery rate (FDR). The most interesting gene, which showed the predictive effect on treatment outcome by delineating low dose responders and treatment-resistant patients at the beginning of medication, was NLGN2, belonging to a family of neuronal cell surface proteins and involving in synapse formation. In addition, the several gene clusters, related to immune response, signal transduction and neurotrophin pathway, have distinguished responders from non-responders at the week 4 of treatment. After 4 weeks of escitalopram treatment (10mg/day), the YWHAZ gene has showed the highest transcriptional change in responders as compared with non-responders. Finally, at the end of the treatment we noticed that at least three genes (NR2C2, ZNF641, FKBP1A) have been strongly associated with resistance to escitalopram. Thus the results of this study support that exploration of peripheral gene expression is a useful tool in the further

  5. Genomic and Proteomic Profiles Reveal the Association of Gelsolin to TP53 Status and Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Socci, Nicholas D.; Richstone, Lee; Corton, Marta; Behrendt, Nille; Wulkfuhle, Julia; Bochner, Bernard; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Bladder cancer transformation and immortalization require the inactivation of key regulatory genes, including TP53. Genotyping of a large cohort of bladder cancer patients (n = 256) using the TP53 GeneChip showed mutations in 103 cases (40.2%), the majority of them mapping to the DNA-binding core domain. TP53 mutation status was significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.0001) and overall survival for patients with advanced disease (P = 0.01). Transcript profiling using oligonucleotide arrays was performed on a subset of these cases (n = 46). Supervised analyses identified genes differentially expressed between invasive bladder tumors with wild-type (n = 24) and mutated TP53 (n = 22). Pathway analyses of top-ranked genes supported the central role of TP53 in the functional network of such gene patterns. A proteomic strategy using reverse phase arrays with protein extracts of bladder cancer cell lines validated the association of identified differentially expressed genes, such as gelsolin, to TP53 status. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (n = 294) revealed that gelsolin was associated with tumor stage and overall survival, correlating positively with TP53 status in a subset of these patients. This study further reveals that TP53 mutations are frequent events in bladder cancer progression and identified gelsolin related to TP53 status, tumor staging, and clinical outcome by independent high-throughput strategies. PMID:17982131

  6. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity. PMID:26872143

  7. Genome-wide association analysis reveals a SOD1 mutation in canine degenerative myelopathy that resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Awano, Tomoyuki; Johnson, Gary S.; Wade, Claire M.; Katz, Martin L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Perloski, Michele; Biagi, Tara; Baranowska, Izabella; Long, Sam; March, Philip A.; Olby, Natasha J.; Shelton, G. Diane; Khan, Shahnawaz; O'Brien, Dennis P.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Coates, Joan R.

    2009-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease prevalent in several dog breeds. Typically, the initial progressive upper motor neuron spastic and general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs occurs at 8 years of age or older. If euthanasia is delayed, the clinical signs will ascend, causing flaccid tetraparesis and other lower motor neuron signs. DNA samples from 38 DM-affected Pembroke Welsh corgi cases and 17 related clinically normal controls were used for genome-wide association mapping, which produced the strongest associations with markers on CFA31 in a region containing the canine SOD1 gene. SOD1 was considered a regional candidate gene because mutations in human SOD1 can cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult-onset fatal paralytic neurodegenerative disease with both upper and lower motor neuron involvement. The resequencing of SOD1 in normal and affected dogs revealed a G to A transition, resulting in an E40K missense mutation. Homozygosity for the A allele was associated with DM in 5 dog breeds: Pembroke Welsh corgi, Boxer, Rhodesian ridgeback, German Shepherd dog, and Chesapeake Bay retriever. Microscopic examination of spinal cords from affected dogs revealed myelin and axon loss affecting the lateral white matter and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions that bind anti-superoxide dismutase 1 antibodies. These inclusions are similar to those seen in spinal cord sections from ALS patients with SOD1 mutations. Our findings identify canine DM to be the first recognized spontaneously occurring animal model for ALS. PMID:19188595

  8. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Simon J. S.; Lewis, Keir E.; Huws, Sharon A.; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Lewis, Paul D.; Mur, Luis A. J.; Pachebat, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten ‘healthy’ smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity. PMID:26872143

  9. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity.

  10. Wave Propagation in the Ionosphere Associated With Earthquakes Revealed by GPS- TEC 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, S.; Obayashi, M.; Ozawa, S.

    2008-12-01

    surface deformation associated with shallow large earthquakes. An ultimate goal is to retrieve the earthquake fault parameters by modeling the GPS-TEC observations.

  11. Multiple Sex-Associated Regions and a Putative Sex Chromosome in Zebrafish Revealed by RAD Mapping and Population Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer L.; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome. PMID:22792396

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of the TibA Self-Associating Autotransporter Reveals a Modular Organization ▿

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Jean-Philippe; Mourez, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Some enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains express the TibA adhesin/invasin, a multifunctional autotransporter that mediates the autoaggregation of bacteria, biofilm formation, adhesion to cultured epithelial cells, and invasion of these cells. To elucidate the structure-function relationship in TibA, we generated mutants by transposon-based linker scanning mutagenesis and by site-directed mutagenesis. Several insertion mutants had a defect in either adhesion or autoaggregation. Mutants with a defect in autoaggregation were found in the N-terminal half of the extracellular domain, while mutants with a defect in adhesion were found in the C-terminal half. The deletion of the putative N-terminal autoaggregation domain abolished the autoaggregation of the bacteria but did not affect adhesion. The deletion of a proline-rich region located at the C terminus of the extracellular domain abolished the adhesion properties of TibA but did not affect invasion. This finding suggests that adhesion and invasion may rely on distinct mechanisms. Thus, our results reveal that TibA possesses a modular organization, with the extracellular domain being separated into an autoaggregation module and an adhesion module. PMID:21343356

  13. Structure-function analysis of the TibA self-associating autotransporter reveals a modular organization.

    PubMed

    Côté, Jean-Philippe; Mourez, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Some enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains express the TibA adhesin/invasin, a multifunctional autotransporter that mediates the autoaggregation of bacteria, biofilm formation, adhesion to cultured epithelial cells, and invasion of these cells. To elucidate the structure-function relationship in TibA, we generated mutants by transposon-based linker scanning mutagenesis and by site-directed mutagenesis. Several insertion mutants had a defect in either adhesion or autoaggregation. Mutants with a defect in autoaggregation were found in the N-terminal half of the extracellular domain, while mutants with a defect in adhesion were found in the C-terminal half. The deletion of the putative N-terminal autoaggregation domain abolished the autoaggregation of the bacteria but did not affect adhesion. The deletion of a proline-rich region located at the C terminus of the extracellular domain abolished the adhesion properties of TibA but did not affect invasion. This finding suggests that adhesion and invasion may rely on distinct mechanisms. Thus, our results reveal that TibA possesses a modular organization, with the extracellular domain being separated into an autoaggregation module and an adhesion module. PMID:21343356

  14. Meta-analysis of gene–environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W.; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E.; Williams, Katie M.; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F.; Joshi, Peter K.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M.; Simpson, Claire L.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S.; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M. Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E. H.; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W.; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N.; Foster, Paul J.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L.; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A.; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N.; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G.; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O.; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L.; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L.; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10−5), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  15. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  16. High density genotyping of STAT4 gene reveals multiple haplotypic associations with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in different racial groups

    PubMed Central

    Namjou, Bahram; Sestak, Andrea L.; Armstrong, Don L.; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Jacob, Noam; Ciobanu, Voicu; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Ojwang, Joshua O.; Ziegler, Julie; Quismorio, Francesco; Reiff, Andreas; Myones, Barry L.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Nath, Swapan K.; Bruner, Gail R.; Mehrian-Shai, Ruth; Silverman, Earl; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; McCurdy, Deborah; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Nocton, James J.; Putterman, Chaim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Yun Jung; Petri, Michelle; Reveille, John D.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L; Merrill, Joan T.; Scofield, R. Hal; James, Judith A.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Jacob, Chaim O.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypic systemic autoimmune disorder with complex etiology and a strong genetic component. Recently, gene products involved in the interferon pathway have been under intense investigation in SLE pathogenesis. STAT1 and STAT4 are transcription factors that play key roles in the interferon and Th1 signaling pathways, making them attractive candidates for SLE susceptibility. Methods Fifty-six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across STAT1 and STAT4 genes on chromosome 2 were genotyped using Illumina platform as a part of extensive association study in a large collection of 9923 lupus cases and controls from different racial groups. DNA from patients and controls was obtained from peripheral blood. Principal component analyses and population based case-control association analyses were performed and the p values, FDR q values and Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Results We observed strong genetic associations with SLE and multiple SNPs located within the STAT4 gene in different ethnicities (Fisher combined p= 7.02×10−25). In addition to strong confirmation of the association in the 3rd intronic region of this gene reported previously, we identified additional haplotypic association across STAT4 gene and in particular a common risk haplotype that is found in multiple racial groups. In contrast, only a relatively weak suggestive association was observed with STAT1, probably due to the proximity to STAT4. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the STAT4 gene is likely to be a crucial component in SLE pathogenesis among multiple racial groups. The functional effects of this association, when revealed, might improve our understanding of the disease and provide new therapeutic targets. PMID:19333953

  17. A genome-wide scan study identifies a single nucleotide substitution in ASIP associated with white versus non-white coat-colour variation in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Li, M-H; Tiirikka, T; Kantanen, J

    2014-02-01

    In sheep, coat colour (and pattern) is one of the important traits of great biological, economic and social importance. However, the genetics of sheep coat colour has not yet been fully clarified. We conducted a genome-wide association study of sheep coat colours by genotyping 47 303 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Finnsheep population in Finland. We identified 35 SNPs associated with all the coat colours studied, which cover genomic regions encompassing three known pigmentation genes (TYRP1, ASIP and MITF) in sheep. Eighteen of these associations were confirmed in further tests between white versus non-white individuals, but none of the 35 associations were significant in the analysis of only non-white colours. Across the tests, the s66432.1 in ASIP showed significant association (P=4.2 × 10(-11) for all the colours; P=2.3 × 10(-11) for white versus non-white colours) with the variation in coat colours and strong linkage disequilibrium with other significant variants surrounding the ASIP gene. The signals detected around the ASIP gene were explained by differences in white versus non-white alleles. Further, a genome scan for selection for white coat pigmentation identified a strong and striking selection signal spanning ASIP. Our study identified the main candidate gene for the coat colour variation between white and non-white as ASIP, an autosomal gene that has been directly implicated in the pathway regulating melanogenesis. Together with ASIP, the two other newly identified genes (TYRP1 and MITF) in the Finnsheep, bordering associated SNPs, represent a new resource for enriching sheep coat-colour genetics and breeding.

  18. A genome-wide scan study identifies a single nucleotide substitution in ASIP associated with white versus non-white coat-colour variation in sheep (Ovis aries)

    PubMed Central

    Li, M-H; Tiirikka, T; Kantanen, J

    2014-01-01

    In sheep, coat colour (and pattern) is one of the important traits of great biological, economic and social importance. However, the genetics of sheep coat colour has not yet been fully clarified. We conducted a genome-wide association study of sheep coat colours by genotyping 47 303 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Finnsheep population in Finland. We identified 35 SNPs associated with all the coat colours studied, which cover genomic regions encompassing three known pigmentation genes (TYRP1, ASIP and MITF) in sheep. Eighteen of these associations were confirmed in further tests between white versus non-white individuals, but none of the 35 associations were significant in the analysis of only non-white colours. Across the tests, the s66432.1 in ASIP showed significant association (P=4.2 × 10−11 for all the colours; P=2.3 × 10−11 for white versus non-white colours) with the variation in coat colours and strong linkage disequilibrium with other significant variants surrounding the ASIP gene. The signals detected around the ASIP gene were explained by differences in white versus non-white alleles. Further, a genome scan for selection for white coat pigmentation identified a strong and striking selection signal spanning ASIP. Our study identified the main candidate gene for the coat colour variation between white and non-white as ASIP, an autosomal gene that has been directly implicated in the pathway regulating melanogenesis. Together with ASIP, the two other newly identified genes (TYRP1 and MITF) in the Finnsheep, bordering associated SNPs, represent a new resource for enriching sheep coat-colour genetics and breeding. PMID:24022497

  19. Perineal scanning.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, P; d'Alton, M; Romero, R; Hobbins, J C

    1986-10-01

    Although various techniques have been described to aid in the ultrasound diagnosis of placenta previa and incompetent cervix, these maneuvers depend on the precise identification of the internal cervical os, a feat which is notoriously difficult to accomplish consistently. In an attempt to get a closer view of the cervix we tried another approach. This simple technique of perineal scanning has the potential to help considerably with these problems. PMID:3530265

  20. Genome-wide association scan and phased haplotype construction for quantitative trait loci affecting boar taint in three pig breeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Boar taint is the undesirable smell and taste of pork meat derived from some entire male pigs. The main causes of boar taint are the two compounds androstenone and skatole (3-methyl-indole). The steroid androstenone is a sex pheromone produced in the testis of the boars. Skatole is produced from tryptophan by bacteria in the intestine of the pigs. In many countries pigs are castrated as piglets to avoid boar taint, however, this is undesirable for animal welfare reasons. Genetic variations affecting the level of boar taint have previously been demonstrated in many breeds. In the study presented in this paper, markers and haplotypes, which can be applied to DNA-based selection schemes in order to reduce or eliminate the boar taint problem, are identified. Results Approximately 30,000 SNPs segregating in 923 boars from three Danish breeds; Duroc, Landrace, and Yorkshire, were used to conduct genome wide association studies of boar taint compounds. At 46 suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTL), 25 haplotypes and three single markers with effects were identified. Furthermore, 40% of the haplotypes mapped to previously identified regions. Haplotypes were also analysed for effects of slaughter weight and meat content. The most promising haplotype was identified on Sus scrofa chromosome 1. The gain in fixed effect of having this haplotype on level of androstenone in Landrace was identified to be high (1.279 μg/g). In addition, this haplotype explained 16.8% of the phenotypic variation within the trait. The haplotype was identified around the gene CYB5A which is known to have an indirect impact on the amount of androstenone. In addition to CYB5A, the genes SRD5A2, LOC100518755, and CYP21A2 are candidate genes for other haplotypes affecting androstenone, whereas, candidate genes for the indolic compounds were identified to be SULT1A1 and CYP2E1. Conclusions Despite the small sample size, a total of 25 haplotypes and three single markers were identified

  1. SNP analyses of growth factor genes EGF, TGF{beta}-1, and HGF reveal haplotypic association of EGF with autism

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Takao; Thanseem, Ismail; Kawai, Masayoshi; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Anitha, Ayyappan; Suda, Shiro . E-mail: nakamura@hama-med.ac.jp; Yamada, Kazuo; Tsujii, Masatsugu |; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Toyota, Tomoko; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Miyachi, Taishi; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Sugihara, Gen-ichi; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Mori, Norio |; Ouchi, Yasuomi |; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Takei, Nori

    2007-09-07

    Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder diagnosed in early childhood. Growth factors have been found to play a key role in the cellular differentiation and proliferation of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is detected in several regions of the developing and adult brain, where, it enhances the differentiation, maturation, and survival of a variety of neurons. Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) isoforms play an important role in neuronal survival, and the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been shown to exhibit neurotrophic activity. We examined the association of EGF, TGF{beta}1, and HGF genes with autism, in a trio association study, using DNA samples from families recruited to the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange; 252 trios with a male offspring scored for autism were selected for the study. Transmission disequilibrium test revealed significant haplotypic association of EGF with autism. No significant SNP or haplotypic associations were observed for TGF{beta}1 or HGF. Given the role of EGF in brain and neuronal development, we suggest a possible role of EGF in the pathogenesis of autism.

  2. Genetic Architecture of Natural Variation in Rice Chlorophyll Content Revealed by a Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxiu; Xie, Weibo; Xing, Hongkun; Yan, Ju; Meng, Xiangzhou; Li, Xinglei; Fu, Xiangkui; Xu, Jiuyue; Lian, Xingming; Yu, Sibin; Xing, Yongzhong; Wang, Gongwei

    2015-06-01

    Chlorophyll content is one of the most important physiological traits as it is closely related to leaf photosynthesis and crop yield potential. So far, few genes have been reported to be involved in natural variation of chlorophyll content in rice (Oryza sativa) and the extent of variations explored is very limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a diverse worldwide collection of 529 O. sativa accessions. A total of 46 significant association loci were identified. Three F2 mapping populations with parents selected from the association panel were tested for validation of GWAS signals. We clearly demonstrated that Grain number, plant height, and heading date7 (Ghd7) was a major locus for natural variation of chlorophyll content at the heading stage by combining evidence from near-isogenic lines and transgenic plants. The enhanced expression of Ghd7 decreased the chlorophyll content, mainly through down-regulating the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and chloroplast. In addition, Narrow leaf1 (NAL1) corresponded to one significant association region repeatedly detected over two years. We revealed a high degree of polymorphism in the 5' UTR and four non-synonymous SNPs in the coding region of NAL1, and observed diverse effects of the major haplotypes. The loci or candidate genes identified would help to fine-tune and optimize the antenna size of canopies in rice breeding.

  3. Epigenomic profiling of men exposed to early-life stress reveals DNA methylation differences in association with current mental state

    PubMed Central

    Khulan, B; Manning, J R; Dunbar, D R; Seckl, J R; Raikkonen, K; Eriksson, J G; Drake, A J

    2014-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is known to be associated with an increased risk of neuropsychiatric and cardiometabolic disease in later life. One of the potential mechanisms underpinning this is through effects on the epigenome, particularly changes in DNA methylation. Using a well-phenotyped cohort of 83 men from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, who experienced ELS in the form of separation from their parents during childhood, and a group of 83 matched controls, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in peripheral blood. We found no differences in DNA methylation between men who were separated from their families and non-separated men; however, we did identify differences in DNA methylation in association with the development of at least mild depressive symptoms over the subsequent 5–10 years. Notably, hypomethylation was identified at a number of genes with roles in brain development and/or function in association with depressive symptoms. Pathway analysis revealed an enrichment of DNA methylation changes in pathways associated with development and morphogenesis, DNA and transcription factor binding and programmed cell death. Our results support the concept that DNA methylation differences may be important in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disease. PMID:25247593

  4. Epigenomic profiling of men exposed to early-life stress reveals DNA methylation differences in association with current mental state.

    PubMed

    Khulan, B; Manning, J R; Dunbar, D R; Seckl, J R; Raikkonen, K; Eriksson, J G; Drake, A J

    2014-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is known to be associated with an increased risk of neuropsychiatric and cardiometabolic disease in later life. One of the potential mechanisms underpinning this is through effects on the epigenome, particularly changes in DNA methylation. Using a well-phenotyped cohort of 83 men from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, who experienced ELS in the form of separation from their parents during childhood, and a group of 83 matched controls, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in peripheral blood. We found no differences in DNA methylation between men who were separated from their families and non-separated men; however, we did identify differences in DNA methylation in association with the development of at least mild depressive symptoms over the subsequent 5-10 years. Notably, hypomethylation was identified at a number of genes with roles in brain development and/or function in association with depressive symptoms. Pathway analysis revealed an enrichment of DNA methylation changes in pathways associated with development and morphogenesis, DNA and transcription factor binding and programmed cell death. Our results support the concept that DNA methylation differences may be important in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disease. PMID:25247593

  5. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-11-09

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants.

  6. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants. PMID:26549216

  7. Three-dimensional cellular architecture of the flagellar pocket and associated cytoskeleton in trypanosomes revealed by electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lacomble, Sylvain; Vaughan, Sue; Gadelha, Catarina; Morphew, Mary K.; Shaw, Michael K.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Gull, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study uses electron tomography linked to a variety of other EM methods to provide an integrated view of the flagellar pocket and basal body area of the African trypanosome procyclic trypomastigote. We reveal the pocket as an asymmetric membranous `balloon' with two boundary structures. One of these – the collar – defines the flagellum exit point. The other defines the entry point of the flagellum into the pocket and consists of both an internal transitional fibre array and an external membrane collarette. A novel set of nine radial fibres is described in the basal body proximal zone. The pocket asymmetry is invariably correlated with the position of the probasal body and Golgi. The neck region, just distal to the flagellum exit site, is a specialised area of membrane associated with the start of the flagellum attachment zone and signifies the point where a special set of four microtubules, nucleated close to the basal bodies, joins the subpellicular array. The neck region is also associated with the single Golgi apparatus of the cell. The flagellar exit point interrupts the subpellicular microtubule array with discrete endings of microtubules at the posterior side. Overall, our studies reveal a highly organised, yet dynamic, area of cytoplasm and will be informative in understanding its function. PMID:19299460

  8. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure and Cryptic Associations Reveal Evidence of Kin-Based Sociality in the African Forest Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Schuttler, Stephanie G.; Philbrick, Jessica A.; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Eggert, Lori S.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns of relatedness within animal populations are important in the evolution of mating and social systems, and have the potential to reveal information on species that are difficult to observe in the wild. This study examines the fine-scale genetic structure and connectivity of groups within African forest elephants, Loxodonta cyclotis, which are often difficult to observe due to forest habitat. We tested the hypothesis that genetic similarity will decline with increasing geographic distance, as we expect kin to be in closer proximity, using spatial autocorrelation analyses and Tau Kr tests. Associations between individuals were investigated through a non-invasive genetic capture-recapture approach using network models, and were predicted to be more extensive than the small groups found in observational studies, similar to fission-fusion sociality found in African savanna (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) species. Dung samples were collected in Lopé National Park, Gabon in 2008 and 2010 and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci, genetically sexed, and sequenced at the mitochondrial DNA control region. We conducted analyses on samples collected at three different temporal scales: a day, within six-day sampling sessions, and within each year. Spatial autocorrelation and Tau Kr tests revealed genetic structure, but results were weak and inconsistent between sampling sessions. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in distance classes of 0–5 km, and was strongest for the single day session. Despite weak genetic structure, individuals within groups were significantly more related to each other than to individuals between groups. Social networks revealed some components to have large, extensive groups of up to 22 individuals, and most groups were composed of individuals of the same matriline. Although fine-scale population genetic structure was weak, forest elephants are typically found in groups consisting of kin and based on matrilines

  9. Fine-scale genetic structure and cryptic associations reveal evidence of kin-based sociality in the African forest elephant.

    PubMed

    Schuttler, Stephanie G; Philbrick, Jessica A; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Eggert, Lori S

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns of relatedness within animal populations are important in the evolution of mating and social systems, and have the potential to reveal information on species that are difficult to observe in the wild. This study examines the fine-scale genetic structure and connectivity of groups within African forest elephants, Loxodonta cyclotis, which are often difficult to observe due to forest habitat. We tested the hypothesis that genetic similarity will decline with increasing geographic distance, as we expect kin to be in closer proximity, using spatial autocorrelation analyses and Tau K(r) tests. Associations between individuals were investigated through a non-invasive genetic capture-recapture approach using network models, and were predicted to be more extensive than the small groups found in observational studies, similar to fission-fusion sociality found in African savanna (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) species. Dung samples were collected in Lopé National Park, Gabon in 2008 and 2010 and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci, genetically sexed, and sequenced at the mitochondrial DNA control region. We conducted analyses on samples collected at three different temporal scales: a day, within six-day sampling sessions, and within each year. Spatial autocorrelation and Tau K(r) tests revealed genetic structure, but results were weak and inconsistent between sampling sessions. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in distance classes of 0-5 km, and was strongest for the single day session. Despite weak genetic structure, individuals within groups were significantly more related to each other than to individuals between groups. Social networks revealed some components to have large, extensive groups of up to 22 individuals, and most groups were composed of individuals of the same matriline. Although fine-scale population genetic structure was weak, forest elephants are typically found in groups consisting of kin and based on matrilines

  10. Family-based Association Analyses of Imputed Genotypes Reveal Genome-Wide Significant Association of Alzheimer’s disease with OSBPL6, PTPRG and PDCL3

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Christine; Hooli, Basavaraj V.; Mullin, Kristina; Liu, Tian; Roehr, Johannes T; Mattheisen, Manuel; Parrado, Antonio R.; Bertram, Lars; Lange, Christoph; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex and heterogeneous. Over 200 highly penetrant pathogenic variants in the genes APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 cause a subset of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD). On the other hand, susceptibility to late-onset forms of AD (LOAD) is indisputably associated to the ε4 allele in the gene APOE, and more recently to variants in more than two-dozen additional genes identified in the large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses reports. Taken together however, although the heritability in AD is estimated to be as high as 80%, a large proportion of the underlying genetic factors still remain to be elucidated. In this study we performed a systematic family-based genome-wide association and meta-analysis on close to 15 million imputed variants from three large collections of AD families (~3,500 subjects from 1,070 families). Using a multivariate phenotype combining affection status and onset age, meta-analysis of the association results revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that achieved genome-wide significance for association with AD risk: rs7609954 in the gene PTPRG (P-value = 3.98·10−08), rs1347297 in the gene OSBPL6 (P-value = 4.53·10−08), and rs1513625 near PDCL3 (P-value = 4.28·10−08). In addition, rs72953347 in OSBPL6 (P-value = 6.36·10−07) and two SNPs in the gene CDKAL1 showed marginally significant association with LOAD (rs10456232, P-value: 4.76·10−07; rs62400067, P-value: 3.54·10−07). In summary, family-based GWAS meta-analysis of imputed SNPs revealed novel genomic variants in (or near) PTPRG, OSBPL6, and PDCL3 that influence risk for AD with genome-wide significance. PMID:26830138

  11. Immunoepidemiological profiling of onchocerciasis patients reveals associations with microfilaria loads and ivermectin intake on both individual and community levels.

    PubMed

    Arndts, Kathrin; Specht, Sabine; Debrah, Alexander Y; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Klarmann Schulz, Ute; Mand, Sabine; Batsa, Linda; Kwarteng, Alexander; Taylor, Mark; Adjei, Ohene; Martin, Coralie; Layland, Laura E; Hoerauf, Achim

    2014-02-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) programmes against Onchocerca volvulus use ivermectin (IVM) which targets microfilariae (MF), the worm's offspring. Most infected individuals are hyporesponsive and present regulated immune responses despite high parasite burden. Recently, with MDA programmes, the existence of amicrofilaridermic (a-MF) individuals has become apparent but little is known about their immune responses. Within this immunoepidemiological study, we compared parasitology, pathology and immune profiles in infection-free volunteers and infected individuals that were MF(+) or a-MF. The latter stemmed from villages in either Central or Ashanti regions of Ghana which, at the time of the study, had received up to eight or only one round of MDA respectively. Interestingly, a-MF patients had fewer nodules and decreased IL-10 responses to all tested stimuli. On the other hand, this patient group displayed contrary IL-5 profiles following in vitro stimulation or in plasma and the dampened response in the latter correlated to reduced eosinophils and associated factors but elevated neutrophils. Furthermore, multivariable regression analysis with covariates MF, IVM or the region (Central vs. Ashanti) revealed that immune responses were associated with different covariates: whereas O. volvulus-specific IL-5 responses were primarily associated with MF, IL-10 secretion had a negative correlation with times of individual IVM therapy (IIT). All plasma parameters (eosinophil cationic protein, IL-5, eosinophils and neutrophils) were highly associated with MF. With regards to IL-17 secretion, although no differences were observed between the groups to filarial-specific or bystander stimuli, these responses were highly associated with the region. These data indicate that immune responses are affected by both, IIT and the rounds of IVM MDA within the community. Consequently, it appears that a lowered infection pressure due to IVM MDA may affect the immune profile of community

  12. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On On; Yang, Jiangke; Bougouffa, Salim; Wang, Yong; Batang, Zenon; Tian, Renmao; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2012-01-01

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals. PMID:22865078

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies reveals genetic overlap between Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khankhanian, Pouya; Cozen, Wendy; Himmelstein, Daniel S; Madireddy, Lohith; Din, Lennox; van den Berg, Anke; Matsushita, Takuya; Glaser, Sally L; Moré, Jayaji M; Smedby, Karin E.; Baranzini, Sergio E; Mack, Thomas M; Lizée, Antoine; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Nieters, Alexandra; Hauser, Stephen L; Cocco, Pierluigi; Maynadié, Marc; Foretová, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Li, Dalin; Bhatia, Smita; Melbye, Mads; Onel, Kenan; Jarrett, Ruth; McKay, James D; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on epidemiological commonalities, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), two clinically distinct conditions, have long been suspected to be aetiologically related. MS and HL occur in roughly the same age groups, both are associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, and they cluster mutually in families (though not in individuals). We speculated if in addition to sharing environmental risk factors, MS and HL were also genetically related. Using data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 1816 HL patients, 9772 MS patients and 25 255 controls, we therefore investigated the genetic overlap between the two diseases. Methods: From among a common denominator of 404 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) studied, we identified SNPs and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles independently associated with both diseases. Next, we assessed the cumulative genome-wide effect of MS-associated SNPs on HL and of HL-associated SNPs on MS. To provide an interpretational frame of reference, we used data from published GWAS to create a genetic network of diseases within which we analysed proximity of HL and MS to autoimmune diseases and haematological and non-haematological malignancies. Results: SNP analyses revealed genome-wide overlap between HL and MS, most prominently in the HLA region. Polygenic HL risk scores explained 4.44% of HL risk (Nagelkerke R2), but also 2.36% of MS risk. Conversely, polygenic MS risk scores explained 8.08% of MS risk and 1.94% of HL risk. In the genetic disease network, HL was closer to autoimmune diseases than to solid cancers. Conclusions: HL displays considerable genetic overlap with MS and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26971321

  14. THE 2016 ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Gene

    2015-09-01

    Every year, the American Hospital Association compiles the Environmental Scan to provide hospital leaders with insight and information about market forces that are likely to affect the health care field. One common theme this year is the pace of change. PMID:26495611

  15. Genetic scores based on risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can reveal inherited risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yishuo; Zhang, Ning; Li, Kaiwen; Chen, Haitao; Lin, Xiaolin; Yu, Yang; Gou, Yuancheng; Hou, Jiangang; Jiang, Deke; Na, Rong; Wang, Xiang; Ding, Qiang; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could reflect the individual inherited risks of RCC. A total of 346 RCC patients and 1,130 controls were recruited in this case-control study. Genetic scores were calculated for each individual based on the odds ratios and frequencies of risk-associated SNPs. Four SNPs were significantly associated with RCC in Chinese population. Two genetic score models were established, genetic score 1 (rs10054504, rs7023329 and rs718314) and genetic score 2 (rs10054504, rs7023329 and rs1049380). For genetic score 1, the individual likelihood of RCC with low (<0.8), medium (0.8-1.2) and high (≥1.2) genetic score 1 was 15.61%, 22.25% and 33.92% respectively (P-trend=6.88×10(-7)). For genetic score 2, individual with low (<0.8), medium (0.8-1.2) and high (≥1.2) genetic score 2 would have likelihood of RCC as 14.39%, 24.54% and 36.48%, respectively (P-trend=1.27×10(-10)). The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of genetic score 1 was 0.626, and AUC of genetic score 2 was 0.658. We concluded that genetic score can reveal personal risk and inherited risk of RCC, especially when family history is not available.

  16. Cultivation of a human-associated TM7 phylotype reveals a reduced genome and epibiotic parasitic lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Edlund, Anna; Yooseph, Shibu; Hall, Adam P.; Liu, Su-Yang; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Hunter, Ryan C.; Cheng, Genhong; Nelson, Karen E.; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    The candidate phylum TM7 is globally distributed and often associated with human inflammatory mucosal diseases. Despite its prevalence, the TM7 phylum remains recalcitrant to cultivation, making it one of the most enigmatic phyla known. In this study, we cultivated a TM7 phylotype (TM7x) from the human oral cavity. This extremely small coccus (200–300 nm) has a distinctive lifestyle not previously observed in human-associated microbes. It is an obligate epibiont of an Actinomyces odontolyticus strain (XH001) yet also has a parasitic phase, thereby killing its host. This first completed genome (705 kb) for a human-associated TM7 phylotype revealed a complete lack of amino acid biosynthetic capacity. Comparative genomics analyses with uncultivated environmental TM7 assemblies show remarkable conserved gene synteny and only minimal gene loss/gain that may have occurred as TM7x adapted to conditions within the human host. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles provided the first indications, to our knowledge, that there is signaling interaction between TM7x and XH001. Furthermore, the induction of TNF-α production in macrophages by XH001 was repressed in the presence of TM7x, suggesting its potential immune suppression ability. Overall, our data provide intriguing insights into the uncultivability, pathogenicity, and unique lifestyle of this previously uncharacterized oral TM7 phylotype. PMID:25535390

  17. Cultivation of a human-associated TM7 phylotype reveals a reduced genome and epibiotic parasitic lifestyle.

    PubMed

    He, Xuesong; McLean, Jeffrey S; Edlund, Anna; Yooseph, Shibu; Hall, Adam P; Liu, Su-Yang; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Hunter, Ryan C; Cheng, Genhong; Nelson, Karen E; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    The candidate phylum TM7 is globally distributed and often associated with human inflammatory mucosal diseases. Despite its prevalence, the TM7 phylum remains recalcitrant to cultivation, making it one of the most enigmatic phyla known. In this study, we cultivated a TM7 phylotype (TM7x) from the human oral cavity. This extremely small coccus (200-300 nm) has a distinctive lifestyle not previously observed in human-associated microbes. It is an obligate epibiont of an Actinomyces odontolyticus strain (XH001) yet also has a parasitic phase, thereby killing its host. This first completed genome (705 kb) for a human-associated TM7 phylotype revealed a complete lack of amino acid biosynthetic capacity. Comparative genomics analyses with uncultivated environmental TM7 assemblies show remarkable conserved gene synteny and only minimal gene loss/gain that may have occurred as TM7x adapted to conditions within the human host. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles provided the first indications, to our knowledge, that there is signaling interaction between TM7x and XH001. Furthermore, the induction of TNF-α production in macrophages by XH001 was repressed in the presence of TM7x, suggesting its potential immune suppression ability. Overall, our data provide intriguing insights into the uncultivability, pathogenicity, and unique lifestyle of this previously uncharacterized oral TM7 phylotype.

  18. Quantitative Genetics of CTCF Binding Reveal Local Sequence Effects and Different Modes of X-Chromosome Association

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bum-Kyu; Battenhouse, Anna; Louzada, Sandra; Yang, Fengtang; Dunham, Ian; Crawford, Gregory E.; Lieb, Jason D.; Durbin, Richard; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Birney, Ewan

    2014-01-01

    Associating genetic variation with quantitative measures of gene regulation offers a way to bridge the gap between genotype and complex phenotypes. In order to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that influence the binding of a transcription factor in humans, we measured binding of the multifunctional transcription and chromatin factor CTCF in 51 HapMap cell lines. We identified thousands of QTLs in which genotype differences were associated with differences in CTCF binding strength, hundreds of them confirmed by directly observable allele-specific binding bias. The majority of QTLs were either within 1 kb of the CTCF binding motif, or in linkage disequilibrium with a variant within 1 kb of the motif. On the X chromosome we observed three classes of binding sites: a minority class bound only to the active copy of the X chromosome, the majority class bound to both the active and inactive X, and a small set of female-specific CTCF sites associated with two non-coding RNA genes. In sum, our data reveal extensive genetic effects on CTCF binding, both direct and indirect, and identify a diversity of patterns of CTCF binding on the X chromosome. PMID:25411781

  19. Analysis of S. pombe SIN protein association to the SPB reveals two genetically separable states of the SIN.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Paulina; Chasapi, Anastasia; Krapp, Andrea; Cano Del Rosario, Elena; Schmitter, Daniel; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael; Xenarios, Ioannis; Rougemont, Jacques; Simanis, Viesturs

    2015-02-15

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe septation initiation network (SIN) regulates cytokinesis, and asymmetric association of SIN proteins with the mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs) is important for its regulation. Here, we have used semi-automated image analysis to study SIN proteins in large numbers of wild-type and mutant cells. Our principal conclusions are: first, that the association of Cdc7p with the SPBs in early mitosis is frequently asymmetric, with a bias in favour of the new SPB; second, that the early association of Cdc7p-GFP to the SPB depends on Plo1p but not Spg1p, and is unaffected by mutations that influence its asymmetry in anaphase; third, that Cdc7p asymmetry in anaphase B is delayed by Pom1p and by activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, and is promoted by Rad24p; and fourth, that the length of the spindle, expressed as a fraction of the length of the cell, at which Cdc7p becomes asymmetric is similar in cells dividing at different sizes. These data reveal that multiple regulatory mechanisms control the SIN in mitosis and lead us to propose a two-state model to describe the SIN.

  20. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance

    PubMed Central

    Penuliar, Gil M.; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 μM MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  1. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-10-08

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner.

  2. Analysis of ultra-deep targeted sequencing reveals mutation burden is associated with gender and clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuqiang; Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; He, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Gender-associated difference in incidence and clinical outcomes of lung cancer have been established, but the biological mechanisms underlying these gender-associated differences are less studied. Recently we have characterized the genomic landscape of lung adenocarcinoma derived from Chinese population (Reference [1]). In this study we evaluated the clinical significance of mutation burden in lung adenocarcinoma and found that the male tumors harbored statistically greater burden of genetic alterations than female counterparts (Male median 3 (range 0–34) vs female median = 2 (0–24), male to female ratio = 1.636, 95% CI = 1.343–1.992) after adjustment of age at surgery, stage, smoking status. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that greater burden of genetic alterations was associated with worse overall survival. Moreover, multivariable analysis demonstrated mutation burden was an independent prognostic factor for the patients. Taken together, our analysis demonstrated gender disparity of mutation burden and their prognostic value in lung adenocarcinoma. This gender difference in mutation burden might provide an explanation for the distinct difference in the clinical outcomes between sexes in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27009843

  3. Genetic scores based on risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can reveal inherited risk of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haitao; Lin, Xiaolin; Yu, Yang; Gou, Yuancheng; Hou, Jiangang; Jiang, Deke; Na, Rong; Wang, Xiang; Ding, Qiang; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could reflect the individual inherited risks of RCC. A total of 346 RCC patients and 1,130 controls were recruited in this case-control study. Genetic scores were calculated for each individual based on the odds ratios and frequencies of risk-associated SNPs. Four SNPs were significantly associated with RCC in Chinese population. Two genetic score models were established, genetic score 1 (rs10054504, rs7023329 and rs718314) and genetic score 2 (rs10054504, rs7023329 and rs1049380). For genetic score 1, the individual likelihood of RCC with low (<0.8), medium (0.8-1.2) and high (≥1.2) genetic score 1 was 15.61%, 22.25% and 33.92% respectively (P-trend=6.88×10−7). For genetic score 2, individual with low (<0.8), medium (0.8-1.2) and high (≥1.2) genetic score 2 would have likelihood of RCC as 14.39%, 24.54% and 36.48%, respectively (P-trend=1.27×10−10). The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of genetic score 1 was 0.626, and AUC of genetic score 2 was 0.658. We concluded that genetic score can reveal personal risk and inherited risk of RCC, especially when family history is not available. PMID:27229762

  4. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses.

    PubMed

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A; Vu, Anthony Q; Hutt, Kasey R; Martinez, Fernando J; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J; Huelga, Stephanie C; Chun, Seung J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3' untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism. PMID:27378374

  5. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Vu, Anthony Q.; Hutt, Kasey R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J.; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Chun, Seung J.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P.; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares Jr., Manuel; Burge, Christopher B.; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3′ untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism. PMID:27378374

  6. A genome-wide admixture scan identifies MYH9 as a candidate locus associated with non-diabetic end stage renal disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Linda Kao, WH; Klag, Michael J; Meoni, Lucy A; Reich, David; Berthier-Schaad, Yvette; Li, Man; Coresh, Josef; Patterson, Nick; Tandon, Arti; Powe, Neil R; Fink, Nancy E; Sadler, John H; Weir, Matthew R; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon; Divers, Jasmin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Freedman, Barry I; Kimmel, Paul L; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly F; Kramp, Kristopher; Leehey, David J; Nicholas, Susanne; Pahl, Madeleine; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Sedor, John R; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Winkler, Cheryl A; Smith, Michael W.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2008-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has a four times higher incidence in African Americans compared to European Americans. This led to the hypothesis that susceptibility alleles for ESRD have a higher frequency in West African than European gene pool. We performed a genome-wide admixture scan in 1,372 ESRD cases and 806 controls and demonstrated a highly significant association between excess African ancestry and non-diabetic ESRD (LOD 5.70) but not diabetic ESRD (LOD 0.47) on chromosome 22q12. Each copy of the European ancestral allele conferred a relative risk of 0.50 (95% credible interval 0.39 – 0.63) compared to African ancestry. Multiple common SNPs (allele frequency ranging from 0.2 to 0.6) in the gene that encodes non-muscle myosin heavy chain type II isoform A (MYH9) were associated with 2-4 times greater risk of non-diabetic ESRD and accounted for a large proportion of the excess risk of ESRD observed in African compared to European Americans. PMID:18794854

  7. A genome-wide association study on androstenone levels in pigs reveals a cluster of candidate genes on chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In many countries, male piglets are castrated shortly after birth because a proportion of un-castrated male pigs produce meat with an unpleasant flavour and odour. Main compounds of boar taint are androstenone and skatole. The aim of this high-density genome-wide association study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with androstenone levels in a commercial sire line of pigs. The identification of major genetic effects causing boar taint would accelerate the reduction of boar taint through breeding to finally eliminate the need for castration. Results The Illumina Porcine 60K+SNP Beadchip was genotyped on 987 pigs divergent for androstenone concentration from a commercial Duroc-based sire line. The association analysis with 47,897 SNPs revealed that androstenone levels in fat tissue were significantly affected by 37 SNPs on pig chromosomes SSC1 and SSC6. Among them, the 5 most significant SNPs explained together 13.7% of the genetic variance in androstenone. On SSC6, a larger region of 10 Mb was shown to be associated with androstenone covering several candidate genes potentially involved in the synthesis and metabolism of androgens. Besides known candidate genes, such as cytochrome P450 A19 (CYP2A19), sulfotransferases SULT2A1, and SULT2B1, also new members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2 gene subfamilies and of the hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenases (HSD17B14) were found. In addition, the gene encoding the ß-chain of the luteinizing hormone (LHB) which induces steroid synthesis in the Leydig cells of the testis at onset of puberty maps to this area on SSC6. Interestingly, the gene encoding the α-chain of LH is also located in one of the highly significant areas on SSC1. Conclusions This study reveals several areas of the genome at high resolution responsible for variation of androstenone levels in intact boars. Major genetic factors on SSC1 and SSC6 showing moderate to large effects on androstenone concentration were identified in

  8. Expression Profiling of Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata Inbred Lines Reveals Their Association with Glucosinolate Content.

    PubMed

    Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Laila, Rawnak; Yang, Kiwoung; Park, Jong-In; Kim, Hye Ran; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are the biochemical compounds that provide defense to plants against pathogens and herbivores. In this study, the relative expression level of 48 glucosinolate biosynthesis genes was explored in four morphologically-different cabbage inbred lines by qPCR analysis. The content of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate molecules present in those cabbage lines was also estimated by HPLC analysis. The possible association between glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression level was explored by principal component analysis (PCA). The genotype-dependent variation in the relative expression level of different aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes is the novel result of this study. A total of eight different types of glucosinolates, including five aliphatic and three indolic glucosinolates, was detected in four cabbage lines. Three inbred lines BN3383, BN4059 and BN4072 had no glucoraphanin, sinigrin and gluconapin detected, but the inbred line BN3273 had these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA revealed that a higher expression level of ST5b genes and lower expression of GSL-OH was associated with the accumulation of these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA further revealed that comparatively higher accumulation of neoglucobrassicin in the inbred line, BN4072, was associated with a high level of expression of MYB34 (Bol017062) and CYP81F1 genes. The Dof1 and IQD1 genes probably trans-activated the genes related to biosynthesis of glucoerucin and methoxyglucobrassicin for their comparatively higher accumulation in the BN4059 and BN4072 lines compared to the other two lines, BN3273 and BN3383. A comparatively higher progoitrin level in BN3273 was probably associated with the higher expression level of the GSL-OH gene. The cabbage inbred line BN3383 accounted for the significantly higher relative expression level for the 12 genes out of 48, but this line had comparatively lower total glucosinolates detected

  9. Characterization of the Active Microbiotas Associated with Honey Bees Reveals Healthier and Broader Communities when Colonies are Genetically Diverse

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Heather R.; Rios, Daniela; Walker-Sperling, Victoria E.; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L. G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies the active bacterial communities that are found on honey bees, in their digestive tracts, and in bee bread. This method provided insights that have not been revealed by past studies into the content and benefits of honey bee-associated microbial communities. Colony microbiotas differed substantially between sampling environments and were dominated by several anaerobic bacterial genera never before associated with honey bees, but renowned for their use by humans to ferment food. Colonies with genetically diverse populations of workers, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from greater microbial diversity, reduced pathogen loads, and increased abundance of putatively helpful bacteria, particularly species from the potentially probiotic genus Bifidobacterium. Across all colonies, Bifidobacterium activity was negatively correlated with the activity of genera that include pathogenic microbes; this relationship suggests a possible target for understanding whether microbes provide protective benefits to honey bees. Within-colony diversity shapes microbiotas associated with honey bees in ways that may have important repercussions for colony function and health. Our findings illuminate the importance of honey bee-bacteria symbioses and examine their intersection with nutrition, pathogen load, and genetic diversity, factors that are considered key to understanding honey bee decline. PMID:22427917

  10. Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees reveals healthier and broader communities when colonies are genetically diverse.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Heather R; Rios, Daniela; Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies the active bacterial communities that are found on honey bees, in their digestive tracts, and in bee bread. This method provided insights that have not been revealed by past studies into the content and benefits of honey bee-associated microbial communities. Colony microbiotas differed substantially between sampling environments and were dominated by several anaerobic bacterial genera never before associated with honey bees, but renowned for their use by humans to ferment food. Colonies with genetically diverse populations of workers, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from greater microbial diversity, reduced pathogen loads, and increased abundance of putatively helpful bacteria, particularly species from the potentially probiotic genus Bifidobacterium. Across all colonies, Bifidobacterium activity was negatively correlated with the activity of genera that include pathogenic microbes; this relationship suggests a possible target for understanding whether microbes provide protective benefits to honey bees. Within-colony diversity shapes microbiotas associated with honey bees in ways that may have important repercussions for colony function and health. Our findings illuminate the importance of honey bee-bacteria symbioses and examine their intersection with nutrition, pathogen load, and genetic diversity, factors that are considered key to understanding honey bee decline.

  11. Rat skeletal muscle glycogen degradation pathways reveal differential association of glycogen-related proteins with glycogen granules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyang; Stapleton, David; Murphy, Robyn M

    2015-06-01

    Glycogenin, glycogen-debranching enzyme (GDE) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are important enzymes that contribute to glycogen particle metabolism. In Long-Evans Hooded rat whole muscle homogenates prepared from extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch) and soleus (SOL, oxidative, predominantly slow twitch), it was necessary to include α-amylase, which releases glucosyl units from glycogen, to detect glycogenin but not GDE or GP. Up to ∼12 % of intramuscular glycogen pool was broken down using either in vitro electrical stimulation or leaving muscle at room temperature >3 h (delayed, post-mortem). Electrical stimulation did not reveal glycogenin unless α-amylase was added, although in post-mortem muscle ∼50 and ∼30 % of glycogenin in EDL and SOL muscles, respectively, was detected compared to the amount detected with α-amylase treatment. Single muscle fibres were dissected from fresh or post-mortem EDL muscles, mechanically skinned to remove surface membrane and the presence of glycogenin, GDE and GP as freely diffusible proteins (i.e. cytoplasmic localization) compared by Western blotting. Diffusibility of glycogenin (∼20 %) and GP (∼60 %) was not different between muscles, although GDE increased from ∼15 % diffusible in fresh muscle to ∼60 % in post-mortem muscle. Under physiologically relevant circumstances, in rat muscle and within detection limits: (1) The total cellular pool of glycogenin is always associated with glycogen granules, (2) GDE is associated with glycogen granules with over half the total pool associated with the outer tiers of glycogen, (3) GP is only ever weakly associated with glycogen granules and (4) addition of α-amylase is necessary in order to detect glycogenin, but not GDE or GP.

  12. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize.

  13. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  14. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize. PMID:27379126

  15. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that m