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Sample records for association scan reveals

  1. Bayesian association scan reveals loci associated with human lifespan and linked biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, Aaron F.; Joshi, Peter K.; Porcu, Eleonora; Komljenovic, Andrea; Li, Hao; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Litovchenko, Maria; Bevers, Roel P. J.; Rüeger, Sina; Reymond, Alexandre; Bochud, Murielle; Deplancke, Bart; Williams, Robert W.; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Paccaud, Fred; Rousson, Valentin; Auwerx, Johan; Wilson, James F.; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    The enormous variation in human lifespan is in part due to a myriad of sequence variants, only a few of which have been revealed to date. Since many life-shortening events are related to diseases, we developed a Mendelian randomization-based method combining 58 disease-related GWA studies to derive longevity priors for all HapMap SNPs. A Bayesian association scan, informed by these priors, for parental age of death in the UK Biobank study (n=116,279) revealed 16 independent SNPs with significant Bayes factor at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Eleven of them replicate (5% FDR) in five independent longevity studies combined; all but three are depleted of the life-shortening alleles in older Biobank participants. Further analysis revealed that brain expression levels of nearby genes (RBM6, SULT1A1 and CHRNA5) might be causally implicated in longevity. Gene expression and caloric restriction experiments in model organisms confirm the conserved role for RBM6 and SULT1A1 in modulating lifespan. PMID:28748955

  2. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  3. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  4. A genome-wide linkage and association scan reveals novel loci for autism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lauren A; Arking, Dan E; Daly, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2009-10-08

    Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success. Genome-wide association studies using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits. Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed an SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 x 10(-7)). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening whereas the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants.

  5. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  6. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  7. A genome-wide linkage and association scan reveals novel loci for hypertension and blood pressure traits.

    PubMed

    Guo, Youling; Tomlinson, Brian; Chu, Tanya; Fang, Yu Jing; Gui, Hongsheng; Tang, Clara S; Yip, Benjamin H; Cherny, Stacey S; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Sham, Pak Chung; Lam, Tai Hing; Thomas, Neil G

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is caused by the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The condition which is very common, with about 18% of the adult Hong Kong Chinese population and over 50% of older individuals affected, is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. To identify genes influencing hypertension and blood pressure, we conducted a combined linkage and association study using over 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 328 individuals comprising 111 hypertensive probands and their siblings. Using a family-based association test, we found an association with SNPs on chromosome 5q31.1 (rs6596140; P<9 × 10(-8)) for hypertension. One candidate gene, PDC, was replicated, with rs3817586 on 1q31.1 attaining P = 2.5 × 10(-4) and 2.9 × 10(-5) in the within-family tests for DBP and MAP, respectively. We also identified regions of significant linkage for systolic and diastolic blood pressure on chromosomes 2q22 and 5p13, respectively. Further family-based association analysis of the linkage peak on chromosome 5 yielded a significant association (rs1605685, P<7 × 10(-5)) for DBP. This is the first combined linkage and association study of hypertension and its related quantitative traits with Chinese ancestry. The associations reported here account for the action of common variants whereas the discovery of linkage regions may point to novel targets for rare variant screening.

  8. Genome-wide scan reveals association of psoriasis with IL-23 and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rajan P; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Helms, Cynthia; Ding, Jun; Stuart, Philip E; Goldgar, David; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Li, Yun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Feng, Bing-Jian; Ruether, Andreas; Schreiber, Stefan; Weichenthal, Michael; Gladman, Dafna; Rahman, Proton; Schrodi, Steven J; Prahalad, Sampath; Guthery, Stephen L; Fischer, Judith; Liao, Wilson; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Menter, Alan; Lathrop, G Mark; Wise, Carol A; Begovich, Ann B; Voorhees, John J; Elder, James T; Krueger, Gerald G; Bowcock, Anne M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2009-02-01

    Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated disorder that affects the skin, nails and joints. To identify psoriasis susceptibility loci, we genotyped 438,670 SNPs in 1,409 psoriasis cases and 1,436 controls of European ancestry. We followed up 21 promising SNPs in 5,048 psoriasis cases and 5,041 controls. Our results provide strong support for the association of at least seven genetic loci and psoriasis (each with combined P < 5 x 10(-8)). Loci with confirmed association include HLA-C, three genes involved in IL-23 signaling (IL23A, IL23R, IL12B), two genes that act downstream of TNF-alpha and regulate NF-kappaB signaling (TNIP1, TNFAIP3) and two genes involved in the modulation of Th2 immune responses (IL4, IL13). Although the proteins encoded in these loci are known to interact biologically, we found no evidence for epistasis between associated SNPs. Our results expand the catalog of genetic loci implicated in psoriasis susceptibility and suggest priority targets for study in other auto-immune disorders.

  9. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  10. Genome-wide indel/SSR scanning reveals significant loci associated with excellent agronomic traits of a cabbage (Brassica oleracea) elite parental line ‘01–20’

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Honghao; Wang, Qingbiao; Han, Fengqing; Liu, Xing; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Yangyong

    2017-01-01

    Elite parental lines are of great significance to crop breeding. To discover unique genomic loci associated with excellent economic traits in the elite cabbage inbred-line ‘01–20’, we performed comparisons of phenotypes as well as whole-genome insertion-deletion/simple sequence repeat loci between ‘01–20’ and each of its five sister lines. ‘01–20’ has a range of excellent agronomic traits, including early-maturing, and improvements in plant type and leaf colour. Eight unique loci were discovered for ‘01–20’ and ‘01-07-258’, another elite line similar to ‘01–20’ at the whole-genome level. In addition, two excellent double-haploid lines derived from a cross of ‘01–20’ also inherited these loci. Based on the quantitative trait locus association results, five of these loci were found to be associated with important agronomic traits, which could explain why the elite parent ‘01–20’ possesses greener outer leaves, a more compact and upright plant-type, rounder head, shorter core length, and better taste. Additionally, some of these loci have clustering effects for quantitative trait loci associated with different traits; therefore, important genes in these regions were analysed. The obtained results should enable marker-assisted multi-trait selection at the whole-genome level in cabbage breeding and provide insights into significant genome loci and their breeding effects. PMID:28164997

  11. Catalytic reaction processes revealed by scanning probe microscopy. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Bao, Xinhe; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-05-19

    Heterogeneous catalysis is of great importance for modern society. About 80% of the chemicals are produced by catalytic reactions. Green energy production and utilization as well as environmental protection also need efficient catalysts. Understanding the reaction mechanisms is crucial to improve the existing catalysts and develop new ones with better activity, selectivity, and stability. Three components are involved in one catalytic reaction: reactant, product, and catalyst. The catalytic reaction process consists of a series of elementary steps: adsorption, diffusion, reaction, and desorption. During reaction, the catalyst surface can change at the atomic level, with roughening, sintering, and segregation processes occurring dynamically in response to the reaction conditions. Therefore, it is imperative to obtain atomic-scale information for understanding catalytic reactions. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a very appropriate tool for catalytic research at the atomic scale because of its unique atomic-resolution capability. A distinguishing feature of SPM, compared to other surface characterization techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is that there is no intrinsic limitation for SPM to work under realistic reaction conditions (usually high temperature and high pressure). Therefore, since it was introduced in 1981, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been widely used to investigate the adsorption, diffusion, reaction, and desorption processes on solid catalyst surfaces at the atomic level. STM can also monitor dynamic changes of catalyst surfaces during reactions. These invaluable microscopic insights have not only deepened the understanding of catalytic processes, but also provided important guidance for the development of new catalysts. This Account will focus on elementary reaction processes revealed by SPM. First, we will demonstrate the power of SPM to investigate the adsorption and diffusion process of reactants on catalyst surfaces

  12. Ancient Pb and Ti mobilization revealed by Scanning Ion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiak, Monika A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.

    2014-05-01

    Zircons from strongly layered early Archean ortho- and paragneisses in ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic rocks of the Napier Complex, Enderby Land, East Antarctica are characterized by complex U-Th-Pb systematics [1,2,3]. A large number of zircons from three samples, Gage Ridge, Mount Sones and Dallwitz Nunatak, are reversely discordant (U/Pb ages older than 207Pb/206Pb ages) with the oldest date of 3.9 Ga [4] (for the grain from Gage Ridge orthogneiss). To further investigate this process, we utilized a novel high spatial resolution Scanning Ion Imaging technique on the CAMECA IMS 1280 at the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. Areas of 70 μm x 70 μm were selected for imaging in mono- and multicollection modes using a ~2 μm rastered primary beam to map out the distribution of 48Ti, 89Y, 180Hf, 232Th, 238U, 204Pb, 206Pb and 207Pb. The ion maps reveal variable distribution of certain elements within analysed grains that can be compared to their CL response. Yttrium, together with U and Th, exhibits zonation visible on the CL images, Hf shows expected minimal variation. Unusual patchiness is visible in the map for Ti and Pb distribution. The bright patches with enhanced signal do not correspond to any zones or to crystal imperfections (e.g. cracks). The presence of patchy titanium is likely to affect Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and patchy Pb affecting 207Pb/206Pb ages, usually considered as more robust for Archean zircons. Using the WinImage program, we produced 207Pb/206Pb ratio maps that allow calculation of 207Pb/206Pb ages for spots of any size within the frame of the picture and at any time after data collection. This provides a new and unique method for obtaining age information from zircon. These maps show areas of enhanced brightness where the 207Pb/206Pb ratio is higher and demonstrate that within these small areas (μm scale) the apparent 207Pb/206Pb age is older, in some of these patches even > 4 Ga. These data are a result of ancient Pb

  13. Scanning angle interference microscopy reveals cell dynamics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Paszek, Matthew J; DuFort, Christopher C; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Davidson, Michael W; Thorn, Kurt S; Liphardt, Jan T; Weaver, Valerie M

    2012-07-01

    Emerging questions in cell biology necessitate nanoscale imaging in live cells. Here we present scanning angle interference microscopy, which is capable of localizing fluorescent objects with nanoscale precision along the optical axis in motile cellular structures. We use this approach to resolve nanotopographical features of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton as well as the temporal evolution, three-dimensional architecture and nanoscale dynamics of focal adhesion complexes.

  14. Scanning force microscopy reveals ellipsoid shape of chicken erythrocyte nucleosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, W; Henderson, E

    1996-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy was used to investigate the conformation of hypotonic spread chicken erythrocyte nucleosomes. Nucleosomal chains were prepared in low-salt conditions and fixed before centrifugation onto glass coverslips and air drying. The images of single nucleosomes were isolated by image processing, and the height and geometry of the resulting three-dimensional structures were investigated. An average nucleosome height of 4.2 +/- 1.1 nm was determined. A virtual cross section at half-maximum height of the nucleosome structure was used for a characterization of the nucleosome geometry. The shape of this cross section was best described by an ellipse with an aspect ratio (major/minor axis) of approximately 1.30. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8889198

  15. Genome Scan, Fine-Mapping, and Candidate Gene Analysis of Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate Reveals Phenotype-Specific Differences in Linkage and Association Results

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Field, L.Leigh; Maher, Brion S.; Goldstein McHenry, Toby; Cooper, Margaret E.; Govil, Manika; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Riley, Bridget; Jugessur, Astanand; Felix, Temis; Morene, Lina; Mansilla, M.Adela; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Doheny, Kim; Pugh, Elizabeth; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Non-syndromic orofacial clefts, i.e. cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP), are among the most common birth defects. The goal of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes for CL with or without CP (CL/P). Methods We performed linkage analyses of a 10 cM genome scan in 820 multiplex CL/P families (6,565 individuals). Significant linkage results were followed by association analyses of 1,476 SNPs in candidate genes and regions, utilizing a weighted false discovery rate (wFDR) approach to control for multiple testing and incorporate the genome scan results. Results Significant (multipoint HLOD ≥3.2) or genome-wide-significant (HLOD ≥4.02) linkage results were found for regions 1q32, 2p13, 3q27-28, 9q21, 12p11, 14q21-24 and 16q24. SNPs in IRF6 (1q32) and in or near FOXE1 (9q21) reached formal genome-wide wFDR-adjusted significance. Further, results were phenotype dependent in that the IRF6 region results were most significant for families in which affected individuals have CL alone, and the FOXE1 region results were most significant in families in which some or all of the affected individuals have CL with CP. Conclusions These results highlight the importance of careful phenotypic delineation in large samples of families for genetic analyses of complex, heterogeneous traits such as CL/P. PMID:19521098

  16. Genome scan, fine-mapping, and candidate gene analysis of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate reveals phenotype-specific differences in linkage and association results.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L; Lidral, Andrew C; Murray, Jeffrey C; Field, L Leigh; Maher, Brion S; Goldstein McHenry, Toby; Cooper, Margaret E; Govil, Manika; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Riley, Bridget; Jugessur, Astanand; Felix, Temis; Morene, Lina; Mansilla, M Adela; Vieira, Alexandre R; Doheny, Kim; Pugh, Elizabeth; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Non-syndromic orofacial clefts, i.e. cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP), are among the most common birth defects. The goal of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes for CL with or without CP (CL/P). We performed linkage analyses of a 10 cM genome scan in 820 multiplex CL/P families (6,565 individuals). Significant linkage results were followed by association analyses of 1,476 SNPs in candidate genes and regions, utilizing a weighted false discovery rate (wFDR) approach to control for multiple testing and incorporate the genome scan results. Significant (multipoint HLOD >or=3.2) or genome-wide-significant (HLOD >or=4.02) linkage results were found for regions 1q32, 2p13, 3q27-28, 9q21, 12p11, 14q21-24 and 16q24. SNPs in IRF6 (1q32) and in or near FOXE1 (9q21) reached formal genome-wide wFDR-adjusted significance. Further, results were phenotype dependent in that the IRF6 region results were most significant for families in which affected individuals have CL alone, and the FOXE1 region results were most significant in families in which some or all of the affected individuals have CL with CP. These results highlight the importance of careful phenotypic delineation in large samples of families for genetic analyses of complex, heterogeneous traits such as CL/P. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Temperature-scan cryocrystallography reveals reaction intermediates in bacteriophytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhong; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2012-03-27

    Light is a fundamental signal that regulates important physiological processes such as development and circadian rhythm in living organisms. Phytochromes form a major family of photoreceptors responsible for red light perception in plants, fungi and bacteria. They undergo reversible photoconversion between red-absorbing (Pr) and far-red-absorbing (Pfr) states, thereby ultimately converting a light signal into a distinct biological signal that mediates subsequent cellular responses. Several structures of microbial phytochromes have been determined in their dark-adapted Pr or Pfr states. However, the structural nature of initial photochemical events has not been characterized by crystallography. Here we report the crystal structures of three intermediates in the photoreaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome (PaBphP). We used cryotrapping crystallography to capture intermediates, and followed structural changes by scanning the temperature at which the photoreaction proceeded. Light-induced conformational changes in PaBphP originate in ring D of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore, and E-to-Z isomerization about the C{sub 15} = C{sub 16} double bond between rings C and D is the initial photochemical event. As the chromophore relaxes, the twist of the C{sub 15} methine bridge about its two dihedral angles is reversed. Structural changes extend further to rings B and A, and to the surrounding protein regions. These data indicate that absorption of a photon by the Pfr state of PaBphP converts a light signal into a structural signal via twisting and untwisting of the methine bridges in the linear tetrapyrrole within the confined protein cavity.

  18. Snow metamorphism as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominé, Florent; Lauzier, Thomas; Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Kuhs, Werner F; Techmer, Kirsten; Heinrichs, Till

    2003-09-01

    Current theories of snow metamorphism indicate that sublimating snow crystals have rounded shapes, while growing crystals have shapes that depend on growth rates. At slow growth rates, crystals are rounded. At moderate rates, they have flat faces with rounded edges. At fast growth rates, crystals have flat faces with sharp edges, and they have hollow faces at very fast growth rates. The main growth/sublimation mechanism is thought to be by the homogeneous nucleation of new layers at or near crystal edges. It was also suggested that the equilibrium shape of snow crystals would be temperature dependent: rounded above -10.5 degrees C, and faceted below. To test these paradigms, we have performed SEM investigations of snow samples having undergone metamorphism under natural conditions, and of snow samples subjected to isothermal metamorphism at -4 degrees and -15 degrees C in the laboratory. In general, current theories predicting crystal shapes as a function of growth rates, and of whether crystals are growing or sublimating, are verified. However, the transition in equilibrium shapes from rounded to faceted at -10.5 degrees C is not observed in our isothermal experiments that reveal a predominance of rounded shapes after more than a month of metamorphism at -4 and -15 degrees C. Some small crystals with flat faces that also have sharp angles at -15 degrees C, are observed in our isothermal experiments. These faces are newly formed, and contradict current theory. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain their occurrence. One is that they are due to sublimation at emerging dislocations.

  19. Chromosome 21 scan in Down syndrome reveals DSCAM as a predisposing locus in Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Pelet, Anna; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Chaoui, Asma; Masse-Morel, Marine; Arnold, Stacey; Sanlaville, Damien; Ceccherini, Isabella; Borrego, Salud; Hofstra, Robert M W; Munnich, Arnold; Bondurand, Nadège; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2013-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) genetics is a paradigm for the study and understanding of multigenic disorders. Association between Down syndrome and HSCR suggests that genetic factors that predispose to HSCR map to chromosome 21. To identify these additional factors, we performed a dose-dependent association study on chromosome 21 in Down syndrome patients with HSCR. Assessing 10,895 SNPs in 26 Caucasian cases and their parents led to identify two associated SNPs (rs2837770 and rs8134673) at chromosome-wide level. Those SNPs, which were located in intron 3 of the DSCAM gene within a 19 kb-linkage disequilibrium block region were in complete association and are consistent with DSCAM expression during enteric nervous system development. We replicated the association of HSCR with this region in an independent sample of 220 non-syndromic HSCR Caucasian patients and their parents. At last, we provide the functional rationale to the involvement of DSCAM by network analysis and assessment of SOX10 regulation. Our results reveal the involvement of DSCAM as a HSCR susceptibility locus, both in Down syndrome and HSCR isolated cases. This study further ascertains the chromosome-scan dose-dependent methodology used herein as a mean to map the genetic bases of other sub-phenotypes both in Down syndrome and other aneuploidies.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals single-molecule insights into the self-assembly of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kalashnyk, Nataliya; Nielsen, Jakob T; Nielsen, Erik H; Skrydstrup, Troels; Otzen, Daniel E; Lægsgaard, Erik; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Linderoth, Trolle R

    2012-08-28

    Many severe diseases are associated with amyloid fibril deposits in the body caused by protein misfolding. Structural information on amyloid fibrils is accumulating rapidly, but little is known about the assembly of peptides into fibrils at the level of individual molecules. Here we investigate self-assembly of the fibril-forming tetrapeptides KFFE and KVVE on a gold surface under ultraclean vacuum conditions using scanning tunneling microscopy. Combined with restrained molecular dynamics modeling, we identify peptide arrangements with interesting similarities to fibril structures. By resolving individual peptide residues and revealing conformational heterogeneities and dynamics, we demonstrate how conformational correlations may be involved in cooperative fibril growth. Most interestingly, intermolecular interactions prevail over intramolecular interactions, and assembly of the phenyl-rich KFFE peptide appears not to be dominated by π-π interactions. This study offers interesting perspectives for obtaining fundamental single-molecule insights into fibril formation using a surface science approach to study idealized model systems.

  1. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  2. A scan statistic for identifying chromosomal patterns of SNP association.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V; Levin, Albert M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Robertson, Henry; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic that takes into account the complex distribution of the human genome variation in the identification of chromosomal regions with significant SNP associations. This scan statistic has wide applicability for genetic analysis, whether to identify important chromosomal regions associated with common diseases based on whole-genome SNP association studies or to identify disease susceptibility genes based on dense SNP positional candidate studies. To illustrate this method, we analyzed patterns of SNP associations on chromosome 19 in a large cohort study. Among 2,944 SNPs, we found seven regions that contained clusters of significantly associated SNPs. The average width of these regions was 35 kb with a range of 10-72 kb. We compared the scan statistic results to Fisher's product method using a sliding window approach, and detected 22 regions with significant clusters of SNP associations. The average width of these regions was 131 kb with a range of 10.1-615 kb. Given that the distances between SNPs are not taken into consideration in the sliding window approach, it is likely that a large fraction of these regions represents false positives. However, all seven regions detected by the scan statistic were also detected by the sliding window approach. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns within the seven regions were highly variable indicating that the clusters of SNP associations were not due to LD alone. The scan statistic developed here can be used to make gene-based or region-based SNP inferences about disease association.

  3. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... reported their findings in a recent issue of Nature. Prior to this study, only two classes of ... in MITF predisposes to familial and sporadic melanoma. Nature. 2011 Nov 13;480(7375):99-103. doi: ...

  4. Photoreceptor perturbation around subretinal drusenoid deposits revealed by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaolin; Rivero, Ernesto Blanco; Clark, Mark E; Witherspoon, Clark Douglas; Spaide, Richard F; Girkin, Christopher A.; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the microscopic structure of photoreceptors impacted by subretinal drusenoid deposits, also called pseudodrusen, an extracellular lesion associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Design Observational case series. Methods Fifty-three patients with AMD and 10 age-similar subjects in normal retinal health were recruited. All subjects underwent color fundus photography, infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subretinal drusenoid deposits were classified with a 3-stage OCT-based grading system. Lesions and surrounding photoreceptors were examined with AOSLO. Results Subretinal drusenoid deposits were found in 26 eyes of 13 patients with AMD and imaged by AOSLO and SD-OCT in 18 eyes (n=342 lesions). SD-OCT showed subretinal drusenoid deposits as highly reflective material accumulated internal to the retinal pigment epithelium. AOSLO revealed that photoreceptor reflectivity was qualitatively reduced by stage 1 subretinal drusenoid deposits and greatly reduced by stage 2. AOSLO presented a distinct structure in stage 3, a hyporeflective annulus consisting of deflected, degenerated or absent photoreceptors. A central core with a reflectivity superficially resembling photoreceptors is formed by the lesion material itself. A hyporeflective gap in the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone on either side of this core shown in SD-OCT corresponded to the hyporeflective annulus seen by AOSLO. Conclusions AOSLO and multimodal imaging of subretinal drusenoid deposits indicate solid, space filling lesions in the subretinal space. Associated retinal reflectivity changes are related to lesion stages and are consistent with perturbations to photoreceptors, as suggested by histology. PMID:24907433

  5. Endolithic algae and micrite envelope formation in Bahamian oolites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S.; Rex, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of Holocene Bahamian ooelites by scanning electron and light microscopy has revealed the morphology and orientation of aragonite crystals in the lamellar ooelitic envelope, and their modification by the boring activities of endolithic algae. The voids produced by these algae are found in progressive stages of being lined and filled with precipitated microcrystalline aragonite, which is similar to the process of micrite envelope formation in molluscan and other skeletal carbonate grains.

  6. Endolithic algae and micrite envelope formation in Bahamian oolites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S.; Rex, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of Holocene Bahamian ooelites by scanning electron and light microscopy has revealed the morphology and orientation of aragonite crystals in the lamellar ooelitic envelope, and their modification by the boring activities of endolithic algae. The voids produced by these algae are found in progressive stages of being lined and filled with precipitated microcrystalline aragonite, which is similar to the process of micrite envelope formation in molluscan and other skeletal carbonate grains.

  7. Cone and Rod Loss in Stargardt Disease Revealed by Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongxin; Rossi, Ethan A.; Latchney, Lisa; Bessette, Angela; Stone, Edwin; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.; Chung, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Importance Stargardt disease (STGD1) is characterized by macular atrophy and flecks in the retinal pigment epithelium. The causative ABCA4 gene encodes a protein localizing to photoreceptor outer segments. The pathologic steps by which ABCA4 mutations lead to clinically detectable retinal pigment epithelium changes remain unclear. We investigated early STGD1 using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. Observations Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy imaging of 2 brothers with early STGD1 and their unaffected parents was compared with conventional imaging. Cone and rod spacing were increased in both patients (P <.001) with a dark cone appearance. No foveal cones were detected in the older brother. In the younger brother, foveal cones were enlarged with low density (peak cone density, 48.3 × 103 cones/mm2). The ratio of cone to rod spacing was increased in both patients, with greater divergence from normal approaching the foveal center, indicating that cone loss predominates centrally and rod loss increases peripherally. Both parents had normal photoreceptor mosaics. Genetic testing revealed 3 disease-causing mutations. Conclusions and Relevance This study provides in vivo images of rods and cones in STGD1. Although the primary clinical features of STGD1 are retinal pigment epithelial lesions, adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy reveals increased cone and rod spacing in areas that appear normal in conventional images, suggesting that photoreceptor loss precedes clinically detectable retinal pigment epithelial disease in STGD1. PMID:26247787

  8. PET-CT scan positive pulmonary nodule revealing histoplasmosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matos Figueroa, Jorge R; Vázquez Torres, Orlando L; Hernández, Inés; Vila, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Our medical staff identified a case of a forty-six years old Armed Force active duty female that presented with multiple systemic and pulmonary signs and symptoms, such as hemoptysis, arthralgias, chest pain and dyspnea after being exposed to a humid and old wooden building one year ago in the state of Georgia. Various imaging studies (cervical & thoracic x-rays and CT Scans), revealed diffuse small nodules at cervical & thoracic areas, osteolytic lesions and lymphadenopathy. Suspecting a malignant process, a PET-CT Scan was performed revealing a right lung lower lobe nodule consistent with a primary malignancy, metastatic disease, active infectious or inflammatory process. She underwent a CT-guided needle biopsy followed by an open thoracotomy. These results were negative for malignancy and positive for chronic granulomatous inflammatory process. Therefore, special immunologic stains were undertaken revealing a granulomatous process with Histoplasmosis capsulatum. This case was diagnosed in the most unusual manner, given the presenting symptoms and pathological findings which suggested a malignant process, later confirmed by multiple specialized imaging studies and tests. This presumptive diagnosis turned out to be an inflammatory/infectious (fungal) process. We must keep in mind that not all mass lesions encountered by special imaging studies should be considered malignant. This case exemplifies the need of clinicians to exercise strong clinical and critical thinking skills to consider the broad diagnostic possibilities of pulmonary nodules presenting as a malignancy.

  9. 75 FR 34482 - Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and Products..., associated software, and products containing the same by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S... certain biometric scanning devices, components thereof, associated software, or products containing...

  10. Dynamics of ribosome scanning and recycling revealed by translation complex profiling.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Regulation of messenger RNA translation is central to eukaryotic gene expression control. Regulatory inputs are specified by them RNA untranslated regions (UTRs) and often target translation initiation. Initiation involves binding of the 40S ribosomal small subunit (SSU) and associated eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs)near the mRNA 5′ cap; the SSU then scans in the 3′ direction until it detects the start codon and is joined by the 60S ribosomal large subunit (LSU) to form the 80S ribosome. Scanning and other dynamic aspects of the initiation model have remained as conjectures because methods to trap early intermediates were lacking. Here we uncover the dynamics of the complete translation cycle in live yeast cells using translation complex profile sequencing (TCP-seq), a method developed from the ribosome profiling approach. We document scanning by observing SSU footprints along 5′ UTRs. Scanning SSU have 5′-extended footprints (up to~75 nucleotides), indicative of additional interactions with mRNA emerging from the exit channel, promoting forward movement. We visualized changes in initiation complex conformation as SSU footprints coalesced into three major sizes at start codons (19, 29 and 37 nucleotides). These share the same 5′ start site but differ at the 3′ end, reflecting successive changes at the entry channel from an open to a closed state following start codon recognition. We also observe SSU 'lingering' at stop codons after LSU departure. Our results underpin mechanistic models of translation initiation and termination, built on decades of biochemical and structural investigation, with direct genome-wide in vivo evidence. Our approach captures ribosomal complexes at all phases of translation and will aid in studying translation dynamics in diverse cellular contexts. Dysregulation of translation is common in disease and, for example, SSU scanning is a target of anti-cancer drug development. TCP-seq will prove useful in discerning differences

  11. Pediatric ophthalmic computed tomographic scanning and associated cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Mills, David M; Tsai, Salina; Meyer, Dale R; Belden, Clifford

    2006-12-01

    To review pediatric neuroimaging studies of the head and orbit and the radiation-induced cancer risk associated with computed tomography in light of recent attention to pediatric radioimaging by the US Food and Drug Administration, the National Cancer Institute, pediatricians, and radiologists. Perspective. Literature review. Institutional. Pediatric ophthalmic patients requiring neuroimaging studies. INTERVENTION/PROCEDURE: Review of the current literature. After review of the current literature and discussion of the related issues, recommendations are made for pediatric neuroimaging studies of the head and orbit. Computed tomography (CT) of the head and orbit may be performed in children with the appropriate indications as long as the radiation exposure is minimized. Information obtained from CT scans of the head and orbit may determine or affect management in the pediatric ophthalmic population. Because of the concern of cancer induced by radiation exposure in children, neuroimaging modalities without radiation exposure, such as magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound, may be considered. However, when CT is indicated, it is reasonable and acceptable to perform CT of the head and orbit while minimizing the radiation exposure, thereby adhering to the "ALARA" (as low as reasonably achievable) policy recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration. Further studies of the actual radiation dose delivered during pediatric CT of the head and orbit and the true incidence of radiation-induced cancers after scans are warranted.

  12. Color-shape associations revealed with implicit association tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky's color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky's theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people's color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods.

  13. Color-Shape Associations Revealed with Implicit Association Tests

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky’s color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky’s theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people’s color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods. PMID:25625717

  14. Correlation Effects in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Images of Molecules Revealed by Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Barborini, Matteo; Sorella, Sandro; Rontani, Massimo; Corni, Stefano

    2016-11-08

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy probe the local density of states of single molecules electrically insulated from the substrate. The experimental images, although usually interpreted in terms of single-particle molecular orbitals, are associated with quasiparticle wave functions dressed by the whole electron-electron interaction. Here we propose an ab initio approach based on quantum Monte Carlo to calculate the quasiparticle wave functions of molecules. Through the comparison between Monte Carlo wave functions and their uncorrelated Hartree-Fock counterparts we visualize the electronic correlation embedded in the simulated STM images, highlighting the many-body features that might be observed.

  15. Deformations of a small mud volcano revealed by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2017-04-01

    Activities of mud volcanoes are often regarded as signals of tectonics both in subaerial and submarine environments. Characteristics of mud volcanoes, including the composition of mud, water and gas, the underground structure, and the surface morphology, have often been investigated to reveal their activities. Here we explore the spatial variation in the deformation of a small terrestrial mud volcano, which has hardly been revealed without the use of high-resolution topographic measurements. The Murono mud volcano (north-central Japan) exhibits displacements of its ground surface morphology both by the earthquake events and in the inter-seismic quiescent periods. Multiple-time terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was applied to detect the spatial variations in the ground surface deformations. After registering the point cloud data at different times using numerous points on unchanged reference features, deformations of the central zone of the mud volcano were detected at the scale of centimeters to decimeters, including both central uplift and peripheral subsidence with an elliptic spatial pattern. Open cracks on the central uplift area were also mapped, whose formation was successfully modeled with the displacement and stress fields estimated by the strong earthquakes. More gradual changes in the surface elevation of the mud volcano during the inter-seismic quiescent periods were also detected by the TLS data, and it was revealed that the spatial location of the center of uplift could have changed after an earthquake event.

  16. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-03-11

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone.

  17. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model.

  18. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone. PMID:25759085

  19. Fast kinetics of chromatin assembly revealed by single-molecule videomicroscopy and scanning force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ladoux, Benoit; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Doyle, Patrick; Roure, Olivia du; Almouzni, Geneviève; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescence videomicroscopy and scanning force microscopy were used to follow, in real time, chromatin assembly on individual DNA molecules immersed in cell-free systems competent for physiological chromatin assembly. Within a few seconds, molecules are already compacted into a form exhibiting strong similarities to native chromatin fibers. In these extracts, the compaction rate is more than 100 times faster than expected from standard biochemical assays. Our data provide definite information on the forces involved (a few piconewtons) and on the reaction path. DNA compaction as a function of time revealed unique features of the assembly reaction in these extracts. They imply a sequential process with at least three steps, involving DNA wrapping as the final event. An absolute and quantitative measure of the kinetic parameters of the early steps in chromatin assembly under physiological conditions could thus be obtained. PMID:11114182

  20. Z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution of cytosolic and membrane-associated protein populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elizabeth M; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D

    2015-07-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Furthermore, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C delta 1 labeled with green fluorescent protein on ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area-to-volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Golden Drachma From Bruttia: Counterfeit Money Revealed By Scanning Electron Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, Valentino; Barberio, Marianna; Oliva, Antonino; Noce, Nicoletta; Gattuso, Caterina; Davoli, Mariano

    Diagnostic studies performed on an ancient coin are presented in order to find if the coin is authentic or is a coinage proof. Our investigation includes Scanning Electron Microscopy - Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) and Cathodoluminescence (CL). The coin is a Drachma representing on the obverse the portrait of Poseidon and, on the reverse the figure of Anfitrite riding a seahorse while Eros is shooting an arrow. The coin is well known in the numismatic studies and originals can also be found in Catanzaro, Naples or Milan museums. The EDX analysis, executed on narrow points of the surface, revealed Pb and Cu as main components of the coin on both sides: 51% of Pb and 35% of Cu their weight and surprisingly on both sides traces of gold was found. The maximum dimensions and the percentage in weight of the small revealed gold spots were respectively on the order of 20 μm and 95%. At the same time luminescence emission induced by electron bombardment (CL) on these spots was executed. This analysis confirmed SEM results, though the presence of Au was more evident than in SEM analysis. In fact CL analysis showed a little presence of Au throughout the sample surface.

  2. Morphological process of podocyte development revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Kakuta, Soichiro; Kawasaki, Yuto; Miyaki, Takayuki; Nonami, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Nakao, Tomoyo; Enomoto, Sakiko; Arai, Shigeo; Koike, Masato; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Podocytes present a unique 3D architecture specialized for glomerular filtration. However, several 3D morphological aspects on podocyte development remain partially understood because they are difficult to reveal using conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here, we adopted serial block-face SEM imaging, a powerful tool for analyzing the 3D cellular ultrastructure, to precisely reveal the morphological process of podocyte development, such as the formation of foot processes. Development of foot processes gives rise to three morphological states: the primitive, immature and mature foot processes. Immature podocytes were columnar in shape and connected to each other by the junctional complex, which migrated toward the basal side of the cell. When the junctional complex was close to the basement membrane, immature podocytes started to interdigitate with primitive foot processes under the level of junctional complex. As primitive foot processes lengthened, the junctional complex moved between primitive foot processes to form immature foot processes. Finally, the junctional complex was gradually replaced by the slit diaphragm, resulting in the maturation of immature foot processes into mature foot processes. In conclusion, the developmental process of podocytes is now clearly visualized by block-face SEM imaging. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Microtubule organization within mitotic spindles revealed by serial block face scanning EM and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Faye M; Honnor, Thomas R; Clarke, Nicholas I; Starling, Georgina P; Beckett, Alison J; Johansen, Adam M; Brettschneider, Julia A; Prior, Ian A; Royle, Stephen J

    2017-04-07

    Serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) is a powerful method to analyze cells in 3D. Here, working at the resolution limit of the method, we describe a correlative light-SBF-SEM workflow to resolve microtubules of the mitotic spindle in human cells. We present four examples of uses for this workflow which are not practical by light microscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy. First, distinguishing closely associated microtubules within K-fibers; second, resolving bridging fibers in the mitotic spindle; third, visualizing membranes in mitotic cells, relative to the spindle apparatus; fourth, volumetric analysis of kinetochores. Our workflow also includes new computational tools for exploring the spatial arrangement of MTs within the mitotic spindle. We use these tools to show that microtubule order in mitotic spindles is sensitive to the level of TACC3 on the spindle.

  4. Visualization of localized elastic properties in human tooth and jawbone as revealed by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelke, Amit; Blume, Maximilian; Mularczyk, Michael; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert; Bereiter-Hahn, Jurgen

    2013-05-01

    The elastic properties of human canine and supporting alveolar bone are measured by the distribution of localized speed of sound using scanning acoustic microscopy. Methods for the dynamic, non-destructive diagnostics of dental hard tissues can have a key role in the early detection of demineralization processes and carious lesions, and they are supposed to open the possibility of early dental restorations. The localized distribution of the ultrasound velocity in canine tooth and alveolar bone was obtained using scanning acoustic microscopy with a 5- and 30-MHz transducer. An acoustic material signature curve signifies the interference of the waves and quantitatively maps the localized speed of sound in alveolar bone and the canine tooth. Seven samples, consisting of alveolar jawbone and tooth sliced along the coronally apical axis, were investigated. The average speed of sound was determined along three independent cross sections at enamel, dentin and cortical bone. The average speed of sound in enamel, bone and dentin was SD 3460 ± 193 m/s, 3232 ± 113 m/s and 2928 ± 106 m/s. The distribution of sound wave propagation reveals a decrease in sound speed from the peripheral parts within the enamel and dentin layers toward the proximal zones. These results prove the possibility of linking the elastic properties to different areas within the osseous and dental hard tissues and visualize them in an extremely high local resolution. The results serve as a basis for further study and substantiate the enormous potential of ultrasound based analysis in the field of dento-alveolar diagnosis.

  5. Evolutionary change driven by metal exposure as revealed by coding SNP genome scan in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Bélanger-Deschênes, Sébastien; Couture, Patrice; Campbell, Peter G C; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Pollution can drive rapid evolutionary change in wild populations. This study targets functional polymorphisms of chronically metal-contaminated wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A de novo transcriptome scan contrasted subsets of individuals from clean (n = 16) and contaminated (n = 16) lakes to identify 87 candidate annotated coding SNPs. Candidate genotypes and liver [metal] were obtained in 10 populations (n = 1,052) and a genome scan distinguished outliers: one nuclear (cyclin G1 gene) and two mitochondrial (cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes) also displaying allelic correlation to mean population [cadmium]. Whole mtDNA and 17 kb surrounding cyclin G1 were characterised through 454 sequencing thus revealing two non-synonymous substitutions involving dissimilar amino acids. Based on associated functions and inter-population differentiation, contaminated perch may have been selected for fast life cycle completion (p53 pathway) and memorization impairment mitigation (long-term potentiation pathway). In accordance with predicted evolutionary trajectory for stressed and energy deprived organisms, adapted perch would not compensate for repair mechanism inhibition, instead reallocating energy towards growth and favouring inexpensive impairment mitigation adaptations over costly detoxification. Overall, 85 years of selection could have driven rapid, potentially adaptive evolution by selecting alleles increasing perch fitness in polluted environments.

  6. Scanning laser polarimetry reveals status of RNFL integrity in eyes with optic nerve head swelling by OCT.

    PubMed

    Kupersmith, Mark J; Kardon, Randy; Durbin, Mary; Horne, Melissa; Shulman, Julia

    2012-04-18

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickening in optic nerve head (ONH) swelling, but does not provide information on acute axonal disruption. It was hypothesized that scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) compared with OCT might reveal the status of axon integrity and visual prognosis in acute RNFL swelling. Threshold perimetry, OCT, and SLP were used to prospectively study eyes with papilledema (24), optic neuritis (14), nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) (21), and ONH swelling (average RNFL value by OCT was above the 95th percentile of controls at presentation). Regional RNFL was judged reduced if the quadrant measurement was below the fifth percentile of controls. At presentation, average RNFL by OCT was similar for eyes with papilledema and NAION (P = 0.97), and reduced for optic neuritis. Average RNFL by SLP was slightly increased for papilledema and optic neuritis, and reduced for NAION (P = 0.02) eyes. The RNFL by SLP was reduced in at least one quadrant in 1 eye with papilledema, 1 eye with optic neuritis, and in 13 eyes with NAION. In NAION eyes, quadrants with reduced SLP had corresponding visual field loss that did not recover. By one month, eyes with NAION showed RNFL thinning by OCT (7/17 eyes) and by SLP (14/16 eyes) in contrast to optic neuritis (by OCT, 0/12, P = 0.006; and by SLP, 1/12, P = 0.0004). OCT and SLP revealed different aspects of RNFL changes associated with ONH swelling. OCT revealed thickening due to edema. SLP revealed a decrease in retardance in eyes with axonal injury associated with visual field loss, which is unlikely to recover.

  7. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  8. Long-term home cage activity scans reveal lowered exploratory behaviour in symptomatic female Rett mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lianne; Plano, Andrea; Cobb, Stuart; Riedel, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Numerous experimental models have been developed to reiterate endophenotypes of Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder with a multitude of motor, cognitive and vegetative symptoms. Here, female Mecp2Stop mice [1] were characterised at mild symptomatic conditions in tests for anxiety (open field, elevated plus maze) and home cage observation systems for food intake, locomotor activity and circadian rhythms. Aged 8–9 months, Mecp2Stop mice presented with heightened body weight, lower overall activity in the open field, but no anxiety phenotype. Although home cage activity scans conducted in two different observation systems, PhenoMaster and PhenoTyper, confirmed normal circadian activity, they revealed severely compromised habituation to a novel environment in all parameters registered including those derived from a non-linear decay model such as initial exploration maximum, decay half-life of activity and span, as well as plateau. Furthermore, overall activity was significantly reduced in nocturnal periods due to reductions in both fast ambulatory movements, but also a slow lingering. In contrast, light-period activity profiles during which the amount of sleep was highest remained normal in Mecp2Stop mice. These data confirm the slow and progressive development of Rett-like symptoms in female Mecp2Stop mice resulting in a prominent reduction of overall locomotor activity, while circadian rhythms are maintained. Alterations in the time-course of habituation may indicate deficiencies in cognitive processing. PMID:23643691

  9. Immunogold Labeling of Amelogenin in Developing Porcine Enamel Revealed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chang; Fan, Daming; Sun, Zhi; Fan, Yuwei; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The present study describes a method using immunohistochemical labeling in combination with high-resolution imaging (field emission scanning electron microscopy) to investigate the spatial localization of amelogenins on apatite crystallites in developing porcine enamel. Cross-sections of developing enamel tissue from freeze-fractured pig third molar were treated with antiserum against recombinant mouse amelogenin and immunoreactivity confirmed by Western blot analysis. The samples were then treated with the goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated with 10-nm gold particles. The control samples were treated with the secondary antibody only. The in-lens secondary electrons detector and quadrant back-scattering detector were employed to reveal the high-resolution morphology of enamel structures and gold particle distribution. The immunolabeling showed a preference of the gold particle localization along the side faces of the ribbon-like apatite crystals. The preferential localization of amelogenin in vivo on enamel crystals strongly supports its direct function in controlling crystal morphology. PMID:18701812

  10. Allosteric Features of KCNQ1 Gating Revealed by Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Juan; Ohmert, Iris; Vardanyan, Vitya

    2011-01-01

    Controlled opening and closing of an ion-selective pathway in response to changes of membrane potential is a fundamental feature of voltage-gated ion channels. In recent decades, various details of this process have been revealed with unprecedented precision based on studies of prototypic potassium channels. Though current scientific efforts are focused more on a thorough description of voltage-sensor movement, much less is known about the similarities and differences of the gating mechanisms among potassium channels. Here, we describe the peculiarities of the KCNQ1 gating process in parallel comparison to Shaker. We applied alanine scanning mutagenesis to the S4-S5 linker and pore region and followed the regularities of gating perturbations in KCNQ1. We found a fractional constitutive conductance for wild-type KCNQ1. This component increased significantly in mutants with considerably leftward-shifted steady-state activation curves. In contrast to Shaker, no correlation between V1/2 and Z parameters was observed for the voltage-dependent fraction of KCNQ1. Our experimental findings are explained by a simple allosteric gating scheme with voltage-driven and voltage-independent transitions. Allosteric features are discussed in the context of extreme gating adaptability of KCNQ1 upon interaction with KCNE β-subunits. PMID:21320432

  11. Correspondence between dermoscopic features and epidermal structures revealed by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yoko; Tsuchida, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    It is already known that some typical dermoscopic patterns seen in melanocytic nevi on the sole have their own favorite site. In the weight-bearing area, melanocytic nevi with a parallel furrow pattern were preferentially observed. Those with a lattice-like pattern were observed in the arch area, whereas those with a crista reticulated pattern were seen in the border area. To investigate the relationship between the distribution of the dermoscopic patterns seen in plantar melanocytic nevi and the 3-D structures of the epidermis, the basal surfaces of the plantar epidermis from 14 skin lesions were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our SEM observations revealed that transverse ridges formed a couple of parallel lamellae on the crista profunda limitans (limiting ridges). Between the limiting ridges and the crista profunda intermedia (intermediate ridges), the transverse ridges had different shapes according to the anatomical location of the sole. From these results, it was suggested that the characteristic dermoscopic patterns seen in acquired and junctional melanocytic nevi on the sole simulate the arrangement of transverse ridges.

  12. Long-term home cage activity scans reveal lowered exploratory behaviour in symptomatic female Rett mice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lianne; Plano, Andrea; Cobb, Stuart; Riedel, Gernot

    2013-08-01

    Numerous experimental models have been developed to reiterate endophenotypes of Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder with a multitude of motor, cognitive and vegetative symptoms. Here, female Mecp2(Stop) mice [1] were characterised at mild symptomatic conditions in tests for anxiety (open field, elevated plus maze) and home cage observation systems for food intake, locomotor activity and circadian rhythms. Aged 8-9 months, Mecp2(Stop) mice presented with heightened body weight, lower overall activity in the open field, but no anxiety phenotype. Although home cage activity scans conducted in two different observation systems, PhenoMaster and PhenoTyper, confirmed normal circadian activity, they revealed severely compromised habituation to a novel environment in all parameters registered including those derived from a non-linear decay model such as initial exploration maximum, decay half-life of activity and span, as well as plateau. Furthermore, overall activity was significantly reduced in nocturnal periods due to reductions in both fast ambulatory movements, but also a slow lingering. In contrast, light-period activity profiles during which the amount of sleep was highest remained normal in Mecp2(Stop) mice. These data confirm the slow and progressive development of Rett-like symptoms in female Mecp2(Stop) mice resulting in a prominent reduction of overall locomotor activity, while circadian rhythms are maintained. Alterations in the time-course of habituation may indicate deficiencies in cognitive processing.

  13. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology. PMID:24639675

  14. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology.

  15. Irregular snow crystals: structural features as revealed by low temperature scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wergin, William P; Rango, Albert; Foster, James; Erbe, Eric F; Pooley, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, investigators using light microscopy have vaguely alluded to a unique type of snow crystal that has become known as an irregular snow crystal. However, the limited resolution and depth-of-field of the light microscope has prevented investigators from characterizing these crystals. In this study, a field-emission scanning electron microscope, equipped with a cold stage, was used to document the structural features, physical associations, and atmospheric metamorphosis of irregular snow crystals. The crystals appear as irregular hexagons, measuring 60 to 90 mm across, when viewed from the a-axis. Their length (c-axis) rarely exceeds the diameter. The irregular crystals are occasionally found as secondary particles on other larger forms of snow crystals; however, they most frequently occur in aggregates consisting of more than 100 irregular crystals. In the aggregates, the irregular crystals have their axes oriented parallel to one another and, collectively, tend to form columnar structures. Occasionally, these columnar structures exhibit rounded faces along one side, suggesting atmospheric metamorphoses during formation and descent. In extreme cases of metamorphoses, the aggregates would be difficult to distinguish from graupel. Frost, consisting of irregular crystals, has also been encountered, suggesting that atmospheric conditions that favor their growth can also occur terrestrially.

  16. Revealing the Secrets of Stonehenge Through the Application of Laser Scanning, Photogrammetry and Visualisation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, P. G.; Abbott, M.; Dodson, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Stonehenge is perhaps the most famous prehistoric monument in the world. Begun as a simple earthwork enclosure, it was built in several stages with the unique lintelled stone circle being erected in the Neolithic period in around 2,500 BC. Today Stonehenge, together with Avebury and other associated sites, form the heart of a World Heritage Site (WHS) with a unique and dense concentration of outstanding prehistoric monuments. In 2011 English Heritage (EH) embarked on a new survey of the monument. Undertaken by the Greenhatch Group, a commercial survey company based near Derby, a combination of laser scanning and photogrammetric approaches were used to generate the required scale and detailed level of output required by English Heritage. This paper will describe the background to this project and its context within previous survey activities at this World Heritage Site. It will explain the data acquisition technology and processes undertaken on site, the datasets derived from post-processing and their filtering and analysis within both subsequent research projects. Alongside a description of how the data is currently being exploited and proposed future applications within the conservation and management of the site, it will finish by considering the impact of developing geospatial imaging technologies.

  17. Ion milling coupled field emission scanning electron microscopy reveals current misunderstanding of morphology of polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Francis, Donny; Mouftah, Samiha; Steffen, Robert; Beduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently used as drug delivery systems for numerous therapeutic macromolecules, e.g. proteins or DNA. Based on the preparation by double emulsion solvent evaporation a sponge-like structure was postulated entrapping hydrophilic drugs inside an internal aqueous phase. However, a direct proof of this hypothesized structure is still missing today. NPs were prepared from different polymers using a double-emulsion method and characterized for their physicochemical properties. Combining ion milling with field emission scanning electron microscopy allowed to cross section single NP and to visualize their internal morphology. The imaging procedure permitted cross-sectioning of NPs and visualization of the internal structure as well as localizing drugs associated with NPs. It was observed that none of the model actives was encapsulated inside the polymeric matrix when particle diameters were below around 470 nm but predominantly adsorbed to the particle surface. Even at larger diameters only a minority of particles of a diameter below 1 μm contained an internal phase. The properties of such drug loaded NPs, i.e. drug release or the observations in cellular uptake or even drug targeting needs to be interpreted carefully since in most cases NP surface properties are potentially dominated by the 'encapsulated' drug characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery.

  19. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  20. Retinal damage in chloroquine maculopathy, revealed by high resolution imaging: a case report utilizing adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Jin; Kim, Kyoung Rae; Tsang, Stephen H; Park, Sung Pyo; Chang, Stanley

    2014-02-01

    A 53-year-old Asian woman was treated with hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine for lupus erythematosus. Within a few years, she noticed circle-shaped shadows in her central vision. Upon examination, the patient's visual acuity was 20 / 25 in both eyes. Humphrey visual field (HVF) testing revealed a central visual defect, and fundoscopy showed a ring-shaped area of parafoveal retinal pigment epithelium depigmentation. Fundus autofluorescence imaging showed a hypofluorescent lesion consistent with bull's eye retinopathy. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) revealed patch cone mosaic lesions, in which cones were missing or lost. In addition, the remaining cones consisted of asymmetrical shapes and sizes that varied in brightness. Unlike previous studies employing deformable mirrors for wavefront aberration correction, our AO-SLO approach utilized dual liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators. Thus, by using AO-SLO, we were able to create a photographic montage consisting of high quality images. Disrupted cone AO-SLO images were matched with visual field test results and functional deficits were associated with a precise location on the montage, which allowed correlation of histological findings with functional changes determined by HVF. We also investigated whether adaptive optics imaging was more sensitive to anatomical changes compared with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

  1. Acrometastasis of Neuroblastoma to the Great Toe Revealed by MIBG Scan.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Zhuang, Hongming

    2017-02-03

    A 3-year-old boy with history of neuroblastoma underwent I-MIBG scan. The whole-body images showed relatively normal tracer distribution except for mild activity in the right foot, which was located in the first metatarsal on SPECT/CT images. The subsequent MRI scan of the right foot showed infiltration of the metatarsal of the right first toe. The findings were consistent with solitary acrometastasis of neuroblastoma to the great toe.

  2. Rime and graupel: Description and characterization as revealed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rango, A.; Foster, J.; Josberger, E.G.; Erbe, E.F.; Pooley, C.; Wergin, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    Snow crystals, which form by vapor deposition, occasionally come in contact with supercooled cloud droplets during their formation and descent. When this occurs, the droplets adhere and freeze to the snow crystals in a process known as accretion. During the early stages of accretion, discrete snow crystals exhibiting frozen cloud droplets are referred to as rime. If this process continues, the snow crystal may become completely engulfed in frozen cloud droplets. The resulting particle is known as graupel. Light microscopic investigations have studied rime and graupel for nearly 100 years. However, the limiting resolution and depth of field associated with the light microscope have prevented detailed descriptions of the microscopic cloud droplets and the three-dimensional topography of the rime and graupel particles. This study uses low-temperature scanning electron microscopy to characterize the frozen precipitates that are commonly known as rime and graupel. Rime, consisting of frozen cloud droplets, is observed on all types of snow crystals including needles, columns, plates, and dendrites. The droplets, which vary in size from 10 to 100 μm, frequently accumulate along one face of a single snow crystal, but are found more randomly distributed on aggregations consisting of two or more snow crystals (snowflakes). The early stages of riming are characterized by the presence of frozen cloud droplets that appear as a layer of flattened hemispheres on the surface of the snow crystal. As this process continues, the cloud droplets appear more sinuous and elongate as they contact and freeze to the rimed crystals. The advanced stages of this process result in graupel, a particle 1 to 3 mm across, composed of hundreds of frozen cloud droplets interspersed with considerable air spaces; the original snow crystal is no longer discernible. This study increases our knowledge about the process and characteristics of riming and suggests that the initial appearance of the

  3. Respiratory concerts revealed by scanning microrespirography in a termite Prorhinotermes simplex (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Sláma, K; Sobotník, J; Hanus, R

    2007-04-01

    Respiratory metabolism of different developmental stages (larvae, pseudergates, nymphs, soldiers, neotenic reproductives; 0.6-4.5 mg body mass) of Prorhinotermes simplex was individually monitored by scanning respirographic method sensitive to subnanoliter amounts of O(2) consumption or CO(2) output per minute. Specimens exposed to dry air after removal from the colony performed enormously large, discontinuous bursts of CO(2) lasting usually 2 min. The volume of CO(2) produced during the burst often surpassed the volume of the whole body and it was 10- to 20-fold in excess of the air-filled endogenous tracheal volume. The initial velocity of CO(2) production during the burst was more than 90-fold faster in comparison to O(2) consumption. In the presence of enough moisture within the respiratory vessel, the termites breathed continuously without any larger outburst of CO(2). This fact fully corroborates validity of the so-called water retention theory in discontinuous CO(2) release. The highest rates of O(2) consumption were found in the second instar larvae (0.9 mg, 1000-2000 microl O(2)/g/h), the soldier caste was intermediate (700 microl O(2)/g/h) while pseudergates and neotenic reproductives consumed between 300 and 600 microl O(2)/g/h, at 25 degrees C. All developmental stages feeding on a cellulose diet had CO(2)/O(2) values (RQ) over 1 (1.2-1.4, i.e. carbohydrate metabolism), pigmented soldiers fed by the workers had RQ around 0.75 (predominating lipid or protein metabolism). The unusually large, sudden eruptions of CO(2) in specimens exposed to dry air allow us to make the following conclusions: (1) the bursts were due to special chemical processes, such as by enzymatic hydration of carbonic acid by carbonic anhydrase and; (2) the bulk of chemically evolved gaseous CO(2) escaped from the body by a mass flow supported by active ventilation, not by a passive diffusion. These results demonstrated that the periodic emissions of CO(2) and the associated

  4. Rime and graupel: description and characterization as revealed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rango, Albert; Foster, James; Josberger, Edward G; Erbe, Eric F; Pooley, Christopher; Wergin, William P

    2003-01-01

    Snow crystals, which form by vapor deposition, occasionally come in contact with supercooled cloud droplets during their formation and descent. When this occurs, the droplets adhere and freeze to the snow crystals in a process known as accretion. During the early stages of accretion, discrete snow crystals exhibiting frozen cloud droplets are referred to as rime. If this process continues, the snow crystal may become completely engulfed in frozen cloud droplets. The resulting particle is known as graupel. Light microscopic investigations have studied rime and graupel for nearly 100 years. However, the limiting resolution and depth of field associated with the light microscope have prevented detailed descriptions of the microscopic cloud droplets and the three-dimensional topography of the rime and graupel particles. This study uses low-temperature scanning electron microscopy to characterize the frozen precipitates that are commonly known as rime and graupel. Rime, consisting of frozen cloud droplets, is observed on all types of snow crystals including needles, columns, plates, and dendrites. The droplets, which vary in size from 10 to 100 microm, frequently accumulate along one face of a single snow crystal, but are found more randomly distributed on aggregations consisting of two or more snow crystals (snowflakes). The early stages of riming are characterized by the presence of frozen cloud droplets that appear as a layer of flattened hemispheres on the surface of the snow crystal. As this process continues, the cloud droplets appear more sinuous and elongate as they contact and freeze to the rimed crystals. The advanced stages of this process result in graupel, a particle 1 to 3 mm across, composed of hundreds of frozen cloud droplets interspersed with considerable air spaces; the original snow crystal is no longer discernible. This study increases our knowledge about the process and characteristics of riming and suggests that the initial appearance of the

  5. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  6. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  7. The zinc finger-associated SCAN box is a conserved oligomerization domain.

    PubMed

    Williams, A J; Blacklow, S C; Collins, T

    1999-12-01

    A number of Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger proteins contain a highly conserved amino-terminal motif termed the SCAN domain. This element is an 80-residue, leucine-rich region that contains three segments strongly predicted to be alpha-helices. In this report, we show that the SCAN motif functions as an oligomerization domain mediating self-association or association with other proteins bearing SCAN domains. These findings suggest that the SCAN domain plays an important role in the assembly and function of this newly defined subclass of transcriptional regulators.

  8. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Scanning Angle Interference Microscopy Reveals Cell Dynamics at the Nano-scale

    PubMed Central

    Paszek, Matthew J.; DuFort, Christopher C.; Rubashkin, Matthew G.; Davidson, Mike W.; Thorn, Kurt S.; Liphardt, Jan T.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging questions in cell biology necessitate nanometer-scale imaging in live cells. Here we present scanning angle interference microscopy, capable of localizing fluorescent objects with nanometer-scale precision along the optical axis in motile cellular structures. We use this approach to resolve nano-topographical features of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton, as well as the temporal evolution, three-dimensional architecture, and nano-scale dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. PMID:22751201

  10. Three-Dimensional Structure of Extended Chromatin Fibers as Revealed by Tapping-Mode Scanning Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuba, Sanford H.; Yang, Guoliang; Robert, Charles; Samori, Bruno; van Holde, Kensal; Zlatanova, Joordanka; Bustamante, Carlos

    1994-11-01

    Unfixed chicken erythrocyte chromatin fibers in very low salt have been imaged with a scanning force microscope operating in the tapping mode in air at ambient humidity. These images reveal a three-dimensional organization of the fibers. The planar "zig-zag" conformation is rare, and extended "beads-on-a-string" fibers are seen only in chromatin depleted of histones H1 and H5. Glutaraldehyde fixation reveals very similar structures. Fibers fixed in 10 mM salt appear somewhat more compacted. These results, when compared with modeling studies, suggest that chromatin fibers may exist as irregular three-dimensional arrays of nucleosomes even at low ionic strength.

  11. How to reveal metastable skyrmionic spin structures by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Kruse, C. N.; Dornheim, T.; Heinze, S.

    2016-05-01

    We predict the occurrence of metastable skyrmionic spin structures such as antiskyrmions and higher-order skyrmions in ultra-thin transition-metal films at surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian parametrized from density functional theory calculations. We show that such spin structures will appear with a similar contrast in spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy images. Both skyrmions and antiskyrmions display a circular shape for out-of-plane magnetized tips and a two-lobe butterfly contrast for in-plane tips. An unambiguous distinction can be achieved by rotating the tip magnetization direction without requiring the information of all components of the magnetization.

  12. High-Resolution Laser Scanning Reveals Plant Architectures that Reflect Universal Network Design Principles.

    PubMed

    Conn, Adam; Pedmale, Ullas V; Chory, Joanne; Navlakha, Saket

    2017-07-26

    Transport networks serve critical functions in biological and engineered systems, and yet their design requires trade-offs between competing objectives. Due to their sessile lifestyle, plants need to optimize their architecture to efficiently acquire and distribute resources while also minimizing costs in building infrastructure. To understand how plants resolve this design trade-off, we used high-precision three-dimensional laser scanning to map the architectures of tomato, tobacco, or sorghum plants grown in several environmental conditions and through multiple developmental time points, scanning in total 505 architectures from 37 plants. Using a graph-theoretic algorithm that we developed to evaluate design strategies, we find that plant architectures lie along the Pareto front between two simple length-based objectives-minimizing total branch length and minimizing nutrient transport distance-thereby conferring a selective fitness advantage for plant transport processes. The location along the Pareto front can distinguish among species and conditions, suggesting that during evolution, natural selection may employ common network design principles despite different optimization trade-offs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Roller Coaster Scanning reveals spontaneous triggering of dendritic spikes in CA1 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Turi, Gergely F; Hájos, Norbert; Tamás, Gábor; Vizi, E Sylvester; Rózsa, Balázs

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the controlling units of neural networks, despite their sparse number and unique morphological characteristics compared with excitatory pyramidal cells. Although pyramidal cell dendrites have been shown to display local regenerative events--dendritic spikes (dSpikes)--evoked by artificially patterned stimulation of synaptic inputs, no such studies exist for interneurons or for spontaneous events. In addition, imaging techniques have yet to attain the required spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of spontaneously occurring events that trigger dSpikes. Here we describe a high-resolution 3D two-photon laser scanning method (Roller Coaster Scanning) capable of imaging long dendritic segments resolving individual spines and inputs with a temporal resolution of a few milliseconds. By using this technique, we found that local, NMDA receptor-dependent dSpikes can be observed in hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons during spontaneous network activities in vitro. These NMDA spikes appear when approximately 10 spatially clustered inputs arrive synchronously and trigger supralinear integration in dynamic interaction zones. In contrast to the one-to-one relationship between computational subunits and dendritic branches described in pyramidal cells, here we show that interneurons have relatively small (∼14 μm) sliding interaction zones. Our data suggest a unique principle as to how interneurons integrate synaptic information by local dSpikes.

  14. Roller Coaster Scanning reveals spontaneous triggering of dendritic spikes in CA1 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Turi, Gergely F.; Hájos, Norbert; Tamás, Gábor; Vizi, E. Sylvester; Rózsa, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the controlling units of neural networks, despite their sparse number and unique morphological characteristics compared with excitatory pyramidal cells. Although pyramidal cell dendrites have been shown to display local regenerative events—dendritic spikes (dSpikes)—evoked by artificially patterned stimulation of synaptic inputs, no such studies exist for interneurons or for spontaneous events. In addition, imaging techniques have yet to attain the required spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of spontaneously occurring events that trigger dSpikes. Here we describe a high-resolution 3D two-photon laser scanning method (Roller Coaster Scanning) capable of imaging long dendritic segments resolving individual spines and inputs with a temporal resolution of a few milliseconds. By using this technique, we found that local, NMDA receptor-dependent dSpikes can be observed in hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons during spontaneous network activities in vitro. These NMDA spikes appear when approximately 10 spatially clustered inputs arrive synchronously and trigger supralinear integration in dynamic interaction zones. In contrast to the one-to-one relationship between computational subunits and dendritic branches described in pyramidal cells, here we show that interneurons have relatively small (∼14 μm) sliding interaction zones. Our data suggest a unique principle as to how interneurons integrate synaptic information by local dSpikes. PMID:21224413

  15. Impaired Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in Live Cardiomyocytes Revealed by Rapid Line Scan Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, David M.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    Altered intracellular Ca2+ dynamics are characteristically observed in cardiomyocytes from failing hearts. Studies of Ca2+ handling in myocytes predominantly use Fluo-3 AM, a visible light excitable Ca2+ chelating fluorescent dye in conjunction with rapid line-scanning confocal microscopy. However, Fluo-3 AM does not allow for traditional ratiometric determination of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and has required the use of mathematic correction factors with values obtained from separate procedures to convert Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to appropriate Ca2+ concentrations. This study describes methodology to directly measure intracellular Ca2+ levels using inactivated, Fluo-3-AM-loaded cardiomyocytes equilibrated with Ca2+ concentration standards. Titration of Ca2+ concentration exhibits a linear relationship to increasing Fluo-3 AM fluorescence intensity. Images obtained from individual myocyte confocal scans were recorded, average pixel intensity values were calculated, and a plot is generated relating the average pixel intensity to known Ca2+ concentrations. These standard plots can be used to convert transient Ca2+ fluorescence obtained with experimental cells to Ca2+ concentrations by linear regression analysis. Standards are determined on the same microscope used for acquisition of unknown Ca2+ concentrations, simplifying data interpretation and assuring accuracy of conversion values. This procedure eliminates additional equipment, ratiometric imaging, and mathematic correction factors and should be useful to investigators requiring a straightforward method for measuring Ca2+ concentrations in live cells using Ca2+-chelating dyes exhibiting variable fluorescence intensity.

  16. Superparamagnetism at oxide interfaces revealed by scanning SQUID-on-tip microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anahory, Yonathan; Embon, L.; Li, C. J.; Banerjee, S.; Meltzer, A.; Naren, H. R.; Yakovenko, A.; Cuppens, J.; Myasoedov, Y.; Rappaport, M. L.; Huber, M. E.; Michaeli, K.; Venkatesan, T.,; Ariando, A.; Zeldov, E.

    Our novel scanning SQUID-on-tip technique is used to study nanoscale magnetism present in systems such as atomically sharp oxide heterostructures. Here we report a new emergent phenomenon at the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 interface in which an antiferromagnetic insulator abruptly transforms into a magnetic state that exhibits unexpected nanoscale superparamagnetic dynamics. Upon increasing the thickness of LaMnO3 above five unit cells, our scanning nanoSQUID-on-tip microscopy shows spontaneous formation of isolated magnetic islands of 10 to 50 nm diameter, which display random moment reversals by thermal activation or in response to an in-plane magnetic field. Our charge reconstruction model of the polar LaMnO3/SrTiO3 heterostructure describes the sharp emergence of thermodynamic phase separation leading to nucleation of metallic ferromagnetic islands in an insulating antiferromagnetic matrix. The model further suggests that the nearby superparamagnetic-ferromagnetic transition can be gate tuned, holding potential for applications in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  17. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  18. Three-dimensional architecture of the myosalpinx in the mare as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Germanà, Antonino; Cassata, Rosa; Cristarella, Santo; Scirpo, Aurelio; Muglia, Ugo

    2002-07-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of the myosalpinx in the mare was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after removal of interstitial connective tissue with NaOH digestion. In the extramural portion of the tubo-uterine junction (TUJ), isthmus, and ampulla, the myosalpinx architecture is represented by a unique muscular structure which runs from the mesosalpinx to the base of the inner mucous folds. This unique muscular structure consists mainly of bundles of muscular fibers independent of one another, which show a multiple spatial arrangement and form a complex network. Such a muscular architecture is likely more suitable for stirring rather than pushing the embryos and gametes through the Fallopian tube.

  19. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  20. Morphology of central California continental margin, revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; McCulloch, D.S.; Eittreim, S.L.; Masson, D.G.

    1985-02-01

    Leg 2 of the 4-leg USGS EEZ-SCAN 84 program used GLORIA long-range side-scan sonar to survey the region from Pt. Conception to just south of Pt. Arena, from the shelf break to the 200-nmi coverage. The overlapping digital sonographs were slant-range and anamorphically corrected, and a photomosaic of the sonographs was constructed at a scale of 1:375,000 (1 in. = 11.1 km). The underlying bed rock appears to be an important control in shaping the morphology of this margin. Several faults have sea-floor expression and lie subparallel to the margin. The density of canyons and gullies on the slope varies from south to north, probably because of variations in the characteristics of the bed rock. The slope west of San Francisco is the most dissected segment of the central California slope. Monterey Fan is covered by large-scale bed forms (5-15 m amplitude and 1.5-2.0 km wavelength) over much of its surface. Monterey channel crosses southwestward across the fan, but abruptly turns south along a 40-km long surface fault that coincides with a well-mapped meander loop. The channel loops to the north then turns southward crossing the entire Monterey Fan, at its distal reaches, changes to a broad, braided pattern. Major slumps on the margin have long (> 30 km) scarps, some have slump folds, and one has a debris-flow deposit that can be acoustically traced for more than 75 km. Seventeen new seamounts were mapped. Taney Seamounts are large, rimmed, calderas with diameters of about 15 km each; these appear to be very large explosive or summit-collapse features.

  1. External morphogenesis of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Vladimir; Minich, Irene; Mayer, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Tardigrada, commonly called water bears, is a taxon of microscopic panarthropods with five-segmented bodies and four pairs of walking legs. Although tardigrades have been known to science for several centuries, questions remain regarding many aspects of their biology, such as embryogenesis. Herein, we used scanning electron microscopy to document the external changes that occur during embryonic development in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini (Eutardigrada, Parachela, Hypsibiidae). Our results show an accelerated development of external features, with approximately 30 hrs separating the point at which external structures first become recognizable and a fully formed embryo. All segments appear to arise simultaneously between ∼20 and 25 hrs of development, and no differences in the degree of development could be detected between the limb buds at any stage. Claws emerge shortly after the limb buds and are morphologically similar to those of adults. The origin of the claws is concurrent with that of the sclerotized parts of the mouth, suggesting that all cuticular structures arise simultaneously at ∼30 hrs. The mouth arises as an invagination in the terminal region of the head at ∼25 hrs, closes later in development, and opens again shortly before hatching. The anlagen of the peribuccal lobes arise as one dorsal and one ventral row, each consisting of three lobes, and later form a ring in the late embryo, whereas there is no indication of a labrum anlage at any point during development. Furthermore, we describe limited postembryonic development in the form of cuticular pores that are absent in juveniles but present in adults. This study represents the first scanning electron micrographs of tardigrade embryos, demonstrating the utility of this technique for studying embryogenesis in tardigrades. This work further adds an external morphological perspective to the developmental data already available for H. dujardini, facilitating future comparisons to related

  2. Estimation of significance thresholds for genomewide association scans

    PubMed Central

    Dudbridge, Frank; Gusnanto, Arief

    2008-01-01

    The question of what significance threshold is appropriate for genomewide association studies is somewhat unresolved. Previous theoretical suggestions have yet to be validated in practice, whereas permutation testing does not resolve a discrepancy between the genomewide multiplicity of the experiment and the subset of markers actually tested. We used genotypes from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium to estimate a genomewide significance threshold for the UK Caucasian population. We subsampled the genotypes at increasing densities, using permutation to estimate the nominal P-value for 5% family-wise error. By extrapolating to infinite density, we estimated the genomewide significance threshold to be about 7.2 × 10−8. To reduce the computation time, we considered Patterson's eigenvalue estimator of the effective number of tests, but found it to be an order of magnitude too low for multiplicity correction. However, by fitting a Beta distribution to the minimum P-value from permutation replicates, we showed that the effective number is a useful heuristic and suggest that its estimation in this context is an open problem. We conclude that permutation is still needed to obtain genomewide significance thresholds, but with subsampling, extrapolation and estimation of an effective number of tests, the threshold can be standardized for all studies of the same population. PMID:18300295

  3. Native-oxide limited cross-plane thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes revealed by scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, A. M.; Bluet, J.-M.; Lacatena, V.; Haras, M.; Robillard, J.-F.; Chapuis, P.-O.

    2017-08-01

    By thermally characterizing nanometer-thin suspended silicon membranes with various micrometric lengths in ambient conditions, we determine simultaneously the spatial resolution of our Wollaston-probe scanning thermal microscopy experiment, which probes an area of (285 nm)2, and the effective thermal conductivity of the membranes of 40 W.m-1.K-1. This value is smaller than the in-plane thermal conductivity measured using other techniques in vacuum (˜60 W.m-1.K-1), revealing that both cross-plane and in-plane heat conduction are strongly affected by the native oxide in ambient conditions. This work also underlines that high-thermal conductivity samples can be characterized by scanning thermal microscopy when micro-patterned.

  4. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Falchook, Aaron D.; Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  5. Fine structure of Delia platura (Meigen) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Ke; Yang, Yan-Zhi; Liu, Mei-Qin; Zhang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Delia platura (Meigen) is a phytophagous fly that can cause significant crop losses. To obtain a better understanding of the external morphology of this species, adult D. platura is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Organs or structures that are important for taxonomy, such as the compound eyes, spiracles, pulvilli, wings, and genitalia are highlighted to complement previous description based on light microscope. Mesothoracic and metathoracic spiracles of D. platura that provide efficiency in preventing entrance of fine materials or dust into the tracheal system are morphologically different. In addition, the elongate-oval pulvillus is densely covered with tenent setae with spoon-like tip, which can increase the number of contact points for attachment to a surface. Four types of sensilla are observed on the male genitalia of D. platura including: trichoid sensilla, chaetic sensilla, three subtypes of campaniform sensilla, and basiconic sensilla. Long bristles and microtrichiae are observed on the female genitalia of D. platura. The possible function of sensilla located in the genitalia of D. platura is discussed. Microsc. Res. Tech. 77:619-630, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Revealing Hidden Conformational Space of LOV Protein VIVID Through Rigid Residue Scan Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyu; Zoltowski, Brian D.; Tao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    VIVID(VVD) protein is a Light-Oxygen-Voltage(LOV) domain in circadian clock system. Upon blue light activation, a covalent bond is formed between VVD residue Cys108 and its cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD), and prompts VVD switching from Dark state to Light state with significant conformational deviation. However, the mechanism of this local environment initiated global protein conformational change remains elusive. We employed a recently developed computational approach, rigid residue scan(RRS), to systematically probe the impact of the internal degrees of freedom in each amino acid residue of VVD on its overall dynamics by applying rigid body constraint on each residue in molecular dynamics simulations. Key residues were identified with distinctive impacts on Dark and Light states, respectively. All the simulations display wide range of distribution on a two-dimensional(2D) plot upon structural root-mean-square deviations(RMSD) from either Dark or Light state. Clustering analysis of the 2D RMSD distribution leads to 15 representative structures with drastically different conformation of N-terminus, which is also a key difference between Dark and Light states of VVD. Further principle component analyses(PCA) of RRS simulations agree with the observation of distinctive impact from individual residues on Dark and Light states. PMID:28425502

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production.

  8. Comprehensive cysteine-scanning mutagenesis reveals Claudin-2 pore-lining residues with different intrapore locations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahua; Zhuo, Min; Pei, Lei; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Yu, Alan S L

    2014-03-07

    The first extracellular loop (ECL1) of claudins forms paracellular pores in the tight junction that determine ion permselectivity. We aimed to map the pore-lining residues of claudin-2 by comprehensive cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of ECL1. We screened 45 cysteine mutations within the ECL1 by expression in polyclonal Madin-Darby canine kidney II Tet-Off cells and found nine mutants that displayed a significant decrease of conductance after treatment with the thiol-reactive reagent 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate, indicating the location of candidate pore-lining residues. Next, we stably expressed these candidates in monoclonal Madin-Darby canine kidney I Tet-Off cells and exposed them to thiol-reactive reagents. The maximum degree of inhibition of conductance, size selectivity of degree of inhibition, and size dependence of the kinetics of reaction were used to deduce the location of residues within the pore. Our data support the following sequence of pore-lining residues located from the narrowest to the widest part of the pore: Ser(68), Ser(47), Thr(62)/Ile(66), Thr(56), Thr(32)/Gly(45), and Met(52). The paracellular pore appears to primarily be lined by polar side chains, as expected for a predominantly aqueous environment. Furthermore, our results strongly suggest the existence of a continuous sequence of residues in the ECL1 centered around Asp(65)-Ser(68) that form a major part of the lining of the pore.

  9. Comprehensive Cysteine-scanning Mutagenesis Reveals Claudin-2 Pore-lining Residues with Different Intrapore Locations*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiahua; Zhuo, Min; Pei, Lei; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Yu, Alan S. L.

    2014-01-01

    The first extracellular loop (ECL1) of claudins forms paracellular pores in the tight junction that determine ion permselectivity. We aimed to map the pore-lining residues of claudin-2 by comprehensive cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of ECL1. We screened 45 cysteine mutations within the ECL1 by expression in polyclonal Madin-Darby canine kidney II Tet-Off cells and found nine mutants that displayed a significant decrease of conductance after treatment with the thiol-reactive reagent 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate, indicating the location of candidate pore-lining residues. Next, we stably expressed these candidates in monoclonal Madin-Darby canine kidney I Tet-Off cells and exposed them to thiol-reactive reagents. The maximum degree of inhibition of conductance, size selectivity of degree of inhibition, and size dependence of the kinetics of reaction were used to deduce the location of residues within the pore. Our data support the following sequence of pore-lining residues located from the narrowest to the widest part of the pore: Ser68, Ser47, Thr62/Ile66, Thr56, Thr32/Gly45, and Met52. The paracellular pore appears to primarily be lined by polar side chains, as expected for a predominantly aqueous environment. Furthermore, our results strongly suggest the existence of a continuous sequence of residues in the ECL1 centered around Asp65–Ser68 that form a major part of the lining of the pore. PMID:24436330

  10. Revealing Hidden Conformational Space of LOV Protein VIVID Through Rigid Residue Scan Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Zoltowski, Brian D.; Tao, Peng

    2017-04-01

    VIVID(VVD) protein is a Light-Oxygen-Voltage(LOV) domain in circadian clock system. Upon blue light activation, a covalent bond is formed between VVD residue Cys108 and its cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD), and prompts VVD switching from Dark state to Light state with significant conformational deviation. However, the mechanism of this local environment initiated global protein conformational change remains elusive. We employed a recently developed computational approach, rigid residue scan(RRS), to systematically probe the impact of the internal degrees of freedom in each amino acid residue of VVD on its overall dynamics by applying rigid body constraint on each residue in molecular dynamics simulations. Key residues were identified with distinctive impacts on Dark and Light states, respectively. All the simulations display wide range of distribution on a two-dimensional(2D) plot upon structural root-mean-square deviations(RMSD) from either Dark or Light state. Clustering analysis of the 2D RMSD distribution leads to 15 representative structures with drastically different conformation of N-terminus, which is also a key difference between Dark and Light states of VVD. Further principle component analyses(PCA) of RRS simulations agree with the observation of distinctive impact from individual residues on Dark and Light states.

  11. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of anti-TRAP (AT) reveals residues involved in binding to TRAP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-04-11

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free l-tryptophan in many Gram-positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT(3)) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT(12)) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the "top" region of AT(3), that are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation.

  12. Immunogold scanning electron microscopy can reveal the polysaccharide architecture of xylem cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuliang; Juzenas, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the two main techniques commonly used to detect polysaccharides in plant cell walls. Both are important in localizing cell wall polysaccharides, but both have major limitations, such as low resolution in IFM and restricted sample size for immunogold TEM. In this study, we have developed a robust technique that combines immunocytochemistry with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study cell wall polysaccharide architecture in xylem cells at high resolution over large areas of sample. Using multiple cell wall monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this immunogold SEM technique reliably localized groups of hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of five different xylem structures (vessel elements, fibers, axial and ray parenchyma cells, and tyloses). This demonstrates its important advantages over the other two methods for studying cell wall polysaccharide composition and distribution in these structures. In addition, it can show the three-dimensional distribution of a polysaccharide group in the vessel lateral wall and the polysaccharide components in the cell wall of developing tyloses. This technique, therefore, should be valuable for understanding the cell wall polysaccharide composition, architecture and functions of diverse cell types. PMID:28398585

  13. Antennal fine morphology of the threatened beetle Osmoderma eremita (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zauli, Agnese; Maurizi, Emanuela; Carpaneto, Giuseppe M; Chiari, Stefano; Svensson, Glenn P; Di Giulio, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the antennal morphology of Osmoderma eremita, a threatened scarab beetle inhabiting tree hollows. O. eremita males produce a sex pheromone, (R)-(+)-γ-decalactone, responsible mainly for the attraction of females but also other males. Gross and fine morphology of microstructures including sensilla, microsculpture and pores were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The antenna of O. eremita showed the typical lamellicorn shape of scarab beetles, with a basal scape, a pedicel, a funicle composed of five antennomeres and a club composed of three lamellae. Six different subtypes of sensilla chaetica (Ch.1 - 6), Böhm sensilla (Bo), one subtype of sensilla basiconica (Ba.1), two subtypes of sensilla coeloconica (Co.1 - 2), two subtypes of sensilla placodea (Pl.1 - 2), pores and peculiar folds were described. The two sexes did not show any significant differences in the occurrence and number of the sensilla placodea, known to be responsible for the pheromone reception. Instead, some sexual differences were found on the occurrence and topology of three different microstructures: (1) one subtype of sensillum chaeticum (Ch.2) occurring on the pedicel only in males; (2) a characteristic pore occurring on the funicle only in males; (3) a peculiar fold occurring on different antennomeres of the funicle in the two sexes, on the fourth in males and on the fifth in females. A comparison between sensilla of O. eremita and those of other Scarabaeoidea is provided.

  14. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W.; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  15. Genomic scan reveals loci under altitude adaptation in Tibetan and Dahe pigs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Kunzhe; Yao, Na; Pu, Yabin; He, Xiaohong; Zhao, Qianjun; Luan, Yizhao; Guan, Weijun; Rao, Shaoqi; Ma, Yuehui

    2014-01-01

    High altitude environments are of particular interest in the studies of local adaptation as well as their implications in physiology and clinical medicine in human. Some Chinese pig breeds, such as Tibetan pig (TBP) that is well adapted to the high altitude and Dahe pig (DHP) that dwells at the moderate altitude, provide ideal materials to study local adaptation to altitudes. Yet, it is still short of in-depth analysis and understanding of the genetic adaptation to high altitude in the two pig populations. In this study we conducted a genomic scan for selective sweeps using FST to identify genes showing evidence of local adaptations in TBP and DHP, with Wuzhishan pig (WZSP) as the low-altitude reference. Totally, we identified 12 specific selective genes (CCBE1, F2RL1, AGGF1, ZFPM2, IL2, FGF5, PLA2G4A, ADAMTS9, NRBF2, JMJD1C, VEGFC and ADAM19) for TBP and six (OGG1, FOXM, FLT3, RTEL1, CRELD1 and RHOG) for DHP. In addition, six selective genes (VPS13A, GNA14, GDAP1, PARP8, FGF10 and ADAMTS16) were shared by the two pig breeds. Among these selective genes, three (VEGFC, FGF10 and ADAMTS9) were previously reported to be linked to the local adaptation to high altitudes in pigs, while many others were newly identified by this study. Further bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that majority of these selective signatures have some biological functions relevant to the altitude adaptation, for examples, response to hypoxia, development of blood vessels, DNA repair and several hematological involvements. These results suggest that the local adaptation to high altitude environments is sophisticated, involving numerous genes and multiple biological processes, and the shared selective signatures by the two pig breeds may provide an effective avenue to identify the common adaptive mechanisms to different altitudes.

  16. Accurate 3d Scanning of Damaged Ancient Greek Inscriptions for Revealing Weathered Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, A. I.; Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.; Prignitz, S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper two non-invasive non-destructive alternative techniques to the traditional and invasive technique of squeezes are presented alongside with specialized developed processing methods, aiming to help the epigraphists to reveal and analyse weathered letters in ancient Greek inscriptions carved in masonry or marble. The resulting 3D model would serve as a detailed basis for the epigraphists to try to decipher the inscription. The data were collected by using a Structured Light scanner. The creation of the final accurate three dimensional model is a complicated procedure requiring large computation cost and human effort. It includes the collection of geometric data in limited space and time, the creation of the surface, the noise filtering and the merging of individual surfaces. The use of structured light scanners is time consuming and requires costly hardware and software. Therefore an alternative methodology for collecting 3D data of the inscriptions was also implemented for reasons of comparison. Hence, image sequences from varying distances were collected using a calibrated DSLR camera aiming to reconstruct the 3D scene through SfM techniques in order to evaluate the efficiency and the level of precision and detail of the obtained reconstructed inscriptions. Problems in the acquisition processes as well as difficulties in the alignment step and mesh optimization are also encountered. A meta-processing framework is proposed and analysed. Finally, the results of processing and analysis and the different 3D models are critically inspected and then evaluated by a specialist in terms of accuracy, quality and detail of the model and the capability of revealing damaged and "hidden" letters.

  17. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  18. A biometrical genome-scan in rats reveals the multigenic basis of blood pressure variation

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Trolliet, M.R.; Koike, G.

    1994-09-01

    Well-designed breeding programs involving model organisms and modern DNA marker technologies have the potential to reveal loci whose evolutionary homologs influence human traits. Researchers investigating particular human traits can exploit this fact by studying the genetic basis of those traits in model organisms in an effort to gain insight into which genes might be influencing the trait in humans. This strategy is especially useful for researchers studying human quantitative traits (QTs), since the genetic architecture of human QTs is complex enough to preclude easy characterization with limited extant human gene mapping tools. We performed a genome-wide search for loci influencing salt-loaded systolic blood pressure (NaSBP) in 188 F2 rats produced from a Brown-Norway x Spontaneously Hypertensive rat cross. From genotype information available at 184 marker loci dispersed throughout the rat genome, we were able to determine 6 loci that collectively explain some 43% of the total NaSBP variation exhibited by our F2 progeny. Our results not only shed light on potential candidate loci for human BP variation, but also suggest that the genetic basis of classically-defined polygenic traits of higher organisms may yield to modern biometrical analyses in controlled settings.

  19. Genome-wide scans between two honeybee populations reveal putative signatures of human-mediated selection.

    PubMed

    Parejo, M; Wragg, D; Henriques, D; Vignal, A; Neuditschko, M

    2017-09-04

    Human-mediated selection has left signatures in the genomes of many domesticated animals, including the European dark honeybee, Apis mellifera mellifera, which has been selected by apiculturists for centuries. Using whole-genome sequence information, we investigated selection signatures in spatially separated honeybee subpopulations (Switzerland, n = 39 and France, n = 17). Three different test statistics were calculated in windows of 2 kb (fixation index, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity and cross-population composite likelihood ratio) and combined into a recently developed composite selection score. Applying a stringent false discovery rate of 0.01, we identified six significant selective sweeps distributed across five chromosomes covering eight genes. These genes are associated with multiple molecular and biological functions, including regulation of transcription, receptor binding and signal transduction. Of particular interest is a selection signature on chromosome 1, which corresponds to the WNT4 gene, the family of which is conserved across the animal kingdom with a variety of functions. In Drosophila melanogaster, WNT4 alleles have been associated with differential wing, cross vein and abdominal phenotypes. Defining phenotypic characteristics of different Apis mellifera ssp., which are typically used as selection criteria, include colour and wing venation pattern. This signal is therefore likely to be a good candidate for human mediated-selection arising from different applied breeding practices in the two managed populations. © 2017 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  20. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V; Jacobsen, Douglas M; Turner, Stephen T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2009-03-15

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R(2)<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms.

  1. Scanning STED-FCS reveals spatiotemporal heterogeneity of lipid interaction in the plasma membrane of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Ta, Haisen; Schoenle, Andreas; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W.; Eggeling, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of lipids and proteins plays an important role in plasma membrane bioactivity, and much can be learned from their diffusion characteristics. Here we present the combination of super-resolution STED microscopy with scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (scanning STED-FCS, sSTED-FCS) to characterize the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of lipid interactions. sSTED-FCS reveals transient molecular interaction hotspots for a fluorescent sphingolipid analogue. The interaction sites are smaller than 80 nm in diameter and lipids are transiently trapped for several milliseconds in these areas. In comparison, newly developed fluorescent phospholipid and cholesterol analogues with improved phase-partitioning properties show more homogenous diffusion, independent of the preference for liquid-ordered or disordered membrane environments. Our results do not support the presence of nanodomains based on lipid-phase separation in the basal membrane of our cultured nonstimulated cells, and show that alternative interactions are responsible for the strong local trapping of our sphingolipid analogue.

  2. A genome-wide scan for human obesity genes reveals a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Hager, J; Dina, C; Francke, S; Dubois, S; Houari, M; Vatin, V; Vaillant, E; Lorentz, N; Basdevant, A; Clement, K; Guy-Grand, B; Froguel, P

    1998-11-01

    Obesity, a common multifactorial disorder, is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD). According to the definition of the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 6-10% of the population in Westernized countries are considered obese. Epidemiological studies have shown that 30-70% of the variation in body weight may be attributable to genetic factors. To date, two genome-wide scans using different obesity-related quantitative traits have provided candidate regions for obesity. We have undertaken a genome-wide scan in affected sibpairs to identify chromosomal regions linked to obesity in a collection of French families. Model-free multipoint linkage analyses revealed evidence for linkage to a region on chromosome 10p (MLS=4.85). Two further loci on chromosomes 5cen-q and 2p showed suggestive evidence for linkage of serum leptin levels in a genome-wide context. The peak on chromosome 2 coincided with the region containing the gene (POMC) encoding pro-opiomelanocortin, a locus previously linked to leptin levels and fat mass in a Mexican-American population and shown to be mutated in obese humans. Our results suggest that there is a major gene on chromosome 10p implicated in the development of human obesity, and the existence of two further loci influencing leptin levels.

  3. Variables Associated with Environmental Scanning among Clinicians at Substance Abuse Treatment Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Alison L.; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Agius, Elizabeth; Dickson, Marcus W.; Mitchelson, Jacqueline K.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Environmental scanning, as a component of absorptive capacity, has been shown to be associated with increased use of innovative treatment techniques at substance abuse treatment programmes. As the transfer of innovative, evidence-based treatment techniques from research to practice is gaining attention, we aimed to identify variables…

  4. Thermal stability and molecular microstructure of heat-induced cereal grains, revealed with Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Majibur Rahman; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-07-03

    The objectives of the present study were to use Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to reveal molecular thermal stability and thermal degradation behavior of heat-induced cereal grains and reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein structures of cereal grain tissues affected by heat processing and to quantify the protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modeling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were also conducted to identify molecular differences in the Raman spectra. Three cereal grain seeds, wheat, triticale, and corn, were used as the model for feed protein in the experiment. The specimens were autoclaved (moist heating) and dry-heated (roasted) at 121 °C for 80 min, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results revealed that there are marked differences in the secondary structures of the proteins subjected to various heating treatments of different cereals. The sensitivity of cereals to moist heating was much higher than the sensitivity to dry heating. The multivariate analyses (CLA and PCA) showed that heat treatment was significantly isolated between the different Raman raw spectra. The DSC study revealed that the thermal degradation behavior of cereals was significantly changed after moist- and dry-heat treatments. The position of the major endothermic peak of dry-heated cereals shifted toward a higher temperature, from 131.7 to 134.0 °C, suggesting the high thermal stability of dry-heated cereals. In contrast, the endothermic peak position was slightly decreased to 132.1 °C in the case of moist autoclaved heating. The digestive behavior and nutritive value of rumen-undegradable protein in animals may be related to the changes of the protein secondary molecular structure and thermal stability of the cereal grain materials, which is attributed by Raman microspectroscopy and DSC endotherm profiles.

  5. CT scan screening is associated with increased distress among subjects of the APExS

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the psychological consequences of HRCT scan screening in retired asbestos-exposed workers. Methods A HRCT-scan screening program for asbestos-related diseases was carried out in four regions of France. At baseline (T1), subjects filled in self-administered occupational questionnaires. In two of the regions, subjects also received a validated psychological scale, namely the psychological consequences questionnaire (PCQ). The physician was required to provide the subject with the results of the HRCT scan at a final visit. A second assessment of psychological consequences was performed 6 months after the HRCT-scan examination (T2). PCQ scores were compared quantitatively (t-test, general linear model) and qualitatively (chi²-test, logistic regression) to screening results. Multivariate analyses were adjusted for gender, age, smoking, asbestos exposure and counseling. Results Among the 832 subjects included in this psychological impact study, HRCT-scan screening was associated with a significant increase of the psychological score 6 months after the examination relative to baseline values (8.31 to 10.08, p < 0.0001, t-test). This increase concerned patients with an abnormal HRCT-scan result, regardless of the abnormalities, but also patients with normal HRCT-scans after adjustment for age, gender, smoking status, asbestos exposure and counseling visit. The greatest increase was observed for pleural plaques (+3.60; 95%CI [+2.15;+5.06]), which are benign lesions. Detection of isolated pulmonary nodules was also associated with a less marked but nevertheless significant increase of distress (+1.88; 95%CI [+0.34;+3.42]). However, analyses based on logistic regressions only showed a close to significant increase of the proportion of subjects with abnormal PCQ scores at T2 for patients with asbestosis (OR = 1.92; 95%CI [0.97-3.81]) or with two or more diseases (OR = 2.04; 95%CI [0.95-4.37]). Conclusion This study suggests that

  6. Progressive dyspnea associated with a crazy-paving appearance on a chest computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Maimon, Nimrod; Paul, Narinder; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    A ‘crazy-paving’ appearance of the lungs on computed tomography scanning of the chest was first described nearly 20 years ago in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and was thought to be characteristic of this condition. However, this pattern has subsequently been reported in a variety of pulmonary diseases and is now considered to be nonspecific. The present report describes a case of a 74-year-old man in whom congestive heart failure presented with a crazy-paving appearance of the lungs on a chest computed tomography scan. This uncommon association illustrates the importance of the correlation of clinical and radiographic information. PMID:16896429

  7. Curved saccade trajectories reveal conflicting predictions in associative learning.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-09-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target stimulus at 1 of 3 possible locations, right (R), mid (M), or left (L), in the upper hemifield. We analyzed as measures of associative learning the frequency, latency, and curvature of saccades elicited by the cues and directed at the trained locations in anticipation of the targets. Participants were trained on two concurrent discrimination problems A+R, AC+R, AX+M, X+M and B+L, BC+L, BY+M, Y+M. From a connectionist perspective, cues were predicted to acquire associative links connecting the cues to the trained outcomes in memory. Model simulations based on the learning rule of the Rescorla and Wagner (1972) model revealed that for some cues, the prediction of the correct target location was challenged by the interfering prediction of an incorrect location. We observed that saccades directed at the correct location in anticipation of the target curved away from the location that was predicted by the interfering association. Furthermore, changes in curvature during training corresponded to predicted changes in associative memory. We propose that this curvature was caused by the inhibition of the incorrect prediction, as previously has been suggested with the concept of distractor inhibition (Sheliga, Riggio, & Rizzolatti, 1994; Tipper, Howard, & Houghton, 2000). The paradigm provides a new method to examine memory interference during associative learning.

  8. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  9. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment.

  10. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell

    PubMed Central

    Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Thompson, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  11. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction: how confined oscillations reveal short lived radicals and auto-catalytic species.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, T Jane; Noël, Jean-Marc; Ristori, Sandra; Combellas, Catherine; Abou-Hassan, Ali; Rossi, Federico; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2015-10-06

    Oscillating chemical reactions, encapsulated within artificial vesicles have been demonstrated as a powerful analogy of living cells for the investigation of chemical communication and morphogenesis. However, little is understood with regards to the influence of confinement on the reactivity of such systems. Herein, the effect of confinement on the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillating reaction in bulk solution, (employing ferroin as a catalyst and malonic acid as the organic substrate) is investigated using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) toward different insulating surfaces such as glass, silanized glass, or PTFE. An unexpected increase in the amplitude of the BZ reaction at a tip-substrate distance of ∼12-15 μm is observed. By simulating different reaction mechanisms, from simple EC' catalysis to more sophisticated Oregonator or even an 11-reaction scheme, it is shown that such behavior reveals the intervention of redox catalysis processes and particularly the short-lived highly reactive radical intermediate BrO2(•) indirectly detected at micromolar concentrations. The reinspection of the EC' mechanism shows that the homogeneous catalysis route is confirmed and kinetically characterized from SECM toward an insulating substrate, with promising potentiality in many systems. More specifically to the complex chemical case of BZ reactions, the mechanism is understood from the envelope curves of the oscillations, which are assessed in the absence of the oscillation (absence of organic substrate).

  12. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  13. Proline Scan of the hERG Channel S6 Helix Reveals the Location of the Intracellular Pore Gate

    PubMed Central

    Thouta, Samrat; Sokolov, Stanislav; Abe, Yuki; Clark, Sheldon J.; Cheng, Yen M.; Claydon, Tom W.

    2014-01-01

    In Shaker-like channels, the activation gate is formed at the bundle crossing by the convergence of the inner S6 helices near a conserved proline-valine-proline motif, which introduces a kink that allows for electromechanical coupling with voltage sensor motions via the S4-S5 linker. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels lack the proline-valine-proline motif and the location of the intracellular pore gate and how it is coupled to S4 movement is less clear. Here, we show that proline substitutions within the S6 of hERG perturbed pore gate closure, trapping channels in the open state. Performing a proline scan of the inner S6 helix, from Ile655 to Tyr667 revealed that gate perturbation occurred with proximal (I655P-Q664P), but not distal (R665P-Y667P) substitutions, suggesting that Gln664 marks the position of the intracellular gate in hERG channels. Using voltage-clamp fluorimetry and gating current analysis, we demonstrate that proline substitutions trap the activation gate open by disrupting the coupling between the voltage-sensing unit and the pore of the channel. We characterize voltage sensor movement in one such trapped-open mutant channel and demonstrate the kinetics of what we interpret to be intrinsic hERG voltage sensor movement. PMID:24606930

  14. Saturation scanning of ubiquitin variants reveals a common hot spot for binding to USP2 and USP21

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Isabel; Dekel, Ayelet; Shifman, Julia M.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby ubiquitin (Ub) recognizes enzymes in the Ub proteasome system is crucial for understanding the biological function of Ub. Many structures of Ub complexes have been solved and, in most cases, reveal a large structural epitope on a common face of the Ub molecule. However, owing to the generally weak nature of these interactions, it has been difficult to map in detail the functional contributions of individual Ub side chains to affinity and specificity. Here we took advantage of Ub variants (Ubvs) that bind tightly to particular Ub-specific proteases (USPs) and used phage display and saturation scanning mutagenesis to comprehensively map functional epitopes within the structural epitopes. We found that Ubvs that bind to USP2 or USP21 contain a remarkably similar core functional epitope, or “hot spot,” consisting mainly of positions that are conserved as the wild type sequence, but also some positions that prefer mutant sequences. The Ubv core functional epitope contacts residues that are conserved in the human USP family, and thus it is likely important for the interactions of Ub across many family members. PMID:27436899

  15. An Earlier Time of Scan is Associated with Greater Threat-related Amygdala Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Baranger, David A A; Margolis, Seth; Hariri, Ahmad R; Bogdan, Ryan

    2017-04-04

    Time-dependent variability in mood and anxiety suggest that related neural phenotypes, such as threat-related amygdala reactivity, may also follow a diurnal pattern. Here, using data from 1,043 young adult volunteers, we found that threat-related amygdala reactivity was negatively coupled with time of day, an effect which was stronger in the left hemisphere (β=-0.1083, p-fdr=0.0012). This effect was moderated by subjective sleep quality (β=-0.0715, p-fdr=0.0387); participants who reported average and poor sleep quality had relatively increased left amygdala reactivity in the morning. Bootstrapped simulations suggest that similar cross-sectional samples with at least 300 participants would be able to detect associations between amygdala reactivity and time of scan. In control analyses, we found no associations between time and V1 activation. Our results provide initial evidence that threat-related amygdala reactivity may vary diurnally, and that this effect is potentiated among individuals with average to low sleep quality. More broadly, our results suggest that considering time of scan in study design or modeling time of scan in analyses, as well as collecting additional measures of circadian variation, may be useful for understanding threat-related neural phenotypes and their associations with behavior, such as fear conditioning, mood and anxiety symptoms, and related phenotypes.

  16. [Differential diagnosis of reduced uptake images revealed by bone scan: about a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bahadi, Nisrine; Biyi, Abdelhamid; Oueriagli, Salah Nabih; Doudouh, Abderrahim

    2016-01-01

    If increased uptake during bone scan usually bring to light many bone pathologies, reduced uptakes are a rare occurrence and they require careful analysis to avoid erroneous interpretations. We report the case of a 17-year old admitted with diffuse bone pain, hypercalcemia and thrombopenia. Bone scan showed areas of low uptakes. Bone marrow tests allowed the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This case report aims to discuss the main differential diagnoses based on such bone scan abnormalities.

  17. [Fahr syndrome associated to hypoparathyroidy, revealed by dermatologic manifestation].

    PubMed

    Khadir, K; Moussaid, L; El Ouazzani, T; Gam, I; Slassi, I; Azzouzi, S; Lakhdar, H

    2004-11-01

    Fahr syndrome is defined by the presence at the brain base of strio-pallido-notched non-arteriosclerotic bilateral and symmetric calcifications. We report an observation of Fahr syndrome revealed by a growing pyodermitis in direct relation with hypocalcemia. A 17 year-old girl was admitted to the Dermatology Department for a growing pyodermitis of the large folds. The patient was known to be epileptic and had undergone surgery for a left eye cataract a year before. Microbiologic and mycologic examinations of the pus and of the cutaneous fragments were negative. During hospitalization, the patient had an attack of tetany, a laryngeal spasm and a generalized erythema thrust studded with pustules. The phosphocalcic assessment showed severe hypocalcemia and hyperphosphoremia. Parathormone serum rate was decreased. The brain tomodensitometry conveyed bilateral calcifications of the central gray nucleus. The diagnosis of a growing amicrobial pustulosis secondary to an idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and responsible for the Fahr syndrome was maintained. Treatment was composed of calcium (2 g/day) and vitamin D3. The evolution was favorable with a relapse at 2 years. We report an idiopathic hypoparathyroidism associated with Fahr syndrome conveyed by growing amicrobial pustulosis. We discuss the dermatologic manifestations of Fahr syndrome associated with hypoparathyroidism and the physiopathologic mechanisms of the dermatologic lesions during hypocalcemia.

  18. Synaptotagmin C2B domain regulates Ca2+-triggered fusion in vitro: critical residues revealed by scanning alanine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Dunning, F Mark; Wang, Zhao; Hui, Enfu; Chapman, Edwin R

    2008-11-14

    Synaptotagmin (syt) 1 is localized to synaptic vesicles, binds Ca2+, and regulates neuronal exocytosis. Syt 1 harbors two Ca2+-binding motifs referred to as C2A and C2B. In this study we examine the function of the isolated C2 domains of Syt 1 using a reconstituted, SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor)-mediated, fusion assay. We report that inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine into reconstituted SNARE vesicles enabled isolated C2B, but not C2A, to regulate Ca2+-triggered fusion. The isolated C2B domain had a 6-fold lower EC50 for Ca2+-activated fusion than the intact cytosolic domain of Syt 1 (C2AB). Phosphatidylethanolamine increased both the rate and efficiency of C2AB- and C2B-regulated fusion without affecting their abilities to bind membrane-embedded syntaxin-SNAP-25 (t-SNARE) complexes. At equimolar concentrations, the isolated C2A domain was an effective inhibitor of C2B-, but not C2AB-regulated fusion; hence, C2A has markedly different effects in the fusion assay depending on whether it is tethered to C2B. Finally, scanning alanine mutagenesis of C2AB revealed four distinct groups of mutations within the C2B domain that play roles in the regulation of SNARE-mediated fusion. Surprisingly, substitution of Arg-398 with alanine, which lies on the opposite end of C2B from the Ca2+/membrane-binding loops, decreases C2AB t-SNARE binding and Ca2+-triggered fusion in vitro without affecting Ca2+-triggered interactions with phosphatidylserine or vesicle aggregation. In addition, some mutations uncouple the clamping and stimulatory functions of syt 1, suggesting that these two activities are mediated by distinct structural determinants in C2B.

  19. Mobility and age of black carbon in two temperate grassland soils revealed by differential scanning calorimetry and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Feng, Xiaojuan; Eglinton, Timothy; Wacker, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a natural component of soil organic matter (SOM) and abundant in many ecosystems. Its stability, due to its relative resistance to microbial decomposition, means it plays an important role in soil C sequestration. A recent review suggests that BC may be mobile in soil; hence, its contribution to a stable SOM pool may change over time due to its lateral or vertical reallocation (Rumpel et al. 2014). However, direct evidence of the mobility of BC, particularly with reference to its vertical mobility, is scarce. We studied the amount of BC in two temperate grassland fields (eutric clayey Camibsol,) that were established in 2001 on former cropland. Volumetric soil samples (0-50 cm, 5 cm increments) were taken at 10 spots in each field in 2001, 2006 and 2011. One of the fields was ploughed in 2007 and the sward was re-sown. BC content was measured by differential scanning calorimetry for a total number of c. 500 samples. The mean BC/OC ratio was 0.10 (±0.05) and reached 0.25 in some samples. Radiocarbon measurements from 24 bulk soil samples revealed relatively small 14C contents in 2001 (92±2.7 pMC) which increased over time (2006: 99.0±1.1 pMC; 2011: 99.1±1.1 pMC). Thermal fractionation of BC by DSC revealed calibrated BC ages of 400 to 1000 years (pMC 87-94), suggesting that BC originates from medieval and post-medieval fire clearings. The change in soil signature may have been caused by a preferential transport of old BC down the soil profile, leading to a selective enrichment of younger soil C over time. In line with this interpretation the DSC measurements suggest that in both fields, BC concentrations significantly decreased for most layers between 2001 and 2006. However, between 2006 and 2011, no further vertical reallocation was observed in the continuous grassland, whereas BC contents of the field ploughed in 2007 significantly increased in the top layers. Together, these data suggest that ploughing in 2001 triggered subsequent

  20. /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scanning in ampicillin-associated right-sided hemorrhagic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Saverymuttu, S.H.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1984-07-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis is a rare but well-recognized complication with ampicillin or penicillin derivative treatment. Early colonoscopy has been advocated in establishing the diagnosis by demonstrating the characteristic pattern of only right-sided involvement and so distinguishing it from other colitides. The authors report a patient who developed colitis after amoxycillin therapy in whom /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan demonstrated right-sided colitis which alerted them to the diagnosis. Discontinuation of the antibiotic resulting in rapid improvement, and return of the /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan to normal in this patient suggests that ampicillin-associated colitis should not be considered purely as a hemorrhagic disease but may in some cases have an inflammatory component.

  1. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and typhoid fever association based on spatial standpoint using scan statistics in DKI Jakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervind, Widyaningsih, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Concurrent infection with multiple infectious agents may occur in one patient, it appears frequently in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and typhoid fever. This paper depicted association between DHF and typhoid based on spatial point of view. Since paucity of data regarding dengue and typhoid co-infection, data that be used are the number of patients of those diseases in every district (kecamatan) in Jakarta in 2014 and 2015 obtained from Jakarta surveillance website. Poisson spatial scan statistics is used to detect DHF and typhoid hotspots area district in Jakarta separately. After obtain the hotspot, Fisher's exact test is applied to validate association between those two diseases' hotspot. The result exhibit hotspots of DHF and typhoid are located around central Jakarta. The further analysis used Poisson space-time scan statistics to reveal the hotspot in term of spatial and time. DHF and typhoid fever more likely occurr from January until May in the area which is relatively similar with pure spatial result. Preventive action could be done especially in the hotspot areas and it is required further study to observe the causes based on characteristics of the hotspot area.

  2. Marine bacterial, archaeal and protistan association networks reveal ecological linkages.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joshua A; Countway, Peter D; Xia, Li; Vigil, Patrick D; Beman, J Michael; Kim, Diane Y; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Sachdeva, Rohan; Jones, Adriane C; Schwalbach, Michael S; Rose, Julie M; Hewson, Ian; Patel, Anand; Sun, Fengzhu; Caron, David A; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2011-09-01

    Microbes have central roles in ocean food webs and global biogeochemical processes, yet specific ecological relationships among these taxa are largely unknown. This is in part due to the dilute, microscopic nature of the planktonic microbial community, which prevents direct observation of their interactions. Here, we use a holistic (that is, microbial system-wide) approach to investigate time-dependent variations among taxa from all three domains of life in a marine microbial community. We investigated the community composition of bacteria, archaea and protists through cultivation-independent methods, along with total bacterial and viral abundance, and physico-chemical observations. Samples and observations were collected monthly over 3 years at a well-described ocean time-series site of southern California. To find associations among these organisms, we calculated time-dependent rank correlations (that is, local similarity correlations) among relative abundances of bacteria, archaea, protists, total abundance of bacteria and viruses and physico-chemical parameters. We used a network generated from these statistical correlations to visualize and identify time-dependent associations among ecologically important taxa, for example, the SAR11 cluster, stramenopiles, alveolates, cyanobacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Negative correlations, perhaps suggesting competition or predation, were also common. The analysis revealed a progression of microbial communities through time, and also a group of unknown eukaryotes that were highly correlated with dinoflagellates, indicating possible symbioses or parasitism. Possible 'keystone' species were evident. The network has statistical features similar to previously described ecological networks, and in network parlance has non-random, small world properties (that is, highly interconnected nodes). This approach provides new insights into the natural history of microbes.

  3. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions.

  4. Proteomics Reveal Cochlin Deposits Associated with Glaucomatous Trabecular Meshwork* S

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Rockwood, Edward J.; Smith, Scott D.; Bonilha, Vera L.; Crabb, John S.; Kuchtey, Rachel W.; Robertson, Nahid G.; Peachey, Neal S.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Crabb, John W.

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of primary open angle glaucoma, a leading cause of age-related blindness, remains poorly defined, although elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) contributes to the disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms causing elevated IOP from aqueous humor circulation, we pursued proteomic analyses of trabecular meshwork (TM) from glaucoma and age-matched control donors. These analyses demonstrated that Cochlin, a protein associated with deafness disorder DFNA9, is present in glaucomatous but absent in normal TM. Cochlin was also detected in TM from the glaucomatous DBA/2J mouse preceding elevated IOP but found to be absent in three other mouse lines that do not develop elevated IOP. Histochemical analyses revealed co-deposits of Cochlin and mucopolysaccharide in human TM around Schlemm’s canal, similar to that observed in the cochlea in DFNA9 deafness. Purified Cochlin was found to aggregate after sheer stress and to induce the aggregation of TM cells in vitro. Age-dependent in vivo increases in Cochlin were observed in glaucomatous TM, concomitant with a decrease in type II collagen, suggesting that Cochlin may disrupt the TM architecture and render components like collagen more susceptible to degradation and collapse. Overall, these observations suggest that Cochlin contributes to elevated IOP in primary open angle glaucoma through altered interactions within the TM extracellular matrix, resulting in cell aggregation, mucopolysaccharide deposition, and significant obstruction of the aqueous humor circulation. PMID:15579465

  5. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  6. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/software/baypass/.

  7. Role of the "helix clamp" in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase catalytic cycling as revealed by alanine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Beard, W A; Minnick, D T; Wade, C L; Prasad, R; Won, R L; Kumar, A; Kunkel, T A; Wilson, S H

    1996-05-24

    Residues 259-284 of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase exhibit sequence homology with other nucleic acid polymerases and have been termed the "helix clamp" (Hermann, T., Meier, T., Gotte, M., and Heumann, H. (1994) Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 4625-4633), since crystallographic evidence indicates these residues are part of two alpha-helices (alpha H and alpha I) that interact with DNA. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis has previously demonstrated that several residues in alpha H make important interactions with nucleic acid and influence frameshift fidelity. To define the role of alpha I (residues 278-286) during catalytic cycling, we performed systematic site-directed mutagenesis from position 277 through position 287 by changing each residue, one by one, to alanine. Each mutant protein was expressed and, except for L283A and T286A, was soluble. The soluble mutant enzymes were purified and characterized. In contrast to alanine mutants of alpha H, alanine substitution in alpha I did not have a significant effect on template.primer (T.P) binding as revealed by a lack of an effect on Km, T.P, Ki for 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, koff, T.P and processivity. Consistent with these observations, the fidelity of the mutant enzymes was not influenced. However, alanine mutagenesis of alpha I lowered the apparent activity of every mutant relative to wild-type enzyme. Titration of two mutants exhibiting the lowest activity with T.P (L282A and R284A) demonstrated that these mutant enzymes could bind T.P stoichiometrically and tightly. In contrast, active site concentrations determined from "burst" experiments suggest that the lower activity is due to a smaller populations of enzyme bound productively to T.P. The putative electrostatic interactions between the basic side chains of the helix clamp and the DNA backbone are either very weak or kinetically silent. In contrast, interactions between several residues of alpha H and the DNA minor groove, 3-5 nucleotides from the 3

  8. Case of lung carcinoma revealed by vulvar metastasis associated with systemic scleroderma and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Safae; Glaria, Luis A.; Asmae, Naim; Flores, Luis F.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the vulva is rare, where the incidence is believed to be between 5% and 8%. However, malignant tumors have been described in 3–11% of systemic scleroderma (SSc) cases. We report the case of one patient, a 66-year-old postmenopausal woman, whose medical history was marked with rheumatic vascular disease (systemic scleroderma) since 1993 without muscular, renal, cardiac lesions or HTA (arterial hypertension) and without tobacco history. The woman presented with a new vulvar mass of the right labia in December 2011 that had progressively enlarged in size. CT scan of the abdominopelvic region demonstrated a lobular mass of the right labia with central necrosis, 7 cm on the wide axis, and the rectum and the vaginal wall were normal. No inguinal or iliac lymphadenopathy was noted. An outpatient excisional biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated malignant tumor suggestive of carcinoma. IHC: CK7+/CK20−, estrogen receptors−, AE 1 AE 3+, vimentine+, S100−, Desmina−, CD34−, KI 67: 20%. The thoracic scan revealed a large mass of 4 cm × 3 cm in the right lung base with right paratracheal lymphadenopathy 3 cm × 2 cm. A bronchoscopy revealed discrete stenosis of the mediastinal portion of the right bronchial tree. The bronchial biopsy also revealed poorly differentiated lung carcinoma, non-small cell, which was identical with the vulvar tumor. Conclusion The presence of the single lung lesion with only one lymphadenopathy paratracheal with pathological and immunohistochemical (IHC) profile similar to the vulvar lesion, and a particular IHC profile with CK7+ and CK20− was detected – that is more specific to the primitive pulmonary cancer, and the presence of only one sarcoma marker vementine+, desmine and actine−. Also the presence of KI 67: 20%, predicted the proliferative and great metastatic power of the lung tumor was observed. Additionally, lung cancer was the most frequent type and may develop in scleroderma as reported in

  9. A genome-wide SNP scan reveals novel loci for egg production and quality traits in white leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Chen, Sirui; Qu, Lujiang; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Availability of the complete genome sequence as well as high-density SNP genotyping platforms allows genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in chickens. A high-density SNP array containing 57,636 markers was employed herein to identify associated variants underlying egg production and quality traits within two lines of chickens, i.e., White Leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers. For each individual, age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW), and number of eggs (EN) from 21 to 56 weeks of age were recorded, and egg quality traits including egg weight (EW), eggshell weight (ESW), yolk weight (YW), eggshell thickness (EST), eggshell strength (ESS), albumen height(AH) and Haugh unit(HU) were measured at 40 and 60 weeks of age. A total of 385 White Leghorn females and 361 brown-egg dwarf dams were selected to be genotyped. The genome-wide scan revealed 8 SNPs showing genome-wise significant (P<1.51E-06, Bonferroni correction) association with egg production and quality traits under the Fisher's combined probability method. Some significant SNPs are located in known genes including GRB14 and GALNT1 that can impact development and function of ovary, but more are located in genes with unclear functions in layers, and need to be studied further. Many chromosome-wise significant SNPs were also detected in this study and some of them are located in previously reported QTL regions. Most of loci detected in this study are novel and the follow-up replication studies may be needed to further confirm the functional significance for these newly identified SNPs.

  10. A Genome-Wide SNP Scan Reveals Novel Loci for Egg Production and Quality Traits in White Leghorn and Brown-Egg Dwarf Layers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenbo; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Chen, Sirui; Qu, Lujiang; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Availability of the complete genome sequence as well as high-density SNP genotyping platforms allows genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in chickens. A high-density SNP array containing 57,636 markers was employed herein to identify associated variants underlying egg production and quality traits within two lines of chickens, i.e., White Leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers. For each individual, age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW), and number of eggs (EN) from 21 to 56 weeks of age were recorded, and egg quality traits including egg weight (EW), eggshell weight (ESW), yolk weight (YW), eggshell thickness (EST), eggshell strength (ESS), albumen height(AH) and Haugh unit(HU) were measured at 40 and 60 weeks of age. A total of 385 White Leghorn females and 361 brown-egg dwarf dams were selected to be genotyped. The genome-wide scan revealed 8 SNPs showing genome-wise significant (P<1.51E-06, Bonferroni correction) association with egg production and quality traits under the Fisher's combined probability method. Some significant SNPs are located in known genes including GRB14 and GALNT1 that can impact development and function of ovary, but more are located in genes with unclear functions in layers, and need to be studied further. Many chromosome-wise significant SNPs were also detected in this study and some of them are located in previously reported QTL regions. Most of loci detected in this study are novel and the follow-up replication studies may be needed to further confirm the functional significance for these newly identified SNPs. PMID:22174844

  11. Whole-genome linkage and association scan in primary, nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Darlay, Rebecca; Charoen, Pimphen; Stewart, Aisling; Gullett, Ambrose M; Lambert, Heather J; Malcolm, Sue; Feather, Sally A; Goodship, Timothy H J; Woolf, Adrian S; Kenda, Rajko B; Goodship, Judith A

    2010-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteric reflux accounts for approximately 10% of kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation, and sibling studies suggest a large genetic component. Here, we report a whole-genome linkage and association scan in primary, nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux and reflux nephropathy. We used linkage and family-based association approaches to analyze 320 white families (661 affected individuals, generally from families with two affected siblings) from two populations (United Kingdom and Slovenian). We found modest evidence of linkage but no clear overlap with previous studies. We tested for but did not detect association with six candidate genes (AGTR2, HNF1B, PAX2, RET, ROBO2, and UPK3A). Family-based analysis detected associations with one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the UK families, with three SNPs in the Slovenian families, and with three SNPs in the combined families. A case-control analysis detected associations with three additional SNPs. The results of this study, which is the largest to date investigating the genetics of reflux, suggest that major loci may not exist for this common renal tract malformation within European populations.

  12. Whole-Genome Linkage and Association Scan in Primary, Nonsyndromic Vesicoureteric Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Darlay, Rebecca; Charoen, Pimphen; Stewart, Aisling; Gullett, Ambrose M.; Lambert, Heather J.; Malcolm, Sue; Feather, Sally A.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Woolf, Adrian S.; Kenda, Rajko B.

    2010-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteric reflux accounts for approximately 10% of kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation, and sibling studies suggest a large genetic component. Here, we report a whole-genome linkage and association scan in primary, nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux and reflux nephropathy. We used linkage and family-based association approaches to analyze 320 white families (661 affected individuals, generally from families with two affected siblings) from two populations (United Kingdom and Slovenian). We found modest evidence of linkage but no clear overlap with previous studies. We tested for but did not detect association with six candidate genes (AGTR2, HNF1B, PAX2, RET, ROBO2, and UPK3A). Family-based analysis detected associations with one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the UK families, with three SNPs in the Slovenian families, and with three SNPs in the combined families. A case-control analysis detected associations with three additional SNPs. The results of this study, which is the largest to date investigating the genetics of reflux, suggest that major loci may not exist for this common renal tract malformation within European populations. PMID:19959718

  13. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  14. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  15. Correlative Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy Reveals that a Chimeric Flavivirus Is Released as Individual Particles in Secretory Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations. PMID:24681578

  16. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  17. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  18. Whole genome scan reveals the genetic signature of African Ankole cattle breed and potential for higher quality beef.

    PubMed

    Taye, Mengistie; Kim, Jaemin; Yoon, Sook Hee; Lee, Wonseok; Hanotte, Olivier; Dessie, Tadelle; Kemp, Stephen; Mwai, Okeyo Ally; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Cho, Seoae; Oh, Sung Jong; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Kim, Heebal

    2017-02-09

    Africa is home to numerous cattle breeds whose diversity has been shaped by subtle combinations of human and natural selection. African Sanga cattle are an intermediate type of cattle resulting from interbreeding between Bos taurus and Bos indicus subspecies. Recently, research has asserted the potential of Sanga breeds for commercial beef production with better meat quality as compared to Bos indicus breeds. Here, we identified meat quality related gene regions that are positively selected in Ankole (Sanga) cattle breeds as compared to indicus (Boran, Ogaden, and Kenana) breeds using cross-population (XP-EHH and XP-CLR) statistical methods. We identified 238 (XP-EHH) and 213 (XP-CLR) positively selected genes, of which 97 were detected from both statistics. Among the genes obtained, we primarily reported those involved in different biological process and pathways associated with meat quality traits. Genes (CAPZB, COL9A2, PDGFRA, MAP3K5, ZNF410, and PKM2) involved in muscle structure and metabolism affect meat tenderness. Genes (PLA2G2A, PARK2, ZNF410, MAP2K3, PLCD3, PLCD1, and ROCK1) related to intramuscular fat (IMF) are involved in adipose metabolism and adipogenesis. MB and SLC48A1 affect meat color. In addition, we identified genes (TIMP2, PKM2, PRKG1, MAP3K5, and ATP8A1) related to feeding efficiency. Among the enriched Gene Ontology Biological Process (GO BP) terms, actin cytoskeleton organization, actin filament-based process, and protein ubiquitination are associated with meat tenderness whereas cellular component organization, negative regulation of actin filament depolymerization and negative regulation of protein complex disassembly are involved in adipocyte regulation. The MAPK pathway is responsible for cell proliferation and plays an important role in hyperplastic growth, which has a positive effect on meat tenderness. Results revealed several candidate genes positively selected in Ankole cattle in relation to meat quality characteristics. The genes

  19. Structural reconstruction and spontaneous formation of Fe polynuclears: a self-assembly of Fe-porphyrin coordination chains on Au(111) revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxu; Zhou, Kun; Shi, Ziliang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-06-07

    A self-assembled Fe-porphyrin coordination chain structure on a Au(111) surface is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), revealing structural reconstruction resulting from an alternative change of molecular orientations and spontaneous formation of uniformly sized Fe polynuclears. The alternation of the molecular orientations is ascribed to the cooperation of the attractive coordination and the intermolecular steric repulsion as elucidated by high-resolution STM observations. Furthermore, chemical control experiments are carried out to determine the number of atoms in an Fe polynuclear, suggesting a tentative Fe dinuclear-module that serves not only as a coordination center to link porphyrin units together but also as a "dangling" site for further functionalization by a guest terpyridine ligand. The chain structure and the Fe polynuclears are stable up to 320 K as revealed by real-time STM scanning. Annealing at higher temperatures converts the chain structure into a two-dimensional coordination structure.

  20. Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Clara S.; Zhang, He; Cheung, Chloe Y. Y.; Xu, Ming; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Zhou, Wei; Cherny, Stacey S.; Zhang, Yan; Holmen, Oddgeir; Au, Ka-Wing; Yu, Haiyi; Xu, Lin; Jia, Jia; Porsch, Robert M.; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Weixian; Zheng, Huiping; Wong, Lai-Yung; Mu, Yiming; Dou, Jingtao; Fong, Carol H. Y.; Wang, Shuyu; Hong, Xueyu; Dong, Liguang; Liao, Yanhua; Wang, Jiansong; Lam, Levina S. M.; Su, Xi; Yan, Hua; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Jin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Xie, Gaoqiang; Woo, Yu-Cho; Wu, Yangfeng; Tan, Kathryn C. B.; Hveem, Kristian; Cheung, Bernard M. Y.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Xu, Aimin; Eugene Chen, Y; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Youyi; Lam, Tai-Hing; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Huo, Yong; Sham, Pak C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Tse, Hung-Fat; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P<2.69 × 10−7), including three Asian-specific coding variants in known genes (CETP p.Asp459Gly, PCSK9 p.Arg93Cys and LDLR p.Arg257Trp). Furthermore, missense variants at two novel loci—PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met and PKD1L3 p.Thr429Ser—also influence levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively. Another novel gene, TEAD2, is found to be associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through gene-based association analysis. Most of these newly identified coding variants show suggestive association (P<0.05) with CAD. These findings demonstrate that exome-wide genotyping on samples of non-European ancestry can identify additional population-specific possible causal variants, shedding light on novel lipid biology and CAD. PMID:26690388

  1. Genomewide Association Scan of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviour in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schosser, Alexandra; Butler, Amy W.; Ising, Marcus; Perroud, Nader; Uher, Rudolf; Ng, Mandy Y.; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.; Korszun, Ania; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian; Gill, Michael; Rice, John P.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mors, Ole; Rietschel, Marcella; Lucae, Susanne; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Preisig, Martin; Perry, Julia; Tozzi, Federica; Muglia, Pierandrea; Aitchison, Katherine J.; Breen, Gerome; Craig, Ian W.; Farmer, Anne E.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; McGuffin, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Suicidal behaviour can be conceptualised as a continuum from suicidal ideation, to suicidal attempts to completed suicide. In this study we identify genes contributing to suicidal behaviour in the depression study RADIANT. Methodology/Principal Findings A quantitative suicidality score was composed of two items from the SCAN interview. In addition, the 251 depression cases with a history of serious suicide attempts were classified to form a discrete trait. The quantitative trait was correlated with younger onset of depression and number of episodes of depression, but not with gender. A genome-wide association study of 2,023 depression cases was performed to identify genes that may contribute to suicidal behaviour. Two Munich depression studies were used as replication cohorts to test the most strongly associated SNPs. No SNP was associated at genome-wide significance level. For the quantitative trait, evidence of association was detected at GFRA1, a receptor for the neurotrophin GDRA (p = 2e-06). For the discrete trait of suicide attempt, SNPs in KIAA1244 and RGS18 attained p-values of <5e-6. None of these SNPs showed evidence for replication in the additional cohorts tested. Candidate gene analysis provided some support for a polymorphism in NTRK2, which was previously associated with suicidality. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a genome-wide assessment of possible genetic contribution to suicidal behaviour in depression but indicates a genetic architecture of multiple genes with small effects. Large cohorts will be required to dissect this further. PMID:21750702

  2. Extension of type 2 diabetes genome-wide association scan results in the diabetes prevention program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Allan F; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Saxena, Richa; Pollin, Toni I; Franks, Paul W; Hanson, Robert L; Shuldiner, Alan R; Knowler, William C; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2008-09-01

    Genome-wide association scans (GWASs) have identified novel diabetes-associated genes. We evaluated how these variants impact diabetes incidence, quantitative glycemic traits, and response to preventive interventions in 3,548 subjects at high risk of type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which examined the effects of lifestyle intervention, metformin, and troglitazone versus placebo. We genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near diabetes-associated loci, including EXT2, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, HHEX, LOC387761, and SLC30A8 in DPP participants and performed Cox regression analyses using genotype, intervention, and their interactions as predictors of diabetes incidence. We evaluated their effect on insulin resistance and secretion at 1 year. None of the selected SNPs were associated with increased diabetes incidence in this population. After adjustments for ethnicity, baseline insulin secretion was lower in subjects with the risk genotype at HHEX rs1111875 (P = 0.01); there were no significant differences in baseline insulin sensitivity. Both at baseline and at 1 year, subjects with the risk genotype at LOC387761 had paradoxically increased insulin secretion; adjustment for self-reported ethnicity abolished these differences. In ethnicity-adjusted analyses, we noted a nominal differential improvement in beta-cell function for carriers of the protective genotype at CDKN2A/B after 1 year of troglitazone treatment (P = 0.01) and possibly lifestyle modification (P = 0.05). We were unable to replicate the GWAS findings regarding diabetes risk in the DPP. We did observe genotype associations with differences in baseline insulin secretion at the HHEX locus and a possible pharmacogenetic interaction at CDKNA2/B.

  3. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  4. Curved Saccade Trajectories Reveal Conflicting Predictions in Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target…

  5. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  6. Association Mapping Reveals Genetic Loci Associated with Important Agronomic Traits in Lentinula edodes, Shiitake Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuang; Gong, Wenbing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Zhiquan; Nong, Wenyan; Bian, Yinbing; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Man-Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Association mapping is a robust approach for the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Here, by genotyping 297 genome-wide molecular markers of 89 Lentinula edodes cultivars in China, the genetic diversity, population structure and genetic loci associated with 11 agronomic traits were examined. A total of 873 alleles were detected in the tested strains with a mean of 2.939 alleles per locus, and the Shannon's information index was 0.734. Population structure analysis revealed two robustly differentiated groups among the Chinese L. edodes cultivars (FST = 0.247). Using the mixed linear model, a total of 43 markers were detected to be significantly associated with four traits. The number of markers associated with traits ranged from 9 to 26, and the phenotypic variations explained by each marker varied from 12.07% to 31.32%. Apart from five previously reported markers, the remaining 38 markers were newly reported here. Twenty-one markers were identified as simultaneously linked to two to four traits, and five markers were associated with the same traits in cultivation tests performed in two consecutive years. The 43 traits-associated markers were related to 97 genes, and 24 of them were related to 10 traits-associated markers detected in both years or identified previously, 13 of which had a >2-fold expression change between the mycelium and primordium stages. Our study has provided candidate markers for marker-assisted selection (MAS) and useful clues for understanding the genetic architecture of agronomic traits in the shiitake mushroom. PMID:28261189

  7. Consanguinity and late fertility: spatial analysis reveals positive association patterns.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Antonella; Astolfi, Paola; Zei, Gianna; Tentoni, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of consanguinity on human complex traits is an important and controversial issue. In this work we focused on the Sardinian population and examined the effect of consanguineous unions on late female fertility. During the last century the island has been characterized by a high incidence of marriages between relatives, favoured by socio economic conditions and geographical isolation, and by high fertility despite a widespread tendency to delay reproduction. Through spatial analysis techniques, we explored the geographical heterogeneity of consanguinity and late fertility, and identified in Central-Eastern Sardinia a common area with an excess of both traits, where the traits are positively associated. We found that their association did not significantly affect women's fertility in the area, despite the expected negative role of both traits. Intriguingly, this critical zone corresponds well to areas reported by previous studies as being peculiar for a high frequency of centenarians and for lower risk in pregnancy outcome. The proposed approach can be generally exploited to identify target populations on which socioeconomic, biodemographic and genetic data can be collected at the individual level, and deeper analyses carried out to disentangle the determinants of complex biological traits and to investigate their association.

  8. Recent rock fall activity in the Wetterstein Mountains revealed by a time series of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpa, Anne; Baewert, Henning; Cook, Kristen; Morche, David

    2015-04-01

    The north face of the Hochwanner in the Reintal valley, Wetterstein Mountains, southern Germany, has been a site of frequent rock fall activity for the past several hundred years. The so-called 'Steingerümpel' rock fall included an estimated volume of 2.3-2.7 x 106 m3 and led to damming of the Partnach river. This event was dated to 1400-1600 AD. The rock fall left a prominent scar in the rock face where subsequent rock fall activity was concentrated, postulated to be a 'delayed consequence' of the Steingerümpel event. Previous workers used airborne and terrestrial laser scan data to evaluate the volume of the detached material and the deposits on the talus cone at the foot of the slope from the 'delayed consequence' activity between 2006 and 2008 (Heckmann et al., 2012). The largest event during this period was a 5 x 104 m3 rock fall in August 2007. We compared the data of six terrestrial laser scans, which were acquired in June and September 2008, September 2010, June 2011, August 2013, October and November 2014, in order to assess the volumes of detached material after the large rock fall event of 2007. The aim is to investigate the post-event activity at a site of a large rock fall in order to give estimates about the timing when the activity is back to normal conditions in relation to the magnitude of the large event. Although no large rock fall occurred in the observation period, the comparison of the laser scan data indicate that the average rock wall retreat at this site is still higher compared to the mean annual rock wall retreat rate of 0.54 mm/yr for the last millennium in the Reintal valley (Krautblatter et al., 2012). This shows that sites of large rock falls remain active even years after the event. Heckmann, T.; Bimböse, M.; Krautblatter, M.; Haas, F.; Becht, M.; Morche, D. (2012): From geotechnical analysis to quantification and modelling using LiDAR data: a study on rockfall in the Reintal catchment, Bavarian Alps, Germany; Earth Surface

  9. Vascularization of male gonads in Blennius pavo (Teleostei, Blenniidae) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts.

    PubMed

    Lahnsteiner, F; Lametschwandtner, A; Patzner, R A; Adam, H

    1988-12-01

    The vascular architecture of male gonads of Blennius pavo is studied by scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts. Arterial supply to the gonads is by a branch of the first ventral segmental artery of the tail. From the surface of the gonads, this vessel gives rise to branches which supply testes, spermatic ducts, testicular glands, blind pouches, urogenital sinus and urogenital papilla. The testis has a rope-ladder-like capillary network around the seminiferous tubules, while in the testicular gland the capillary network is irregular in form. The spermatic ducts are found to have an exterior capillary network located in the compact connective tissue layer and an interior one, lying subepithelially. Urogenital sinus and urogenital papilla show a multilayered capillary network. Angioarchitecture in mature and immature gonads does not differ.

  10. Formation of arenicin-1 microdomains in bilayers and their specific lipid interaction revealed by Z-scan FCS.

    PubMed

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin; Chernovets, Tatsiana; Zhmak, Maxim N; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V; Sýkora, Jan

    2011-04-01

    Z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is employed to characterize the interaction between arenicin-1 and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of different compositions. Lipid analogue C8-BODIPY 500/510C5-HPC and ATTO 465 labelled arenicin-1 are used to detect changes in lipid and peptide diffusion upon addition of unlabelled arenicin-1 to SLBs. Arenicin-1 decreases lipid mobility in negatively charged SLBs. According to diffusion law analysis, microdomains of significantly lower lipid mobility are formed. The analysis of peptide FCS data confirms the presence of microdomains for anionic SLBs. No indications of microdomain formation are detected in SLBs composed purely of zwitterionic lipids. Additionally, our FCS results imply that arenicin-1 exists in the form of oligomers and/or aggregates when interacting with membranes of both compositions.

  11. Scanning photocurrent microscopy reveals electron-hole asymmetry in ionic liquid-gated WS{sub 2} transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ubrig, Nicolas Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Jo, Sanghyun; Morpurgo, Alberto F.; Berger, Helmuth

    2014-04-28

    We perform scanning photocurrent microscopy on WS{sub 2} ionic liquid-gated field effect transistors exhibiting high-quality ambipolar transport. By properly biasing the gate electrode, we can invert the sign of the photocurrent showing that the minority photocarriers are either electrons or holes. Both in the electron- and hole-doping regimes the photocurrent decays exponentially as a function of the distance between the illumination spot and the nearest contact, in agreement with a two-terminal Schottky-barrier device model. This allows us to compare the value and the doping dependence of the diffusion length of the minority electrons and holes on a same sample. Interestingly, the diffusion length of the minority carriers is several times larger in the hole accumulation regime than in the electron accumulation regime, pointing out an electron-hole asymmetry in WS{sub 2}.

  12. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K. J.; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K.; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  13. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  14. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-08-15

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10(-11), β = -0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10(-14), β = -0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), β = -1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10(-9), β = -1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  16. Tritrichomonas foetus: a scanning electron microscopy study of erythrocyte adhesion associated with hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Tasca, Tiana; Pires Borges, Fernanda

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro hemolytic activity of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The parasite was tested against human erythrocytes of groups A, B, AB, and O, and against erythrocytes of nine adult animals of different species (the rabbit, rat, chicken, cat, dog, swine, horse, bovine, and sheep). The results showed that T. foetus strains (ATCC KV1, K, PAL, 5022, RJ, 90) did not present any hemolytic activity against any human erythrocyte group nor against rabbit, rat, chicken, cat, dog and swine erythrocytes. T. foetus strains, however, lysed horse, bovine, and sheep erythrocytes. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be identified. Hemolysis did not occur with trichomonad culture supernatants, with sonicated extracts of T. foetus, nor with killed organisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that human erythrocytes did not adhere to the trophozoites, in contrast horse erythrocytes adhered to the surface of the parasites and were phagocytosed for up to 90 min. The parasites are able to exert their cytopathic effects through: (a) physical contact established between the two cell surfaces, (b) toxins released from parasites into the interaction media, or (c) the association of both mechanisms. Further studies are necessary to clarify the importance of the hemolytic activity in the biology of T. foetus.

  17. Recent Developments in Genomewide Association Scans: A Workshop Summary and Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W.; Duggan, David

    2005-01-01

    With the imminent availability of ultra-high-volume genotyping platforms (on the order of 100,000–1,000,000 genotypes per sample) at a manageable cost, there is growing interest in the possibility of conducting genomewide association studies for a variety of diseases but, so far, little consensus on methods to design and analyze them. In April 2005, an international group of >100 investigators convened at the University of Southern California over the course of 2 days to compare notes on planned or ongoing studies and to debate alternative technologies, study designs, and statistical methods. This report summarizes these discussions in the context of the relevant literature. A broad consensus emerged that the time was now ripe for launching such studies, and several common themes were identified—most notably the considerable efficiency gains of multistage sampling design, specifically those made by testing only a portion of the subjects with a high-density genomewide technology, followed by testing additional subjects and/or additional SNPs at regions identified by this initial scan. PMID:16080110

  18. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking revealed by in situ micro-cantilever bending test inside environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Hajilou, Tarlan; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2017-07-28

    To evaluate the hydrogen (H)-induced embrittlement in iron aluminium intermetallics, especially the one with stoichiometric composition of 50 at.% Al, a novel in situ micro-cantilever bending test was applied within an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which provides both a full process monitoring and a clean, in situ H-charging condition. Two sets of cantilevers were analysed in this work: one set of un-notched cantilevers, and the other set with focused ion beam-milled notch laying on two crystallographic planes: (010) and (110). The cantilevers were tested under two environmental conditions: vacuum (approximately 5 × 10(-4) Pa) and ESEM (450 Pa water vapour). Crack initiation at stress-concentrated locations and propagation to cause catastrophic failure were observed when cantilevers were tested in the presence of H; while no cracking occurred when tested in vacuum. Both the bending strength for un-notched beams and the fracture toughness for notched beams were reduced under H exposure. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility was found to be orientation dependent: the (010) crystallographic plane was more fragile to HE than the (110) plane.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking revealed by in situ micro-cantilever bending test inside environmental scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yun; Hajilou, Tarlan; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the hydrogen (H)-induced embrittlement in iron aluminium intermetallics, especially the one with stoichiometric composition of 50 at.% Al, a novel in situ micro-cantilever bending test was applied within an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which provides both a full process monitoring and a clean, in situ H-charging condition. Two sets of cantilevers were analysed in this work: one set of un-notched cantilevers, and the other set with focused ion beam-milled notch laying on two crystallographic planes: (010) and (110). The cantilevers were tested under two environmental conditions: vacuum (approximately 5 × 10-4 Pa) and ESEM (450 Pa water vapour). Crack initiation at stress-concentrated locations and propagation to cause catastrophic failure were observed when cantilevers were tested in the presence of H; while no cracking occurred when tested in vacuum. Both the bending strength for un-notched beams and the fracture toughness for notched beams were reduced under H exposure. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility was found to be orientation dependent: the (010) crystallographic plane was more fragile to HE than the (110) plane. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  20. Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals differences between early and late M intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Rödig, C; Chizhov, I; Weidlich, O; Siebert, F

    1999-01-01

    In this report, from time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared investigations from 15 ns to 160 ms, we provide evidence for the subsequent rise of three different M states that differ in their structures. The first state rises with approximately 3 microseconds to only a small percentage. Its structure as judged from amide I/II bands differs in small but well-defined aspects from the L state. The next M state, which appears in approximately 40 microseconds, has almost all of the characteristics of the "late" M state, i.e., it differs considerably from the first one. Here, the L left arrow over right arrow M equilibrium is shifted toward M, although some percentage of L still persists. In the last M state (rise time approximately 130 microseconds), the equilibrium is shifted toward full deprotonation of the Schiff base, and only small additional structural changes take place. In addition to these results obtained for unbuffered conditions or at pH 7, experiments performed at lower and higher pH are presented. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular changes postulated to occur in the M intermediate to allow the shift of the L/M equilibrium toward M and possibly to regulate the change of the accessibility of the Schiff base necessary for effective proton pumping. PMID:10233083

  1. Monitoring Si growth on Ag(111) with scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that silicene structure involves silver atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Prévot, G.; Bernard, R.; Cruguel, H.; Borensztein, Y.

    2014-11-24

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), the elaboration of the so-called silicene layer on Ag(111) is monitored in real time during Si evaporation at different temperatures. It is shown that the growth of silicene is accompanied by the release of about 65% of the surface Ag atoms from the Si covered areas. We observe that Si islands develop on the Ag terraces and Si strips at the Ag step edges, progressively forming ordered (4×4), (√(13)×√(13)) R13.9°, and dotted phases. Meanwhile, displaced Ag atoms group to develop additional bare Ag terraces growing round the Si islands from the pristine Ag step edges. This indicates a strong interaction between Si and Ag atoms, with an important modification of the Ag substrate beneath the surface layer. This observation is in contradiction with the picture of a silicene layer weakly interacting with the unreconstructed Ag substrate, and strongly indicates that the structure of silicene on Ag(111) corresponds either to a Si-Ag surface alloy or to a Si plane covered with Ag atoms.

  2. Fast-scanning atomic force microscopy reveals the ATP/ADP-dependent conformational changes of GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Wada, Chieko; Ando, Toshio; Sakai, Nobuaki; Yagi, Akira; Yoshimura, Shige H; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    In order to fold non-native proteins, chaperonin GroEL undergoes numerous conformational changes and GroES binding in the ATP-dependent reaction cycle. We constructed the real-time three-dimensional-observation system at high resolution using a newly developed fast-scanning atomic force microscope. Using this system, we visualized the GroES binding to and dissociation from individual GroEL with a lifetime of 6 s (k=0.17 s−1). We also caught ATP/ADP-induced open–closed conformational changes of individual GroEL in the absence of qGroES and substrate proteins. Namely, the ATP/ADP-bound GroEL can change its conformation ‘from closed to open' without additional ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, the lifetime of open conformation in the presence of ADP (∼1.0 s) was apparently lower than those of ATP and ATP-analogs (2–3 s), meaning that ADP-bound open-form is structurally less stable than ATP-bound open-form. These results indicate that GroEL has at least two distinct open-conformations in the presence of nucleotide; ATP-bound prehydrolysis open-form and ADP-bound open-form, and the ATP hydrolysis in open-form destabilizes its open-conformation and induces the ‘from open to closed' conformational change of GroEL. PMID:16977315

  3. Ion-Abrasion Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Surface-Connected Tubular Conduits in HIV-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Adam E.; Narayan, Kedar; Shi, Dan; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Gousset, Karine; He, Haifeng; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Yoo, Terry S.; Bliss, Donald; Freed, Eric O.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1-containing internal compartments are readily detected in images of thin sections from infected cells using conventional transmission electron microscopy, but the origin, connectivity, and 3D distribution of these compartments has remained controversial. Here, we report the 3D distribution of viruses in HIV-1-infected primary human macrophages using cryo-electron tomography and ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM), a recently developed approach for nanoscale 3D imaging of whole cells. Using IA-SEM, we show the presence of an extensive network of HIV-1-containing tubular compartments in infected macrophages, with diameters of ∼150–200 nm, and lengths of up to ∼5 µm that extend to the cell surface from vesicular compartments that contain assembling HIV-1 virions. These types of surface-connected tubular compartments are not observed in T cells infected with the 29/31 KE Gag-matrix mutant where the virus is targeted to multi-vesicular bodies and released into the extracellular medium. IA-SEM imaging also allows visualization of large sheet-like structures that extend outward from the surfaces of macrophages, which may bend and fold back to allow continual creation of viral compartments and virion-lined channels. This potential mechanism for efficient virus trafficking between the cell surface and interior may represent a subversion of pre-existing vesicular machinery for antigen capture, processing, sequestration, and presentation. PMID:19779568

  4. High-Resolution Imaging by Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Reveals Two Morphologically Distinct Types of Retinal Hard Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Muneo; Nakao, Shintaro; Kaizu, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Arima, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Oshima, Yuji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Shizuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-hei

    2016-01-01

    Histological studies from autopsy specimens have characterized hard exudates as a composition of lipid-laden macrophages or noncellular materials including lipid and proteinaceous substances (hyaline substances). However, the characteristics of hard exudates in living patients have not been examined due to insufficient resolution of existing equipment. In this study, we used adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to examine the characteristics of hard exudates in patients with retinal vascular diseases. High resolution imaging using AO-SLO enables morphological classification of retinal hard exudates into two types, which could not be distinguished either on fundus examination or by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). One, termed a round type, consisted of an accumulation of spherical particles (average diameter of particles: 26.9 ± 4.4 μm). The other, termed an irregular type, comprised an irregularly shaped hyper-reflective deposition. The retinal thickness in regions with round hard exudates was significantly greater than the thickness in regions with irregular hard exudates (P = 0.01 →0.02). This differentiation of retinal hard exudates in patients by AO-SLO may help in understanding the pathogenesis and clinical prognosis of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27641223

  5. Ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy reveals surface-connected tubular conduits in HIV-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Adam E; Narayan, Kedar; Shi, Dan; Hartnell, Lisa M; Gousset, Karine; He, Haifeng; Lowekamp, Bradley C; Yoo, Terry S; Bliss, Donald; Freed, Eric O; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-09-01

    HIV-1-containing internal compartments are readily detected in images of thin sections from infected cells using conventional transmission electron microscopy, but the origin, connectivity, and 3D distribution of these compartments has remained controversial. Here, we report the 3D distribution of viruses in HIV-1-infected primary human macrophages using cryo-electron tomography and ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM), a recently developed approach for nanoscale 3D imaging of whole cells. Using IA-SEM, we show the presence of an extensive network of HIV-1-containing tubular compartments in infected macrophages, with diameters of approximately 150-200 nm, and lengths of up to approximately 5 microm that extend to the cell surface from vesicular compartments that contain assembling HIV-1 virions. These types of surface-connected tubular compartments are not observed in T cells infected with the 29/31 KE Gag-matrix mutant where the virus is targeted to multi-vesicular bodies and released into the extracellular medium. IA-SEM imaging also allows visualization of large sheet-like structures that extend outward from the surfaces of macrophages, which may bend and fold back to allow continual creation of viral compartments and virion-lined channels. This potential mechanism for efficient virus trafficking between the cell surface and interior may represent a subversion of pre-existing vesicular machinery for antigen capture, processing, sequestration, and presentation.

  6. Adrenal microvascularization in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts.

    PubMed

    Thongpila, S; Rojananeungnit, S; Chunhabundit, P; Cherdchu, C; Samritthong, A; Somana, R

    1998-01-01

    The blood supply of the adrenal gland in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) was studied by use of transmission electron microscopy and vascular corrosion cast/scanning electron microscopy techniques. It was found that the gland receives its blood supply from branches of the inferior phrenic, aorta and renal arteries. Upon reaching the gland, these arteries divide into cortical and medullary arteries. The cortical arteries give rise to the subcapsular capillary plexuses which partially enclose the clusters of cells in the zona glomerulosa (ZG) and appear as lobular-like microvascular networks before running among the cellular cords in the zona fasciculata (ZF) and zona reticularis (ZR). It was noted that the capillaries in ZG and ZR are with more anastomoses than those in the ZF. Capillaries from the ZR become the sinusoidal capillaries in the adrenal medulla before proceeding to the peripheral radicles of the central vein. The medullary arteries penetrate the adrenal cortex and occasionally give off small branches to supply the inner cortex, especially the ZR. Their main branches break up into small or conventional capillaries in the adrenal medulla. These capillaries drain the blood into the peripheral radicles of the central vein and medullary collecting veins which proceed further into a very large central vein. The present findings illustrate that the adrenal medulla receives two blood supplies that yield somewhat different influences upon the adrenal medulla. The portal blood vessel could not be illustrated in the tree shrew adrenal gland.

  7. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  8. Neurological, visual, and MRI brain scan findings in 87 South African patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Loyse, A; Moodley, A; Rich, P; Molloy, S F; Bicanic, T; Bishop, L; Rae, W I D; Bhigjee, A I; Loubser, N D; Michowicz, A J; Wilson, D; Harrison, T S

    2015-06-01

    HIV-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is a leading cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Neuroradiological data is however limited to case reports and small case series from developed countries and/or immunocompetent patients. Eighty seven patients aged ≥18 hospitalized with a first episode of CM had magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging during the first two weeks of admission. A subset of eleven patients had follow-up scans approximately one month from their initial MRI scan. All had prospectively-recorded detailed neurological and visual examinations. An abnormal finding on neurological examination was detected in 33 (39%) patients. 38 (48%) patients experienced some visual loss. Neuroradiological lesions presumed to be cryptococcosis-related, as defined by the presence of dilated Virchow Robin spaces, pseudocysts or cryptococcomas, enhancing nodules, hydrocephalus, meningitis, focal perilesional oedema and infarcts, were detected in 55 (63%) patients. MRI findings suggestive of a second diagnosis were found in 18 (21%) patients. Visual loss was associated with the presence of cryptococcal-related lesions (p = 0.02). Blindness was associated with raised intracranial pressure (ICP) (p = 0.02). Of eleven patients with paired scans, brain swelling was identified on the initial scan in only one patient. The majority of patients had MRI brain scan abnormalities presumed secondary to CM. Dilated Virchow Robin spaces were the commonest neuroradiological lesion. Visual loss was associated with the degree of cerebral involvement as reflected by the presence of MRI abnormalities. Blindness was associated with the presence of raised ICP. Initial generalised brain swelling does not appear to be common, but further studies with paired scans are needed. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Genome-Wide Scan of Selective Sweeps and Association Mapping of Fruit Traits Using Microsatellite Markers in Watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Umesh K.; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R.; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C.; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5′ untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness. PMID:25425675

  10. Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Francesca; Zhao, Wenting; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Duan, Liting; Schnitker, Jan; van de Burgt, Yoeri; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Liu, Bofei; Salleo, Alberto; Cui, Lifeng; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2017-08-22

    The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

  11. Alanine scan of α-conotoxin RegIIA reveals a selective α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kompella, Shiva N; Hung, Andrew; Clark, Richard J; Marí, Frank; Adams, David J

    2015-01-09

    Activation of the α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of various conditions, including development and progression of lung cancer and in nicotine addiction. As selective α3β4 nAChR antagonists, α-conotoxins are valuable tools to evaluate the functional roles of this receptor subtype. We previously reported the discovery of a new α4/7-conotoxin, RegIIA. RegIIA was isolated from Conus regius and inhibits acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents mediated by α3β4, α3β2, and α7 nAChR subtypes. The current study used alanine scanning mutagenesis to understand the selectivity profile of RegIIA at the α3β4 nAChR subtype. [N11A] and [N12A] RegIIA analogs exhibited 3-fold more selectivity for the α3β4 than the α3β2 nAChR subtype. We also report synthesis of [N11A,N12A]RegIIA, a selective α3β4 nAChR antagonist (IC50 of 370 nM) that could potentially be used in the treatment of lung cancer and nicotine addiction. Molecular dynamics simulations of RegIIA and [N11A,N12A]RegIIA bound to α3β4 and α3β2 suggest that destabilization of toxin contacts with residues at the principal and complementary faces of α3β2 (α3-Tyr(92), Ser(149), Tyr(189), Cys(192), and Tyr(196); β2-Trp(57), Arg(81), and Phe(119)) may form the molecular basis for the selectivity shift.

  12. One-Dimensional Nature of InAs/InP Quantum Dashes Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papatryfonos, Konstantinos; Rodary, Guillemin; David, Christophe; Lelarge, François; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Girard, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-08

    We report on low-temperature cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on InAs(P)/InGaAsP/InP(001) quantum dashes, embedded in a diode-laser structure. The laser active region consists of nine InAs(P) quantum dash layers separated by the InGaAsP quaternary alloy barriers. The effect of the p-i-n junction built-in potential on the band structure has been evidenced and quantified on large-scale tunneling spectroscopic measurements across the whole active region. By comparing the tunneling current onset channels, a consistent energy shift has been measured in successive quantum dash or barrier layers, either for the ground state energy of similar-sized quantum dashes or for the conduction band edge of the barriers, corresponding to the band-bending slope. The extracted values are in good quantitative agreement with the theoretical band structure calculations, demonstrating the high sensitivity of this spectroscopic measurement to probe the electronic structure of individual nanostructures, relative to local potential variations. Furthermore, by taking advantage of the potential gradient, we compared the local density of states over successive quantum dash layers. We observed that it does not vanish while increasing energy, for any of the investigated quantum dashes, in contrast to what would be expected for discrete level zero-dimensional (0D) structures. In order to acquire further proof and fully address the open question concerning the quantum dash dimensionality nature, we focused on individual quantum dashes obtaining high-energy-resolution measurements. The study of the local density of states clearly indicates a 1D quantum-wirelike nature for these nanostructures whose electronic squared wave functions were subsequently imaged by differential conductivity mapping.

  13. Hypophyseal angioarchitecture of common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) revealed by scanning electron microscopy study of vascular corrosion casts.

    PubMed

    Sudwan, P; Chunhabundit, P; Bamroongwong, S; Rattanachaikunsopon, P; Somana, R

    1991-11-01

    The vascular corrosion cast technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for the study of pituitary microvascularization in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis). The pituitary vascular casts were obtained by infusion of low viscosity methyl methacrylate plastic (Batson's no.17) mixture. It was found that the blood supplies to the pituitary complex were from branches of the circle of Willis and could be divided into two groups. The first group consisted of two to four superior hypophyseal arteries (SHAs) branching off from the internal carotid artery supplying each half of the median eminence (ME), infundibular stalk (IS), and pars distalis (PD). The SHAs supplying the ME branched into internal and external capillary plexi. The internal plexus had a larger capillary size (approximately 15 microns in diameter), was deeper in position, and had denser and more complex capillary loops than those in the external plexus. The capillaries of the external plexus were approximately 10 microns in diameter. The two plexi drained into 15-20 hypophyseal portal veins (HPVs) which were located mainly along the ventral and ventrolateral surfaces of the IS before breaking up into large capillaries (approximately 18 microns in diameter) with an anteroposterior arrangement within the PD. The second group consisted of one inferior hypophyseal artery (IHA) on each side branching off from the internal carotid artery. These arteries gave off branches to pierce the dorsolateral and ventrolateral aspects of infundibular process (IP) before branching off to form a capillary network. They also gave rise to radiating capillaries to supply the pars intermedia (PI) surrounding the cortical area of the IP. The hypophyseal cleft separating the PI from the PD was clearly seen with very few blood vessels. The capillaries in both PD and IP joined to form confluent hypophyseal veins draining the blood into the cavernous sinus.

  14. Using the Gene Ontology to Scan Multi-Level Gene Sets for Associations in Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schaid, Daniel J.; Sinnwell, Jason P.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Ingle, James N.; Kubo, Michiaki; Goss, Paul E.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene-set analyses have been widely used in gene expression studies, and some of the developed methods have been extended to genome wide association studies (GWAS). Yet, complications due to linkage disequilibrium (LD) among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and variable numbers of SNPs per gene and genes per gene-set, have plagued current approaches, often leading to ad hoc “fixes”. To overcome some of the current limitations, we developed a general approach to scan GWAS SNP data for both gene-level and gene-set analyses, building on score statistics for generalized linear models, and taking advantage of the directed acyclic graph structure of the gene ontology when creating gene-sets. However, other types of gene-set structures can be used, such as the popular Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Our approach combines SNPs into genes, and genes into gene-sets, but assures that positive and negative effects of genes on a trait do not cancel. To control for multiple testing of many gene-sets, we use an efficient computational strategy that accounts for LD and provides accurate step-down adjusted p-values for each gene-set. Application of our methods to two different GWAS provide guidance on the potential strengths and weaknesses of our proposed gene-set analyses. PMID:22161999

  15. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep. © 2016 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Animal Genetics © 2016 Stichting International Foundation.

  16. The genetic architecture of seed composition in soybean is refined by genome-wide association scans across multiple populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to re...

  17. Are Prenatal Ultrasound Scans Associated with the Autism Phenotype? Follow-Up of a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoch, Yonit K.; Williams, Cori J.; Granich, Joanna; Hunt, Anna M.; Landau, Lou I.; Newnham, John P.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2012-01-01

    An existing randomised controlled trial was used to investigate whether multiple ultrasound scans may be associated with the autism phenotype. From 2,834 single pregnancies, 1,415 were selected at random to receive ultrasound imaging and continuous wave Doppler flow studies at five points throughout pregnancy (Intensive) and 1,419 to receive a…

  18. A comparison in association and linkage genome-wide scans for alcoholism susceptibility genes using single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liu, Su-Yun; Tsai, Ya-Yu

    2005-12-30

    We conducted genome-wide linkage scans using both microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Regions showing the strongest evidence of linkage to alcoholism susceptibility genes were identified. Haplotype analyses using a sliding-window approach for SNPs in these regions were performed. In addition, we performed a genome-wide association scan using SNP data. SNPs in these regions with evidence of association (P scans are fairly consistent; however, the peaks of the NPL scores are mostly higher in the SNP-based scan than those using microsatellite markers, which might be located at different regions. Furthermore, SNPs identified from linkage screens were not so strongly associated with alcoholism (the most significant SNP had a p-value of 0.030) as those identified from association genomic screening (the most significant SNP had a p-value of 2.0 x 10(-8)).

  19. Multistage 8.2 kyr event revealed through high-resolution XRF core scanning of Cuban sinkhole sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peros, Matthew; Collins, Shawn; G'Meiner, Anna Agosta; Reinhardt, Eduard; Pupo, Felipe Matos

    2017-07-01

    We use sediments from a flooded sinkhole (Cenote Jennifer) in northern Cuba to provide new, well-dated, high-resolution evidence for the 8.2 kyr event. From 7600 to 8700 cal yr B.P. the sinkhole contained shallow, low-salinity water, which supported a marsh dominated by cattail and grass. Peaks in Cl and Br—occurring at 8150, 8200, and 8250 cal yr B.P.—are attributable to increased evaporation due to regional drying associated with the 8.2 kyr event. The three peaks in these elements also closely correspond to the greyscale record from the Cariaco Basin, indicative of increased upwelling in the southern Caribbean Sea at this time, supporting the notion of a multistage 8.2 kyr event. Our work provides new data that help to clarify the initiation, behavior, and impacts of the 8.2 kyr event in the northern tropics.

  20. The interaction of asbestos and iron in lung tissue revealed by synchrotron-based scanning X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Schneider, Giulia; Salomé, Murielle; Schneider, Manuela; Calligaro, Carla; Kiskinova, Maya; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos is a potent carcinogen associated with malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer but its carcinogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Asbestos toxicity is ascribed to its particular physico-chemical characteristics, and one of them is the presence of and ability to adsorb iron, which may cause an alteration of iron homeostasis in the tissue. This observational study reports a combination of advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and micro-spectroscopic methods that provide correlative morphological and chemical information for shedding light on iron mobilization features during asbestos permanence in lung tissue. The results show that the processes responsible for the unusual distribution of iron at different stages of interaction with the fibres also involve calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. It has been confirmed that the dominant iron form present in asbestos bodies is ferritin, while the concurrent presence of haematite suggests alteration of iron chemistry during asbestos body permanence. PMID:23350030

  1. Empirical Examination of the Potential Adverse Psychological Effects Associated with Pediatric fMRI Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wakschlag, Naomi; Britton, Jennifer C.; Jarcho, Johanna; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Over the past decade, the number of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies has increased dramatically. As MRI scans may be anxiety provoking, performing them in a research setting, particularly with children already prone to anxiety, raises questions about ethics as well as methodological feasibility. It is essential to address these questions before expanding the use of this technique to clinical settings, or more widely in the context of pediatric psychopharmacology and biological psychiatry research. The current study investigates the psychological reactions of anxious and non-anxious children and non-anxious adults to an fMRI scan. Methods Eighty-seven anxious children, 140 non-anxious children, and 98 non-anxious adults rated their emotional reactions to an fMRI scan. Results Results indicated that anxious and non-anxious children reported no greater anxiety after fMRI scanning than did adults. In addition, no age-related differences in distress were observed. These data demonstrate that anxious children, healthy children, and healthy adults have similar emotional reactions to fMRI scanning. Conclusions The observed findings suggest that the potential for fMRI to produce anxiety should not impede its widespread use in clinical research, psychopharmacology, and biological psychiatry. PMID:23738869

  2. Empirical examination of the potential adverse psychological effects associated with pediatric FMRI scanning.

    PubMed

    Shechner, Tomer; Wakschlag, Naomi; Britton, Jennifer C; Jarcho, Johanna; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S

    2013-06-01

    Over the past decade, the number of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies has increased dramatically. As MRI scans may be anxiety provoking, performing them in a research setting, particularly with children already prone to anxiety, raises questions about ethics as well as methodological feasibility. It is essential to address these questions before expanding the use of this technique to clinical settings, or more widely in the context of pediatric psychopharmacology and biological psychiatry research. The current study investigates the psychological reactions of anxious and non-anxious children and non-anxious adults to an fMRI scan. Eighty-seven anxious children, 140 non-anxious children, and 98 non-anxious adults rated their emotional reactions to an fMRI scan. Results indicated that anxious and non-anxious children reported no greater anxiety after fMRI scanning than did adults. In addition, no age-related differences in distress were observed. These data demonstrate that anxious children, healthy children, and healthy adults have similar emotional reactions to fMRI scanning. The observed findings suggest that the potential for fMRI to produce anxiety should not impede its widespread use in clinical research, psychopharmacology, and biological psychiatry.

  3. Genome-wide scan reveals LEMD3 and WIF1 on SSC5 as the candidates for porcine ear size.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longchao; Liang, Jing; Luo, Weizhen; Liu, Xin; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Kebin; Shi, Huibi; Zhang, Yuebo; Wang, Ligang; Wang, Lixian

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative trait loci (QTL) for porcine ear size was previously reported to mainly focus on SSC5 and SSC7. Recently, a missense mutation, G32E, in PPARD in the QTL interval on SSC7 was identified as the causative mutation for ear size. However, on account of the large interval of QTL, the responsible gene on SSC5 has not been identified. In this study, an intercross population was constructed from the large-eared Minzhu, an indigenous Chinese pig breed, and the Western commercial Large White pig to examine the genetic basis of ear size diversity. A GWAS was performed to detect SNPs significantly associated with ear size. Thirty-five significant SNPs defined a 10.78-Mb (30.14-40.92 Mb) region on SSC5. Further, combining linkage disequilibrium and haplotype sharing analysis, a reduced region of 3.07-Mb was obtained. Finally, by using a selective sweep analysis, a critical region of about 450-kb interval containing two annotated genes LEMD3 and WIF1 was refined in this work. Functional analysis indicated that both represent biological candidates for porcine ear size, with potential application in breeding programs. The two genes could also be used as novel references for further study of the mechanism underlying human microtia.

  4. Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario 2001 Environmental Scan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario, Toronto.

    The 2001 Environmental Scan for the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario is designed to assist colleges in their strategic planning processes. It provides information about economy and labor, various trends in education and training, postsecondary enrollment and demographics, transfer payments and operating grants, Ontario's…

  5. Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario 2002 Environmental Scan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario, Toronto.

    This environmental scan is designed to assist Ontario's colleges in their strategic planning processes. Ontario's colleges have supported a 35% increase in enrollment, with a 40% decrease in funding, over the last ten years, while operating costs have risen. In addition, Ontario eliminated the secondary school Ontario Academic Courses (OACs),…

  6. Systems Genetic Validation of the SNP-Metabolite Association in Rice Via Metabolite-Pathway-Based Phenome-Wide Association Scans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Liu, Yemao; Niu, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingyong; Hu, Xuehai; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xia, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    In the post-GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Scan) era, the interpretation of GWAS results is crucial to screen for highly relevant phenotype-genotype association pairs. Based on the single genotype-phenotype association test and a pathway enrichment analysis, we propose a Metabolite-pathway-based Phenome-Wide Association Scan (M-PheWAS) to analyze the key metabolite-SNP pairs in rice and determine the regulatory relationship by assessing similarities in the changes of enzymes and downstream products in a pathway. Two SNPs, sf0315305925 and sf0315308337, were selected using this approach, and their molecular function and regulatory relationship with Enzyme EC:5.5.1.6 and with flavonoids, a significant downstream regulatory metabolite product, were demonstrated. Moreover, a total of 105 crucial SNPs were screened using M-PheWAS, which may be important for metabolite associations.

  7. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MACULAR EDEMA AND CIRCULATORY STATUS IN EYES WITH RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION: An Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Iida, Yuto; Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Murakami, Tomoaki; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Arichika, Shigeta; Takahashi, Ayako; Miwa, Yuko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-10-01

    To investigate associations between parafoveal microcirculatory status and foveal pathomorphology in eyes with macular edema (ME) secondary to retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Ten consecutive patients (10 eyes) with acute retinal vein occlusion were enrolled, 9 eyes of which received intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR) injections. Foveal morphologic changes were examined via optical coherence tomography (OCT), and parafoveal circulatory status was assessed via adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). The mean parafoveal aggregated erythrocyte velocity (AEV) measured by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in eyes with retinal vein occlusion was 0.99 ± 0.43 mm/second at baseline, which was significantly lower than that of age-matched healthy subjects (1.41 ± 0.28 mm/second, P = 0.042). The longitudinal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy examinations of each patient showed that parafoveal AEV was strongly inversely correlated with optical coherence tomography-measured central foveal thickness (CFT) over the entire observation period. Using parafoveal AEV and central foveal thickness measurements obtained at the first and second examinations, we investigated associations between differences in parafoveal AEV and central foveal thickness, which were significantly and highly correlated (r = -0.84, P = 0.002). Using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in eyes with retinal vein occlusion macular edema, we could quantitatively evaluate the parafoveal AEV. A reduction or an increase in parafoveal AEV may be a clinical marker for the resolution or development/progression of macular edema respectively.

  8. Transcript scanning reveals novel and extensive splice variations in human l-type voltage-gated calcium channel, Cav1.2 alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhen Zhi; Liang, Mui Cheng; Lu, Songqing; Yu, Dejie; Yu, Chye Yun; Yue, David T; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2004-10-22

    The L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-gated calcium channels play critical roles in membrane excitability, gene expression, and muscle contraction. The generation of splice variants by the alternative splicing of the poreforming Cav1.2 alpha1-subunit (alpha(1)1.2) may thereby provide potent means to enrich functional diversity. To date, however, no comprehensive scan of alpha(1)1.2 splice variation has been performed, particularly in the human context. Here we have undertaken such a screen, exploiting recently developed "transcript scanning" methods to probe the human gene. The degree of variation turns out to be surprisingly large; 19 of the 55 exons comprising the human alpha(1)1.2 gene were subjected to alternative splicing. Two of these are previously unrecognized exons and two others were not known to be spliced. Comparisons of fetal and adult heart and brain uncovered a large IVS3-S4 variability resulting from combinatorial utilization of exons 31-33. Electrophysiological characterization of such IVS3-S4 variation revealed unmistakable shifts in the voltage dependence of activation, according to an interesting correlation between increased IVS3-S4 linker length and activation at more depolarized potentials. Steady-state inactivation profiles remained unaltered. This systematic portrait of splice variation furnishes a reference library for comprehending combinatorial arrangements of Cav1.2 splice exons, especially as they impact development, physiology, and disease.

  9. Meta-Analysis of 13 Genome Scans Reveals Multiple Cleft Lip/Palate Genes with Novel Loci on 9q21 and 2q32-35

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Cooper, Margaret E.; Goldstein, Toby; Maher, Brion S.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Schultz, Rebecca; Mansilla, M. Adela; Field, L. Leigh; Liu, You-e; Prescott, Natalie; Malcolm, Sue; Winter, Robin; Ray, Ajit; Moreno, Lina; Valencia, Consuelo; Neiswanger, Katherine; Wyszynski, Diego F.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Albacha-Hejazi, Hasan; Beaty, Terri H.; McIntosh, Iain; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Edwards, Matthew; Harkin, Louise; Scott, Rodney; Roddick, Laurence G.

    2004-01-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common birth defect with a complex etiology. A 10-cM genome scan of 388 extended multiplex families with CL/P from seven diverse populations (2,551 genotyped individuals) revealed CL/P genes in six chromosomal regions, including a novel region at 9q21 (heterogeneity LOD score [HLOD]=6.6). In addition, meta-analyses with the addition of results from 186 more families (six populations; 1,033 genotyped individuals) showed genomewide significance for 10 more regions, including another novel region at 2q32-35 (P=.0004). These are the first genomewide significant linkage results ever reported for CL/P, and they represent an unprecedented demonstration of the power of linkage analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. PMID:15185170

  10. Meta-analysis of 13 genome scans reveals multiple cleft lip/palate genes with novel loci on 9q21 and 2q32-35.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Lidral, Andrew C; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby; Maher, Brion S; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Schultz, Rebecca; Mansilla, M Adela; Field, L Leigh; Liu, You-e; Prescott, Natalie; Malcolm, Sue; Winter, Robin; Ray, Ajit; Moreno, Lina; Valencia, Consuelo; Neiswanger, Katherine; Wyszynski, Diego F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Albacha-Hejazi, Hasan; Beaty, Terri H; McIntosh, Iain; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Edwards, Matthew; Harkin, Louise; Scott, Rodney; Roddick, Laurence G

    2004-08-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common birth defect with a complex etiology. A 10-cM genome scan of 388 extended multiplex families with CL/P from seven diverse populations (2,551 genotyped individuals) revealed CL/P genes in six chromosomal regions, including a novel region at 9q21 (heterogeneity LOD score [HLOD]=6.6). In addition, meta-analyses with the addition of results from 186 more families (six populations; 1,033 genotyped individuals) showed genomewide significance for 10 more regions, including another novel region at 2q32-35 (P=.0004). These are the first genomewide significant linkage results ever reported for CL/P, and they represent an unprecedented demonstration of the power of linkage analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder.

  11. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Gy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  12. Breaking RAD: An evaluation of the utility of restriction site associated DNA sequencing for genome scans of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David B; Hoban, Sean; Kelley, Joanna L; Lotterhos, Katie E; Reed, Laura K; Antolin, Michael F; Storfer, Andrew

    2016-09-12

    Understanding how and why populations evolve is of fundamental importance to molecular ecology. RADseq (Restriction site-Associated DNA sequencing), a popular reduced representation method, has ushered in a new era of genome-scale research for assessing population structure, hybridization, demographic history, phylogeography, and migration. RADseq has also been widely used to conduct genome scans to detect loci involved in adaptive divergence among natural populations. Here, we examine the capacity of those RADseq-based genome scan studies to detect loci involved in local adaptation. To understand what proportion of the genome is missed by RADseq studies, we developed a simple model using different numbers of RAD-tags, genome sizes, and extents of linkage disequilibrium (length of haplotype blocks). We then surveyed recent studies that have used RADseq for genome scans and found that that the median density of RADseq markers across these studies was one marker per 3.96 megabases. Given that the length of linkage disequilibrium is often orders of magnitude less than a megabase, we conclude that genome scans based on RADseq data alone are unlikely to advance our understanding of molecular ecology or evolutionary genetics for most systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal associative processes revealed by intrusions in paired-associate recall

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Orin C.; Geller, Aaron S.; Rizzuto, Daniel S.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Although much is known about the factors that influence the acquisition and retention of individual paired associates, the existence of temporally defined associations spanning multiple pairs has not been demonstrated. We report two experiments in which subjects studied randomly paired nouns for a subsequent cued recall test. When subjects recalled nontarget items, their intrusions tended to come from nearby pairs. This across-pair contiguity effect was graded, spanning noncontiguously studied word pairs. The existence of such long-range temporally defined associations lends further support to contextual-retrieval models of episodic association. PMID:18605481

  14. PheWAS: demonstrating the feasibility of a phenome-wide scan to discover gene–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Basford, Melissa A.; Pulley, Jill M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Wang, Deede; Masys, Dan R.; Roden, Dan M.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Emergence of genetic data coupled to longitudinal electronic medical records (EMRs) offers the possibility of phenome-wide association scans (PheWAS) for disease–gene associations. We propose a novel method to scan phenomic data for genetic associations using International Classification of Disease (ICD9) billing codes, which are available in most EMR systems. We have developed a code translation table to automatically define 776 different disease populations and their controls using prevalent ICD9 codes derived from EMR data. As a proof of concept of this algorithm, we genotyped the first 6005 European–Americans accrued into BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biobank, at five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with previously reported disease associations: atrial fibrillation, Crohn's disease, carotid artery stenosis, coronary artery disease, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. The PheWAS software generated cases and control populations across all ICD9 code groups for each of these five SNPs, and disease-SNP associations were analyzed. The primary outcome of this study was replication of seven previously known SNP–disease associations for these SNPs. Results: Four of seven known SNP–disease associations using the PheWAS algorithm were replicated with P-values between 2.8 × 10−6 and 0.011. The PheWAS algorithm also identified 19 previously unknown statistical associations between these SNPs and diseases at P < 0.01. This study indicates that PheWAS analysis is a feasible method to investigate SNP–disease associations. Further evaluation is needed to determine the validity of these associations and the appropriate statistical thresholds for clinical significance. Availability:The PheWAS software and code translation table are freely available at http://knowledgemap.mc.vanderbilt.edu/research. Contact: josh.denny@vanderbilt.edu PMID:20335276

  15. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish

    PubMed Central

    Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp., a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark “maze” and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. PMID:26961107

  16. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish.

    PubMed

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp, a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark "maze" and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Genome-wide association study reveals sex-specific selection signals against autosomal nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongchan; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to examine genetic associations of common autosomal nucleotide variants with sex in a Korean population with 4183 males and 4659 females. Nine genetic association signals were identified in four intragenic and five intergenic regions (P<5 × 10(-8)). Further analysis with an independent data set confirmed two intragenic association signals in the genes encoding protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 12B (PPP1R12B, intron 12, rs1819043) and dynein, axonemal, heavy chain 11 (DNAH11, intron 61, rs10255013), which are directly involved in the reproductive system. This study revealed autosomal genetic variants associated with sex ratio by GWAS for the first time. This implies that genetic variants in proximity to the association signals may influence sex-specific selection and contribute to sex ratio variation. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms underlying sex-specific selection.

  18. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J.; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−119), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  19. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-03-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair.

  20. Scanning laser entoptic perimetry for the detection of visual defects associated with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    El‐Bradey, M; Plummer, D J; Uwe‐Bartsch, D; Freeman, W R

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the sensitivity and specificity of entoptic perimetry for diagnosing diabetic retinopathy at all levels of severity. Methods A prospective clinical study at the Shiley Eye Center, University of California, and San Diego. 30 patients with photographically documented diabetic retinopathy and 24 controls with a similar age distribution. Sensitivity and specificity of entoptic perimetry were computed for detecting clinically significant macular oedema within the central 120 degree radius of the fovea compared to fundus photographs. Results Entoptic perimetry can detect clinically significant diabetic retinopathy with a sensitivity of 0.88 and specificity of 1.00. Entoptic perimetry can detect the earliest stages of diabetic retinopathy with a sensitivity of 0.86. Conclusion Scanning laser entoptic perimetry is an effective tool for detecting visual function loss caused by diabetic retinopathy. PMID:16361659

  1. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Collins, Francis S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayes, Richard B; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E; Visscher, Peter M; Assimes, Themistocles L; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation.

  2. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  3. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  5. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  6. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE.

  7. Damage of the bacterial cell envelope by antimicrobial peptides gramicidin S and PGLa as revealed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Mareike; Berditsch, Marina; Hawecker, Jacques; Ardakani, Mohammad Fotouhi; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Ulrich, Anne S

    2010-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria induced by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Both the beta-stranded gramicidin S and the alpha-helical peptidyl-glycylleucine-carboxyamide (PGLa) are cationic amphiphilic AMPs known to interact with bacterial membranes. One representative Gram-negative strain, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and one representative Gram-positive strain, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, were exposed to the AMPs at sub-MICs and supra-MICs in salt-free medium. SEM revealed a shortening and swelling of the E. coli cells, and multiple blisters and bubbles formed on their surface. The S. aureus cells seemed to burst upon AMP exposure, showing open holes and deep craters in their envelope. TEM revealed the formation of intracellular membranous structures in both strains, which is attributed to a lateral expansion of the lipid membrane upon peptide insertion. Also, some morphological alterations in the DNA region were detected for S. aureus. After E. coli was incubated with AMPs in medium with low ionic strength, the cells appeared highly turgid compared to untreated controls. This observation suggests that the AMPs enhance osmosis through the inner membrane, before they eventually cause excessive leakage of the cellular contents. The adverse effect on the osmoregulatory capacity of the bacteria is attributed to the membrane-permeabilizing action of the amphiphilic peptides, even at low (sub-MIC) AMP concentrations. Altogether, the results demonstrate that both TEM and SEM, as well as appropriate sample preparation protocols, are needed to obtain detailed mechanistic insights into peptide function.

  8. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and quantitative microscopy with a charge coupled device camera improve detection of human papillomavirus DNA revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lizard, G; Chignol, M C; Souchier, C; Schmitt, D; Chardonnet, Y

    1994-04-01

    Epithelial cervical CaSki, SiHa and HeLa cells containing respectively 600 copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA type 16, 1-2 copies of HPV DNA type 16 and 10-50 copies of HPV DNA type 18 were used as model to detect different quantities of integrated HPV genome. The HPV DNA was identified on cell deposits with specific biotinylated DNA probes either by enzymatic in situ hybridization (EISH) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) involving successively a rabbit anti-biotin antibody, a biotinylated goat anti-rabbit antibody and streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase complex or streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate complex. With brightfield microscopy and EISH, hybridization spots were observed in CaSki and HeLa cells but hardly any in SiHa cells. With fluorescence microscopy and FISH, hybridization spots were clearly seen only on CaSki cell nuclei. In an attempt to improve the detection of low quantities of HPV DNA signals revealed by FISH, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and quantitative microscopy with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera were used. With both LSCM and quantitative microscopy, as few as 1-2 copies of HPV DNA were detected and found to be confined to cell nuclei counterstained with propidium iodide. Under Nomarski phase contrast, a good preservation of the cell structure was observed. With quantitative microscopy, differences in the number, size, total area and integrated fluorescence intensity of hybridization spots per nucleus were revealed between CaSki, SiHa and HeLa cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Anatomy and growth pattern of Amazon deep-sea fan as revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) and high-resolution seismic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Flood, R.D.; Kowsmann, R.O.; Belderson, R.H.; Gorini, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Imaging of the Amazon deep-sea fan with long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) has, for the first time, revealed the anatomy, trends, and growth pattern of distributary channels on this fan. Only one channel-levee system was active at any given time and extended from the Amazon Submarine Canyon downslope onto the lower fan (> 4,200 m). Formation of new channel-levee systems occurred when a currently active channel-levee system was cut off and abandoned through avulsion, and a new channel-levee system was established nearby. Through time, successive channel-levee formation and abandonment built two broad levee complexes consisting of groups of overlapping, coalescing segments of channel-levee systems across the present fan surface. These, plus older, now buried levee complexes, indicate that fan growth is radially outward and downslope through development of successive levee complexes. The most striking characteristic of the distributary channels is their intricate, often recurving, meanders with sinuosities of up to 2.5. Cutoffs and abandoned meander loops indicate that the channels migrate laterally through time. Channel bifurcation results predominantly from avulsion when flows breach a channel levee, thereby abandoning the present channel and establishing a new channel-levee segment nearby. No clear evidence of channel branching (i.e., division of a single channel into two active segments) or braiding was observed. 22 figs.

  10. Scanning tunneling spectroscopic evidence for a magnetic field-revealed microscopic order in the high-TC superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A. D.; Grinolds, M. S.; Teague, M. L.; Yeh, N.-C.; Tajima, S.

    2009-03-01

    We present spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of YBa2Cu3O7-δ as a function of magnetic field and at T<reveals two sets of non-dispersive, field-enhanced conductance modulations with periods of 3.4+0.5 and 7.3+0.5 lattice constants. Energy histograms of QP spectra show a significant shift from SC to primarily PG-like spectra and a growing enhancement of spectral weight at δ' as magnetic field increases, implying a significant interplay between SC and a field-enhanced microscopic order. Ref.: Beyer, et.al. [arxiv:0808.3016].

  11. Association of polymorphic sites in the OCA2 gene with eye colour using the tree scanning method.

    PubMed

    Branicki, W; Brudnik, U; Kupiec, T; Wolańska-Nowak, P; Szczerbińska, A; Wojas-Pelc, A

    2008-03-01

    A number of genes are considered to affect normal variation in human pigmentation. Recent studies have indicated that OCA2 is the crucial gene involved in the high variation of iris colour present among populations of European descent. In this study, eleven polymorphisms of the OCA2 gene were examined in search of their association with different pigment traits. The evolutionary tree scanning method indicated that the strongest phenotypic eye colour variation is associated with the branch defined by nonsynonymous change rs1800407, which refers to amino acid causing change Arg419Gln located in exon 13. Single SNP analysis indicated that allele 419Gln is associated with green/hazel iris colour (p < 0.001). According to tree scanning analysis, the proportion of eye colour variation explained by this nucleotide position is merely 4%. Thus, additional variation present in the OCA2 gene and perhaps some other pigment related genes must be taken into account in order to explain the high phenotypic variation in iris colour.

  12. Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy to Probe the Milk Fat Globule Membrane and Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallier, Sophie; Gragson, Derek; JiméNez-Flores, Rafael; Everett, David

    2010-01-01

    The bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is an important, biologically relevant membrane due to its functional and health properties. Its composition has been thoroughly studied but its structure, especially the lateral organization of its components, still remains unclear. We have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate the surface structure of the MFGM in globules with different degree of processing using two types of fluorescently-labeled phospholipid probes and a protein dye. Using this technique, we have observed heterogeneities in the distribution of MFGM lipids and proteins relating to the processing and size of the globules. The effect of pre-treating the milk (centrifugation, pasteurization-homogenization and churning) was studied by double-staining the surface of the milk fat globules, followed by observation using CLSM, and by determining the phospholipid profile of raw milk, raw cream, processed milk and buttermilk powder. Our findings agree with other techniques by showing that the composition of the MFGM changes with processing through the loss of phospholipids and the adsorption of caseins and whey proteins onto the surface. PMID:20218614

  13. Breaking RAD: an evaluation of the utility of restriction site-associated DNA sequencing for genome scans of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David B; Hoban, Sean; Kelley, Joanna L; Lotterhos, Katie E; Reed, Laura K; Antolin, Michael F; Storfer, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how and why populations evolve is of fundamental importance to molecular ecology. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq), a popular reduced representation method, has ushered in a new era of genome-scale research for assessing population structure, hybridization, demographic history, phylogeography and migration. RADseq has also been widely used to conduct genome scans to detect loci involved in adaptive divergence among natural populations. Here, we examine the capacity of those RADseq-based genome scan studies to detect loci involved in local adaptation. To understand what proportion of the genome is missed by RADseq studies, we developed a simple model using different numbers of RAD-tags, genome sizes and extents of linkage disequilibrium (length of haplotype blocks). Under the best-case modelling scenario, we found that RADseq using six- or eight-base pair cutting restriction enzymes would fail to sample many regions of the genome, especially for species with short linkage disequilibrium. We then surveyed recent studies that have used RADseq for genome scans and found that the median density of markers across these studies was 4.08 RAD-tag markers per megabase (one marker per 245 kb). The length of linkage disequilibrium for many species is one to three orders of magnitude less than density of the typical recent RADseq study. Thus, we conclude that genome scans based on RADseq data alone, while useful for studies of neutral genetic variation and genetic population structure, will likely miss many loci under selection in studies of local adaptation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Laser scanning tomography in the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study: principal components and associations.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Anthony P; Chan, Michelle P Y; Broadway, David C; Garway-Heath, David F; Luben, Robert; Yip, Jennifer L Y; Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J

    2013-10-09

    To describe Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) measures, their principal components, and their associations in a British population. The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk Eye Study is nested within a multicenter cohort study. Measurements were taken with the HRT-2 and the software subsequently updated to yield HRT-3 parameters. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify distinct components of the HRT variables. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine associations of these components with age, sex, height, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, social class, education, alcohol intake, smoking status, axial length, IOP, and lens status. Complete data were available from 10,859 eyes of 6430 participants with a mean age of 68 years. Principal components analysis identified three components with an eigenvalue greater than 1, explaining 79.9% of the variance of all the HRT measures. These were named cup, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and rim based on the factor loadings they were most correlated with. Older age was significantly associated with a greater cup (P = 0.003), smaller RNFL (P < 0.001), and smaller rim (P < 0.001). Female sex (P = 0.001), higher education (P < 0.001), and shorter axial length (P < 0.001) were associated with a greater RNFL. Lower BMI and higher IOP were associated with a greater cup (both, P < 0.001) and a smaller rim (BMI, P = 0.001; IOP, P < 0.001). Heidelberg Retina Tomograph measures in this cohort were largely explained by three principal components related to optic disc cup, RNFL, and rim. Associations with cup and rim were distinct to associations with RNFL, suggesting different underlying determinants.

  15. Laser Scanning Tomography in the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study: Principal Components and Associations

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Anthony P.; Chan, Michelle P. Y.; Broadway, David C.; Garway-Heath, David F.; Luben, Robert; Yip, Jennifer L. Y.; Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To describe Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) measures, their principal components, and their associations in a British population. Methods. The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk Eye Study is nested within a multicenter cohort study. Measurements were taken with the HRT-2 and the software subsequently updated to yield HRT-3 parameters. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify distinct components of the HRT variables. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine associations of these components with age, sex, height, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, social class, education, alcohol intake, smoking status, axial length, IOP, and lens status. Results. Complete data were available from 10,859 eyes of 6430 participants with a mean age of 68 years. Principal components analysis identified three components with an eigenvalue greater than 1, explaining 79.9% of the variance of all the HRT measures. These were named cup, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and rim based on the factor loadings they were most correlated with. Older age was significantly associated with a greater cup (P = 0.003), smaller RNFL (P < 0.001), and smaller rim (P < 0.001). Female sex (P = 0.001), higher education (P < 0.001), and shorter axial length (P < 0.001) were associated with a greater RNFL. Lower BMI and higher IOP were associated with a greater cup (both, P < 0.001) and a smaller rim (BMI, P = 0.001; IOP, P < 0.001). Conclusions. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph measures in this cohort were largely explained by three principal components related to optic disc cup, RNFL, and rim. Associations with cup and rim were distinct to associations with RNFL, suggesting different underlying determinants. PMID:24030456

  16. Genome-Wide Association Scan Meta-Analysis Identifies Three Loci Influencing Adiposity and Fat Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Chambers, John C.; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W.; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C.; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Scott, Laura J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D.; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strachan, David P.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins for the PROCARDIS consortia, Hugh; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L.; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy for the GIANT consortium, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist–hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9×10−11) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9×10−9). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6×10−8). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity. PMID:19557161

  17. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Cecilia M; Heid, Iris M; Randall, Joshua C; Lamina, Claudia; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J; Herrera, Blanca M; Jackson, Anne U; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Chambers, John C; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J; Zillikens, M Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S F; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scott, Laura J; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G Bragi; Weedon, Michael N; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Franks, Paul W; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J; Spector, Timothy D; Strachan, David P; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nicholas J; Hugh Watkins; Waterworth, Dawn M; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Loos, Ruth J F; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I

    2009-06-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11)) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9)). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8)). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  18. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens. PMID:26496084

  19. Genome-wide scan identifies variation in MLXIPL associated with plasma triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Kooner, Jaspal S; Chambers, John C; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Hinds, David A; Hyde, Craig L; Warnes, Gregory R; Gómez Pérez, Francisco J; Frazer, Kelly A; Elliott, Paul; Scott, James; Milos, Patrice M; Cox, David R; Thompson, John F

    2008-02-01

    We tested over 267,000 SNPs in 1,005 Northern Europeans and 248,000 in 1,006 Indian Asians for association with triglycerides and HDL cholesterol, with replication in 10,536 subjects. We found association of a nonsynonymous SNP (rs3812316, G771C, Gln241His) in MLXIPL with plasma triglyceride levels (combined P = 1.4 x 10(-10)). MLXIPL coordinates transcriptional regulation of enzymes that channel glycolytic end-products into lipogenesis and energy storage, making MLXIPL a plausible 'thrifty gene'.

  20. A Genome Wide Association Scan of Bovine Tuberculosis Susceptibility in Holstein-Friesian Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Emma K.; Berry, Donagh P.; Wickham, Brian; Gormley, Eamonn P.; Bradley, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis is a significant veterinary and financial problem in many parts of the world. Although many factors influence infection and progression of the disease, there is a host genetic component and dissection of this may enlighten on the wider biology of host response to tuberculosis. However, a binary phenotype of presence/absence of infection presents a noisy signal for genomewide association study. Methodology/Principal Findings We calculated a composite phenotype of genetic merit for TB susceptibility based on disease incidence in daughters of elite sires used for artificial insemination in the Irish dairy herd. This robust measure was compared with 44,426 SNP genotypes in the most informative 307 subjects in a genome wide association analysis. Three SNPs in a 65 kb genomic region on BTA 22 were associated (i.e. p<10−5, peaking at position 59588069, p = 4.02×10−6) with tuberculosis susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance A genomic region on BTA 22 was suggestively associated with tuberculosis susceptibility; it contains the taurine transporter gene SLC6A6, or TauT, which is known to function in the immune system but has not previously been investigated for its role in tuberculosis infection. PMID:22355315

  1. Family-based genome-wide association scan of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F; Reiersen, Angela M; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M; Faraone, Stephen V

    2010-09-01

    Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of DSM-IV-TR ADHD. Families were ascertained at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH; N = 309 trios), Washington University at St. Louis (WASH-U; N = 272 trios), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA; N = 156 trios). Genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip platforms. After applying quality control filters, association with ADHD was tested with 835,136 SNPs in 735 DSM-IV ADHD trios from 732 families. Our smallest p value (6.7E-07) did not reach the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance (5.0E-08), but one of the 20 most significant associations was located in a candidate gene of interest for ADHD (SLC9A9, rs9810857, p = 6.4E-6). We also conducted gene-based tests of candidate genes identified in the literature and found additional evidence of association with SLC9A9. We and our colleagues in the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium are working to pool together GWAS samples to establish the large data sets needed to follow-up on these results and to identify genes for ADHD and other disorders. 2010 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatos-DeVito, Maura; Schipul, Sarah E.; Bulluck, John C.; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4-13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD.…

  3. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatos-DeVito, Maura; Schipul, Sarah E.; Bulluck, John C.; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4-13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD.…

  4. Association scan of 14,500 nonsynonymous SNPs in four diseases identifies autoimmunity variants.

    PubMed

    Burton, Paul R; Clayton, David G; Cardon, Lon R; Craddock, Nick; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; McCarthy, Mark I; Ouwehand, Willem H; Samani, Nilesh J; Todd, John A; Donnelly, Peter; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Davison, Dan; Easton, Doug; Evans, David M; Leung, Hin-Tak; Marchini, Jonathan L; Morris, Andrew P; Spencer, Chris C A; Tobin, Martin D; Attwood, Antony P; Boorman, James P; Cant, Barbara; Everson, Ursula; Hussey, Judith M; Jolley, Jennifer D; Knight, Alexandra S; Koch, Kerstin; Meech, Elizabeth; Nutland, Sarah; Prowse, Christopher V; Stevens, Helen E; Taylor, Niall C; Walters, Graham R; Walker, Neil M; Watkins, Nicholas A; Winzer, Thilo; Jones, Richard W; McArdle, Wendy L; Ring, Susan M; Strachan, David P; Pembrey, Marcus; Breen, Gerome; St Clair, David; Caesar, Sian; Gordon-Smith, Katharine; Jones, Lisa; Fraser, Christine; Green, Elaine K; Grozeva, Detelina; Hamshere, Marian L; Holmans, Peter A; Jones, Ian R; Kirov, George; Moskivina, Valentina; Nikolov, Ivan; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Collier, David A; Elkin, Amanda; Farmer, Anne; Williamson, Richard; McGuffin, Peter; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barrett, Jennifer H; Bishop, Timothy D; Iles, Mark M; Maqbool, Azhar; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Hall, Alistair S; Braund, Peter S; Dixon, Richard J; Mangino, Massimo; Stevens, Suzanne; Thompson, John R; Bredin, Francesca; Tremelling, Mark; Parkes, Miles; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charles W; Nimmo, Elaine R; Satsangi, Jack; Fisher, Sheila A; Forbes, Alastair; Lewis, Cathryn M; Onnie, Clive M; Prescott, Natalie J; Sanderson, Jeremy; Matthew, Christopher G; Barbour, Jamie; Mohiuddin, M Khalid; Todhunter, Catherine E; Mansfield, John C; Ahmad, Tariq; Cummings, Fraser R; Jewell, Derek P; Webster, John; Brown, Morris J; Lathrop, Mark G; Connell, John; Dominiczak, Anna; Marcano, Carolina A Braga; Burke, Beverley; Dobson, Richard; Gungadoo, Johannie; Lee, Kate L; Munroe, Patricia B; Newhouse, Stephen J; Onipinla, Abiodun; Wallace, Chris; Xue, Mingzhan; Caulfield, Mark; Farrall, Martin; Barton, Anne; Bruce, Ian N; Donovan, Hannah; Eyre, Steve; Gilbert, Paul D; Hilder, Samantha L; Hinks, Anne M; John, Sally L; Potter, Catherine; Silman, Alan J; Symmons, Deborah P M; Thomson, Wendy; Worthington, Jane; Dunger, David B; Widmer, Barry; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Lango, Hana; Perry, John R B; Shields, Beverley M; Weedon, Michael N; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hitman, Graham A; Walker, Mark; Elliott, Kate S; Groves, Christopher J; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Rayner, Nigel W; Timpson, Nicolas J; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Newport, Melanie; Sirugo, Giorgio; Lyons, Emily; Vannberg, Fredrik; Hill, Adrian V S; Bradbury, Linda A; Farrar, Claire; Pointon, Jennifer J; Wordsworth, Paul; Brown, Matthew A; Franklyn, Jayne A; Heward, Joanne M; Simmonds, Matthew J; Gough, Stephen C L; Seal, Sheila; Stratton, Michael R; Rahman, Nazneen; Ban, Maria; Goris, An; Sawcer, Stephen J; Compston, Alastair; Conway, David; Jallow, Muminatou; Newport, Melanie; Sirugo, Giorgio; Rockett, Kirk A; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Chaney, Amy; Downes, Kate; Ghori, Mohammed J R; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E; Inouye, Michael; Keniry, Andrew; King, Emma; McGinnis, Ralph; Potter, Simon; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Whittaker, Pamela; Widden, Claire; Withers, David; Cardin, Niall J; Davison, Dan; Ferreira, Teresa; Pereira-Gale, Joanne; Hallgrimsdo'ttir, Ingeleif B; Howie, Bryan N; Su, Zhan; Teo, Yik Ying; Vukcevic, Damjan; Bentley, David; Brown, Matthew A; Compston, Alastair; Farrall, Martin; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hill, Adrian V S; Parkes, Miles; Pembrey, Marcus; Stratton, Michael R; Mitchell, Sarah L; Newby, Paul R; Brand, Oliver J; Carr-Smith, Jackie; Pearce, Simon H S; McGinnis, R; Keniry, A; Deloukas, P; Reveille, John D; Zhou, Xiaodong; Sims, Anne-Marie; Dowling, Alison; Taylor, Jacqueline; Doan, Tracy; Davis, John C; Savage, Laurie; Ward, Michael M; Learch, Thomas L; Weisman, Michael H; Brown, Mathew

    2007-11-01

    We have genotyped 14,436 nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and 897 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tag SNPs from 1,000 independent cases of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and breast cancer (BC). Comparing these data against a common control dataset derived from 1,500 randomly selected healthy British individuals, we report initial association and independent replication in a North American sample of two new loci related to ankylosing spondylitis, ARTS1 and IL23R, and confirmation of the previously reported association of AITD with TSHR and FCRL3. These findings, enabled in part by increased statistical power resulting from the expansion of the control reference group to include individuals from the other disease groups, highlight notable new possibilities for autoimmune regulation and suggest that IL23R may be a common susceptibility factor for the major 'seronegative' diseases.

  5. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  6. A twin study of breastfeeding with a preliminary genome wide association scan

    PubMed Central

    Colodro-Conde, L.; Zhu, G.; Power, R. A.; Henders, A.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Medland, S. E.; Ordoñana, J.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been an important survival trait during human history, though it has long been recognised that individuals differ in their exact breastfeeding behaviour. Here our aims were, first, to explore to what extent genetic and environmental influences contributed to the individual differences in breastfeeding behaviour; second, to detect possible genetic variants related to breastfeeding; and lastly, to test if the genetic variants associated with breastfeeding have been previously found to be related with breast size. Data were collected from a large community-based cohort of Australian twins, with 3,364 women for the twin modelling analyses and 1,521 of them included in the genome wide association study. Monozygotic twin correlations (rMZ = .52, 95% CI .46 – .57) were larger than dizygotic twin correlations (rDZ = .35, 95% CI .25 – .43) and the best-fitting model was the one composed by additive genetics and unique environmental factors, explaining 53% and 47% of the variance in breastfeeding behaviour, respectively. No breastfeeding-related genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. The polygenic risk score analyses showed no significant results, suggesting breast size does not influence breastfeeding. This study confers a replication of a previous one exploring the sources of variance of breastfeeding and, to our knowledge, is the first one to conduct a Genome-Wide Association Study on breastfeeding and look at the overlap with variants for breast size. PMID:25475840

  7. Deep Gray Matter Involvement on Brain MRI Scans Is Associated with Clinical Progression in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Neema, Mohit; Arora, Ashish; Healy, Brian C.; Guss, Zachary D.; Brass, Steven D.; Duan, Yang; Buckle, Guy J.; Glanz, Bonnie I.; Stazzone, Lynn; Khoury, Samia J.; Weiner, Howard L.; Guttmann, Charles R.G.; Bakshi, Rohit

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conventional brain MRI lesion measures have unreliable associations with clinical progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Gray matter imaging may improve clinical-MRI correlations. METHODS We tested if gray matter MRI measures and conventional measures of lesions/atrophy predicted clinical progression in a 4-year longitudinal study of 97 patients with MS. Baseline and follow-up brain MRI were analyzed for basal ganglia and thalamic normalized T2 signal intensity, whole brain T2-hyperintense lesion volume, and whole brain atrophy. Logistic regression tested the ability of baseline or on-study change in MRI to predict disability progression, as reported by area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC). RESULTS Lower caudate T2-intensity at baseline (P = .04; AUC = .69) and on-study decreasing T2-intensity in the putamen (P = .03; AUC = .70) and thalamus (P = .01; AUC = .71) were the MRI variables associated with clinical progression when regression modeling was adjusted for length of follow-up interval, baseline EDSS, disease duration, age, and sex. CONCLUSIONS Gray matter T2-hypointensity, suggestive of excessive iron deposition is associated with worsening disability in patients with MS. Gray matter MRI assessment may be able to capture neurodegenerative aspects of the disease, with more clinical relevance than derived from conventional MRI measures. PMID:19192042

  8. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  9. DTI and VBM reveal white matter changes without associated gray matter changes in patients with idiopathic restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Belke, Marcus; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Keil, Boris; Rosenow, Felix; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Knake, Susanne; Menzler, Katja

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated cerebral white and gray matter changes in patients with iRLS in order to shed light on the pathophysiology of this disease. Twelve patients with iRLS were compared to 12 age- and sex-matched controls using whole-head diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) techniques. Evaluation of the DTI scans included the voxelwise analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). Diffusion tensor imaging revealed areas of altered FA in subcortical white matter bilaterally, mainly in temporal regions as well as in the right internal capsule, the pons, and the right cerebellum. These changes overlapped with changes in RD. Voxel-based morphometry did not reveal any gray matter alterations. We showed altered diffusion properties in several white matter regions in patients with iRLS. White matter changes could mainly be attributed to changes in RD, a parameter thought to reflect altered myelination. Areas with altered white matter microstructure included areas in the internal capsule which include the corticospinal tract to the lower limbs, thereby supporting studies that suggest changes in sensorimotor pathways associated with RLS.

  10. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; ...

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, orderedmore » restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.« less

  11. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes.

  12. Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observations Reveal High Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana, on the Onion Maggot (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) Adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shengyong; Xing, Zhenlong; Wang, Xiaoqing; Lei, Zhongren

    2016-12-01

    When flies were dipped in 1 × 10(8) conidia/ml conidia suspensions and then kept in the incubator (22 ± 1 °C, 70 ± 5% RH), scanning electron microscope observations revealed that, at 2 h, the majority of adhering Beauveria bassiana conidia were attached to either the wing surface or the interstitial area between the macrochaetae on the thorax and abdomen of the onion maggot adults. Germ tubes were being produced and had oriented toward the cuticle by 18 h. Penetration of the insect cuticle had occurred by 36 h, and by 48 h, germ tubes had completely penetrated the cuticle. Fungal mycelia had emerged from the insect body and were proliferating after 72 h. The superficial area and structure of the wings and macrochaetae may facilitate the attachment of conidia and enable effective penetration. The susceptibility of adults to 12 isolates, at a concentration of 1 × 10(7) conidia/ml, was tested in laboratory experiments. Eight of the more potent strains caused in excess of 85% adult mortality 8 d post inoculation, while the median lethal time (LT50) of these strains was <6 d. The virulence of the more effective strains was further tested, and the median lethal concentrations (LC50) were calculated by exposing adults to doses ranging from 10(3)-10(7) conidia/ml. The lowest LC50 value, found in the isolate XJWLMQ-32, for the adults was 3.87 × 10(3) conidia/ml. These results demonstrate that some B. bassiana strains are highly virulent to onion maggot adults and should be considered as potential biocontrol agents against the adult flies.

  13. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Chain, Patrick S G; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.

  14. Association between bone indices assessed by DXA, HR-pQCT and QCT scans in post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Amstrup, Anne Kristine; Jakobsen, Niels Frederik Breum; Moser, Emil; Sikjaer, Tanja; Mosekilde, Leif; Rejnmark, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT), high-resolution peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT) and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans are commonly used when assessing bone mass and structure in patients with osteoporosis. Depending on the imaging technique and measuring site, different information on bone quality is obtained. How well these techniques correlate when assessing central as well as distal skeletal sites has not been carefully assessed to date. One hundred and twenty-five post-menopausal women aged 56-82 (mean 63) years were studied using DXA scans (spine, hip, whole body and forearm), including trabecular bone score (TBS), QCT scans (spine and hip) and HR-pQCT scans (distal radius and tibia). Central site measurements of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by DXA and volumetric BMD (vBMD) by QCT correlated significantly at the hip (r = 0.74, p < 0.01). Distal site measurements of density at the radius as assessed by DXA and HR-pQCT were also associated (r = 0.74, p < 0.01). Correlations between distal and central site measurements of the hip and of the tibia and radius showed weak to moderate correlation between vBMD by HR-pQCT and QCT (r = -0.27 to 0.54). TBS correlated with QCT at the lumbar spine (r = 0.35) and to trabecular indices of HR-pQCT at the radius and tibia (r = -0.16 to 0.31, p < 0.01). There was moderate to strong agreement between measuring techniques when assessing the same skeletal site. However, when assessing correlations between central and distal sites, the associations were only weak to moderate. Our data suggest that the various techniques measure different characteristics of the bone, and may therefore be used in addition to rather than as a replacment for imaging in clinical practice.

  15. Signatures of selection in the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) revealed by a genome scan analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galarza, Julio; Henriques, Dora; Johnston, J Spencer; Azevedo, João C; Patton, John C; Muñoz, Irene; De la Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the genetic mechanisms of adaptive population divergence is one of the most fundamental endeavours in evolutionary biology and is becoming increasingly important as it will allow predictions about how organisms will respond to global environmental crisis. This is particularly important for the honey bee, a species of unquestionable ecological and economical importance that has been exposed to increasing human-mediated selection pressures. Here, we conducted a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome scan in honey bees collected across an environmental gradient in Iberia and used four FST -based outlier tests to identify genomic regions exhibiting signatures of selection. Additionally, we analysed associations between genetic and environmental data for the identification of factors that might be correlated or act as selective pressures. With these approaches, 4.4% (17 of 383) of outlier loci were cross-validated by four FST -based methods, and 8.9% (34 of 383) were cross-validated by at least three methods. Of the 34 outliers, 15 were found to be strongly associated with one or more environmental variables. Further support for selection, provided by functional genomic information, was particularly compelling for SNP outliers mapped to different genes putatively involved in the same function such as vision, xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune response. This study enabled a more rigorous consideration of selection as the underlying cause of diversity patterns in Iberian honey bees, representing an important first step towards the identification of polymorphisms implicated in local adaptation and possibly in response to recent human-mediated environmental changes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Genome-wide association Scan of dental caries in the permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 90% of adults aged 20 years or older with permanent teeth have suffered from dental caries leading to pain, infection, or even tooth loss. Although caries prevalence has decreased over the past decade, there are still about 23% of dentate adults who have untreated carious lesions in the US. Dental caries is a complex disorder affected by both individual susceptibility and environmental factors. Approximately 35-55% of caries phenotypic variation in the permanent dentition is attributable to genes, though few specific caries genes have been identified. Therefore, we conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genes affecting susceptibility to caries in adults. Methods Five independent cohorts were included in this study, totaling more than 7000 participants. For each participant, dental caries was assessed and genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were genotyped or imputed across the entire genome. Due to the heterogeneity among the five cohorts regarding age, genotyping platform, quality of dental caries assessment, and study design, we first conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses on each of the five independent cohorts separately. We then performed three meta-analyses to combine results for: (i) the comparatively younger, Appalachian cohorts (N = 1483) with well-assessed caries phenotype, (ii) the comparatively older, non-Appalachian cohorts (N = 5960) with inferior caries phenotypes, and (iii) all five cohorts (N = 7443). Top ranking genetic loci within and across meta-analyses were scrutinized for biologically plausible roles on caries. Results Different sets of genes were nominated across the three meta-analyses, especially between the younger and older age cohorts. In general, we identified several suggestive loci (P-value ≤ 10E-05) within or near genes with plausible biological roles for dental caries, including RPS6KA2 and PTK2B, involved in p38-depenedent MAPK signaling

  17. Genome-wide association scan of dental caries in the permanent dentition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Shaffer, John R; Zeng, Zhen; Begum, Ferdouse; Vieira, Alexandre R; Noel, Jacqueline; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Cuenco, Karen T; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Beck, James; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Hu, Frank B; Crosslin, David R; Laurie, Cathy C; Nelson, Sarah C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Polk, Deborah E; Weyant, Robert J; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W; Weeks, Daniel E; Feingold, Eleanor; Marazita, Mary L

    2012-12-21

    Over 90% of adults aged 20 years or older with permanent teeth have suffered from dental caries leading to pain, infection, or even tooth loss. Although caries prevalence has decreased over the past decade, there are still about 23% of dentate adults who have untreated carious lesions in the US. Dental caries is a complex disorder affected by both individual susceptibility and environmental factors. Approximately 35-55% of caries phenotypic variation in the permanent dentition is attributable to genes, though few specific caries genes have been identified. Therefore, we conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genes affecting susceptibility to caries in adults. Five independent cohorts were included in this study, totaling more than 7000 participants. For each participant, dental caries was assessed and genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were genotyped or imputed across the entire genome. Due to the heterogeneity among the five cohorts regarding age, genotyping platform, quality of dental caries assessment, and study design, we first conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses on each of the five independent cohorts separately. We then performed three meta-analyses to combine results for: (i) the comparatively younger, Appalachian cohorts (N = 1483) with well-assessed caries phenotype, (ii) the comparatively older, non-Appalachian cohorts (N = 5960) with inferior caries phenotypes, and (iii) all five cohorts (N = 7443). Top ranking genetic loci within and across meta-analyses were scrutinized for biologically plausible roles on caries. Different sets of genes were nominated across the three meta-analyses, especially between the younger and older age cohorts. In general, we identified several suggestive loci (P-value ≤ 10E-05) within or near genes with plausible biological roles for dental caries, including RPS6KA2 and PTK2B, involved in p38-depenedent MAPK signaling, and RHOU and FZD1, involved

  18. A scan of chromosome 10 identifies a novel locus showing strong association with late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S K; Maxwell, Taylor J; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O'Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10-specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P < .05). Five of these markers replicated at P < .05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P = .0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  19. A genome-wide association scan for acute insulin response to glucose in Hispanic Americans: The IRAS Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Rich, S. S.; Goodarzi, M. O.; Palmer, N. D.; Langefeld, C. D.; Ziegler, J.; Haffner, S. M.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Norris, J. M.; Taylor, K. D.; Haritunians, T.; Rotter, J. I.; Chen, Y-D. I.; Wagenknecht, L. E.; Bowden, D. W.; Bergman, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis The goal of this study was to identify genes and regions in the human genome that are associated with the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), an important predictor of type 2 diabetes, in Hispanic-American participants from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRAS FS). Methods A two-stage genome-wide association scan (GWAS) was performed in IRAS FS Hispanic-American samples. In the first stage, 318K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed in 229 Hispanic-American DNA samples (from 34 families) from San Antonio, TX. SNPs with the most significant associations with AIRg were genotyped in the entire set of IRAS FS Hispanic-American samples (n = 1190). In chromosomal regions with evidence of association, additional SNPs were genotyped to capture variation in genes. Results No individual SNP achieved genome-wide levels of significance (P < 5 × 10-7); however, two regions — chromosomes 6p21 and 20p11 — had multiple highly-ranked SNPs that were associated with AIRg. Additional genotyping in these regions supported the initial evidence for variants contributing to variation in AIRg. One region resides in a gene desert between PXT1 and KCTD20 on 6p21 while the region on 20p11 has several viable candidate genes (ENTPD6, PYGB, GINS1 and R4-691N24.1). Conclusions/Interpretation A GWAS in Hispanic-American samples identified several candidate genes and loci that may be associated with AIRg. These associations explain a small component of variation in AIRg. The genes identified are involved in phosphorylation and ion transport and provide preliminary evidence that these processes have importance in beta cell response. PMID:19430760

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genes Associated with Fusarium Ear Rot Resistance in a Maize Core Diversity Panel

    PubMed Central

    Zila, Charles T.; Samayoa, L. Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0–100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  1. Genome-wide transcript profiling reveals novel breast cancer-associated intronic sense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Lin, Yuefeng; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Monaghan, A Paula; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer.

  2. Genome-Wide Transcript Profiling Reveals Novel Breast Cancer-Associated Intronic Sense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuefeng; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Monaghan, A. Paula; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play major roles in development and cancer progression. To identify novel ncRNAs that may identify key pathways in breast cancer development, we performed high-throughput transcript profiling of tumor and normal matched-pair tissue samples. Initial transcriptome profiling using high-density genome-wide tiling arrays revealed changes in over 200 novel candidate genomic regions that map to intronic regions. Sixteen genomic loci were identified that map to the long introns of five key protein-coding genes, CRIM1, EPAS1, ZEB2, RBMS1, and RFX2. Consistent with the known role of the tumor suppressor ZEB2 in the cancer-associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), in situ hybridization reveals that the intronic regions deriving from ZEB2 as well as those from RFX2 and EPAS1 are down-regulated in cells of epithelial morphology, suggesting that these regions may be important for maintaining normal epithelial cell morphology. Paired-end deep sequencing analysis reveals a large number of distinct genomic clusters with no coding potential within the introns of these genes. These novel transcripts are only transcribed from the coding strand. A comprehensive search for breast cancer associated genes reveals enrichment for transcribed intronic regions from these loci, pointing to an underappreciated role of introns or mechanisms relating to their biology in EMT and breast cancer. PMID:25798919

  3. Common trends in mutualism revealed by model associations between invertebrates and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chaston, John; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    Mutually beneficial interactions between microorganisms and animals are a conserved and ubiquitous feature of biotic systems. In many instances animals, including humans, are dependent on their microbial associates for nutrition, defense, or development. To maintain these vital relationships, animals have evolved processes that ensure faithful transmission of specific microbial symbionts between generations. Elucidating mechanisms of transmission and symbiont specificity has been aided by the study of experimentally tractable invertebrate animals with diverse and highly evolved associations with microorganisms. Here, we review several invertebrate model systems that contribute to our current understanding of symbiont transmission, recognition, and specificity. Although the details of transmission and symbiont selection vary among associations, comparisons of diverse mutualistic associations are revealing a number of common themes, including restriction of symbiont diversity during transmission and glycan-lectin interactions during partner selection and recruitment.

  4. Common Trends in Mutualism Revealed by Model Associations Between Invertebrates and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaston, John; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Mutually beneficial interactions between microbes and animals are a conserved and ubiquitous feature of biotic systems. In many instances animals, including humans, are dependent on their microbial associates for nutrition, defense, or development. To maintain these vital relationships animals have evolved processes that ensure faithful transmission of specific microbial symbionts between generations. Elucidating mechanisms of transmission and symbiont specificity has been aided by the study of experimentally tractable invertebrate animals with diverse and highly evolved associations with microbes. Here we review several invertebrate model systems that are contributing to our current understanding of symbiont transmission, recognition, and specificity. Although the details of transmission and symbiont selection vary among associations, comparisons of diverse mutualistic associations are revealing a number of common themes, including restriction of symbiont diversity during transmission and glycan-lectin interactions during partner selection and recruitment. PMID:19909347

  5. [Polyradiculopathy revealing an enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma in a patient with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Jousserand, G; Poujois, A; Antoine, J-C; Camdessanché, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may be complicated by an enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), but lymphomatous dissemination outside the gastrointestinal tract is uncommon especially to the peripheral nervous sytem. We report a 54-year-old CD patient with EATL revealed by subacute polyradiculopathy. Peripheral neuropathies associated with CD are generally not polyradiculopathies, but sensorimotor neuropathies. Peripheral neurological complications of non-Hodgkin lymphoma are more frequent with B-lymphoma and a neurological presentation of EATL is very rare. This case illustrates the usefulness of searching for EATL in CD patients with polyradiculopathy.

  6. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients. PMID:27081498

  7. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients.

  8. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  9. mtDNA lineages reveal coronary artery disease-associated structures in the Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Haber, Marc; Youhanna, Sonia C; Balanovsky, Oleg; Saade, Stephanie; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Shasha, Nabil; Osman, Raed; el Bayeh, Hamid; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Balanovska, Elena; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Platt, Daniel E; Zalloua, Pierre A

    2012-01-01

    Population origins and ancestry have previously been found to be important determinants of coronary artery disease (CAD). This study investigates associations of Lebanese mitochondrial DNA lineages with CAD and studies their correlation with other populations, exploring population structures that may infer mitochondria functional associations and reveal population movements and origins. Sequencing the mitochondrial hypervariable sequence 1 (HVS-1) of 363 controls and 448 cases revealed that haplogroup W was more frequent (P = 0.013) in cases compared to controls, and was associated with increased risk of CAD (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.50-35.30, P = 0.026) among Lebanese samples. Haplogroup A was only found in controls (P = 0.029). We have detected stronger geographic correlation between haplogroup W and CAD (Pearson's r = 0.316, P < 0.001) than between haplogroup A and CAD (r = 0.149, P < 0.001). HVS-1 phylogenetic network of haplogroup W shows controls are restricted to European clusters while cases belong mostly to Middle Eastern natives. The network of haplogroup A shows that the controls belong to a cluster dominated by Central Asians. Our results show evidence of a gene flow into Lebanon, creating CAD-associated population structures that are similar to those in the source populations, maintained by limited admixture, and probably encompassing variations on the nuclear and/or the mitochondrial genome that are correlated with the disease. © 2011 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  10. Metagenomic sequencing reveals microbiota and its functional potential associated with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Hui; He, Shu; Zhang, Yifei; Wei, Shicheng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2013-01-01

    Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationships between bacteria and human health, little is known about the species and function of the microbial community associated with oral diseases. In this study, we report the sequencing of 16 metagenomic samples collected from dental swabs and plaques representing four periodontal states. Insights into the microbial community structure and the metabolic variation associated with periodontal health and disease were obtained. We observed a strong correlation between community structure and disease status, and described a core disease-associated community. A number of functional genes and metabolic pathways including bacterial chemotaxis and glycan biosynthesis were over-represented in the microbiomes of periodontal disease. A significant amount of novel species and genes were identified in the metagenomic assemblies. Our study enriches the understanding of the oral microbiome and sheds light on the contribution of microorganisms to the formation and succession of dental plaques and oral diseases.

  11. Metagenomic sequencing reveals microbiota and its functional potential associated with periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Hui; He, Shu; Zhang, Yifei; Wei, Shicheng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2013-01-01

    Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationships between bacteria and human health, little is known about the species and function of the microbial community associated with oral diseases. In this study, we report the sequencing of 16 metagenomic samples collected from dental swabs and plaques representing four periodontal states. Insights into the microbial community structure and the metabolic variation associated with periodontal health and disease were obtained. We observed a strong correlation between community structure and disease status, and described a core disease-associated community. A number of functional genes and metabolic pathways including bacterial chemotaxis and glycan biosynthesis were over-represented in the microbiomes of periodontal disease. A significant amount of novel species and genes were identified in the metagenomic assemblies. Our study enriches the understanding of the oral microbiome and sheds light on the contribution of microorganisms to the formation and succession of dental plaques and oral diseases. PMID:23673380

  12. Association between Periodontal Disease and Inflammatory Arthritis Reveals Modulatory Functions by Melanocortin Receptor Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F.M.; Norling, Lucy V.; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A.; da Silva, Tarcília A.; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp8–γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 μg dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 μg DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r−/− compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. PMID:24979595

  13. Association between periodontal disease and inflammatory arthritis reveals modulatory functions by melanocortin receptor type 3.

    PubMed

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F M; Norling, Lucy V; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A; da Silva, Tarcília A; Perretti, Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp(8)-γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 μg dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 μg DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r(-/-) compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J.; Acemel, Rafael D.; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  15. Chemical Signature of Biomass Burning Emitted PM2.5 as Revealed by a C/N/S Multi- Elemental Scanning Thermal Analysis (MESTA) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.; Bugna, G.

    2006-12-01

    Uncertainty of black carbon (BC) research is often plagued by the analytical difficulty associated with separating carbon components in solid samples. A rapid and sensitive multi-elemental scanning thermal analysis (MESTA), originally developed for organic matter analysis in solid samples, was applied to this study. The objective was to identify the chemical signature of biomass burning emitted PM2.5 (aerosols less than 2.5 micron) for tracing purposes. We collected PM2.5 from the burning of various biomass of a pine forest and from the ambient air of an urban campus using a PM sampler. The MESTA provides simultaneous C, N and S thermograms of the PM2.5 samples that can be used for characterization and identification purposes. This study showed that the PM2.5 samples produced from the burning of forest biomass can be characterized by a high temperature (greater than 350 oC) volatile organic component with high C/N ratio and no S content while those produced from the ambient air can be characterized by a low temperature (less than 350 oC) volatile organic component with low C/N ratio and high S content. Burning of the soaked woody debris, however, produced significant amount of the low-temperature volatile organic component similar to that of the ambient air in C/N ratio but different in S content. Most PM2.5 samples have a very low temperature (less than 110 oC) volatile N component that is identified as absorbed ammonia. The absorbed ammonia is most significant in the PM2.5 of the ambient air and the burning of soaked woody debris. All PM2.5 samples have significant amount of BC which volatilized above 500 oC with very high C/N ratio. This study also shows that MESTA can provide an objective means to present the chemical signature of the whole spectrum of OC/BC in the PM2.5 samples.

  16. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Maggioni, Davide; Arrigoni, Roberto; Seveso, Davide; Puce, Stefania; Galli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  17. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Simone; Maggioni, Davide; Arrigoni, Roberto; Seveso, Davide; Puce, Stefania; Galli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  18. Genomic sequencing reveals historical, demographic and selective factors associated with the diversification of the fire-associated fungus Neurospora discreta.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, Pierre; Wilson, Benjamin A; Perraudeau, Fanny; Montoya, Liliam A; Kowbel, David; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Fischer, Monika; Sylvain, Iman; Jacobson, David J; Taylor, John W

    2015-11-01

    Delineating microbial populations, discovering ecologically relevant phenotypes and identifying migrants, hybrids or admixed individuals have long proved notoriously difficult, thereby limiting our understanding of the evolutionary forces at play during the diversification of microbial species. However, recent advances in sequencing and computational methods have enabled an unbiased approach whereby incipient species and the genetic correlates of speciation can be identified by examining patterns of genomic variation within and between lineages. We present here a population genomic study of a phylogenetic species in the Neurospora discreta species complex, based on the resequencing of full genomes (~37 Mb) for 52 fungal isolates from nine sites in three continents. Population structure analyses revealed two distinct lineages in South-East Asia, and three lineages in North America/Europe with a broad longitudinal and latitudinal range and limited admixture between lineages. Genome scans for selective sweeps and comparisons of the genomic landscapes of diversity and recombination provided no support for a role of selection at linked sites on genomic heterogeneity in levels of divergence between lineages. However, demographic inference indicated that the observed genomic heterogeneity in divergence was generated by varying rates of gene flow between lineages following a period of isolation. Many putative cases of exchange of genetic material between phylogenetically divergent fungal lineages have been discovered, and our work highlights the quantitative importance of genetic exchanges between more closely related taxa to the evolution of fungal genomes. Our study also supports the role of allopatric isolation as a driver of diversification in saprobic microbes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Proteomics analysis revealed changes in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins associated with oil mist exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Shan; Chen, Pang-Wei; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Su, Shu-Hui; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2006-04-01

    Exposure to oil mist has been associated with a variety of acute and chronic respiratory effects. Using proteomics approaches to investigate exposure-associated proteins may provide useful information to understand the mechanisms of associated respiratory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins associated with oil mist exposure using nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The results revealed that 29 proteins exhibited significant changes after exposure. These proteins included surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A and SP-D), inflammatory proteins (complement component 3, immunoglobulins, lysozyme, etc.), growth factors (e.g., transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha)), calcium-binding proteins (calcyclin, calgranulin A, calreticulin, and calvasculin), and other proteins (e.g., cathepsin D, saposin, and intestinal trefoil factor). To further evaluate changes in protein levels, a simple quantitative strategy was developed in this study. A large decrease in protein levels of SP-A and SP-D (0.24- and 0.38-fold, respectively) following exposure was observed. In contrast, protein levels of TGF-alpha and calcium-binding proteins were significantly increased (4.46- and 1.4-1.8-fold, respectively). Due to the diverse functions of these proteins, the results might contribute to understand the mechanisms involved in lung disorders induced by oil mist exposure.

  20. Genomic regions underlying agronomic traits in linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) as revealed by association mapping‡

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Cerda, Braulio J; Duguid, Scott; Booker, Helen; Rowland, Gordon; Diederichsen, Axel; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The extreme climate of the Canadian Prairies poses a major challenge to improve yield. Although it is possible to breed for yield per se, focusing on yield-related traits could be advantageous because of their simpler genetic architecture. The Canadian flax core collection of 390 accessions was genotyped with 464 simple sequence repeat markers, and phenotypic data for nine agronomic traits including yield, bolls per area, 1,000 seed weight, seeds per boll, start of flowering, end of flowering, plant height, plant branching, and lodging collected from up to eight environments was used for association mapping. Based on a mixed model (principal component analysis (PCA) + kinship matrix (K)), 12 significant marker-trait associations for six agronomic traits were identified. Most of the associations were stable across environments as revealed by multivariate analyses. Statistical simulation for five markers associated with 1000 seed weight indicated that the favorable alleles have additive effects. None of the modern cultivars carried the five favorable alleles and the maximum number of four observed in any accessions was mostly in breeding lines. Our results confirmed the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits and the inherent difficulties associated with their identification while illustrating the potential for improvement through marker-assisted selection. PMID:24138336

  1. Revealing genes associated with vitellogenesis in the liver of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) by transcriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Pekarski, Irena; Gutman, Ellen; Fortina, Paolo; Hyslop, Terry; Biran, Jakob; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Lubzens, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Background In oviparous vertebrates, including fish, vitellogenesis consists of highly regulated pathways involving 17β-estradiol (E2). Previous studies focused on a relatively small number of hepatic expressed genes during vitellogenesis. This study aims to identify hepatic genes involved in vitellogenesis and regulated by E2, by using zebrafish microarray gene expression profiling, and to provide information on functional distinctive genes expressed in the liver of a vitellogenic female, using zebrafish as a model fish. Results Genes associated with vitellogenesis were revealed by the following paired t-tests (SAM) comparisons: a) two-month old vitellogenic (Vit2) females were compared with non-vitellogenic (NV) females, showing 825 differentially expressed transcripts during early stages of vitellogenesis, b) four-month old vitellogenic (Vit4) females were compared with NV females, showing 1,046 differentially expressed transcripts during vitellogenesis and c) E2-treated males were compared with control males, showing 1,828 differentially expressed transcripts regulated by E2. A Venn diagram revealed 822 common transcripts in the three groups, indicating that these transcripts were involved in vitellogenesis and putatively regulated by E2. In addition, 431 transcripts were differentially expressed in Vit2 and Vit4 females but not in E2-treated males, indicating that they were putatively not up-regulated by E2. Correspondence analysis showed high similarity in expression profiles of Vit2 with Vit4 and of NV females with control males. The E2-treated males differed from the other groups. The repertoire of genes putatively regulated by E2 in vitellogenic females included genes associated with protein synthesis and reproduction. Genes associated with the immune system processes and biological adhesion, were among the genes that were putatively not regulated by E2. E2-treated males expressed a large array of transcripts that were not associated with vitellogenesis

  2. A genome-wide association study reveals a QTL influencing caudal supernumerary teats in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Joerg, H; Meili, C; Ruprecht, O; Bangerter, E; Burren, A; Bigler, A

    2014-12-01

    Supernumerary teats represent a common abnormality of the bovine udder. A genome-wide association study was performed based on the proportion of the occurrence of supernumerary teats in the daughters of 1097 Holstein bulls. The heritability of caudal supernumerary teats without mammary gland in this study was 0.604. The largest proportion of the heritability was attributable to BTA 20. The strongest evidence for association was with five SNPs on chromosome 20, referred to as a QTL. The mode of inheritance at this QTL was dominant. These findings reveal that the occurrence of caudal supernumerary teats without mammary gland in Holstein cattle is influenced by a QTL on chromosome 20 and a polygenic part. The data support the high potential of the SNPs in the QTL region as markers for breeding against caudal supernumerary teats. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  3. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  4. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Sabatos-DeVito, Maura; Schipul, Sarah E; Bulluck, John C; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T

    2016-04-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4-13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD. Disengagement was impaired across all groups during temporal overlap for dynamic stimuli compared to static, but only ASD showed slower disengagement from multimodal relative to unimodal dynamic stimuli. Attentional disengagement had differential associations with distinct sensory response patterns in ASD and DD. Atypical sensory processing and temporal binding appear to be intertwined with development of disengagement in ASD, but longitudinal studies are needed to unravel causal pathways.

  5. Preferential associations between co-regulated genes reveal a transcriptional interactome in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Sexton, Tom; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Cope, Nathan F; Horton, Alice; Andrews, Simon; Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Umlauf, David; Dimitrova, Daniela S; Eskiw, Christopher H; Luo, Yanquan; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Bieker, James J; Fraser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of interchromosomal interactions in higher eukaryotes points to a functional interplay between genome architecture and gene expression, challenging the view of transcription as a one-dimensional process. However, the extent of interchromosomal interactions and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we present the first genome-wide analysis of transcriptional interactions using the mouse globin genes in erythroid tissues. Our results show that the active globin genes associate with hundreds of other transcribed genes, revealing extensive and preferential intra- and interchromosomal transcription interactomes. We show that the transcription factor Klf1 mediates preferential co-associations of Klf1-regulated genes at a limited number of specialized transcription factories. Our results establish a new gene expression paradigm, implying that active co-regulated genes and their regulatory factors cooperate to create specialized nuclear hot spots optimized for efficient and coordinated transcriptional control.

  6. Genome-wide association and functional follow-up reveals new loci for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Köttgen, Anna; Teumer, Alexander; Garnaas, Maija; Böger, Carsten A; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D; Gierman, Hinco J; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD.

  7. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Schipul, Sarah E.; Bulluck, John C.; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T.

    2017-01-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4–13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD. Disengagement was impaired across all groups during temporal overlap for dynamic stimuli compared to static, but only ASD showed slower disengagement from multimodal relative to unimodal dynamic stimuli. Attentional disengagement had differential associations with distinct sensory response patterns in ASD and DD. Atypical sensory processing and temporal binding appear to be intertwined with development of disengagement in ASD, but longitudinal studies are needed to unravel causal pathways. PMID:26816345

  8. Parental diabetes status reveals association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J1 with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Jeanette; Ovadia, Ofer; Blech, Ilana; Cohen, Josef; Wainstein, Julio; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Background Although mitochondrial dysfunction is consistently manifested in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the association of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variants with T2DM varies among populations. These differences might stem from differing environmental influences among populations. However, other potentially important considerations emanate from the very nature of mitochondrial genetics, namely the notable high degree of partitioning in the distribution of human mtDNA variants among populations, as well as the interaction of mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors working in concert to govern mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that association of mtDNA genetic variants with T2DM could be revealed while controlling for the effect of additional inherited factors, reflected in family history information. Methods To test this hypothesis we set out to investigate whether mtDNA genetic variants will be differentially associated with T2DM depending on the diabetes status of the parents. To this end, association of mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplogroups) with T2DM was assessed in 1055 Jewish patients with and without T2DM parents ('DP' and 'HP', respectively). Results Haplogroup J1 was found to be 2.4 fold under-represented in the 'HP' patients (p = 0.0035). These results are consistent with a previous observation made in Finnish T2DM patients. Moreover, assessing the haplogroup distribution in 'DP' versus 'HP' patients having diabetic siblings revealed that haplogroup J1 was virtually absent in the 'HP' group. Conclusion These results imply the involvement of inherited factors, which modulate the susceptibility of haplogroup J1 to T2DM. PMID:19534826

  9. Identification of lncRNA-associated competing triplets reveals global patterns and prognostic markers for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, Ronghong; Ye, Jingrun; Zhao, Zuxianglan; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Zheng; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can interact with microRNAs (miRNAs) and indirectly regulate miRNA targets though competing interactions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are still largely unknown. In this study, these lncRNA–miRNA–gene interactions were defined as lncRNA-associated competing triplets (LncACTs), and an integrated pipeline was developed to identify lncACTs that are active in cancer. Competing lncRNAs had sponge features distinct from non-competing lncRNAs. In the lncACT cross-talk network, disease-associated lncRNAs, miRNAs and coding-genes showed specific topological patterns indicative of their competence and control of communication within the network. The construction of global competing activity profiles revealed that lncACTs had high activity specific to cancers. Analyses of clustered lncACTs revealed that they were enriched in various cancer-related biological processes. Based on the global cross-talk network and cluster analyses, nine cancer-specific sub-networks were constructed. H19- and BRCA1/2-associated lncACTs were able to discriminate between two groups of patients with different clinical outcomes. Disease-associated lncACTs also showed variable competing patterns across normal and cancer patient samples. In summary, this study uncovered and systematically characterized global properties of human lncACTs that may have prognostic value for predicting clinical outcome in cancer patients. PMID:25800746

  10. Quantitative weaknesses of the Marcus-Hush theory of electrode kinetics revealed by Reverse Scan Square Wave Voltammetry: The reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane at mercury microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborda, Eduardo; Wang, Yijun; Henstridge, Martin C.; Martínez-Ortiz, Francisco; Molina, Angela; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-08-01

    The Marcus-Hush and Butler-Volmer kinetic electrode models are compared experimentally by studying the reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane in acetonitrile at mercury microelectrodes using Reverse Scan Square Wave Voltammetry. This technique is found to be very sensitive to the electrode kinetics and to permit critical comparison of the two models. The Butler-Volmer model satisfactorily fits the experimental data whereas Marcus-Hush does not quantitatively describe this redox system.

  11. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Reveals an Association between Brain Iron Load and Depression Severity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shun; Zhong, Yi; Xu, Yuhao; Qin, Jiasheng; Zhang, Ningning; Zhu, Xiaolan; Li, Yuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have detected abnormal serum ferritin levels in patients with depression; however, the results have been inconsistent. This study used quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) for the first time to examine brain iron concentration in depressed patients and evaluated whether it is related to severity. We included three groups of age- and gender-matched participants: 30 patients with mild-moderate depression (MD), 14 patients with major depression disorder (MDD) and 20 control subjects. All participants underwent MR scans with a 3D gradient-echo sequence reconstructing for QSM and performed the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) test. In MDD, the susceptibility value in the bilateral putamen was significantly increased compared with MD or control subjects. In addition, a significant difference was also observed in the left thalamus in MDD patients compared with controls. However, the susceptibility values did not differ between MD patients and controls. The susceptibility values positively correlated with the severity of depression as indicated by the HDRS scores. Our results provide evidence that brain iron deposition may be associated with depression and may even be a biomarker for investigating the pathophysiological mechanism of depression.

  12. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  13. Association between number and sites of new bone scan abnormalities and presence of skeletal metastases in patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F.; Stomper, P.C.; Jochelson, M.S.; Ascoli, D.M.; Henderson, I.C.; Kaplan, W.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Review of 1,441 bone scans performed on 242 breast cancer patients without known skeletal metastases identified 239 scans with new abnormalities. Findings on 54 of these 239 scans (23%) represented bone metastases. The proportion of scans reflecting metastases, grouped by the number of new abnormalities, was: (1) 20/182 (11%); (2) 9/26 (35%); (3) 4/9 (45%); (4) 1/2 (50%); greater than or equal to 5-20/20 (100%). When metastatic disease presented as a bone scan with 1-4 new abnormalities, the spine was the most common site of involvement (18 of 34 (53%)), followed by the skull (5/34; 15%), extremities and sternum (each 4/34; 12%). Rib lesions were the most common new findings on scans with less than 5 new abnormalities (seen on 76 of 219 scans (35%)) but only infrequently represented metastases (n = 2). Considering as indicative of malignancy only, those bone scans which demonstrated either (a) greater than or equal to 5 new abnormalities, (b) initial radiographic correlation suggestive of metastases, or (c) thoracic spine lesions with normal correlative radiographs, the presence of skeletal metastatic disease could be predicted with a sensitivity of 0.80 and a specificity of 0.94.

  14. Evaluation of in-vivo measurement errors associated with micro-computed tomography scans by means of the bone surface distance approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2015-11-01

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning is an important tool for longitudinal monitoring of the bone adaptation process in animal models. However, the errors associated with the usage of in vivo µCT measurements for the evaluation of bone adaptations remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the measurement errors using the bone surface distance approach. The right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6 J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size (10.4 µm) and the tibiae were repositioned between each scan. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration and a region of interest was selected in the proximal tibia metaphysis for analysis. The bone surface distances between the repeated and the baseline scan datasets were evaluated. It was found that the average (±standard deviation) median and 95th percentile bone surface distances were 3.10 ± 0.76 µm and 9.58 ± 1.70 µm, respectively. This study indicated that there were inevitable errors associated with the in vivo µCT measurements of bone microarchitecture and these errors should be taken into account for a better interpretation of bone adaptations measured with in vivo µCT. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunohistochemistry in association with scanning electron microscopy for the morphological characterization and location of astrocytes of the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Haddad, A; Ramírez, A I; Laicine, E M; Salazar, J J; Triviño, A; Ramírez, J M

    2001-04-30

    The purpose of the present investigation was to establish a method for the morphological characterization and location of the several types of astrocytes in the rabbit retina. Whole retinas were incubated with unlabeled antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and, afterwards, treated with secondary antibody labeled according to the requirements for the visualization of the antigen-antibody reaction either with the confocal or transmission electron microscope. Specimens treated similarly to the latter were osmium enhanced and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The different immunohistochemical approaches led to the conclusion that the cells selectively visualized with the SEM are astrocytes. The higher resolution and depth of focus of this instrument allowed a better morphological characterization and a more precise location of the astrocytes in the several levels of the inner portion of the rabbit retina. The method described herein, in which pre-embedding immunohistochemistry for GFAP on rabbit retinas was associated with osmium enhancement and examination with SEM, proved to be reliable and efficient for the morphological characterization and location of astrocytes.

  16. Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses of the gallbladder are associated with black pigment gallstone formation: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Andrea; Cetta, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses are the result of hyperplasia and herniation of epithelial cells through the fibromuscular layer of the gallbladder wall and are usually referred to as adenomyomatosis. The role of this study is to demonstrate that Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses of the gallbladder are a risk factor for the formation of black pigment gallstones. A total of 179 removed gallbladders, were hystologically examined. Sixty-four of the 179 consecutive cholecystomized patients had typical adenomyomatosis. Thirty-eight of the 64 patients with adenomyomatosis had black pigment gallstones, alone (n=22) or in association with single (n=12) or multiple (n=4) cholesterol gallstones in the same gallbladder. Twelve of these patients did not have the typical risk factors for black stones (hemolysis, cirrhoses, gastrectomy, etc). Gallstones were examined by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. In addition, in a subset of 14 patients, the gallstones and the gallbladder wall were examined by scanning electron microscopy. At least in the initial phases of formation, Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses were found close to small intraparietal vessels and sometimes they contained black pigment microstones. After the fourth to fifth decades of life, black gallstones can be found in the Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses and in the main gallbladder lumen. Black pigment gallstones can form in Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses of the gallbladder in absence of the typical risk factors for bilirubin suprasaturation of bile.

  17. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation.

  18. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    PubMed

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), and this association was even more significant when comparing all parasite-positive samples with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.001). Additionally, our data revealed that a low abundance of Prevotella and a higher abundance of Clostridial cluster XIVa was associated with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Our data support the theory that Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella.

  19. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Longevity-Associated Protein Modulating Endothelial Function and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Villa, Francesco; Carrizzo, Albino; Spinelli, Chiara C; Ferrario, Anna; Malovini, Alberto; Maciąg, Anna; Damato, Antonio; Auricchio, Alberto; Spinetti, Gaia; Sangalli, Elena; Dang, Zexu; Madonna, Michele; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Sitia, Leopoldo; Bigini, Paolo; Calì, Gaetano; Schreiber, Stefan; Perls, Thomas; Fucile, Sergio; Mulas, Francesca; Nebel, Almut; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Madeddu, Paolo; Vecchione, Carmine; Puca, Annibale A

    2015-07-31

    Long living individuals show delay of aging, which is characterized by the progressive loss of cardiovascular homeostasis, along with reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, endothelial dysfunction, and impairment of tissue repair after ischemic injury. Exploit genetic analysis of long living individuals to reveal master molecular regulators of physiological aging and new targets for treatment of cardiovascular disease. We show that the polymorphic variant rs2070325 (Ile229Val) in bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold-containing-family-B-member-4 (BPIFB4) associates with exceptional longevity, under a recessive genetic model, in 3 independent populations. Moreover, the expression of BPIFB4 is instrumental to maintenance of cellular and vascular homeostasis through regulation of protein synthesis. BPIFB4 phosphorylation/activation by protein-kinase-R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase induces its complexing with 14-3-3 and heat shock protein 90, which is facilitated by the longevity-associated variant. In isolated vessels, BPIFB4 is upregulated by mechanical stress, and its knock-down inhibits endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In hypertensive rats and old mice, gene transfer of longevity-associated variant-BPIFB4 restores endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, rescues endothelial dysfunction, and reduces blood pressure levels. Furthermore, BPIFB4 is implicated in vascular repair. BPIFB4 is abundantly expressed in circulating CD34(+) cells of long living individuals, and its knock-down in endothelial progenitor cells precludes their capacity to migrate toward the chemoattractant SDF-1. In a murine model of peripheral ischemia, systemic gene therapy with longevity-associated variant-BPIFB4 promotes the recruitment of hematopoietic stem cells, reparative vascularization, and reperfusion of the ischemic muscle. Longevity-associated variant-BPIFB4 may represent a novel therapeutic tool to fight endothelial dysfunction and promote vascular

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of T cell activation reveals differential gene expression associated with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Palau, Nuria; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández, Emilia; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Marsal, Sara

    2013-11-23

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease in which T cells have a predominant role in initiating and perpetuating the chronic inflammation in skin. However, the mechanisms that regulate T cell activation in psoriasis are still incompletely understood. The objective of the present study was to characterize the main genetic pathways associated with T cell activation in psoriasis. Gene expression profiles from in vitro activated T cells were obtained from 17 psoriasis patients and 7 healthy controls using Illumina HT-12 v4 microarrays. From a total of 47,321 analyzed transcripts, 42 genes were found to be differentially expressed between psoriasis and controls (FDR p-value < 0.1, absolute fold-change > 1.2). Using an independent cohort of 8 patients and 8 healthy controls we validated the overexpression of SPATS2L (p-value =0.0009) and KLF6 (p-value =0.0012) genes in activated T cells from psoriasis patients. Using weighted correlation analysis we identified SPATS2L and KLF6 coexpression networks, which were also significantly associated with psoriasis (p-value < 0.05). Gene Ontology analysis allowed the identification of several biological processes associated with each coexpression network. Finally, using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis over the global T cell transcriptome we also found additional genetic pathways strongly associated with psoriasis (p-value < 0.0001). This study has identified two new genes, SPATS2L and KLF6, strongly associated with T cell activation in psoriasis. Functional analyses of the gene expression profiles also revealed new biological processes and genetic pathways associated with psoriasis. The results of this study provide an important insight into the biology of this common chronic inflammatory disease.

  1. Genomic scan of selective sweeps in thin and fat tail sheep breeds for identifying of candidate regions associated with fat deposition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of genomic regions that have been targets of selection for phenotypic traits is one of the most important and challenging areas of research in animal genetics. However, currently there are relatively few genomic regions identified that have been subject to positive selection. In this study, a genome-wide scan using ~50,000 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed in an attempt to identify genomic regions associated with fat deposition in fat-tail breeds. This trait and its modification are very important in those countries grazing these breeds. Results Two independent experiments using either Iranian or Ovine HapMap genotyping data contrasted thin and fat tail breeds. Population differentiation using FST in Iranian thin and fat tail breeds revealed seven genomic regions. Almost all of these regions overlapped with QTLs that had previously been identified as affecting fat and carcass yield traits in beef and dairy cattle. Study of selection sweep signatures using FST in thin and fat tail breeds sampled from the Ovine HapMap project confirmed three of these regions located on Chromosomes 5, 7 and X. We found increased homozygosity in these regions in favour of fat tail breeds on chromosome 5 and X and in favour of thin tail breeds on chromosome 7. Conclusions In this study, we were able to identify three novel regions associated with fat deposition in thin and fat tail sheep breeds. Two of these were associated with an increase of homozygosity in the fat tail breeds which would be consistent with selection for mutations affecting fat tail size several thousand years after domestication. PMID:22364287

  2. Genomic scan of selective sweeps in thin and fat tail sheep breeds for identifying of candidate regions associated with fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad Hossein; Nejati-Javaremi, Ardeshir; Moradi-Shahrbabak, Mohammad; Dodds, Ken G; McEwan, John C

    2012-02-26

    Identification of genomic regions that have been targets of selection for phenotypic traits is one of the most important and challenging areas of research in animal genetics. However, currently there are relatively few genomic regions identified that have been subject to positive selection. In this study, a genome-wide scan using ~50,000 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed in an attempt to identify genomic regions associated with fat deposition in fat-tail breeds. This trait and its modification are very important in those countries grazing these breeds. Two independent experiments using either Iranian or Ovine HapMap genotyping data contrasted thin and fat tail breeds. Population differentiation using FST in Iranian thin and fat tail breeds revealed seven genomic regions. Almost all of these regions overlapped with QTLs that had previously been identified as affecting fat and carcass yield traits in beef and dairy cattle. Study of selection sweep signatures using FST in thin and fat tail breeds sampled from the Ovine HapMap project confirmed three of these regions located on Chromosomes 5, 7 and X. We found increased homozygosity in these regions in favour of fat tail breeds on chromosome 5 and X and in favour of thin tail breeds on chromosome 7. In this study, we were able to identify three novel regions associated with fat deposition in thin and fat tail sheep breeds. Two of these were associated with an increase of homozygosity in the fat tail breeds which would be consistent with selection for mutations affecting fat tail size several thousand years after domestication.

  3. Genome-wide interrogation reveals hundreds of long intergenic noncoding RNAs that associate with cardiometabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Rachel L; Zhang, Xuan; Nuñez, Sara; Xue, Chenyi; Zhao, Wei; Reed, Eric; Salaheen, Danish; Foulkes, Andrea S; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P

    2016-07-15

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) play important roles in disease, but the vast majority of these transcripts remain uncharacterized. We defined a set of 54 944 human lincRNAs by drawing on four publicly available lincRNA datasets, and annotated ∼2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each of 15 cardiometabolic genome-wide association study datasets into these lincRNAs. We identified hundreds of lincRNAs with at least one trait-associated SNP: 898 SNPs in 343 unique lincRNAs at 5% false discovery rate, and 469 SNPs in 146 unique lincRNAs meeting Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05. An additional 64 trait-associated lincRNAs were identified using a class-level testing strategy at Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05. To better understand the genomic context and prioritize trait-associated lincRNAs, we examined the pattern of linkage disequilibrium between SNPs in the lincRNAs and SNPs that met genome-wide-significance in the region (±500 kb of lincRNAs). A subset of the lincRNA-trait association findings was replicated in independent Genome-wide association studies data from the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study study. For trait-associated lincRNAs, we also investigated synteny and conservation relative to mouse, expression patterns in five cardiometabolic-relevant tissues, and allele-specific expression in RNA sequencing data for adipose tissue and leukocytes. Finally, we revealed a functional role in human adipocytes for linc-NFE2L3-1, which is expressed in adipose and is associated with waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI. This comprehensive profile of trait-associated lincRNAs provides novel insights into disease mechanism and serves as a launching point for interrogation of the biology of specific lincRNAs in cardiometabolic disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  5. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of coleoptile length in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Genqiao; Bai, Guihua; Carver, Brett F; Elliott, Norman C; Bennett, Rebecca S; Wu, Yanqi; Hunger, Robert; Bonman, J Michael; Xu, Xiangyang

    2017-02-01

    Eight QTL for coleoptile length were identified in a genome-wide association study on a set of 893 wheat accessions, four of which are novel loci. Wheat cultivars with long coleoptiles are preferred in wheat-growing regions where deep planting is practiced. However, the wide use of gibberellic acid (GA)-insensitive dwarfing genes, Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b, makes it challenging to breed dwarf wheat cultivars with long coleoptiles. To understand the genetic basis of coleoptile length, we performed a genome-wide association study on a set of 893 landraces and historical cultivars using 5011 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Structure analysis revealed four subgroups in the association panel. Association analysis results suggested that Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b genes significantly reduced coleoptile length, and eight additional quantitative trait loci (QTL) for coleoptile length were also identified. These QTL explained 1.45-3.18 and 1.36-3.11% of the phenotypic variation in 2015 and 2016, respectively, and their allelic substitution effects ranged from 0.31 to 1.75 cm in 2015, and 0.63-1.55 cm in 2016. Of the eight QTL, QCL.stars-1BS1, QCL.stars-2DS1, QCL.stars-4BS2, and QCL.stars-5BL1 are likely novel loci for coleoptile length. The favorable alleles in each accession ranged from two to eight with an average of 5.8 at eight loci in the panel, and more favorable alleles were significantly associated with longer coleoptile, suggesting that QTL pyramiding is an effective approach to increase wheat coleoptile length.

  6. Sedimentary features of the south Texas continental slope as revealed by side-scan sonar and high-resolution seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, R.G.; Kenyon, N.H. ); McGregor, B.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Sedimentary provinces on the south Texas slope have been identified by their acoustic character on long-range side-scan sonar records and high-resolution seismic profiles. Probable lithofacies within these provinces have been identified by core data and by analogy with previously cored acoustic facies. In the northern part of the study area, the East Breaks Slide is a prominent mass-transport feature. Revised bathymetry shows that the slide originated on the upper slope (200-1,000 m), in front of a sandy late Wisconsinan shelf-margin delta, where the gradient is up to 3{degree}. Side-scan sonar data indicates that the slide is a strongly backscattering feature extending more than 110 km downslope from the shelf edge. it consists of two lobes that are separated by a diapiric high. Diapiric highs on the middle slope have blocked most of the flow. borehole data shows that the slide deposit contains intercalated sands and contorted bedding. The slide is therefore attributed to failure of sandy deltaic material deposited close to the shelf edge during the last period of low sea level (late Wisconsinan, circa 11-29 Ka). Core data suggests that the weakly backscattering acoustic facies adjacent to the slide are fine-grained sediments (mudturbidites and hemipelagites) of a slope mud drape. The middle slope in front of the sandy late Wisconsinan shelf-margin delta of the Rio Grande has an intermediate level of backscattering with numerous channels leading to the Sigsbee Deep. Acoustic facies mapping using long-range side-scan sonar matches well with acoustic facies mapping using 3.5-kHz high-resolution seismic profiles.

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for total body BMD in children and adults reveals allelic heterogeneity and age-specific effects at the WNT16 locus.

    PubMed

    Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Kemp, John P; Estrada, Karol; Eriksson, Joel; Liu, Jeff; Reppe, Sjur; Evans, David M; Heppe, Denise H M; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ring, Susan M; Kruithof, Claudia J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Zillikens, M Carola; Olstad, Ole K; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Richards, J Brent; St Pourcain, Beate; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Smith, George Davey; Lorentzon, Mattias; Gautvik, Kaare M; Uitterlinden, André G; Brommage, Robert; Ohlsson, Claes; Tobias, Jonathan H; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing bone accrual, we performed a genome-wide association scan for total-body bone mineral density (TB-BMD) variation in 2,660 children of different ethnicities. We discovered variants in 7q31.31 associated with BMD measurements, with the lowest P = 4.1 × 10(-11) observed for rs917727 with minor allele frequency of 0.37. We sought replication for all SNPs located ± 500 kb from rs917727 in 11,052 additional individuals from five independent studies including children and adults, together with de novo genotyping of rs3801387 (in perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs917727) in 1,014 mothers of children from the discovery cohort. The top signal mapping in the surroundings of WNT16 was replicated across studies with a meta-analysis P = 2.6 × 10(-31) and an effect size explaining between 0.6%-1.8% of TB-BMD variance. Conditional analyses on this signal revealed a secondary signal for total body BMD (P = 1.42 × 10(-10)) for rs4609139 and mapping to C7orf58. We also examined the genomic region for association with skull BMD to test if the associations were independent of skeletal loading. We identified two signals influencing skull BMD variation, including rs917727 (P = 1.9 × 10(-16)) and rs7801723 (P = 8.9 × 10(-28)), also mapping to C7orf58 (r(2) = 0.50 with rs4609139). Wnt16 knockout (KO) mice with reduced total body BMD and gene expression profiles in human bone biopsies support a role of C7orf58 and WNT16 on the BMD phenotypes observed at the human population level. In summary, we detected two independent signals influencing total body and skull BMD variation in children and adults, thus demonstrating the presence of allelic heterogeneity at the WNT16 locus. One of the skull BMD signals mapping to C7orf58 is mostly driven by children, suggesting temporal determination on peak bone mass acquisition. Our life-course approach postulates that these genetic effects influencing peak bone mass accrual may impact the risk of

  8. Correlation of spicule sign on computed tomography scans with peripheral lung cancers associated with interstitial lung disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Gao, L; Wu, W L

    2015-03-27

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between spicular signs on computed tomography (CT) scans and peripheral lung cancer (PLC) that is associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We analyzed clinical data from 96 PLC cases and grouped patients based on whether they had interstitial pneumonia into either ILD/COPD group or non-ILD/COPD group. The occurrence rate of spicule sign was 90.3% in the ILD/COPD group and 61.8% in the non-ILD/COPD group, respectively. There was a significant difference between these groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of spicular signs among patients with different pathological types of PLC. The severity of ILD affected the spicular morphology on CT scans directly. There was a significant correlation between the appearance of spicule sign on CT scans and PLC that was associated with ILD/COPD.

  9. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  10. Genome of the pitcher plant Cephalotus reveals genetic changes associated with carnivory.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fang, Xiaodong; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Cai, Huimin; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Chen, Cui; Chang, Tien-Hao; Farr, Kimberly M; Fujita, Tomomichi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Imai, Takamasa; Kasahara, Masahiro; Librado, Pablo; Mao, Likai; Mori, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Nozawa, Masafumi; Pálfalvi, Gergő; Pollard, Stephen T; Rozas, Julio; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Sankoff, David; Shibata, Tomoko F; Shigenobu, Shuji; Sumikawa, Naomi; Uzawa, Taketoshi; Xie, Meiying; Zheng, Chunfang; Pollock, David D; Albert, Victor A; Li, Shuaicheng; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2017-02-06

    Carnivorous plants exploit animals as a nutritional source and have inspired long-standing questions about the origin and evolution of carnivory-related traits. To investigate the molecular bases of carnivory, we sequenced the genome of the heterophyllous pitcher plant Cephalotus follicularis, in which we succeeded in regulating the developmental switch between carnivorous and non-carnivorous leaves. Transcriptome comparison of the two leaf types and gene repertoire analysis identified genetic changes associated with prey attraction, capture, digestion and nutrient absorption. Analysis of digestive fluid proteins from C. follicularis and three other carnivorous plants with independent carnivorous origins revealed repeated co-options of stress-responsive protein lineages coupled with convergent amino acid substitutions to acquire digestive physiology. These results imply constraints on the available routes to evolve plant carnivory.

  11. A survey of emergency physicians' fear of malpractice and its association with the decision to order computed tomography scans for children with minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andrew C; Kowalenko, Terry; Roahen-Harrison, Stephanie; Smith, Barbara; Maio, Ronald F; Stanley, Rachel M

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether fear of malpractice is associated with emergency physicians' decision to order head computed tomography (CT) in 3 age-specific scenarios of pediatric minor head trauma. We hypothesized that physicians with higher fear of malpractice scores will be more likely to order head CT scans. Board-eligible/board-certified members of the Michigan College of Emergency Physicians were sent a 2-part survey consisting of case scenarios and demographic questions. Effect of fear of malpractice on the decision to order a CT scan was evaluated using a cumulative logit model. Two hundred forty-six members (36.5%) completed the surveys. In scenario 1 (infant), being a male and working in a university setting were associated with reduced odds of ordering a CT scan (odds ratio [OR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18-0.88; and OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.13-0.96, respectively). In scenario 2 (toddler), working for 15 years or more, at multiple hospitals, and for a private group were associated with reduced odds of ordering a CT scan (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.26-0.79; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.16-0.80; and OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.94, respectively). No demographic variables were significantly associated with ordering a CT scan in scenario 3 (teen). Overall, the fear of malpractice was not significantly associated with ordering a CT scan (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.73-2.26; and OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 0.97-3.0). Only in scenario 2 was high fear significantly associated with increased odds of ordering a CT scan (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.08-4.05). Members of Michigan College of Emergency Physicians with a higher fear of malpractice score tended to order more head CT scans in pediatric minor head trauma. However, this trend was shown to be statistically significant only in 1 case and not overall.

  12. Copulatory courtship by bushcricket genital titillators revealed by functional morphology, μCT scanning for 3D reconstruction and female sense structures.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Nadja C; Lehmann, Arne W; Hipsley, Christy A; Lehmann, Gerlind U C

    2015-07-01

    Genitalia are rapidly evolving morphological structures most likely under sexual selection. Due to their internal nature they are often hidden inside the body, thus morpho-functional studies of animal genitalia are broadly lacking. Males of some bushcricket taxa bear paired genital appendices called titillators, the exact function of which is unknown since they are obscured inside the female body during pairing. To investigate titillator morphology and possible function during copulation, we studied the bushcricket Metrioptera roeselii (Hagenbach, 1822) using a novel combination of independent, yet complementary, techniques. Copulating pairs were snap-frozen and scanned by X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) to visualize the coupling of male and female genitalia in situ. Video recordings of copulating pairs also showed rhythmical insertion of male titillators into the female's genital chamber, where they percuss a softened structure on the female's subgenital plate. Movements did not induce damage to the female's structure, which lacks any sclerotized genital counterparts. Instead, scanning electron microscopy and histological sections show the female subgenital plate to be covered with two different types of sensory receptors at the contact zone between the male's titillator and the female genital chamber. We interpret the non-harmful function of the titillator processes, the lack of a genital counter-structure and the presence of sensory cells on the female's subgenital plate as indicators of a copulatory courtship function of titillators, subject to sexual selection by female choice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An eye tracking system for monitoring face scanning patterns reveals the enhancing effect of oxytocin on eye contact in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Manato; Shimono, Kohei; Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Nakako, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Kenji; Ogi, Yuji; Konoike, Naho; Nakamura, Katsuki; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2017-09-01

    Eye tracking systems are used to investigate eyes position and gaze patterns presumed as eye contact in humans. Eye contact is a useful biomarker of social communication and known to be deficient in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Interestingly, the same eye tracking systems have been used to directly compare face scanning patterns in some non-human primates to those in human. Thus, eye tracking is expected to be a useful translational technique for investigating not only social attention and visual interest, but also the effects of psychiatric drugs, such as oxytocin, a neuropeptide that regulates social behavior. In this study, we report on a newly established method for eye tracking in common marmosets as unique New World primates that, like humans, use eye contact as a mean of communication. Our investigation was aimed at characterizing these primates face scanning patterns and evaluating the effects of oxytocin on their eye contact behavior. We found that normal common marmosets spend more time viewing the eyes region in common marmoset's picture than the mouth region or a scrambled picture. In oxytocin experiment, the change in eyes/face ratio was significantly greater in the oxytocin group than in the vehicle group. Moreover, oxytocin-induced increase in the change in eyes/face ratio was completely blocked by the oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899. These results indicate that eye tracking in common marmosets may be useful for evaluating drug candidates targeting psychiatric conditions, especially ASDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oligomerization process of Bcl-2 associated X protein revealed from intermediate structures in solution.

    PubMed

    Shih, Orion; Yeh, Yi-Qi; Liao, Kuei-Fen; Sung, Tai-Ching; Chiang, Yun-Wei; Jeng, U-Ser

    2017-03-15

    Upon apoptotic stress, Bcl-2 associated X (BAX) protein undergoes conformational changes and oligomerizes, leading to the mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death. While structures of the resultant oligomer have been extensively studied, little is known about the intermediates that describe the reaction pathway from the inactive monomers to activated oligomers. Here we characterize the intermediate structures of BAX using combined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with on-line gel-filtration and electron spin resonance (ESR). The intermediates, including monomers, dimers, and tetramers, are reconstructed via integrating the SAXS-envelopes and ESR-determined skeleton structures. The hence revealed structures suggest a linear oligomerization of BAX utilizing the extended dimers with the two flexible α6 chains protruded out as ditopic ligands. The results of molecular dynamics simulation also support the ditopic dimer conformation with mobile α6. The ditopic dimers could further wind into a helical rod structure with three dimers in one helical turn. Our results not only reveal the on-pathway intermediates, but also suggest a ditopic oligomerization mechanism that may bridge the observed intermediate structures in solution to the large BAX assemblies lately observed on mitochondria.

  15. Ecoinformatics Can Reveal Yield Gaps Associated with Crop-Pest Interactions: A Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheim, Jay A.; Meisner, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Farmers and private consultants execute a vast, decentralized data collection effort with each cropping cycle, as they gather pest density data to make real-time pest management decisions. Here we present a proof of concept for an ecoinformatics approach to pest management research, which attempts to harness these data to answer questions about pest-crop interactions. The impact of herbivory by Lygus hesperus on cotton is explored as a case study. Consultant-derived data satisfied a ‘positive control’ test for data quality by clearly resolving the expected negative relationship between L. hesperus density and retention of flower buds. The enhanced statistical power afforded by the large ecoinformatics dataset revealed an early-season window of crop sensitivity, during which L. hesperus densities as low as 1-2 per sample were associated with yield loss. In contrast, during the mid-season insecticide use by farmers was often unnecessary, as cotton compensated fully for moderate L. hesperus densities. Because the dataset emerged from the commercial production setting, it also revealed the limited degree to which farmers were willing to delay crop harvest to provide opportunities for compensatory fruiting. Observational approaches to pest management research have strengths and weaknesses that complement those of traditional, experimental approaches; combining these methods can contribute to enhanced agricultural productivity. PMID:24260408

  16. Ecoinformatics can reveal yield gaps associated with crop-pest interactions: a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Rosenheim, Jay A; Meisner, Matthew H

    2013-01-01

    Farmers and private consultants execute a vast, decentralized data collection effort with each cropping cycle, as they gather pest density data to make real-time pest management decisions. Here we present a proof of concept for an ecoinformatics approach to pest management research, which attempts to harness these data to answer questions about pest-crop interactions. The impact of herbivory by Lygus hesperus on cotton is explored as a case study. Consultant-derived data satisfied a 'positive control' test for data quality by clearly resolving the expected negative relationship between L. hesperus density and retention of flower buds. The enhanced statistical power afforded by the large ecoinformatics dataset revealed an early-season window of crop sensitivity, during which L. hesperus densities as low as 1-2 per sample were associated with yield loss. In contrast, during the mid-season insecticide use by farmers was often unnecessary, as cotton compensated fully for moderate L. hesperus densities. Because the dataset emerged from the commercial production setting, it also revealed the limited degree to which farmers were willing to delay crop harvest to provide opportunities for compensatory fruiting. Observational approaches to pest management research have strengths and weaknesses that complement those of traditional, experimental approaches; combining these methods can contribute to enhanced agricultural productivity.

  17. Proteome analysis of pear reveals key genes associated with fruit development and quality.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia Ming; Huang, Xiao San; Li, Lie Ting; Zheng, Dan Man; Xue, Cheng; Zhang, Shao Ling; Wu, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Comparative and association analyses of the proteome and transcriptome for pear fruit development were conducted for the first time in this study. Pear fruit development involves complex physiological and biochemical processes, but there is still little knowledge available at proteomic and transcriptomic levels, which would be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of fruit development and quality in pear. In our study, three important stages, including early development (S4-22), middle development (S6-27), and near ripening (S8-30), were investigated in 'Dangshansuli' by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology, identifying a total of 1,810 proteins during pear fruit development. The association analysis of proteins and transcript expression revealed 1,724, 1,722, and 1,718 associated proteins identified in stages S4-22, S6-27, and S8-30, respectively. A total of 237, 318, and 425 unique proteins were identified as differentially expressed during S4-22 vs S6-27, S6-27 vs S8-30, S4-22 vs S8-30, respectively, and the corresponding correlation coefficients of the overall differentially expressed proteins and transcripts data were 0.6336, 0.4113, and 0.7049. The phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway, which is related to lignin formation of pear fruit, was identified as a significantly enriched pathway during early stages of fruit development. Finally, a total of 35 important differentially expressed proteins related to fruit quality were identified, including three proteins related to sugar formation, seven proteins related to aroma synthesis, and sixteen proteins related to the formation of lignin. In addition, qRT-PCR verification provided further evidence to support differentially expressed gene selection. This study is the first to reveal protein and associated mRNA variations in pear during fruit development and quality conformation, and identify key genes and proteins helpful for future functional genomics

  18. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Murphy, Laura; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Warrier, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419) versus low (n = 183) mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5), 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6)). In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859) showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115) were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4)). Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64). The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  19. MHC class II DRB diversity in raccoons (Procyon lotor) reveals associations with raccoon rabies virus (Lyssavirus).

    PubMed

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Castillo, Sarrah; Rosatte, Rick C; Kyle, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    In North America, the raccoon rabies virus (RRV) is an endemic wildlife disease which causes acute encephalopathies and is a strong selective force on raccoons (Procyon lotor), with estimates of ∼85% of the population succumbing to the disease when epizootic. RRV is regarded as a lethal disease if untreated; therefore, no evolutionary response would be expected of raccoon populations. However, variable immune responses to RRV have been observed in raccoons indicating a potential for evolutionary adaptation. Studies of variation within the immunologically important major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have revealed relationships between MHC alleles and diseases in humans and other wildlife species. This enhances our understanding of how hosts and pathogens adapt and co-evolve. In this study, we used RRV as a model system to study host-pathogen interaction in raccoons from a challenge study and from four wild populations that differ in exposure times and viral lineages. We investigated the potential role of Prlo-DRB polymorphism in relation to susceptibility/resistance to RRV in 113 RRV positive and 143 RRV negative raccoons. Six alleles were found to be associated with RRV negative status and five alleles with RRV positive animals. We found variable patterns of MHC associations given the relative number of selective RRV sweeps in the studied regions and correlations between MHC diversity and RRV lineages. The allelic associations established provide insight into how the genetic variation of raccoons may affect the disease outcome and this can be used to examine similar associations between other rabies variants and their hosts.

  20. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  1. A comparative scanning electron microscopy evaluation of smear layer removal with apple vinegar and sodium hypochlorite associated with EDTA

    PubMed Central

    CANDEIRO, George Táccio de Miranda; de MATOS, Isabela Barbosa; da COSTA, Clarice Fernandes Eloy; FONTELES, Cristiane Sá Roriz; do VALE, Mônica Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the removal of smear layer from the middle and apical root thirds after use of different irrigating solutions. Material and Methods Forty roots of permanent human teeth had their canals instrumented and were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=10), according to the irrigating solution: apple vinegar (group A), apple vinegar finished with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (group B), 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) finished with 17% EDTA (group C) and saline (group D - control). After chemomechanical preparation, the roots were cleaved longitudinally and their middle and apical thirds were examined by SEM at ×1,000 magnification. Two calibrated examiners (kappa=0.92) analyzed the SEM micrographs qualitatively attributing scores that indicated the efficacy of the solutions in removing the smear layer from the surface of the dentin tubules (1 - poor, 2 - good and 3 - excellent). Data from the control and experimental groups were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test, while the Wilcoxon test was used to compare the middle and apical thirds of the canals within the same group (α=0.05). Results The middle third presented less amount of smear layer than the apical third, regardless of the irrigant. There was statistically significant difference (p=0.0402) among the groups in the middle third. In the apical third, the apple vinegar/EDTA group showed the greatest removal of smear layer (p=0.0373). Conclusion Apple vinegar associated or not with EDTA was effective in removing smear layer when used as an endodontic irrigant. PMID:22231000

  2. Multivariate analysis reveals genetic associations of the resting default mode network in psychotic bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Shashwath A.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; O’Neil, Kasey; Berwise, Clifton; Dunn, Sabra M.; Boccaccio, Leah E.; Narayanan, Balaji; Kocherla, Mohan; Sprooten, Emma; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Sweeney, John A.; Clementz, Brett A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The brain’s default mode network (DMN) is highly heritable and is compromised in a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, genetic control over the DMN in schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) is largely unknown. Study subjects (n = 1,305) underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and were analyzed by a two-stage approach. The initial analysis used independent component analysis (ICA) in 324 healthy controls, 296 SZ probands, 300 PBP probands, 179 unaffected first-degree relatives of SZ probands (SZREL), and 206 unaffected first-degree relatives of PBP probands to identify DMNs and to test their biomarker and/or endophenotype status. A subset of controls and probands (n = 549) then was subjected to a parallel ICA (para-ICA) to identify imaging–genetic relationships. ICA identified three DMNs. Hypo-connectivity was observed in both patient groups in all DMNs. Similar patterns observed in SZREL were restricted to only one network. DMN connectivity also correlated with several symptom measures. Para-ICA identified five sub-DMNs that were significantly associated with five different genetic networks. Several top-ranking SNPs across these networks belonged to previously identified, well-known psychosis/mood disorder genes. Global enrichment analyses revealed processes including NMDA-related long-term potentiation, PKA, immune response signaling, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis that significantly influenced DMN modulation in psychoses. In summary, we observed both unique and shared impairments in functional connectivity across the SZ and PBP cohorts; these impairments were selectively familial only for SZREL. Genes regulating specific neurodevelopment/transmission processes primarily mediated DMN disconnectivity. The study thus identifies biological pathways related to a widely researched quantitative trait that might suggest novel, targeted drug treatments for these diseases. PMID:24778245

  3. Multivariate analysis reveals genetic associations of the resting default mode network in psychotic bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meda, Shashwath A; Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; O'Neil, Kasey; Berwise, Clifton; Dunn, Sabra M; Boccaccio, Leah E; Narayanan, Balaji; Kocherla, Mohan; Sprooten, Emma; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A; Clementz, Brett A; Calhoun, Vince D; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2014-05-13

    The brain's default mode network (DMN) is highly heritable and is compromised in a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, genetic control over the DMN in schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) is largely unknown. Study subjects (n = 1,305) underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and were analyzed by a two-stage approach. The initial analysis used independent component analysis (ICA) in 324 healthy controls, 296 SZ probands, 300 PBP probands, 179 unaffected first-degree relatives of SZ probands (SZREL), and 206 unaffected first-degree relatives of PBP probands to identify DMNs and to test their biomarker and/or endophenotype status. A subset of controls and probands (n = 549) then was subjected to a parallel ICA (para-ICA) to identify imaging-genetic relationships. ICA identified three DMNs. Hypo-connectivity was observed in both patient groups in all DMNs. Similar patterns observed in SZREL were restricted to only one network. DMN connectivity also correlated with several symptom measures. Para-ICA identified five sub-DMNs that were significantly associated with five different genetic networks. Several top-ranking SNPs across these networks belonged to previously identified, well-known psychosis/mood disorder genes. Global enrichment analyses revealed processes including NMDA-related long-term potentiation, PKA, immune response signaling, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis that significantly influenced DMN modulation in psychoses. In summary, we observed both unique and shared impairments in functional connectivity across the SZ and PBP cohorts; these impairments were selectively familial only for SZREL. Genes regulating specific neurodevelopment/transmission processes primarily mediated DMN disconnectivity. The study thus identifies biological pathways related to a widely researched quantitative trait that might suggest novel, targeted drug treatments for these diseases.

  4. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam R.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Dejene, Eden A.; Ramadan, James W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Taylor, Kent D.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Watanabe, Richard M.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  5. Dissection of Genomewide-Scan Data in Extended Families Reveals a Major Locus and Oligogenic Susceptibility for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Sudha K.; Song, Danhong; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Schick, James H.; Humphrey, Jennifer; Millard, Christopher; Liptak, Rachel; Russo, Karlie; Jun, Gyungah; Lee, Kristine E.; Fijal, Bonnie; Elston, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), a degenerative disease of the retinal pigment epithelium and neurosensory retina, we conducted a genomewide scan in 34 extended families (297 individuals, 349 sib pairs) ascertained through index cases with neovascular disease or geographic atrophy. Family and medical history was obtained from index cases and family members. Fundus photographs were taken of all participating family members, and these were graded for severity by use of a quantitative scale. Model-free linkage analysis was performed, and tests of heterogeneity and epistasis were conducted. We have evidence of a major locus on chromosome 15q (GATA50C03 multipoint P=1.98×10-7; empirical P⩽1.0×10-5; single-point P=3.6×10-7). This locus was present as a weak linkage signal in our previous genome scan for ARMD, in the Beaver Dam Eye Study sample (D15S659, multipoint P=.047), but is otherwise novel. In this genome scan, we observed a total of 13 regions on 11 chromosomes (1q31, 2p21, 4p16, 5q34, 9p24, 9q31, 10q26, 12q13, 12q23, 15q21, 16p12, 18p11, and 20q13), with a nominal multipoint significance level of P⩽.01 or LOD ⩾1.18. Family-by-family analysis of the data, performed using model-free linkage methods, suggests that there is evidence of heterogeneity in these families. For example, a single family (family 460) individually shows linkage evidence at 8 loci, at the level of P<.0001. We conducted tests for heterogeneity, which suggest that ARMD susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9p24, 10q26, and 15q21 are not present in all families. We tested for mutations in linked families and examined SNPs in two candidate genes, hemicentin-1 and EFEMP1, in subsamples (145 and 189 sib pairs, respectively) of the data. Mutations were not observed in any of the 11 exons of EFEMP1 nor in exon 104 of hemicentin-1. The SNP analysis for hemicentin-1 on 1q31 suggests that variants within or in very close proximity to this gene cause ARMD

  6. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  7. Genetic architecture dissection by genome-wide association analysis reveals avian eggshell ultrastructure traits

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhongyi; Sun, Congjiao; Shen, ManMan; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of an eggshell is considered the major determinant of eggshell quality, which has biological and economic significance for the avian and poultry industries. However, the interrelationships and genome-wide architecture of eggshell ultrastructure remain to be elucidated. Herein, we measured eggshell thickness (EST), effective layer thickness (ET), mammillary layer thickness (MT), and mammillary density (MD) and conducted genome-wide association studies in 927 F2 hens. The SNP-based heritabilities of eggshell ultrastructure traits were estimated to be 0.39, 0.36, 0.17 and 0.19 for EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively, and a total of 719, 784, 1 and 10 genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively. ABCC9, ITPR2, KCNJ8 and WNK1, which are involved in ion transport, were suggested to be the key genes regulating EST and ET. ITM2C and KNDC1 likely affect MT and MD, respectively. Additionally, there were linear relationships between the chromosome lengths and the variance explained per chromosome for EST (R2 = 0.57) and ET (R2 = 0.67). In conclusion, the interrelationships and genetic architecture of eggshell ultrastructure traits revealed in this study are valuable for our understanding of the avian eggshell and contribute to research on a variety of other calcified shells. PMID:27456605

  8. Mammalian Comparative Genomics Reveals Genetic and Epigenetic Features Associated with Genome Reshuffling in Rodentia

    PubMed Central

    Capilla, Laia; Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa Ana; Farré, Marta; Paytuví-Gallart, Andreu; Malinverni, Roberto; Ventura, Jacint; Larkin, Denis M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding how mammalian genomes have been reshuffled through structural changes is fundamental to the dynamics of its composition, evolutionary relationships between species and, in the long run, speciation. In this work, we reveal the evolutionary genomic landscape in Rodentia, the most diverse and speciose mammalian order, by whole-genome comparisons of six rodent species and six representative outgroup mammalian species. The reconstruction of the evolutionary breakpoint regions across rodent phylogeny shows an increased rate of genome reshuffling that is approximately two orders of magnitude greater than in other mammalian species here considered. We identified novel lineage and clade-specific breakpoint regions within Rodentia and analyzed their gene content, recombination rates and their relationship with constitutive lamina genomic associated domains, DNase I hypersensitivity sites and chromatin modifications. We detected an accumulation of protein-coding genes in evolutionary breakpoint regions, especially genes implicated in reproduction and pheromone detection and mating. Moreover, we found an association of the evolutionary breakpoint regions with active chromatin state landscapes, most probably related to gene enrichment. Our results have two important implications for understanding the mechanisms that govern and constrain mammalian genome evolution. The first is that the presence of genes related to species-specific phenotypes in evolutionary breakpoint regions reinforces the adaptive value of genome reshuffling. Second, that chromatin conformation, an aspect that has been often overlooked in comparative genomic studies, might play a role in modeling the genomic distribution of evolutionary breakpoints. PMID:28175287

  9. Revealing gene clusters associated with the development of cholangiocarcinoma, based on a time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyu; Xiao, Zhifu; Zhao, Xiulei; Wu, Xiangsong

    2015-05-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a rapidly lethal malignancy and currently is considered to be incurable. Biomarkers related to the development of CC remain unclear. The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between normal tissue and intrahepatic CC, as well as specific gene expression patterns that changed together with the development of CC. By using a two‑way analysis of variance test, the biomarkers that could distinguish between normal tissue and intrahepatic CC dissected from different days were identified. A k‑means cluster method was used to identify gene clusters associated with the development of CC according to their changing expression pattern. Functional enrichment analysis was used to infer the function of each of the gene sets. A time series analysis was constructed to reveal gene signatures that were associated with the development of CC based on gene expression profile changes. Genes related to CC were shown to be involved in 'mitochondrion' and 'focal adhesion'. Three interesting gene groups were identified by the k‑means cluster method. Gene clusters with a unique expression pattern are related with the development of CC. The data of this study will facilitate novel discoveries regarding the genetic study of CC by further work.

  10. (2n × 1) Reconstructions of TiO2(011) Revealed by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chi Lun; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Onoda, Jo; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Thornton, Geoff

    2014-10-09

    We have used noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study the rutile TiO2(011) surface. A series of (2n × 1) reconstructions were observed, including two types of (4 × 1) reconstruction. High-resolution NC-AFM and STM images indicate that the (4 × 1)-α phase has the same structural elements as the more widely reported (2 × 1) reconstruction. An array of analogous higher-order (2n × 1) reconstructions were also observed where n = 3-5. On the other hand, the (4 × 1)-β reconstruction seems to be a unique structure without higher-order analogues. A model is proposed for this structure that is also based on the (2 × 1) reconstruction but with additional microfacets of {111} character.

  11. Mineralogical composition and phase-to-phase relationships in natural hydraulic lime and/or natural cement - raw materials and burnt products revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Racek, Martin; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to modern process of production of cement clinker, traditional burning of natural hydraulic lime below sintering temperature relied on the formation of new phases from ion migration between neighbouring mineral grains composing raw material. The importance of the mineralogical composition and spatial distribution of rock-forming minerals in impure limestones used as a raw material for natural hydraulic lime presents not well explored issue in the scientific literature. To fill this gap, the recent study focuses in detailed analysis of experimentally burnt impure limestones (mostly from Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif). The phase changes were documented by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) coupled with x-ray elemental mapping. The latest allowed for visualization of distribution of elements within raw materials and burnt products. SEM/EDS study brought valuable data on the presence of transitional and/or minor phases, which were poorly detectable by other methods.

  12. Noncytopathic hepatitis A virus induces surface alterations in LLC-MK2 cells revealed by thin sections, negative staining, and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Chavarría, Francisco; Alzamora-González, Libertad; Herrero-Uribe, Libia

    2002-06-01

    Previous electron microscope studies of ultrastructural events during hepatitis A virus replication in experimentally infected cells have used only ultrathin section techniques. Nevertheless, no important differences were observed between infected and uninfected cells. This study was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and negative staining of whole LLC-MK2 cells grown directly on grids covered with support membranes, and then infected with an hepatitis A virus strain. Thin sections of infected and uninfected controls were also analyzed. An intricate web of projections forming a net between cell interfaces was observed only in infected cells. Some of these projections were more than 700 nm long and had ballooning tips. Nevertheless, HAV particles were not visualized in the infected cells.

  13. (2n × 1) Reconstructions of TiO2(011) Revealed by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have used noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study the rutile TiO2(011) surface. A series of (2n × 1) reconstructions were observed, including two types of (4 × 1) reconstruction. High-resolution NC-AFM and STM images indicate that the (4 × 1)-α phase has the same structural elements as the more widely reported (2 × 1) reconstruction. An array of analogous higher-order (2n × 1) reconstructions were also observed where n = 3–5. On the other hand, the (4 × 1)-β reconstruction seems to be a unique structure without higher-order analogues. A model is proposed for this structure that is also based on the (2 × 1) reconstruction but with additional microfacets of {111} character. PMID:25309642

  14. A Fashi Lymphoproliferative Phenotype Reveals Non-Apoptotic Fas Signaling in HTLV-1-Associated Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Soraya Maria; Leal, Fabio E.; Dierckx, Tim; Khouri, Ricardo; Decanine, Daniele; Silva-Santos, Gilvaneia; Schnitman, Saul V.; Kruschewsky, Ramon; López, Giovanni; Alvarez, Carolina; Talledo, Michael; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Nixon, Douglas F.; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Brassat, David; Liblau, Roland; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Van Weyenbergh, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1 was the first human retrovirus to be associated to cancer, namely adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but its pathogenesis remains enigmatic, since only a minority of infected individuals develops either ATL or the neuroinflammatory disorder HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A functional FAS -670 polymorphism in an interferon (IFN)-regulated STAT1-binding site has been associated to both ATL and HAM/TSP susceptibility. Fashi T stem cell memory (Tscm) cells have been identified as the hierarchical apex of ATL, but have not been investigated in HAM/TSP. In addition, both FAS and STAT1 have been identified in an IFN-inducible HAM/TSP gene signature, but its pathobiological significance remains unclear. We comprehensively explored Fas expression (protein/mRNA) and function in lymphocyte activation, apoptosis, proliferation, and transcriptome, in PBMC from a total of 47 HAM/TSP patients, 40 asymptomatic HTLV-1-infected individuals (AC), and 58 HTLV-1 -uninfected healthy controls. Fas surface expression followed a two-step increase from HC to AC and from AC to HAM/TSP. In HAM/TSP, Fas levels correlated positively to lymphocyte activation markers, but negatively to age of onset, linking Fashi cells to earlier, more aggressive disease. Surprisingly, increased lymphocyte Fas expression in HAM/TSP was linked to decreased apoptosis and increased lymphoproliferation upon in vitro culture, but not to proviral load. This Fashi phenotype is HAM/TSP-specific, since both ex vivo and in vitro Fas expression was increased as compared to multiple sclerosis (MS), another neuroinflammatory disorder. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying non-apoptotic Fas signaling in HAM/TSP, we combined transcriptome analysis with functional assays, i.e., blocking vs. triggering Fas receptor in vitro with antagonist and agonist-, anti-Fas mAb, respectively. Treatment with agonist anti-Fas mAb restored apoptosis, indicating

  15. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2017-06-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k- means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  16. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2016-10-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k-means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  17. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Ana; Airey, David; Thompson, Brent; Zhu, C; Rinchik, Eugene M; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Erikson, Keith; Blakely, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  18. Genome Analysis of Two Pseudonocardia Phylotypes Associated with Acromyrmex Leafcutter Ants Reveals Their Biosynthetic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Neil A.; Innocent, Tabitha M.; Heine, Daniel; Bassam, Mahmoud Al; Worsley, Sarah F.; Trottmann, Felix; Patrick, Elaine H.; Yu, Douglas W.; Murrell, J. C.; Schiøtt, Morten; Wilkinson, Barrie; Boomsma, Jacobus J.; Hutchings, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    The attine ants of South and Central America are ancient farmers, having evolved a symbiosis with a fungal food crop >50 million years ago. The most evolutionarily derived attines are the Atta and Acromyrmex leafcutter ants, which harvest fresh leaves to feed their fungus. Acromyrmex and many other attines vertically transmit a mutualistic strain of Pseudonocardia and use antifungal compounds made by these bacteria to protect their fungal partner against co-evolved fungal pathogens of the genus Escovopsis. Pseudonocardia mutualists associated with the attines Apterostigma dentigerum and Trachymyrmex cornetzi make novel cyclic depsipeptide compounds called gerumycins, while a mutualist strain isolated from derived Acromyrmex octospinosus makes an unusual polyene antifungal called nystatin P1. The novelty of these antimicrobials suggests there is merit in exploring secondary metabolites of Pseudonocardia on a genome-wide scale. Here, we report a genomic analysis of the Pseudonocardia phylotypes Ps1 and Ps2 that are consistently associated with Acromyrmex ants collected in Gamboa, Panama. These were previously distinguished solely on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing but genome sequencing of five Ps1 and five Ps2 strains revealed that the phylotypes are distinct species and each encodes between 11 and 15 secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). There are signature BGCs for Ps1 and Ps2 strains and some that are conserved in both. Ps1 strains all contain BGCs encoding nystatin P1-like antifungals, while the Ps2 strains encode novel nystatin-like molecules. Strains show variations in the arrangement of these BGCs that resemble those seen in gerumycin gene clusters. Genome analyses and invasion assays support our hypothesis that vertically transmitted Ps1 and Ps2 strains have antibacterial activity that could help shape the cuticular microbiome. Thus, our work defines the Pseudonocardia species associated with Acromyrmex ants and supports the hypothesis

  19. Proteome profiling of breast cancer biopsies reveals a wound healing signature of cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Groessl, Michael; Slany, Astrid; Bileck, Andrea; Gloessmann, Kerstin; Kreutz, Dominique; Jaeger, Walter; Pfeiler, Georg; Gerner, Christopher

    2014-11-07

    Breast cancer is still the most common type of cancer in women; an important role in carcinogenesis is actually attributed to cancer-associated fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated whether it is possible to assess the functional state of cancer-associated fibroblasts through tumor tissue proteome profiling. Tissue proteomics was performed on tumor-central, tumor-near, and tumor-distant biopsy sections from breast adenocarcinoma patients, which allowed us to identify 2074 proteins. Data were interpreted referring to reference proteome profiles generated from primary human mammary fibroblasts comprising 4095 proteins. These cells were analyzed in quiescent cell state as well as after in vitro treatment with TGFβ or IL-1β, stimulating wound healing or inflammatory processes, respectively. Representative for cancer cells, we investigated the mammary carcinoma cell line ZR-75-1, identifying 5212 proteins. All mass analysis data have been made fully accessible via ProteomeXchange, DOI PXD001311 and PXD001323-8. Comparison of tissue proteomics data with all of those reference profiles revealed predominance of cancer cell-derived proteins within the tumor and fibroblast-derived proteins in the tumor-distant tissue sections. Remarkably, proteins characteristic for acute inflammation were hardly identified in the tissue samples. In contrast, several proteins found by us to be induced by TGFβ in mammary fibroblasts, including fibulin-5, SLC2A1, and MUC18, were positively identified in all tissue samples, with relatively higher abundance in tumor neighboring tissue sections. These findings indicate a predominance of cancer-associated fibroblasts with wound healing activities localized around tumors.

  20. Mitochondrial haplogroups and polymorphisms reveal no association with sporadic prostate cancer in a southern European population.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cubero, María Jesús; Saiz Guinaldo, María; Martínez-González, Luís Javier; Álvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Cózar Olmo, José Manuel; Acosta, José Antonio Lorente

    2012-01-01

    It is known that mitochondria play an important role in certain cancers (prostate, renal, breast, or colorectal) and coronary disease. These organelles play an essential role in apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species; in addition, mtDNA also reveals the history of populations and ancient human migration. All these events and variations in the mitochondrial genome are thought to cause some cancers, including prostate cancer, and also help us to group individuals into common origin groups. The aim of the present study is to analyze the different haplogroups and variations in the sequence in the mitochondrial genome of a southern European population consisting of subjects affected (n = 239) and non-affected (n = 150) by sporadic prostate cancer. Using primer extension analysis and DNA sequencing, we identified the nine major European haplogroups and CR polymorphisms. The frequencies of the haplogroups did not differ between patients and control cohorts, whereas the CR polymorphism T16356C was significantly higher in patients with PC compared to the controls (p = 0.029). PSA, staging, and Gleason score were associated with none of the nine major European haplogroups. The CR polymorphisms G16129A (p = 0.007) and T16224C (p = 0.022) were significantly associated with Gleason score, whereas T16311C (p = 0.046) was linked with T-stage. Our results do not suggest that mtDNA haplogroups could be involved in sporadic prostate cancer etiology and pathogenesis as previous studies performed in middle Europe population. Although some significant associations have been obtained in studying CR polymorphisms, further studies should be performed to validate these results.

  1. Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Polymorphisms Reveal No Association with Sporadic Prostate Cancer in a Southern European Population

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Cubero, María Jesús; Saiz Guinaldo, María; Martínez-González, Luís Javier; Álvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Cózar Olmo, José Manuel; Acosta, José Antonio Lorente

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known that mitochondria play an important role in certain cancers (prostate, renal, breast, or colorectal) and coronary disease. These organelles play an essential role in apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species; in addition, mtDNA also reveals the history of populations and ancient human migration. All these events and variations in the mitochondrial genome are thought to cause some cancers, including prostate cancer, and also help us to group individuals into common origin groups. The aim of the present study is to analyze the different haplogroups and variations in the sequence in the mitochondrial genome of a southern European population consisting of subjects affected (n = 239) and non-affected (n = 150) by sporadic prostate cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings Using primer extension analysis and DNA sequencing, we identified the nine major European haplogroups and CR polymorphisms. The frequencies of the haplogroups did not differ between patients and control cohorts, whereas the CR polymorphism T16356C was significantly higher in patients with PC compared to the controls (p = 0.029). PSA, staging, and Gleason score were associated with none of the nine major European haplogroups. The CR polymorphisms G16129A (p = 0.007) and T16224C (p = 0.022) were significantly associated with Gleason score, whereas T16311C (p = 0.046) was linked with T-stage. Conclusions and Significance Our results do not suggest that mtDNA haplogroups could be involved in sporadic prostate cancer etiology and pathogenesis as previous studies performed in middle Europe population. Although some significant associations have been obtained in studying CR polymorphisms, further studies should be performed to validate these results. PMID:22815971

  2. Evaluation of copy number variations reveals novel candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder-associated pathways

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Anthony J.; Ma, Deqiong; Cukier, Holly N.; Nations, Laura D.; Schmidt, Mike A.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Jaworski, James M.; Salyakina, Daria; Konidari, Ioanna; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Williams, Scott M.; Menon, Ramkumar; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable, yet relatively few associated genetic loci have been replicated. Copy number variations (CNVs) have been implicated in autism; however, the majority of loci contribute to <1% of the disease population. Therefore, independent studies are important to refine associated CNV regions and discover novel susceptibility genes. In this study, a genome-wide SNP array was utilized for CNV detection by two distinct algorithms in a European ancestry case–control data set. We identify a significantly higher burden in the number and size of deletions, and disrupting more genes in ASD cases. Moreover, 18 deletions larger than 1 Mb were detected exclusively in cases, implicating novel regions at 2q22.1, 3p26.3, 4q12 and 14q23. Case-specific CNVs provided further evidence for pathways previously implicated in ASDs, revealing new candidate genes within the GABAergic signaling and neural development pathways. These include DBI, an allosteric binder of GABA receptors, GABARAPL1, the GABA receptor-associated protein, and SLC6A11, a postsynaptic GABA transporter. We also identified CNVs in COBL, deletions of which cause defects in neuronal cytoskeleton morphogenesis in model vertebrates, and DNER, a neuron-specific Notch ligand required for cerebellar development. Moreover, we found evidence of genetic overlap between ASDs and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric diseases. These genes include glutamate receptors (GRID1, GRIK2 and GRIK4), synaptic regulators (NRXN3, SLC6A8 and SYN3), transcription factor (ZNF804A) and RNA-binding protein FMR1. Taken together, these CNVs may be a few of the missing pieces of ASD heritability and lead to discovering novel etiological mechanisms. PMID:22543975

  3. Genome Analysis of Two Pseudonocardia Phylotypes Associated with Acromyrmex Leafcutter Ants Reveals Their Biosynthetic Potential.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Neil A; Innocent, Tabitha M; Heine, Daniel; Bassam, Mahmoud Al; Worsley, Sarah F; Trottmann, Felix; Patrick, Elaine H; Yu, Douglas W; Murrell, J C; Schiøtt, Morten; Wilkinson, Barrie; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Hutchings, Matthew I

    2016-01-01

    The attine ants of South and Central America are ancient farmers, having evolved a symbiosis with a fungal food crop >50 million years ago. The most evolutionarily derived attines are the Atta and Acromyrmex leafcutter ants, which harvest fresh leaves to feed their fungus. Acromyrmex and many other attines vertically transmit a mutualistic strain of Pseudonocardia and use antifungal compounds made by these bacteria to protect their fungal partner against co-evolved fungal pathogens of the genus Escovopsis. Pseudonocardia mutualists associated with the attines Apterostigma dentigerum and Trachymyrmex cornetzi make novel cyclic depsipeptide compounds called gerumycins, while a mutualist strain isolated from derived Acromyrmex octospinosus makes an unusual polyene antifungal called nystatin P1. The novelty of these antimicrobials suggests there is merit in exploring secondary metabolites of Pseudonocardia on a genome-wide scale. Here, we report a genomic analysis of the Pseudonocardia phylotypes Ps1 and Ps2 that are consistently associated with Acromyrmex ants collected in Gamboa, Panama. These were previously distinguished solely on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing but genome sequencing of five Ps1 and five Ps2 strains revealed that the phylotypes are distinct species and each encodes between 11 and 15 secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). There are signature BGCs for Ps1 and Ps2 strains and some that are conserved in both. Ps1 strains all contain BGCs encoding nystatin P1-like antifungals, while the Ps2 strains encode novel nystatin-like molecules. Strains show variations in the arrangement of these BGCs that resemble those seen in gerumycin gene clusters. Genome analyses and invasion assays support our hypothesis that vertically transmitted Ps1 and Ps2 strains have antibacterial activity that could help shape the cuticular microbiome. Thus, our work defines the Pseudonocardia species associated with Acromyrmex ants and supports the hypothesis

  4. Comparative hybridization reveals extensive genome variation in the AIDS-associated pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanggan; Liu, Iris; Sham, Anita; Stajich, Jason E; Dietrich, Fred S; Kronstad, James W

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability can have a profound influence on the virulence of pathogenic microbes. The availability of genome sequences for two strains of the AIDS-associated fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans presented an opportunity to use comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to examine genome variability between strains of different mating type, molecular subtype, and ploidy. Results Initially, CGH was used to compare the approximately 100 kilobase MATa and MATα mating-type regions in serotype A and D strains to establish the relationship between the Log2 ratios of hybridization signals and sequence identity. Subsequently, we compared the genomes of the environmental isolate NIH433 (MATa) and the clinical isolate NIH12 (MATα) with a tiling array of the genome of the laboratory strain JEC21 derived from these strains. In this case, CGH identified putative recombination sites and the origins of specific segments of the JEC21 genome. Similarly, CGH analysis revealed marked variability in the genomes of strains representing the VNI, VNII, and VNB molecular subtypes of the A serotype, including disomy for chromosome 13 in two strains. Additionally, CGH identified differences in chromosome content between three strains with the hybrid AD serotype and revealed that chromosome 1 from the serotype A genome is preferentially retained in all three strains. Conclusion The genomes of serotypes A, D, and AD strains exhibit extensive variation that spans the range from small differences (such as regions of divergence, deletion, or amplification) to the unexpected disomy for chromosome 13 in haploid strains and preferential retention of specific chromosomes in naturally occurring diploids. PMID:18294377

  5. Autonomous gliders reveal features of the water column associated with foraging by adelie penguins.

    PubMed

    Kahl, L Alex; Schofield, Oscar; Fraser, William R

    2010-12-01

    Despite their strong dependence on the pelagic environment, seabirds and other top predators in polar marine ecosystems are generally studied during their reproductive phases in terrestrial environments. As a result, a significant portion of their life history is understudied which in turn has led to limited understanding. Recent advances in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technologies have allowed satellite-tagged Adélie penguins to guide AUV surveys of the marine environment at the Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on the western Antarctic Peninsula. Near real-time data sent via Iridium satellites from the AUVs to a centralized control center thousands of miles away allowed scientists to adapt AUV sampling strategies to meet the changing conditions of the subsurface. Such AUV data revealed the water masses and fine-scale features associated with Adélie penguin foraging trips. During this study, the maximum concentration of chlorophyll was between 30 and 50 m deep. Encompassing this peak in the chlorophyll concentration, within the water-column, was a mixture of nutrient-laden Upper Circumpolar Deep (UCDW) and western Antarctic Peninsula winter water (WW). Together, data from the AUV survey and penguin dives reveal that 54% of foraging by Adélie penguins occurs immediately below the chlorophyll maximum. These data demonstrate how bringing together emerging technologies, such as AUVs, with established methods such as the radio-tagging of penguins can provide powerful tools for monitoring and hypothesis testing of previously inaccessible ecological processes. Ocean and atmosphere temperatures are expected to continue increasing along the western Antarctic Peninsula, which will undoubtedly affect regional marine ecosystems. New and emerging technologies such as unmanned underwater vehicles and individually mounted satellite tracking devices will provide the tools critical to documenting and understanding the widespread ecological change

  6. Kinetoplastid Phylogenomics Reveals the Evolutionary Innovations Associated with the Origins of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Aslett, Martin; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Bringaud, Frederic; Schlacht, Alexander; Hartley, Catherine; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Dacks, Joel B.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Field, Mark C.; Ginger, Michael L.; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Summary The evolution of parasitism is a recurrent event in the history of life and a core problem in evolutionary biology. Trypanosomatids are important parasites and include the human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp., which in humans cause African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis, respectively. Genome comparison between trypanosomatids reveals that these parasites have evolved specialized cell-surface protein families, overlaid on a well-conserved cell template. Understanding how these features evolved and which ones are specifically associated with parasitism requires comparison with related non-parasites. We have produced genome sequences for Bodo saltans, the closest known non-parasitic relative of trypanosomatids, and a second bodonid, Trypanoplasma borreli. Here we show how genomic reduction and innovation contributed to the character of trypanosomatid genomes. We show that gene loss has “streamlined” trypanosomatid genomes, particularly with respect to macromolecular degradation and ion transport, but consistent with a widespread loss of functional redundancy, while adaptive radiations of gene families involved in membrane function provide the principal innovations in trypanosomatid evolution. Gene gain and loss continued during trypanosomatid diversification, resulting in the asymmetric assortment of ancestral characters such as peptidases between Trypanosoma and Leishmania, genomic differences that were subsequently amplified by lineage-specific innovations after divergence. Finally, we show how species-specific, cell-surface gene families (DGF-1 and PSA) with no apparent structural similarity are independent derivations of a common ancestral form, which we call “bodonin.” This new evidence defines the parasitic innovations of trypanosomatid genomes, revealing how a free-living phagotroph became adapted to exploiting hostile host environments. PMID:26725202

  7. Mesoscale morphology at nanoscale resolution: serial block-face scanning electron microscopy reveals fine 3D detail of a novel silk spinneret system in a tube-building tanaid crustacean.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Tomonari; Kakui, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Palmer, A Richard

    2016-01-01

    The study of morphology is experiencing a renaissance due to rapid improvements in technologies for 3D visualization of complex internal and external structures. But 3D visualization of the internal structure of mesoscale objects - those in the 10-1000 μm range - remains problematic. They are too small for microCT, many lack suitable specific fluorescent markers for confocal microscopy, or they require labor-intensive stacking and smoothing of individual TEM images. Here we illustrate the first comprehensive morphological description of a complete mesoscale biological system at nanoscopic resolution using ultra-modern technology for 3D visualization - serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The SBF-SEM machine combines an in-chamber ultramicrotome, which creates a serial array of exposed surfaces, with an SEM that images each surface as it is exposed. The serial images are then stacked automatically by 3D reconstruction software. We used SBF-SEM to study the spinneret (thread-producing) system of a small, tube-dwelling crustacean that weaves tubes of silk. Thread-producing ability is critical for the survival of many small-bodied animals but the basic morphology of these systems remains mysterious due to the limits of traditional microscopy. SBF-SEM allowed us to describe - in full 3D - well-resolved components (glands, ducts, pores, and associated nerves and muscles) of the spinneret system in the thoracic legs and body segments of Sinelobus sp. (Crustacea, Peracarida, Tanaidacea), a tube-building tanaid only 2 mm in body length. The 3D reconstruction by SBF-SEM revealed at nanoscale resolution a unique structure to the gland and duct systems: In each of three thread-producing thoracic segments, two separate ducts, derived from two separate glands located in the body, run through the entire leg and merge at the leg tip just before the spinneret pore opening. We also resolved nerves connecting to individual setae, spines and pores on the

  8. Confounding of the Association between Radiation Exposure from CT Scans and Risk of Leukemia and Brain Tumors by Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Johanna M; Ronckers, Cécile M; Merks, Johannes; Weijerman, Michel E; Lubin, Jay H; Hauptmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies linking radiation exposure from pediatric computed tomography (CT) to increased risks of leukemia and brain tumors lacked data to control for cancer susceptibility syndromes (CSS). These syndromes might be confounders because they are associated with an increased cancer risk and may increase the likelihood of CT scans performed in children. We identify CSS predisposing to leukemia and brain tumors through a systematic literature search and summarize prevalence and risk estimates. Because there is virtually no empirical evidence in published literature on patterns of CT use for most types of CSS, we estimate confounding bias of relative risks (RR) for categories of radiation exposure based on expert opinion about the current and previous patterns of CT scans among CSS patients. We estimate that radiation-related RRs for leukemia are not meaningfully confounded by Down syndrome, Noonan syndrome, or other CSS. In contrast, RRs for brain tumors may be overestimated due to confounding by tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) while von Hippel-Lindau disease, neurofibromatosis type 1, or other CSS do not meaningfully confound. Empirical data on the use of CT scans among CSS patients are urgently needed. Our assessment indicates that associations with leukemia reported in previous studies are unlikely to be substantially confounded by unmeasured CSS, whereas brain tumor risks might have been overestimated due to confounding by TSC. Future studies should identify TSC patients in order to avoid overestimation of brain tumor risks due to radiation exposure from CT scans. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Genome-wide association analysis reveals new targets for carotenoid biofortification in maize.

    PubMed

    Suwarno, Willy B; Pixley, Kevin V; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M; Babu, Raman

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide association analysis in CIMMYT's association panel revealed new favorable native genomic variations in/nearby important genes such as hydroxylases and CCD1 that have potential for carotenoid biofortification in maize. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to identify allelic variation for genes controlling important agronomic and nutritional traits in plants. Provitamin A (proVA) enhancing alleles of lycopene epsilon cyclase (LCYE) and β-carotene hydroxylase 1 (CRTRB1), previously identified through candidate-gene based GWAS, are currently used in CIMMYT's maize breeding program. The objective of this study was to identify genes or genomic regions controlling variation for carotenoid concentrations in grain for CIMMYT's carotenoid association mapping panel of 380 inbred maize lines, using high-density genome-wide platforms with ~476,000 SNP markers. Population structure effects were minimized by adjustments using principal components and kinship matrix with mixed models. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated faster LD decay (3.9 kb; r (2) = 0.1) than commonly reported for temperate germplasm, and therefore the possibility of achieving higher mapping resolution with our mostly tropical diversity panel. GWAS for various carotenoids identified CRTRB1, LCYE and other key genes or genomic regions that govern rate-critical steps in the upstream pathway, such as DXS1, GGPS1, and GGPS2 that are known to play important roles in the accumulation of precursor isoprenoids as well as downstream genes HYD5, CCD1, and ZEP1, which are involved in hydroxylation and carotenoid degradation. SNPs at or near all of these regions were identified and may be useful target regions for carotenoid biofortification breeding efforts in maize; for example a genomic region on chromosome 2 explained ~16% of the phenotypic variance for β-carotene independently of CRTRB1, and a variant of CCD1 that resulted in reduced

  10. Dose equations for tube current modulation in CT scanning and the interpretation of the associated CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} for automatic tube current modulation (TCM) has a different physical meaning from the traditional CTDI{sub vol} at constant mA, resulting in the dichotomy “CTDI{sub vol} of the first and second kinds” for which a physical interpretation is sought in hopes of establishing some commonality between the two.Methods: Rigorous equations are derived to describe the accumulated dose distributions for TCM. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of their differences. Graphical dose simulations are also provided for a variety of TCM tube current distributions (including constant mA), all having the same scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol}.Results: These convolution equations and simulations show that the local dose at z depends only weakly on the local tube current i(z) due to the strong influence of scatter from all other locations along z, and that the “local CTDI{sub vol}(z)” does not represent a local dose but rather only a relative i(z) ≡ mA(z). TCM is a shift-variant technique to which the CTDI-paradigm does not apply and its application to TCM leads to a CTDI{sub vol} of the second kind which lacks relevance.Conclusions: While the traditional CTDI{sub vol} at constant mA conveys useful information (the peak dose at the center of the scan length), CTDI{sub vol} of the second kind conveys no useful information about the associated TCM dose distribution it purportedly represents and its physical interpretation remains elusive. On the other hand, the total energy absorbed E (“integral dose”) as well as its surrogate DLP remain robust between variable i(z) TCM and constant current i{sub 0} techniques, both depending only on the total mAs =t{sub 0}=i{sub 0} t{sub 0} during the beam-on time t{sub 0}.

  11. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry reveals that L-Dopa produces regionally selective, bimodal influences on striatal dopamine kinetics in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Harun, R; Munoz, M; Grassi, C; Hare, K; Brough, E; Torres, GE; Grace, AA; Wagner, AK

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating condition that is caused by a relatively specific degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. Levodopa (L-Dopa) was introduced as a viable treatment option for PD over 40 years ago and still remains the most common and effective therapy for PD. Though the effects of L-Dopa to augment striatal DA production are well known, little is actually known about how L-Dopa alters the kinetics of DA neurotransmission that contribute to its beneficial and adverse effects. In this study, we examined the effects of L-Dopa administration (100mg/kg carbidopa/250mg/kg L-Dopa) on regional electrically stimulated DA response kinetics using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) in anesthetized rats. We demonstrate that L-Dopa enhances DA release in both the dorsal striatum (D-STR) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), but surprisingly causes a delayed inhibition of release in the D-STR, a finding that may be related to high-dose L-Dopa effects. In both regions, L-Dopa progressively attenuated reuptake kinetics through a decrease in Vmax and an increase in Km. This finding is consistent with recent clinical studies suggesting that L-Dopa chronically down-regulates the DA transporter (DAT), which may relate to the common development of L-Dopa induced dyskinesias (LID) in PD subjects. PMID:26611352

  12. Line scanning fMRI reveals earlier onset of optogenetically evoked BOLD response in rat somatosensory cortex as compared to sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Albers, Franziska; Schmid, Florian; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius

    2016-12-21

    The combination of optogenetic control and fMRI readout in the brain is increasingly used to assess neuronal networks and underlying signal processing. However, how exactly optogenetic activation or inhibition reproduces normal physiological input has not been fully unraveled. To assess details of temporal dynamics of the hemodynamic response, temporal resolution in rodent fMRI is often not sufficient. Recent advances in human fMRI using faster acquisition schemes cannot be easily translated to small animals due to smaller dimensions, fast physiological motion, and higher sensitivity to artefacts. Here, we applied a one dimensional line scanning acquisition with 50ms temporal resolution in rat somatosensory cortex. We observed that optogenetic activation reproduces the hemodynamic response upon sensory stimulation, but shows a 160 to 340ms earlier onset of the response. This difference is explained by direct activation of all opsin-expressing and illuminated cortical layers, while hemodynamic response to sensory stimulation is delayed during intracortical transmission between cortical layers. Our results confirm that optogenetic activation is a valid model for physiological neuronal input, and that differences in temporal behavior of only a few hundred milliseconds can be resolved in rodent fMRI.

  13. Significant differences in cell-cell fusion and viral entry between strains revealed by scanning mutagenesis of the C-heptad repeat of HIV gp41.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Aguilar, Barbara; Dewispelaere, Karen; Yi, Hyun Ah; Jacobs, Amy

    2013-05-21

    The transmembrane subunit, gp41, of the HIV envelope mediates the viral fusion step of entry into the host cell. The protein consists of an extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. The extracellular domain contains a fusion peptide, an N-terminal heptad repeat, a loop region, a C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR), and a membrane-proximal external region. For this study, we examined each amino acid in the CHR (residues 623-659) by alanine scanning mutagenesis in two HIV strains: one CCR5-utilizing strain (JRFL) and one CXCR4-utilizing strain (HXB2). We studied the functional importance of each amino acid residue by measuring mutational effects in both cell-cell fusion and viral entry and assessing envelope expression and gp120-gp41 proteolytic processing. The transmembrane subunit of the HIV envelope, gp41, is very sensitive to subtle changes, like alanine substitution, which severely affect envelope function at multiple sites. Two important general findings are apparent when the entire data set from this study is taken into account. (1) Strain HXB2 is much more stable to mutagenesis than strain JRFL, and (2) viral entry is much more stable to mutagenesis than cell-cell fusion. These findings strengthen our notion that gp41 is a vulnerable target for therapeutic and prophylactic intervention. Further structural studies aimed at gaining a full understanding of the intermediate states that drive HIV membrane fusion are imperative.

  14. Cardiac Myocyte Diversity and a Fibroblast Network in the Junctional Region of the Zebrafish Heart Revealed by Transmission and Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lafontant, Pascal J.; Behzad, Ali R.; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart. PMID:24058412

  15. Surface and subsurface water storage changes over the central Congo Basin revealed by integrating GRACE, Envisat altimetry, and PALSAR ScanSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Jung, H.; Yuan, T.; Beighley, E.; Duan, J.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Raoufi, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Congo Basin is the world's third largest in size (~3.7 million km2), and second only to the Amazon River in discharge (~40,200 m3 s-1 annual average). The impact and connections of this hydrologic flux with the regional and global climate, biogeochemical cycles, and terrestrial water storages are clearly of great importance. However, little is known about the hydrology and hydraulics of the Congo Basin. The Congo Basin has not experienced the same degree of new research compared to the Amazon in spite of its enormous size because the lack of in situ has limited our hydrologic understanding of the basin. In this study, we integrate multiple satellite measurements; terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE, water level changes from radar altimeter, and inundated extents from PALSAR ScanSAR imagery to characterize and quantify TWS change and its surface and subsurface components over the central Congo Basin. Our results indicate that the annual variations of the TWS changes during the period of 2007 - 2010 range between 21 km3 and 31 km3, and mostly controlled by surface storage changes. Our result is in contrast with a study over another large tropical basin, the Negro River Basin, where the amplitude of the subsurface storage changes represents more than a third of the amplitude of TWS changes. Our findings will contribute to provide a basis for determining and predicting the impacts of climate change and deforestations on the distribution of terrestrial water stores and fluxes in the Congo Basin.

  16. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart.

  17. Genomewide Scan Reveals Amplification of mdr1 as a Common Denominator of Resistance to Mefloquine, Lumefantrine, and Artemisinin in Plasmodium chabaudi Malaria Parasites▿†‡

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sofia; Cravo, Pedro; Creasey, Alison; Fawcett, Richard; Modrzynska, Katarzyna; Rodrigues, Louise; Martinelli, Axel; Hunt, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites pose a threat to effective drug control, even to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). Here we used linkage group selection and Solexa whole-genome resequencing to investigate the genetic basis of resistance to component drugs of ACTs. Using the rodent malaria parasite P. chabaudi, we analyzed the uncloned progeny of a genetic backcross between the mefloquine-, lumefantrine-, and artemisinin-resistant mutant AS-15MF and a genetically distinct sensitive clone, AJ, following drug treatment. Genomewide scans of selection showed that parasites surviving each drug treatment bore a duplication of a segment of chromosome 12 (translocated to chromosome 04) present in AS-15MF. Whole-genome resequencing identified the size of the duplicated segment and its position on chromosome 4. The duplicated fragment extends for ∼393 kbp and contains over 100 genes, including mdr1, encoding the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein homologue 1. We therefore show that resistance to chemically distinct components of ACTs is mediated by the same genetic mutation, highlighting a possible limitation of these therapies. PMID:21709099

  18. Chl- a triplet quenching by peridinin in H-PCP and organic solvent revealed by step-scan FTIR time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, C.; Alexandre, M. T. A.; Hiller, R. G.; Kennis, J. T. M.; Grondelle, R. van

    2009-02-01

    Triplet-state dynamics in Chl- a/Per mixtures in organic solvent and in native H-PCP were studied by means of step-scan FTIR spectroscopy. A single decay component of 10 μs was observed for the H-PCP triplet, the spectrum of which closely matches the 13 μs component of A-PCP [Alexandre et al., Biophysical Journal 93 (2007) 2118-2128], implying that in H-PCP, as in A-PCP, the peridinin triplet state is shared with Chl- a. In a mixture of Chl- a and Per in THF, TEET from 3Chl- a to 3Per proceeds in 3.5 μs followed by 3Per decay in 7 μs. Using a target analysis procedure, 3Chl- a and 3Per infrared difference spectra were obtained. The specific carbonyl frequencies of 3Per and 3Chl- a in THF confirm our assignment of their co-existence in the infrared spectra of H-PCP and A-PCP.

  19. Association between Body Mass Index and Bone Mineral Density in Patients Referred for Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Scan in Ajman, UAE.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Tarek; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Ahmed, Amal; Alshamsi, Salma Obaid Saeed; Al Ali, Mariyam Saif Salim Humaid Bin Bader; Al Balsooshi, Khawla Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) is a good indicator for measurements of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) which measures the density of minerals present in the bones using a special scan. This study was conducted to assess the association between BMI and status of BMD among 101 individuals who underwent Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. 39 subjects had normal and 62 had low bone mineral density. BMD was low in 82.4% of people with normal BMI, 78.1% among overweight, and 44.2% among obese. There was a statistically significant association between these two variables (P < .001). Low BMD was recorded in 59.1% of females and 76.9% of males. Association between advancing age and lower BMI is an important risk factor in the occurrence of low BMD.

  20. Metabolomic profiling reveals mitochondrial-derived lipid biomarkers that drive obesity-associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Brante P; Freemerman, Alex J; Zhang, Jimmy; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Galanko, Joseph A; O'Connell, Thomas M; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Stevens, Robert D; Newgard, Christopher B; Brauer, Heather A; Troester, Melissa A; Makowski, Liza

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Several animal models of obesity exist, but studies are lacking that compare traditional lard-based high fat diets (HFD) to "Cafeteria diets" (CAF) consisting of nutrient poor human junk food. Our previous work demonstrated the rapid and severe obesogenic and inflammatory consequences of CAF compared to HFD including rapid weight gain, markers of Metabolic Syndrome, multi-tissue lipid accumulation, and dramatic inflammation. To identify potential mediators of CAF-induced obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, we used metabolomic analysis to profile serum, muscle, and white adipose from rats fed CAF, HFD, or standard control diets. Principle component analysis identified elevations in clusters of fatty acids and acylcarnitines. These increases in metabolites were associated with systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that paralleled weight gain, physiologic measures of Metabolic Syndrome, and tissue inflammation in CAF-fed rats. Spearman pairwise correlations between metabolites, physiologic, and histologic findings revealed strong correlations between elevated markers of inflammation in CAF-fed animals, measured as crown like structures in adipose, and specifically the pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids and oxidation intermediates laurate and lauroyl carnitine. Treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with lauroyl carnitine polarized macrophages towards the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype through downregulation of AMPK and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results presented herein demonstrate that compared to a traditional HFD model, the CAF diet provides a robust model for diet-induced human obesity, which models Metabolic Syndrome-related mitochondrial dysfunction in serum, muscle, and adipose, along with pro-inflammatory metabolite alterations. These data also suggest that modifying the availability or metabolism of saturated fatty acids may limit the inflammation associated with obesity leading to Metabolic

  1. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial-Derived Lipid Biomarkers That Drive Obesity-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sampey, Brante P.; Freemerman, Alex J.; Zhang, Jimmy; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Galanko, Joseph A.; O'Connell, Thomas M.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Stevens, Robert D.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Brauer, Heather A.; Troester, Melissa A.; Makowski, Liza

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Several animal models of obesity exist, but studies are lacking that compare traditional lard-based high fat diets (HFD) to “Cafeteria diets" (CAF) consisting of nutrient poor human junk food. Our previous work demonstrated the rapid and severe obesogenic and inflammatory consequences of CAF compared to HFD including rapid weight gain, markers of Metabolic Syndrome, multi-tissue lipid accumulation, and dramatic inflammation. To identify potential mediators of CAF-induced obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, we used metabolomic analysis to profile serum, muscle, and white adipose from rats fed CAF, HFD, or standard control diets. Principle component analysis identified elevations in clusters of fatty acids and acylcarnitines. These increases in metabolites were associated with systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that paralleled weight gain, physiologic measures of Metabolic Syndrome, and tissue inflammation in CAF-fed rats. Spearman pairwise correlations between metabolites, physiologic, and histologic findings revealed strong correlations between elevated markers of inflammation in CAF-fed animals, measured as crown like structures in adipose, and specifically the pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids and oxidation intermediates laurate and lauroyl carnitine. Treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with lauroyl carnitine polarized macrophages towards the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype through downregulation of AMPK and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results presented herein demonstrate that compared to a traditional HFD model, the CAF diet provides a robust model for diet-induced human obesity, which models Metabolic Syndrome-related mitochondrial dysfunction in serum, muscle, and adipose, along with pro-inflammatory metabolite alterations. These data also suggest that modifying the availability or metabolism of saturated fatty acids may limit the inflammation associated with obesity leading to

  2. Comparative genomics reveals distinct host-interacting traits of three major human-associated propionibacteria.

    PubMed

    Mak, Tim N; Schmid, Monika; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Zeng, Guanghong; Meyer, Rikke; Sfanos, Karen S; Brinkmann, Volker; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2013-09-22

    Propionibacteria are part of the human microbiota. Many studies have addressed the predominant colonizer of sebaceous follicles of the skin, Propionibacterium acnes, and investigated its association with the skin disorder acne vulgaris, and lately with prostate cancer. Much less is known about two other propionibacterial species frequently found on human tissue sites, Propionibacterium granulosum and Propionibacterium avidum. Here we analyzed two and three genomes of P. granulosum and P. avidum, respectively, and compared them to two genomes of P. acnes; we further highlight differences among the three cutaneous species with proteomic and microscopy approaches. Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-like structure surrounding P. avidum cells, that is absent in P. acnes and P. granulosum. In contrast, P. granulosum possesses pili-like appendices, which was confirmed by surface proteome analysis. The corresponding genes were identified; they are clustered with genes encoding sortases. Both, P. granulosum and P. avidum lack surface or secreted proteins for predicted host-interacting factors of P. acnes, including several CAMP factors, sialidases, dermatan-sulphate adhesins, hyaluronidase and a SH3 domain-containing lipoprotein; accordingly, only P. acnes exhibits neuraminidase and hyaluronidase activities. These functions are encoded on previously unrecognized island-like regions in the genome of P. acnes. Despite their omnipresence on human skin little is known about the role of cutaneous propionibacteria. All three species are associated with a variety of diseases, including postoperative and device-related abscesses and infections. We showed that the three organisms have evolved distinct features to interact with their human host. Whereas P. avidum and P. granulosum produce an EPS-like surface structure and pili-like appendices, respectively, P. acnes possesses a number of unique surface-exposed proteins with host

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Natural Variations Contributing to Drought Resistance in Crops

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Qin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Crops are often cultivated in regions where they will face environmental adversities; resulting in substantial yield loss which can ultimately lead to food and societal problems. Thus, significant efforts have been made to breed stress tolerant cultivars in an attempt to minimize these problems and to produce more stability with respect to crop yields across broad geographies. Since stress tolerance is a complex and multi-genic trait, advancements with classical breeding approaches have been challenging. On the other hand, molecular breeding, which is based on transgenics, marker-assisted selection and genome editing technologies; holds great promise to enable farmers to better cope with these challenges. However, identification of the key genetic components underlying the trait is critical and will serve as the foundation for future crop genetic improvement. Recently, genome-wide association studies have made significant contributions to facilitate the discovery of natural variation contributing to stress tolerance in crops. From these studies, the identified loci can serve as targets for genomic selection or editing to enable the molecular design of new cultivars. Here, we summarize research progress on this issue and focus on the genetic basis of drought tolerance as revealed by genome-wide association studies and quantitative trait loci mapping. Although many favorable loci have been identified, elucidation of their molecular mechanisms contributing to increased stress tolerance still remains a challenge. Thus, continuous efforts are still required to functionally dissect this complex trait through comprehensive approaches, such as system biological studies. It is expected that proper application of the acquired knowledge will enable the development of stress tolerant cultivars; allowing agricultural production to become more sustainable under dynamic environmental conditions. PMID:28713401

  4. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  5. Laterality of brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-ting; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Jing; Li, Wei

    2005-04-20

    Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions: arithmetic calculation may be one of these phenomena. In this study, first, laterality of brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations was revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Second, the relationship among laterality, handedness, and types of arithmetic task was assessed. Third, we postulate possible reasons for laterality. Using a block-designed experiment, twenty-five right-handed and seven left-handed healthy volunteers carried out simple calculations, complex calculations and proximity judgments. T1WI and GRE-EPI fMRI were performed with a GE 1.5T whole body MRI scanner. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used to process data and localize functional areas. Numbers of activated voxels were recorded to calculate laterality index for evaluating the laterality of functional brain areas. For both groups, the activation of functional areas in the frontal lobe showed a tendency towards the nonpredominant hand side, but the functional areas in the inferior parietal lobule had left laterality. During simple and complex calculations, the laterality indices of the prefrontal cortex and premotor area were higher in the right-handed group than that in the left-handed group, whereas the laterality of the inferior parietal lobule had no such significant difference. In both groups, when the difficulty of the task increased, the laterality of the prefrontal cortex, premotor area, and inferior parietal lobule decreased, but the laterality of posterior part of the inferior frontal gyrus increased. The laterality of the functional brain areas associated with arithmetic calculations can be detected with fMRI. The laterality of the functional areas was related to handedness and task difficulty.

  6. Characterizing WW Domain Interactions of Tumor Suppressor WWOX Reveals Its Association with Multiprotein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Huang, Haiming; Kim, TaeHyung; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib K.; Sudol, Marius; Reichmann, Dana; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kim, Philip M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2014-01-01

    WW domains are small modules present in regulatory and signaling proteins that mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain. Based on its ligand recognition motifs, the WW domain family is classified into four groups. The largest one, to which WWOX belongs, recognizes ligands with a PPXY motif. To pursue the functional properties of the WW domains of WWOX, we employed mass spectrometry and phage display experiments to identify putative WWOX-interacting partners. Our analysis revealed that the first WW (WW1) domain of WWOX is the main functional interacting domain. Furthermore, our study uncovered well known and new PPXY-WW1-interacting partners and shed light on novel LPXY-WW1-interacting partners of WWOX. Many of these proteins are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, including transcription, RNA processing, tight junction, and metabolism. By utilizing GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays, we validated that WWOX is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, which contains two LPXY motifs. We found that ITCH mediates Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination of WWOX, leading to its nuclear localization and increased cell death. Our data suggest that the WW1 domain of WWOX provides a versatile platform that links WWOX with individual proteins associated with physiologically important networks. PMID:24550385

  7. Molecular details of α-synuclein membrane association revealed by neutrons and photons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiping; Hess, Sara K; Heinrich, Frank; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-04-09

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is an abundant neuronal protein associated with Parkinson's disease that is disordered in solution, but it exists in equilibrium between a bent-helix and an elongated-helix on negatively charged membranes. Here, neutron reflectometry (NR) and fluorescence spectroscopy were employed to uncover molecular details of the interaction between α-syn and two anionic lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine (PS). Both NR and site-specific Trp measurements indicate that penetration depth of α-syn is similar for either PA- or PS-containing membranes (∼9-11 Å from bilayer center) even though there is a preference for α-syn binding to PA. However, closer examination of the individual Trp quenching profiles by brominated lipids reveals differences into local membrane interactions especially at position 39 where conformational heterogeneity was observed. The data also indicate that while W94 penetrates the bilayer as deeply as W4, W94 resides in a more polar surrounding. Taken together, we suggest the N- and C-terminal regions near positions 4 and 94 are anchored to the membrane, while the putative linker spanning residue 39 samples multiple conformations, which are sensitive to the chemical nature of the membrane surface. This flexibility may enable α-syn to bind diverse biomembranes in vivo.

  8. Characterizing WW domain interactions of tumor suppressor WWOX reveals its association with multiprotein networks.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Huang, Haiming; Kim, TaeHyung; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib K; Sudol, Marius; Reichmann, Dana; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kim, Philip M; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-03-28

    WW domains are small modules present in regulatory and signaling proteins that mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain. Based on its ligand recognition motifs, the WW domain family is classified into four groups. The largest one, to which WWOX belongs, recognizes ligands with a PPXY motif. To pursue the functional properties of the WW domains of WWOX, we employed mass spectrometry and phage display experiments to identify putative WWOX-interacting partners. Our analysis revealed that the first WW (WW1) domain of WWOX is the main functional interacting domain. Furthermore, our study uncovered well known and new PPXY-WW1-interacting partners and shed light on novel LPXY-WW1-interacting partners of WWOX. Many of these proteins are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, including transcription, RNA processing, tight junction, and metabolism. By utilizing GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays, we validated that WWOX is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, which contains two LPXY motifs. We found that ITCH mediates Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination of WWOX, leading to its nuclear localization and increased cell death. Our data suggest that the WW1 domain of WWOX provides a versatile platform that links WWOX with individual proteins associated with physiologically important networks.

  9. Molecular Details of α-Synuclein Membrane Association Revealed by Neutrons and Photons

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiping; Hess, Sara K.; Heinrich, Frank; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is an abundant neuronal protein associated with Parkinson’s disease that is disordered in solution, but exists in equilibrium between a bent- and an elongated-helix on negatively charged membranes. Here, neutron reflectometry (NR) and fluorescence spectroscopy were employed to uncover molecular details of the interaction between α-syn and two anionic lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine (PS). Both NR and site-specific Trp measurements indicate that penetration depth of α-syn is similar for either PA- or PS-containing membranes (~9–11 Å from bilayer center) even though there is a preference for α-syn binding to PA. However, closer examination of the individual Trp quenching profiles by brominated lipids reveal differences into local membrane interactions especially at position 39 where conformational heterogeneity was observed. The data also indicate that while W94 penetrates the bilayer as deeply as W4, W94 resides in a more polar surrounding. Taken together, we suggest the N- and C-terminal regions near positions 4 and 94 are anchored to the membrane, while the putative linker spanning residue 39 samples multiple conformations, which are sensitive to the chemical nature of the membrane surface. This flexibility may enable α-syn to bind diverse biomembranes in vivo. PMID:25790164

  10. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  11. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-10-16

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. Copyright © 2015 Johnson et al.

  12. Comparative secretomics reveals novel virulence-associated factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; Wang, Hua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a causative agent of serious human seafood-borne gastroenteritis disease and even death. In this study, for the first time, we obtained the secretomic profiles of seven V. parahaemolyticus strains of clinical and food origins. The strains exhibited various toxic genotypes and phenotypes of antimicrobial susceptibility and heavy metal resistance, five of which were isolated from aquatic products in Shanghai, China. Fourteen common extracellular proteins were identified from the distinct secretomic profiles using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques. Of these, half were involved in protein synthesis and sugar transport of V. parahaemolyticus. Strikingly, six identified proteins were virulence-associated factors involved in the pathogenicity of some other pathogenic bacteria, including the translation elongation factor EF-Tu, pyridoxine 5′-phosphate synthase, σ54 modulation protein, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, transaldolase and phosphoglycerate kinase. In addition, comparative secretomics also revealed several extracellular proteins that have not been described in any bacteria, such as the ribosome-recycling factor, translation elongation factor EF-Ts, phosphocarrier protein HPr and maltose-binding protein MalE. The results in this study will facilitate the better understanding of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus and provide data in support of novel vaccine candidates against the leading seafood-borne pathogen worldwide. PMID:26236293

  13. Lamin B distribution and association with peripheral chromatin revealed by optical sectioning and electron microscopy tomography

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have used a combination of immunogold staining, optical sectioning light microscopy, intermediate voltage electron microscopy, and EM tomography to examine the distribution of lamin B over the nuclear envelope of CHO cells. Apparent inconsistencies between previously published light and electron microscopy studies of nuclear lamin staining were resolved. At light microscopy resolution, an apparent open fibrillar network is visualized. Colocalization of lamin B and nuclear pores demonstrates that these apparent fibrils, separated by roughly 0.5 micron, are anti-correlated with the surface distribution of nuclear pores; pore clusters lie between or adjacent to regions of heavy lamin B staining. Examination at higher, EM resolution reveals that this apparent lamin B network does not correspond to an actual network of widely spaced, discrete bundles of lamin filaments. Rather it reflects a quantitative variation in lamin staining over a roughly 0.5-micron size scale, superimposed on a more continuous but still complex distribution of lamin filaments, spatially heterogeneous on a 0.1-0.2-micron size scale. Interestingly, lamin B staining at this higher resolution is highly correlated to the underlying chromatin distribution. Heavy concentrations of lamin B directly "cap" the surface of envelope associated, large-scale chromatin domains. PMID:8276889

  14. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as ‘setae’ on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in ‘pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were ‘delipidized’ to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems. PMID:25902194

  15. Renal scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urinate often to help remove the radioactive material from the body. How to Prepare for the Test Tell your health care provider if you take ... drink additional fluids before the scan. How the Test will ... into the vein. However, you will not feel the radioactive material. The scanning table may be hard and cold. ...

  16. Physical properties of archaeal tetraether lipid membranes as revealed by differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, molecular acoustics, and neutron reflectometry: effects of pressure and cell growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yong; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Taylor, Leeandrew Jacques-Asa; Erlkamp, Mirko; Grobelny, Sebastian; Czeslik, Claus; Watkins, Erik; Winter, Roland

    2012-03-20

    The polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) is a major tetraether lipid component in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Using differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry as well as ultrasound velocity and density measurements, we have determined the compressibilities and volume fluctuations of PLFE liposomes derived from different cell growth temperatures (T(g) = 68, 76, and 81 °C). The compressibility and volume fluctuation values of PLFE liposomes, which are substantially less than those detected from diester lipid membranes (e.g., DPPC), exhibit small but significant differences with T(g). Among the three T(g)s employed, 76 °C leads to the least compressible and most tightly packed PLFE membranes. This temperature is within the range for optimal cell growth (75-80 °C). It is known that a decrease in T(g) decreases the number of cyclopentane rings in archael tetraether lipids. Thus, our data enable us to present the new view that membrane packing in PLFE liposomes varies with the number of cyclopentane rings in a nonlinear manner, reaching maximal tightness when the tetraether lipids are derived from cells grown at optimal T(g)s. In addition, we have studied the effects of pressure on total layer thickness, d, and neutron scattering length density, ρ(n), of a silicon-D(2)O interface that is covered with a PLFE membrane using neutron reflectometry (NR). At 55 °C, d and ρ(n) are found to be rather insensitive to pressure up to 1800 bar, suggesting minor changes of the thickness of the membrane's hydrophobic core and headgroup orientation upon compression only.

  17. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the second extracellular loop of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor revealed residues critical for peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Gkountelias, Kostas; Tselios, Theodoros; Venihaki, Maria; Deraos, George; Lazaridis, Iakovos; Rassouli, Olga; Gravanis, Achille; Liapakis, George

    2009-04-01

    Upon binding of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) analog sauvagine to the type 1 CRF receptor (CRF(1)), the amino-terminal portion of the peptide has been shown to lie near Lys257 in the receptor's second extracellular loop (EL2). To test the hypothesis that EL2 residues play a role in the binding of sauvagine to CRF(1) we carried out an alanine-scanning mutagenesis study to determine the functional role of EL2 residues (Leu251 to Val266). Only the W259A, F260A, and W259A/F260A mutations reduced the binding affinity and potency of sauvagine. In contrast, these mutations did not seem to significantly alter the overall receptor conformation, in that they left unchanged the affinities of the ligands astressin and antalarmin that have been suggested to bind to different regions of CRF(1). The W259A, F260A, and W259A/F260A mutations also decreased the affinity of the endogenous ligand, CRF, implying that these residues may play a common important role in the binding of different peptides belonging to CRF family. Parallel amino acid deletions of the two peptides produced ligands with various affinities for wild-type CRF(1) compared with the W259A, F260A, and W259A/F260A mutants, supporting the interaction between the amino-terminal residues 8 to 10 of sauvagine and the corresponding region in CRF with EL2 of CRF(1). This is the first time that a specific region of CRF(1) has been implicated in detailed interactions between the receptor and the amino-terminal portion of peptides belonging to the CRF family.

  18. Patterns of postnatal ontogeny of the skull and lower jaw of snakes as revealed by micro-CT scan data and three-dimensional geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Palci, Alessandro; Lee, Michael S Y; Hutchinson, Mark N

    2016-12-01

    We compared the head skeleton (skull and lower jaw) of juvenile and adult specimens of five snake species [Anilios (=Ramphotyphlops) bicolor, Cylindrophis ruffus, Aspidites melanocephalus, Acrochordus arafurae, and Notechis scutatus] and two lizard outgroups (Ctenophorus decresii, Varanus gilleni). All major ontogenetic changes observed were documented both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative comparisons were based on high-resolution micro-CT scanning of the specimens, and detailed quantitative analyses were performed using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Two sets of landmarks were used, one for accurate representation of the intraspecific transformations of each skull and jaw configuration, and the other for comparison between taxa. Our results document the ontogenetic elaboration of crests and processes for muscle attachment (especially for cervical and adductor muscles); negative allometry in the braincase of all taxa; approximately isometric growth of the snout of all taxa except Varanus and Anilios (positively allometric); and positive allometry in the quadrates of the macrostomatan snakes Aspidites, Acrochordus and Notechis, but also, surprisingly, in the iguanian lizard Ctenophorus. Ontogenetic trajectories from principal component analysis provide evidence for paedomorphosis in Anilios and peramorphosis in Acrochordus. Some primitive (lizard-like) features are described for the first time in the juvenile Cylindrophis. Two distinct developmental trajectories for the achievement of the macrostomatan (large-gaped) condition in adult snakes are documented, driven either by positive allometry of supratemporal and quadrate (in pythons), or of quadrate alone (in sampled caenophidians); this is consistent with hypothesised homoplasy in this adaptive complex. Certain traits (e.g. shape of coronoid process, marginal tooth counts) are more stable throughout postnatal ontogeny than others (e.g. basisphenoid keel), with implications for their

  19. Structure and Dynamics Study of LeuT Using the Markov State Model and Perturbation Response Scanning Reveals Distinct Ion Induced Conformational States.

    PubMed

    Asciutto, Eliana K; Gedeon, Patrick C; General, Ignacio J; Madura, Jeffry D

    2016-08-25

    The bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a close homologue of the eukaryote monoamine transporters (MATs), currently serves as a powerful template for computer simulations of MATs. Transport of the amino acid leucine through the membrane is made possible by the sodium electrochemical potential. Recent reports indicate that the substrate transport mechanism is based on structural changes such as hinge movements of key transmembrane domains. In order to further investigate the role of sodium ions in the uptake of leucine, here we present a Markov state model analysis of atomistic simulations of lipid embedded LeuT in different environments, generated by varying the presence of binding pocket sodium ions and substrate. Six metastable conformations are found, and structural differences between them along with transition probabilities are determined. We complete the analysis with the implementation of perturbation response scanning on our system, determining the most sensitive and influential regions of LeuT, in each environment. Our results show that the occupation of sites Na1 and Na2, along with the presence of the substrate, selectively influences the geometry of LeuT. In particular, the occupation of each site Na1/Na2 has strong effects (in terms of changes in influence and/or sensitivity, as compared to the case without ions) in specific regions of LeuT, and the effects are different for simultaneous occupation. Our results strengthen the rationale and provide a conformational mechanism for a putative transport mechanism in which Na2 is necessary, but may not be sufficient, to initiate and stabilize extracellular substrate access to the binding pocket.

  20. On Utilization of NEXRAD Scan Strategy Information to Infer Discrepancies Associated With Radar and Rain Gauge Surface Volumetric Rainfall Accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Datta, Saswati; Jones, W. Linwood; Kasparis, Takis; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) monthly Ground Validation (GV) rain map, 42 quality controlled tipping bucket rain gauge data (1 minute interpolated rain rates) were utilized. We have compared the gauge data to the surface volumetric rainfall accumulation of NEXRAD reflectivity field, (converting to rain rates using a 0.5 dB resolution smooth Z-R table). The comparison was carried out from data collected at Melbourne, Florida during the month of July 98. GV operational level 3 (L3 monthly) accumulation algorithm was used to obtain surface volumetric accumulations for the radar. The gauge records were accumulated using the 1 minute interpolated rain rates while the radar Volume Scan (VOS) intervals remain less than or equal to 75 minutes. The correlation coefficient for the radar and gauge totals for the monthly time-scale remain at 0.93, however, a large difference was noted between the gauge and radar derived rain accumulation when the radar data interval is either 9 minute, or 10 minute. This difference in radar and gauge accumulation is being explained in terms of the radar scan strategy information. The discrepancy in terms of the Volume Coverage Pattern (VCP) of the NEXRAD is being reported where VCP mode is ascertained using the radar tilt angle information. Hourly radar and gauge accumulations have been computed using the present operational L3 method supplemented with a threshold period of +/- 5 minutes (based on a sensitivity analysis). These radar and gauge accumulations are subsequently improved using a radar hourly scan weighting factor (taking ratio of the radar scan frequency within a time bin to the 7436 total radar scans for the month). This GV procedure is further being improved by introducing a spatial smoothing method to yield reasonable bulk radar to gauge ratio for the hourly and daily scales.

  1. Association Between Airway Caliber Changes With Lung Inflation and Emphysema Assessed by Volumetric CT Scan in Subjects With COPD

    PubMed Central

    Come, Carolyn E.; Ross, James C.; San José Estépar, Raúl; Han, MeiLan K.; Loring, Stephen H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An increase in airway caliber (airway distensibility) with lung inflation is attenuated in COPD. Furthermore, some subjects have a decrease in airway caliber with lung inflation. We aimed to test the hypothesis that airway caliber increases are lower in subjects with emphysema-predominant (EP) compared with airway-predominant (AP) CT scan subtypes. Additionally, we compared clinical and CT scan features of subjects with (airway constrictors) and without a decrease in airway caliber. Methods: Based on GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stages and CT scan subtypes, we created a control group (n = 46) and the following matched COPD groups (n = 23 each): GOLD-2-AP, GOLD-2-EP, GOLD-4-AP, and GOLD-4-EP. From the CT scans of all 138 subjects, we measured emphysema, lung volumes, and caliber changes in the third and fourth airway generations of two bronchi. We expressed airway distensibility (ratio of airway lumen diameter change to lung volume change from end tidal breathing to full inspiration) as a global or lobar measure based on normalization by whole-lung or lobar volume changes. Results: Global distensibility in the third and fourth airway generations was significantly lower in the GOLD-2-EP and GOLD-4-EP groups than in control subjects. In GOLD-2 subjects, lobar distensibility of the right-upper-lobe fourth airway generation was significantly lower in those with EP than in those with AP. In multivariate analysis, emphysema was an independent determinant of global and lobar airway distensibility. Compared with nonconstrictors, airway constrictors experienced more dyspnea, were more hyperinflated, and had a higher percentage of emphysema. Conclusions: Distensibility of large- to medium-sized airways is reduced in subjects with an EP CT scan subtype. Emphysema seems to alter airway-parenchyma interdependence. Trial registry: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00608764; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:21940776

  2. On Utilization of NEXRAD Scan Strategy Information to Infer Discrepancies Associated With Radar and Rain Gauge Surface Volumetric Rainfall Accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Datta, Saswati; Jones, W. Linwood; Kasparis, Takis; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) monthly Ground Validation (GV) rain map, 42 quality controlled tipping bucket rain gauge data (1 minute interpolated rain rates) were utilized. We have compared the gauge data to the surface volumetric rainfall accumulation of NEXRAD reflectivity field, (converting to rain rates using a 0.5 dB resolution smooth Z-R table). The comparison was carried out from data collected at Melbourne, Florida during the month of July 98. GV operational level 3 (L3 monthly) accumulation algorithm was used to obtain surface volumetric accumulations for the radar. The gauge records were accumulated using the 1 minute interpolated rain rates while the radar Volume Scan (VOS) intervals remain less than or equal to 75 minutes. The correlation coefficient for the radar and gauge totals for the monthly time-scale remain at 0.93, however, a large difference was noted between the gauge and radar derived rain accumulation when the radar data interval is either 9 minute, or 10 minute. This difference in radar and gauge accumulation is being explained in terms of the radar scan strategy information. The discrepancy in terms of the Volume Coverage Pattern (VCP) of the NEXRAD is being reported where VCP mode is ascertained using the radar tilt angle information. Hourly radar and gauge accumulations have been computed using the present operational L3 method supplemented with a threshold period of +/- 5 minutes (based on a sensitivity analysis). These radar and gauge accumulations are subsequently improved using a radar hourly scan weighting factor (taking ratio of the radar scan frequency within a time bin to the 7436 total radar scans for the month). This GV procedure is further being improved by introducing a spatial smoothing method to yield reasonable bulk radar to gauge ratio for the hourly and daily scales.

  3. Confounding of the association between radiation exposure from CT scans and risk of leukemia and brain tumors by cancer susceptibility syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Johanna M; Ronckers, Cécile M; Merks, Johannes; Weijerman, Michel E; Lubin, Jay H; Hauptmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies linking radiation exposure from pediatric computed tomography (CT) to increased risks of leukemia and brain tumors lacked data to control for cancer susceptibility syndromes (CSS). These syndromes might be confounders because they are associated with an increased cancer risk and may increase the likelihood of pediatric CT scans. We identify CSS predisposing to leukemia and brain tumors through a systematic literature search and summarize prevalence and risk. Since empirical evidence is lacking in published literature on patterns of CT use for most types of CSS, we estimate confounding bias of relative risks (RR) for categories of radiation exposure based on expert opinion about patterns of CT scans among CSS patients. We estimate that radiation-related RRs for leukemia are not meaningfully confounded by Down syndrome, Noonan syndrome and other CSS. Moreover, tuberous sclerosis complex, von Hippel-Lindau disease, neurofibromatosis type 1 and other CSS do not meaningfully confound RRs for brain tumors. Empirical data on the use of CT scans among CSS patients is urgently needed. Our assessment indicates that associations with radiation exposure from pediatric CT scans and leukemia or brain tumors reported in previous studies are unlikely to be substantially confounded by unmeasured CSS.

  4. The molecular pathway to ZIF-7 microrods revealed by in situ time-resolved small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, quick-scanning extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Goesten, Maarten; Stavitski, Eli; Pidko, Evgeny A; Gücüyener, Canan; Boshuizen, Bart; Ehrlich, Steven N; Hensen, Emiel J M; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2013-06-10

    We present an in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and quick-scanning extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (QEXAFS) spectroscopy study on the crystallization of the metal-organic framework ZIF-7. In combination with DFT calculations, the self-assembly and growth of ZIF-7 microrods together with the chemical function of the crystal growth modulator (diethylamine) are revealed at all relevant length scales, from the atomic to the full crystal size.

  5. Characterization of Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension From REVEAL

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juliana; Parsons, Lori; Hassoun, Paul M.; McGoon, Michael; Badesch, David B.; Miller, Dave P.; Nicolls, Mark R.; Zamanian, Roham T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: REVEAL (the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management) is the largest US cohort of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) confirmed by right-sided heart catheterization (RHC), providing a more comprehensive subgroup characterization than previously possible. We used REVEAL to analyze the clinical features of patients with connective tissue disease-associated PAH (CTD-APAH). Methods: All newly and previously diagnosed patients with World Health Organization (WHO) group 1 PAH meeting RHC criteria at 54 US centers were consecutively enrolled. Cross-sectional and 1-year mortality and hospitalization analyses from time of enrollment compared CTD-APAH to idiopathic disease and systemic sclerosis (SSc) to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results: Compared with patients with idiopathic disease (n = 1,251), patients with CTD-APAH (n = 641) had better hemodynamics and favorable right ventricular echocardiographic findings but a higher prevalence of pericardial effusions, lower 6-min walk distance (300.5 ± 118.0 vs 329.4 ± 134.7 m, P = .01), higher B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels (432.8 ± 789.1 vs 245.6 ± 427.2 pg/mL, P < .0001), and lower diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (Dlco) (44.9% ± 18.0% vs 63.6% ± 22.1% predicted, P < .0001). One-year survival and freedom from hospitalization were lower in the CTD-APAH group (86% vs 93%, P < .0001; 67% vs 73%, P = .03). Compared with patients with SSc-APAH (n = 399), those with other CTDs (SLE, n = 110; MCTD, n = 52; RA, n = 28) had similar hemodynamics; however, patients with SSc-APAH had the highest BNP levels (552.2 ± 977.8 pg/mL), lowest Dlco (41.2% ± 16.3% predicted), and poorest 1-year survival (82% vs 94% in SLE-APAH, 88% in MCTD-APAH, and 96% in RA-APAH). Conclusions: Patients with SSc-APAH demonstrate a unique phenotype with the highest BNP levels, lowest Dlco

  6. Detailed crustal deformation and fault rupture of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal, revealed from ScanSAR-based interferograms of ALOS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tomokazu; Morishita, Yu; Yarai, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We have successfully detected widely distributed ground displacements for the 2015 Gorkha earthquake by applying a ScanSAR-based interferometry analysis of Advanced Land Observing Satellite 2 (ALOS-2) L-band data. A major displacement area extends with a length of about 160 km in the east-west direction, and the most concentrated crustal deformation with ground displacement exceeding 1 m is located 20-30 km east from Kathmandu. A quasi-vertical displacement estimated by combining the ascending and the descending data indicates upheaval of about 1.4 m at maximum. We inverted the synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) data including both of the main shock (moment magnitude (Mw) 7.8) and the largest aftershock (Mw 7.3) to construct a slip distribution model. Our model shows a nearly pure reverse fault motion with a slip amount of approximately 6 m at maximum, and the spatial extent is zonally distributed within a distance of 50 to 100 km from the surface along downdip direction. The downdip end of the slip is quite consistent with that of the interseismic coupling area geodetically inferred in previous studies. On the other hand, there is no significant slip at shallow depth in spite of the fact that the plate interface is thought to be fully locked there, may be suggesting that there still remains a potential of fault slip. The slip distribution unnaturally bifurcates in the east, and we can identify a clear-cut slip deficit area with a radius of ~10 km just west side of the Mw 7.3 event, where the slip amount reaches only 20 cm at most. This area is presumably subjected to a strong shear stress which should promote a reverse fault slip. There is a possibility to produce a fault slip equivalent to Mw ~7.0 in the future although we do not know if the slip heterogeneity would be smoothed out by a seismic event or an aseismic event.

  7. Genomewide association study reveals a risk locus for equine metabolic syndrome in the Arabian horse.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S L; Holl, H M; Streeter, C; Posbergh, C; Schanbacher, B J; Place, N J; Mallicote, M F; Long, M T; Brooks, S A

    2017-03-01

    Equine obesity can cause life-threatening secondary chronic conditions, similar to those in humans and other animal species. Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), primarily characterized by hyperinsulinemia, is often present in obese horses and ponies. Due to clinical similarities to conditions such as pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (formerly equine Cushing's disease), conclusive diagnosis of EMS often proves challenging. Aside from changes in diet and exercise, few targeted treatments are available for EMS, emphasizing the need for early identification of at-risk individuals to enable implementation of preventative measures. A genomewide association study (GWAS) using Arabian horses with a history of severe laminitis secondary to EMS revealed significant genetic markers near a single candidate gene () that may play a role in cholesterol homeostasis. The best marker, BIEC2-263524 (chr14:69276814 T > C), was correlated with elevated insulin values and increased frequency of laminitis ( = 0.0024 and = 9.663 × 10, respectively). In a second population of Arabian horses, the BIEC2-263524 marker maintained its associations with higher modified insulin-to-glucose ratio (MIRG) values ( = 0.0056) and BCS ( = 0.0063). Screening of the predicted coding regions by sequencing identified a polymorphic guanine homopolymer and 5 haplotypes in the 3' untranslated region (UTR). An 11 guanine (11-G) allele at was correlated with elevated insulin values in the GWAS population ( = 0.0008) and, in the second population, elevated MIRG and increased BCS > 6.5 ( = 0.0055 and = 0.0162, respectively). The BIEC2-263524-C and the 3' UTR -11(G) polymorphisms were correlated at a 98% frequency, indicating strong linkage disequilibrium across this 150-kb haplotype. Assays for these markers could diagnose horses with a genetic predisposition to develop obesity. Additionally, discovery of FAM174A function may improve our understanding of the etiology of this troubling illness in the horse and

  8. Fine Mapping and Transcriptome Analysis Reveal Candidate Genes Associated with Hybrid Lethality in Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xue, Yuqian; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhang, Yangyong; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Liu, Xing; Liu, Zezhou; Lv, Honghao; Zhuang, Mu

    2017-06-05

    Hybrid lethality is a deleterious phenotype that is vital to species evolution. We previously reported hybrid lethality in cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and performed preliminary mapping of related genes. In the present study, the fine mapping of hybrid lethal genes revealed that BoHL1 was located on chromosome C1 between BoHLTO124 and BoHLTO130, with an interval of 101 kb. BoHL2 was confirmed to be between insertion-deletion (InDels) markers HL234 and HL235 on C4, with a marker interval of 70 kb. Twenty-eight and nine annotated genes were found within the two intervals of BoHL1 and BoHL2, respectively. We also applied RNA-Seq to analyze hybrid lethality in cabbage. In the region of BoHL1, seven differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and five resistance (R)-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo1g153320 and Bo1g153380) were found, whereas in the region of BoHL2, two DEGs and four R-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo4g173780 and Bo4g173810) were found. Along with studies in which R genes were frequently involved in hybrid lethality in other plants, these interesting R-DEGs may be good candidates associated with hybrid lethality. We also used SNP/InDel analyses and quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the results. This work provides new insight into the mechanisms of hybrid lethality in cabbage.

  9. Gene expression profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer reveals key genes and pathways associated with chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Luo, S C

    2016-01-22

    The aim of this study is to analyze gene expression data to identify key genes and pathways associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to improve clinical treatment strategies. The gene expression data set was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included 12 chemotherapy-resistant EOC samples and 16 chemotherapy-sensitive EOC samples. A differential analysis was performed to screen out differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A functional enrichment analysis was conducted for the DEGs using the database for annotation, visualization, and integration discovery. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed with information from the human protein reference database. Pathway-pathway interactions were determined with a test based on the hypergeometric distribution. A total of 1564 DEGs were identified in chemotherapy-sensitive EOC, including 654 upregulated genes and 910 downregulated genes. The top three upregulated genes were HIST1H3G, AKT3, and RTN3, while the top three downregulated genes were NBLA00301, TRIM62, and EPHA5. A Gene Ontology enrichment analysis showed that cell adhesion, biological adhesion, and intracellular signaling cascades were significantly enriched in the DEGs. A KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the calcium, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and B cell receptor signaling pathways were significantly over-represented in the DEGs. A PPI network containing 101 interactions was acquired. The top three hub genes were RAC1, CAV1, and BCL2. Five modules were identified from the PPI network. Taken together, these findings could advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying intrinsic chemotherapy resistance in EOC.

  10. Quantitative Protein Localization Signatures Reveal an Association between Spatial and Functional Divergences of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  11. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals differentially expressed genes associated with sex expression in garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis).

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Yuan, Jin-Hong; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2017-08-22

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a highly valuable vegetable crop of commercial and nutritional interest. It is also commonly used to investigate the mechanisms of sex determination and differentiation in plants. However, the sex expression mechanisms in asparagus remain poorly understood. De novo transcriptome sequencing via Illumina paired-end sequencing revealed more than 26 billion bases of high-quality sequence data from male and female asparagus flower buds. A total of 72,626 unigenes with an average length of 979 bp were assembled. In comparative transcriptome analysis, 4876 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the possible sex-determining stage of female and male/supermale flower buds. Of these DEGs, 433, including 285 male/supermale-biased and 149 female-biased genes, were annotated as flower related. Of the male/supermale-biased flower-related genes, 102 were probably involved in anther development. In addition, 43 DEGs implicated in hormone response and biosynthesis putatively associated with sex expression and reproduction were discovered. Moreover, 128 transcription factor (TF)-related genes belonging to various families were found to be differentially expressed, and this finding implied the essential roles of TF in sex determination or differentiation in asparagus. Correlation analysis indicated that miRNA-DEG pairs were also implicated in asparagus sexual development. Our study identified a large number of DEGs involved in the sex expression and reproduction of asparagus, including known genes participating in plant reproduction, plant hormone signaling, TF encoding, and genes with unclear functions. We also found that miRNAs might be involved in the sex differentiation process. Our study could provide a valuable basis for further investigations on the regulatory networks of sex determination and differentiation in asparagus and facilitate further genetic and genomic studies on this dioecious species.

  12. Association of ActA to Peptidoglycan Revealed by Cell Wall Proteomics of Intracellular Listeria monocytogenes*

    PubMed Central

    García-del Portillo, Francisco; Calvo, Enrique; D'Orazio, Valentina; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterial pathogen that colonizes the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Recent transcriptomic studies have revealed that intracellular L. monocytogenes alter expression of genes encoding envelope components. However, no comparative global analysis of this cell wall remodeling process is yet known at the protein level. Here, we used high resolution mass spectrometry to define the cell wall proteome of L. monocytogenes growing inside epithelial cells. When compared with extracellular bacteria growing in a nutrient-rich medium, a major difference found in the proteome was the presence of the actin assembly-inducing protein ActA in peptidoglycan purified from intracellular bacteria. ActA was also identified in the peptidoglycan of extracellular bacteria growing in a chemically defined minimal medium. In this condition, ActA maintains its membrane anchoring domain and promotes efficient bacterial entry into nonphagocytic host cells. Unexpectedly, Internalin-A, which mediates entry of extracellular L. monocytogenes into eukaryotic cells, was identified at late infection times (6 h) as an abundant protein in the cell wall of intracellular bacteria. Other surface proteins covalently bound to the peptidoglycan, as Lmo0514 and Lmo2085, were detected exclusively in intracellular and extracellular bacteria, respectively. Altogether, these data provide the first insights into the changes occurring at the protein level in the L. monocytogenes cell wall as the pathogen transits from the extracellular environment to an intracytosolic lifestyle inside eukaryotic cells. Some of these changes include alterations in the relative amount and the mode of association of certain surface proteins. PMID:21846725

  13. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  14. Gel mobility shift scanning of pectin-inducible promoter from Penicillium griseoroseum reveals the involvement of a CCAAT element in the expression of a polygalacturonase gene

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have described pgg2, a polygalacturonase-encoding gene of Penicillium griseoroseum, as an attractive model for transcriptional regulation studies, due to its high expression throughout several in vitro growth conditions, even in the presence of non-inducing sugars such as sucrose. A search for regulatory motifs in the 5' upstream regulatory sequence of pgg2 identified a putative CCAAT box that could justify this expression profile. This element, located 270 bp upstream of the translational start codon, was tested as binding target for regulatory proteins. Analysis of a 170 bp promoter fragment by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts prepared from mycelia grown in pectin-containing culture medium revealed a high mobility complex that was subsequently confirmed by analyzing it with a double-stranded oligonucleotide spanning the CCAAT motif. A substitution in the core sequence for GTAGG partially abolished the formation of specific complexes, showing the involvement of the CCAAT box in the regulation of the polygalacturonase gene studied. PMID:21637657

  15. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... rays given off by the radioactive material. A computer displays images of the thyroid gland. Other scans ... It is an even gray color on the computer image without darker or lighter areas. What Abnormal ...

  16. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... material called gallium and is a type of nuclear medicine exam. A related test is gallium scan ... Brown ML, Forstrom LA, et al. Society of nuclear medicine procedure guideline for gallium scintigraphy in inflammation. ...

  17. Liver scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... cirrhosis or hepatitis ) Superior vena cava obstruction Splenic infarction (tissue death) Tumors Risks Radiation from any scan ... Hepatitis Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Liver disease Splenic infarction SVC obstruction Review Date 1/18/2015 Updated ...

  18. Genome scan of hybridizing sunflowers from Texas (Helianthus annuus and H. debilis) reveals asymmetric patterns of introgression and small islands of genomic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Scascitelli, M; Whitney, K D; Randell, R A; King, Matthew; Buerkle, C A; Rieseberg, L H

    2010-02-01

    Although the sexual transfer of genetic material between species (i.e. introgression) has been documented in many groups of plants and animals, genome-wide patterns of introgression are poorly understood. Is most of the genome permeable to interspecific gene flow, or is introgression typically restricted to a handful of genomic regions? Here, we assess the genomic extent and direction of introgression between three sunflowers from the south-central USA: the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus ssp. annuus; a near-endemic to Texas, Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius; and their putative hybrid derivative, thought to have recently colonized Texas, H. annuus ssp. texanus. Analyses of variation at 88 genetically mapped microsatellite loci revealed that long-term migration rates were high, genome-wide and asymmetric, with higher migration rates from H. annuus texanus into the two parental taxa than vice versa. These results imply a longer history of intermittent contact between H. debilis and H. annuus than previously believed, and that H. annuus texanus may serve as a bridge for the transfer of alleles between its parental taxa. They also contradict recent theory suggesting that introgression should predominantly be in the direction of the colonizing species. As in previous studies of hybridizing sunflower species, regions of genetic differentiation appear small, whether estimated in terms of FST or unidirectional migration rates. Estimates of recent immigration and admixture were inconsistent, depending on the type of analysis. At the individual locus level, one marker showed striking asymmetry in migration rates, a pattern consistent with tight linkage to a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility.

  19. Transcriptome sequencing of Mycosphaerella fijiensis during association with Musa acuminata reveals candidate pathogenicity genes.

    PubMed

    Noar, Roslyn D; Daub, Margaret E

    2016-08-30

    genes with higher expression in infected leaf tissue, suggesting that they may play a role in pathogenicity. For two other scaffolds, no transcripts were detected in either condition, and PCR assays support the hypothesis that at least one of these scaffolds corresponds to a dispensable chromosome that is not required for survival or pathogenicity. Our study revealed major changes in the transcriptome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, when associating with its host compared to during saprophytic growth in medium. This analysis identified putative pathogenicity genes and also provides support for the existence of dispensable chromosomes in this fungus.

  20. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  1. Revealing Significant Relations between Chemical/Biological Features and Activity: Associative Classification Mining for Drug Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Pulan

    2012-01-01

    Classification, clustering and association mining are major tasks of data mining and have been widely used for knowledge discovery. Associative classification mining, the combination of both association rule mining and classification, has emerged as an indispensable way to support decision making and scientific research. In particular, it offers a…

  2. Why Are Home Literacy Environment and Children's Reading Skills Associated? What Parental Skills Reveal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bergen, Elsje; van Zuijen, Titia; Bishop, Dorothy; de Jong, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Associations between home literacy environment and children's reading ability are often assumed to reflect a direct influence. However, heritability could account for the association between parent and child literacy-related measures. We used data from 101 mother/father/child triads to consider the extent to which associations between home…

  3. Revealing Significant Relations between Chemical/Biological Features and Activity: Associative Classification Mining for Drug Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Pulan

    2012-01-01

    Classification, clustering and association mining are major tasks of data mining and have been widely used for knowledge discovery. Associative classification mining, the combination of both association rule mining and classification, has emerged as an indispensable way to support decision making and scientific research. In particular, it offers a…

  4. Mobile gamma-ray scanning system for detecting radiation anomalies associated with /sup 226/Ra-bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A mobile gamma-ray scanning system has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the Department of Energy's remedial action survey programs. The unit consists of a NaI(T1) detection system housed in a specially-equipped van. The system is operator controlled through an on-board mini-computer, with data output provided on the computer video screen, strip chart recorders, and an on-line printer. Data storage is provided by a floppy disk system. Multichannel analysis capabilities are included for qualitative radionuclide identification. A /sup 226/Ra-specific algorithm is employed to identify locations containing residual radium-bearing materials. This report presents the details of the system description, software development, and scanning methods utilized with the ORNL system. Laboratory calibration and field testing have established the system sensitivity, field of view, and other performance characteristics, the results of which are also presented. Documentation of the instrumentation and computer programs are included.

  5. Green LED associated to 20% hydrogen peroxide for dental bleaching: nanomorfologic study of enamel by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    Dental bleaching is a much requested procedure in clinical dental practice and widely related to dental esthetics. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on the morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the effect of hydrogen peroxide at 20% at neutral pH, cured by the green LED, to evaluate the action of these substances on dental enamel. We selected 15 pre-molars, lingual surfaces were sectioned and previously marked with a central groove to take the experimental and control groups on the same specimen. The groups were divided as follows. The mesial hemi-faces were the experimental group and distal ones as controls. For morphological analysis were performed 75 electron micrographs SEM with an increase of X 43, X 220 and X 1000 and its images were evaluated by tree observers. Was also performed quantitative analysis of the determination of the surface atomic composition of the samples through microanalysis with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The use of hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 20% at photoactivated green LED showed no significant changes in mineral composition of the samples or the dental morphological structure of the same when compared to their controls, according to the study protocol.

  6. A genome-wide association analysis of temozolomide response using lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals a clinically relevant association with MGMT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Chad C.; Havener, Tammy M.; Medina, Marisa Wong; Auman, J. Todd; Mangravite, Lara M.; Krauss, Ronald M.; McLeod, Howard L.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) have emerged as an innovative model system for mapping gene variants that predict dose response to chemotherapy drugs. In the current study, this strategy was expanded to the in vitro genome-wide association approach, using 516 LCLs derived from a Caucasian cohort to assess cytotoxic response to temozolomide. Genome-wide association analysis using approximately 2.1 million quality controlled single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified a statistically significant association (p < 10−8) with SNPs in the O6-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. We also demonstrate that the primary SNP in this region is significantly associated with differential gene expression of MGMT (p< 10−26) in LCLs, and differential methylation in glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The previously documented clinical and functional relationships between MGMT and temozolomide response highlight the potential of well-powered GWAS of the LCL model system to identify meaningful genetic associations. PMID:23047291

  7. A sweet sound? Food names reveal implicit associations between taste and pitch.

    PubMed

    Crisinel, Anne-Sylvie; Spence, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sounds (high- and low-pitched) have been shown to be implicitly associated with basic tastes (sour and bitter-see Crisinel and Spence, 2009 Neuroscience Letters 464 39-42). In the present study, a version of the implicit association test was used to assess the strength of the association between high-pitched sounds and names of sweet-tasting foodstuffs, and between low-pitched sounds and names of salty-tasting foodstuffs (experiment 1). A similar task, the go/no-go association task was then used to evaluate the relative strengths of these associations (experiment 2). Analysis of the sensitivity of participants' responses suggested that both sour- and sweet-tasting (names of) food items were associated with high-pitched sounds. This result highlights the existence of robust cross-modal associations between certain sounds and basic tastes.

  8. ScanProsite: detection of PROSITE signature matches and ProRule-associated functional and structural residues in proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Edouard; Sigrist, Christian J. A.; Gattiker, Alexandre; Bulliard, Virginie; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S.; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    ScanProsite——is a new and improved version of the web-based tool for detecting PROSITE signature matches in protein sequences. For a number of PROSITE profiles, the tool now makes use of ProRules—context-dependent annotation templates—to detect functional and structural intra-domain residues. The detection of those features enhances the power of function prediction based on profiles. Both user-defined sequences and sequences from the UniProt Knowledgebase can be matched against custom patterns, or against PROSITE signatures. To improve response times, matches of sequences from UniProtKB against PROSITE signatures are now retrieved from a pre-computed match database. Several output modes are available including simple text views and a rich mode providing an interactive match and feature viewer with a graphical representation of results. PMID:16845026

  9. Genome-wide association study and admixture mapping reveal new loci associated with total IgE levels in Latinos.

    PubMed

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Gignoux, Christopher R; Galanter, Joshua M; Levin, Albert M; Campbell, Catarina D; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Nishimura, Katherine K; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mohajeri, Kiana; O'Roak, Brian J; Hu, Donglei; Mathias, Rasika A; Nguyen, Elizabeth A; Roth, Lindsey A; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A; Lurmann, Fred; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G; Lenoir, Michael A; Thyne, Shannon M; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Borrell, Luisa N; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Sen, Saunak; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Martinez, Fernando D; Raby, Benjamin A; Weiss, Scott T; Nicolae, Dan L; Ober, Carole; Meyers, Deborah A; Bleecker, Eugene R; Mack, Steven J; Hernandez, Ryan D; Eichler, Evan E; Barnes, Kathleen C; Williams, L Keoki; Torgerson, Dara G; Burchard, Esteban G

    2015-06-01

    IgE is a key mediator of allergic inflammation, and its levels are frequently increased in patients with allergic disorders. We sought to identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos. We performed a genome-wide association study and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1564 European Americans, and 3187 African Americans from independent studies. We confirmed associations of 6 genes identified by means of previous genome-wide association studies and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in the zinc finger protein 365 gene (ZNF365) with total IgE levels (rs200076616, P = 2.3 × 10(-8)). We next identified 4 admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) at which local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower IgE levels (P = 4.95 × 10(-8)). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and 2 of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified 6 genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, 2 of which replicated in European Americans. Another single nucleotide polymorphism was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, P = 3.7 × 10(-6)) and replicated in non-African American samples (P = .011). We confirmed genetic associations at 6 genes and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse multiethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide Association Study and Admixture Mapping Reveal New Loci Associated with Total IgE Levels in Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Levin, Albert M.; Campbell, Catarina D.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mohajeri, Kiana; O'Roak, Brian J.; Hu, Donglei; Mathias, Rasika A.; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Lurmann, Fred; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G.; Lenoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon M.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Borrell, Luisa N.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Sen, Saunak; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Mack, Steven J.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Eichler, Evan E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Williams, L. Keoki; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a key mediator of allergic inflammation and is frequently elevated in allergic disorders. Objective To identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3,334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1,564 European Americans, and 3,187 African Americans from independent studies. Results We confirmed associations of six genes identified by previous GWAS and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in ZNF365 with total IgE (rs200076616, p=2.3x10−8). We next identified four admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) where local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower levels of IgE (p=4.95x10−8). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and two of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified six genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, two of which replicated in European Americans. Another SNP was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, p=3.7x10−6), and replicated in non-African American samples (p=0.011). Conclusion We confirmed genetic associations at six genes, and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels. PMID:25488688

  11. Genome-wide association study of facial morphology reveals novel associations with FREM1 and PARK2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung Keun; Shaffer, John R; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Orlova, Ekaterina; Carlson, Jenna C; Feingold, Eleanor; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have now shown evidence of association between common genetic variants and quantitative facial traits in humans. The reported associations generally involve simple univariate measures and likely represent only a small fraction of the genetic loci influencing facial morphology. In this study, we applied factor analysis to a set of 276 facial linear distances derived from 3D facial surface images of 2187 unrelated individuals of European ancestry. We retained 23 facial factors, which we then tested for genetic associations using a genome-wide panel of 10,677,593 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In total, we identified genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10-8) associations in three regions, including two that are novel: one involving measures of midface height at 6q26 within an intron of PARK2 (lead SNP rs9456748; p = 4.99 × 10-8) and another involving measures of central upper lip height at 9p22 within FREM1 (lead SNP rs72713618; p = 2.02 × 10-8). In both cases, the genetic association was stronger with the composite facial factor phenotype than with any of the individual linear distances that comprise those factors. While the biological role of PARK2 in the craniofacial complex is currently unclear, there is evidence from both mouse models and Mendelian syndromes that FREM1 may influence facial variation. These results highlight the potential value of data-driven multivariate phenotyping for genetic studies of human facial morphology.

  12. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  13. Targeted genomic analysis reveals widespread autoimmune disease association with regulatory variants in the TNF superfamily cytokine signalling network.

    PubMed

    Richard, Arianne C; Peters, James E; Lee, James C; Vahedi, Golnaz; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Siegel, Richard M; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2016-07-19

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily cytokines and their receptors regulate diverse immune system functions through a common set of signalling pathways. Genetic variants in and expression of individual TNF superfamily cytokines, receptors and signalling proteins have been associated with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but their interconnected biology has been largely unexplored. We took a hypothesis-driven approach using available genome-wide datasets to identify genetic variants regulating gene expression in the TNF superfamily cytokine signalling network and the association of these variants with autoimmune and autoinflammatory disease. Using paired gene expression and genetic data, we identified genetic variants associated with gene expression, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), in four peripheral blood cell subsets. We then examined whether eQTLs were dependent on gene expression level or the presence of active enhancer chromatin marks. Using these eQTLs as genetic markers of the TNF superfamily signalling network, we performed targeted gene set association analysis in eight autoimmune and autoinflammatory disease genome-wide association studies. Comparison of TNF superfamily network gene expression and regulatory variants across four leucocyte subsets revealed patterns that differed between cell types. eQTLs for genes in this network were not dependent on absolute gene expression levels and were not enriched for chromatin marks of active enhancers. By examining autoimmune disease risk variants among our eQTLs, we found that risk alleles can be associated with either increased or decreased expression of co-stimulatory TNF superfamily cytokines, receptors or downstream signalling molecules. Gene set disease association analysis revealed that eQTLs for genes in the TNF superfamily pathway were associated with six of the eight autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases examined, demonstrating associations beyond single genome-wide significant

  14. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10−8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  15. Osteochondral lesions in distal tarsal joints of Icelandic horses reveal strong associations between hyaline and calcified cartilage abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ley, C J; Ekman, S; Hansson, K; Björnsdóttir, S; Boyde, A

    2014-03-25

    Osteochondral lesions in the joints of the distal tarsal region of young Icelandic horses provide a natural model for the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA) in low-motion joints. We describe and characterise mineralised and non-mineralised osteochondral lesions in left distal tarsal region joint specimens from twenty-two 30 ±1 month-old Icelandic horses. Combinations of confocal scanning light microscopy, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (including, importantly, iodine staining) and three-dimensional microcomputed tomography were used on specimens obtained with guidance from clinical imaging. Lesion-types were described and classified into groups according to morphological features. Their locations in the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC), articular calcified cartilage (ACC), subchondral bone (SCB) and the joint margin tissues were identified and their frequency in the joints recorded. Associations and correlations between lesion-types were investigated for centrodistal joints only. In centrodistal joints the lesion-types HAC chondrocyte loss, HAC fibrillation, HAC central chondrocyte clusters, ACC arrest and ACC advance had significant associations and strong correlations. These lesion-types had moderate to high frequency in centrodistal joints but low frequencies in tarsometatarsal and talocalcaneal-centroquartal joints. Joint margin lesion-types had no significant associations with other lesion-types in the centrodistal joints but high frequency in both the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints. The frequency of SCB lesion-types in all joints was low. Hypermineralised infill phase lesion-types were detected. Our results emphasise close associations between HAC and ACC lesions in equine centrodistal joints and the importance of ACC lesions in the development of OA in low-motion compression-loaded equine joints.

  16. Genetic Dissection of Acute Anterior Uveitis Reveals Similarities and Differences in Associations observed with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip C.; Claushuis, Theodora A.M.; Cortes, Adrian; Martin, Tammy M.; Evans, David M.; Leo, Paul; Mukhopadhyay, Pamela; Bradbury, Linda A.; Cremin, Katie; Harris, Jessica; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Inman, Robert D.; Rahman, Proton; Haroon, Nigil; Gensler, Lianne; Powell, Joseph E.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Lim, Lyndell L.; Wakefield, Denis; McCluskey, Peter; Voigt, Valentina; Fleming, Peter; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia; Pointon, Jennifer J.; Weisman, Michael H.; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Reveille, John D.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use high density genotyping to investigate the genetic associations of acute anterior uveitis (AAU) in patients both with and without ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Method We genotyped 1,711 patients with AAU (either primary or with AAU and AS), 2,339 AS patients without AAU, and 10,000 controls on the Illumina Immunochip Infinium microarray. We also used data on AS patients from previous genomewide association studies to investigate the AS risk locus ANTXR2 for its putative effect in AAU. ANTXR2 expression in mouse eyes was investigated by RT-PCR. Results Comparing all AAU cases with HC, strong association was seen over HLA-B corresponding to the HLA-B27 tag SNP rs116488202. Three non-MHC loci IL23R, the intergenic region 2p15 and ERAP1 were associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5×10−8). Five loci harboring the immune-related genes IL10-IL19, IL18R1-IL1R1, IL6R, the chromosome 1q32 locus harboring KIF21B, as well as the eye related gene EYS, were also associated at a suggestive level of significance (P < 5×10−6). A number of previously confirmed AS associations demonstrated significant differences in effect size between AS patients with AAU and AS patients without AAU. ANTXR2 expression was found to vary across eye compartments. Conclusion These findings, with both novel AAU specific associations, and associations shared with AS demonstrate overlapping but also distinct genetic susceptibility loci for AAU and AS. The associations in IL10 and IL18R1 are shared with inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting common etiologic pathways. PMID:25200001

  17. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  18. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  19. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M; Neves, Leandro G; Resende, Márcio F R; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Dervinis, Christopher; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Davenport, Ruth; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. These polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  20. Class II 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser Association with Young Massive Cores Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Csengeri, Timea; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Iguchi, Satoru; Alhassan, Jibrin A.; Higuchi, Aya E.; Bontemps, Sylvain; Menten, Karl M.

    2017-02-01

    We explored the implication of the association (or lack of it) of 6.7 GHz class II methanol (CH3OH) masers with massive dense cores (MDCs) detected (within a sample of ATLASGAL selected infrared quiet massive clumps) at 0.9 mm with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array. We found 42 out of the 112 cores (37.5%) detected with the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) to be associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. The lowest mass core with CH3OH maser association is ∼ 12 {M}ȯ . The angular offsets of the ACA cores from the 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser peak positions range from 0.″17 to 4.″79, with a median value of 2.″19. We found a weak correlation between the 0.9 mm continuum (MDCs) peak fluxes and the peak fluxes of their associated methanol multibeam (MMB) 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. About 90% of the cores associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers have masses of >40 M ⊙. The CH3OH maser containing cores are candidates for embedded high-mass protostellar objects in their earliest evolutionary stages. With our ACA 0.9 continuum data compared with the MMB 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser survey, we have constrained the cores already housing massive protostars based on their association with the radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  1. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides

    DOE PAGES

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M.; Neves, Leandro G.; Resende, Jr., Marcio F. R.; ...

    2016-09-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genesmore » in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. Lastly, these polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.« less

  2. Comparative Genome Sequence Analysis Reveals the Extent of Diversity and Conservation for Glycan-Associated Proteins in Burkholderia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Mohamed, Rahmah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia family occupy diverse ecological niches. In pathogenic family members, glycan-associated proteins are often linked to functions that include virulence, protein conformation maintenance, surface recognition, cell adhesion, and immune system evasion. Comparative analysis of available Burkholderia genomes has revealed a core set of 178 glycan-associated proteins shared by all Burkholderia of which 68 are homologous to known essential genes. The genome sequence comparisons revealed insights into species-specific gene acquisitions through gene transfers, identified an S-layer protein, and proposed that significantly reactive surface proteins are associated to sugar moieties as a potential means to circumvent host defense mechanisms. The comparative analysis using a curated database of search queries enabled us to gain insights into the extent of conservation and diversity, as well as the possible virulence-associated roles of glycan-associated proteins in members of the Burkholderia spp. The curated list of glycan-associated proteins used can also be directed to screen other genomes for glycan-associated homologs. PMID:22991502

  3. Biometrics-based service marketing issues: exploring acceptability and risk factors of iris scans associated with registered travel programmes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan D

    2008-01-01

    The marketability and viability of biometric technologies by companies marketing their own versions of pre-approved registered travel programmes have generated a number of controversies. Data were collected and analysed to formulate graphs, run regression and correlation analyses, and use Chi-square to formally test basic research propositions on a sample of 241 professionals in the Pittsburgh area. It was found that there was a significant relationship between the respondents' familiarity with new technology (namely web-enabled and internet sophistication) and knowledge of biometrics, in particular iris scans. Participants who frequently use the internet are more comfortable with innovative technology; although individuals with higher income levels have less trust in the government, it appeared that virtually everyone is concerned about trusting the government with their personal information. Healthcare professionals need to document the safety, CRM-related factors, and provide leadership in the international collaboration of biometric-related personal identification technologies, since they will be one of the main beneficiaries of the implementation of such technologies.

  4. Whole-genome scanning for the litter size trait associated genes and SNPs under selection in dairy goat (Capra hircus)

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Fang-Nong; Zhai, Hong-Li; Cheng, Ming; Ma, Jun-Yu; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Ge, Wei; Zhang, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Rui-Qian; Wang, Xue; Min, Ling-Jiang; Song, Jiu-Zhou; Shen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Dairy goats are one of the most utilized domesticated animals in China. Here, we selected extreme populations based on differential fecundity in two Laoshan dairy goat populations. Utilizing deep sequencing we have generated 68.7 and 57.8 giga base of sequencing data, and identified 12,458,711 and 12,423,128 SNPs in the low fecundity and high fecundity groups, respectively. Following selective sweep analyses, a number of loci and candidate genes in the two populations were scanned independently. The reproduction related genes CCNB2, AR, ADCY1, DNMT3B, SMAD2, AMHR2, ERBB2, FGFR1, MAP3K12 and THEM4 were specifically selected in the high fecundity group whereas KDM6A, TENM1, SWI5 and CYM were specifically selected in the low fecundity group. A sub-set of genes including SYCP2, SOX5 and POU3F4 were localized both in the high and low fecundity selection windows, suggesting that these particular genes experienced strong selection with lower genetic diversity. From the genome data, the rare nonsense mutations may not contribute to fecundity, whereas nonsynonymous SNPs likely play a predominant role. The nonsynonymous exonic SNPs in SETDB2 and CDH26 which were co-localized in the selected region may take part in fecundity traits. These observations bring us a new insights into the genetic variation influencing fecundity traits within dairy goats. PMID:27905513

  5. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P. falciparum, the limited amount of linkage disequilibrium hinders the power of traditional array-based GWAS. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility and power improvements gained by using whole-genome sequencing for association studies. We analyzed data from 45 Senegalese parasites and identified genetic changes associated with the parasites’ in vitro response to 12 different antimalarials. To further increase statistical power, we adapted a common test for natural selection, XP-EHH (cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity), and used it to identify genomic regions associated with resistance to drugs. Using this sequence-based approach and the combination of association and selection-based tests, we detected several loci associated with drug resistance. These loci included the previously known signals at pfcrt, dhfr, and pfmdr1, as well as many genes not previously implicated in drug-resistance roles, including genes in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on the success of the analysis presented in this study, and on the demonstrated shortcomings of array-based approaches, we argue for a complete transition to sequence-based GWAS for small, low linkage-disequilibrium genomes like that of P. falciparum. PMID:22826220

  6. Cis-Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Reveals Replicable Associations with Heroin Addiction in OPRM1

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Hulse, Gary; Wildenauer, Dieter; Kelty, Erin; Schwab, Sibylle; Degenhardt, Louisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Kral, Alex; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Background No opioid receptor, mu 1 (OPRM1) gene polymorphisms, including the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1799971, have been conclusively associated with heroin/other opioid addiction, despite their biological plausibility. We used evidence of polymorphisms altering OPRM1 expression in normal human brain tissue to nominate and then test associations with heroin addiction. Methods We tested 103 OPRM1 SNPs for association with OPRM1 mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex from 224 European Americans and African Americans of the BrainCloud cohort. We then tested the 16 putative cis-quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) SNPs for association with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study and two replication cohorts, totaling 16,729 European Americans, African Americans, and Australians of European ancestry. Results Four putative cis-eQTL SNPs were significantly associated with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study (smallest P=8.9×10−5): rs9478495, rs3778150, rs9384169, and rs562859. Rs3778150, located in OPRM1 intron 1, was significantly replicated (P=6.3×10−5). Meta-analysis across all case-control cohorts resulted in P=4.3×10−8: the rs3778150-C allele (frequency=16%-19%) being associated with increased heroin addiction risk. Importantly, the functional SNP allele rs1799971-A was associated with heroin addiction only in the presence of rs3778150-C (P=1.48×10−6 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-C and P=0.79 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-T haplotypes). Lastly, replication was observed for six other intron 1 SNPs which had prior suggestive associations with heroin addiction (smallest P=2.7×10−8 for rs3823010). Conclusions Our findings show that common OPRM1 intron 1 SNPs have replicable associations with heroin addiction. The haplotype structure of rs3778150 and nearby SNPs may underlie the inconsistent associations between rs1799971 and heroin addiction. PMID:25744370

  7. Conventional allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for lymphoma may overcome the poor prognosis associated with a positive FDG-PET scan before transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Akihide; Izutsu, Koji; Takahashi, Miwako; Kako, Shinichi; Oshima, Kumi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Momose, Toshimitsu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-06-01

    A positive scan in pretransplantation fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been shown to be associated with a poor prognosis in patients with lymphoma undergoing high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). For those with a positive FDG-PET scan, treatment that includes allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may be an alternative. However, it is uncertain whether allo-SCT can overcome a poor prognosis. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 14 patients with lymphoma who had undergone FDG-PET scan within one month before allo-SCT at our institution. Eleven patients were FDG-PET-positive and three were negative. With a median follow-up of 17 months (range: 6-44) after allo-SCT, the cumulative incidence of progression was 29.3% in FDG-PET-positive patients and 0% in the FDG-PET-negative patients. Four of the 11 patients who had post-transplantation FDG-PET showed FDG-avid lesions on the first post-transplantation scan. In two of the four, regression of the lesions was observed during the scheduled reduction of immunosuppressant without donor lymphocyte infusion and remained without progression at the last follow-up (34 and 8 months). Durable responses after allo-SCT, at least with conventional conditioning regimens, can be expected in patients with FDG-PET-positive lesions before transplantation. Thus, conventional allo-SCT could be an attractive modality compared to ASCT for patients with positive FDG-PET after the completion of conventional salvage chemotherapy, and particularly for patients with T and NK-cell lymphomas.

  8. A Genome-wide Association Study Reveals that Variants within the HLA Region Are Associated with Risk for Nonobstructive Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Han; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Haobo; Sun, Jielin; Sun, Yingpu; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Jiayin; Ding, Qiang; Lu, Shaoming; Shi, Rong; You, Li; Qin, Yingying; Zhao, Xiaoming; Lin, Xiaoling; Li, Xiao; Feng, Junjie; Wang, Li; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Xu, Chengyan; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Xuan; Hu, Jingmei; Chen, Hong; Li, Guangyu; Zhao, Junzhao; Zou, Shuhua; Jiang, Hong; Hao, Cuifang; Zhao, Yueran; Ma, Jinglong; Zheng, S. Lilly; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2012-01-01

    A genome-wide association study of Han Chinese subjects was conducted to identify genetic susceptibility loci for nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA). In the discovery stage, 802 azoospermia cases and 1,863 controls were screened for genetic variants in the genome. Promising SNPs were subsequently confirmed in two independent sets of subjects: 818 azoospermia cases and 1,755 controls from northern China, and 606 azoospermia cases and 958 controls from central and southern China. We detected variants at human leukocyte antigen (HLA) regions that were independently associated with NOA (HLA-DRA, rs3129878, pcombine = 3.70 × 10−16, odds ratio [OR] = 1.37; C6orf10 and BTNL2, rs498422, pcombine = 2.43 × 10−12, OR = 1.42). These findings provide additional insight into the pathogenesis of NOA. PMID:22541561

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Traits Reveals Novel Gene-Metabolite-Disease Links

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Andrew W.; Salek, Reza M.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Montoliu, Ivan; Da Silva, Laeticia; Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François-Pierre; Rezzi, Serge; Steinbeck, Christoph; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Le Coutre, Johannes; Mooser, Vincent; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K.; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic traits are molecular phenotypes that can drive clinical phenotypes and may predict disease progression. Here, we report results from a metabolome- and genome-wide association study on 1H-NMR urine metabolic profiles. The study was conducted within an untargeted approach, employing a novel method for compound identification. From our discovery cohort of 835 Caucasian individuals who participated in the CoLaus study, we identified 139 suggestively significant (P<5×10−8) and independent associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and metabolome features. Fifty-six of these associations replicated in the TasteSensomics cohort, comprising 601 individuals from São Paulo of vastly diverse ethnic background. They correspond to eleven gene-metabolite associations, six of which had been previously identified in the urine metabolome and three in the serum metabolome. Our key novel findings are the associations of two SNPs with NMR spectral signatures pointing to fucose (rs492602, P = 6.9×10−44) and lysine (rs8101881, P = 1.2×10−33), respectively. Fine-mapping of the first locus pinpointed the FUT2 gene, which encodes a fucosyltransferase enzyme and has previously been associated with Crohn's disease. This implicates fucose as a potential prognostic disease marker, for which there is already published evidence from a mouse model. The second SNP lies within the SLC7A9 gene, rare mutations of which have been linked to severe kidney damage. The replication of previous associations and our new discoveries demonstrate the potential of untargeted metabolomics GWAS to robustly identify molecular disease markers. PMID:24586186

  10. Hypercontrols in Genotype-Phenotype Analysis Reveal Ancestral Haplotypes Associated With Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Balam-Ortiz, Eros; Esquivel-Villarreal, Adolfo; Huerta-Hernandez, David; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Alfaro-Ruiz, Luis; Muñoz-Monroy, Omar; Gutierrez, Ruth; Figueroa-Genis, Enrique; Carrillo, Karol; Elizalde, Adela; Hidalgo, Alfredo; Rodriguez, Mauricio; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The angiotensinogen gene locus has been associated with essential hypertension in most populations analyzed to date. Increased plasma angiotensinogen levels have been proposed as an underlying cause of essential hypertension in whites; however, differences in the genetic regulation of plasma angiotensinogen levels have also been reported for other populations. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with plasma angiotensinogen levels and the risk of essential hypertension in the Mexican population. We genotyped 9 angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in 706 individuals. Four polymorphisms, A-6, C4072, C6309, and G12775, were associated with increased risk, and the strongest association was found for the C6309 allele (χ2 = 23.9; P = 0.0000009), which resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.8–4.9; P = 0.000006) in the recessive model. Two polymorphisms, A-20C (P = 0.003) and C3389T (P = 0.0001), were associated with increased plasma angiotensinogen levels but did not show association with essential hypertension. The haplotypes H1 (χ2 = 8.1; P = 0.004) and H5 (χ2 = 5.1; P = 0.02) were associated with essential hypertension. Using phylogenetic analysis, we found that haplotypes 1 and 5 are the human ancestral haplotypes. Our results suggest that the positive association between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with essential hypertension is not simply explained by an increase in plasma angiotensinogen concentration. Complex interactions between risk alleles suggest that these haplotypes act as “superalleles.” PMID:22371359

  11. Hypercontrols in genotype-phenotype analysis reveal ancestral haplotypes associated with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Balam-Ortiz, Eros; Esquivel-Villarreal, Adolfo; Huerta-Hernandez, David; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Alfaro-Ruiz, Luis; Muñoz-Monroy, Omar; Gutierrez, Ruth; Figueroa-Genis, Enrique; Carrillo, Karol; Elizalde, Adela; Hidalgo, Alfredo; Rodriguez, Mauricio; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2012-04-01

    The angiotensinogen gene locus has been associated with essential hypertension in most populations analyzed to date. Increased plasma angiotensinogen levels have been proposed as an underlying cause of essential hypertension in whites; however, differences in the genetic regulation of plasma angiotensinogen levels have also been reported for other populations. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with plasma angiotensinogen levels and the risk of essential hypertension in the Mexican population. We genotyped 9 angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in 706 individuals. Four polymorphisms, A-6, C4072, C6309, and G12775, were associated with increased risk, and the strongest association was found for the C6309 allele (χ(2)=23.9; P=0.0000009), which resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.8-4.9; P=0.000006) in the recessive model. Two polymorphisms, A-20C (P=0.003) and C3389T (P=0.0001), were associated with increased plasma angiotensinogen levels but did not show association with essential hypertension. The haplotypes H1 (χ(2)=8.1; P=0.004) and H5 (χ(2)=5.1; P=0.02) were associated with essential hypertension. Using phylogenetic analysis, we found that haplotypes 1 and 5 are the human ancestral haplotypes. Our results suggest that the positive association between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with essential hypertension is not simply explained by an increase in plasma angiotensinogen concentration. Complex interactions between risk alleles suggest that these haplotypes act as "superalleles."

  12. Association mapping utilizing diverse barley lines reveals net form net blotch seedling resistance/susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jonathan K; Friesen, Timothy L; Brueggeman, Robert S

    2017-05-01

    A diverse collection of barley lines was phenotyped with three North American Pyrenophora teres f. teres isolates and association analyses detected 78 significant marker-trait associations at 16 genomic loci. Pyrenophora teres f. teres is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen and the causal agent of the economically important foliar disease net form net blotch (NFNB) of barley. The deployment of effective and durable resistance against P. teres f. teres has been hindered by the complexity of quantitative resistance and susceptibility. Several bi-parental mapping populations have been used to identify QTL associated with NFNB disease on all seven barley chromosomes. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect marker-trait associations for resistance or susceptibility to P. teres f. teres. Geographically diverse barley genotypes from a world barley core collection (957) were genotyped with the Illumina barley iSelect chip and phenotyped with three P. teres f. teres isolates collected in two geographical regions of the USA (15A, 6A and LDNH04Ptt19). The best of nine regression models tested were identified for each isolate and used for association analysis resulting in the identification of 78 significant marker-trait associations (MTA; -log10p value >3.0). The MTA identified corresponded to 16 unique genomic loci as determined by analysis of local linkage disequilibrium between markers that did not meet a correlation threshold of R (2) ≥ 0.1, indicating that the markers represented distinct loci. Five loci identified represent novel QTL and were designated QRptts-3HL, QRptts-4HS, QRptts-5HL.1, QRptts-5HL.2, and QRptts-7HL.1. In addition, 55 of the barley lines examined exhibited a high level of resistance to all three isolates and the SNP markers identified will provide useful genetic resources for barley breeding programs.

  13. Expanded dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping reveals spurious class II associations

    PubMed Central

    Safra, N.; Pedersen, N.C.; Wolf, Z.; Johnson, E.G.; Liu, H.W.; Hughes, A.M.; Young, A.; Bannasch, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) system contains many of the functional genes of the immune system, thereby making it a candidate region for involvement in immune-mediated disorders. A number of studies have identified associations between specific DLA class II haplotypes and canine immune hemolytic anemia, thyroiditis, immune polyarthritis, type I diabetes mellitus, hypoadrenocorticism, systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease complex, necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) and anal furunculosis. These studies have relied on sequencing approximately 300 bases of exon 2 of each of the DLA class II genes: DLA-DRB1, DLA-DQA1 and DLA-DQB1. An association (odds ratio = 4.29) was identified by this method between Weimaraner dogs with hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD) and DLA-DRB1*01501. In the present study, a genotyping assay of 126 coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from across the entire DLA, spanning a region of 2.5 Mb (3,320,000–5,830,000) on CFA12, was developed and tested on Weimaraners with HOD, as well as two additional breeds with diseases associated with DLA class II: Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers with hypoadrenocorticism and Pug dogs with NME. No significant associations were found between Weimaraners with HOD or Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers with hypoadrenocorticism and SNPs spanning the DLA region. In contrast, significant associations were found with NME in Pug dogs, although the associated region extended beyond the class II genes. By including a larger number of genes from a larger genomic region a SNP genotyping assay was generated that provides coverage of the extended DLA region and may be useful in identifying and fine mapping DLA associations in dogs. PMID:21741283

  14. Genome-wide association study of dermatomyositis reveals genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Miller, Frederick W; Cooper, Robert G; Vencovský, Jiří; Rider, Lisa G; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Pachman, Lauren M; Reed, Ann M; Ytterberg, Steven R; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Isenberg, David A; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E R; O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I; Gregersen, Peter K

    2013-12-01

    To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1,178) and controls (n = 4,724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that 3 SNPs linked with 3 genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) of <0.05. These genes were phospholipase C-like 1 (PLCL1; rs6738825, FDR = 0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK; rs2736340, FDR = 0.0031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21; rs951005, FDR = 0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Lipidomics Reveals Associations of Phospholipids With Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Rauschert, Sebastian; Uhl, Olaf; Koletzko, Berthold; Kirchberg, Franca; Mori, Trevor A; Huang, Rae-Chi; Beilin, Lawrence J; Hellmuth, Christian; Oddy, Wendy H

    2016-03-01

    Obesity and related diseases have become a global public health burden. Identifying biomarkers will lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms associated with obesity and the pathways leading to insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. This study aimed to identify the lipidomic biomarkers associated with obesity and IR using plasma samples from a population-based cohort of young adults. The Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) study enrolled 2900 pregnant women from 1989 to 1991. The 20-year follow-up was conducted between March 2010 and April 2012. Participants and Samples: Plasma samples from 1176 subjects aged 20 years were analyzed using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Associations of analytes with markers of obesity and IR including body mass index, waist circumference, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), and insulin were examined. Analyses were stratified by body mass index and adjusted for lifestyle and other factors. Waist circumference was positively associated with seven sphingomyelins and five diacylphosphatidylcholines and negatively associated with two lysophosphatidylcholines. HOMA-IR was negatively associated with two diacylphosphatidylcholines and positively with one lysophosphatidylcholine and one diacylphosphatidylcholine. No significant association was found in the obese/overweight group of the HOMA-IR model. In the normal-weight group, one lysophosphatidylcholine was increased. A possible discriminative effect of sphingomyelins, particularly those with two double bonds, and lysophosphatidylcholines was identified between subjects with normal weight and obesity independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. Our results suggest weight status-dependent mechanisms for the development of IR with lysophosphatidylcholine C14:0 as a key metabolite in nonobese IR.

  16. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Variants in ARL15 that Influence Adiponectin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Richards, J. Brent; Waterworth, Dawn; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Hivert, Marie-France; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Perry, John R. B.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas John; Semple, Robert K.; Soranzo, Nicole; Song, Kijoung; Rocha, Nuno; Grundberg, Elin; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C.; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Sladek, Robert; Aulchenko, Yurii; Evans, David; Waeber, Gerard; Erdmann, Jeanette; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Sattar, Naveed; Devaney, Joseph; Willenborg, Christina; Hingorani, Aroon; Witteman, Jaquelin C. M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Glaser, Beate; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David; Stark, Klaus; Deanfield, John; Winogradow, Janina; Grassl, Martina; Hall, Alistair S.; Egan, Josephine M.; Thompson, John R.; Ricketts, Sally L.; König, Inke R.; Reinhard, Wibke; Grundy, Scott; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barter, Phil; Mahley, Robert; Kesaniemi, Y. Antero; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schunkert, Heribert; Burling, Keith; Deloukas, Panos; Pastinen, Tomi; Samani, Nilesh J.; McPherson, Ruth; Davey Smith, George; Frayling, Timothy M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Meigs, James B.

    2009-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived protein adiponectin is highly heritable and inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD). We meta-analyzed 3 genome-wide association studies for circulating adiponectin levels (n = 8,531) and sought validation of the lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 additional cohorts (n = 6,202). Five SNPs were genome-wide significant in their relationship with adiponectin (P≤5×10−8). We then tested whether these 5 SNPs were associated with risk of T2D and CHD using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P≤0.011 to declare statistical significance for these disease associations. SNPs at the adiponectin-encoding ADIPOQ locus demonstrated the strongest associations with adiponectin levels (P-combined = 9.2×10−19 for lead SNP, rs266717, n = 14,733). A novel variant in the ARL15 (ADP-ribosylation factor-like 15) gene was associated with lower circulating levels of adiponectin (rs4311394-G, P-combined = 2.9×10−8, n = 14,733). This same risk allele at ARL15 was also associated with a higher risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = 8.5×10−6, n = 22,421) more nominally, an increased risk of T2D (OR = 1.11, P = 3.2×10−3, n = 10,128), and several metabolic traits. Expression studies in humans indicated that ARL15 is well-expressed in skeletal muscle. These findings identify a novel protein, ARL15, which influences circulating adiponectin levels and may impact upon CHD risk. PMID:20011104

  17. Generalist genes analysis of DNA markers associated with mathematical ability and disability reveals shared influence across ages and abilities.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Sophia J; Kovas, Yulia; Petrill, Stephen A; Plomin, Robert

    2010-07-05

    The Generalist Genes Hypothesis is based upon quantitative genetic findings which indicate that many of the same genes influence diverse cognitive abilities and disabilities across age. In a recent genome-wide association study of mathematical ability in 10-year-old children, 43 SNP associations were nominated from scans of pooled DNA, 10 of which were validated in an individually genotyped sample. The 4927 children in this genotyped sample have also been studied at 7, 9 and 12 years of age on measures of mathematical ability, as well as on other cognitive and learning abilities. Using these data we have explored the Generalist Genes Hypothesis by assessing the association of the available measures of ability at age 10 and other ages with two composite 'SNP-set' scores, formed from the full set of 43 nominated SNPs and the sub-set of 10 SNPs that were previously found to be associated with mathematical ability at age 10. Both SNP sets yielded significant associations with mathematical ability at ages 7, 9 and 12, as well as with reading and general cognitive ability at age 10. Although effect sizes are small, our results correspond with those of quantitative genetic research in supporting the Generalist Genes Hypothesis. SNP sets identified on the basis of their associations with mathematical ability at age 10 show associations with mathematical ability at earlier and later ages and show associations of similar magnitude with reading and general cognitive ability. With small effect sizes expected in such complex traits, future studies may be able to capitalise on power by searching for 'generalist genes' using longitudinal and multivariate approaches.

  18. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  19. Evaluation of the genetic overlap between osteoarthritis with body mass index and height using genome-wide association scan data

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Katherine S; Chapman, Kay; Day-Williams, Aaron; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Southam, Lorraine; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Arden, Nigel; Aslam, Nadim; Birrell, Fraser; Carluke, Ian; Carr, Andrew; Deloukas, Panos; Doherty, Michael; Loughlin, John; McCaskie, Andrew; Ollier, William E R; Rai, Ashok; Ralston, Stuart; Reed, Mike R; Spector, Timothy D; Valdes, Ana M; Wallis, Gillian A; Wilkinson, Mark; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI) is one of the major risk factors for osteoarthritis. In addition, genetic overlap has been reported between osteoarthritis and normal adult height variation. We investigated whether this relationship is due to a shared genetic aetiology on a genome-wide scale. Methods We compared genetic association summary statistics (effect size, p value) for BMI and height from the GIANT consortium genome-wide association study (GWAS) with genetic association summary statistics from the arcOGEN consortium osteoarthritis GWAS. Significance was evaluated by permutation. Replication of osteoarthritis association of the highlighted signals was investigated in an independent dataset. Phenotypic information of height and BMI was accounted for in a separate analysis using osteoarthritis-free controls. Results We found significant overlap between osteoarthritis and height (p=3.3×10−5 for signals with p≤0.05) when the GIANT and arcOGEN GWAS were compared. For signals with p≤0.001 we found 17 shared signals between osteoarthritis and height and four between osteoarthritis and BMI. However, only one of the height or BMI signals that had shown evidence of association with osteoarthritis in the arcOGEN GWAS was also associated with osteoarthritis in the independent dataset: rs12149832, within the FTO gene (combined p=2.3×10−5). As expected, this signal was attenuated when we adjusted for BMI. Conclusions We found a significant excess of shared signals between both osteoarthritis and height and osteoarthritis and BMI, suggestive of a common genetic aetiology. However, only one signal showed association with osteoarthritis when followed up in a new dataset. PMID:22956599

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data reveals association of haplogroup U with psychosis in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Frye, Mark A; Ryu, Euijung; Nassan, Malik; Jenkins, Gregory D; Andreazza, Ana C; Evans, Jared M; McElroy, Susan L; Oglesbee, Devin; Highsmith, W Edward; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2017-01-01

    Converging genetic, postmortem gene-expression, cellular, and neuroimaging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder. This study was conducted to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are associated with sub-phenotypes of bipolar disorder. MtDNA from 224 patients with Bipolar I disorder (BPI) was sequenced, and association of sequence variations with 3 sub-phenotypes (psychosis, rapid cycling, and adolescent illness onset) was evaluated. Gene-level tests were performed to evaluate overall burden of minor alleles for each phenotype. The haplogroup U was associated with a higher risk of psychosis. Secondary analyses of SNVs provided nominal evidence for association of psychosis with variants in the tRNA, ND4 and ND5 genes. The association of psychosis with ND4 (gene that encodes NADH dehydrogenase 4) was further supported by gene-level analysis. Preliminary analysis of mtDNA sequence data suggests a higher risk of psychosis with the U haplogroup and variation in the ND4 gene implicated in electron transport chain energy regulation. Further investigation of the functional consequences of this mtDNA variation is encouraged. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Basis of Stalk Cell Wall Components in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojiao; Liu, Zhifang; Wu, Yujin; Huang, Changling

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose are the three main components of the plant cell wall and can impact stalk quality by affecting cell wall structure and strength. In this study, we evaluated the lignin (LIG), cellulose (CEL) and hemicellulose (HC) contents in maize using an association mapping panel that included 368 inbred lines in seven environments. A genome-wide association study using approximately 0.56 million SNPs with a minor allele frequency of 0.05 identified 22, 18 and 24 loci significantly associated with LIG, CEL and HC at P < 1.0×10−4, respectively. The allelic variation of each significant association contributed 4 to 7% of the phenotypic variation. Candidate genes identified by GWAS mainly encode enzymes involved in cell wall metabolism, transcription factors, protein kinase and protein related to other biological processes. Among the association signals, six candidate genes had pleiotropic effects on lignin and cellulose content. These results provide valuable information for better understanding the genetic basis of stalk cell wall components in maize. PMID:27479588

  2. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  3. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-05-19

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion.

  4. MEMO associated with an ErbB2 receptor phosphopeptide reveals a new phosphotyrosine motif