Science.gov

Sample records for astrophysical disk models

  1. On Vertically Global, Horizontally Local Models for Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Pessah, Martin E.

    2015-10-01

    Disks with a barotropic equilibrium structure, for which the pressure is only a function of the density, rotate on cylinders in the presence of a gravitational potential, so that the angular frequency of such a disk is independent of height. Such disks with barotropic equilibria can be approximately modeled using the shearing box framework, representing a small disk volume with height-independent angular frequency. If the disk is in baroclinic equilibrium, the angular frequency does generally depend on height, and it is thus necessary to go beyond the standard shearing box approach. In this paper, we show that given a global disk model, it is possible to develop approximate models that are local in horizontal planes without an expansion in height with shearing-periodic boundary conditions. We refer to the resulting framework as the vertically global shearing box (VGSB). These models can be non-axisymmetric for globally barotropic equilibria but should be axisymmetric for globally baroclinic equilibria. We provide explicit equations for this VGSB which can be implemented in standard magnetohydrodynamic codes by generalizing the shearing-periodic boundary conditions to allow for a height-dependent angular frequency and shear rate. We also discuss the limitations that result from the radial approximations that are needed in order to impose height-dependent shearing periodic boundary conditions. We illustrate the potential of this framework by studying a vertical shear instability and examining the modes associated with the magnetorotational instability.

  2. ON VERTICALLY GLOBAL, HORIZONTALLY LOCAL MODELS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Pessah, Martin E. E-mail: mpessah@nbi.dk

    2015-10-01

    Disks with a barotropic equilibrium structure, for which the pressure is only a function of the density, rotate on cylinders in the presence of a gravitational potential, so that the angular frequency of such a disk is independent of height. Such disks with barotropic equilibria can be approximately modeled using the shearing box framework, representing a small disk volume with height-independent angular frequency. If the disk is in baroclinic equilibrium, the angular frequency does generally depend on height, and it is thus necessary to go beyond the standard shearing box approach. In this paper, we show that given a global disk model, it is possible to develop approximate models that are local in horizontal planes without an expansion in height with shearing-periodic boundary conditions. We refer to the resulting framework as the vertically global shearing box (VGSB). These models can be non-axisymmetric for globally barotropic equilibria but should be axisymmetric for globally baroclinic equilibria. We provide explicit equations for this VGSB which can be implemented in standard magnetohydrodynamic codes by generalizing the shearing-periodic boundary conditions to allow for a height-dependent angular frequency and shear rate. We also discuss the limitations that result from the radial approximations that are needed in order to impose height-dependent shearing periodic boundary conditions. We illustrate the potential of this framework by studying a vertical shear instability and examining the modes associated with the magnetorotational instability.

  3. Rossby Wave Instability in Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Richard; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    A brief review is given of the Rossby wave instability in astrophysical disks. In non-self-gravitating discs, around for example a newly forming stars, the instability can be triggered by an axisymmetric bump at some radius r0 in the disk surface mass-density. It gives rise to exponentially growing non-axisymmetric perturbation (proportional to Exp[im ϕ], m = 1,2,...) in the vicinity of r0 consisting of anticyclonic vortices. These vortices are regions of high pressure and consequently act to trap dust particles which in turn can facilitate planetesimal growth in protoplanetary disks. The Rossby vortices in the disks around stars and black holes may cause the observed quasi-periodic modulations of the disk's thermal emission. Stirling Colgate's long standing interest in all types of vortices - particularly tornados - had an important part in stimulating the research on the Rossby wave instability.

  4. THE COSMIC BATTERY IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Nathanail, Antonios; Katsanikas, Matthaios

    2015-06-01

    The aberrated radiation pressure at the inner edge of the accretion disk around an astrophysical black hole imparts a relative azimuthal velocity on the electrons with respect to the ions which gives rise to a ring electric current that generates large-scale poloidal magnetic field loops. This is the Cosmic Battery established by Contopoulos and Kazanas in 1998. In the present work we perform realistic numerical simulations of this important astrophysical mechanism in advection-dominated accretion flows, ADAFs. We confirm the original prediction that the inner parts of the loops are continuously advected toward the central black hole and contribute to the growth of the large-scale magnetic field, whereas the outer parts of the loops are continuously diffusing outward through the turbulent accretion flow. This process of inward advection of the axial field and outward diffusion of the return field proceeds all the way to equipartition, thus generating astrophysically significant magnetic fields on astrophysically relevant timescales. We confirm that there exists a critical value of the magnetic Prandtl number between unity and 10 in the outer disk above which the Cosmic Battery mechanism is suppressed.

  5. Examining the Accuracy of Astrophysical Disk Simulations with a Generalized Hydrodynamical Test Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    We discuss a generalization of the classic Keplerian disk test problem allowing for both pressure and rotational support, as a method of testing astrophysical codes incorporating both gravitation and hydrodynamics. We argue for the inclusion of pressure in rotating disk simulations on the grounds that realistic, astrophysical disks exhibit non-negligible pressure support. We then apply this test problem to examine the performance of various smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods incorporating a number of improvements proposed over the years to address problems noted in modeling the classical gravitation-only Keplerian disk. We also apply this test to a newly developed extension of SPH based on reproducing kernels called CRKSPH. Counterintuitively, we find that pressure support worsens the performance of traditional SPH on this problem, causing unphysical collapse away from the steady-state disk solution even more rapidly than the purely gravitational problem, whereas CRKSPH greatly reduces this error.

  6. Hydrodynamic turbulence cannot transport angular momentum effectively in astrophysical disks.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael; Schartman, Ethan; Goodman, Jeremy

    2006-11-16

    The most efficient energy sources known in the Universe are accretion disks. Those around black holes convert 5-40 per cent of rest-mass energy to radiation. Like water circling a drain, inflowing mass must lose angular momentum, presumably by vigorous turbulence in disks, which are essentially inviscid. The origin of the turbulence is unclear. Hot disks of electrically conducting plasma can become turbulent by way of the linear magnetorotational instability. Cool disks, such as the planet-forming disks of protostars, may be too poorly ionized for the magnetorotational instability to occur, and therefore essentially unmagnetized and linearly stable. Nonlinear hydrodynamic instability often occurs in linearly stable flows (for example, pipe flows) at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers. Although planet-forming disks have extreme Reynolds numbers, keplerian rotation enhances their linear hydrodynamic stability, so the question of whether they can be turbulent and thereby transport angular momentum effectively is controversial. Here we report a laboratory experiment, demonstrating that non-magnetic quasi-keplerian flows at Reynolds numbers up to millions are essentially steady. Scaled to accretion disks, rates of angular momentum transport lie far below astrophysical requirements. By ruling out purely hydrodynamic turbulence, our results indirectly support the magnetorotational instability as the likely cause of turbulence, even in cool disks.

  7. Integrated accretion disk angular momentum removal and astrophysical jet acceleration mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A model has been developed for how accretion disks discard angular momentum while powering astrophysical jets. The model depends on the extremely weak ionization of disks. This causes disk ions to be collisionally locked to adjacent disk neutrals so a clump of disk ions and neutrals has an effective cyclotron frequency αωci where α is the fractional ionization. When αωci is approximately twice the Kepler orbital frequency, conservation of canonical momentum shows that the clump spirals radially inwards producing a radially inward disk electric current as electrons cannot move radially in the disk. Upon reaching the jet radius, this current then flows axially away from the disk plane along the jet, producing a toroidal magnetic field that drives the jet. Electrons remain frozen to poloidal flux surfaces everywhere and electron motion on flux surfaces in the ideal MHD region outside the disk completes the current path. Angular momentum absorbed from accreting material in the disk by magnetic counter-torque -JrBz is transported by the electric circuit and ejected at near infinite radius in the disk plane. This is like an electric generator absorbing angular momentum and wired to a distant electric motor that emits angular momentum. Supported by USDOE/NSF Partnership in Plasma Science.

  8. MOMENTUM TRANSPORT FROM CURRENT-DRIVEN RECONNECTION IN ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Prager, S. C.

    2011-12-20

    Current-driven reconnection is investigated as a possible mechanism for angular momentum transport in astrophysical disks. A theoretical and computational study of angular momentum transport from current-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities is performed. It is found that both a single resistive tearing instability and an ideal instability can transport momentum in the presence of azimuthal Keplerian flow. The structure of the Maxwell stress is examined for a single mode through analytic quasilinear theory and computation. Full nonlinear multiple-mode computation shows that a global Maxwell stress causes significant momentum transport.

  9. Between the Disk and the Star: Boundary Layers in Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman

    Accretion disks are encountered in a wide variety of astrophysical settings: compact binaries, active galactic nuclei, star and planet formation. Whenever accretion proceeds onto a central object with a surface, a boundary layer forms at the inner edge of the disk. Energy release taking place in this layer is expected to dramatically modify spectra and give rise to variability of accreting objects. To properly interpret observations it is thus imperative to obtain a good working model of the boundary layer phenomenon. However, at the moment reconciliation of observations and theory of the boundary layers in grossly incomplete, and there are long-standing puzzles such as e.g. the missing boundary layer problem in accreting white dwarfs and young stars. The main reason for this unsatisfactory state of affairs is that the current theory is severely hampered by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms by which angular momentum and mass are transported across the boundary layer region. Our group has recently discovered a novel transport mechanism, which naturally emerges under the boundary layer conditions and has proven to be very robust. Using a suite of large-scale hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations we have shown that supersonic shear near the stellar surface is highly conducive to the excitation of a global instability, which relies on launching the acoustic modes in the system. Saturation of this instability results in a regular, non-axisymmetric, global pattern of acoustic waves that persists on very long time scales. These waves dissipate in weak shocks giving rise to global momentum transport, which in turn drives mass accretion. Transport of angular momentum and energy by these waves is intrinsically non-local and cannot be described in the framework of existing local models of effective viscosity. This new transport mechanism is efficient and robust. Its discovery calls for better and urgent understanding of how the boundary layer operate in a

  10. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  11. Astrophysical Model Selection in Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Matthew R.; Cornish, Neil J.; Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies in gravitational wave astronomy have mostly focused on the information that can be extracted from individual detections, such as the mass of a binary system and its location in space. Here we consider how the information from multiple detections can be used to constrain astrophysical population models. This seemingly simple problem is made challenging by the high dimensionality and high degree of correlation in the parameter spaces that describe the signals, and by the complexity of the astrophysical models, which can also depend on a large number of parameters, some of which might not be directly constrained by the observations. We present a method for constraining population models using a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach which simultaneously infers the source parameters and population model and provides the joint probability distributions for both. We illustrate this approach by considering the constraints that can be placed on population models for galactic white dwarf binaries using a future space-based gravitational wave detector. We find that a mission that is able to resolve approximately 5000 of the shortest period binaries will be able to constrain the population model parameters, including the chirp mass distribution and a characteristic galaxy disk radius to within a few percent. This compares favorably to existing bounds, where electromagnetic observations of stars in the galaxy constrain disk radii to within 20%.

  12. Spiral waves and instability in magnetized astrophysical disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tagger, M.; Henriksen, R.N.; Sygnet, J.F.; Pellat, R. CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau )

    1990-04-01

    It is shown that an ionized disk in a vertical magnetic field (e.g., the dipole field of the central object for an accretion or planetary disk) is subject to spiral instabilities of low azimuthal wavenumber, driven by differential rotation. The amplification is due to the Swing mechanism already known for the spiral instability of galactic disks, with self-gravity replaced by magnetic forces. In realistic cases the growth time is a few tens of rotation periods. Such instabilities, or waves driven by irregularities in the ambient magnetic field, might be important in particular for accretion disks, and to explain the spokes in Saturn's rings. 11 refs.

  13. Numerical simulations of accretion disks and astrophysical jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Bodo, G.; Mignone, A.; Massaglia, S.; Ferrari, A.

    We present the results of high resolution numerical simulations concerning accretion disks and relativistic jets. For accretion disks, in the context of the problem of angular momentum transport, we performed simulations of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box approximation and, on the basis of our results, we discuss its validity. In the case of relativistic jets, we analyse how their interaction with the ambient medium can lead to their deceleration, as it appears to be the case for jets in FRI extragalactic radiosources.

  14. Reaction models in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We present different reaction models commonly used in nuclear astrophysics, in particular for the nucleosynthesis of light elements. Pioneering works were performed within the potential model, where the internal structure of the colliding nuclei is completely ignored. Significant advances in microscopic cluster models provided the first microscopic description of the 3He(α,&gamma)7 Be reaction more than thirty years ago. In this approach, the calculations are based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, but the cluster approximation should be made to simplify the calculations. Nowadays, modern microscopic calculations are able to go beyond the cluster approximation, and aim at finding exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We discuss recent examples on the d+d reactions at low energies.

  15. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  16. Buoyancy-limited magnetic viscosity in quasi-stellar object accretion disk models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, Philip J.; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    1989-01-01

    Alpha models of astrophysical accretion disks assume an ad hoc viscous stress which scales locally as the total pressure. It is shown here that, if turbulent magnetic Maxwell stresses are the source of this viscosity in quasi-stellar object accretion disk models, then the stress cannot follow the assumed alpha-law in the radiation pressure-dominated inner region of the disk.

  17. A Pure Hydrodynamic Instability in Shear Flows and Its Application to Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-10-01

    We provide a possible resolution for the century-old problem of hydrodynamic shear flows, which are apparently stable in linear analysis but shown to be turbulent in astrophysically observed data and experiments. This mismatch is noticed in a variety of systems, from laboratory to astrophysical flows. There are so many uncountable attempts made so far to resolve this mismatch, beginning with the early work of Kelvin, Rayleigh, and Reynolds toward the end of the nineteenth century. Here we show that the presence of stochastic noise, whose inevitable presence should not be neglected in the stability analysis of shear flows, leads to pure hydrodynamic linear instability therein. This explains the origin of turbulence, which has been observed/interpreted in astrophysical accretion disks, laboratory experiments, and direct numerical simulations. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first solution to the long-standing problem of hydrodynamic instability of Rayleigh-stable flows.

  18. Axisymmetric Shearing Box Models of Magnetized Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Gammie, Charles F.

    2008-01-01

    The local model, or shearing box, has proven a useful model for studying the dynamics of astrophysical disks. Here we consider the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in an axisymmetric local model in order to evaluate the limitations of global axisymmetric models. An exploration of the model parameter space shows the following: (1) The magnetic energy and α-decay approximately exponentially after an initial burst of turbulence. For our code, HAM, the decay time τ propto Res , where Res/2 is the number of zones per scale height. (2) In the initial burst of turbulence the magnetic energy is amplified by a factor proportional to Res3/4λR, where λR is the radial scale of the initial field. This scaling applies only if the most unstable wavelength of the magnetorotational instability is resolved and the final field is subthermal. (3) The shearing box is a resonant cavity and in linear theory exhibits a discrete set of compressive modes. These modes are excited by the MHD turbulence and are visible as quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in temporal power spectra of fluid variables at low spatial resolution. At high resolution the QPOs are hidden by a noise continuum. (4) In axisymmetry disk turbulence is local. The correlation function of the turbulence is limited in radial extent, and the peak magnetic energy density is independent of the radial extent of the box LR for LR > 2H. (5) Similar results are obtained for the HAM, ZEUS, and ATHENA codes; ATHENA has an effective resolution that is nearly double that of HAM and ZEUS. (6) Similar results are obtained for 2D and 3D runs at similar resolution, but only for particular choices of the initial field strength and radial scale of the initial magnetic field.

  19. Exploring non-normality in magnetohydrodynamic rotating shear flows: Application to astrophysical accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Bhatia, Tanayveer; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-10-01

    shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysics, especially accretion disks, where molecular viscosity is too low to account for observed data. The primary accepted cause of energy-momentum transport therein is turbulent viscosity. Hence, these results would have important implications in astrophysics.

  20. Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto, Jorge; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2000-05-01

    The conference Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations was aimed at discussing the most recent advances, arid some of the avenues for future work, in the field of cosmical plasmas. It was held (hiring the week of October 25th to 29th 1999, at the Centro Nacional de las Artes (CNA) in Mexico City, Mexico it modern and impressive center of theaters and schools devoted to the performing arts. This was an excellent setting, for reviewing the present status of observational (both on earth and in space) arid theoretical research. as well as some of the recent advances of laboratory research that are relevant, to astrophysics. The demography of the meeting was impressive: 128 participants from 12 countries in 4 continents, a large fraction of them, 29% were women and most of them were young persons (either recent Ph.Ds. or graduate students). This created it very lively and friendly atmosphere that made it easy to move from the ionization of the Universe and high-redshift absorbers, to Active Galactic Nucleotides (AGN)s and X-rays from galaxies, to the gas in the Magellanic Clouds and our Galaxy, to the evolution of H II regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe), and to the details of plasmas in the Solar System and the lab. All these topics were well covered with 23 invited talks, 43 contributed talks. and 22 posters. Most of them are contained in these proceedings, in the same order of the presentations.

  1. ON THE ANISOTROPIC NATURE OF MRI-DRIVEN TURBULENCE IN ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Gareth C.; Pessah, Martin E. E-mail: mpessah@nbi.dk

    2015-04-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations on various scales and the degree of anisotropy of the underlying turbulence. This has motivated several studies to characterize the distribution of turbulent power in spectral space. In this paper we investigate the anisotropic nature of MRI-driven turbulence using a pseudo-spectral code and introduce novel ways for providing a robust characterization of the underlying turbulence. We study the growth of the MRI and the subsequent transition to turbulence via parasitic instabilities, identifying their potential signature in the late linear stage. We show that the general flow properties vary in a quasi-periodic way on timescales comparable to ∼10 inverse angular frequencies, motivating the temporal analysis of its anisotropy. We introduce a 3D tensor invariant analysis to quantify and classify the evolution of the anisotropy of the turbulent flow. This analysis shows a continuous high level of anisotropy, with brief sporadic transitions toward two- and three-component isotropic turbulent flow. This temporal-dependent anisotropy renders standard shell averaging especially when used simultaneously with long temporal averages, inadequate for characterizing MRI-driven turbulence. We propose an alternative way to extract spectral information from the turbulent magnetized flow, whose anisotropic character depends strongly on time. This consists of stacking 1D Fourier spectra along three orthogonal directions that exhibit maximum anisotropy in Fourier space. The resulting averaged spectra show that the power along each of the three independent directions differs by several orders of magnitude over most scales, except the largest ones. Our results suggest that a first

  2. On the Anisotropic Nature of MRI-driven Turbulence in Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Gareth C.; Pessah, Martin E.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations on various scales and the degree of anisotropy of the underlying turbulence. This has motivated several studies to characterize the distribution of turbulent power in spectral space. In this paper we investigate the anisotropic nature of MRI-driven turbulence using a pseudo-spectral code and introduce novel ways for providing a robust characterization of the underlying turbulence. We study the growth of the MRI and the subsequent transition to turbulence via parasitic instabilities, identifying their potential signature in the late linear stage. We show that the general flow properties vary in a quasi-periodic way on timescales comparable to ∼10 inverse angular frequencies, motivating the temporal analysis of its anisotropy. We introduce a 3D tensor invariant analysis to quantify and classify the evolution of the anisotropy of the turbulent flow. This analysis shows a continuous high level of anisotropy, with brief sporadic transitions toward two- and three-component isotropic turbulent flow. This temporal-dependent anisotropy renders standard shell averaging especially when used simultaneously with long temporal averages, inadequate for characterizing MRI-driven turbulence. We propose an alternative way to extract spectral information from the turbulent magnetized flow, whose anisotropic character depends strongly on time. This consists of stacking 1D Fourier spectra along three orthogonal directions that exhibit maximum anisotropy in Fourier space. The resulting averaged spectra show that the power along each of the three independent directions differs by several orders of magnitude over most scales, except the largest ones. Our results suggest that a first

  3. Shape: A 3D Modeling Tool for Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Koning, Nicholas; Wenger, Stephan; Morisset, Christophe; Magnor, Marcus

    2011-04-01

    We present a flexible interactive 3D morpho-kinematical modeling application for astrophysics. Compared to other systems, our application reduces the restrictions on the physical assumptions, data type, and amount that is required for a reconstruction of an object's morphology. It is one of the first publicly available tools to apply interactive graphics to astrophysical modeling. The tool allows astrophysicists to provide a priori knowledge about the object by interactively defining 3D structural elements. By direct comparison of model prediction with observational data, model parameters can then be automatically optimized to fit the observation. The tool has already been successfully used in a number of astrophysical research projects.

  4. Modeling Gas Distribution in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Martin; Lewis, Josiah; Brittain, Sean

    2010-07-01

    Protoplanetary accretion disks are disks of dust and gas which surround and feed material onto a forming star in the earliest stages of its evolution. One of the most useful methods for studying these disks is near infrared spectroscopy of rovibrational CO emission. This paper presents the methods in which synthetically generated spectra are modeled and fit to spectral data gathered from protoplanetary disks. This paper also discussed the methods in which this code can be improved by modifying the code to run a Monte Carlo analysis of best fit across the CONDOR cluster at Clemson University, thereby allowing for the creation of a catalog of protoplanetary disks with detailed information about them as gathered from the model.

  5. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Observations of resolved debris disks show a spectacular variety of features and asymmetries, including inner cavities and gaps, inclined secondary disks or warps, and eccentric, sharp-edged rings. Embedded exoplanets could create many of these features via gravitational perturbations, which sculpt the disk directly and by generating planetesimal collisions. In this thesis, I present the Superparticle Model/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in 3-D, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. I show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 107 yr, and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. As an example of the algorithm's capabilities, I use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit and demonstrate that differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring. To demonstrate SMACK's utility in studying debris disk physics, I apply SMACK to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (alpha = 2/7). I find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index alpha of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t coll of the disk by alpha = 0.32(t/ tcoll)-0.04, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion

  6. An MCMC Circumstellar Disks Modeling Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Schuyler; Perrin, Marshall D.; Mazoyer, Johan; Choquet, Elodie; Soummer, Remi; Ren, Bin; Pueyo, Laurent; Debes, John H.; Duchene, Gaspard; Pinte, Christophe; Menard, Francois

    2016-01-01

    We present an enhanced software framework for the Monte Carlo Markov Chain modeling of circumstellar disk observations, including spectral energy distributions and multi wavelength images from a variety of instruments (e.g. GPI, NICI, HST, WFIRST). The goal is to self-consistently and simultaneously fit a wide variety of observables in order to place constraints on the physical properties of a given disk, while also rigorously assessing the uncertainties in the derived properties. This modular code is designed to work with a collection of existing modeling tools, ranging from simple scripts to define the geometry for optically thin debris disks, to full radiative transfer modeling of complex grain structures in protoplanetary disks (using the MCFOST radiative transfer modeling code). The MCMC chain relies on direct chi squared comparison of model images/spectra to observations. We will include a discussion of how best to weight different observations in the modeling of a single disk and how to incorporate forward modeling from PCA PSF subtraction techniques. The code is open source, python, and available from github. Results for several disks at various evolutionary stages will be discussed.

  7. Multi-wavelength modeling of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinte, C.; Ménard, F.; Duchêne, G.; Augereau, J.-C.

    2006-06-01

    The on-going revolution of high angular resolution observations and increasing wavelength coverage promises to unlock tightly-kept secrets of circumstellar disks. Thanks to these advances, many issues have already been addressed : large scale geometry of disks, evidence of grain growth, of dust settling, ldots Most of these results are based on models that emphasize on fitting either SEDs or scattered light images or, more recently, interferometric visibilities. In this contribution, we present a global approach which aims at interpreting the increasing amount of observational data coherently, in the framework of a single model, in order to get a more global picture and to better characterize both the dust population and the disk properties. Results of such a modeling approach, applied to a few disks for which large observational data-sets are available, are presented.

  8. Self-gravitating disk models of YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodato, G.; Bertin, G.

    2001-12-01

    Disks cannot be too cold, otherwise gravitational instabilities would violently set in. A simple model of self-gravitating accretion disk is presented here and applied to fit and interpret the Spectral Energy Distribution of a sample of Young Stellar Objects. In general, this scenario is likely to be more relevant for younger objects, for which mm observations point to disk masses comparable to that of the central protostar. The key characteristic of the model is the process of self-regulation associated with gravitational instabilities. This is incorporated in our model equations explicitly and significantly modifies the energy budget inside the disk with respect to standard pictures. Dynamical mechanisms related to the physical processes considered by us have been addressed by other authors, especially by means of numerical simulations. The disk self-gravity may thus enhance the long-wavelength emission of protostellar nebulae through the combined effects of increased viscous dissipation (resulting from significant deviations from Keplerian rotation) and of additional heating (responsible for maintaining the disk close to marginal Jeans stability). An investigation of a relatively large sample of YSOs, which includes four T Tauri stars and two FU Orionis objects discussed by us earlier (A&A, 375, 455-468) and a number of Herbig Ae/Be objects, allows us to identify a subsample of objects for which self-gravity may indeed provide an important contribution to the observed infrared excess. The model turns out to be more appealing for FU Orionis objects, while for T Tauri stars the derived values of the physical parameters, such as disk mass and accretion rate, tend to fall outside the generally accepted range.

  9. Are Bulges and Disks Real? Decomposing Spectral Data Cubes Into Their Astrophysical Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrifield, Michael; Tabor, Martha; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cappellari, Michele; Johnston, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Decomposing galaxies photometrically into bulge and disk components is now a well-established technique, but it remains unclear how distinct and real these components are, and how they relate to each other. To address these questions, we have been developing novel techniques to extract the various structural components from integral field unit (IFU) spectral observations of galaxies, in order to study simultaneously their spectral and spatial properties.As a first approach, by spatially decomposing each wavelength in a spectral data cube, we can discover how much light comes from the separate components as a function of wavelength, and hence derive unprecedentedly high quality spectra of bulge and disk for detailed analysis of their stellar populations.In addition, we have decomposed spectral data cubes by fitting the spectrum at each location with the sum of two components, with the spectral properties left entirely free to fit both kinematic and stellar population properties, subject only to the constraint that the relative flux contributions match those of a conventional bulge-disk decomposition.Initial results applied to MaNGA and other IFU surveys show the power of these techniques when applied to such high quality data. The first method allows us to understand the formation sequence of bulges and disks, with, for example, bulges showing the younger stellar populations in S0 galaxies, implying that this was where the last gasp of star formation occurred. The second technique reveals subtle population gradients within individual components, but also confirms that the decomposition into separate components is a credible procedure, as the resulting bulges and disks have entirely plausible kinematic properties that are in no way imposed by the decomposition.Although our initial application of these decomposition techniques has been to studying bulges and disks in S0 galaxies, the methods have much wider application to the spectral data cubes that MaNGA and other

  10. Thin accretion disks in f(R) modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Pun, C. S. J.; Harko, T.; Kovacs, Z.

    2008-07-15

    We consider the basic physical properties of matter forming a thin accretion disc in the static and spherically symmetric space-time metric of the vacuum f(R) modified gravity models. The Lagrangian of the generalized gravity theory is also obtained in a parametric form, and the conditions of the viability of the model are also discussed. The exact Schwarzschild-type solution of the gravitational field equations in the f(R) gravity contains a linearly increasing term, as well as a logarithmic correction, as compared to the standard Schwarzschild solution of general relativity, and it depends on four arbitrary integration constants. The energy flux and the emission spectrum from the accretion disk around the f(R) gravity black holes are obtained, and they are compared to the general relativistic case. Particular signatures can appear in the electromagnetic spectrum, thus leading to the possibility of directly testing modified gravity models by using astrophysical observations of the emission spectra from accretion disks.

  11. Relativistic static thin disks: The counterrotating model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Guillermo A.; Espitia, Omar A.

    2003-11-01

    A detailed study is presented of the counterrotating model (CRM) for generic finite static axially symmetric thin disks with nonzero radial pressure. A general constraint over the counterrotating tangential velocities, needed to cast the surface energy-momentum tensor of the disk as the superposition of two counterrotating perfect fluids, and expressions for the energy density and pressure of the counterrotating fluids are obtained. We show that, in general, it is not possible to take the two counterrotating fluids as circulating along geodesics nor take the two counterrotating tangential velocities as equal and opposite. A simple family of disks is studied that admits some CRMs with well defined counterrotating tangential velocities and stable against radial perturbations.

  12. Wave-Vortex Mode Coupling in Astrophysical Accretion Disks under Combined Radial and Vertical Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2013-07-01

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or "shearing box") approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoïland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K 2/k 1 Gt 1 and k 3 = 0 or k 1 ~ k 3, where k 1, K 2, and k 3 are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized "wave-vortex" decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.

  13. WAVE-VORTEX MODE COUPLING IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS UNDER COMBINED RADIAL AND VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2013-07-10

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or ''shearing box'') approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoieland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K{sub 2}/k{sub 1} >> 1 and k{sub 3} = 0 or k{sub 1} {approx} k{sub 3}, where k{sub 1}, K{sub 2}, and k{sub 3} are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized ''wave-vortex'' decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.

  14. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  15. ON THE TRANSITIONAL DISK CLASS: LINKING OBSERVATIONS OF T TAURI STARS AND PHYSICAL DISK MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Espaillat, C.; Andrews, S.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D.; Ingleby, L.; Calvet, N.; Hernandez, J.; Furlan, E.; D'Alessio, P.; Muzerolle, J. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dwilner@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: Elise.Furlan@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: muzerol@stsci.edu

    2012-03-10

    Two decades ago 'transitional disks' (TDs) described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk (FD). Here, we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a 'dip' in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects 'transitional disks' and 'pre-transitional disks' (PTDs), respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with FD models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest that the term 'transitional' only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that TDs and PTDs tend to have lower mass accretion rates than FDs and that TDs have lower accretion rates than PTDs. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of TDs and PTDs will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.

  16. Astrophysical models of r-process nucleosynthesis: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yongzhong

    2012-11-12

    An update on astrophysical models for nucleosynthesis via rapid neutron capture, the r process, is given. A neutrino-induced r process in supernova helium shells may have operated up to metallicities of {approx} 10{sup -3} times the solar value. Another r-process source, possibly neutron star mergers, is required for higher metallicities.

  17. Radiation-Driven Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-10-01

    Radiative winds and jets from luminous accretion disks/tori are reviewed. Among various models of astrophysical jets, plasma outflows emanating from accretion disks/tori and accelerated by the radiation pressure is the most promising one. Here explained are the roles of radiation pressure force and radiation drag force. Rise and fall of a torus model are also discussed, following its revenge. Finally, the millennium jet model, where the multistage acceleration takes place, is proposed.

  18. A Liquid Sodium Model of a BH Accretion Disk Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckley, Howard; Colgate, Stirling; Pariev, Vladimir; Weatherall, James

    2002-04-01

    A magnetic dynamo experiment is under construction at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experiment is designed to demonstrate in the laboratory the alpha-omega magnetic dynamo, which is believed to operate in many rotating and conducting astrophysical objects. The experiment uses the Couette flow of liquid sodium between two cylinders rotating with different angular velocities to model the omega-effect. The alpha-effect is created by the rising and expanding jets of liquid sodium driven through a pair of orifices in the end plates of the cylindrical vessel. The driven jets simulate plumes driven by buoyancy either within stars or from star-disk collisions in AGN accretion disks. A water analog of the dynamo device has been constructed and the flow necessary for the dynamo has been demonstrated. Numerical simulations of the kinematic dynamo predict that the toroidal field produced by the omega-effect will be B_phi (R_m/2pi) B_poloidal 20 x B_poloidal for the expected magnetic Reynolds number of Rm 120. The critical rate of jets necessary for the dynamo self-excitation is predicted to be a pair of jets every 4 revolutions of the outer cylinder. Within the limitations on the strength of materials and the power of the drive, the self-excitation of the dynamo appears to be feasible.

  19. Astrophysical constraints on extended gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, Gaetano; Stabile, Antonio; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Stabile, Arturo E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: arturo.stabile@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the propagation of gravitational waves in the context of fourth order gravity nonminimally coupled to a massive scalar field. Using the damping of the orbital period of coalescing stellar binary systems, we impose constraints on the free parameters of extended gravity models. In particular, we find that the variation of the orbital period is a function of three mass scales which depend on the free parameters of the model under consideration; we can constrain these mass scales from current observational data.

  20. Spinning Unmagnetized Plasma for Laboratory Studies of Astrophysical Accretion Disks & Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Cami

    2015-11-01

    A technique for creating a large, fast-flowing, unmagnetized plasma has been demonstrated experimentally. This marks an important first step towards laboratory studies of phenomenon such as magnetic field generation through self-excited dynamos, or the magnetorotational instability (MRI), the mechanism of interest for its role in the efficient outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks. In the Plasma Couette Experiment (PCX), a sufficiently hot, steady-state plasma is confined in a cylindrical, axisymmetric multicusp magnetic field, with Te<10 eV, Ti<1 eV, and n<1011 cm-3. Azimuthal flows are driven by JxB torque using toroidally localized, biased hot cathodes in the magnetized edge region. Measurements show that momentum couples viscously from the magnetized edge to the unmagnetized core, and the core rotates when collisional ion viscosity overcomes the drag due to ion-neutral collisions. Torque can be applied at the inner or outer boundaries, resulting in controlled, differential rotation. Maximum speeds are observed (He ~ 12 km/s, Ne ~ 4 km/s, Ar ~ 3.2 km/s, Xe ~ 1.4 km/s), consistent with a critical ionization velocity limit reported to occur in partially ionized plasmas. PCX has achieved magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm ~ 65 and magnetic Prandtl numbers of Pm ~ 0.2-10, which are approaching regimes shown to excite the MRI in a global Hall-MHD stability analysis. Ion-neutral collisions effectively add a body force that undesirably changes the flow profile shape. Recent upgrades have increased the ionization fraction with an additional 6 kW of microwave heating power and stronger magnets that reduce loss area and increase plasma volume by 150%. In addition, an alternative scheme using volume-applied JxB force will maintain the shear profile and destabilize the MRI at more easily achievable plasma parameters.

  1. Relativistic model of disk-jet variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.; Mangalam, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a relativistic model of disk-jet variability in the optical/UV and X-ray wavelengths from AGN. The model treats the kinematics of a bulk inflow in orbital motion in a relativistic thin disk. A part of the advected plasma continues in a helical orbital motion onto a relativistic jet shaped by a magnetic surface with foot points near the innermost stable circular orbit. The model, cast in Kerr geometry includes Doppler and gravitational shifts, aberration, light bending and time delay effects on the outgoing radiation. Light curves are simulated for studying effects of the relativistic beaming and the quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) phenomena with resulting typical timescales ranging between a few 1000 s and a few days. A power law power spectral density shape results with a typical slope of ˜ -2.5. Also, using a model for the quality factor of the QPO, we place constraints on black hole mass, spin and the size of the emission region.

  2. Towards a Global Evolutionary Model of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2016-04-01

    A global picture of the evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is key to understanding almost every aspect of planet formation, where standard α-disk models have been continually employed for their simplicity. In the meantime, disk mass loss has been conventionally attributed to photoevaporation, which controls disk dispersal. However, a paradigm shift toward accretion driven by magnetized disk winds has taken place in recent years, thanks to studies of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in PPDs. I present a framework of global PPD evolution aiming to incorporate these advances, highlighting the role of wind-driven accretion and wind mass loss. Disk evolution is found to be largely dominated by wind-driven processes, and viscous spreading is suppressed. The timescale of disk evolution is controlled primarily by the amount of external magnetic flux threading the disks, and how rapidly the disk loses the flux. Rapid disk dispersal can be achieved if the disk is able to hold most of its magnetic flux during the evolution. In addition, because wind launching requires a sufficient level of ionization at the disk surface (mainly via external far-UV (FUV) radiation), wind kinematics is also affected by the FUV penetration depth and disk geometry. For a typical disk lifetime of a few million years, the disk loses approximately the same amount of mass through the wind as through accretion onto the protostar, and most of the wind mass loss proceeds from the outer disk via a slow wind. Fractional wind mass loss increases with increasing disk lifetime. Significant wind mass loss likely substantially enhances the dust-to-gas mass ratio and promotes planet formation.

  3. BE STAR DISK MODELS IN CONSISTENT VERTICAL HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Sigut, T. A. A.; McGill, M. A.; Jones, C. E. E-mail: mmcgill@astro.uwo.ca

    2009-07-10

    A popular model for the circumstellar disks of Be stars is that of a geometrically thin disk with a density in the equatorial plane that drops as a power law of distance from the star. It is usually assumed that the vertical structure of such a disk (in the direction parallel to the stellar rotation axis) is governed by the hydrostatic equilibrium set by the vertical component of the star's gravitational acceleration. Previous radiative equilibrium models for such disks have usually been computed assuming a fixed density structure. This introduces an inconsistency as the gas density is not allowed to respond to temperature changes and the resultant disk model is not in vertical, hydrostatic equilibrium. In this work, we modify the BEDISK code of Sigut and Jones so that it enforces a hydrostatic equilibrium consistent with the temperature solution. We compare the disk densities, temperatures, H{alpha} line profiles, and near-IR excesses predicted by such models with those computed from models with a fixed density structure. We find that the fixed models can differ substantially from the consistent hydrostatic models when the disk density is high enough that the circumstellar disk develops a cool (T {approx}< 10, 000 K) equatorial region close to the parent star. Based on these new hydrostatic disks, we also predict an approximate relation between the (global) density-averaged disk temperature and the T{sub eff} of the central star, covering the full range of central Be star spectral types.

  4. Self-Consistent Models of Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Ramesh

    1997-01-01

    The investigations of advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), with emphasis on applications to X-ray binaries containing black holes and neutron stars is presented. This work is now being recognized as the standard paradigm for understanding the various spectral states of black hole X-ray Binaries (BHXBs). Topics discussed include: (1) Problem in BHXBS, namely that several of these binaries have unusually large concentrations of lithium in their companion stars; (2) A novel test to show that black holes have event horizons; (3) Application of the ADAF model to the puzzling X-ray delay in the recent outburst of the BHXB, GRO J1655-40; (4) Description of the various spectral states in BHXBS; (5) Application of the ADAF model to the famous supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, Sgr A(*); (6) Writing down and solving equations describing steady-state, optically thin, advection-dominated accretion onto a Kerr black hole; (7) The effect of "photon bubble" instability on radiation dominated accretion disks; and (8) Dwarf nova disks in quiescence that have rather low magnetic Reynolds number, of order 10(exp 3).

  5. Models of unsaturated Compton disks around supermassive black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.; Thompson, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two inverse-Compton disk models for the hard X-ray spectra of quasi-stellar objects and active galactic nuclei are studied and compared. One is a slightly generalized version of the Shapiro, Lightman and Eardley optically thin disk model, and the other is a conduction-stabilized Corona model. Observational distinctions between the two models are discussed.

  6. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  7. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  8. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitke, P.; Min, M.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Kamp, I.; Rab, C.; Anthonioz, F.; Antonellini, S.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Carmona, A.; Dominik, C.; Dionatos, O.; Greaves, J.; Güdel, M.; Ilee, J. D.; Liebhart, A.; Ménard, F.; Rigon, L.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In particular, we propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs in radiative equilibrium which is sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple yet physically justified treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts continuum and line observations that resemble typical multi-wavelength continuum and line observations of Class II T Tauri stars. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all mainstream continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63 μm, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties, i.e. large grains, often needed to fit the SED, have important consequences for disk chemistry and heating/cooling balance, leading to stronger near- to far-IR emission lines in general. Strong dust settling and missing disk flaring have similar effects on continuum observations, but opposite effects on far-IR gas emission lines. PAH molecules can efficiently shield the gas from stellar UV radiation because of their strong absorption and negligible scattering opacities in comparison to evolved dust. The observable millimetre-slope of the SED can become significantly more gentle in the case of cold disk midplanes, which we find regularly in our T Tauri models

  9. On Numerical Considerations for Modeling Reactive Astrophysical Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Papatheodore, Thomas L; Messer, Bronson

    2014-01-01

    Simulating detonations in astrophysical environments is often complicated by numerical approximations to shock structure. A common prescription to ensure correct detonation speeds (and associated quantities) is to prohibit burning inside the numerically broadened shock (Fryxell et al. 1989). We have performed a series of simulations to verify the efficacy of this approximation and to understand how resolution and dimensionality might affect its use. Our results show that, in one dimension, prohibiting burning in the shock is important wherever the carbon burning length is not resolved, in keeping with the results of Fryxell et al. (1989). In two dimensions, we find that the prohibition of shock burning effectively inhibits the development of cellular structure for all but the most highly-resolved cases. We discuss the possible impacts this outcome may have on sub-grid models and detonation propagation in Type Ia supernovae.

  10. An analytic performance model of disk arrays and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    As disk arrays become widely used, tools for understanding and analyzing their performance become increasingly important. In particular, performance models can be invaluable in both configuring and designing disk arrays. Accurate analytic performance models are desirable over other types of models because they can be quickly evaluated, are applicable under a wide range of system and workload parameters, and can be manipulated by a range of mathematical techniques. Unfortunately, analytical performance models of disk arrays are difficult to formulate due to the presence of queuing and fork-join synchronization; a disk array request is broken up into independent disk requests which must all complete to satisfy the original request. We develop, validate, and apply an analytic performance model for disk arrays. We derive simple equations for approximating their utilization, response time, and throughput. We then validate the analytic model via simulation and investigate the accuracy of each approximation used in deriving the analytical model. Finally, we apply the analytical model to derive an equation for the optimal unit of data striping in disk arrays.

  11. Sharp Eccentric Rings in Planetless Hydrodynamical Models of Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyra, W.; Kuchner, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Exoplanets are often associated with disks of dust and debris, analogs of the Kuiper Belt in our solar system. These "debris disks" show a variety of non-trivial structures attributed to planetary perturbations and utilized to constrain the properties of the planets. However, analyses of these systems have largely ignored the fact that, increasingly, debris disks are found to contain small quantities of gas, a component all debris disks should contain at some level. Several debris disks have been measured with a dust-to-gas ratio around unity where the effect of hydrodynamics on the structure of the disk cannot be ignored. Here we report that dust-gas interactions can produce some of the key patterns seen in debris disks that were previously attributed to planets. Through linear and nonlinear modeling of the hydrodynamical problem, we find that a robust clumping instability exists in this configuration, organizing the dust into narrow, eccentric rings, similar to the Fomalhaut debris disk. The hypothesis that these disks might contain planets, though thrilling, is not necessarily required to explain these systems.

  12. On the importance of having accurate data for astrophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Francois

    2016-06-01

    The Herschel telescope and the ALMA and NOEMA interferometers have opened new windows of observation for wavelengths ranging from far infrared to sub-millimeter with spatial and spectral resolutions previously unmatched. To make the most of these observations, an accurate knowledge of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar media is essential.In this presentation, I will discuss what are the current needs of astrophysics in terms of molecular data and I will show that accurate molecular data are crucial for the proper determination of the physical conditions in molecular clouds.First, I will focus on collisional excitation studies that are needed for molecular lines modelling beyond the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) approach. In particular, I will show how new collisional data for the HCN and HNC isomers, two tracers of star forming conditions, have allowed solving the problem of their respective abundance in cold molecular clouds. I will also present the last collisional data that have been computed in order to analyse new highly resolved observations provided by the ALMA interferometer.Then, I will present the calculation of accurate rate constants for the F+H2 → HF+H and Cl+H2 ↔ HCl+H reactions, which have allowed a more accurate determination of the physical conditions in diffuse molecular clouds. I will also present the recent work on the ortho-para-H2 conversion due to hydrogen exchange that allow more accurate determination of the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio in the universe and that imply a significant revision of the cooling mechanism in astrophysical media.

  13. A Collisional Algorithm for Modeling Circumstellar Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvold, Erika; Kuchner, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Many planetary systems harbor circumstellar disks of dust and planetesimals thought to be debris left over from planet formation. These debris disks exhibit a range of morphological features which can arise from the gravitational perturbations of planets. Accurate models of these features, accounting for the interactions of the particles in a disk with each other and with whatever planets they contain, can act as signposts for planets in debris disks that otherwise could not be detected. Such models can also constrain the planet's mass and orbital parameters. Current models for many disks consider the gravitational and radiative effects of the star and planets on the disk, but neglect the morphological consequences of collisional interactions between the planetesimals. Many observed disk features are not satisfactorily explained by the current generation of models. I am developing a new kind of debris disk model that considers both the gravitational shaping of the disk by planets and the inelastic collisions between particles. I will use a hybrid N-body integrator to numerically solve the equations of motion for the particles and planets in the disk. To include the collisional effects, I begin with an algorithm that tests for collisions at each step of the orbit integration and readjusts the velocities of colliding particles. I am adapting this algorithm to the problem at hand by allowing each particle to represent a "swarm" of planetesimals with a range of masses. When the algorithm detects an encounter between swarms, two or three swarms are produced to approximate the range of possible trajectories of the daughter planetesimals. Here I present preliminary results from my collisional algorithm.

  14. Model of magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2013-03-01

    Maxwell's equations imply that exponentially smaller non-ideal effects than commonly assumed can give rapid magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas. In an ideal evolution, magnetic field lines act as stretchable strings, which can become ever more entangled but cannot be cut. High entanglement makes the lines exponentially sensitive to small non-ideal changes in the magnetic field. The cause is well known in popular culture as the butterfly effect and in the theory of deterministic dynamical systems as a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, but the importance to magnetic reconnection is not generally recognized. Two-coordinate models are too constrained geometrically for the required entanglement, but otherwise the effect is general and can be studied in simple models. A simple model is introduced, which is periodic in the x and y Cartesian coordinates and bounded by perfectly conducting planes in z. Starting from a constant magnetic field in the z direction, reconnection is driven by a spatially smooth, bounded force. The model is complete and could be used to study the impulsive transfer of energy between the magnetic field and the ions and electrons using a kinetic plasma model.

  15. Model of magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2013-03-15

    Maxwell's equations imply that exponentially smaller non-ideal effects than commonly assumed can give rapid magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas. In an ideal evolution, magnetic field lines act as stretchable strings, which can become ever more entangled but cannot be cut. High entanglement makes the lines exponentially sensitive to small non-ideal changes in the magnetic field. The cause is well known in popular culture as the butterfly effect and in the theory of deterministic dynamical systems as a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, but the importance to magnetic reconnection is not generally recognized. Two-coordinate models are too constrained geometrically for the required entanglement, but otherwise the effect is general and can be studied in simple models. A simple model is introduced, which is periodic in the x and y Cartesian coordinates and bounded by perfectly conducting planes in z. Starting from a constant magnetic field in the z direction, reconnection is driven by a spatially smooth, bounded force. The model is complete and could be used to study the impulsive transfer of energy between the magnetic field and the ions and electrons using a kinetic plasma model.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of radiative disks in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picogna, G.; Marzari, F.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks in binaries are perturbed by the companion gravity causing significant alterations of the disk morphology. Spiral waves due to the companion tidal force also develop in the vertical direction and affect the disk temperature profile. These effects may significantly influence the process of planet formation. Aims: We perform 3D numerical simulations of disks in binaries with different initial dynamical configurations and physical parameters. Our goal is to investigate their evolution and their propensity to grow planets. Methods: We use an improved version of the SPH code VINE modified to better account for momentum and energy conservation via variable smoothing and softening length. The energy equation includes a flux-limited radiative transfer algorithm. The disk cooling is obtained with the use of "boundary particles" populating the outer surfaces of the disk and radiating to infinity. We model a system made of star/disk + star/disk where the secondary star (and relative disk) is less massive than the primary. Results: The numerical simulations performed for different values of binary separation and disk density show that trailing spiral shock waves develop when the stars approach their pericenter. Strong hydraulic jumps occur at the shock front, in particular for small separation binaries, creating breaking waves, and a consistent mass stream between the two disks. Both shock waves and mass transfer cause significant heating of the disk. At apocenter these perturbations are reduced and the disks are cooled down and less eccentric. Conclusions: The disk morphology is substantially affected by the companion perturbations, in particular in the vertical direction. The hydraulic jumps may slow down or even halt the dust coagulation process. The disk is significantly heated up by spiral waves and mass transfer, and the high gas temperature may prevent the ice condensation by moving the "snow line" outward. The disordered motion triggered by

  17. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T. E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de E-mail: henning@mpia.de E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-03-20

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  18. Modeling of debris disks in Single and Binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Gómez, M.

    2016-04-01

    Infrared space observatories such as Spitzer and Herschel have allowed the detection of likely analogs to the Kuiper Belt in single as well as binary systems. The aim of this work is to characterize debris disks in single and binary stars and to identify features shared by the disks in both types of systems, as well as possible differences. We compiled a sample of 25 single and 14 binary stars (ages > 100 Myr) with flux measurements at λ >100 μm and evidence of infrared excesses attributed to the presence of debris disks. Then, we constructed and modeled the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and compared the parameters of the disks of both samples. Both types of disks are relatively free of dust in the inner region (< 3-5 AU) and extend beyond 100 AU. No significant differences in the mass and dust size distributions of both samples are found.

  19. No evidence for Bardeen-Petterson alignment in GRMHD simulations and semi-analytic models of moderately thin, prograde, tilted accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, Viacheslav V.; Ivanov, Pavel B.; Teixeira, Danilo Morales

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce the first results that use data extracted directly from numerical simulations as inputs to the analytic twisted disk model of Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In both numerical and analytic approaches, fully relativistic models of tilted and twisted disks having a moderate effective viscosity around a slowly rotating Kerr black hole are considered. Qualitatively, the analytic model demonstrates the same dynamics as the simulations, although with some quantitative offset. Namely, the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations typically give smaller variations of tilt and twist across the disk. When the black hole and the disk rotate in the same direction, the simulated tilted disk and analytic model show no sign of Bardeen-Petterson alignment, even in the innermost parts of the disk where the characteristic time for relaxation to a quasi-stationary configuration is of the same order as the computation time. In the opposite case, when the direction of the disk's rotation is opposite to that of the black hole, a partial alignment is observed, in agreement with previous theoretical estimates. Thus, both fully numerical and analytic schemes demonstrate that the Bardeen-Petterson effect may not be possible for the case of prograde rotation provided that disk's effective viscosity is sufficiently small. This may have implications in modeling of different astrophysical phenomena such as disk spectra and jet orientation.

  20. Modeling transiting circumstellar disks: characterizing the newly discovered eclipsing disk system OGLE LMC-ECL-11893

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Erin L.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Quillen, Alice C.; Moolekamp, Fred; Bell, Cameron P. M.

    2014-12-10

    We investigate the nature of the unusual eclipsing star OGLE LMC-ECL-11893 (OGLE J05172127-6900558) in the Large Magellanic Cloud recently reported by Dong et al. The eclipse period for this star is 468 days, and the eclipses exhibit a minimum of ∼1.4 mag, preceded by a plateau of ∼0.8 mag. Spectra and optical/IR photometry are consistent with the eclipsed star being a lightly reddened B9III star of inferred age ∼150 Myr and mass ∼4 M {sub ☉}. The disk appears to have an outer radius of ∼0.2 AU with predicted temperatures of ∼1100-1400 K. We model the eclipses as being due to either a transiting geometrically thin dust disk or gaseous accretion disk around a secondary object; the debris disk produces a better fit. We speculate on the origin of such a dense circumstellar dust disk structure orbiting a relatively old low-mass companion, and on the similarities of this system to the previously discovered EE Cep.

  1. Constraining Dark Matter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.

    This thesis addresses astrophysical probes to constrain dark matter (DM) and dark energy models. Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain one of the few DM candidates within the Standard Model of Particle Physics. This thesis presents a new probe of this PBH DM, using the microlensing of the source stars monitored by the already existing Kepler satellite. With its photometric precision and the large projected cross section of the nearby stars, it is found that previous constraints on PBH DM could theoretically be extended by two orders of magnitude. Correcting a well-known microlensing formula, a limb-darkening analysis is included, and a new approximation is calculated for future star selection. A preliminary prediction is calculated for the planned Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope. A preliminary study of the first two years of publicly available Kepler data is presented. The investigation yields many new sources of background error not predicted in the theoretical calculations, such as stellar flares and comets in the field of view. Since no PBH candidates are detected, an efficiency of detection is therefore calculated by running a Monte Carlo with fake limb-darkened finite-source microlensing events. It is found that with just the first 8 quarters of data, a full order of magnitude of the PBH mass range can be already constrained. Finally, one of the astrophysical probes of dark energy is also addressed - specifically, the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) measurement in the gas distribution, as detected in quasar absorption lines. This unique measurement of dark energy at intermediate redshifts is being measured by current telescope surveys. The last part of this thesis therefore focuses on understanding the systematic effects in such a detection. Since the bias between the underlying dark matter distribution and the measured gas flux distribution is based on gas physics, hydrodynamic simulations are used to understand the evolution of neutral hydrogen over

  2. Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunova, G. V.; Malanchev, K. L.

    2016-10-01

    Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

  3. Modeling the PAH Emission Spectra of Protoplanetary and Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen; Lunine, J. I.

    2006-05-01

    The 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 micron emission features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been detected in protoplanetary disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars and in debris disks around main-sequence stars. PAHs play an important role in the thermal budget and chemistry of the gas in the disk, by providing photoelectrons for heating the gas and large surface areas for chemical reactions. Stochastically heated by a single UV/visible photon, the PAH emission is spatially more extended than large grains and therefore, the disks can be more easily resolved at the PAH emission bands. We propose to model the PAH emission spectra of protoplanetary and debris disks obtained by Spitzer and ISO. We will first calculate the temperature probability distribution functions dP/dT for both neutral and ionized PAHs of a wide range of sizes, at a wide range of radial distances (from the central star) in disks illuminated by stars of a wide range of spectral types. By modeling the PAH emission of dust disks, we will be able (1) to derive the abundance, size and spatial distributions of PAHs; (2) to derive the PAH photoelectric heating rates which dominate the gas heating in the disk surface layers; and (3) to see how the abundance and properties of the PAHs vary among disks at different evolutionary stages and illuminated by stars of different parameters (e.g. luminosity, spectral type). This program will create a web-based ``library'' of the temperature distribution functions dP/dT of PAHs (and their emission spectra and photoelectric heating rates) as a function of size, charge state, and radial distance in disks illuminated by stars of different spectral types. This library, a useful tool for interpreting the PAH emission features of dust disks obtained by Spitzer and for understanding the disk chemistry, will be made publicly available by April 2007 via the WWW at http://www.missouri.edu/~lia/.

  4. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  5. Analytical models of helical wind-type astrophysical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K.; Vlastou-Tsinganos, G.

    1988-01-01

    Three classes of analytic solutions of the basic hydrodynamic equations assumed to govern plasma flow in the atmosphere of a rotating astrophysical object are presented. Attention is focused on the balance of the inertial and gravitational forces with suitable pressure gradients in the presence of rotation. The solutions are written in terms of dimensionless physical parameters in order to facilitate their direct application to specific astrophysical flows, such as winds from massive premain sequence objects and T Tauri stars, and bipolar flows in young stellar objects.

  6. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  7. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Sellwood, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however, the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced by bars, and found that halo compression and angular momentum exchange with the disk did not alter our earlier conclusion that spiral activity is largely responsible for creating smooth density profiles and rotation curves.

  8. The Maximum Disk Hypothesis and 2-D Spiral Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palunas, P.; Williams, T. B.

    1995-12-01

    We present an analysis of two-dimensional \\ha\\ velocity fields and I-band surface photometry for spiral galaxies taken from the southern sky Fabry-Perot Tully-Fisher survey (Schommer et al., 1993, AJ 105, 97). We construct axi-symmetric maximum disk mass models for 75 galaxies and examine in detail the deviations from axi-symmetry in the surface brightness and kinematics for a subsample of these galaxies. The luminosity profiles and rotation curves are derived using consistent centers, position angles, and inclinations. The disk and bulge are deconvolved by fitting an exponential disk and a series expansion of Gaussians for the bulge directly to the I-band images. This helps constrain the deconvolution by exploiting geometric information as well as the distinct disk and bulge radial profiles. The final disk model is the surface brightness profile of the bulge-subtracted image. The photometric model is fitted to the rotation curve assuming a maximum disk and constant M/L's for the disk and bulge components. The overall structure of the photometric models reproduces the structure in the rotation curves in the majority of galaxies spanning a large range of morphologies and rotation widths from 120 \\kms\\ to 680 \\kms. The median I-band M/L in solar units is 2.8, consistent with normal stellar populations. These results make the disk-halo conspiracy even more puzzling. The degree to which spiral galaxy mass models can reproduce small-scale structure in rotation curves is often used as evidence to support or refute the maximum disk hypothesis. However, single-slit rotation curves sample the velocity distribution only along the major axis, and photometric profiles for inclined galaxies are also sampled most heavily near the major axis. The small-scale structure can be due to local perturbations, such as spiral arms and spiral-arm streaming motions, rather than variations in the global mass distribution. We test this hypothesis by analysing azimuthal correlations in

  9. The Disk Wind Model of the Broad Line Regions in Active Galactic Nuclei and Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    This is the final progress report for our Astrophysics Theory Program (NRA 97-OSS12) grant NAG5-7723. We have made considerable progress on incorporating photoionization calculations with a 2.5D hydrodynamical code to model disk winds in AGNs. Following up on our simultaneous broad band monitoring campaign of the type I Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548, we have investigated the constraints imposed on models of accretion in Seyfert galaxies by their optical, UV, and X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using results from thermal Comptonization models that relate the physical properties of the hot inner accretion flow to the thermal reprocessing that occurs in the surrounding colder thin disk, we find that we can constrain the central black hole mass, accretion rate and size scale of the hot central flow. We have applied our model to observations of Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516, NGC 7469 and NGC 5548. Our mass and accretion rate estimates for these objects roughly agree with those found using other methods.

  10. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF. PMID:27647957

  11. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF.

  12. APPLICATION OF THE DISK EVAPORATION MODEL TO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. F.

    2009-12-10

    The disk corona evaporation model extensively developed for the interpretation of observational features of black hole X-ray binaries (BHXRBs) is applied to active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Since the evaporation of gas in the disk can lead to its truncation for accretion rates less than a maximal evaporation rate, the model can naturally account for the soft spectrum in high-luminosity AGNs and the hard spectrum in low-luminosity AGNs. The existence of two different luminosity levels describing transitions from the soft to hard state and from the hard to soft state in BHXRBs, when applied to AGNs, suggests that AGNs can be in either spectral state within a range of luminosities. For example, at a viscosity parameter, alpha, equal to 0.3, the Eddington ratio from the hard-to-soft transition and from the soft-to-hard transition occurs at 0.027 and 0.005, respectively. The differing Eddington ratios result from the importance of Compton cooling in the latter transition, in which the cooling associated with soft photons emitted by the optically thick inner disk in the soft spectral state inhibits evaporation. When the Eddington ratio of the AGN lies below the critical value corresponding to its evolutionary state, the disk is truncated. With decreasing Eddington ratios, the inner edge of the disk increases to greater distances from the black hole with a concomitant increase in the inner radius of the broad-line region, R {sub BLR}. The absence of an optically thick inner disk at low luminosities (L) gives rise to region in the R {sub BLR}-L plane for which the relation R {sub BLR} propor to L {sup 1/2} inferred at high luminosities is excluded. As a result, a lower limit to the accretion rate is predicted for the observability of broad emission lines, if the broad-line region is associated with an optically thick accretion disk. Thus, true Seyfert 2 galaxies may exist at very low accretion rates/luminosities. The differences between BHXRBs and AGNs in the framework of

  13. Prospect of the Theory of Black Hole Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Q.; Wang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The theory of black hole accretion disks is one of the most important basic theories and advanced topics in astrophysics. There are four known models of black hole accretion disks: standard thin disk (SSD), Shapiro-Lightman-Eardley (SLE) disk, optically thick advection dominated accretion flows (ADAF) theory (slim disk) and optically thin ADAF theory. During the past decades, they have made great contributions to the development of astrophysics. Despite their great successes in both theory and application, there are still many open questions. First of all, this paper will briefly introduce these four models. Then it will discuss several limitations of these models and review present possible solutions to address these problems. Our review work will contribute to further research of black hole accretion disks to a certain extent.

  14. Modeling Host Disk Kinematics of Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuca, Camilo; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by our group has shown that, although the kinematics of many active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be modeled by biconal outflow, most AGN have kinematics that are too convolved with other forms of motion to be modeled so simply, such as the rotation of the host disk. To disentangle these rotational components from the outflowing ionized gas due to AGN "feedback" in the narrow-line region (NLR) and understand the AGN's relationship with the host galaxy at extended distances, we present this study on two Seyfert 2 galaxies, Markarian 3 and Markarian 573, based on two-dimensional long-slit spectra taken with the ARC 3.5m telescope at Apache-Point Observatory. The two targets were observed multiple times at varying position angles (in order to trace the kinematics of the host disk at multiple points) and their total kinematics were analyzed and modeled using DiskFit, a publicly available code that fits given velocity fields. We compare the results of DiskFit to observed velocities and consider the applications of this technique to the kinematic fitting of other nearby AGN with convolved motions.

  15. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  16. Planet formation in transition disks: Modeling, spectroscopy, and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liskowsky, Joseph Paul

    due to either a massive planet accreting the material onto it or via a photoevaporation process whereby the central star's radiation field ejects material from the inner disk out of the bound system in the the interstellar medium. It is presumed that this phase is the last gasp of the planetary disk's evolution before the debris disk stage and before a fully formed solar system evolves. Our work specifically focuses on one object of this transition disk class: HD100546. We add to the understanding of transition disks by showing that a model where ro-vibrational OH emission in the NIR is preferentially emitted along the 'wall' of the disk is consistent with observations, and furthermore that adding an eccentricity to this `wall' component is required to generate the necessary observed line shape. In conjunction with this observation we present supporting material which motivates the usage of such an eccentric wall component in light of predictions of the influence of giant planet formation occurring within the disk.

  17. Constraining Collisional Models of Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, Meredith A.; Wilner, David J.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Steele, Amy; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean M.; Chandler, Claire J.; Tahli Maddison, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Debris disks around main-sequence stars are produced by the ongoing collisional erosion of planetesimals, analogous to Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) or comets in our own Solar System. Observations of these dusty belts offer a window into the physical and dynamical properties of planetesimals in extrasolar systems through the size distribution of dust grains. In particular, the millimeter/radio spectral index of thermal dust emission encodes information on the grain size distribution that can be used to test proposed collisional models of planetesimals. We have made sensitive Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations of a sample of 7 nearby debris disks at 9 mm and combine these with archival Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of 8 additional debris disks at 7 mm. Using measurements at (sub)millimeter wavelengths from the literature, we place tight constraints on the millimeter spectral indices and thus grain size distributions of this sample of debris disks. Our analysis gives a weighted mean for the slope of the power-law grain distribution that is close to the classical prediction for a steady-state collisional cascade (q=3.5), but not consistent with the steeper distributions predicted by recent models that include more complex fragmentation processes. To interpret this result, we explore the effects of material strengths, velocity distributions, and small-size cutoffs on the steady-state grain size distribution.

  18. An analytic model for buoyancy resonances in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Zhu, Zhaohuan E-mail: zhzhu@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-10

    Zhu et al. found in three-dimensional shearing box simulations a new form of planet-disk interaction that they attributed to a vertical buoyancy resonance in the disk. We describe an analytic linear model for this interaction. We adopt a simplified model involving azimuthal forcing that produces the resonance and permits an analytic description of its structure. We derive an analytic expression for the buoyancy torque and show that the vertical torque distribution agrees well with the results of the Athena simulations and a Fourier method for linear numerical calculations carried out with the same forcing. The buoyancy resonance differs from the classic Lindblad and corotation resonances in that the resonance lies along tilted planes. Its width depends on damping effects and is independent of the gas sound speed. The resonance does not excite propagating waves. At a given large azimuthal wavenumber k{sub y} > h {sup –1} (for disk thickness h), the buoyancy resonance exerts a torque over a region that lies radially closer to the corotation radius than the Lindblad resonance. Because the torque is localized to the region of excitation, it is potentially subject to the effects of nonlinear saturation. In addition, the torque can be reduced by the effects of radiative heat transfer between the resonant region and its surroundings. For each azimuthal wavenumber, the resonance establishes a large scale density wave pattern in a plane within the disk.

  19. Structure of relativistic accretion disk with non-standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khesali, A. R.; Salahshoor, K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of stationary, axisymmetric advection-dominated accretion disk (ADAF) around rotating black hole, using non-standard model, was examined. In this model, the transport efficiency of the angular momentum α was dependent on the magnetic Prandtl number α ∝ Pm^{δ } . The full relativistic shear stress recently obtained by a new manner, was used. By considering black hole spin and Prandtl number instantaneously, the structure of ADAFs was changed in inner and outer region of the disk. It was discovered that the accretion flow was denser and hotter in the inner region, due to the black hole spin, and in the outer region, due to the presence of Prandtl parameter. Inasmuch as the rotation of the black hole affected the transport efficiency of angular momentum in parts of the disk very close to the even horizon, then in these regions, the viscosity depended on the rotation of black hole. Also, it was discovered that the effect of the black hole spin on the structure of the disk was related to the presence of Prandtl parameter.

  20. Microstructure Modeling of Third Generation Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program was to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool was to be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishments achieved during the third year (2009) of the program are summarized. The activities of this year included: Further development of multistep precipitation simulation framework for gamma prime microstructure evolution during heat treatment; Calibration and validation of gamma prime microstructure modeling with supersolvus heat treated LSHR; Modeling of the microstructure evolution of the minor phases, particularly carbides, during isothermal aging, representing the long term microstructure stability during thermal exposure; and the implementation of software tools. During the research and development efforts to extend the precipitation microstructure modeling and prediction capability in this 3-year program, we identified a hurdle, related to slow gamma prime coarsening rate, with no satisfactory scientific explanation currently available. It is desirable to raise this issue to the Ni-based superalloys research community, with hope that in future there will be a mechanistic understanding and physics-based treatment to overcome the hurdle. In the mean time, an empirical correction factor was developed in this modeling effort to capture the experimental observations.

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamical Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within one astronomical unit (AU). These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric, and include starlight heating, silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, timedependent temperature and density, and accretion stresses parametrizing the results of MHD magneto-rotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions, and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rims’s location. A small optically-thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops at the position of thermal ionization at temperatures about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are su ciently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  2. MODELING THE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION IN AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nanase; Thompson, Todd A.; Herbst, Eric

    2013-03-10

    We use a high-temperature chemical network to derive the molecular abundances in axisymmetric accretion disk models around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) within 100 pc using simple radial and vertical density and temperature distributions motivated by more detailed physical models. We explore the effects of X-ray irradiation and cosmic-ray ionization on the spatial distribution of the molecular abundances of CO, CN, CS, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HC{sub 3}N, C{sub 2}H, and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} using a variety of plausible disk structures. These simple models have molecular regions with an X-ray-dominated region layer, a midplane without the strong influence of X-rays, and a high-temperature region in the inner portion with moderate X-ray flux where families of polyynes (C{sub n}H{sub 2}) and cyanopolyynes can be enhanced. For the high midplane density disks we explore, we find that cosmic rays produced by supernovae do not significantly affect the regions unless the star formation efficiency significantly exceeds that of the Milky Way. We highlight molecular abundance observations and ratios that may distinguish among theoretical models of the density distribution in AGN disks. Finally, we assess the importance of the shock crossing time and the accretion time relative to the formation time for various chemical species. Vertical column densities are tabulated for a number of molecular species at both the characteristic shock crossing time and steady state. Although we do not attempt to fit any particular system or set of observations, we discuss our models and results in the context of the nearby AGN NGC 1068.

  3. Constraints on Planetesimal Collision Models in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, Meredith A.; Wilner, David J.; Chandler, Claire; Ricci, Luca; Maddison, Sarah T.; Cranmer, Steven R.; Andrews, Sean M.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Steele, Amy

    2016-06-01

    Observations of debris disks offer a window into the physical and dynamical properties of planetesimals in extrasolar systems through the size distribution of dust grains. In particular, the millimeter spectral index of thermal dust emission encodes information on the grain size distribution. We have made new VLA observations of a sample of seven nearby debris disks at 9 mm, with 3\\prime\\prime resolution and ˜5 μJy beam-1rms. We combine these with archival ATCA observations of eight additional debris disks observed at 7 mm, together with up-to-date observations of all disks at (sub)millimeter wavelengths from the literature, to place tight constraints on the millimeter spectral indices and thus grain size distributions. The analysis gives a weighted mean for the slope of the power-law grain size distribution, n(a)\\propto {a}-q, of < q> =3.36+/- 0.02, with a possible trend of decreasing q for later spectral type stars. We compare our results to a range of theoretical models of collisional cascades, from the standard self-similar, steady-state size distribution (q = 3.5) to solutions that incorporate more realistic physics such as alternative velocity distributions and material strengths, the possibility of a cutoff at small dust sizes from radiation pressure, and results from detailed dynamical calculations of specific disks. Such effects can lead to size distributions consistent with the data, and plausibly the observed scatter in spectral indices. For the AU Mic system, the VLA observations show clear evidence of a highly variable stellar emission component; this stellar activity obviates the need to invoke the presence of an asteroid belt to explain the previously reported compact millimeter source in this system.

  4. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this initiative, funded by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, is to model, validate, and predict, with high fidelity, the microstructural evolution of third-generation high-refractory Ni-based disc superalloys during heat treating and service conditions. This initiative is a natural extension of the DARPA-AIM (Accelerated Insertion of Materials) initiative with GE/Pratt-Whitney and with other process simulation tools. Strong collaboration with the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is a key component of this initiative and the focus of this program is on industrially relevant disk alloys and heat treatment processes identified by GRC. Employing QuesTek s Computational Materials Dynamics technology and PrecipiCalc precipitation simulator, physics-based models are being used to achieve high predictive accuracy and precision. Combining these models with experimental data and probabilistic analysis, "virtual alloy design" can be performed. The predicted microstructures can be optimized to promote desirable features and concurrently eliminate nondesirable phases that can limit the reliability and durability of the alloys. The well-calibrated and well-integrated software tools that are being applied under the proposed program will help gas turbine disk alloy manufacturers, processing facilities, and NASA, to efficiently and effectively improve the performance of current and future disk materials.

  5. Modeling Noncircular Motions in Disk Galaxies: Application to NGC 2976

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    We present a new procedure to fit nonaxisymmetric flow patterns to two-dimensional velocity maps of spiral galaxies. We concentrate on flows caused by barlike or oval distortions to the total potential, which may arise either from a non-axially symmetric halo or a bar in the luminous disk. We apply our method to high-quality CO and Hα data for the nearby, low-mass spiral NGC 2976, previously obtained by Simon et al., and find that a barlike model fits the data at least as well as their model with large radial flows. We find supporting evidence for the existence of a bar in the baryonic disk. Our model suggests that the azimuthally averaged central attraction in the inner part of this galaxy is larger than estimated by these authors. It is likely that the disk is also more massive, which will limit the increase to the allowed dark halo density. Allowance for barlike distortions in other galaxies may either increase or decrease the estimated central attraction.

  6. Astrophysics today

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, A.G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Examining recent history, current trends, and future possibilities, the author reports the frontiers of research on the solar system, stars, galactic physics, and cosmological physics. The book discusses the great discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics and examines the circumstances in which they occurred. It discusses the physics of white dwarfs, the inflationary universe, the extinction of dinosaurs, black hole, cosmological models, and much more.

  7. Asymmetric mass models of disk galaxies. I. Messier 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Laurent; Huré, Jean-Marc; Soubiran, Caroline; Zibetti, Stefano; Charlot, Stéphane; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Mass models of galactic disks traditionally rely on axisymmetric density and rotation curves, paradoxically acting as if their most remarkable asymmetric features, such as lopsidedness or spiral arms, were not important. In this article, we relax the axisymmetry approximation and introduce a methodology that derives 3D gravitational potentials of disk-like objects and robustly estimates the impacts of asymmetries on circular velocities in the disk midplane. Mass distribution models can then be directly fitted to asymmetric line-of-sight velocity fields. Applied to the grand-design spiral M 99, the new strategy shows that circular velocities are highly nonuniform, particularly in the inner disk of the galaxy, as a natural response to the perturbed gravitational potential of luminous matter. A cuspy inner density profile of dark matter is found in M 99, in the usual case where luminous and dark matter share the same center. The impact of the velocity nonuniformity is to make the inner profile less steep, although the density remains cuspy. On another hand, a model where the halo is core dominated and shifted by 2.2-2.5 kpc from the luminous mass center is more appropriate to explain most of the kinematical lopsidedness evidenced in the velocity field of M 99. However, the gravitational potential of luminous baryons is not asymmetric enough to explain the kinematical lopsidedness of the innermost regions, irrespective of the density shape of dark matter. This discrepancy points out the necessity of an additional dynamical process in these regions: possibly a lopsided distribution of dark matter.

  8. Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  9. Drag-o-llision Models of Extrasolar Planets in Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2009-01-01

    An extrasolar planet sculpts the famous debris disk around Fomalhaut; probably many other debris disks contain planets that we could locate if only we could better recognize their signatures in the dust that surrounds them. But the interaction between planets and debris disks involves both orbital resonances and collisions among grains and rocks in the disks---difficult processes to model simultaneously. The author describes new 3-D models of debris disk dynamics, Drag-o-llision models, that incorporate both collisions and resonant trapping of dust for the first time. The author also discusses the implications of these models for coronagraphic imaging with Gemini and other telescopes.

  10. The Behavior of Accretion Disks in Low Mass X-ray Binaries: Disk Winds and Alpha Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on two low mass X-ray binaries. The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy with the ACS/SBC on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km/s as determined from the Doppler width of the C IV emission line. The broad and shallow eclipse indicates that the disk has a vertically-extended, optically-thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to 50% of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically-thick base of the disk wind. V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115) is a low mass X-ray binary which continues to be a black hole candidate. We have new photometric data of this system from the Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope's high speed CCD photometer at McDonald Observatory. The light curve is largely sinusoidal which we model with two components: a constant light source from the disk and a sinusoidal modulation at the orbital period from the irradiated face of the companion star. This is a radical re-interpretation of the orbital light curve. We do not require a large or asymmetric disk rim to account for the modulation in the light curve. Thus, the orbital inclination is unconstrained in our new model, removing the foundation for any claims of the compact object being a black hole.

  11. MODELING MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2011-12-01

    Turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI) crucially affects the evolution of solid bodies in protoplanetary disks. On the other hand, small dust particles stabilize MRI by capturing ionized gas particles needed for the coupling of the gas and magnetic fields. To provide an empirical basis for modeling the coevolution of dust and MRI, we perform three-dimensional, ohmic-resistive MHD simulations of a vertically stratified shearing box with an MRI-inactive 'dead zone' of various sizes and with a net vertical magnetic flux of various strengths. We find that the vertical structure of turbulence is well characterized by the vertical magnetic flux and three critical heights derived from the linear analysis of MRI in a stratified disk. In particular, the turbulent structure depends on the resistivity profile only through the critical heights and is insensitive to the details of the resistivity profile. We discover scaling relations between the amplitudes of various turbulent quantities (velocity dispersion, density fluctuation, vertical diffusion coefficient, and outflow mass flux) and vertically integrated accretion stresses. We also obtain empirical formulae for the integrated accretion stresses as a function of the vertical magnetic flux and the critical heights. These empirical relations allow us to predict the vertical turbulent structure of a protoplanetary disk for a given strength of the magnetic flux and a given resistivity profile.

  12. Radiation Hydrodynamics Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within a few astronomical units (AU). The occurrence rate and distributions of masses and orbits vary greatly with the host star’s mass. These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric and include starlight heating silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, time-dependent temperature and density and accretion stresses parameterizing the results of MHD magnetorotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rim’s location. A small optically thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops near the location of thermal ionization at temperatures of about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are sufficiently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  13. Three-dimensional models of astrophysical magnetohydrodynamical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Gareth C.

    2007-05-01

    In the previous fifty years it has become clear that jets and outflows play a vital role in the formation of stars and compact objects. Jets from young stellar objects typically show Herbig-Haro knots and bow shocks. Additionally, it now appears that (1) most stars form in binaries, and (2) jets from young stars are multiple and episodic outflows. Several groups have carried out large-scale simulations of jets, but often assuming a uniform ambient medium and a single disk and star. In this thesis the problems associated with non-uniform media and binary systems are explored. In order to understand the role of jets in star formation the questions are asked: how do jets from binary stars behave? What is the effect of the prehistory of jets on their collimation, acceleration and morphology? To answer these questions, a parallel adaptive-grid magnetohydrodynamics code, ATLAS, is modified to include optically thin atomic radiative cooling losses. The code is rigorously tested, with particular reference to the shock-capturing and the radiative cooling. The tests used include one-dimensional shock-tube tests, two-dimensional blast waves, double Mach reflection of a strong shock from a wedge, the overstable radiatively cooling shock, and the Orszag-Tang vortex. A comparison of the code with another code, PLUTO, for the type of jet problems solved in this thesis is also performed. Using ATLAS, the propagation of jets in complex environments is studied. The first ever simulations of binary jets are performed. Three aspects of the problem are studied, the effects of source orbiting, the effects of interaction, and the role of the magnetic field. It is shown that jets from binary stars can interact and the signature of the interaction is demonstrated. The negligible effect of source orbiting is demonstrated. A toroidal magnetic field is placed in the ambient environment and further accentuates the interaction. Following on from this work, the evolution of the jet when the

  14. Modeling Planet-Building Stellar Disks with Radiative Transfer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol A.; Wagner, Kevin Robert; Champney, Elizabeth H.; Johnson, Alexa N.; Warren, Chelsea C.; Russell, Ray W.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Lisse, Casey M.; Cure, Michel; Kraus, Stefan; Fukagawa, Misato; Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Monnier, John D.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Wilner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the many planetary systems found outside of our own solar system cannot be completed without knowledge of the beginnings these systems. By detecting planets in very young systems and modeling the disks of material around stars from which they form, we can gain a better understanding of planetary origin and evolution. The efforts presented here have been in modeling two pre-transitional disk systems using a radiative transfer code. With the first of these systems, V1247 Ori, a model that fits the spectral energy distribution (SED) well and whose parameters are consistent with existing interferometry data (Kraus et al 2013) has been achieved. The second of these two systems, SAO 206462, has presented a different set of challenges but encouraging SED agreement between the model and known data gives hope that the model can produce images that can be used in future interferometry work. This work was supported by NASA ADAP grant NNX09AC73G, and the IR&D program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  15. Computer Modeling of Electrostatic Aggregation of Granular Materials in Planetary and Astrophysical Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.

    1999-01-01

    Electrostatic forces strongly influence the behavior of granular materials in both dispersed (cloud) systems and semi-packed systems. These forces can cause aggregation or dispersion of particles and are important in a variety of astrophysical and planetary settings. There are also many industrial and commercial settings where granular matter and electrostatics become partners for both good and bad. This partnership is important for human exploration on Mars where dust adheres to suits, machines, and habitats. Long-range Coulombic (electrostatic) forces, as opposed to contact-induced dipoles and van der Waals attractions, are generally regarded as resulting from net charge. We have proposed that in addition to net charge interactions, randomly distributed charge carriers on grains will result in a dipole moment regardless of any net charge. If grains are unconfined, or fluidized, they will rotate so that the dipole always induces attraction between grains. Aggregates are readily formed, and Coulombic polarity resulting from the dipole produces end-to-end stacking of grains to form filamentary aggregates. This has been demonstrated in USML experiments on Space Shuttle where microgravity facilitated the unmasking of static forces. It has also been demonstrated in a computer model using grains with charge carriers of both sign. Model results very closely resembled micro-g results with actual sand grains. Further computer modeling of the aggregation process has been conducted to improve our understanding of the aggregation process, and to provide a predictive tool for microgravity experiments slated for Space Station. These experiments will attempt to prove the dipole concept as outlined above. We have considerably enhanced the original computer model: refinements to the algorithm have improved the fidelity of grain behavior during grain contact, special attention has been paid to simulation time steps to enable establishment of a meaningful, quantitative time axis

  16. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Challenge on the Astrophysical R-Process Calculation with Nuclear Mass Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bao-Hua; Meng, Jie

    2008-07-01

    Our understanding of the rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis process in universe depends on the reliability of nuclear mass predictions. Initiated by the newly developed mass table in the relativistic mean field theory (RMF), we investigate the influence of mass models on the r-process calculations, assuming the same astrophysical conditions. The different model predictions on the so far unreachable nuclei lead to significant deviations in the calculated r-process abundances.

  17. Modelling Cosmic-Ray Effects in the Protosolar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    The role that Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) play in the dynamic evolution of protosolar disks and the origin of our Solar System is a fundamental one. The GCRs are an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM), and even play a role in correcting the age determinations of some irons versus CAIs (calcium-aluminum inclusions) in meteoroids . Because CRs also are one of the energy transport mechanisms in a planetary nebula, the question of modelling their effect upon this broad subject is a serious topic for planetary science. The problem is addressed here.

  18. Exact Relativistic Models of Thin Disks around Static Black Holes in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.; García-Reyes, Gonzalo; González, Guillermo A.

    2014-11-01

    The exact superposition of a central static black hole with surrounding thin disk in presence of a magnetic field is investigated. We consider two models of disk, one of infinite extension based on a Kuzmin-Chazy-Curzon metric and other finite based on the first Morgan-Morgan disk. We also analyze a simple model of active galactic nuclei (AGN) consisting of black hole, a Kuzmin-Chazy-Curzon disk and two rods representing jets, in presence of magnetic field. To explain the stability of the disks, we consider the matter of the disk made of two pressureless streams of counter-rotating charged particles (counter-rotating model) moving along electrogeodesic. Using the Rayleigh criterion, we derivate for circular orbits the stability conditions of the particles of the streams. The influence of the magnetic field on the matter properties of the disk and on its stability are also analyzed.

  19. Eddington's Stellar Models and Early Twentieth Century Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisberg, Joann

    1991-06-01

    Between 1916 and 1926, Arthur Stanley Eddington developed models of the temperature, pressure and density in the interior of stars. The models generated a relationship between stellar mass and luminosity that agreed well with observation. Coupled with the evolutionary theory that astronomers then thought governed stars, the models explained the distribution of stars upon the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. This thesis argues that Eddington's models were shaped by the cosmological concerns that had preoccupied the British astronomical community in the preceding decade. British astronomers participated in a program of statistical cosmology, spearheaded by the Dutch astronomer, J. C. Kapteyn, to map the universe by studying the distribution of stars in neighborhoods successively more distant from the sun. The parameters of chief concern in this program were proper motion, which was used to measure stellar distance, and luminosity, considered the most important inherent characteristic of a star. In 1913 Henry Norris Russell published an empirical diagram of stellar luminosity and spectral type, on which he based a new theory of the evolution of stars from bright, red giants to bright, blue giants, to faint red dwarfs. British astronomers recognized the theory and diagram as fruits of the statistical program, and they rapidly accepted its parameters as the ones a stellar model should generate. Prompted by his interest in cepheid variable stars to construct a model of stars in radiative equilibrium, Eddington's first concern was to reproduce the features of Russell's diagram. Russell's evolutionary theory played so large a role in Eddington's work that when his own mass -luminosity relationship threatened to overturn it, he tailored his theory of stellar energy generation to preserve it.

  20. Searching for Simpler Models of Astrophysical Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cangi, Eryn; Abrams, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    While theories of synchronization in two- or three-body astronomical systems are well understood, a generalization to many-bodied systems remains largely unexplored. Historically, problems of resonant capture among astronomical bodies have been treated primarily using methods from conservative classical mechanics. We investigate the possibility of using nonconservative models together with perturbation theory and numerical methods to understand the phenomenon of resonant capture in large-scale structures such as rings, planetary systems and galactic spiral arms. In particular, we focus on N-body dissipative systems such as circumplanetary discs and use methods drawn from the study of coupled oscillators. One such method is inspired by the Kuramoto model, which describes mean-field behavior in large ensembles of coupled nonlinear oscillators. The Kuramoto model can be modified to allow for non-mean-field coupling, leading to the existence of chimera states, in which most of the oscillators synchronize. These chimera states can appear as clusters or spirals of synced oscillators, and may be suggestive of objects in astronomical contexts. As an illustrative example, we develop a mean-field model for N small particles in a dust ring around a massive planet and integrate it numerically using code developed in MATLAB and Python. Preliminary results show promise that this approach will yield new insight into astronomical synchronization phenomena across a wide range of length scales.

  1. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, D. A.

    In this chapter we review a new and rapidly growing area of research in high-energy plasma astrophysics—radiative magnetic reconnection, defined here as a regime of reconnection where radiation reaction has an important influence on the reconnection dynamics, energetics, and/or nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a variety of radiative effects that are critical in many high-energy astrophysical applications. The most notable radiative effects in astrophysical reconnection include radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. The self-consistent inclusion of these effects into magnetic reconnection theory and modeling sometimes calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool available for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical conditions in a reconnecting system to observable radiative signatures. This chapter presents an overview of our recent theoretical progress in developing basic physical understanding of radiative magnetic reconnection, with a special emphasis on astrophysically most important radiation mechanisms like synchrotron, curvature, and inverse-Compton. The chapter also offers a broad review of key high-energy astrophysical applications of radiative reconnection, illustrated by multiple examples such as: pulsar wind nebulae, pulsar magnetospheres, black-hole accretion-disk coronae and hot accretion flows in X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei and their relativistic jets, magnetospheres of magnetars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, this chapter discusses the most critical

  2. Microscopic nuclear models for astrophysics: The Brussels BRUSLIB nuclear library and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.

    2006-10-01

    Astrophysics is in need of a broad variety of nuclear data. This concerns static ground state properties, characteristics of excited nuclei, spontaneous decay properties, or interactions of nuclei with (mainly) nucleons, α-particles or photons. A strong theoretical activity complementing laboratory efforts is also mandatory. A large variety of highly ‘exotic’ laboratory-unreachable nuclei are indeed involved in the astrophysics modelling. Even when laboratory-studied nuclei are considered, theory has very often to be called for. Mastering the huge volume of nuclear information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into astrophysics models is clearly of pivotal importance. The recognition of this necessity has been the driving motivation for the construction of the Brussels library (BRUSLIB) of computed data of astrophysics relevance. It provides an extended information in tabular form on masses, nuclear level densities and partition functions, fission barriers, and thermonuclear reaction rates. In addition of the unprecedented broadness of its scope, BRUSLIB has the unique and most important feature of relying to the largest possible extent on global and coherent microscopic nuclear models. The models of this sort that we have developed to predict the basic properties of the nuclei and of their interactions are briefly reviewed. The content of the BRUSLIB library that relies on these models is described, as well as a user-friendly nuclear network generator (NETGEN) complementing BRUSLIB. Finally, an application of BRUSLIB and NETGEN to the p-process nucleosynthesis during He detonation in sub-Chandrasekhar CO white dwarfs is proposed.

  3. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  4. The Response of Model and Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flames to Curvature and Stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursi, L. J.; Zingale, M.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Timmes, F. X.; Vladimirova, N.; Rosner, R.; Caceres, A.; Lamb, D. Q.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Riley, K.; Siegel, A.; Truran, J. W.

    2003-10-01

    Critically understanding the standard candle-like behavior of Type Ia supernovae requires understanding their explosion mechanism. One family of models for Type Ia supernovae begins with a deflagration in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf that greatly accelerates through wrinkling and flame instabilities. While the planar speed and behavior of astrophysically relevant flames is increasingly well understood, more complex behavior, such as the flame's response to stretch and curvature, has not been extensively explored in the astrophysical literature; this behavior can greatly enhance or suppress instabilities and local flame-wrinkling, which in turn can increase or decrease the bulk burning rate. In this paper, we explore the effects of curvature on both nuclear flames and simpler model flames to understand the effect of curvature on the flame structure and speed.

  5. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Fragile, P. Chris

    2013-12-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks), Shakura-Sunyaev (thin) disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs).

  6. Generalized Mittag-Leffler Distributions and Processes for Applications in Astrophysics and Time Series Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Kanichukattu Korakutty; Uma, Padmini; Lekshmi, Vanaja Seetha; Haubold, Hans Joachim

    Geometric generalized Mittag-Leffler distributions having the Laplace transform 1/(1+βlog(1+tα)), 0 < α ≤ 2, β > 0 is introduced and its properties are discussed. Autoregressive processes with Mittag-Leffler and geometric generalized Mittag-Leffler marginal distributions are developed. Haubold and Mathai (Astrophysics and Space Science 273 53-63, 2000) derived a closed form representation of the fractional kinetic equation and thermonuclear function in terms of Mittag-Leffler function. Saxena et al. (2002; Astrophysics and Space Science 209 299-310 2004a; Physica A 344 657-664 2004b) extended the result and derived the solutions of a number of fractional kinetic equations in terms of generalized Mittag-Leffler functions. These results are useful in explaining various fundamental laws of physics. Here we develop first-order autoregressive time series models and the properties are explored. The results have applications in various areas like astrophysics, space sciences, meteorology, financial modeling and reliability modeling.

  7. A Model Study of the Thermal Evolution of Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We address the question of the evolution of ices that have been exposed to radiation from stellar sources and cosmic rays. We studied in the laboratory the thermal evolution of a model ice sample: a mixture of water, hydrogen peroxide, dioxygen, and ozone produced by irradiating solid H2O2 with 50 keV H(+) at 17 K. The changes in composition and release of volatiles during warming to 200 K were monitored by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microbalance techniques. We find evidence for voids in the water component from the infrared bands due to dangling H bonds. The absorption from these bands increases during heating and can be observed at temperatures as high as approx. 155 K. More O2 is stored in the radiolyzed film than can be retained by codeposition of O2 and H2O. This O2 remains trapped until approx. 155 K, where it desorbs in an outburst as water ice crystallizes. Warming of the ice also drastically decreases the intrinsic absorbance of O2 by annealing defects in the ice. We also observe loss of O3 in two stages during heating, which correlates with desorption and possibly chemical reactions with radicals stored in the ice, triggered by the temperature increase.

  8. Numerical modeling of the interstellar medium in galactic disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Bregman, J. N.; Norman, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    We have been developing detailed hydrodynamic models of the global interstellar medium in the hope of understanding the mass and volume occupied by various phases, as well as their structure and kinematics. In our model, the gas is modeled by one fluid while representative Pop 1 stars are modeled by a second fluid. The two fluids are coupled in that the gas forms into stars at a rate given by a Schmidt law while stellar mass loss returns matter into the gas phase (on a time scale of 100 Myr). Also, the stars heat the gas through stellar winds and the gas cools through optically thin radiation. The time behavior of these two fluids is studied in two spatial dimensions with the Eulerian finite difference numerical hydrodynamic code Zen. The two spatial dimensions are along the plane of a disk (x, total length of 2 kpc) and perpendicular to the disk (z, total height of +/- 15 kpc) and a galactic gravitational field in the z direction, typical of that at the solar circle, is imposed upon the simulation; self-gravity and rotation are absent. For the boundary conditions, outflow is permitted at the top and bottom of the grid (z = +/- 15 kpc) while periodic boundary conditions are imposed upon left and right sides of the grid. As initial conditions, we assumed a gaseous distribution like that seen for the H1 by earlier researchers, although the results are insensitive to the initial conditions. We have run simulations in which the heating due to stars, parameterized as a stellar wind velocity, a, is varied from low (a = 150 km/s), to intermediate (a = 300 km/s), to high (a = 600 km/s). Since the intermediate case is roughly equivalent to the Galactic energy injection rate from supernovae, this summary will concentrate on results from this simulation.

  9. Arnold's structural theorem for the thick disk model describes the structure of planetary systems and circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmin, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Ideal hydrodynamics and MHD are widely used in astrophysical models due to not only low viscosity but because of large scale of the systems. These general models allow to describe not only flows of neutral gas and magnetized plasma but evolution of many-body system as well. Our basic idea is to describe cosmic structures by 3D steady Euler equation of ideal fluid flow. According to Arnold's structural theorem, 3D steady Euler equation of ideal incompressible fluid flow has solution with toroidal topology described by divergent free vector field. The minimal energy among all the fields with closed flow lines on 3D sphere has a structure called Hopf field. Stereographic projection of Hopf field into Euclidian space has image as field where flow lines are Villarceau circles lying on tori corresponding to the levels of Bernoulli function. Arnold's structural theorem is also applicable to steady ideal incompressible MHD and steady isentropic or isothermal flow of ideal compressible fluid. We tested Arnold's structural theorem in the 3D hydrodynamic model of thick disk formation. We have shown that optimal level of Bernoulli function corresponding to "optimal torus" exists, and relative surface free energy is minimal at this level. Corresponding inclination of Villarceau circles to accretion plane is ?-4. Beat of oscillations with wave numbers corresponding to structural radii of "optimal torus" lying in accretion plane leads to scaling of "optimal tori" with factor: K = 1 + sin(?-4) ≈ 1.7071.... Set of scaled optimal tori form thick disk with divergence angle to accretion plane ?-4. Considering optimal tori as precursors of planetary orbits, we found coincidence of scaling factors in Dermort's Law for semi-major axis of Solar system K = 1.7002 ± 0.018 and HR8799 system K = 1.68 ± 0.05 with the optimal one. Also, we analyzed the probability distribution of ratios of semi-major axes of neighbor planets in the known multiple-exoplanet systems. We found existence of two

  10. AN ANALYTIC MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF A VISCOUS, IRRADIATED DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J. E.

    2009-11-10

    We describe an analytic model for the evolution of a protoplanetary disk heated by viscous accretion and radiation from the central star. The disk is assumed to be flared and viscosity is assumed to follow an 'alpha' model, where viscosity is proportional to the local sound speed and scale height. In the inner disk, the midplane temperature is mainly determined by the energy released by the viscous accretion of material through the disk and onto the star. In the outer disk, stellar irradiation is the dominant heat source. A third regime is present in the innermost part of the disk, where viscous heating dominates but the opacity declines rapidly with increasing temperature due to dust grain sublimation. Changes in the protostellar radius and luminosity over time are readily incorporated into the model, although these have a relatively minor effect on the disk evolution. The model yields the surface density and midplane temperature at any point in space and time during the lifetime of the disk. It is especially suited to studies of planet formation that require a self-consistent model of disk evolution with minimal computational expense.

  11. THE MISSING CAVITIES IN THE SEEDS POLARIZED SCATTERED LIGHT IMAGES OF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: A GENERIC DISK MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, R.; Rafikov, R.; Zhu, Z.; Brandt, T.; Janson, M.; Hartmann, L.; Whitney, B.; Muto, T.; Hashimoto, J.; Kuzuhara, M.; Grady, C.; Follette, K.; Tanii, R.; Itoh, Y.; Thalmann, C.; Wisniewski, J.; Mayama, S.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; and others

    2012-05-10

    Transitional circumstellar disks around young stellar objects have a distinctive infrared deficit around 10 {mu}m in their spectral energy distributions, recently measured by the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), suggesting dust depletion in the inner regions. These disks have been confirmed to have giant central cavities by imaging of the submillimeter continuum emission using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). However, the polarized near-infrared scattered light images for most objects in a systematic IRS/SMA cross sample, obtained by HiCIAO on the Subaru telescope, show no evidence for the cavity, in clear contrast with SMA and Spitzer observations. Radiative transfer modeling indicates that many of these scattered light images are consistent with a smooth spatial distribution for {mu}m-sized grains, with little discontinuity in the surface density of the {mu}m-sized grains at the cavity edge. Here we present a generic disk model that can simultaneously account for the general features in IRS, SMA, and Subaru observations. Particularly, the scattered light images for this model are computed, which agree with the general trend seen in Subaru data. Decoupling between the spatial distributions of the {mu}m-sized dust and mm-sized dust inside the cavity is suggested by the model, which, if confirmed, necessitates a mechanism, such as dust filtration, for differentiating the small and big dust in the cavity clearing process. Our model also suggests an inwardly increasing gas-to-dust ratio in the inner disk, and different spatial distributions for the small dust inside and outside the cavity, echoing the predictions in grain coagulation and growth models.

  12. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks: a grid of models. I. The disk structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Planets are thought to eventually form from the mostly gaseous (~99% of the mass) disks around young stars. The density structure and chemical composition of protoplanetary disks are affected by the incident radiation field at optical, far-ultraviolet (FUV), and X-ray wavelengths, as well as by the dust properties. Aims: The effect of FUV and X-rays on the disk structure and the gas chemical composition are investigated. This work forms the basis of a second paper, which discusses the impact on diagnostic lines of, e.g., C+, O, H2O, and Ne+ observed with facilities such as Spitzer and Herschel. Methods: A grid of 240 models is computed in which the X-ray and FUV luminosity, minimum grain size, dust size distribution, and surface density distribution are varied in a systematic way. The hydrostatic structure and the thermo-chemical structure are calculated using Protoplanetary Disk Model (ProDiMo), with the recent addition of X-rays. Results: The abundance structure of neutral oxygen is very stable to changes in the X-ray and FUV luminosity, and the emission lines will thus be useful tracers of the disk mass and temperature. The C+ abundance distribution is sensitive to both X-rays and FUV. The radial column density profile shows two peaks, one at the inner rim and a second one at a radius r = 5-10 AU. The minimum is caused by shadowing from the inner rim. The fluctuations in value of the column density as a function of radius are smoothed out when FUV and X-ray luminosities increase. Ne+ and other heavy elements with an ionization potential higher than IP > 13.6 eV have a very strong response to X-rays, and the column density in the inner disk increases by two orders of magnitude from the lowest (LX = 1029 erg s-1) to the highest considered X-ray flux (LX = 1032 erg s-1). FUV confines the Ne+ ionized region to areas closer to the star at low X-ray luminosities (LX = 1029 erg s-1). This is indirectly caused by changes in the disk structure. The radial column

  13. Studying Wake Deflection of Wind Turbines in Yaw using Drag Disk Experiments and Actuator Disk Modeling in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there has been a push towards the optimization in the power output of entire large wind farms through the control of individual turbines, as opposed to operating each turbine in a maximum power point tracking manner. In this vane, the wake deflection by wind turbines in yawed conditions has generated considerable interest in recent years. In order to effectively study the wake deflection according to classical actuator disk momentum theory, a 3D printed drag disk model with a coefficient of thrust of approximately 0.75 - 0.85 and a diameter of 3 cm is used, studied under uniform inflow in a wind tunnel with test section of 1 m by 1.3 m, operating with a negligible inlet turbulence level at an inflow velocity of 10 m/s. Mean velocity profile measurements are performed using Pitot probes. Different yaw angles are considered, including 10, 20, and 30 degrees. We confirm earlier results that (e.g.) a 30 degree yaw angle deflects the center of the wake around 1/2 of a rotor diameter when it impinges on a downstream turbine. Detailed comparisons between the experiments and Large Eddy Simulations using actuator disk model for the wind turbines are carried out in order to help validate the CFD model. Work supported by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project) and by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471).

  14. Power-law wrinkling turbulence-flame interaction model for astrophysical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, Dean M.; Calder, Alan C.

    2014-04-01

    We extend a model for turbulence-flame interactions (TFI) to consider astrophysical flames with a particular focus on combustion in Type Ia supernovae. The inertial range of the turbulent cascade is nearly always under-resolved in simulations of astrophysical flows, requiring the use of a model in order to quantify the effects of subgrid-scale wrinkling of the flame surface. We provide implementation details to extend a well-tested TFI model to low-Prandtl number flames for use in the compressible hydrodynamics code FLASH. A local, instantaneous measure of the turbulent velocity is calibrated for FLASH and verification tests are performed. Particular care is taken to consider the relation between the subgrid rms turbulent velocity and the turbulent flame speed, especially for high-intensity turbulence where the turbulent flame speed is not expected to scale with the turbulent velocity. Finally, we explore the impact of different TFI models in full-star, three-dimensional simulations of Type Ia supernovae.

  15. Searching for inflation in simple string theory models: An astrophysical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Tegmark, Max; Kachru, Shamit; Shelton, Jessie; Özcan, Onur

    2007-11-01

    Attempts to connect string theory with astrophysical observation are hampered by a jargon barrier, where an intimidating profusion of orientifolds, Kähler potentials, etc. dissuades cosmologists from attempting to work out the astrophysical observables of specific string theory solutions from the recent literature. We attempt to help bridge this gap by giving a pedagogical exposition with detailed examples, aimed at astrophysicists and high energy theorists alike, of how to compute predictions for familiar cosmological parameters when starting with a 10-dimensional string theory action. This is done by investigating inflation in string theory, since inflation is the dominant paradigm for how early universe physics determines cosmological parameters. We analyze three explicit string models from the recent literature, each containing an infinite number of vacuum solutions. Our numerical investigation of some natural candidate inflatons, the so-called “moduli fields,” fails to find inflation. We also find in the simplest models that, after suitable field redefinitions, vast numbers of these vacua differ only in an overall constant multiplying the effective inflaton potential, a difference which affects neither the potential’s shape nor its ability to support slow-roll inflation. This illustrates that even having an infinite number of vacua does not guarantee having inflating ones. This may be an artifact of the simplicity of the models that we study. Instead, more complicated string theory models appear to be required, suggesting that identifying the inflating subset of the string landscape will be challenging.

  16. The Io mass-loading disk: Model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongli; Russell, Christopher T.; Raeder, Joachim

    2001-11-01

    The observations of ion cyclotron waves up to 0.5 RJ beyond the orbit of Io are best explained by the presence of a thin disk of fast neutrals whose ionization and pickup provide the free energy for the waves. We extend the model of Wilson and Schneider [1999] in order to explain the observed properties of this mass-loading region, especially the most recent Galileo observations near Io. In the extended model, some of the molecules of sulfur compounds in Io's exobase are first ionized by photoionization, impact ionization, and charge exchange. These charged particles are accelerated in the corotation electric field associated with the motion of the magnetized Io torus plasma that is moving through its exosphere. After a period of acceleration the heavy ions are neutralized by charge exchange with other exospheric neutral particles or combined with local electrons. These newly neutralized particles continue with high velocities similar to those of their former charged state, moving only under the influence of the gravity fields of Jupiter and Io, not affected by the electric and magnetic field. If they do not impact Io or its atmosphere, these neutral particles can propagate large distances across the magnetic field before they are reionized. Eventually, the reionized particles are lost by dissociation. Characteristic Io mass-loading particle distributions, such as high torus plasma density outside Io's orbit and the lower density inside, and the directional feature of the mass-loading neutral cloud, are qualitatively reproduced in the model. Meanwhile, the configuration of the mass-loading region, in which the ion cyclotron waves are observed, is obtained, and the results are consistent with Galileo wave observations. Three parameters are found to control the structure of the neutral and ion loading disks: the characteristic lifetimes of the initially created ions, of the neutral molecules, and of the ions generated by neutral particle reionization. In addition

  17. Testing slim-disk models on the thermal spectra of LMC X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, O.; Bursa, M.; Sądowski, A.; Steiner, J. F.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Kluźniak, W.; McClintock, J. E.; Narayan, R.; Remillard, R. A.

    2011-09-01

    Slim-disk models describe advective accretion flows at high luminosities, while reducing to the standard thin disk form in the low luminosity limit. We have developed a new spectral model, slimbb, within the framework of XSPEC, which describes fully relativistic slim-disk accretion and includes photon ray-tracing that starts from the disk photosphere, rather than the equatorial plane. We demonstrate the features of this model by applying it to RXTE spectra of the persistent black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-3. LMC X-3 has the virtues of exhibiting large intensity variations while maintaining itself in soft spectral states which are well described using accretion-disk models, making it an ideal candidate to test the aptness of slimbb. Our results demonstrate consistency between the low-luminosity (thin-disk) and high luminosity (slim-disk) regimes. The results also illustrate that advection alone does not solve the problem of the origin of the surprisingly soft high-luminosity spectra in LMC X-3. We show that X-ray continuum-fitting in the high accretion rate regime can powerfully test black-hole accretion disk models.

  18. Action-Based Dynamical Modeling for the Milky Way Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trick, Wilma H.; Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-10-01

    We present RoadMapping, a full-likelihood dynamical modeling machinery that aims to recover the Milky Way’s (MW) gravitational potential from large samples of stars in the Galactic disk. RoadMapping models the observed positions and velocities of stars with a parameterized, three-integral distribution function (DF) in a parameterized axisymmetric potential. We investigate through differential test cases with idealized mock data how the breakdown of model assumptions and data properties affect constraints on the potential and DF. Our key results are: (i) If the MW’s true potential is not included in the assumed model potential family, we can—in the axisymmetric case—still find a robust estimate for the potential, with only ≲ 10 % difference in surface density within | z| ≤slant 1.1 {kpc} inside the observed volume. (ii) Modest systematic differences between the true and model DF are inconsequential. E.g., when binning stars to define sub-populations with simple DFs, binning errors do not affect the modeling as long as the DF parameters of neighboring bins differ by \\lt 20 % . In addition, RoadMapping ensures unbiased potential estimates for either (iii) small misjudgements of the spatial selection function (i.e., ≲ 15 % at the survey volume’s edge), (iv) if distances are known to within 10%, or (v) if proper motion uncertainties are known within 10% or are smaller than δ μ ≲ 1 {mas} {{yr}}-1. Challenges are the rapidly increasing computational costs for large sample sizes. Overall, RoadMapping is well suited to making precise new measurements of the MW’s potential with data from the upcoming Gaia releases.

  19. Protoplanetary disk formation and evolution models: DM Tau and GM Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Guillot, T.

    2002-09-01

    We study the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks using an axisymmetric turbulent disk model. We compare model results with observational parameters derived for the DM Tau and GM Aur systems. These are relatively old T Tauri stars with large and massive protoplanetary disks. Early disk formation is studied in the standard scenario of slowly rotating isothermal collapsing spheres and is strongly dependent on the initial angular momentum and the collapse accretion rate. The viscous evolution of the disk is integrated in time using the classical Alpha prescription of turbulence. We follow the temporal evolution of the disks until their characteristics fit the observed characteristics of DM Tau and GM Aur. We therefore obtain the set of model parameters that are able to explain the present state of these disks. We also study the disk evolution under the Beta parameterization of turbulence, recently proposed for sheared flows on protoplanetary disks. Both parameterizations allow explaining the present state of both DM Tau and GM Aur. We infer a value of Alpha between 5x10-3 to 0.02 for DM Tau and one order of magnitude smaller for GM Aur. Values of the Beta parameter are in accordance with theoretical predictions of Beta around 2x10-5 but with a larger dispersion on other model parameters, which make us favor the Alpha parameterization of turbulence. Implications for planetary system development in these systems are presented. In particular, GM Aur is a massive and slowly evolving disk where conditions are very favorable for planetesimal growth. The large value of present disk mass and the relatively small observed accretion rate of this system may also be indicative of the presence of an inner gas giant planet. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Programme Nationale de Planetologie. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doctoral fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  20. Simulating the Timescale-Dependent Color Variation in Quasars with a Revised Inhomogeneous Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Wang, Jun-Xian; Gu, Wei-Min; Sun, Yu-Han; Wu, Mao-Chun; Huang, Xing-Xing; Chen, Xiao-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The UV-optical variability of active galactic nuclei and quasars is useful for understanding the physics of the accretion disk and is gradually being attributed to stochastic fluctuations over the accretion disk. Quasars generally appear bluer when they brighten in the UV-optical bands; the nature of this phenomenon remains controversial. Recently, Sun et al. discovered that the color variation of quasars is timescale-dependent, in the way that faster variations are even bluer than longer term ones. While this discovery can directly rule out models that simply attribute the color variation to contamination from the host galaxies, or to changes in the global accretion rates, it favors the stochastic disk fluctuation model as fluctuations in the inner-most hotter disk could dominate the short-term variations. In this work, we show that a revised inhomogeneous disk model, where the characteristic timescales of thermal fluctuations in the disk are radius-dependent (i.e., τ ˜ r; based on that originally proposed by Dexter & Agol), can reproduce well a timescale-dependent color variation pattern, similar to the observed one and unaffected by the uneven sampling and photometric error. This demonstrates that one may statistically use variation emission at different timescales to spatially resolve the accretion disk in quasars, thus opening a new window with which to probe and test the accretion disk physics in the era of time domain astronomy. Caveats of the current model, which ought to be addressed in future simulations, are discussed.

  1. New TVD Hydro Code for Modeling Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Lawrence; Murray, Norman

    2004-06-01

    We present test simulations of a TVD hydrodynamical code designed with very few calculations per time step. The code is to be used to preform simulations of proto-planet interactions within gas disks in early solar systems.

  2. Computer Model Shows a Disk Galaxy's Life History

    NASA Video Gallery

    This cosmological simulation follows the development of a single disk galaxy over about 13.5 billion years, from shortly after the Big Bang to the present time. Colors indicate old stars (red), you...

  3. Iron lines in model disk spectra of Galactic black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Madej, J.; Konorski, P.; SaḐowski, A.

    2011-03-01

    Context. We present angle-dependent, broad-band intensity spectra from accretion disks around black holes of 10 M⊙. In our computations disks are assumed to be slim, which means that the radial advection is taken into account while computing the effective temperature of the disk. Aims: We attempt to reconstruct continuum and line spectra of X-ray binaries in soft state, i.e. dominated by the disk component of multitemperature shape. We follow how the iron-line complex depends on the external irradiation, an accretion rate, and a black hole spin. Methods: Full radiative transfer is solved including effects of Compton scattering, free-free and all important bound-free transitions of 10 main elements. We assume the LTE equation of state. Moreover, we include here the fundamental series of iron lines from helium-like and hydrogen-like ions, and fluorescent Kα and Kβ lines from low ionized iron. We consider two cases: nonrotating black hole, and black hole rotating with almost maximum spin a = 0.98, and obtain spectra for five accretion disks from hard X-rays to the infrared. Results: In nonirradiated disks, resonance lines from He-like and H-like iron appear mostly in absorption. Such disk spectra exhibit limb darkening in the whole energy range. External irradiation causes that iron resonance lines appear in emission. Furthermore, depending on disk effective temperature, fluorescent iron Kα and Kβ lines are present in disk emitting spectra. All models with irradiation exhibit limb brightening in their X-ray reflected continua. Conclusions: We show that the disk around stellar black hole itself is hot enough to produce strong-absorption resonance lines of iron. Emission lines can only be observed if heating by external X-rays dominates thermal processess in a hot disk atmosphere. Irradiated disks are usually brighter in X-ray continuum when seen edge on, and fainter when seen face on.

  4. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. I - Method and application to circumstellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1992-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo code that accurately treats multiple scattering, absorption, and polarization by dust, and use this code to calculate images of dusty disks around young stellar objects. We present some approximate analytic results that describe the behavior of the Monte Carlo calculations. A geometrically thin disk illuminated by a central T Tauri star scatters very little light at distances of many AU from the star. Viewed at any inclination, the flux scattered by such a disk at the distance to the nearest star-forming region will be overwhelmed by the stellar image. An optically thick disk that has a flaring surface may be observable, especially if viewed nearly edge-on so that the stellar source becomes occulted. An optically thin disk with a finite opening angle, similar to the one surrounding beta Pictoris, is about as observable as the typical flared optically thick disk at a similar distance from the earth. The polarization position angle is perpendicular to the disk plane in all of the models, in contrast to observations of many young stellar objects which have the position angle oriented parallel to the presumed disk plane. We suggest that the scattered light structures observed around many premain-sequence objects are dusty envelopes rather than disks.

  5. Promoting the Understanding of Scientific Reasoning, Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis: A Course for Astrophysics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Dennis; Ford, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NSF-supported “AstroCom NYC” program, a collaboration of the City University of New York, American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), and Columbia University has the explicit goal of increasing the participation of underrepresented minorities in astronomy and astrophysics by providing pedagogical mentoring and research experiences to undergraduate students. To supplement AstroCom scholars' undergraduate course work, and as a gateway to summer astrophysics research opportunities, we implemented a course called “Methods of Scientific Research” (MSR). The semester-long MSR course emphasizes the study of data using computers and other digital tools in a laboratory environment that encourages collaborative and active learning. We enroll early physical science majors and deliberately seek to inculcate habits of mind needed for science research, including assigning physical meaning to variables and measurements; engaging in mathematical modeling; quantifying error; eliminating bias; proposing hypotheses; creating predictions; testing predictions. Using laptop computers interfaced with probeware, students collect and analyze data using graphing software. Students study concepts such as motion, temperature, magnetism, electricity, gas pressure, and force with open-ended investigations where large data sets can be readily collected and replicated during a course meeting. Students are guided to examine data for patterns and trends, to make meaning of descriptive statistics such as means, standard deviations, maximum and minimum values, correlation coefficients and root mean square error values, and in general to understand, judge, and describe the studied phenomena based on data. A secondary goal of the course is to familiarize students with the facilities at AMNH, where they will do summer research as part of AstroCom NYC, in an effort to build a sense of belonging and to help them begin to self-identify as a scientist. We will discuss some our activities and

  6. Stability of general-relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkin, Oleg; Abdikamalov, Ernazar B.; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Zink, Burkhard

    2011-02-01

    Self-gravitating relativistic disks around black holes can form as transient structures in a number of astrophysical scenarios such as binary neutron star and black hole-neutron star coalescences, as well as the core collapse of massive stars. We explore the stability of such disks against runaway and nonaxisymmetric instabilities using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations in full general relativity using the Thor code. We model the disk matter using the ideal fluid approximation with a Γ-law equation of state with Γ=4/3. We explore three disk models around nonrotating black holes with disk-to-black hole mass ratios of 0.24, 0.17, and 0.11. Because of metric blending in our initial data, all of our initial models contain an initial axisymmetric perturbation which induces radial disk oscillations. Despite these oscillations, our models do not develop the runaway instability during the first several orbital periods. Instead, all of the models develop unstable nonaxisymmetric modes on a dynamical time scale. We observe two distinct types of instabilities: the Papaloizou-Pringle and the so-called intermediate type instabilities. The development of the nonaxisymmetric mode with azimuthal number m=1 is accompanied by an outspiraling motion of the black hole, which significantly amplifies the growth rate of the m=1 mode in some cases. Overall, our simulations show that the properties of the unstable nonaxisymmetric modes in our disk models are qualitatively similar to those in the Newtonian theory.

  7. Stability of general-relativistic accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Korobkin, Oleg; Abdikamalov, Ernazar B.; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Zink, Burkhard

    2011-02-15

    Self-gravitating relativistic disks around black holes can form as transient structures in a number of astrophysical scenarios such as binary neutron star and black hole-neutron star coalescences, as well as the core collapse of massive stars. We explore the stability of such disks against runaway and nonaxisymmetric instabilities using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations in full general relativity using the Thor code. We model the disk matter using the ideal fluid approximation with a {Gamma}-law equation of state with {Gamma}=4/3. We explore three disk models around nonrotating black holes with disk-to-black hole mass ratios of 0.24, 0.17, and 0.11. Because of metric blending in our initial data, all of our initial models contain an initial axisymmetric perturbation which induces radial disk oscillations. Despite these oscillations, our models do not develop the runaway instability during the first several orbital periods. Instead, all of the models develop unstable nonaxisymmetric modes on a dynamical time scale. We observe two distinct types of instabilities: the Papaloizou-Pringle and the so-called intermediate type instabilities. The development of the nonaxisymmetric mode with azimuthal number m=1 is accompanied by an outspiraling motion of the black hole, which significantly amplifies the growth rate of the m=1 mode in some cases. Overall, our simulations show that the properties of the unstable nonaxisymmetric modes in our disk models are qualitatively similar to those in the Newtonian theory.

  8. Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Present astronomical archives that contain billions of objects, both Galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allow new studies and discoveries. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories (VO) use available databases and current observing material as a collection of interoperating data archives and software tools to form a research environment in which complex research programs can be conducted. Most of the modern databases give at present VO access to the stored information, which makes possible also a fast analysis and managing of these data. Cross-correlations result in revealing new objects and new samples. Very often dozens of thousands of sources hide a few very interesting ones that are needed to be discovered by comparison of various physical characteristics. VO is a prototype of Grid technologies that allows distributed data computation, analysis and imaging. Particularly important are data reduction and analysis systems: spectral analysis, SED building and fitting, modelling, variability studies, cross correlations, etc. Computational astrophysics has become an indissoluble part of astronomy and most of modern research is being done by means of it.

  9. A simple tandem disk model for a cross-wind machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, J. V.

    The relative power coefficients, area expansion ratio, and crosswind forces for a crosswind tubine, e.g., the Darrieus, were examined with a tandem-disk, single-streamtube model. The upwind disk is assumed to be rectangular and the downwind disk is modeled as filling the wake of the upwind disk. Velocity and force triangles are devised for the factors operating at each blade. Attention was given to the NACA 0012 and 0018, and Go 735 and 420 airfoils as blades, with Reynolds number just under 500,000. The 0018 was found to be the best airfoil, followed by the 0012, the 735, and, very far behind in terms of the power coefficient, the 420. The forces on the two disks were calculated to be equal at low tip speed ratios with symmetrical airfoil, while the Go cambered profiles yielded negative values upwind in the same conditions.

  10. Models for the 3D axisymmetric gravitational potential of the Milky Way galaxy. A detailed modelling of the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, D. A.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: Galaxy mass models based on simple and analytical functions for density and potential pairs have been widely proposed in the literature. Disk models that are constrained solely by kinematic data only provide information about the global disk structure very near the Galactic plane. We attempt to circumvent this issue by constructing disk mass models whose three-dimensional structures are constrained by a recent Galactic star counts model in the near-infrared and also by observations of the hydrogen distribution in the disk. Our main aim is to provide models for the gravitational potential of the Galaxy that are fully analytical but also give a more realistic description of the density distribution in the disk component. Methods: We produced fitted mass models from the disk model, which is directly based on the observations divided into thin and thick stellar disks and H I and H2 disks subcomponents, by combining three Miyamoto-Nagai disk profiles of any model order (1, 2, or 3) for each disk subcomponent. The Miyamoto-Nagai disks are combined with models for the bulge and dark halo components and the total set of parameters is adjusted by observational kinematic constraints. A model that includes a ring density structure in the disk, beyond the solar Galactic radius, is also investigated. Results: The Galactic mass models return very good matches to the imposed observational constraints. In particular, the model with the ring density structure provides a greater contribution of the disk to the rotational support inside the solar circle. The gravitational potential models and their associated force-fields are described in analytically closed forms. Conclusions: The simple and analytical models for the mass distribution in the Milky Way and their associated three-dimensional gravitational potential are able to reproduce the observed kinematic constraints and, in addition, they are also compatible with our best knowledge of the stellar and gas distributions in

  11. The magnetic nature of disk accretion onto black holes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jon M; Raymond, John; Fabian, Andy; Steeghs, Danny; Homan, Jeroen; Reynolds, Chris; van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy

    2006-06-22

    Although disk accretion onto compact objects-white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes-is central to much of high-energy astrophysics, the mechanisms that enable this process have remained observationally difficult to determine. Accretion disks must transfer angular momentum in order for matter to travel radially inward onto the compact object. Internal viscosity from magnetic processes and disk winds can both in principle transfer angular momentum, but hitherto we lacked evidence that either occurs. Here we report that an X-ray-absorbing wind discovered in an observation of the stellar-mass black hole binary GRO J1655 - 40 (ref. 6) must be powered by a magnetic process that can also drive accretion through the disk. Detailed spectral analysis and modelling of the wind shows that it can only be powered by pressure generated by magnetic viscosity internal to the disk or magnetocentrifugal forces. This result demonstrates that disk accretion onto black holes is a fundamentally magnetic process.

  12. Modeling self-subtraction in angular differential imaging: Application to the HD 32297 debris disk

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for forward-modeling self-subtraction of spatially extended emission in observations processed with angular differential imaging (ADI) algorithms. High-contrast direct imaging of circumstellar disks is limited by quasi-static speckle noise, and ADI is commonly used to suppress those speckles. However, the application of ADI can result in self-subtraction of the disk signal due to the disk's finite spatial extent. This signal attenuation varies with radial separation and biases measurements of the disk's surface brightness, thereby compromising inferences regarding the physical processes responsible for the dust distribution. To compensate for this attenuation, we forward model the disk structure and compute the form of the self-subtraction function at each separation. As a proof of concept, we apply our method to 1.6 and 2.2 μm Keck adaptive optics NIRC2 scattered-light observations of the HD 32297 debris disk reduced using a variant of the 'locally optimized combination of images' algorithm. We are able to recover disk surface brightness that was otherwise lost to self-subtraction and produce simplified models of the brightness distribution as it appears with and without self-subtraction. From the latter models, we extract radial profiles for the disk's brightness, width, midplane position, and color that are unbiased by self-subtraction. Our analysis of these measurements indicates a break in the brightness profile power law at r ≈ 110 AU and a disk width that increases with separation from the star. We also verify disk curvature that displaces the midplane by up to 30 AU toward the northwest relative to a straight fiducial midplane.

  13. The New Mexico αω dynamo experiment: Modelling astrophysical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.; Pariev, V. I.; Beckley, H. F.; Ferrel, R.; Romero, V. D.; Weatherall, J. C.

    2002-06-01

    TA magnetic dynamo experiment is under construction at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experiment is designed to demonstrate in the laboratory the αω magnetic dynamo, which is believed to operate in many rotating and conducting astrophysical objects. The experiment uses the Couette flow of liquid sodium between two cylinders rotating with different angular velocities to model the ω-effect. The α-effect is created by the rising and expanding jets of liquid sodium driven through a pair of orifices in the end plates of the cylindrical vessel, presumably simulating plumes driven by buoyancy in astrophysical objects. The water analog of the dynamo device has been constructed and the flow necessary for the dynamo has been demonstrated. Results of the numerical simulations of the kinematic dynamo are presented. The toroidal field produced by the ω-effect is predicted to be B_{φ} ≃ (Rm /2π) B_{poloidal}≃ 20 × B_{poloidal} for the expected magnetic Reynolds number of Rm ˜ 120. The critical rate of jets necessary for the dynamo self-excitation is predicted from the calculations to be a pair of plumes every 4 revolutions of the outer cylinder. For reasonable technical limitations on the strength of materials and the power of the drive, the self-excitation of the dynamo appears to be feasible. Figs 9, Refs 15.

  14. Accretion disk dynamics. α-viscosity in self-similar self-gravitating models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubsch, Marcus; Illenseer, Tobias F.; Duschl, Wolfgang J.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the suitability of α-viscosity in self-similar models for self-gravitating disks with a focus on active galactic nuclei (AGN) disks. Methods: We use a self-similar approach to simplify the partial differential equations arising from the evolution equation, which are then solved using numerical standard procedures. Results: We find a self-similar solution for the dynamical evolution of self-gravitating α-disks and derive the significant quantities. In the Keplerian part of the disk our model is consistent with standard stationary α-disk theory, and self-consistent throughout the self-gravitating regime. Positive accretion rates throughout the disk demand a high degree of self-gravitation. Combined with the temporal decline of the accretion rate and its low amount, the model prohibits the growth of large central masses. Conclusions: α-viscosity cannot account for the evolution of the whole mass spectrum of super-massive black holes (SMBH) in AGN. However, considering the involved scales it seems suitable for modelling protoplanetary disks.

  15. Exponential Disks from Stellar Scattering. III. Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis

    2016-10-01

    Stellar scattering off irregularities in a galaxy disk has been shown to make an exponential radial profile, but no fundamental reason for this has been suggested. Here, we show that exponentials are mathematically expected from random scattering in a disk when there is a slight inward bias in the scattering probability. Such a bias was present in our previous scattering experiments that formed exponential profiles. Double exponentials can arise when the bias varies with radius. This is a fundamental property of scattering and may explain why piece-wise exponential profiles are ubiquitous in galaxies, even after minor mergers and other disruptive events.

  16. Finite element simulation of an artificial intervertebral disk using fiber reinforced laminated composite model.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Asgharzadeh Shirazi, Hadi; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-10-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral disk (IVD) has been increased in recent years. The lumbar herniation can be cured using conservative and surgical procedures. Surgery is considered after failure of conservative treatment. Partial discectomy, fusion, and total disk replacement (TDR) are also common surgical treatments for degenerative disk disease. However, due to limitations and disadvantages of the current treatments, many studies have been carried out to approach the best design of mimicking natural disk. Recently, a new method of TDRs has been introduced using nature deformation of IVD by reinforced fibers of annulus fibrosis. Nonetheless, owing to limitations of experimental works on the human body, numerical studies of IVD may help to understand load transfer and biomechanical properties within the disks with reinforced fibers. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the L2-L3 disk vertebrae unit with 12 vertical fibers embedded into annulus fibrosis was constructed. The IVD was subjected to compressive force, bending moment, and axial torsion. The most important parameters of disk failures were compared to that of experimental data. The results showed that the addition of reinforced fibers into the disk invokes a significant decrease of stress in the nucleus and annulus. The findings of this study may have implications not only for developing IVDs with reinforced fibers but also for the application of fiber reinforced IVD in orthopedics surgeries as a suitable implant. PMID:24981720

  17. Effects of stellar flybys on planetary systems: 3D modeling of the circumstellar disk's damping effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picogna, G.; Marzari, F.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Stellar flybys in star clusters are suspected of affecting the orbital architecture of planetary systems causing eccentricity excitation and orbital misalignment between the planet orbit and the equatorial plane of the star. Aims: We explore whether the impulsive changes in the orbital elements of planets, caused by a hyperbolic stellar flyby, can be fully damped by the circumstellar disk surrounding the star. The time required to disperse stellar clusters is comparable to the circumstellar disk's lifetime. Since we perform 3D simulations, we can also test the inclination, excitation, and damping. Methods: We have modeled in 3D with the SPH code VINE, a system made of a solar-type star surrounded by a low density disk with a giant planet embedded in it approached on a hyperbolic encounter trajectory by a second star of similar mass and with its own disk. Different inclinations between the disks, planet orbit, and star trajectory have been considered to explore various encounter geometries. We focus on an extreme configuration where a very deep stellar flyby perturbs a Jovian planet on an external orbit. This allows us to test in full the ability of the disk to erase the effects of the stellar encounter. Results: We find that the amount of mass lost by the disk during the stellar flyby is less than in 2D models where a single disk was considered. This is mostly related to the mass exchange between the two disks at the encounter. The damping in eccentricity is slightly faster than in 2D models and it occurs on timescales on the order of a few kyr. During the flyby both the disks are warped owing to the mutual interaction and to the stellar gravitational perturbations, but they quickly relax to a new orbital plane. The planet is quickly dragged back within the disk by the tidal interaction with the gas. The only trace of the flyby left in the planet system, after about 104 yr, is a small misalignment, lower than 9°, between the star equatorial plane and the

  18. MODELING CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS OF B-TYPE STARS WITH OBSERVATIONS FROM THE PALOMAR TESTBED INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Grzenia, B. J.; Tycner, C.; Jones, C. E.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Rinehart, S. A.; Van Belle, G. T.

    2013-05-15

    Geometrical (uniform disk) and numerical models were calculated for a set of B-emission (Be) stars observed with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI). Physical extents have been estimated for the disks of a total of 15 stars via uniform disk models. Our numerical non-LTE models used parameters for the B0, B2, B5, and B8 spectral classes and following the framework laid by previous studies, we have compared them to infrared K-band interferometric observations taken at PTI. This is the first time such an extensive set of Be stars observed with long-baseline interferometry has been analyzed with self-consistent non-LTE numerical disk models.

  19. Modeling Circumstellar Disks of B-Type Stars with Observations from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzenia, B. J.; Tycner, C.; Jones, C. E.; Rinehart, S. A.; vanBelle, G. T.; Sigut, T. A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Geometrical (uniform disk) and numerical models were calculated for a set of B-emission (Be) stars observed with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI). Physical extents have been estimated for the disks of a total of15 stars via uniform disk models. Our numerical non-LTE models used parameters for the B0, B2, B5, and B8spectral classes and following the framework laid by previous studies, we have compared them to infrared K-band interferometric observations taken at PTI. This is the first time such an extensive set of Be stars observed with long-baseline interferometry has been analyzed with self-consistent non-LTE numerical disk models.

  20. Scour around a perforated disk modeling a marine hydrokinetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beninati, M. L.; Soliani, G.; Zhou, C. C.; Krane, M.; Fontaine, A.

    2013-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the behavior of scour hole dimensions and scour rates around a bottom-mounted cylindrical support structure of a perforated disk. The experiments focus on collecting temporal variations of scour depth around the support structure of the perforated disk for two scour regimes: transitional (ReD = 8500 and 9400) and live-bed (ReD = 10200). A perforated disk is used to approximate the drag of a submerged, horizontal axis, marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine. The goal is to compare the scour behavior around a perforated disk to that of a marine hydrokinetic (MHK) device. This study is motivated by the need to predict the environmental effect of MHK devices on an erodible bed. Testing is conducted in the small-scale hydraulic flume facility (1.2 m wide, 0.38 m deep, and 9.75 m long) at Bucknell University. The base of the support structure is marked incrementally to allow for time based observations of changes in scour depth. Bed form topologies are then acquired after a three hour time interval using a 2D sediment bed profiler. Experimental results show that scour rate is dependent on flow speed. Additionally, an increase in scour hole size occurs as the scour conditions are varied from transitional to live-bed.

  1. Some astrophysical implication of gas profiles in a new galaxy clusters model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedipalumbo, Ester; Cardone, V. F.; Tortora, C.

    2004-12-01

    The structure of the dark matter and the thermodynamical status of the hot gas in galaxy clusters is an interesting and widely discussed topic in modern astrophysics. Recently, Rasia et al. (2004) have proposed a new dynamical model of clusters of galaxies, which describes both the dark matter halo and the hot intracluster gas. We analyze the influence of the gas density and temperature profiles on the properties of the X-emission and the comptonization parameter that determines the CMBR temperature decrement due to the Sunyaev - Zel’dovich effect† .A complete traetment of this topic is found in Cardone V.F., Piedipalumbo E., Tortora C., 2005, A&A, 429, 49

  2. High Energy Astrophysics Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approximately 10-35 m. I will discuss here the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) from observations of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations ofthe spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) to the amount of LIV at a proton Lorentz factor of -2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future.

  3. An alternative model for the origin of gaps in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Regaly, Zsolt; Guedel, Manuel; Lin, Doug N. C.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Motivated by recent observational and numerical studies suggesting that collapsing protostellar cores may be replenished from the local environment, we explore the evolution of protostellar cores submerged in the external counter-rotating environment. These models predict the formation of counter-rotating disks with a deep gap in the gas surface density separating the inner disk (corotating with the star) and the outer counter-rotating disk. The properties of these gaps are compared to those of planet-bearing gaps that form in disks hosting giant planets. Methods: We employ numerical hydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cores that are replenished from the local counter-rotating environment and numerical hydrodynamics simulations of isolated disks hosting giant planets to derive the properties of the gaps that form in both cases. Results: Our numerical simulations demonstrate that counter-rotating disks can form for a wide range of mass and angular momentum available in the local environment. The gap that separates both disks has a substantial depletion factor, can be located at a distance from ten to over a hundred AU from the star, and can propagate inward with velocity ranging from 1 AU Myr-1 to >100 AU Myr-1. Unlike our previous conclusion, the gap can therefore be a long-lived phenomenon that is, in some case, comparable to the lifetime of the disk itself. For a proper choice of the planetary mass, the viscous α-parameter and disk mass, the planet-bearing gaps and gaps in counter-rotating disks may show a remarkable similarity in the gas density profile and depletion factor, which may complicate their observational differentiation.

  4. Models of Be Star Disks Constrained by Long-baseline Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycner, Christopher; Jones, C. E.; Sigut, T. A.; Thomson, L.; Molak, A.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate how theoretical models of the circumstellar disks surrounding Be stars are constrained by interferometric observations that spatially resolve the circumstellar regions. The disk models are constructed using a non-LTE radiative transfer code developed by Sigut & Jones, which incorporates a number of improvements over previous treatments of the thermal structure, including a realistic chemical composition. We show that the disk models of three Be stars, κ Dra, υ Cyg, and β Psc agree with the interferometric observations only for particular ranges of the disk parameters, which results in specific density structure and temperature distribution constraints. C.T. acknowledges that this work was performed in part under contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funded by NASA through the Michelson Fellowship Program. JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology. C. E. J. and T. A. A. S. acknowledge financial support from NSERC.

  5. Spectral Modeling in Astrophysics - The Physics of Non-equilibrium Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, Gary; Williams, Robin

    2016-02-01

    Collisional-radiative spectral modeling plays a central role in astrophysics, probing phenomena ranging from the chemical evolution of the Universe to the energy production near supermassive black holes in distant quasars. The observed emission lines form in non-equilibrium clouds that have very low densities by laboratory standards, and are powered by energy sources which themselves are not in equilibrium. The spectrum is the result of a large number of microphysical processes, thermal statistics often do not apply, and analytical theory cannot be used. Numerical simulations are used to understand the physical state and the resulting spectrum. The greatest distinction between astrophysical modeling and conventional plasma simulations lies in the range of phenomena that must be considered. A single astronomical object will often have gas with kinetic temperatures of T˜10^6 K, 10^4 K, and T≤ 10^3 K, with the physical state ranging from molecular to fully ionized, and emitting over all wavelengths between the radio and x-ray. Besides atomic, plasma, and chemical physics, condensed matter physics is important because of the presence of small solid `grains' which affect the gas through catalytic reactions and the infrared emission they produce. The ionization, level populations, chemistry, and grain properties must be determined self-consistently, along with the radiation transport, to predict the observed spectrum. Although the challenge is great, so are the rewards. Numerical spectral simulations allow us to read the message contained in the spectrum emitted by objects far from the Earth that existed long ago.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of accretion disks with stochastic viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2014-08-20

    We present a nonlinear numerical model for a geometrically thin accretion disk with the addition of stochastic nonlinear fluctuations in the viscous parameter. These numerical realizations attempt to study the stochastic effects on the disk angular momentum transport. We show that this simple model is capable of reproducing several observed phenomenologies of accretion-driven systems. The most notable of these is the observed linear rms-flux relationship in the disk luminosity. This feature is not formally captured by the linearized disk equations used in previous work. A Fourier analysis of the dissipation and mass accretion rates across disk radii show coherence for frequencies below the local viscous frequency. This is consistent with the coherence behavior observed in astrophysical sources such as Cygnus X-1.

  7. Important plasma problems in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    In astrophysics, plasmas occur under very extreme conditions. For example there are ultra strong magnetic fields in neutron stars) relativistic plasmas around black holes and in jets, extremely energetic particles such as cosmic rays in the interstellar medium, extremely dense plasmas in accretion disks, and extremely large magnetic Reynold`s numbers in the interstellar medium. These extreme limits for astrophysical plasmas make plasma phenomena much simpler to analyze in astrophysics than in the laboratory. An understanding of such phenomena often results in an interesting way, by simply taking the extreme limiting case of a known plasma theory. I will describe one of the more exciting examples. I will attempt to convey the excitement I felt when I was first exposed to it. However, not all plasma astrophysical phenomena are so simple. There are certain important plasma phenomena in astrophysics, which have not been so easily resolved. In fact a resolution of them is blocking significant progress in astrophysical research. They have not yet yielded to attacks by theoretical astrophysicists nor to extensive numerical simulation. I will attempt to describe one of the more important of these plasma-astrophysical problems, and discuss why its resolution is so important to astrophysics. This significant example is fast, magnetic reconnection. Another significant example is the large-magnetic-Reynold`s-number MHD dynamos.

  8. MODELING THE RESOLVED DISK AROUND THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Wilner, David J.; Loinard, Laurent; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution sub/millimeter interferometric imaging of the Class 0 protostar L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) at {lambda} = 870 {mu}m and 3.4 mm from the Submillimeter Array and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We detect the signature of an edge-on disk surrounding the protostar with an observed diameter of 180 AU in the sub/millimeter images. The mass of the disk is estimated to be 0.007 M{sub Sun }, assuming optically thin, isothermal dust emission. The millimeter spectral index is observed to be quite shallow at all the spatial scales probed: {alpha} {approx} 2, implying a dust opacity spectral index {beta} {approx} 0. We model the emission from the disk and surrounding envelope using Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, simultaneously fitting the sub/millimeter visibility amplitudes, sub/millimeter images, resolved L' image, spectral energy distribution, and mid-infrared spectrum. The best-fitting model has a disk radius of R = 125 AU, is highly flared (H{proportional_to}R {sup 1.3}), has a radial density profile {rho}{proportional_to}R {sup -2.5}, and has a mass of 0.0075 M{sub Sun }. The scale height at 100 AU is 48 AU, about a factor of two greater than vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The resolved millimeter observations indicate that disks may grow rapidly throughout the Class 0 phase. The mass and radius of the young disk around L1527 are comparable to disks around pre-main-sequence stars; however, the disk is considerably more vertically extended, possibly due to a combination of lower protostellar mass, infall onto the disk upper layers, and little settling of {approx}1 {mu}m-sized dust grains.

  9. 1/f Fluctuation and a Many-Body Disk Model of Slip Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takayuki

    1999-10-01

    A many-body disk system was investigated as a model of slip phenomena. A two-dimensional many-body disk system was used as a model of the boundary layer between slip surfaces. Frustrated states occurred in this system depending on the disk configuration. Experiments with this were carried out using a random packing configuration (packing fraction: 0.74 ˜0.76). Acrylic resin disks were packed between a co-axial outer rotating cylinder and an inner fixed cylinder. The outer cylinder was rotated by a motor and the torque at the fixed inner cylinder was measured in a time series. Stick-slip and 1/f fluctuation were observed in the time series.

  10. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  11. Observations and models of deuterated H3+ in proto-planetary disks.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Dominik, Carsten

    2006-11-15

    Young, gas-rich proto-planetary disks orbiting around solar-type young stars represent a crucial phase in disk evolution and planetary formation. Of particular relevance is to observationally track the evolution of the gas, which governs the overall evolution of the disk and is eventually dispersed. However, the bulk of the mass resides in the plane, which is so cold and dense that virtually all heavy-element-bearing molecules freeze out onto the dust grains and disappear from the gas phase. In this paper, we show that the ground-state ortho-H2D+ transition is the best, if not the only, tracer of the disk-plane gas. We report the theoretical models of the chemical structure of the plane of the disk, where the deuterated forms of H3+, including H2D+, play a major role. We also compare the theoretical predictions with the observations obtained towards the disk of the young star DM Tau and show that the ionization rate is probably enhanced there, perhaps owing to the penetration of X-rays from the central object through the disk plane. We conclude by remarking that the ground-state ortho-H2D+ transition is such a powerful diagnostic that it may also reveal the matter in the dark halos of external galaxies, if it is hidden in cold, dense and small clouds, as several theories predict.

  12. AdS black disk model for small-x DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2011-05-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple AdS black disk model to describe saturation in DIS. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value 1+ω/3+ω, independently of the target.

  13. Astrophysical Magnetic Fields and Topics in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, George B.

    1997-01-01

    The grant was used to support theoretical research on a variety of astro-physical topics falling broadly into those described by the proposal: galaxy formation, astrophysical magnetic fields, magnetized accretion disks in AGN, new physics, and other astrophysical problems. Work accomplished; references are to work authored by project personel.

  14. Modeling the HD 32297 Debris Disk With Far-Infrared Herschel Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, J.K.; Lebreton, J.; Roberge, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    HD 32297 is a young A-star (approx. 30 Myr) 112 pc away with a bright edge-on debris disk that has been resolved in scattered light. We observed the HD 32297 debris disk in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, populating the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 63 to 500 micron..We aimed to determine the composition of dust grains in the HD 32297 disk through SED modeling, using geometrical constraints from the resolved imaging to break the degeneracies inherent in SED modeling. We found the best fitting SED model has two components: an outer ring centered around 110 AU, seen in the scattered light images, and an inner disk near the habitable zone of the star. The outer disk appears to be composed of grains>2 micron consisting of silicates, carbonaceous material, and water ice with an abundance ratio of 1:2:3 respectively and 90% porosity. These grains appear consistent with cometary grains, implying the underlying planetesimal population is dominated by comet-like bodies. We also discuss the 3.7 sigma detection of [C ii] emission at 158 micron with the Herschel PACS instrument, making HD 32297 one of only a handful of debris disks with circumstellar gas detected

  15. HERSCHEL PACS OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF DEBRIS DISKS IN THE TUCANA-HOROLOGIUM ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, J. K.; Roberge, A.; Chen, C. H.; Augereau, J.-C.; Menard, F.; Eiroa, C.; Meeus, G.; Krivov, A. V.; Mathews, G. S.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Sandell, G.

    2012-07-10

    We present Herschel PACS photometry of 17 B- to M-type stars in the 30 Myr old Tucana-Horologium Association. This work is part of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme 'Gas in Protoplanetary Systems'. 6 of the 17 targets were found to have infrared excesses significantly greater than the expected stellar IR fluxes, including a previously unknown disk around HD30051. These six debris disks were fitted with single-temperature blackbody models to estimate the temperatures and abundances of the dust in the systems. For the five stars that show excess emission in the Herschel PACS photometry and also have Spitzer IRS spectra, we fit the data with models of optically thin debris disks with realistic grain properties in order to better estimate the disk parameters. The model is determined by a set of six parameters: surface density index, grain size distribution index, minimum and maximum grain sizes, and the inner and outer radii of the disk. The best-fitting parameters give us constraints on the geometry of the dust in these systems, as well as lower limits to the total dust masses. The HD105 disk was further constrained by fitting marginally resolved PACS 70 {mu}m imaging.

  16. MODELING THE HD 32297 DEBRIS DISK WITH FAR-INFRARED HERSCHEL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, J. K.; Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.

    2013-07-20

    HD 32297 is a young A-star ({approx}30 Myr) 112 pc away with a bright edge-on debris disk that has been resolved in scattered light. We observed the HD 32297 debris disk in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, populating the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 63 to 500 {mu}m. We aimed to determine the composition of dust grains in the HD 32297 disk through SED modeling, using geometrical constraints from the resolved imaging to break the degeneracies inherent in SED modeling. We found the best fitting SED model has two components: an outer ring centered around 110 AU, seen in the scattered light images, and an inner disk near the habitable zone of the star. The outer disk appears to be composed of grains >2 {mu}m consisting of silicates, carbonaceous material, and water ice with an abundance ratio of 1:2:3 respectively and 90% porosity. These grains appear consistent with cometary grains, implying the underlying planetesimal population is dominated by comet-like bodies. We also discuss the 3.7{sigma} detection of [C II] emission at 158 {mu}m with the Herschel PACS instrument, making HD 32297 one of only a handful of debris disks with circumstellar gas detected.

  17. Detailed Mid- and Far- Ultraviolet Model Spectra for Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Richard A.; Hubeny, Ivan

    1998-01-01

    We present a large grid of computed far- and mid-ultraviolet spectra (850-2000 A) of the integrated light from steady-state accretion disks in luminous cataclysmic variables. The spectra are tabulated at 0.25 A intervals with an adopted FWHM resolution of 1.0 A, so they are suitable for use with observed spectra from a variety of modern space-borne observatories. Twenty-six different combinations of white dwarf mass M(sub wd) and mass accretion rate dot-m are considered, and spectra are presented for six different disk inclinations i. The disk models are computed self-consistently in the plane-parallel approximation, assuming LTE and vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, by solving simultaneously the radiative transfer, hydrostatic equilibrium, and energy balance equations. Irradiation from external sources is neglected. Local spectra of disk annuli are computed taking into account line transitions from elements 1-28 (H through Ni). Limb darkening as well as Doppler broadening and blending of lines are taken into account in computing the integrated disk spectra. The radiative properties of the models are discussed, including the dependence of ultraviolet fluxes and colors on M(sub wd), dot-m, and i. The appearance of the disk spectra is illustrated, with regard to changes in the same three parameters. Finally, possible future improvements to the present models and spectra are discussed.

  18. A reduced-order meshless energy (ROME) model for the elastodynamics of mistuned bladed disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chih

    A careful Monte Carlo simulation of the statistical mechanics of a randomly mistuned bladed disk requires, in the ideal sense, a Reduced-Order Meshless Energy (ROME) model that captures the three-dimensional (3-D) elastodynamical physics of the bladed disk at a reasonable cost. Such a modeling technique has been unavailable until now. In this work, a significant order reduction of the elastodynamics of a bladed disk assembly has been achieved. The system studied was regarded as a 3-D annulus of shroudless, arbitrarily-shaped and randomly mistuned blades attached to a flexible disk for interblade mechanical coupling. Specifically, the annulus was modeled as a meshless continuum structure utilizing only nodal data to describe the arbitrary volume in which the system's dynamical energy was minimized. An extended Ritz variational procedure was used to minimize this energy, subjected to constraints imposed by an assumed 3-D displacement field of mathematically complete, orthonormal "blade-disk" polynomials newly constructed for the title problem. From this the governing equations of motion were yielded and recasted into their usual forms to calculate the free and forced responses of bladed disks. The ROME model, which required no conventional finite elements and element connectivity or component substructuring data, employed constituted a considerable advantage over conventionally used finite element methods and component mode synthesis techniques, and even emerging element-free Galerkin methods. The present work outlines the theoretical foundation of the ROME model, and through fundamental case studies, establishes the analytical basis and predictive accuracy of the approach. Hence, an idealized 20-bladed disk was created and modeled to analyze their free and forced responses and to compare the predictive capability and computational efficiency of the ROME technology to general-purpose finite element technology. The ROME model was also used to examine the effect of

  19. Three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations on an SIMD machine applied to accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vath, H.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a tool to solve the radiative transfer equation for a three-dimensional astrophysical object on the SIMD computer MasPar MP-1. With this tool we can rapidly calculate the image of such an object as seen from an arbitrary direction and at an arbitrary wavelength. Such images and spectra can then be used to directly compare observations with the model. This tool can be applied to many different areas in astrophysics, e.g., HI disks of galaxies and polarized radiative transfer of accretion columns onto white dwarfs. Here we use this tool to calculate the image and spectrum of a simple model of an accretion disk.

  20. THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF THE DISK+CAVITY IN THE PDS 70 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ruobing; Rafikov, Roman; Zhu Zhaohuan; Brandt, Timothy; Hashimoto, Jun; Whitney, Barbara; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Egner, S.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Muto, Takayuki; McClure, Melissa K.; Wisniewski, John; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Feldt, M.; Goto, M.; Carson, J.; Grady, C.; Hayashi, M.; and others

    2012-12-01

    Through detailed radiative transfer modeling, we present a disk+cavity model to simultaneously explain both the spectral energy distribution (SED) and Subaru H-band polarized light imaging for the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk PDS 70. In particular, we are able to match not only the radial dependence but also the absolute scale of the surface brightness of the scattered light. Our disk model has a cavity 65 AU in radius, which is heavily depleted of sub-micron-sized dust grains, and a small residual inner disk that produces a weak but still optically thick near-IR excess in the SED. To explain the contrast of the cavity's edge in the Subaru image, a factor of {approx}1000 depletion for the sub-micron-sized dust inside the cavity is required. The total dust mass of the disk may be on the order of 10{sup -4} M {sub Sun }, only weakly constrained due to the lack of long-wavelength observations and the uncertainties in the dust model. The scale height of the sub-micron-sized dust is {approx}6 AU at the cavity edge, and the cavity wall is optically thick in the vertical direction at H-band. PDS 70 is not a member of the class of (pre-)transitional disks identified by Dong et al., whose members only show evidence of the cavity in the millimeter-size dust but not the sub-micron-sized dust in resolved images. The two classes of (pre-)transitional disks may form through different mechanisms, or they may simply be at different evolution stages in the disk-clearing process.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  2. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  3. A model of an X-ray-illuminated accretion disk and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The X-ray-illuminated surface of the accretion disk in a low-mass X-ray Binary (LMXRB) and the X-ray-heated corona above the disk produce optical, UV, and soft X-ray emission lines. This paper presents 1D models of the emission line spectra and the vertical temperature and density structures at different radii. The models include a detailed treatment of the important atomic processes and an escape probability treatment of radiative transfer. Soker and Raymond (1993) use the density structure predicted by these models for a 2D Monte Carlo simulation of the photon scattering in the accretion disk corona (ADC) to examine the effects of the ADC on the angular distribution of X-rays and the flux of X-rays incident on the outer disk. This paper concentrates on the emission line fluxes for various elemental abundances and disk parameters. The UV lines of the classic LMXRBs are consistent with the model predictions. Some CNO processing is necessary to account for the nitrogen and helium abundances in Sco X-1 and other LMXRBs. Comparison of the models with observed spectra also points to a soft X-ray component with luminosity comparable to the hard X-rays. The models predict a substantial luminosity in the group of highly ionized iron lines near 100 A.

  4. Thermal instability accretion disk model for the X-ray transient A0620-00

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Min; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1989-01-01

    The limit-cycle thermal instability model for accretion disks is used to study the soft X-ray transient A0620-00. Thermal instability in geometrically thin, Keplerian alpha-model disks is reviewed. The observational constraints on A0620-00 are presented and the parameters chosen for the model are discussed. It is found that, with the adopted parameters, the model requires a central object mass of about 7 solar masses to fit the burst recurrence time. This is consistent with a black hole as the central object. The results suggest that a mass transfer instability may be responsible for outbursts.

  5. Model of Head-Positioning Error Due to Rotational Vibration of Hard Disk Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Saegusa, Shozo; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya

    An analytical model of head-positioning error due to rotational vibration of a hard disk drive is proposed. The model takes into account the rotational vibration of the base plate caused by the reaction force of the head-positioning actuator, the relationship between the rotational vibration and head-track offset, and the sensitivity function of track-following feedback control. Error calculated by the model agrees well with measured error. It is thus concluded that this model can predict the data transfer performance of a disk drive in read mode.

  6. Period Analysis, Photometry, and Astrophysical Modelling of the Contact Eclipsing Binary BC Gruis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. J. W.

    2016-06-01

    BC Gruis is a W UMa type contact binary system of the W-subtype with the primary minimum 0.1 magnitudes fainter than the secondary minimum. The period is currently 0.3073060 ± 0.0000001 days; it was 4 seconds longer prior to 2000. There were small modulations of 0.001 - 0.003 days in the Observed-Calculated diagram due to asymmetry in the light curves, most likely caused by star spots. An astrophysical model of the system was developed with the mass ratio of 1.16 determined from published spectral data. The best fit to light curves in B, V and I pass bands in 2014-9-30 was given by including 2 large cool star spots on the more massive, cooler component and 1 cool spot on the hotter star. In 2015-9-8, the asymmetry in the light curves was different and was modelled best with a hot spot on the more massive component at the neck joining the stars and 1 cool spot on the other component.

  7. SMACK: A New Algorithm for Modeling Collisions and Dynamics of Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvold, Erika Rose; Kuchner, Marc J.; Rein, Hanno; Pan, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    We present the Superparticle Model/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in 3-D, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. We show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 10(exp 7) yr, and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. We use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit. Differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring.

  8. Circumnuclear Keplerian Disks in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Francesco; Cappellari, Michele; Funes, S. J., José G.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Beltrán, Juan C. Vega

    1998-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the possibility of inferring the presence of Keplerian gaseous disks using properly equipped optical ground-based telescopes. We have modeled the peculiar bidimensional shape of the emission lines in a sample of five early-type disk galaxies as due to the motion of a gaseous disk rotating in the combined potential of a central pointlike mass and of an extended stellar disk. The value of the central mass concentration estimated for four galaxies of the sample (NGC 2179, NGC 4343, NGC 4435, and NGC 4459) is ~109 Msolar. This value, according to the assumptions made in our model, is overestimated. However, we have calculated that the effect is well within the errors. For the remaining galaxy, NGC 5064, an upper limit of 5×107 Msolar is estimated. Based on observations carried out at ESO, La Silla, (Chile) (ESO N. 58, A-0564) and at the Mount Graham International Observatory (AZ) with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  9. Quasi-static model of collimated jets and radio lobes. I. Accretion disk and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Fowler, T. Kenneth; Pino, Jesse

    2014-07-10

    This is the first of a series of papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetic helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures on very large scales and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. In this work, we solve a set of one-dimensional equations similar to the steady-state standard accretion disk model, but now including the large-scale magnetic fields giving rises to jets. We find that the frequently made assumption that large-scale fields are frozen into the disk is fundamentally incorrect, due to the necessity for current and the accreting mass to flow perpendicular to magnetic flux surfaces. A correct treatment greatly simplifies the calculations, yielding fields that leave the disk nearly vertically with magnetic profiles uniquely determined by disk angular momentum conservation. Representative solutions of the magnetic fields in different radial regions of the disk surface are given, and they determine the overall key features in the jet structure and its dissipation, which will be the subjects of later papers.

  10. Improved reflection models of black hole accretion disks: Treating the angular distribution of X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    García, J.; Steiner, J. F.; McClintock, J. E.; Brenneman, L. E-mail: jsteiner@head.cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: lbrenneman@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2014-02-20

    X-ray reflection models are used to constrain the properties of the accretion disk, such as the degree of ionization of the gas and the elemental abundances. In combination with general relativistic ray tracing codes, additional parameters like the spin of the black hole and the inclination to the system can be determined. However, current reflection models used for such studies only provide angle-averaged solutions for the flux reflected at the surface of the disk. Moreover, the emission angle of the photons changes over the disk due to relativistic light bending. To overcome this simplification, we have constructed an angle-dependent reflection model with the XILLVER code and self-consistently connected it with the relativistic blurring code RELLINE. The new model, relxill, calculates the proper emission angle of the radiation at each point on the accretion disk and then takes the corresponding reflection spectrum into account. We show that the reflected spectra from illuminated disks follow a limb-brightening law highly dependent on the ionization of disk and yet different from the commonly assumed form I∝ln (1 + 1/μ). A detailed comparison with the angle-averaged model is carried out in order to determine the bias in the parameters obtained by fitting a typical relativistic reflection spectrum. These simulations reveal that although the spin and inclination are mildly affected, the Fe abundance can be overestimated by up to a factor of two when derived from angle-averaged models. The fit of the new model to the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert galaxy Ark 120 clearly shows a significant improvement in the constraint of the physical parameters, in particular by enhancing the accuracy in the inclination angle and the spin determinations.

  11. High Energy Astrophysics Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2011-01-01

    High energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approximately 10(exp -35)m. I will discuss the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) that can be manifested by observing of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and y-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations of the spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) on the fraction of LIV at a Lorentz factor of approximately 2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space-based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future.

  12. High Energy Astrophysics Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2012-01-01

    High energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approx.10(exp -35) m. I will discuss the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) that can be manifested by observing of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations of the spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) on the fraction of LIV at a Lorentz factor of approx. 2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space-based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future. I will also discuss how the LIV formalism casts doubt on the OPERA superluminal neutrino claim.

  13. SMACK: A NEW ALGORITHM FOR MODELING COLLISIONS AND DYNAMICS OF PLANETESIMALS IN DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvold, Erika R.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Pan, Margaret; Rein, Hanno E-mail: Marc.Kuchner@nasa.gov E-mail: rein@ias.edu

    2013-11-10

    We present the Superparticle-Method/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in three dimensions, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. We show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 10{sup 7} yr and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. We use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit. Differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring.

  14. Dynamic Head-Disk Interface Modeling and Adaptive Control of a Hybrid Actuator for Optical Data Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhizheng; Li, Yang; Wang, Pei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    In the near-field recording (NFR) system, the gap between the lens and disk will drop down to 100 nm. However, the disk vibration and force disturbance make it difficult to maintain the desired flying height during disk operation, and the lens-disk collision can easily occur. It is proposed in this article to design a hybrid actuator system which combines both advantages of the flying slider used in hard disk drives and the voice coil actuator used in optical disk drives. The dynamic head-disk interface model of the hybrid actuator is first developed, then an adaptive regulation approach is proposed to control the flying height at its desired value despite the unknown disturbances. Simulation and experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed flying height control approach.

  15. Multi-scale/multi-physical modeling in head/disk interface of magnetic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Pil Seung; Smith, Robert; Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Jhon, Young In; Tak, Kyungjae; Moon, Il; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S.

    2012-04-01

    The model integration of the head-disk interface (HDI) in the hard disk drive system, which includes the hierarchy of highly interactive layers (magnetic layer, carbon overcoat (COC), lubricant, and air bearing system (ABS)), has recently been focused upon to resolve technical barriers and enhance reliability. Heat-assisted magnetic recording especially demands that the model simultaneously incorporates thermal and mechanical phenomena by considering the enormous combinatorial cases of materials and multi-scale/multi-physical phenomena. In this paper, we explore multi-scale/multi-physical simulation methods for HDI, which will holistically integrate magnetic layers, COC, lubricants, and ABS in non-isothermal conditions.

  16. Non-LTE Models and Theoretical Spectra of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. III. Integrated Spectra for Hydrogen-Helium Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, Ivan; Agol, Eric; Blaes, Omer; Krolik, Julian

    2010-11-01

    We have constructed a grid of non-LTE disk models for a wide range of black hole mass and mass accretion rate, for several values of viscosity parameter alpha, and for two extreme values of the black hole spin: the maximum-rotation Kerr black hole, and the Schwarzschild (non-rotating) black hole. Our procedure calculates self-consistently the vertical structure of all disk annuli together with the radiation field, without any approximations imposed on the optical thickness of the disk, and without any ad hoc approximations to the behavior of the radiation intensity. The total spectrum of a disk is computed by summing the spectra of the individual annuli, taking into account the general relativistic transfer function. The grid covers nine values of the black hole mass between M = 1/8 and 32 billion solar masses with a two-fold increase of mass for each subsequent value; and eleven values of the mass accretion rate, each a power of 2 times 1 solar mass/year. The highest value of the accretion rate corresponds to 0.3 Eddington. We show the vertical structure of individual annuli within the set of accretion disk models, along with their local emergent flux, and discuss the internal physical self-consistency of the models. We then present the full disk-integrated spectra, and discuss a number of observationally interesting properties of the models, such as optical/ultraviolet colors, the behavior of the hydrogen Lyman limit region, polarization, and number of ionizing photons. Our calculations are far from definitive in terms of the input physics, but generally we find that our models exhibit rather red optical/UV colors. Flux discontinuities in the region of the hydrogen Lyman limit are only present in cool, low luminosity models, while hotter models exhibit blueshifted changes in spectral slope.

  17. Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, Ignazio

    2003-04-01

    In this report I will try to illustrate some of the main research themes and "hot topics" in nuclear astrophysics. The particular aim of the present report is to briefly illustrate the research activities, in the field of nuclear astrophysics, performed by the Italian nuclear physicist community within the "Programma di Interesse Nazionale su Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi" (National Research Program on Theoretical Physics of Nuclei and Many Body Systems) supported by the "Ministero dell'Istruzione dell'Università e della Ricerca".

  18. Active Microwave Remote Sensing of a Natural, Tallgrass Prairie and a Projected Disk Component Model to Explain the Behavior of a Modified Dielectric Disk Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert David, Jr.

    C-band scatterometer measurements were made of a tallgrass prairie in an attempt to determine the degree of correlation between (1) the backscattering coefficient (sigma_sp{rm tr}{ circ}) and different expressions of soil moisture and (2) the backscattering coefficient and various canopy parameters. The findings of this study support those made in previous studies in terms of the optimum polarization and view angle selection for soil moisture work (i.e., near-nadir view angles and HH and VV polarizations). In contrast to previous studies, view angles of 30 ^circ and 45^circ also produced strong correlations with soil moisture. A moderately strong correlation and partial correlation was found between sigma_sp{rm tr}{circ} and leaf water potential, indicating some capability of C-band measurements to detect extremes in the water status of prairie vegetation under shallow soil conditions. Also, site differences due to burn treatments appeared to cause significant differences in the sensitivity of sigma_sp{ rm tr}{circ} to soil moisture. In a second study, the disk model developed by Drs. Eom and Fung was tested against a set of field measurements of sigma_sp{rm tr} {circ} from a crop of sunflowers. The model overestimated sigma_sp{ rm tr}{circ} at early growth stages, but decreased the overestimate as the crop matured. The author modified the model to accommodate canopies with non-uniform, continuous leaf angle distributions. The modification altered the shape of the response curve for predicted sigma_sp{rm tr }{circ} versus view angle, but failed to reduce the overestimate in the early growth states. Additional modifications (e.g., incorporating row structure information) may be necessary. A new model, called the Projected Disk Component Model (PDCM), was developed to help explain the behavior of the modified disk model (MDM). By reducing several types of theoretical disk canopies to a simple, quantitative measure of their constituent horizontal and vertical

  19. Magnetocentrifugally driven flows from young stars and disks. 1: A generalized model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank; Najita, Joan; Ostriker, Eve; Wilkin, Frank; Ruden, Steven; Lizano, Susana

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalized model for stellar spin-down, disk accretion, and truncation, and the origin of winds, jets, and bipolar outflows from young stellar objects. We consider the steady state dynamics of accretion of matter from a viscous and imperfectly conducting disk onto a young star with a strong magnetic field. For an aligned stellar magnetosphere, shielding currents in the surface layers of the disk prevent stellar field lines from penetrating the disk everywhere except for a range of radii about pi = R(sub x), where the Keplerian angular speed of rotation Omega(sub x) equals the angular speed of the star Omega(sub *). For the low disk accretion rates and high magnetic fields associated with typical T Tauri stars, R(sub x) exceeds the radius of the star R(sub *) by a factor of a few, and the inner disk is effectively truncated at a radius R(sub t) somewhat smaller than R(sub x). Where the closed field lines between R(sub t) and R(sub x) bow sufficiently inward, the accreting gas attaches itself to the field and is funneled dynamically down the effective potential (gravitational plus centrifugal) onto the star. Contrary to common belief, the accompanying magnetic torques associated with this accreting gas may transfer angular momentum mostly to the disk rather than to the star. Thus, the star can spin slowly as long as R(sub x) remains significantly greater than R(sub *). Exterior to R(sub x) field lines threading the disk bow outward, which makes the gas off the mid-plane rotate at super-Keplerian velocities. This combination drives a magnetocentrifugal wind with a mass-loss rate M(sub w) equal to a definite fraction f of the disk accretion rate M(sub D). For high disk accretion rates, R(sub x) is forced down to the stellar surface, the star is spun to breakup, and the wind is generated in a manner identical to that proposed by Shu, Lizano, Ruden, & Najita in a previous communication to this journal. In two companion papers (II and III), we develop a

  20. Detailed models of a sample of debris disks: from Herschel, KIN and Spitzer to the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.; Beichman, C.; Augereau, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Dusty debris disks surrounding main sequence stars are extrasolar equivalents to the Solar System populations of asteroids, icy bodies and dust grains. Many were observed in thermal emission by Herschel with unprecedented wavelength coverage and spatial resolution, complementing available scattered light images, mid-infrared spectra and interferometric measurements. We present detailed models of the HD 181327 and HD 32297 disks obtained with the GRaTer radiative transfer code and made possible thanks to Herschel. We then focus on the intriguing case of the nearby F2V star η Corvi that shows strong infrared excess despite an estimated age of 1.4 Gyr. We establish a detailed model of its disk from the sub-AU scale to its outermost regions based on observations from the Keck Interferometer Nuller, Herschel and Spitzer. These bright and extended disks will be of prime interest for future observations with the JWST. We finally discuss new debris disks science that will be addressed with the NIRCam and MIRI instruments.

  1. A semi-analytical model for exploring Galilean satellites formation from a massive disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, Yamila; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    A better knowledge of jovian satellites' origins will bring light on the environment that surrounded Jupiter during its formation and can help us to understand the characteristics of this unique satellite system. We developed a semi-analytical model to investigate Jupiter's regular satellite formation and present the results of our population synthesis calculations. We performed simulations adopting a massive, static, low-viscosity circumplanetary disk model, in agreement with a current study of magnetorotational instability in a circum-planetary disk. We find that the high gas density leads to very rapid migration of satellitesimals due to gas drag and type II migration of satellites in a faster disk-dominated mode. A large concentration of solids, large building blocks and longer type II migration time-scales favor formation and survival of large satellites. However, bodies as massive as Ganymede and those located far away from Jupiter, such as Callisto, are difficult to form with this scenario.

  2. Chemical evolution models for spiral disks: the Milky Way, M 31, and M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcon-Uchida, M. M.; Matteucci, F.; Costa, R. D. D.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The distribution of chemical abundances and their variation with time are important tools for understanding the chemical evolution of galaxies. In particular, the study of chemical evolution models can improve our understanding of the basic assumptions made when modelling our Galaxy and other spirals. Aims: We test a standard chemical evolution model for spiral disks in the Local Universe and study the influence of a threshold gas density and different efficiencies in the star formation rate (SFR) law on radial gradients of abundance, gas, and SFR. The model is then applied to specific galaxies. Methods: We adopt a one-infall chemical evolution model where the Galactic disk forms inside-out by means of infall of gas, and we test different thresholds and efficiencies in the SFR. The model is scaled to the disk properties of three Local Group galaxies (the Milky Way, M 31 and M 33) by varying its dependence on the star formation efficiency and the timescale for the infall of gas onto the disk. Results: Using this simple model, we are able to reproduce most of the observed constraints available in the literature for the studied galaxies. The radial oxygen abundance gradients and their time evolution are studied in detail. The present day abundance gradients are more sensitive to the threshold than to other parameters, while their temporal evolutions are more dependent on the chosen SFR efficiency. A variable efficiency along the galaxy radius can reproduce the present day gas distribution in the disk of spirals with prominent arms. The steepness in the distribution of stellar surface density differs from massive to lower mass disks, owing to the different star formation histories. Conclusions: The most massive disks seem to have evolved faster (i.e., with more efficient star formation) than the less massive ones, thus suggesting a downsizing in star formation for spirals. The threshold and the efficiency of star formation play a very important role in the

  3. Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  4. Model Selection and Parameter Estimation in Neutrino Cosmology and High Energy Astrophysics Around the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canac, Nicolas

    Understanding the particle nature of dark matter and determining the properties of neutrinos remain two of the most important questions within the physics community. Both problems lie within the intersection between astrophysics and particle physics, a fact which gives rise to a rich set of independent and complementary approaches to making progress on both fronts. This thesis presents three works that attempt to construct models and constrain the properties of these particles using empirical data from a large host of astronomical observations. The first work uses observations from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT) to construct empirical models of the diffuse gamma-ray background in the Galactic Center (GC). A new template associated with cosmic rays interacting with molecular gas is detected with high significance. Using this new template along with other known sources of gamma-ray emission in the GC, I find that the previously detected extended gamma-ray excess is still detected for all permutations of the background model, although its properties vary significantly within the observed range of models. The second work presents a detection of a new source of gamma-ray emission in the GC that traces the morphology of infrared starlight, again using observations from the Fermi LAT. I argue that this emission is likely due to the same source of cosmic rays responsible for producing the emission associated with the molecular gas template in the previous work, and further make the case that this population of cosmic rays could be produced by the same source responsible for the GC excess. The last work explores how derived neutrino parameter constraints depend on the assumed form of the primordial power spectrum, using constraints derived from a host of cosmological data sets, including cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillation, power spectrum, cluster counts, and hubble constant measurements. I find that for a model

  5. Model-independent determination of the astrophysical S factor in laser-induced fusion plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Lattuada, D.; Barbarino, M.; Bonasera, A.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Warren, M.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; et al

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we present a new and general method for measuring the astrophysical S factor of nuclear reactions in laser-induced plasmas and we apply it to 2H(d,n)3He. The experiment was performed with the Texas Petawatt Laser, which delivered 150–270 fs pulses of energy ranging from 90 to 180 J to D2 or CD4 molecular clusters (where D denotes 2H). After removing the background noise, we used the measured time-of-flight data of energetic deuterium ions to obtain their energy distribution. We derive the S factor using the measured energy distribution of the ions, the measured volume of the fusion plasma,more » and the measured fusion yields. This method is model independent in the sense that no assumption on the state of the system is required, but it requires an accurate measurement of the ion energy distribution, especially at high energies, and of the relevant fusion yields. In the 2H(d,n)3He and 3He(d,p)4He cases discussed here, it is very important to apply the background subtraction for the energetic ions and to measure the fusion yields with high precision. While the available data on both ion distribution and fusion yields allow us to determine with good precision the S factor in the d+d case (lower Gamow energies), for the d+3He case the data are not precise enough to obtain the S factor using this method. Our results agree with other experiments within the experimental error, even though smaller values of the S factor were obtained. This might be due to the plasma environment differing from the beam target conditions in a conventional accelerator experiment.« less

  6. Model-independent determination of the astrophysical S factor in laser-induced fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuada, D.; Barbarino, M.; Bonasera, A.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Warren, M.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new and general method for measuring the astrophysical S factor of nuclear reactions in laser-induced plasmas and we apply it to :mmultiscripts>(d ,n )3He . The experiment was performed with the Texas Petawatt Laser, which delivered 150-270 fs pulses of energy ranging from 90 to 180 J to D2 or CD4 molecular clusters (where D denotes 2H ) . After removing the background noise, we used the measured time-of-flight data of energetic deuterium ions to obtain their energy distribution. We derive the S factor using the measured energy distribution of the ions, the measured volume of the fusion plasma, and the measured fusion yields. This method is model independent in the sense that no assumption on the state of the system is required, but it requires an accurate measurement of the ion energy distribution, especially at high energies, and of the relevant fusion yields. In the :mmultiscripts>(d ,n )3He and 3He(d ,p )4He cases discussed here, it is very important to apply the background subtraction for the energetic ions and to measure the fusion yields with high precision. While the available data on both ion distribution and fusion yields allow us to determine with good precision the S factor in the d +d case (lower Gamow energies), for the d +3He case the data are not precise enough to obtain the S factor using this method. Our results agree with other experiments within the experimental error, even though smaller values of the S factor were obtained. This might be due to the plasma environment differing from the beam target conditions in a conventional accelerator experiment.

  7. Astrophysical S-factor for 6Li(ρ, γ)7Be in the coupled-channel Gamow shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, G. X.; Fossez, K.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have applied the Gamow shell model (GSM) in the coupled-channel representation to study the astrophysical S-factor for the proton radiative capture reaction of 6Li. Reaction channels are built by coupling the proton wave function expanded in different partial waves with the GSM wave functions of the ground state (1+) and the excited states (31+, 01+ and 21+) of 6Li. All relevant E1, M1, and E2 transitions from the initial continuum states in 7Be to the final bound states (3/21- and 1/21-) are included. It is found that the calculated total astrophysical S factor for this reaction agrees well with the experimental data.

  8. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-08-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value (1+ω)/(3+ω), independently of the target. For γ*-γ* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter ω.

  9. Spectropolarimetric test of the relativistic disk model for the broad emission lines of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Kaiyou; Halpern, Jules P.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, it was claimed that the broad emission lines of the radio galaxy Arp 102B can be fitted by the line profile from a simple relativistic Keplerian thin disk. It was argued that the lines originating from the relativistic accretion disk could be polarized due to electron scattering, which is likely to be the dominant opacity in the line-emitting region of Arp 102B. In the present work, the expected polarization properties of these broad emission lines are calculated. The percentage of polarization depends strongly on the inclination angle. For some angles, the red peak of the polarized, double-peaked line profile can be higher than the blue peak. This is in contrast to the total line profile, in which the blue peak is always higher than the red one. Spectropolarimetric observations could, therefore, provide an independent test of the relativistic disk model for the broad emission lines of Arp 102B and other active galactic nuclei.

  10. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro

  11. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Separating disk chemical substructures with cluster models. Evidence of a separate evolution in the metal-poor thin disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Schultheis, M.; Guiglion, G.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Kordopatis, G.; Hill, V.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Koposov, S. E.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.; Chiappini, C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Recent spectroscopic surveys have begun to explore the Galactic disk system on the basis of large data samples, with spatial distributions sampling regions well outside the solar neighborhood. In this way, they provide valuable information for testing spatial and temporal variations of disk structure kinematics and chemical evolution. Aims: The main purposes of this study are to demonstrate the usefulness of a rigorous mathematical approach to separate substructures of a stellar sample in the abundance-metallicity plane, and provide new evidence with which to characterize the nature of the metal-poor end of the thin disk sequence. Methods: We used a Gaussian mixture model algorithm to separate in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane a clean disk star subsample (essentially at RGC< 10 kpc) from the Gaia-ESO survey (GES) internal data release 2 (iDR2). We aim at decomposing it into data groups highlighting number density and/or slope variations in the abundance-metallicity plane. An independent sample of disk red clump stars from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) was used to cross-check the identified features. Results: We find that the sample is separated into five groups associated with major Galactic components; the metal-rich end of the halo, the thick disk, and three subgroups for the thin disk sequence. This is confirmed with the sample of red clump stars from APOGEE. The three thin disk groups served to explore this sequence in more detail. The two metal-intermediate and metal-rich groups of the thin disk decomposition ([Fe/H] > -0.25 dex) highlight a change in the slope at solar metallicity. This holds true at different radial regions of the Milky Way. The distribution of Galactocentric radial distances of the metal-poor part of the thin disk ([Fe/H] < -0.25 dex) is shifted to larger distances than those of the more metal-rich parts. Moreover, the metal-poor part of the thin disk presents indications of a scale height

  12. Modeling MHD accretion-ejection: episodic ejections of jets triggered by a mean-field disk dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanovs, Deniss; Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2014-11-20

    We present MHD simulations exploring the launching, acceleration, and collimation of jets and disk winds. The evolution of the disk structure is consistently taken into account. Extending our earlier studies, we now consider the self-generation of the magnetic field by an α{sup 2}Ω mean-field dynamo. The disk magnetization remains on a rather low level, which helps to evolve the simulations for T > 10, 000 dynamical time steps on a domain extending 1500 inner disk radii. We find the magnetic field of the inner disk to be similar to the commonly found open field structure, favoring magneto-centrifugal launching. The outer disk field is highly inclined and predominantly radial. Here, differential rotation induces a strong toroidal component, which plays a key role in outflow launching. These outflows from the outer disk are slower, denser, and less collimated. If the dynamo action is not quenched, magnetic flux is continuously generated, diffuses outward through the disk, and fills the entire disk. We have invented a toy model triggering a time-dependent mean-field dynamo. The duty cycles of this dynamo lead to episodic ejections on similar timescales. When the dynamo is suppressed as the magnetization falls below a critical value, the generation of the outflows and also accretion is inhibited. The general result is that we can steer episodic ejection and large-scale jet knots by a disk-intrinsic dynamo that is time-dependent and regenerates the jet-launching magnetic field.

  13. Slotted-wall research with disk and parachute models in a low-speed wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Macha, J.M.; Buffington, R.J.; Henfling, J.L. ); Every, D. Van; Harris, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation of slotted-wall blockage interference has been conducted using disk and parachute models in a low speed wind tunnel. Test section open area ratio, model geometric blockage ratio, and model location along the length of the test section were systematically varied. Resulting drag coefficients were compared to each other and to interference-free measurements obtained in a much larger wind tunnel where the geometric blockage ratio was less than 0.0025. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Min Kim, Hyung; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S.

    2014-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  15. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S.; Min Kim, Hyung

    2014-05-07

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  16. Ceramic Inclusions in Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially in turbine disk applications. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that are inherent to the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have a potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they typically do not reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where known populations of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the "natural" inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface-connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life; therefore, the quantity of ceramic "seeds" added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will intersect the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface area was needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macroscopic slices from extrusions

  17. Multitechnique testing of the viscous decretion disk model. I. The stable and tenuous disk of the late-type Be star β CMi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, R.; Carciofi, A. C.; Rivinius, Th.; Panoglou, D.; Vieira, R. G.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Štefl, S.; Tycner, C.; Faes, D. M.; Korčáková, D.; Müller, A.; Zavala, R. T.; Curé, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The viscous decretion disk (VDD) model is able to explain most of the currently observable properties of the circumstellar disks of Be stars. However, more stringent tests, focusing on reproducing multitechnique observations of individual targets via physical modeling, are needed to study the predictions of the VDD model under specific circumstances. In the case of nearby, bright Be star β CMi, these circumstances are a very stable low-density disk and a late-type (B8Ve) central star. Aims: The aim is to test the VDD model thoroughly, exploiting the full diagnostic potential of individual types of observations, in particular, to constrain the poorly known structure of the outer disk if possible, and to test truncation effects caused by a possible binary companion using radio observations. Methods: We use the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code HDUST to produce model observables, which we compare with a very large set of multitechnique and multiwavelength observations that include ultraviolet and optical spectra, photometry covering the interval between optical and radio wavelengths, optical polarimetry, and optical and near-IR (spectro)interferometry. Results: A parametric VDD model with radial density exponent of n = 3.5, which is the canonical value for isothermal flaring disks, is found to explain observables typically formed in the inner disk, while observables originating in the more extended parts favor a shallower, n = 3.0, density falloff. Theoretical consequences of this finding are discussed and the outcomes are compared with the predictions of a fully self-consistent VDD model. Modeling of radio observations allowed for the first determination of the physical extent of a Be disk (35+10-5 stellar radii), which might be caused by a binary companion. Finally, polarization data allowed for an indirect measurement of the rotation rate of the star, which was found to be W ≳ 0.98, i.e., very close to critical. Based partly on observations from Ond

  18. Modelling of liquid flow after a hydraulic jump on a rotating disk prior to centrifugal atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Dowson, A. L.; Jacobs, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a simplified numerical model which is used to calculate the height distribution, and the radial and tangential velocities of a liquid on a rotating disk after a hydraulic jump and prior to centrifugal atomization. The results obtained from this numerical model are compared with predictions made using previously derived `hydraulic jump' and `analytical' models. Calculations, in conjunction with experimental measurements relating to the trajectory of liquid flow on the atomizing disk, have shown that the numerical model can not only give a reasonable prediction of the hydraulic jump location, but also yields more accurate information regarding the variations in liquid height, and radial and tangential velocities. The model is ideally suited for engineering applications.

  19. Non-LTE spectral models for the gaseous debris-disk component of Ton 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Nagel, T.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2014-11-01

    Context. For a fraction of single white dwarfs with debris disks, an additional gaseous disk was discovered. Both dust and gas are thought to be created by the disruption of planetary bodies. Aims: The composition of the extrasolar planetary material can directly be analyzed in the gaseous disk component, and the disk dynamics might be accessible by investigating the temporal behavior of the Ca ii infrared emission triplet, hallmark of the gas disk. Methods: We obtained new optical spectra for the first helium-dominated white dwarf for which a gas disk was discovered (Ton 345) and modeled the non-LTE spectra of viscous gas disks composed of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, and calcium with chemical abundances typical for solar system asteroids. Iron and its possible line-blanketing effects on the model structure and spectral energy distribution was still neglected. A set of models with different radii, effective temperatures, and surface densities as well as chondritic and bulk-Earth abundances was computed and compared with the observed line profiles of the Ca ii infrared triplet. Results: Our models suggest that the Ca ii emission stems from a rather narrow gas ring with a radial extent of R = 0.44-0.94 R⊙, a uniform surface density Σ = 0.3 g cm-2, and an effective temperature of Teff ≈ 6000 K. The often assumed chemical mixtures derived from photospheric abundances in polluted white dwarfs - similar to a chondritic or bulk-Earth composition - produce unobserved emission lines in the model and therefore have to be altered. We do not detect any line-profile variability on timescales of hours, but we confirm the long-term trend over the past decade for the red-blue asymmetry of the double-peaked lines. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  20. A Statistical Study of Accretion Disk Model Spectra for Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puebla, Raúl E.; Diaz, Marcos P.; Hubeny, Ivan

    2007-11-01

    We have performed a statistical test of the currently used accretion disk models for cataclysmic variables (CVs) using a set of 33 CVs with steady disks (10 old novae and 23 nova-like systems). The mass transfer rate () for each system was also calculated. Ultraviolet (UV) data were fitted by model spectra using a multiparametric optimization method, aiming to constrain the values. It was verified that these accretion disk models fail to fit both color and flux simultaneously, as previously noted when composite stellar atmosphere models were fitted to the UV spectra of CVs by Wade. By applying such models to a sample of novae and nova-like CVs, we confirm that the limb-darkening effect must be taken into account when estimating mass transfer rates, especially for high-inclination systems. Important fitting degeneracies of the basic disk parameters are analyzed. Our simulations suggest that to reproduce the observations a revision of the temperature profile, at least in the innermost parts of the disk, seems to be required, and possibly the vertical distribution of the viscosity should be revised. In addition, an optically thin layer or an extended disk component should be considered. This component may be physically represented by a disk wind and/or a chromosphere. A physical description of the emission-line profiles may help to break the degeneracies that appear when only the continuum is analyzed. The average value of found for nova-like systems is ~9.3 × 10-9 Modot yr-1, while ~1.3 × 10-8 Modot yr-1 is found for old classical novae. No clear evidence is found for either the presence or absence of a correlation between and the orbital period. Such correlation analysis was performed for high accretion rate systems (15 nova-like systems and 10 old novae), but we were not able to find a well-defined correlation as found by Patterson. By measuring the equivalent width of the emission lines (C IV λ1550 and He II λ1640) we found a lack of systems with low and

  1. Astrophysical symmetries

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Virginia

    1996-01-01

    Astrophysical objects, ranging from meteorites to the entire universe, can be classified into about a dozen characteristic morphologies, at least as seen by a blurry eye. Some patterns exist over an enormously wide range of distance scales, apparently as a result of similar underlying physics. Bipolar ejection from protostars, binary systems, and active galaxies is perhaps the clearest example. The oral presentation included about 130 astronomical images which cannot be reproduced here. PMID:11607715

  2. Nonlinear model for an optical read-only-memory disk readout channel based on an edge-spread function.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Seiji

    2002-05-10

    A point-spread function (PSF) is commonly used as a model of an optical disk readout channel. However, the model given by the PSF does not contain the quadratic distortion generated by the photo-detection process. We introduce a model for calculating an approximation of the quadratic component of a signal. We show that this model can be further simplified when a read-only-memory (ROM) disk is assumed. We introduce an edge-spread function by which a simple nonlinear model of an optical ROM disk readout channel is created. PMID:12022667

  3. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  4. Contact graphs of disk packings as a model of spatial planar networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Guan, Jihong; Ding, Bailu; Chen, Lichao; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2009-08-01

    Spatially constrained planar networks are frequently encountered in real-life systems. In this paper, based on a space-filling disk packing we propose a minimal model for spatial maximal planar networks, which is similar to but different from the model for Apollonian networks (Andrade et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 018702). We present an exhaustive analysis of various properties of our model, and obtain the analytic solutions for most of the features, including degree distribution, clustering coefficient, average path length and degree correlations. The model recovers some striking generic characteristics observed in most real networks. To address the robustness of the relevant network properties, we compare the structural features between the investigated network and the Apollonian networks. We show that topological properties of the two networks are encoded in the way of disk packing. We argue that spatial constraints of nodes are relevant to the structure of the networks.

  5. Anisotropic Multishell Analytical Modeling of an Intervertebral Disk Subjected to Axial Compression.

    PubMed

    Demers, Sébastien; Nadeau, Sylvie; Bouzid, Abdel-Hakim

    2016-04-01

    Studies on intervertebral disk (IVD) response to various loads and postures are essential to understand disk's mechanical functions and to suggest preventive and corrective actions in the workplace. The experimental and finite-element (FE) approaches are well-suited for these studies, but validating their findings is difficult, partly due to the lack of alternative methods. Analytical modeling could allow methodological triangulation and help validation of FE models. This paper presents an analytical method based on thin-shell, beam-on-elastic-foundation and composite materials theories to evaluate the stresses in the anulus fibrosus (AF) of an axisymmetric disk composed of multiple thin lamellae. Large deformations of the soft tissues are accounted for using an iterative method and the anisotropic material properties are derived from a published biaxial experiment. The results are compared to those obtained by FE modeling. The results demonstrate the capability of the analytical model to evaluate the stresses at any location of the simplified AF. It also demonstrates that anisotropy reduces stresses in the lamellae. This novel model is a preliminary step in developing valuable analytical models of IVDs, and represents a distinctive groundwork that is able to sustain future refinements. This paper suggests important features that may be included to improve model realism. PMID:26833355

  6. FROM DUST TO PLANETESIMALS: AN IMPROVED MODEL FOR COLLISIONAL GROWTH IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Garaud, Pascale; Meru, Farzana; Galvagni, Marina; Olczak, Christoph

    2013-02-20

    Planet formation occurs within the gas- and dust-rich environments of protoplanetary disks. Observations of these objects show that the growth of primordial submicron-sized particles into larger aggregates occurs at the earliest evolutionary stages of the disks. However, theoretical models of particle growth that use the Smoluchowski equation to describe collisional coagulation and fragmentation have so far failed to produce large particles while maintaining a significant population of small grains. This has generally been attributed to the existence of two barriers impeding growth due to bouncing and fragmentation of colliding particles. In this paper, we demonstrate that the importance of these barriers has been artificially inflated through the use of simplified models that do not take into account the stochastic nature of the particle motions within the gas disk. We present a new approach in which the relative velocities between two particles are described by a probability distribution function that models both deterministic motion (from the vertical settling, radial drift, and azimuthal drift) and stochastic motion (from Brownian motion and turbulence). Taking both into account can give quite different results to what has been considered recently in other studies. We demonstrate the vital effect of two 'ingredients' for particle growth: the proper implementation of a velocity distribution function that overcomes the bouncing barrier and, in combination with mass transfer in high-mass-ratio collisions, boosts the growth of larger particles beyond the fragmentation barrier. A robust result of our simulations is the emergence of two particle populations (small and large), potentially explaining simultaneously a number of longstanding problems in protoplanetary disks, including planetesimal formation close to the central star, the presence of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles far out in the disk, and the persistence of {mu}m-sized grains for millions of

  7. Photodissociation Region Models of Photoevaporating Circumstellar Disks and Application to the Proplyds in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Störzer, H.; Hollenbach, D.

    1999-04-01

    We have modeled the neutral flows emerging from circumstellar disks or small clumps of size r0 illuminated by an external source of ultraviolet radiation. The models are applied to the disks (proplyds) in the Orion Nebula, most of which are illuminated by θ1C Ori. Our models improve upon the simpler models of Johnstone, Hollenbach, & Ballyby including the results of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium photodissociation region (PDR) codes, and by treating the flow speed off the disk surface in a more consistent manner. We present a study that delineates the parameter space (G0, r0, and σext) in which far-ultraviolet (FUV)-dominated, as opposed to extreme-ultraviolet (EUV)-dominated, flows exist. G0 is the FUV (6 eV~2r0, have a shock between the disk surface and IF, and the mass-loss rates are determined by FUV photons. For σext=8×10-22 cm2 and a UV source similar to θ1 C Ori, the FUV-dominated region extends from G0~5×104 to G0~2×107 (or distances from θ1 C Ori of 0.3-0.01 pc), for disk or clump size of r0~1014-1015 cm. Outside this parameter space, hydrogen-ionizing EUV photons dominate the photoevaporation, and the IF is close to the disk surface (rIF<~2r0). We show that FUV-dominated flows can explain the observed sizes of the ionization fronts around many of the photoevaporating disks in Orion. The size of the neutral flow region, rIF, depends mainly on r0, G0, and σext inside the flow region. Using ten objects in Orion for which both r0 and rIF are directly observed, and for which G0 can be estimated from the observed projected distance of the proplyd from θ1C Ori, we find that σext~8×10-22 cm2 best fits the observations. In these models, the disk mass-loss rates are roughly 10

  8. Detectability of Planetary Characteristics in Disk-Averaged Spectra. I: The Earth Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Fishbein, Evan; Turnbull, Margaret; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Over the next 2 decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to detect and characterize extrasolar planets. This first generation of observatories will not be able to spatially resolve the terrestrial planets detected. Instead, these planets will be characterized by disk-averaged spectroscopy. To assess the detectability of planetary characteristics in disk-averaged spectra, we have developed a spatially and spectrally resolved model of the Earth. This model uses atmospheric and surface properties from existing observations and modeling studies as input, and generates spatially resolved high-resolution synthetic spectra using the Spectral Mapping Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model. Synthetic spectra were generated for a variety of conditions, including cloud coverage, illumination fraction, and viewing angle geometry, over a wavelength range extending from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared. Here we describe the model and validate it against disk-averaged visible to infrared observations of the Earth taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer, the ESA Mars Express Omega instrument, and ground-based observations of earthshine reflected from the unilluminated portion of the Moon. The comparison between the data and model indicates that several atmospheric species can be identified in disk-averaged Earth spectra, and potentially detected depending on the wavelength range and resolving power of the instrument. At visible wavelengths (0.4-0.9 µm) O3, H2O, O2, and oxygen dimer [(O2)2] are clearly apparent. In the mid-infrared (5-20 µm) CO2, O3, and H2O are present. CH4, N2O, CO2, O3, and H2O are visible in the near-infrared (1-5 µm). A comprehensive three-dimensional model of the Earth is needed to produce a good fit with the observations.

  9. Detectability of planetary characteristics in disk-averaged spectra. I: The Earth model.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Fishbein, Evan; Turnbull, Margaret; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2006-02-01

    Over the next 2 decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to detect and characterize extrasolar planets. This first generation of observatories will not be able to spatially resolve the terrestrial planets detected. Instead, these planets will be characterized by disk-averaged spectroscopy. To assess the detectability of planetary characteristics in disk-averaged spectra, we have developed a spatially and spectrally resolved model of the Earth. This model uses atmospheric and surface properties from existing observations and modeling studies as input, and generates spatially resolved high-resolution synthetic spectra using the Spectral Mapping Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model. Synthetic spectra were generated for a variety of conditions, including cloud coverage, illumination fraction, and viewing angle geometry, over a wavelength range extending from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared. Here we describe the model and validate it against disk-averaged visible to infrared observations of the Earth taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer, the ESA Mars Express Omega instrument, and ground-based observations of earthshine reflected from the unilluminated portion of the Moon. The comparison between the data and model indicates that several atmospheric species can be identified in disk-averaged Earth spectra, and potentially detected depending on the wavelength range and resolving power of the instrument. At visible wavelengths (0.4-0.9 microm) O3, H2O, O2, and oxygen dimer [(O2)2] are clearly apparent. In the mid-infrared (5-20 microm) CO2, O3, and H2O are present. CH4, N2O, CO2, O3, and H2O are visible in the near-infrared (1-5 microm). A comprehensive three-dimensional model of the Earth is needed to produce a good fit with the observations.

  10. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  11. Dynamics and Observational Appearance of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew Frederick

    In my thesis I present a study of the dynamics and observational characteristics of massive circumstellar disks in two dimensions (r, f ) using two complimentary hydro-dynamic codes: a `Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic' (SPH) code and a `Piecewise Parabolic Method' (PPM) code. I also study the detection limits available to radial velocity searches for low mass companions to main sequence stars. This thesis is organized as a series of published or submitted papers, connected by introductory and concluding material. I strongly recommend that readers of this abstract obtain the published versions of each of these papers. I first outline the progress which has been made in the modeling of the structure and origins of the solar system, then in chapter 2 (The Astrophysical Journal v502, p342, with W. Benz, F. Adams and D. Arnett), I proceed with numerical simulations of circumstellar disks using both hydrodynamic codes assuming a `locally isothermal' equation of state. The disks studied range in mass from 0.05M* to 1.0 M* and in initial minimum Toomre Q value from 1.1 to 3.0. Massive disks (MD > 0.2 M*) tend to form grand design spiral structure with 1-3 arms, while low mass disks (MD <= 0.2M*) tend to form filamentary, >4 armed spiral structures. In chapter 4 (submitted to The Astrophysical Journal with W. Benz and T. Ruzmaikina), I relax the assumption the locally isothermal evolution assumption and instead include simple heating and cooling prescriptions for the system. Under these physical conditions, the spiral arm growth is suppressed in the inner 1/3 of the disks relative to the isothermal evolution and in the remainder, changes character to more diffuse spiral structures. I synthesize spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the simulations and compare them to fiducial SEDs derived from observed systems. The size distribution of grains in the inner disk can have marked consequences on the near infrared portion of the SED. After being vaporized in a hot midplane

  12. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  13. The structure and appearance of winds from supercritical accretion disks. I - Numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Equations for the structure and appearance of supercritical accretion disks and the radiation-driven winds which emanate from them are derived and solved by a steady-state hydrodynamic computer code with a relaxation technique used in stellar structure problems. The present model takes into account the mass of the accreting star, the total accretion rate, a generalization of the disk alpha parameter which accounts for heating by processes in addition to viscosity, and the ratio of the total luminosity to the Eddington luminosity. Solutions indicate that for accretion onto a hard-surfaced star, steady, optically thick winds result for even slightly supercritical accretion, and the object will appear as a supergiant star with a high mass loss rate and a nonblackbody spectrum. Winds from black hole accretion disks are expected to depend on the form of the accretion interior to the critical radius, possibly consisting of no ejection at all, a wind similar to that of a hard-surfaced star, or a column of material ejected from a hole in the accretion disk.

  14. THE DISK EVAPORATION MODEL FOR THE SPECTRAL FEATURES OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.; Panessa, Francesca; Liu, J. Y.

    2013-11-10

    Observations show that the accretion flows in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei probably have a two-component structure with an inner, hot, optically thin, advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and an outer, truncated, cool, optically thick accretion disk. As shown by Taam et al., the truncation radius as a function of mass accretion rate is strongly affected by including the magnetic field within the framework of disk evaporation model, i.e., an increase in the magnetic field results in a smaller truncation radius of the accretion disk. In this work, we calculate the emergent spectrum of an inner ADAF + an outer truncated accretion disk around a supermassive black hole based on the prediction by Taam et al.. It is found that an increase in the magnetic field from β = 0.8 to β = 0.5 (with magnetic pressure p{sub m} = B {sup 2}/8π = (1 – β)p{sub tot}, p{sub tot} = p{sub gas} + p{sub m}) results in a factor of ∼8.7 increase in the luminosity from the truncated accretion disk. Meanwhile, results of the peak emission of the truncated accretion disk shift toward a a factor of ∼5 higher frequency. We found that the equipartition of gas pressure to magnetic pressure, i.e., β = 0.5, failed to explain the observed anti-correlation between L{sub 2-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd} and the bolometric correction κ{sub 2-10{sub keV}} (with κ{sub 2-10{sub keV}} = L{sub bol}/L{sub 2-10{sub keV}}). The emergent spectra for larger values of β = 0.8 or β = 0.95 can explain the observed L{sub 2-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd}-κ{sub 2-10{sub keV}} correlation. We argue that in the disk evaporation model, the electrons in the corona are assumed to be heated only by a transfer of energy from the ions to electrons via Coulomb collisions, which is reasonable for accretion with a lower mass accretion rate. Coulomb heating is the dominated heating mechanism for the electrons only if the magnetic field is strongly sub-equipartition, which is roughly consistent with observations.

  15. Computational Relativistic Astrophysics Using the Flowfield-Dependent Variation Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical models, observations and measurements have preoccupied astrophysicists for many centuries. Only in recent years, has the theory of relativity as applied to astrophysical flows met the challenges of how the governing equations can be solved numerically with accuracy and efficiency. Even without the effects of relativity, the physics of magnetohydrodynamic flow instability, turbulence, radiation, and enhanced transport in accretion disks has not been completely resolved. Relativistic effects become pronounced in such cases as jet formation from black hole magnetized accretion disks and also in the study of Gamma-Ray bursts (GRB). Thus, our concern in this paper is to reexamine existing numerical simulation tools as to the accuracy and efficiency of computations and introduce a new approach known as the flowfield-dependent variation (FDV) method. The main feature of the FDV method consists of accommodating discontinuities of shock waves and high gradients of flow variables such as occur in turbulence and unstable motions. In this paper, the physics involved in the solution of relativistic hydrodynamics and solution strategies of the FDV theory are elaborated. The general relativistic astrophysical flow and shock solver (GRAFSS) is introduced, and some simple example problems for Computational Relativistic Astrophysics (CRA) are demonstrated.

  16. Astrophysics with MILAGRO

    SciTech Connect

    The MILAGRO Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes how data from a new type of air shower detector, MILAGRO can shed light on a variety of interesting problems in astrophysics. MILAGRO has the capability to make observations of VHE/UHE emission from the recently discovered TeV gamma-ray source Markarian 421, an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). An observation of the attenuation of this signal in the range of 1--20 TeV can be used to make the first measurement of the intergalactic infrared radiation. We will also describe how MILAGRO can improve the existing limits on the density of Primordial Black Holes (PBH) by three orders of magnitude. Finally, we will discuss how this instrument can be used to measure the diffuse galactic emission of gamma-rays which must come from the disk.

  17. Exozodi disk models for the HOSTS survey on the LBTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Mark; Kennedy, G.; Skemer, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W. C.; Defrere, D.; Haniff, C.; Hinz, P.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Panic, O.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, A.; Serabyn, G.; Shannon, A. B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Weinberger, A. J.; LBTI-HOSTS

    2014-01-01

    This poster describes a simple model for exozodiacal emission that was developed to interpret observations of the Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) project on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI). HOSTS is a NASA-funded key science project using mid-infrared nulling interferometry at the LBTI to seach for faint exozodiacal dust (exozodi) in the habitable zones of nearby stars. The aim was to make a model that includes the fewest possible assumptions, so that it is easy to characterize how choices of model parameters affect what can be inferred from the observations. However the model is also sufficiently complex that it can be compared in a physically meaningful way with the level of dust in the Solar System, and can also be readily used to assess the impact of a detection (or of a non-detection) on the ability of a mission to detect Earth-like planets. Here we describe the model, and apply it to the sample of stars being searched by HOSTS to determine the zodi level (i.e., the number of Solar System zodiacal clouds) that would be needed for a detection for each star in the survey. Particular emphasis is given to our definition of a zodi, and what that means for stars of different luminosity, and a comparison is given between different zodi definitions justifying our final choice. The achievable exozodi levels range from 1-20 zodi for different stars in the prime sample for a 0.01% null depth, with a median level of 2.5 zodi.

  18. Modeling the η Corvi debris disk from the sub-AU scale to its outermost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Defrère, D.; Mennesson, Bertr; Millan-Gabet, R.

    2014-03-01

    Dusty debris disks surrounding main sequence stars are thought to be analogues to thepopulations of small bodies of the Solar System (asteroids, comets/icy bodies and dust grains), however with often much higher masses and associated dust production rates. Mecanisms such as massive collisions or LHB-like events must therefore be invoked to justify their existence. This is especially striking for the nearby F2V star η Corvi that shows a very strong mid- and far-infrared excess despite an estimated age of ~1.4 Gyr (Lisse et al. 2012, Wyatt et al. 2005). We present new observations of the η Crv debris disk obtained in the far-infrared with Herschel/PACS and SPIRE and in the mid-infrared with the Keck Interferometer Nuller (Millan-Gabet et al. 2011). The Herschel/PACS images at 70, 100 and 160 μm reveal a well resolved belt of cold material at ~130 AU, as well as an unresolved component in the innermost parts of the system. This warmer counterpart is resolved in the mid-infrared as a strong null excess originating from within the ~2x4 AU field-of-view of the interferometer, which is reminiscent of the architecture of the Fomalhaut debris disk (Mennesson et al. 2012, Lebreton et al. 2013). The signature of warm silicate dust is also very clear in Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectra (Chen et al. 2006) at intermediate wavelengths (10-35 μm). We undertake to establish a consistent model of the debris disk from the sub-AU scale to its outermost regions using the GRaTer radiative transfer code (Augereau et al. 1999a, Lebreton et al. 2013) by adjusting simultaneously the interferometric nulls, the resolved Herschel images and the spectro-photometric data against a large parameter space. Our analysis providesaccurate estimates of the fundamental parameters of the disk: its surface density profile, grain size distribution and mass, making it possible to unveil the origin of the dust and the relation between the cold (~50 K) Kuiper-like belt and the warm (~500 K) exo

  19. Self-consistent models for triaxial galaxies with flat rotation curves - The disk case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuijken, Konrad

    1993-01-01

    We examine the possibility of constructing scale-free triaxial logarithmic potentials self-consistently, using Schwarzschild's linear programing method. In particular, we explore the limit of nonaxisymmetric disks. In this case it is possible to reduce the problem to the self-consistent reconstruction of the disk surface density on the unit circle, a considerably simpler problem than the usual 2D or 3D one. Models with surface densities of the form Sigma = (x exp n + (y/q) exp n) exp - 1/n with n = 2 or 4 are investigated. We show that the complicated shapes of the 'boxlet' orbit families (which replace the box orbit family found in potentials with smooth cores) limit the possibility of building self-consistent models, though elliptical disks of axis ratio above 0.7 and a restricted range of boxier models can be constructed. This result relies on using sufficiently fine bins, smaller than the 10 deg bins commonly used in 2D or 3D investigations. It also indicates the need for caution in interpreting N-body models of triaxial halos in which the core of the potential is numerically smoothed.

  20. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC MODEL OF ACCRETION DISKS WITH CORONAE SURROUNDING KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    You Bei; Cao Xinwu; Yuan Yefei E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-12-20

    We calculate the structure of a standard accretion disk with a corona surrounding a massive Kerr black hole in the general relativistic frame, in which the corona is assumed to be heated by the reconnection of the strongly buoyant magnetic fields generated in the cold accretion disk. The emergent spectra of accretion disk-corona systems are calculated by using the relativistic ray-tracing method. We propose a new method to calculate the emergent Comptonized spectra from the coronae. The spectra of disk-corona systems with a modified {alpha}-magnetic stress show that both the hard X-ray spectral index and the hard X-ray bolometric correction factor L{sub bol}/L{sub X,2-10keV} increase with the dimensionless mass accretion rate, which is qualitatively consistent with the observations of active galactic nuclei. The fraction of the power dissipated in the corona decreases with increasing black hole spin parameter a, which leads to lower electron temperatures of the coronae for rapidly spinning black holes. The X-ray emission from the coronae surrounding rapidly spinning black holes becomes weak and soft. The ratio of the X-ray luminosity to the optical/UV luminosity increases with the viewing angle, while the spectral shape in the X-ray band is insensitive to the viewing angle. We find that the spectral index in the infrared waveband depends on the mass accretion rate and the black hole spin a, which deviates from the f{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 1/3} relation expected by the standard thin disk model.

  1. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. I. Constant Density Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by solving simultaneously the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent Ka line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  2. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program is to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool will be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishment achieved during the second year (2008) of the program is summarized. The activities of this year include final selection of multicomponent thermodynamics and mobility databases, precipitate surface energy determination from nucleation experiment, multiscale comparison of predicted versus measured intragrain precipitation microstructure in quench samples showing good agreement, isothermal coarsening experiment and interaction of grain boundary and intergrain precipitates, primary microstructure of subsolvus treatment, and finally the software implementation plan for the third year of the project. In the following year, the calibrated models and simulation tools will be validated against an independently developed experimental data set, with actual disc heat treatment process conditions. Furthermore, software integration and implementation will be developed to provide material engineers valuable information in order to optimize the processing of the 3rd generation gas turbine disc alloys.

  3. Lower Bound on the Mean Square Displacement of Particles in the Hard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richthammer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions 2 n × 2 n with arbitrary boundary configuration, and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by c log n. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  4. A Method for the Study of Accretion Disk Emission in Cataclysmic Variables. I. The Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puebla, Raúl E.; Diaz, Marcos P.; Hillier, D. John; Hubeny, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a spectrum synthesis method for modeling the ultraviolet (UV) emission from the accretion disk from cataclysmic variables (CVs). The disk is separated into concentric rings, with an internal structure from the Wade & Hubeny disk-atmosphere models. For each ring, a wind atmosphere is calculated in the comoving frame with a vertical velocity structure obtained from a solution of the Euler equation. Using simple assumptions, regarding rotation and the wind streamlines, these one-dimensional models are combined into a single 2.5-dimensional model for which we compute synthetic spectra. We find that the resulting line and continuum behavior as a function of the orbital inclination is consistent with the observations, and verify that the accretion rate affects the wind temperature, leading to corresponding trends in the intensity of UV lines. In general, we also find that the primary mass has a strong effect on the P Cygni absorption profiles, the synthetic emission line profiles are strongly sensitive to the wind temperature structure, and an increase in the mass-loss rate enhances the resonance line intensities. Synthetic spectra were compared with UV data for two high orbital inclination nova-like CVs—RW Tri and V347 Pup. We needed to include disk regions with arbitrary enhanced mass loss to reproduce reasonably well widths and line profiles. This fact and a lack of flux in some high ionization lines may be the signature of the presence of density-enhanced regions in the wind, or alternatively, may result from inadequacies in some of our simplifying assumptions.

  5. Magnetic fields in astrophysics /Helen B. Warner Prize Lecture/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    1983-03-01

    Magnetic fields play many important roles in interpretative models of astronomical phenomena. They can provide diagnostics of the physical conditions within active objects. They may mediate and collimate the energy release from a deep gravitational potential well. On a microscopic level, they may control the transport properties of astrophysical plasmas with large-scale thermal and dynamical consequences. Some of these facets of the behavior of magnetic fields are illustrated with examples drawn mainly from contemporary high-energy astrophysics. In particular, attention is given to the case that most double radio sources are powered by the electromagnetic or hydromagnetic extraction of energy from a spinning massive black hole and accretion disk and subsequently collimated by the pinching action of toroidal field wrapped around the jet. The origin of neutron star magnetic field is also discussed and it is argued that the magnetization can be generated thermoelectrically by the heat flux escaping from the interior of the star.

  6. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  7. STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE SPIN CONSTRAINTS FROM DISK REFLECTION AND CONTINUUM MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, C. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Miniutti, G.; Gallo, L. C.

    2009-05-20

    Accretion disk reflection spectra, including broad iron emission lines, bear the imprints of the strong Doppler shifts and gravitational redshifts close to black holes. The extremity of these shifts depends on the proximity of the innermost stable circular orbit to the black hole, and that orbit is determined by the black hole spin parameter. Modeling relativistic spectral features, then, gives a means of estimating black hole spin. We report on the results of fits made to archival X-ray spectra of stellar-mass black holes and black hole candidates, selected for strong disk reflection features. Following recent work, these spectra were fit with reflection models and disk continuum emission models (where required) in which black hole spin is a free parameter. Although our results must be regarded as preliminary, we find evidence for a broad range of black hole spin parameters in our sample. The black holes with the most relativistic radio jets are found to have high spin parameters, though jets are observed in a black hole with a low spin parameter. For those sources with constrained binary system parameters, we examine the distribution of spin parameters versus black hole mass, binary mass ratio, and orbital period. We discuss the results within the context of black hole creation events, relativistic jet production, and efforts to probe the innermost relativistic regime around black holes.

  8. The Kozai-Lidov mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. II. Effects of binary and disk parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. (2014b) showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  9. THE KOZAI–LIDOV MECHANISM IN HYDRODYNAMICAL DISKS. II. EFFECTS OF BINARY AND DISK PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  10. The Kozai–Lidov Mechanism in Hydrodynamical Disks. II. Effects of Binary and Disk Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  11. Modelling astrophysical outflows via the unified dynamo-reverse dynamo mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-04-01

    The unified dynamo-reverse dynamo (Dy-RDy) mechanism, capable of simultaneously generating large-scale outflows and magnetic fields from an ambient microscopic reservoir, is explored in a broad astrophysical context. The Dy-RDy mechanism is derived via the Hall magnetohydrodynamics, which unifies the evolution of magnetic field and fluid vorticity. It also introduces an intrinsic length-scale, the ion skin depth, allowing for the proper normalization and categorization of microscopic and macroscopic scales. The large-scale Alfvén Mach number MA, defining the relative `abundance' of the flow field to the magnetic field is shown to be tied to a microscopic scalelength that reflects the characteristics of the ambient short-scale reservoir. The dynamo (Dy), preferentially producing the large-scale magnetic field, is the dominant mode when the ambient turbulence is mostly kinetic, while the outflow producing reverse dynamo (RDy) is the principal manifestation of a magnetically dominated turbulent reservoir. It is conjectured that an efficient RDy may be the source of many observed astrophysical outflows that have MA ≫ 1.

  12. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  13. Two-dimensional modeling of an aircraft engine structural bladed disk-casing modal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Mathias; Pierre, Christophe; Cartraud, Patrice; Lombard, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In modern turbo machines such as aircraft jet engines, structural contacts between the casing and bladed disk may occur through a variety of mechanisms: coincidence of vibration modes, thermal deformation of the casing, rotor imbalance due to design uncertainties to name a few. These nonlinear interactions may result in severe damage to both structures and it is important to understand the physical circumstances under which they occur. In this study, we focus on a modal coincidence during which the vibrations of each structure take the form of a k-nodal diameter traveling wave characteristic of axi-symmetric geometries. A realistic two-dimensional model of the casing and bladed disk is introduced in order to predict the occurrence of this very specific interaction phenomenon versus the rotation speed of the engine. The equations of motion are solved using an explicit time integration scheme in conjunction with the Lagrange multiplier method where friction is accounted for. This model is validated from the comparison with an analytical solution. The numerical results show that the structures may experience different kinds of behaviors (namely damped, sustained and divergent motions) mainly depending on the rotational velocity of the bladed disk.

  14. Titius-Bode laws in the solar system. 2: Build your own law from disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrulle, B.; Graner, F.

    1994-02-01

    Simply respecting both scale and rotational invariance, it is easy to construct an endless collection of theoretical models predicting a Titius-Bode law, irrespective to their physical content. Due to the numerous ways to get the law and its intrinsic arbitrariness, it is not a useful constraint on theories of solar system formation. To illustrate the simple elegance of scale-invariant methods, we explicitly cook up one of the simplest examples, an infinitely thin cold gaseous disk rotating around a central object. In that academic case, the Titius-Bode law holds during the linear stage of the gravitational instability. The time scale of the instability is of the order of a self-gravitating time scale, (G rhod)-1/2, where rhod is the disk density. This model links the separation between different density maxima with the ratio MD/MC of the masses of the disk and the central object; for instance, MD/MC of the order of 0.18 roughly leads to the observed separation between the planets. We discuss the boundary conditions and the limit of the Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation.

  15. The Gaseous Disks of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    Disks represent a crucial stage in the formation of stars and planets. They are novel astrophysical systems with attributes intermediate between the interstellar medium and stars. Their physical properties are inhomogeneous and are affected by hard stellar radiation and by dynamical evolution. Observing disk structure is difficult because of the small sizes, ranging from as little as 0.05 AU at the inner edge to 100-1000 AU at large radial distances. Nonetheless, substantial progress has been made by observing the radiation emitted by the dust from near infrared to mm wavelengths, i.e., the spectral energy distribution of an unresolved disk. Many fewer results are available for the gas, which is the main mass component of disks over much of their lifetime. The inner disk gas of young stellar objects (henceforth YSOs) have been studied using the near infrared rovibrational transitions of CO and a few other molecules, while the outer regions have been explored with the mm and sub-mm lines of CO and other species. Further progress can be expected in understanding the physical properties of disks from observations with sub-mm arrays like SMA, CARMA and ALMA, with mid infrared measurements using Spitzer, and near infrared spectroscopy with large ground-based telescopes. Intense efforts are also being made to model the observations using complex thermal-chemical models. After a brief review of the existing observations and modeling results, some of the weaknesses of the models will be discussed, including the absence of good laboratory and theoretical calculations for essential microscopic processes.

  16. As the Disk Turns... Monitoring the Azimuthal Thermal Gradient of the Irradiated Dust Disk in Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Howell, Steve; Stencel, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For the last ~200 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently showed that epsilon Aur most likely consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star, and a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system size (~8 AU diameter) disk of dusty material. We propose to continue our IRAC monitoring of epsilon Aur, to characterize the disk's azimuthal thermal variation as its irradiated, warm (1150 K) portion increasingly comes into view. We request 0.2 hr to obtain 2 IRAC observations. If Cycle 10 is extended through Jan 2015, we request another 6 visits (0.6 hr) in Dec 2014, coinciding with the predicted start of coherent pulsations of the F star, which occur every ~3000 days. The most recent eclipse was in Aug 2009-Jul 2011; we are now in the post-eclipse phase, when the heated side of the disk begins rotating into view. During the majority of our past IRAC observations (starting a few months prior to the eclipse ingress), only the cool (550 K) side of the disk was visible. In 2014-2015, as we move toward quadrature, the effect of heating due to the F star will increase the IRAC ch1/ch2 flux ratio. The eclipse of epsilon Aur is a rare event and a unique astrophysical opportunity, since backlighting of the disk by the luminous eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar disks around single stars. This is one of the very few astrophysical disks where azimuthal thermal gradients can be mapped and interpreted. Observations of the warm side of the disk are crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, the proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution, along with new insights into

  17. Astrophysical integrated research environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Yang, Yang

    2007-08-01

    Astrophysical Integrated Research Environment (AIRE), aims to integrate astrophysical data, analysis software and astrophysical knowledge into an easy-to-use Internet based environment. Therefore, astrophysicists from different institutes can constitute virtual research groups which are favorable to study some complex multi-band astrophysical phenomena. The AIRE was put into use in Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua university in 2003. Up to now, there are 219 advanced users in this environment. Several astrophysical researches base on AIRE have generated some important published results.

  18. Investigation of the initial state of the Moon-forming disk: Bridging SPH simulations and hydrostatic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Miki; Stevenson, David J.

    2014-05-01

    According to the standard giant impact hypothesis, the Moon formed from a partially vaporized disk generated by a collision between the proto-Earth and a Mars-sized impactor. The initial structure of the disk significantly affects the Moon-forming process, including the Moon’s mass, its accretion time scale, and its isotopic similarity to Earth. The dynamics of the impact event determines the initial structure of a nearly hydrostatic Moon-forming disk. However, the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic models have been studied separately and their connection has not previously been well quantified. Here, we show the extent to which the properties of the disk can be inferred from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations. By using entropy, angular momentum and mass distributions of the SPH outputs as approximately conserved quantities, we compute the two-dimensional disk structure. We investigate four different models: (a) standard, the canonical giant impact model, (b) fast-spinning Earth, a collision between a fast-spinning Earth and a small impactor, (c) sub-Earths, a collision between two objects with half Earth’s mass, and (d) intermediate, a collision of two bodies whose mass ratio is 7:3. Our SPH calculations show that the initial disk has approximately uniform entropy. This is because the materials of different angular momenta are shocked to similar extents. The disks of the fast-spinning Earth and sub-Earths cases are hotter and more vaporized (∼80-90% vapor) than the standard case (∼20%). The intermediate case falls between these values. In the highly vaporized cases, our procedure fails to establish a unique surface density profile of the disk because the disk is unstable according to the Rayleigh criterion (the need for a monotonically increasing specific angular momentum with radius). In these cases, we estimate non-unique disk models by conserving global quantities (mass and total angular momentum). We also develop a semi-analytic model for the

  19. Chemistry in the Molecular Disks of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are the centers of galaxies with supermassive blackholes whose accretion of mass causes very high luminosities of L˜1044-46erg s-1. An accretion disk has a molecular component that extends to hundreds of pc from the central AGN core. The question of how much central illumination affects the disk and how much star formation is present near the core have been astrophysical interests. Rotational lines from these disks at a sub-kpc scale have been observed for molecules such as CO, HCO+, HCN, and HNC. When ALMA becomes fully operational, it will be able to resolve these disks at much higher resolution than currently. Molecular observations at higher resolution may give some hints on the physics in the molecular disk. We modeled the chemical composition of a molecular disk in an AGN on a scale of tens of pc. To do this, we extended our standard gas-phase OSU network to include important processes at much higher temperatures, approaching 1000 K. We used the density model of Thompson et al., and determined the temperature by the blackbody approximation from the luminosity of the AGN core. The ionization by X-rays from the AGN core, by cosmic-rays from the AGN core, supernovae and stellar winds, and by UV-photons from OB stars are considered. We will briefly mention the effects from other factors that may change the molecular abundances such as shock waves and inhomogeneity of the density of the disk. T. Thompson, E. Quataert, and N. Murray, Astrophysical J. 630, 167 (2005)

  20. Chemistry in disks. IX. Observations and modelling of HCO+ and DCO+ in DM Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, R.; Semenov, D.; Guilloteau, S.; Henning, Th.; Dutrey, A.; Wakelam, V.; Chapillon, E.; Pietu, V.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We study the deuteration and ionization structure of the DM Tau disk via interferometric observations and modelling of the key molecular ions, HCO+ and DCO+. Methods: The Plateau de Bure Array is used to observe DM Tau in lines of HCO+ (1-0), (3-2) and DCO+ (3-2) with a ~ 1.5'' angular and ~0.2 km s-1 spectral resolution. Using a power-law fitting approach the observed column densities profiles are derived and thus the isotopic ratio RD = DCO+/HCO+. Chemical modelling allowed an exploration of the sensitivity of HCO+ and DCO+ abundances to physical parameters out with temperature. A steady state approximation was employed to observationally constrain the ionization fraction x(e-). Results: Fitting of radiative transfer models suggests that there is a chemical hole in HCO+ and DCO+, extending up to 50 AU from the star. More work is required to discern the cause of this. The observed column densities of HCO+ and DCO+ at 100 AU were (9.8+0.3-0.7) × 1012 and (1.2 ± 0.7) × 1012 cm-2 respectively. Where both HCO+ and DCO+ were present, RD was found to increase radially from 0.1 at 50 AU to 0.2 at 450 AU. This behaviour was well reproduced by the chemical model. The X-ray luminosity of the central star, the interstellar UV and CO depletion were found to be the most important physical parameters controlling the abundances of HCO+ and DCO+. Differences in the vertical extent of HCO+ and DCO+ molecular layers resulted in different responses to changing physical parameters, manifesting as radial gradients in RD. The ionization fraction was found to be x(e-) ~ 10-7 in the molecular layer, comparable to the disk averaged value. Modelling shows that while HCO+ is the most dominant charged molecular ion in our disk model, atomic ions, such as C+, S+, H+, Na+ and Mg+, dominate the charge in both the molecular layer and disk atmosphere. Conclusions: A high value of RD is indicative of continued deuterium fractionation in a protoplanetary disk after pre/protostellar phases

  1. Exploring Stability of General Relativistic Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkin, Oleg; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Zink, Burkhard

    2011-04-01

    Self-gravitating relativistic disks around black holes can form as transient structures in a number of astrophysical scenarios, involving core collapse of massive stars and mergers of compact ob jects. I will present results on our recent study of the stability of such disks against runaway and non-axisymmetric instabilities, which we explore using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations in full general relativity. All of our models develop unstable non-axisymmetric modes on a dynamical timescale. We observe two distinct types of instabilities: the Papaloizou-Pringle and the so-called intermediate type instabilities. The development of the non-axisymmetric mode with azimuthal number m=1 is accompanied by an outspiraling motion of the black hole, which significantly amplifies the growth rate of the m=1 mode in some cases. We will discuss the types, growth rates and pattern speeds of the unstable modes, as well as the detectability of the gravitational waves from such objects.

  2. Numerical modelling of Mars supersonic disk-gap-band parachute inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinglong; Zhang, Qingbin; Tang, Qiangang

    2016-06-01

    The transient dynamic behaviour of supersonic disk-gap-band parachutes in a Mars entry environment involving fluid structure interactions is studied. Based on the multi-material Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler method, the coupling dynamic model between a viscous compressible fluid and a flexible large deformation structure of the parachute is solved. The inflation performance of a parachute with a fixed forebody under different flow conditions is analysed. The decelerating parameters of the parachute, including drag area, opening loads, and coefficients, are obtained from the supersonic wind tunnel test data from NASA. Meanwhile, the evolution of the three-dimensional shape of the disk-gap-band parachute during supersonic inflation is presented, and the structural dynamic behaviour of the parachute is predicted. Then, the influence of the presence of the capsule on the flow field of the parachute is investigated, and the wake of unsteady fluid and the distribution of shock wave around the supersonic parachute are presented. Finally, the structural dynamic response of the canopy fabric under high-pressure conditions is comparatively analysed. The results show that the disk-gap-band parachute is well inflated without serious collapse. As the Mach numbers increase from 2.0 to 2.5, the drag coefficients gradually decrease, along with a small decrease in inflation time, which corresponds with test results, and proves the validity of the method proposed in this paper.

  3. ZAPP: The Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Falcon, R. E.; Loisel, G. P.; Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Hall, I.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Liedahl, D. A.

    2014-05-15

    The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories [Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] provides MJ-class x-ray sources that can emit powers >0.3 PW. This capability enables benchmark experiments of fundamental material properties in radiation-heated matter at conditions previously unattainable in the laboratory. Experiments on Z can produce uniform, long-lived, and large plasmas with volumes up to 20 cc, temperatures from 1–200 eV, and electron densities from 10{sup 17–23} cc{sup −1}. These unique characteristics and the ability to radiatively heat multiple experiments in a single shot have led to a new effort called the Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties (ZAPP) collaboration. The focus of the ZAPP collaboration is to reproduce the radiation and material characteristics of astrophysical plasmas as closely as possible in the laboratory and use detailed spectral measurements to strengthen models for atoms in plasmas. Specific issues under investigation include the LTE opacity of iron at stellar-interior conditions, photoionization around active galactic nuclei, the efficiency of resonant Auger destruction in black-hole accretion disks, and H-Balmer line shapes in white dwarf photospheres.

  4. Elastic, charge transfer, and related transport cross sections for proton impact of atomic hydrogen for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu; Stancil, P. C.; Zaman, T.

    2016-04-01

    Updating and extending previous work (Krstić and Schultz 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3458 and other references) comprehensive calculations were performed for elastic scattering and charge transfer in proton—atomic hydrogen collisions. The results, obtained for 1301 collision energies in the center-of-mass energy range of 10-4-104 eV, are provided for integral and differential cross sections relevant to transport modeling in astrophysical and other plasma environments, and are made available through a website. Use of the data is demonstrated through a Monte Carlo transport simulation of solar wind proton propagation through atomic hydrogen gas representing a simple model of the solar wind interaction with heliospheric neutrals.

  5. Elastic, charge transfer, and related transport cross sections for proton impact of atomic hydrogen for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu; Stancil, P. C.; Zaman, T.

    2016-04-01

    Updating and extending previous work (Krstić and Schultz 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3458 and other references) comprehensive calculations were performed for elastic scattering and charge transfer in proton—atomic hydrogen collisions. The results, obtained for 1301 collision energies in the center-of-mass energy range of 10‑4–104 eV, are provided for integral and differential cross sections relevant to transport modeling in astrophysical and other plasma environments, and are made available through a website. Use of the data is demonstrated through a Monte Carlo transport simulation of solar wind proton propagation through atomic hydrogen gas representing a simple model of the solar wind interaction with heliospheric neutrals.

  6. X-Ray Reflection from Inhomogeneous Accretion Disks. I. Toy Models and Photon Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Turner, N. J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2004-03-01

    Numerical simulations of the interiors of radiation-dominated accretion disks show that significant density inhomogeneities can be generated in the gas. Here, we present the first results of our study on X-ray reflection spectra from such heterogeneous density structures. We consider two cases: first, we produce a number of toy models in which a sharp increase or decrease in density, of variable width, is placed at different depths in a uniform slab. Comparing the resulting reflection spectra to those from an unaltered slab shows that the inhomogeneity can affect the emission features, in particular the Fe Kα and O VIII Lyα lines. The magnitude of any differences depends on both the parameters of the density change and the ionizing power of the illuminating radiation, but the inhomogeneity is required to be within ~2 Thomson depths of the surface to cause an effect. However, only relatively small variations in density (by factors of a few) are necessary for significant changes in the reflection features to be possible. Our second test was to compute reflection spectra from the density structure predicted by a simulation of the nonlinear outcome of the photon-bubble instability. The resulting spectra also exhibited differences from the constant-density models, caused primarily by a strong 6.7 keV iron line. Nevertheless, constant-density models can provide a good fit to simulated spectra, albeit with a low reflection fraction, between 2 and 10 keV. Below 2 keV, differences in the predicted soft X-ray line emission result in very poor fits with a constant-density ionized-disk model. The results indicate that density inhomogeneities may further complicate the relationship between the Fe Kα equivalent width and the X-ray continuum. Further calculations are needed to verify that density variations of sufficient magnitude will occur within a few Thomson depths of the disk photosphere.

  7. Molecular Abundances in the Disk of AN Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Thompson, T. A.; Herbst, E.

    2011-06-01

    There are galactic nuclei that emit high luminosities L˜1044-46 erg S-1 including luminosity produced by X-rays from high mass accretion onto the central black holes. These nuclei are called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and they are accompanied by molecular disks. Observations show high abundances of CN and HCN in the disks; the molecules are proposed to be probes of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) created by the X-rays from AGNs. We have constructed a spatially-dependent chemical-abundance model of the molecular disk in NGC 1068, a typical AGN-dominated galaxy. Recently, new observations of CN and HCN have been made at much higher spatial resolution, and there are also detections of polyatomic molecules such as HC3N, c-C3H2, and C2H. We discuss how these observations and our simulations can help us to better understand the physical conditions, the disk structure, and conditions for star formation within molecular disks, which are still uncertain. We also include a comparison with other types of galaxies such as (ultra-) luminous infrared galaxies. Usero et al.Astronomy and Astrophysics. 419 (897), 2004. Initial results were presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy 2010, RF05 Garcia-Burillo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics. 519 (2), 2010. Garcia-Burillo et al. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 131 (12031), 2008. Costagliola et al. ArXiv e-print arXiv:1101.2122, 2011. Nakajima et al. Astrophysical Journal Letters 728 (L38), 2008.

  8. V3885 Sagittarius: A Comparison With a Range of Standard Model Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnell, Albert P.; Godon, Patrick; Hubeny, Ivan; Sion, Edward M; Szkody, Paula; Barrett, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    A chi-squared analysis of standard model accretion disk synthetic spectrum fits to combined Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectra of V3885 Sagittarius, on an absolute flux basis, selects a model that accurately represents the observed spectral energy distribution. Calculation of the synthetic spectrum requires the following system parameters. The cataclysmic variable secondary star period-mass relation calibrated by Knigge in 2006 and 2007 sets the secondary component mass. A mean white dwarf (WD) mass from the same study, which is consistent with an observationally determined mass ratio, sets the adopted WD mass of 0.7M(solar mass), and the WD radius follows from standard theoretical models. The adopted inclination, i = 65 deg, is a literature consensus, and is subsequently supported by chi-squared analysis. The mass transfer rate is the remaining parameter to set the accretion disk T(sub eff) profile, and the Hipparcos parallax constrains that parameter to mas transfer = (5.0 +/- 2.0) x 10(exp -9) M(solar mass)/yr by a comparison with observed spectra. The fit to the observed spectra adopts the contribution of a 57,000 +/- 5000 K WD. The model thus provides realistic constraints on mass transfer and T(sub eff) for a large mass transfer system above the period gap.

  9. Tables of Nuclear Cross Sections and Reaction Rates: AN Addendum to the Paper ``ASTROPHYSICAL Reaction Rates from Statistical Model Calculations'' ()

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Thomas; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2001-09-01

    In a previous publication (ATOMIC DATAAND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES75, 1 (2000)), we gave seven-parameter analytical fits to theoretical reaction rates derived from nuclear cross sections calculated in the statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach formalism) for targets with 10<=Z<=83 (Ne to Bi) and for a mass range reaching the neutron and proton driplines. Reactions considered were (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (p,γ), (p,α), (α,γ), and their inverse reactions. Here, we present the theoretical nuclear cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates from which those rate fits were derived, and we provide these data as on-line electronic files. Corresponding to the fitted rates, two complete data sets are provided, one of which includes a phenomenological treatment of shell quenching for neutron-rich nuclei.

  10. The Turbulent Magnetic Prandtl Number of MHD Turbulence in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Gammie, Charles F.

    2009-06-01

    The magnetic Prandtl number PrM is the ratio of viscosity to resistivity. In astrophysical disks the diffusion of angular momentum (viscosity) and magnetic fields (resistivity) are controlled by turbulence. Phenomenological models of the evolution of large-scale poloidal magnetic fields in disks suggest that the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number PrM,T controls the rate of escape of vertical field from the disk; for PrM,T <= R/H vertical field diffuses outward before it can be advected inward by accretion. Here we measure field diffusion and angular momentum transport due to MHD turbulence in a shearing box, and thus PrM,T, by studying the evolution of a sinusoidal perturbation in the magnetic field that is injected into a turbulent background. We show that the perturbation is always stable, decays approximately exponentially, has decay rate vpropk 2, and that the implied PrM,T ~ 1.

  11. Models of the η Corvi Debris Disk from the Keck Interferometer, Spitzer, and Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Defrère, D.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Boccaletti, A.

    2016-02-01

    Debris disks are signposts of analogs to small-body populations of the solar system, often, however, with much higher masses and dust production rates. The disk associated with the nearby star η Crv is especially striking, as it shows strong mid- and far-infrared excesses despite an age of ∼1.4 Gyr. We undertake constructing a consistent model of the system that can explain a diverse collection of spatial and spectral data. We analyze Keck Interferometer Nuller measurements and revisit Spitzer and additional spectrophotometric data, as well as resolved Herschel images, to determine the dust spatial distribution in the inner exozodi and in the outer belt. We model in detail the two-component disk and the dust properties from the sub-AU scale to the outermost regions by fitting simultaneously all measurements against a large parameter space. The properties of the cold belt are consistent with a collisional cascade in a reservoir of ice-free planetesimals at 133 AU. It shows marginal evidence for asymmetries along the major axis. KIN enables us to establish that the warm dust consists of a ring that peaks between 0.2 and 0.8 AU. To reconcile this location with the ∼400 K dust temperature, very high albedo dust must be invoked, and a distribution of forsterite grains starting from micron sizes satisfies this criterion, while providing an excellent fit to the spectrum. We discuss additional constraints from the LBTI and near-infrared spectra, and we present predictions of what James Webb Space Telescope can unveil about this unusual object and whether it can detect unseen planets.

  12. Workshop on the origin of the heavy elements: Astrophysical models and experimental challenges, Santa Fe, New Mexico, September 3-4, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Haight; John L. Ullmann; Daniel D. Strottman; Paul E. Koehler; Franz Kaeppeler

    2000-01-01

    This Workshop was held on September 3--4, 1999, following the 10th International Symposium on Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Presentations were made by 14 speakers, 6 from the US and 8 from other countries on topics relevant to s-, r- and rp-process nucleosynthesis. Laboratory experiments, both present and planned, and astrophysical observations were represented as were astrophysical models. Approximately 50 scientists participated in this Workshop. These Proceedings consist of copies of vu-graphs presented at the Workshop. For further information, the interested readers are referred to the authors.

  13. Modelling circumbinary protoplanetary disks. I. Fluid simulations of the Kepler-16 and 34 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lines, S.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Baruteau, C.; Paardekooper, S.-J.; Carter, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The Kepler mission's discovery of a number of circumbinary planets orbiting close (ap< 1.1 au) to the stellar binary raises questions as to how these planets could have formed given the intense gravitational perturbations the dual stars impart on the disk. The gas component of circumbinary protoplanetary disks is perturbed in a similar manner to the solid, planetesimal dominated counterpart, although the mechanism by which disk eccentricity originates differs. Aims: This is the first work of a series that aims to investigate the conditions for planet formation in circumbinary protoplanetary disks. Methods: We present a number of hydrodynamical simulations that explore the response of gas disks around two observed binary systems: Kepler-16 and Kepler-34. We probe the importance of disk viscosity, aspect-ratio, inner boundary condition, initial surface density gradient, and self-gravity on the dynamical evolution of the disk, as well as its quasi-steady-state profile. Results: We find there is a strong influence of binary type on the mean disk eccentricity, e̅d, leading to e̅d = 0.02 - 0.08 for Kepler-16 and e̅d = 0.10 - 0.15 in Kepler-34. The value of α-viscosity has little influence on the disk, but we find a strong increase in mean disk eccentricity with increasing aspect-ratio due to wave propagation effects. The choice of inner boundary condition only has a small effect on the surface density and eccentricity of the disk. Our primary finding is that including disk self-gravity has little impact on the evolution or final state of the disk for disks with masses less than 12.5 times that of the minimum-mass solar nebula. This finding contrasts with the results of self-gravity relevance in circumprimary disks, where its inclusion is found to be an important factor in describing the disk evolution.

  14. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  15. Sustaining Star Formation Rates in Spiral Galaxies Supernova-driven Turbulent Accretion Disk Models Applied to THINGS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-01

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M ⊙) <~ 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  16. A DISK-WIND MODEL FOR THE NEAR-INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION IN PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bans, Alissa; Koenigl, Arieh E-mail: akonigl@uchicago.edu

    2012-10-20

    Protostellar systems, ranging from low-luminosity classical T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars to high-luminosity Herbig Be stars, exhibit a near-infrared (NIR) excess in their spectra that is dominated by a bump in the monochromatic luminosity with a peak near 3 {mu}m. The bump can be approximated by a thermal emission component of temperature {approx}1500 K that is of the order of the sublimation temperature of interstellar dust grains. In the currently popular 'puffed-up rim' scenario, the bump represents stellar radiation that propagates through the optically thin inner region of the surrounding accretion disk and is absorbed and reemitted by the dust that resides just beyond the dust sublimation radius r {sub sub}. However, this model cannot account for the strongest bumps measured in these sources, and it predicts a pronounced secondary bounce in the interferometric visibility curve that is not observed. In this paper we present an alternative interpretation, which attributes the bump to reemission of stellar radiation by dust that is uplifted from the disk by a centrifugally driven wind. Winds of this type are a leading candidate for the origin of the strong outflows associated with protostars, and there is observational evidence for disk winds originating on scales {approx}r {sub sub}. Using a newly constructed Monte Carlo radiative transfer code and focusing on low-luminosity sources, we show that this model can account for the NIR excess emission even in bright Herbig Ae stars such as AB Auriga and MWC 275, and that it successfully reproduces the basic features of the visibilities measured in these protostars. We argue that a robust dusty outflow in these sources could be self-limiting-through shielding of the stellar FUV photons-to a relatively narrow launching region between r {sub sub} and {approx}2 r {sub sub}. We also suggest that the NIR and scattered-light variability exhibited by a source like MWC 275 can be attributed in this picture to the uplifting of

  17. Signatures of planets: Observations and modeling of structure in the zodiacal cloud and Kuiper disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Elizabeth Katherine

    2002-12-01

    There is a possible connection between structure in evolved circumstellar disks and the presence of planets, our own zodiacal cloud being a proven example. Asymmetries in such a disk could be diagnostic of planets which would be otherwise undetectable. Using COBE DIRBE observations, we link structure in the zodiacal cloud, namely the warp and offset of the cloud, to the presence of planets using secular perturbation theory. In addition, we obtain supplementary ISO observations and determine a scale factor for the data which we apply to calibrate the data to the observed COBE brightness. A Kuiper dust disk will have a resonant structure, with two concentrations in brightness along the ecliptic longitude arising because 10 15% of the Kuiper belt objects are in the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune. We run numerical integrations of particles originating from source bodies trapped in the 3:2 resonance and we determine what percentage of particles remain in the resonance for a variety of particle and source body sizes. The dynamical evolution of the particles is followed from source to sink with Poynting- Robertson light drag, solar wind drag, radiation pressure, the Lorentz force, neutral interstellar gas drag, and the effects of planetary gravitational perturbations included. We then conduct an observational search in the 60 μm COBE data for the Kuiper disk, which is predicted to be, at most, a few percent of the brightness of the zodiacal cloud. By removing emission due to the background zodiacal cloud and the dust bands, we expect to see the trailing/leading signature of Earth's resonant ring. However, when subtracted from the data, we find that none of the empirical background zodiacal cloud models give the residuals predicted by theory. We conclude that a dynamical two-component (both inner and outer) zodiacal cloud model must be created to complete the search. Lastly, we extend our work outside the solar system and obtain upper limits on the flux around ten

  18. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this ``quasar mode'' feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been directly compared to X-ray spectra, providing important insights into the wind physics. However, fundamental improvements on these studies will come only from the unprecedented energy resolution and sensitivity of the upcoming X-ray observatories, namely ASTRO-H (launch date early 2016) and Athena (2028).

  19. Clustering and heterogeneous dynamics in a kinetic Monte Carlo model of self-propelled hard disks.

    PubMed

    Levis, Demian; Berthier, Ludovic

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a kinetic Monte Carlo model for self-propelled hard disks to capture with minimal ingredients the interplay between thermal fluctuations, excluded volume, and self-propulsion in large assemblies of active particles. We analyze in detail the resulting (density, self-propulsion) nonequilibrium phase diagram over a broad range of parameters. We find that purely repulsive hard disks spontaneously aggregate into fractal clusters as self-propulsion is increased and rationalize the evolution of the average cluster size by developing a kinetic model of reversible aggregation. As density is increased, the nonequilibrium clusters percolate to form a ramified structure reminiscent of a physical gel. We show that the addition of a finite amount of noise is needed to trigger a nonequilibrium phase separation, showing that demixing in active Brownian particles results from a delicate balance between noise, interparticle interactions, and self-propulsion. We show that self-propulsion has a profound influence on the dynamics of the active fluid. We find that the diffusion constant has a nonmonotonic behavior as self-propulsion is increased at finite density and that activity produces strong deviations from Fickian diffusion that persist over large time scales and length scales, suggesting that systems of active particles generically behave as dynamically heterogeneous systems.

  20. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  1. A NEW RAYTRACER FOR MODELING AU-SCALE IMAGING OF LINES FROM PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Meijerink, Rowin; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2009-10-20

    The material that formed the present-day solar system originated in feeding zones in the inner solar nebula located at distances within approx20 AU from the Sun, known as the planet-forming zone. Meteoritic and cometary material contain abundant evidence for the presence of a rich and active chemistry in the planet-forming zone during the gas-rich phase of solar system formation. It is a natural conjecture that analogs can be found among the zoo of protoplanetary disks around nearby young stars. The study of the chemistry and dynamics of planet formation requires: (1) tracers of dense gas at 100-1000 K and (2) imaging capabilities of such tracers with 5-100 mas (0.5-20 AU) resolution, corresponding to the planet-forming zone at the distance of the closest star-forming regions. Recognizing that the rich infrared (2-200 mum) molecular spectrum recently discovered to be common in protoplanetary disks represents such a tracer, we present a new general ray-tracing code, RADLite, that is optimized for producing infrared line spectra and images from axisymmetric structures. RADLite can consistently deal with a wide range of velocity gradients, such as those typical for the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. The code is intended as a back-end for chemical and excitation codes, and can rapidly produce spectra of thousands of lines for grids of models for comparison with observations. Such radiative transfer tools will be crucial for constraining both the structure and chemistry of planet-forming regions, including data from current infrared imaging spectrometers and extending to the Atacama Large Millimeter Array and the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope and beyond.

  2. Theoretical study of the α +d →6Li +γ astrophysical capture process in a three-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunov, E. M.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Turakulov, S. A.; Bray, I.

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical capture process α +d →6Li is studied in a three-body model. The initial state is factorized into the deuteron bound state and the (α +d )-scattering state. The final nucleus 6Li (1+) is described as a three-body bound state α +n +p in the hyperspherical Lagrange-mesh method. The contribution of the E 1 -transition operator from the initial isosinglet states to the isotriplet components of the final state is estimated to be negligible. An estimation of the forbidden E 1 transition to the isosinglet components of the final state is comparable with the corresponding results of the two-body model. However, the contribution of the E 2 -transition operator is found to be much smaller than the corresponding estimations of the two-body model. The three-body model perfectly matches the new experimental data of the LUNA Collaboration with the spectroscopic factor of 2.586 estimated from the bound-state wave functions of 6Li and a deuteron.

  3. Confronting Standard Models of Proto-planetary Disks with New Mid-infrared Sizes from the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Che, Xiao; Monnier, John D.; Sitko, Michael L.; Russell, Ray W.; Grady, Carol A.; Day, Amanda N.; Perry, R. B.; Harries, Tim J.; Aarnio, Alicia N.; Colavita, Mark M.; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Ragland, Sam; Woillez, Julien

    2016-08-01

    We present near- and mid-infrared (MIR) interferometric observations made with the Keck Interferometer Nuller and near-contemporaneous spectro-photometry from the infrared telescope facilities (IRTFs) of 11 well-known young stellar objects, several of which were observed for the first time in these spectral and spatial resolution regimes. With au-level spatial resolution, we first establish characteristic sizes of the infrared emission using a simple geometrical model consisting of a hot inner rim and MIR disk emission. We find a high degree of correlation between the stellar luminosity and the MIR disk sizes after using near-infrared data to remove the contribution from the inner rim. We then use a semi-analytical physical model to also find that the very widely used “star + inner dust rim + flared disk” class of models strongly fails to reproduce the spectral energy distribution (SED) and spatially resolved MIR data simultaneously; specifically a more compact source of MIR emission is required than results from the standard flared disk model. We explore the viability of a modification to the model whereby a second dust rim containing smaller dust grains is added, and find that the 2-rim model leads to significantly improved fits in most cases. This complexity is largely missed when carrying out SED modeling alone, although detailed silicate feature fitting by McClure et al. recently came to a similar conclusion. As has been suggested recently by Menu et al., the difficulty in predicting MIR sizes from the SED alone might hint at “transition disk”-like gaps in the inner au; however, the relatively high correlation found in our MIR disk size versus stellar luminosity relation favors layered disk morphologies and points to missing disk model ingredients instead.

  4. Gas lines from the 5-Myr old optically thin disk around HD 141569A . Herschel observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, W.-F.; Pinte, C.; Pantin, E.; Augereau, J. C.; Meeus, G.; Ménard, F.; Martin-Zaïdi, C.; Woitke, P.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Kamp, I.; Carmona, A.; Sandell, G.; Eiroa, C.; Dent, W.; Montesinos, B.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; White, G.; Ardila, D.; Lebreton, J.; Mendigutía, I.; Brittain, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The gas- and dust dissipation processes in disks around young stars remain uncertain despite numerous studies. At the distance of ~99-116 pc, HD 141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disk, probably in transition between a massive primordial disk and a debris disk. Atomic and molecular gases have been found in the structured 5-Myr old HD 141569A disk, making HD 141569A the perfect object within which to directly study the gaseous atomic and molecular component. Aims: We wish to constrain the gas and dust mass in the disk around HD 141569A. Methods: We observed the fine-structure lines of O i at 63 and 145 μm and the C ii line at 157 μm with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large program GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with archival Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, a ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 μm, and 12CO fundamental ro-vibrational and pure rotational J = 3-2 observations. We simultaneously modeled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk gas- and dust properties assuming no dust settling. Results: The models suggest that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disk around HD 141569A, whereas the [C ii] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted mostly by the outer disk. Simultaneous modeling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disk structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains with a radius smaller than 1 mm of ~2.1 × 10-7M⊙ and from grains with a radius of up to 1 cm of 4.9 × 10-6M⊙. We constrained the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mass to be between 2 × 10-11 and 1.4 × 10-10M⊙ assuming circumcircumcoronene (C150H30) as the representative PAH. The associated PAH abundance relative to hydrogen is lower than those found in the interstellar

  5. A guide to the use of the pressure disk rotor model as implemented in INS3D-UP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffin, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    This is a guide for the use of the pressure disk rotor model that has been placed in the incompressible Navier-Stokes code INS3D-UP. The pressure disk rotor model approximates a helicopter rotor or propeller in a time averaged manner and is intended to simulate the effect of a rotor in forward flight on the fuselage or the effect of a propeller on other aerodynamic components. The model uses a modified actuator disk that allows the pressure jump across the disk to vary with radius and azimuth. The cyclic and collective blade pitch angles needed to achieve a specified thrust coefficient and zero moment about the hub are predicted. The method has been validated with experimentally measured mean induced inflow velocities as well as surface pressures on a generic fuselage. Overset grids, sometimes referred to as Chimera grids, are used to simplify the grid generation process. The pressure disk model is applied to a cylindrical grid which is embedded in the grid or grids used for the rest of the configuration. This document will outline the development of the method, and present input and results for a sample case.

  6. Self-Consistent Thermal Accretion Disk Corona Models for Compact Objects. II; Application to Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Joern; Maisack, Michael; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We apply our self-consistent accretion disk corona (ADC) model, with two different geometries, to the broadband X-ray spectrum of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. As shown in a companion paper, models in which the Comptonizing medium is a slab surrounding the cold accretion disk cannot have a temperature higher than about 140 keV for optical depths greater than 0.2, resulting in spectra that are much softer than the observed 10-30 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1. In addition, the slab-geometry models predict a substantial "soft excess" at low energies, a feature not observed for Cyg X-1, and Fe K-alpha fluorescence lines that are stronger than observed. Previous Comptonization models in the literature have invoked a slab geometry with optical depth tau(sub T) approx. greater than 0.3 and coronal temperature T(sub c) approx. 150 keV, but they are not self-consistent. Therefore, ADC models with a slab geometry are not appropriate for explaining the X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1. Models with a spherical corona and an exterior disk, however, predict much higher self-consistent coronal temperatures than the slab-geometry models. The higher coronal temperatures are due to the lower amount of reprocessing of coronal radiation in the accretion disk, giving rise to a lower Compton cooling rate. Therefore, for the sphere-plus-disk geometry, the predicted spectrum can be hard enough to describe the observed X-ray continuum of Cyg X-1 while predicting Fe fluorescence lines having an equivalent width of approx. 40 eV. Our best-fit parameter values for the sphere-plus-disk geometry are tau(sub T) approx. equal to 1.5 and T(sub c) approx. equal to 90 keV.

  7. Chemistry in disks. IV. Benchmarking gas-grain chemical models with surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Hersant, F.; Wakelam, V.; Dutrey, A.; Chapillon, E.; Guilloteau, St.; Henning, Th.; Launhardt, R.; Piétu, V.; Schreyer, K.

    2010-11-01

    Context. We describe and benchmark two sophisticated chemical models developed by the Heidelberg and Bordeaux astrochemistry groups. Aims: The main goal of this study is to elaborate on a few well-described tests for state-of-the-art astrochemical codes covering a range of physical conditions and chemical processes, in particular those aimed at constraining current and future interferometric observations of protoplanetary disks. Methods: We considered three physical models: a cold molecular cloud core, a hot core, and an outer region of a T Tauri disk. Our chemical network (for both models) is based on the original gas-phase osu_03_2008 ratefile and includes gas-grain interactions and a set of surface reactions for the H-, O-, C-, S-, and N-bearing molecules. The benchmarking was performed with the increasing complexity of the considered processes: (1) the pure gas-phase chemistry, (2) the gas-phase chemistry with accretion and desorption, and (3) the full gas-grain model with surface reactions. The chemical evolution is modeled within 109 years using atomic initial abundances with heavily depleted metals and hydrogen in its molecular form. Results: The time-dependent abundances calculated with the two chemical models are essentially the same for all considered physical cases and for all species, including the most complex polyatomic ions and organic molecules. This result, however, required a lot of effort to make all necessary details consistent through the model runs, e.g., definition of the gas particle density, density of grain surface sites, or the strength and shape of the UV radiation field. Conclusions: The reference models and the benchmark setup, along with the two chemical codes and resulting time-dependent abundances are made publicly available on the internet. This will facilitate and ease the development of other astrochemical models and provide nonspecialists with a detailed description of the model ingredients and requirements to analyze the cosmic

  8. Scalar diffraction modeling in optical disk recording using wave function assembling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin; Coene, Wim M J; Hekstra, Andries P

    2007-08-10

    A new scalar diffraction modeling method for simulating the readout signal of optical disks is described. The information layer is discretized into pixels that are grouped in specific ways to form written and unwritten areas. A set of 2D wave functions resulting from these pixels at the detection aperture is established. A readout signal is obtained via the assembly of wave functions from this set according to the content under the scanning spot. The method allows efficient simulation of jitter noise due to edge deformation of recorded marks, which is important at high densities. It is also capable of simulating a physically irregular mark, thereby helping to understand and optimize the recording process.

  9. Efficient Out of Core Sorting Algorithms for the Parallel Disks Model.

    PubMed

    Kundeti, Vamsi; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we present efficient algorithms for sorting on the Parallel Disks Model (PDM). Numerous asymptotically optimal algorithms have been proposed in the literature. However many of these merge based algorithms have large underlying constants in the time bounds, because they suffer from the lack of read parallelism on PDM. The irregular consumption of the runs during the merge affects the read parallelism and contributes to the increased sorting time. In this paper we first introduce a novel idea called the dirty sequence accumulation that improves the read parallelism. Secondly, we show analytically that this idea can reduce the number of parallel I/O's required to sort the input close to the lower bound of [Formula: see text]. We experimentally verify our dirty sequence idea with the standard R-Way merge and show that our idea can reduce the number of parallel I/Os to sort on PDM significantly.

  10. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep them in place. As you age, the disks break down or degenerate. As they do, they lose their cushioning ability. This can lead to pain if the back is stressed. A herniated disk is a disk that ruptures. This allows the ...

  11. Modeling Earth's Disk-Integrated, Time-Dependent Spectrum: Applications to Directly Imaged Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Schwieterman, Edward; Meadows, Victoria; Fujii, Yuka; NAI Virtual Planetary Laboratory, ISSI 'The Exo-Cartography Inverse Problem'

    2016-10-01

    Earth is our only example of a habitable world and is a critical reference point for potentially habitable exoplanets. While disk-averaged views of Earth that mimic exoplanet data can be obtained by interplanetary spacecraft, these datasets are often restricted in wavelength range, and are limited to the Earth phases and viewing geometries that the spacecraft can feasibly access. We can overcome these observational limitations using a sophisticated UV-MIR spectral model of Earth that has been validated against spacecraft observations in wavelength-dependent brightness and phase (Robinson et al., 2011; 2014). This model can be used to understand the information content – and the optimal means for extraction of that information – for multi-wavelength, time-dependent, disk-averaged observations of the Earth. In this work, we explore key telescope parameters and observing strategies that offer the greatest insight into the wavelength-, phase-, and rotationally-dependent variability of Earth as if it were an exoplanet. Using a generalized coronagraph instrument simulator (Robinson et al., 2016), we synthesize multi-band, time-series observations of the Earth that are consistent with large space-based telescope mission concepts, such as the Large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor. We present fits to this dataset that leverage the rotationally-induced variability to infer the number of large-scale planetary surface types, as well as their respective longitudinal distributions and broadband albedo spectra. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of using such methods to identify and map terrestrial exoplanets surfaces with the next generation of space-based telescopes.

  12. Baryon isocurvature scenario in inflationary cosmology - A particle physics model and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Suto, Yasushi

    1991-01-01

    A phenomenological model to produce isocurvature baryon-number fluctuations is proposed in the framework of inflationary cosmology. The resulting spectrum of density fluctuation is very different from the conventional Harrison-Zel'dovich shape. The model, with the parameters satisfying several requirements from particle physics and cosmology, provides an appropriate initial condition for the minimal baryon isocurvature scenario of galaxy formation discussed by Peebles.

  13. Theoretical Modeling of Formic Acid (HCOOH), Formate (HCOO(-)), and Ammonia (NH(4)) Vibrational Spectra in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jin-Young; Woon, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Ions embedded in icy grain mantles are thought to account for various observed infrared spectroscopic features, particularly in certain young stellar objects. The dissociation of formic acid (HCOOH) in astrophysical ices to form the formate ion (HCOO(-)) was modeled with density functional theory cluster calculations. Like isocyanic acid (HOCN), HCOOH was found to spontaneously deprotonate when sufficient water is present to stabilize charge transfer complexes. Both ammonia and water can serve as proton acceptors, yielding ammonium (NH4(+)) and hydronium (H3O(+)) counterions. Computed frequencies of weak infrared features produced by stretching and bending modes in both HCOO(-) and HCOOH were compared with experimental and astronomical data. Our results confirm laboratory assignments that a band at 1381 cm(exp -1) can be attributed to the CH bend in either HCOO(-) or HCOOH, but a band at 1349 cm(exp -1) corresponds to CO stretching in HCOO(-). Another feature at 1710 cm(exp -1) (5.85 m) can possibly be assigned to a CO stretching mode in HCOOH, as suggested by experiment, but the agreement is less satisfactory. In addition, we examine and analyze spectroscopic features associated with NH+4, both as a counterion to HCOO(-) or OCN(-) and in isolation, in order to compare with experimental and astronomical data in the 7 m region.

  14. Application of Laboratory and Modeling Capabilities to Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Astrophysical Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.; Liedahl, D.A.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2000-02-25

    Work funded by the subject LDRD proposal has produced the following results. First, a comprehensive catalog of EUV lines from M-shell iron (Fe IX-XVI) in the 60-140 {angstrom} waveband. Second, a revised estimate of the radiative cooling of high-temperature plasmas by Fe, which dominates the cooling in cosmic-abundance plasmas from 4 x 10{sup 5}K to 1 x 10{sup 7}K. Third, laboratory data to correct theoretical atomic models and develop reliable spectral models of M-shell Fe in the EUV. Fourth, a solution of the origin of the quasi-continuum in EUV spectra of late-type stars, which has been variously ascribed to a high-temperature tail on the emission measure distribution of stellar coronae, reduced metal abundances, resonant scattering (destruction) of emission lines, and incompleteness of atomic models.

  15. Marriage of Electromagnetism and Gravity in an Extended Space Model and Astrophysical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Tsipenyuk, D. Yu.

    2013-09-01

    The generalization of Einstein's special theory of relativity (SRT) is proposed. In this model the possibility of unification of scalar gravity and electromagnetism into a single unified field is considered. Formally, the generalization of the SRT is that instead of (1+3)-dimensional Minkowski space the (1+4)-dimensional extension G is considered. As a fifth additional coordinate the interval S is used. This value is saved under the usual Lorentz transformations in Minkowski space M, but it changes when the transformations in the extended space G are used. We call this model the extended space model (ESM). From a physical point of view our expansion means that processes in which the rest mass of the particles changes are acceptable now. If the rest mass of a particle does not change and the physical quantities do not depend on an additional variable S, then the electromagnetic and gravitational fields exist independently of each other. But if the rest mass is variable and there is a dependence on S, then these two fields are combined into a single unified field. In the extended space model a photon can have a nonzero mass and this mass can be either positive or negative. The gravitational effects such as the speed of escape, gravitational red shift and detection of light can be analyzed in the frame of the extended space model. In this model all these gravitational effects can be found algebraically by the rotations in the (1+4) dimensional space. Now it becomes possible to predict some future results of visible size of supermassive objects in our Universe due to new stage of experimental astronomy development in the RadioAstron Project and analyze phenomena is an explosion of the star V838 Mon.

  16. Analytical model of optical field distribution of thin disk laser with thermal-optical aberration gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Qiu, Yuli; Wang, Zexiong; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong

    2016-08-01

    An analytical model is developed to analyze the optical field distribution of thin disk laser with a thermal-optical aberration gain medium. The fundamental mode field distribution is calculated by using the eigenvector method of the resonator transit matrix for different pumping parameters. The analytical results show that the uniformity of the pumping spot is an important factor that impacts the beam quality of thin disk laser. The uniform pumping spot is beneficial to decrease thermal aberration and Optical Path Difference (OPD) of thin disk crystal, and to improve the beam quality. However, the beam quality still decreases slightly with the increasing of pumping intensity under the uniform pumping condition. The main reason for degradation of beam quality is the aspherical part of OPD which leads to diffraction losses of the resonator and wavefront deformation.

  17. Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability in Low Mass Disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-01

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M sun from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M sun protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (To ) temperatures. Models with To = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with To = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least ~0.043 M sun inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  18. Stellar granulation as seen in disk-integrated intensity. I. Simplified theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Solar granulation has been known for a long time to be a surface manifestation of convection. The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler enable us to observe the signature of this phenomena in disk-integrated intensity on a large number of stars. Aims: The space-based photometric measurements show that the global brightness fluctuations and the lifetime associated with granulation obeys characteristic scaling relations. We thus aimed at providing simple theoretical modeling to reproduce these scaling relations, and subsequently at inferring the physical properties of granulation across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We developed a simple 1D theoretical model. The input parameters were extracted from 3D hydrodynamical models of the surface layers of stars, and the free parameters involved in the model were calibrated with solar observations. Two different prescriptions for representing the Fourier transform of the time-correlation of the eddy velocity were compared: a Lorentzian and an exponential form. Finally, we compared our theoretical prediction with 3D radiative hydrodynamical (RHD) numerical modeling of stellar granulation (hereafter ab initio approach). Results: Provided that the free parameters are appropriately adjusted, our theoretical model reproduces the observed solar granulation spectrum quite satisfactorily; the best agreement is obtained for an exponential form. Furthermore, our model results in granulation spectra that agree well with the ab initio approach using two 3D RHD models that are representative of the surface layers of an F-dwarf and a red-giant star. Conclusions: We have developed a theoretical model that satisfactory reproduces the solar granulation spectrum and gives results consistent with the ab initio approach. The model is used in a companion paper as theoretical framework for interpretating the observed scaling relations. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Toy model for a two-dimensional accretion disk dominated by Poynting flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2001-08-15

    We discuss the effect of the Poynting flux on a magnetically dominated thin accretion disk, which is simplified to a two-dimensional disk on the equatorial plane. It is shown in the relativistic formulation that the Poynting flux caused by a rotating magnetic field with Keplerian angular velocity can balance the energy and angular momentum conservation of a stationary accretion flow.

  20. ASTROPHYSICS. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data.

    PubMed

    2015-08-21

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our experiment, we exclude a variety of representative dark matter models that would induce electronic recoils. For axial-vector couplings to electrons, we exclude cross sections above 6 × 10(-35) cm(2) for particle masses of m(χ) = 2 GeV/c(2). Independent of the dark matter halo, we exclude leptophilic models as an explanation for the long-standing DAMA/LIBRA signal, such as couplings to electrons through axial-vector interactions at a 4.4σ confidence level, mirror dark matter at 3.6σ, and luminous dark matter at 4.6σ. PMID:26293959

  1. ASTROPHYSICS. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data.

    PubMed

    2015-08-21

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our experiment, we exclude a variety of representative dark matter models that would induce electronic recoils. For axial-vector couplings to electrons, we exclude cross sections above 6 × 10(-35) cm(2) for particle masses of m(χ) = 2 GeV/c(2). Independent of the dark matter halo, we exclude leptophilic models as an explanation for the long-standing DAMA/LIBRA signal, such as couplings to electrons through axial-vector interactions at a 4.4σ confidence level, mirror dark matter at 3.6σ, and luminous dark matter at 4.6σ.

  2. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. R.

    1999-11-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, blackbody spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles that are not power-law at all radii but are consistently shallower than r-3/4. Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of active accretion) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance (``decreasing curvature'' disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles that result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally have this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the inner disk. Reprocessing throughout the disk depends sensitively on the inner disk shape and emitted temperature profile. We show that the thermal instability outburst models of Bell & Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of FU Ori systems with T~r-3/4 in the inner disk (r<~0.25 AU corresponding to λ<~10 μm) and T~r-1/2 in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1-10 AU). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass flux, outer disk (Ṁ=10

  3. The Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochau, Gregory

    2013-10-01

    The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories provides near-thermal, MJ-class x-ray sources that emit at powers up to 0.3 PW. This capability enables precise benchmark experiments of fundamental material properties in radiation heated matter at conditions previously unattainable in the laboratory. Experiments on Z can produce uniform, long-lived, and large plasmas at conditions that span volumes up to 100 cm3, temperatures from 1-200 eV, and electron densities from 1E16-23 cm-3. These unique characteristics and the ability to radiatively heat multiple experiments in a single shot have led to a new effort called the Z Astrophysical Plasma Properties (ZAPP) collaboration. This collaboration includes four national laboratories (SNL, LANL, LLNL, and CEA) and three universities (UT-Austin, UN-Reno, and Ohio State) and has been enabled by recent support from the NNSA in fundamental High Energy Density science. The focus of the ZAPP collaboration is to reproduce the radiation and material characteristics of astrophysical plasmas as closely as possible in the laboratory and use detailed spectral measurements to strengthen models for atoms in plasmas. Specific issues under investigation include the LTE opacity of iron at stellar-interior conditions, H-Balmer line shapes in white dwarf photospheres, photoionization around active galactic nuclei, and the efficiency of resonant Auger destruction in black-hole accretion disks. Each of these issues can be simultaneously studied with high precision by acquiring up to 59 individual spectra on a single Z shot. We present the challenges, opportunities, and initial results from ZAPP experiments on Z. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Signatures of Planets: Observations and Modeling of Structure in the Zodiacal Cloud and Kuiper Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, E. K.; Dermott, S. F.

    2001-12-01

    There is a possible connection between structure in evolved circumstellar disks and the presence of planets. Asymmetries in such a disk (such as the zodiacal cloud in the inner solar system or the Kuiper disk in the outer solar system) could be diagnostic of planets that would be otherwise undetectable. At least three different types of asymmetries can serve to indicate bodies orbiting a star in a disk: (1) a warp in the plane of symmetry of the disk, (2) an offset in the center of symmetry of the disk with respect to the central star, and (3) density anomalies in the plane of the disk such as dust bands or resonant rings. Structure in the zodiacal cloud, namely the warp and offset of the cloud, are linked to the presence of planets using secular perturbation theory. A Kuiper disk would most likely have a resonant structure, with two concentrations in brightness along the ecliptic longitude. This structure arises because 10-15% of the Kuiper belt objects, the Plutinos, are in the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune (Jewitt 1999, Malhotra 1995). A size-frequency distribution of particles in the Plutino disk based on the percentage of particles that are trapped in the 3:2 resonance is determined by running numerical integrations of particles in Pluto-like orbits. The dynamical evolution of the particles is followed from source to sink with Poynting-Robertson light drag, solar wind drag, radiation pressure, the Lorentz force, neutral interstellar gas drag, and the effects of planetary gravitational perturbations included. In addition, a search is conducted in COBE DIRBE data for far-infrared emission from the Kuiper disk, which is predicted to be, at most, a few percent of the brightness of the zodiacal cloud from COBE upper limits (Dermott et al. 1999, Backman et al. 1995, Teplitz et al. 1999).

  5. Scattering line polarization in rotating, optically thick disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, I.; Faurobert, M.

    2014-11-01

    Context. To interpret observations of astrophysical disks, it is essential to understand the formation process of the emitted light. If the disk is optically thick, scattering dominated and permeated by a Keplerian velocity field, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) radiative transfer modeling must be done to compute the emergent spectrum from a given disk model. Aims: We investigate NLTE polarized line formation in different simple disk models and aim to demonstrate the importance of both radiative transfer effects and scattering, as well as the effects of velocity fields. Methods: We self-consistently solve the coupled equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium for a two-level atom model by means of Jacobi iteration. We use the short characteristics method of formal solution in two-dimensional axisymmetric media and compute scattering polarization, that is Q/I and U/I line profiles, using the reduced intensity formalism. We account for the presence of Keplerian velocity fields by casting the radiative transfer equation in the observer's frame. Results: Relatively simple (homogeneous and isothermal) disk models show complex intensity profiles that owe their shape to the interplay of multidimensional NLTE radiative transfer and the presence of rotation. The degree of scattering polarization is significantly influenced not only by the inclination of the disk with respect to observer, but also by the optical thickness of the disk and the presence of rotation. Stokes U/I shows double-lobed profiles with amplitude that increases with the disk rotation. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the line profiles, especially the polarized ones, emerging from gaseous disks differ significantly from the profiles predicted by simple approximations. Even in the case of the simple two-level atom model, we obtain line profiles that are diverse in shape, but typically symmetric in Stokes Q and antisymmetric in Stokes U. A clear indicator of disk rotation is

  6. Effect of Degeneration on Fluid–Solid Interaction within Intervertebral Disk Under Cyclic Loading – A Meta-Model Analysis of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Khalaf, Kinda; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The risk of low back pain resulted from cyclic loadings is greater than that resulted from prolonged static postures. Disk degeneration results in degradation of disk solid structures and decrease of water contents, which is caused by activation of matrix digestive enzymes. The mechanical responses resulted from internal solid–fluid interactions of degenerative disks to cyclic loadings are not well studied yet. The fluid–solid interactions in disks can be evaluated by mathematical models, especially the poroelastic finite element (FE) models. We developed a robust disk poroelastic FE model to analyze the effect of degeneration on solid–fluid interactions within disk subjected to cyclic loadings at different loading frequencies. A backward analysis combined with in vitro experiments was used to find the elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability of intact and enzyme-induced degenerated porcine disks. The results showed that the averaged peak-to-peak disk deformations during the in vitro cyclic tests were well fitted with limited FE simulations and a quadratic response surface regression for both disk groups. The results showed that higher loading frequency increased the intradiscal pressure, decreased the total fluid loss, and slightly increased the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. Enzyme-induced degeneration decreased the intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss, and barely changed the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. The increase of intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss with loading frequency was less sensitive after the frequency elevated to 0.1 Hz for the enzyme-induced degenerated disk. Based on this study, it is found that enzyme-induced degeneration decreases energy attenuation capability of disk, but less change the strength of disk. PMID:25674562

  7. A Comprehensive Dust Model Applied to the Resolved Beta Pictoris Debris Disk from Optical to Radio Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Gáspár, András

    2016-06-01

    We investigate whether varying the dust composition (described by the optical constants) can solve a persistent problem in debris disk modeling—the inability to fit the thermal emission without overpredicting the scattered light. We model five images of the β Pictoris disk: two in scattered light from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at 0.58 μm and HST/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC 3) at 1.16 μm, and three in thermal emission from Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) at 24 μm, Herschel/PACS at 70 μm, and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at 870 μm. The WFC3 and MIPS data are published here for the first time. We focus our modeling on the outer part of this disk, consisting of a parent body ring and a halo of small grains. First, we confirm that a model using astronomical silicates cannot simultaneously fit the thermal and scattered light data. Next, we use a simple generic function for the optical constants to show that varying the dust composition can improve the fit substantially. Finally, we model the dust as a mixture of the most plausible debris constituents: astronomical silicates, water ice, organic refractory material, and vacuum. We achieve a good fit to all data sets with grains composed predominantly of silicates and organics, while ice and vacuum are, at most, present in small amounts. This composition is similar to one derived from previous work on the HR 4796A disk. Our model also fits the thermal spectral energy distribution, scattered light colors, and high-resolution mid-IR data from T-ReCS for this disk. Additionally, we show that sub-blowout grains are a necessary component of the halo.

  8. Flexible, Mastery-Oriented Astrophysics Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeilik, Michael, II

    1981-01-01

    Describes the implementation and impact of a two-semester mastery-oriented astrophysics sequence for upper-level physics/astrophysics majors designed to handle flexibly a wide range of student backgrounds. A Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) format was used fostering frequent student-instructor interaction and role-modeling behavior in…

  9. Density fluctuations in the interstellar medium: Evidence for anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence. I - Model and astrophysical sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1984-10-01

    A model of anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence is developed in order to investigate quantitatively a turbulent fluid origin for the small spatial scale density fluctuations observed in 1981 by Armstrong, Cordes, and Rickett in the interstellar medium. The anisotropy at these small spatial scales results from the presence of a large-scale approximately uniform magnetic field that is a sum of the steady-state galactic magnetic field and the large-scale turbulent magnetic field fluctuations. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted to be two-dimensional isobaric entropy variations with oppositely directed gradients in temperature and density projected transverse to the local approximately uniform magnetic field. Three possible sites - cloud shell H II regions, diffuse H II regions produced by O stars, and the tenuous intercloud medium - are investigated as possible locations for turbulent flows.

  10. Dynamics of flux tubes in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, E. T.; Duncan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The study of magnetized plasmas in astrophysics is complicated by a number of factors, not the least of which is that in considering magnetic fields in stars or accretion disks, we are considering plasmas with densities well above those we can study in the laboratory. In particular, whereas laboratory plasmas are dominated by the confining magnetic field pressure, stars, and probably accretion disks, have magnetic fields whose beta (ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field pressure) is much greater than 1. Observations of the Sun suggest that under such circumstances the magnetic field breaks apart into discrete flux tubes with a small filling factor. On the other hand, theoretical treatments of MHD turbulence in high-beta plasmas tend to assume that the field is more or less homogeneously distributed throughout the plasma. Here we consider a simple model for the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in a turbulent medium. We discuss the mechanism by which small inhomogeneities evolve into discrete flux tubes and the size and distribution of such flux tubes. We then apply the model to accretion disks. We find that the fibrilation of the magnetic field does not enhance magnetic buoyancy. We also note that the evolution of an initially diffuse field in a turbulent medium, e.g., any uniform field in a shearing flow, will initially show exponential growth as the flux tubes form. This growth saturates when the flux tube formation is complete and cannot be used as the basis for a self-sustaining dynamo effect. Since the typical state of the magnetic field is a collection of intense flux tubes, this effect is of limited interest. However, it may be important early in the evolution of the galactic magnetic field, and it will play a large role in numerical simulations. Finally, we note that the formation of flux tubes is an essential ingredient in any successful dynamo model for stars or accretion disks.

  11. Photometric models of disk-integrated observations of the OSIRIS-REx target Asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takir, Driss; Clark, Beth Ellen; Drouet d'Aubigny, Christian; Hergenrother, Carl W.; Li, Jian-Yang; Lauretta, Dante S.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-05-01

    We used ground-based photometric phase curve data of the OSIRIS-REx target Asteroid (101955) Bennu and low phase angle data from Asteroid (253) Mathilde as a proxy to fit Bennu data with Minnaert, Lommel-Seeliger, (RObotic Lunar Orbiter) ROLO, Hapke, and McEwen photometric models, which capture the global light scattering properties of the surface and subsequently allow us to calculate the geometric albedo, phase integral, spherical Bond albedo, and the average surface normal albedo for Bennu. We find that Bennu has low reflectance and geometric albedo values, such that multiple scattering is expected to be insignificant. Our photometric models relate the reflectance from Bennu's surface to viewing geometry as functions of the incidence, emission, and phase angles. Radiance Factor functions (RADFs) are used to model the disk-resolved brightness of Bennu. The Minnaert, Lommel-Seeliger, ROLO, and Hapke photometric models work equally well in fitting the best ground-based photometric phase curve data of Bennu. The McEwen model works reasonably well at phase angles from 20° to 70°. Our calculated geometric albedo values of 0.047-0.014+0.012,0.047-0.014+0.005 , and 0.048-0.022+0.012 for the Minnaert, the Lommel-Seeliger, and the ROLO models respectively are consistent with the geometric albedo of 0.045 ± 0.015 computed by Emery et al. (Emery, J.P. et al. [2014]. Icarus 234, 17-35) and Hergenrother et al. (Hergenrother, C.W. et al. [2014].

  12. Modeling and validation of residual stress distribution in an HSLA-100 disk

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Zhu, Y.Y.; Zacharia, T.; Fields, R.J.; Prask, H.J.; Brand, P.C.; Blackburn, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The residual stress distribution in a GTA spot we 100 steel disk was analyzed using thermomechanically uncoupled and semi-coupled finite element (FE) formulations and measured with the neutron diffraction technique. The computations used temperature-dependent the and mechanical properties of the base metal. The thermal analysis was based on the heat conduction formulation with the Gaussian heat input from the arc. The semi-coupled approach is an effective alternative to the fully coupled approach in which the incompatibility in the thermal and mechanical time increments often leads to numerical convergence difficulties. Convergence was achieved in the semi-coupled approach where a larger time increment for temperature calculation was automatically divided into some sub-intervals for the thermal stress calculation. The temperature, deformation configurations, and state variables were updated at the end of the temperature increment. The predictions from the FE models are in very good agreement with the neutron measurement results in the far heat-affected zone (HAZ) and in the base metal. Both models over-predicted the residual stress field in the fusion zone and near HAZ as measured by the neutron diffraction method. The discrepancy could be attributed to the changes in microstructures and material properties in the HAZ and fusion zone due to phase transformations during the welding thermal cycle. The formation of cracks in the fusion zone is another factor that possibly contributes to the lower measured residual stress values.

  13. A Hydrodynamical Mechanism for Generating Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, X.; Rendón, P. L.; Rodríguez-Mota, R. G.; Capella, A.

    2014-04-01

    Whenever in a classical accretion disk the thin disk approximation fails interior to a certain radius, a transition from Keplerian to radial infalling trajectories should occur. We show that this transition is actually expected to occur interior to a certain critical radius, provided surface density profiles are steeper than Sigma(R) ~ R(-1/2) , and further, that it probably corresponds to the observationally inferred phenomena of thick hot walls internally limiting the extent of many stellar accretion disks. Infalling trajectories will lead to the convergent focusing and concentration of matter towards the very central regions, most of which will simply be swallowed by the central object. We show through a perturbative hydrodynamical analysis, that this will naturally develop a well collimated pair of polar jets. A first analytic treatment of the problem described is given, proving the feasibility of purely hydrodynamical mechanisms for astrophysical jet generation.

  14. Future Experiments in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement methodologies of astrophysics experiments reflect the enormous variation of the astrophysical radiation itself. The diverse nature of the astrophysical radiation, e.g. cosmic rays, electromagnetic radiation, and neutrinos, is further complicated by the enormous span in energy, from the 1.95 Kappa relic neutrino background to cosmic rays with energy greater than 10(exp 20)eV. The measurement of gravity waves and search for dark matter constituents are also of astrophysical interest. Thus, the experimental techniques employed to determine the energy of the incident particles are strongly dependent upon the specific particles and energy range to be measured. This paper summarizes some of the calorimetric methodologies and measurements planned by future astrophysics experiments. A focus will be placed on the measurement of higher energy astrophysical radiation. Specifically, future cosmic ray, gamma ray, and neutrino experiments will be discussed.

  15. A Pulsar and a Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  16. Theory and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Alcock, Charles; Allamandola, Lou; Chevalier, Roger A.; Cline, David B.; Dalgarno, Alexander; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Fall, S. Michael; Ferland, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    Science opportunities in the 1990's are discussed. Topics covered include the large scale structure of the universe, galaxies, stars, star formation and the interstellar medium, high energy astrophysics, and the solar system. Laboratory astrophysics in the 1990's is briefly surveyed, covering such topics as molecular, atomic, optical, nuclear and optical physics. Funding recommendations are given for the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Department of Energy. Recommendations for laboratory astrophysics research are given.

  17. On the Relative Relevance of Subject-Specific Geometries and Degeneration-Specific Mechanical Properties for the Study of Cell Death in Human Intervertebral Disk Models

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M.; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F.; van Rijsbergen, Marc M.; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration. PMID:25717471

  18. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki

    2009-11-15

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  19. Astrophysics and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brinks, Elias; Khanna, Ramon

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysics and Space Science publishes original contributions and invited reviews covering the entire range of astronomy, astrophysics, astrophysical cosmology, planetary and space science, and the astrophysical aspects of astrobiology. This includes both observational and theoretical research, the techniques of astronomical instrumentation and data analysis, and astronomical space instrumentation. We particularly welcome papers in the general fields of high-energy astrophysics, astrophysical and astrochemical studies of the interstellar medium including star formation, planetary astrophysics, the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Papers in mathematical physics or in general relativity which do not establish clear astrophysical applications will not longer be considered.The journal also publishes topical collections consisting of invited reviews and original research papers selected special issues in research fields of particular scientific interest. These consist of both invited reviews and original research papers.Conference proceedings will not be considered. All papers published in the journal are subject to thorough and strict peer-reviewing.Astrophysics and Space Science has an Impact Factor of 2.4 and features short editorial turnaround times as well as short publication times after acceptance, and colour printing free of charge. Published by Springer the journal has a very wide online dissemination and can be accessed by researchers at a very large number of institutes worldwide.

  20. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  2. Towards a comprehensive model of Earth's disk-integrated Stokes vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Muñoz, A.

    2015-07-01

    at three wavelengths (0.48, 0.56 and 0.63 μm) during a flyby in 2005. The light curves show distinct structure associated with the varying aspect of the Earth's visible disk (phases of 98-107°) as the planet undergoes a full 24 h rotation; the structure is reasonably well reproduced with model simulations.

  3. Structure and modeling of the three dimensional boundary layer on a rotating disk. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.K.

    1996-12-01

    Almost all practical turbulent flows include three dimensional boundary layers (3DTBL`s), and in many cases, the 3DTBL is the dominant feature of the flow. A boundary layer is defined as a thin layer adjacent to the surface in which the velocity drops rapidly from the freestream value to zero at the wall. A 3D boundary layer is one in which the flow direction also changes rapidly approaching the wall. This change in the flow direction called skewing is caused by transverse pressure gradients, centrifugal forces, or motion of the surface. Most research on turbulent boundary layers has been done in simple two dimensional flows in carefully controlled wind tunnels. Such boundary layers are now well understood, and excellent models are available describing both the fluid mechanics and heat transfer behavior. Recent fluid mechanics studies have shown that skewing can have a pronounced effect on the boundary layer turbulence. Models based on eddy-viscosity concepts fail, and more complex stress transport models cannot capture the reduction of turbulent mixing that usually accompanies skewing. It was unknown prior to the present study what effect the skewing might have on turbulent heat transfer. It was suspected that turbulent heat transport would be reduced in analogy to the reductions of turbulent shear stress. It was also unknown how the skewing would effect the turbulent Prandtl number, a quantity which is embedded in most turbulent heat transfer prediction schemes. The objectives of the present study were then to study the surface heat transfer rate and the turbulent heat flux in a simple three dimensional boundary layer. In particular, the research addressed the heat transfer from a heated disk rotating in an otherwise quiescent environment.

  4. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-08-07

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  5. Stellar models simulating the disk-locking mechanism and the evolutionary history of the Orion Nebula cluster and NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landin, N. R.; Mendes, L. T. S.; Vaz, L. P. R.; Alencar, S. H. P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Rotational evolution in young stars is described by pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks including non-gray boundary conditions, rotation, conservation of angular momentum, and simulations of disk-locking. Aims: By assuming that disk-locking is the regulation mechanism for the stellar angular velocity during the early stages of pre-main sequence evolution, we use our rotating models and observational data to constrain disk lifetimes (Tdisk) of a representative sample of low-mass stars in two young clusters, the Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) and NGC 2264, and to better understand their rotational evolution. Methods: The period distributions of the ONC and NGC 2264 are known to be bimodal and to depend on the stellar mass. To follow the rotational evolution of these two clusters' stars, we generated sets of evolutionary tracks from a fully convective configuration with low central temperatures (before D- and Li-burning). We assumed that the evolution of fast rotators can be represented by models considering conservation of angular momentum during all stages and of moderate rotators by models considering conservation of angular velocity during the first stages of evolution. With these models we estimate a mass and an age for all stars. Results: The resulting mass distribution for the bulk of the cluster population is in the ranges of 0.2-0.4 M⊙ and 0.1-0.6 M⊙ for the ONC and NGC 2264, respectively. For the ONC, we assume that the secondary peak in the period distribution is due to high-mass objects still locked in their disks, with a locking period (Plock) of ~8 days. For NGC 2264 we make two hypotheses: (1) the stars in the secondary peak are still locked with Plock = 5 days, and (2) NGC 2264 is in a later stage in the rotational evolution. Hypothesis 2 implies in a disk-locking scenario with Plock = 8 days, a disk lifetime of 1 Myr and, after that, constant angular momentum evolution. We then simulated the period distribution of NGC 2264 when the mean age

  6. Models of Chemistry, Thermal Balance, and Infrared Spectra from Intermediate-Aged Disks around G and K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.

    2004-09-01

    We model gas and dust emission from regions 0.3-20 AU from a central low-mass star in intermediate-aged (~107 yr) disks whose dust is fairly optically thin to stellar radiation. The models treat thermal balance and chemistry self-consistently and calculate the vertical density and temperature structure of the gas in a disk. The gas and dust temperatures are calculated separately. The models cover gas masses 10-3 to 1 MJ and dust masses 10-7 to 10-4 MJ and treat solar-type (G and K) stars. We focus on mid-infrared and far-infrared emission lines from various gas species such as the rotational lines of H2, OH, H2O, and CO molecules and the fine-structure lines of carbon, oxygen, sulfur, iron, and silicon atoms and ions. These lines and the dust continuum are observable by the Spitzer Space Telescope and future missions including SOFIA and the Herschel Space Observatory. We find that the [S I] 25.23 μm line is the strongest emission line for a wide range of disk and stellar parameters, followed by emission from [Si II] 34.8 μm, [Fe II] 26 μm, and [O I] 63 μm. [Fe I] 24 μm and rotational lines of OH and H2O are strong when gas masses are high (>~0.1 MJ). Emission from the rotational lines of H2 is more difficult to detect unless disk gas masses are substantial (>~0.1 MJ). For emission from H2 lines to be observable and yet for the dust to be optically thin in stellar light, the ratio of gas to small submillimeter-sized dust particle mass in the disk needs to be >~1000, or at least an order of magnitude higher than that in the interstellar medium. This may be possible at intermediate stages in disk evolution, such as in the gas-gathering stage of the core accretion scenario for giant planet formation, in which most of the dust has coagulated into larger objects (>>1 mm) but the gas has not yet fully dispersed. Whereas the absolute fluxes observed in some lines such as [Fe I] 24 μm and H2 S(0) 28 μm primarily measure the gas mass in the disks, various line ratios

  7. Observations of Circumstellar Disks with Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akeson, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Star formation is arguably the area of astrophysics in which infrared interferometry has had the biggest impact. The optically thick portion of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be disks DO NOT extend to a few stellar radii of the stellar surface. Emission is coming from near the dust sublimation radius, but not all from a single radius. The Herbig Ae stars can be either flared or self-shadowed but very massive (early Be) stars are geometrically thin. The Herbig Ae stars can be either flared or self-shadowed but very massive (early Be) stars are geometrically thin. Observational prospects are rapidly improving: a) Higher spectral resolution will allow observations of the gas: jets, winds, accretion. b) Closure phase and imaging will help eliminate model uncertainties/dependencies.

  8. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  9. Modelling circumbinary protoplanetary disks. II. Gas disk feedback on planetesimal dynamical and collisional evolution in the circumbinary systems Kepler-16 and 34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lines, S.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Baruteau, C.; Paardekooper, S.-J.; Carter, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the feasibility of planetesimal growth in circumbinary protoplanetary disks around the observed systems Kepler-16 and Kepler-34 under the gravitational influence of a precessing eccentric gas disk. Methods: We embed the results of our previous hydrodynamical simulations of protoplanetary disks around binaries into an N-body code to perform 3D, high-resolution, inter-particle gravity-enabled simulations of planetesimal growth and dynamics that include the gravitational force imparted by the gas. Results: Including the full, precessing asymmetric gas disk generates high eccentricity orbits for planetesimals orbiting at the edge of the circumbinary cavity, where the gas surface density and eccentricity have their largest values. The gas disk is able to efficiently align planetesimal pericenters in some regions leading to phased, non-interacting orbits. Outside of these areas eccentric planetesimal orbits become misaligned and overlap leading to crossing orbits and high relative velocities during planetesimal collisions. This can lead to an increase in the number of erosive collisions that far outweighs the number of collisions that result in growth. Gravitational focusing from the static axisymmetric gas disk is weak and does not significantly alter collision outcomes from the gas free case. Conclusions: Due to asymmetries in the gas disk, planetesimals are strongly perturbed onto highly eccentric orbits. Where planetesimals orbits are not well aligned, orbit crossings lead to an increase in the number of erosive collisions. This makes it difficult for sustained planetesimal accretion to occur at the location of Kepler-16b and Kepler-34b and we therefore rule out in situ growth. This adds further support to our initial suggestions that most circumbinary planets should form further out in the disk and migrate inwards.

  10. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were:

  11. Cooling and Infrared Emission due to Molecular Collisional Excitation in Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip

    2011-06-01

    Non-thermal popluations of molecules in a variety of astronomical environments, including photodissociation regions, X-ray dominated regions, and protoplanetary disks, are controlled by collisional excitation and quenching of their rovibrational levels. The important colliders are the dominant neutral species: H, He, and H2. Resulting emission lines are primary cooling transitions and can be observed by current and upcoming IR/submillimeter observatories including Spitzer, Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. Modeling these environments, however, requires large-scale computation of collisional excitation processes. The status, needs, and astrophysical applications for important molecular targets will be reviewed including H2, HD, CO, H2O, and NH3.

  12. From Collapsing Cloud Core to Protoplanetary Disk - A radiation transfer model for L1489 IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinch, Christian; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Jørgensen, Jes K.

    We present a new molecular line radiation transfer model of the low-mass Young Stellar Object L1489 IRS (d ~ 140 pc) which may represent a short-lived transitional stage from collapsing cloud core to a star with a protoplanetary disk in Keplarian rotation (Hogerheijde 2001). The model includes a detailed description of the velocity field, the abundance of several molecular species and the shape and orientation of the object. L1489 IRS is seen to be surrounded by a flattened structure, in which both Keplarian rotation and inward motion are detected over size scales ranging from an outer radius of 2000 AU to within 0.1 AU from the central star (Boogert et al. 2002). With the observed inward motions, it would only take a few times 104 years for material at 2000 AU to spiral into the star, suggesting that this object may be very short lived. We use a flattened density distribution in our model to accommodate the non-spherical structure of L1489 IRS. In this study we aim to provide a better description of the physical and chemical characteristics of L1489 IRS through comparison between a detailed model and existing observations. Our model is described by a flattened Plummer-like density distribution (Stamatellos et al. 2004) given by, n(r, θ) = n0 ( 1 + [r/r0]2 )p/2 sinf ( θ ), where the parameter f determines the flatness. We adopt the value p = -1.8 for the radial density slope, based on the fit to the SCUBA submillimeter emission by Jørgensen et al. (2002). Integrating this profile results in a total disk mass of 0.03 M*. We use a radial temperature distribution given by a power-law with an index of -0.35 and T0 = 19.4 K at r0 = 1000 AU. The velocity field is parameterised by the mass of the central star M* and the angle α between the resulting velocity vector and the azimuthal direction. A value of α = 0 thus correspond to pure Keplarian rotation around a star of mass M*. Our free parameters are: M*, α, f, Xmol, and the inclination angle, i. The molecular

  13. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  14. Simulations of Ice Nucleation by Model AgI Disks and Plates.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Stephen A; Bertram, Allan K; Patey, G N

    2016-03-10

    Silver iodide is one of the most effective ice nuclei known. We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate ice nucleation by AgI disks and plates with radii ranging from 1.15 to 2.99 nm. It is shown that disks and plates in this size range are effective ice nuclei, nucleating bulk ice at temperatures as warm as 14 K below the equilibrium freezing temperature, on simulation time scales (up to a few hundred nanoseconds). Ice nucleated on the Ag exposed surface of AgI disks and plates. Shortly after supercooling an ice cluster forms on the AgI surface. The AgI-stabilized ice cluster fluctuates in size as time progresses, but, once formed, it is constantly present. Eventually, depending on the disk or plate size and the degree of supercooling, a cluster fluctuation achieves critical size, and ice nucleates and rapidly grows to fill the simulation cell. Larger AgI disks and plates support larger ice clusters and hence can nucleate ice at warmer temperatures. This work may be useful for understanding the mechanism of ice nucleation on nanoparticles and active sites of larger atmospheric particles. PMID:26878341

  15. ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY AT DEAD ZONE BOUNDARIES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL GLOBAL MODELS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2012-09-01

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parameterized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the PENCIL CODE to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also triggers the RWI. The magnetized vortex that results should be disrupted by parasitical magneto-elliptic instabilities, yet it subsists in high resolution. This suggests that either the parasitic modes are still numerically damped or that the RWI supplies vorticity faster than they can destroy it. We conclude that the resistive transition between the active and dead zones in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, if sharp enough, can indeed excite vortices via RWI. Our results lend credence to previous works that relied on the alpha-disk approximation, and caution against the use of overly reduced azimuthal coverage on modeling this transition.

  16. SPIN (Version 3. 83): A Fortran program for modeling one-dimensional rotating-disk/stagnation-flow chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E. ); Kee, R.J.; Evans, G.H.; Meeks, E.; Rupley, F.M.; Grcar, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    In rotating-disk reactor a heated substrate spins (at typical speeds of 1000 rpm or more) in an enclosure through which the reactants flow. The rotating disk geometry has the important property that in certain operating regimes{sup 1} the species and temperature gradients normal to the disk are equal everywhere on the disk. Thus, such a configuration has great potential for highly uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD),{sup 2--5} and indeed commercial rotating-disk CVD reactors are now available. In certain operating regimes, the equations describing the complex three-dimensional spiral fluid motion can be solved by a separation-of-variables transformation{sup 5,6} that reduces the equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Strictly speaking, the transformation is only valid for an unconfined infinite-radius disk and buoyancy-free flow. Furthermore, only some boundary conditions are consistent with the transformation (e.g., temperature, gas-phase composition, and approach velocity all specified to be independent of radius at some distances above the disk). Fortunately, however, the transformed equations will provide a very good practical approximation to the flow in a finite-radius reactor over a large fraction of the disk (up to {approximately}90% of the disk radius) when the reactor operating parameters are properly chosen, i.e, high rotation rates. In the limit of zero rotation rate, the rotating disk flow reduces to a stagnation-point flow, for which a similar separation-of-variables transformation is also available. Such flow configurations ( pedestal reactors'') also find use in CVD reactors. In this report we describe a model formulation and mathematical analysis of rotating-disk and stagnation-point CVD reactors. Then we apply the analysis to a compute code called SPIN and describe its implementation and use. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  17. SPIN (Version 3.83): A FORTRAN program for modeling one-dimensional rotating-disk/stagnation-flow chemical vapor deposition reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltrin, M. E.; Kee, R. J.; Evans, G. H.; Meeks, E.; Rupley, F. M.; Grcar, J. F.

    1991-08-01

    In a rotating-disk reactor, a heated substrate spins (at typical speeds of 1000 rpm or more) in an enclosure through which the reactants flow. The rotating disk geometry has the important property that in certain operating regimes the species and temperature gradients normal to the disk are equal everywhere on the disk. Thus, such a configuration has great potential for highly uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and indeed commercial rotating-disk CVD reactors are now available. In certain operating regimes, the equations describing the complex three-dimensional spiral fluid motion can be solved by a separation-of-variables transformation that reduces the equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Strictly speaking, the transformation is only valid for an unconfined infinite-radius disk and buoyancy-free flow. Furthermore, only some boundary conditions are consistent with the transformation (e.g., temperature, gas-phase composition, and approach velocity all specified to be independent of radius at some distances above the disk). Fortunately, however, the transformed equations will provide a very good practical approximation to the flow in a finite-radius reactor over a large fraction of the disk (up to approximately 90 percent of the disk radius) when the reactor operating parameters are properly chosen, i.e., high rotation rates. In the limit of zero rotation rate, the rotating disk flow reduces to a stagnation-point flow, for which a similar separation-of-variables transformation is also available. Such flow configurations ('pedestal reactors') also find use in CVD reactors. In this report we describe a model formulation and mathematical analysis of rotating-disk and stagnation-point CVD reactors. Then we apply the analysis to a compute code called SPIN and describe its implementation and use.

  18. A review of astrophysical reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Magnetic reconnection is a basic plasma process involving rapid rearrangement of magnetic field topology. It often leads to violent release of magnetic energy and its conversion to the plasma thermal and kinetic energy as well as nonthermal particle acceleration. It is thus believed to power numerous types of explosive phenomena both inside and outside the Solar system, including various kinds of high-energy flares. In this talk I will first give an overview of astrophysical systems where reconnection is believed to play an important role. Examples include pulsed high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres; gamma-ray flares in pulsar wind nebulae and AGN/blazar jets; Gamma-Ray Bursts; and giant flares in magnetar systems. I will also analyze the physical conditions of the plasma in some of these astrophysical systems and will discuss the fundamental physical differences between various astrophysical instances of magnetic reconnection and the more familiar solar and space examples of reconnection. In particular, I will demonstrate the importance of including radiative effects in order to understand astrophysical magnetic reconnection and in order to connect our theoretical models with the observed radiation signatures.

  19. Condensation Processes in Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Hill, Hugh G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Astrophysical systems present an intriguing set of challenges for laboratory chemists. Chemistry occurs in regions considered an excellent vacuum by laboratory standards and at temperatures that would vaporize laboratory equipment. Outflows around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars have timescales ranging from seconds to weeks depending on the distance of the region of interest from the star and, on the way significant changes in the state variables are defined. The atmospheres in normal stars may only change significantly on several billion-year timescales. Most laboratory experiments carried out to understand astrophysical processes are not done at conditions that perfectly match the natural suite of state variables or timescales appropriate for natural conditions. Experimenters must make use of simple analog experiments that place limits on the behavior of natural systems, often extrapolating to lower-pressure and/or higher-temperature environments. Nevertheless, we argue that well-conceived experiments will often provide insights into astrophysical processes that are impossible to obtain through models or observations. This is especially true for complex chemical phenomena such as the formation and metamorphism of refractory grains under a range of astrophysical conditions. Data obtained in our laboratory has been surprising in numerous ways, ranging from the composition of the condensates to the thermal evolution of their spectral properties. None of this information could have been predicted from first principals and would not have been credible even if it had.

  20. THE GAS/DUST RATIO OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: TESTING MODELS OF PLANETESIMAL FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, David; Gibb, Erika; Rettig, Terrence W.; Tilley, David; Balsara, Dinshaw; Brittain, Sean

    2012-07-20

    We present high-resolution, near-infrared NIRSPEC observations of CO absorption toward six class II T Tauri stars: AA Tau, DG Tau, IQ Tau, RY Tau, CW Tau, and Haro 6-5b. {sup 12}CO overtone absorption lines originating from the circumstellar disk of each object were used to calculate line-of-sight gas column densities toward each source. We measured the gas/dust ratio as a function of disk inclination, utilizing measured visual extinctions and inclinations for each star. The majority of our sources show further evidence for a correlation between the gas/dust column density ratio and disk inclination similar to that found by Rettig et al.

  1. Hot Accretion Disks Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoernsson, Gunnlaugur; Abramowicz, Marek A.; Chen, Xingming; Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    1996-08-01

    All previous studies of hot (Tp 1010-1012 K), optically thin accretion disks have neglected either the presence of e+ e- pairs or advective cooling. Thus all hot disk models constructed previously have not been self-consistent. In this paper we calculate local disk models including pair physics, relevant radiative processes in the hot plasma, and the effect of advective cooling. We use a modification of the Björnsson & Svensson mapping method. We find that the role of e+ e- pairs in the structure of hot, optically thin accretion disks is far less significant than was previously thought. The improved description of the radiation-matter interactions provided in the present paper modify the previously obtained values of the critical parameters characterizing advectively dominated flows.

  2. Radiative properties of astrophysical matter : a quest to reproduce astrophysical conditions on earth.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.

    2010-10-01

    . Z dynamic hohlraums provide such a megajoule-class source. Initial Z experiments measured transmission through iron samples ionized to the same charge states that exist at the solar convection zone base. The resulting data made it possible to test challenging aspects of the opacity calculations such as the ionization balance and the completeness and accuracy of the atomic energy level description. However, the density was too low to provide a definitive test of the physics at the solar convection zone base. Recent experiments have reached higher densities, and opacity model tests for stellar interiors now appear within reach. Accretion powered objects, including active galactic nuclei, x-ray binaries, and black hole accretion disks, are the most luminous objects in the universe. Astrophysical models for these objects rely largely on comparing spectroscopic predictions with observations. A dilemma arises because the spectra originate from plasmas that are bathed in the enormous photon flux from the accretion disk and photoionization dominates the atomic ionization and energy level populations. Thus, constraining astrophysical models depends on accurate atomic models for photoionized plasmas. Unfortunately, to date the ionization in almost all laboratory experiments is collision-dominated and very few tests of photoionized plasma atomic kinetics exist. Megajoule class high-energy-density facilities can help because they generate higher x-ray fluence over larger spatial scales and longer times. Expanded iron foils and pre-filled neon gas cells have been used in experiments at Z to study photoionized atomic kinetics in two elements commonly observed in astrophysical objects. In these experiments, low density samples are exposed to a measured intense x-ray spectrum, emergent emission or absorption spectra are recorded, and the results are compared to predictions made with spectral synthesis codes used by astrophysicists. Initial experiments focused on testing models used

  3. The Accretion Disk Limit Cycle Model: Toward an Understanding of the Long-Term Behavior of SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannizzo, John K.

    1993-12-01

    We present detailed computations of the limit cycle model for dwarf nova outbursts with application to SS Cygni, the best studied dwarf nova. We examine how secular changes in the input parameters of the model affect the properties associated with the outbursts. For input parameters which reproduce the observed outburst recurrence times and outburst durations for SS Cyg, our time-dependent, accretion disk instability code generates light curves in which one or more short outbursts tend to be sandwiched between two long outbursts. We find that the relative frequency of long versus short outbursts can be influenced by changes in the accretion disk viscosity and mass transfer rate. By forming moving averages taken from the long-term AAVSO light curve of SS Cyg, we find a strong correlation between the recurrence time for outbursts tc and the ratio of the number of long outbursts N(L) to the number of short outbursts N(S) occurring in a given time interval. This can be accounted for in the model in several ways. Changes in the radius of the inner edge of the disk produce correlated changes in tc and N(L)/N(S), as do slow variations in either αcold or αhot -- the accretion disk viscosity parameters in quiescence and outburst. In this latter scenario, there must be a fundamental asymmetry between the two alphas in the sense that both quantities cannot be varying in step with each other i.e., one must remain fixed while the other varies. Finally, variations in the mass transfer rate MṡT cannot directly account for the observed long-term changes in the light curve of SS Cyg as was postulated by Hempelmann & Kurths and by Cannizzo & Mattei.

  4. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  5. OUTWARD MIGRATION OF JUPITER AND SATURN IN 3:2 OR 2:1 RESONANCE IN RADIATIVE DISKS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GRAND TACK AND NICE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierens, Arnaud; Raymond, Sean N.; Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Embedded in the gaseous protoplanetary disk, Jupiter and Saturn naturally become trapped in 3:2 resonance and migrate outward. This serves as the basis of the Grand Tack model. However, previous hydrodynamical simulations were restricted to isothermal disks, with moderate aspect ratio and viscosity. Here we simulate the orbital evolution of the gas giants in disks with viscous heating and radiative cooling. We find that Jupiter and Saturn migrate outward in 3:2 resonance in modest-mass (M {sub disk} ≈ M {sub MMSN}, where MMSN is the {sup m}inimum-mass solar nebula{sup )} disks with viscous stress parameter α between 10{sup –3} and 10{sup –2}. In disks with relatively low-mass (M {sub disk} ≲ M {sub MMSN}), Jupiter and Saturn get captured in 2:1 resonance and can even migrate outward in low-viscosity disks (α ≤ 10{sup –4}). Such disks have a very small aspect ratio (h ∼ 0.02-0.03) that favors outward migration after capture in 2:1 resonance, as confirmed by isothermal runs which resulted in a similar outcome for h ∼ 0.02 and α ≤ 10{sup –4}. We also performed N-body runs of the outer solar system starting from the results of our hydrodynamical simulations and including 2-3 ice giants. After dispersal of the gaseous disk, a Nice model instability starting with Jupiter and Saturn in 2:1 resonance results in good solar systems analogs. We conclude that in a cold solar nebula, the 2:1 resonance between Jupiter and Saturn can lead to outward migration of the system, and this may represent an alternative scenario for the evolution of the solar system.

  6. THE EVOLUTION OF INNER DISK GAS IN TRANSITION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoadley, K.; France, K.; McJunkin, M.; Alexander, R. D.; Schneider, P. C.

    2015-10-10

    Investigating the molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) provides insight into how the molecular disk environment changes during the transition from primordial to debris disk systems. We conduct a small survey of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) fluorescent emission, using 14 well-studied Classical T Tauri stars at two distinct dust disk evolutionary stages, to explore how the structure of the inner molecular disk changes as the optically thick warm dust dissipates. We simulate the observed Hi-Lyman α-pumped H{sub 2} disk fluorescence by creating a 2D radiative transfer model that describes the radial distributions of H{sub 2} emission in the disk atmosphere and compare these to observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the radial distributions that best describe the observed H{sub 2} FUV emission arising in primordial disk targets (full dust disk) are demonstrably different than those of transition disks (little-to-no warm dust observed). For each best-fit model, we estimate inner and outer disk emission boundaries (r{sub in} and r{sub out}), describing where the bulk of the observed H{sub 2} emission arises in each disk, and we examine correlations between these and several observational disk evolution indicators, such as n{sub 13–31}, r{sub in,} {sub CO}, and the mass accretion rate. We find strong, positive correlations between the H{sub 2} radial distributions and the slope of the dust spectral energy distribution, implying the behavior of the molecular disk atmosphere changes as the inner dust clears in evolving PPDs. Overall, we find that H{sub 2} inner radii are ∼4 times larger in transition systems, while the bulk of the H{sub 2} emission originates inside the dust gap radius for all transitional sources.

  7. The nuclear physics input to astrophysics modelling, and the r- and p-processes: Where do we stand 50 years after B^2FH and Cameron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, M.

    2008-11-01

    This is a brief review of the progress made since the seminal contributions to the foundations of the theory of nucleosynthesis by M. Burbidge, G. Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, and by Cameron. The reviewed topics are (1) the nuclear physics input to the nucleosynthesis models (nuclear masses, fission, rates of β-decays, neutrino reactions, photoreactions, and nuclear charged particle-induced or neutron-induced reactions), (2) the nuclear physics and astrophysics aspects of the r-process, and (3) the same items for the p-process.

  8. Theoretical study of the electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part II. Dynamics consequences.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Nuclear dynamics is investigated theoretically from first principles by employing the ab initio vibronic models of the prototypical naphthalene and anthracene radical cations developed in Part I. This Part is primarily aimed at corroborating a large amount of available experimental data with a specific final goal to establish an unambiguous link with the current observations in astrophysics and astronomy. The detailed analyses presented here perhaps establish that these two prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations are indeed potential carriers of the observed diffuse interstellar bands. PMID:21750791

  9. GROWTH OF GRAINS IN BROWN DWARF DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Meru, Farzana; Galvagni, Marina; Olczak, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    We perform coagulation and fragmentation simulations using the new physically motivated model by Garaud et al. to determine growth locally in brown dwarf disks. We show that large grains can grow and that if brown dwarf disks are scaled-down versions of T Tauri disks (in terms of stellar mass, disk mass, and disk radius) growth at an equivalent location with respect to the disk truncation radius can occur to the same size in both disks. We show that similar growth occurs because the collisional timescales in the two disks are comparable. Our model may therefore potentially explain the recent observations of grain growth to millimeter sizes in brown dwarf disks, as seen in T Tauri disks.

  10. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... roots. Slipped disks occur more often in middle-aged and older men, usually after strenuous activity. Other ... calm the nerves Muscle relaxants to relieve back spasms LIFESTYLE CHANGES If you are overweight, diet and ...

  11. Structure and modelling of the three-dimensional boundary layer on a rotating disk: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.K.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to develop an improved understanding of the effects of mean flow three dimensionality on boundary layer flow and heat transfer. The specific problem of interest, the flow on a large rotating disk in an otherwise quiescent environment was selected for its geometric simplicity and for its relevance to rotating machinery design.

  12. A formula for the Shakura-Sunyaev turbulent viscosity parameter. [for modeling of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.; Hubickyj, O.

    1984-01-01

    A formula for the Shakura-Suniaev alpha parameter is proposed in terms of the growth rate of the unstable modes of the physical mechanisms that generates turbulence. Turbulent convection is discussed as a particular example. The effect of rotation on turbulent viscosity is considered, and some remarks are made on convective fluxes, disk stability, and other types of instabilities.

  13. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Γ of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter ξ at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A Fe relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 <= Γ <= 3.4, 1 <= ξ <= 104, and 0.5 <= A Fe <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/~javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  14. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Ekmann, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code xillver that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic data base. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Gamma of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter zeta at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A(sub Fe) relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are: 1.2 <= Gamma <= 3.4, 1 <= zeta <= 104, and 0.5 <= A(sub Fe) <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in xspec. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of xillver.

  15. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. III. A COMPLETE GRID OF IONIZED REFLECTION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; McClintock, J. E.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R. E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: thomas.dauser@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de E-mail: wiebke.eikmann@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de

    2013-05-10

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index {Gamma} of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter {xi} at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A{sub Fe} relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 {<=} {Gamma} {<=} 3.4, 1 {<=} {xi} {<=} 10{sup 4}, and 0.5 {<=} A{sub Fe} {<=} 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/{approx}javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  16. Inversions for axisymmetric galactic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiotelis, N.; Patsis, P. A.

    1993-08-01

    We use two models for the distribution function to solve an inverse problem for axisymmetric disks. These systems may be considered - under certain assumptions - as galactic disks. In some cases the solutions of the resulting integral equations are simple, which allows the determination of the kinematic properties of self-consistent models for these systems. These properties for then = 1 Toomre disk are presented in this study.

  17. IMPROVED MODELING OF THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF DISK GALAXIES BY THE EINASTO HALO MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chemin, Laurent; De Blok, W. J. G.; Mamon, Gary A. E-mail: edeblok@ast.uct.ac.za

    2011-10-15

    Analysis of the rotation curves (RCs) of spiral galaxies provides an efficient diagnostic for studying the properties of dark matter halos and their relations with baryonic material. Since the cored pseudo-isothermal (Iso) model usually provides a better description of observed RCs than does the cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) model, there have been concerns that the {Lambda}CDM primordial density fluctuation spectrum may not be the correct one. We have modeled the RCs of galaxies from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) with the Einasto halo model, which has emerged as the best-fitting model of the halos arising in dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations. We find that the RCs are significantly better fit with the Einasto halo than with either Iso or NFW halo models. In our best-fit Einasto models, the radius of density slope -2 and the density at this radius are highly correlated. The Einasto index, which controls the overall shape of the density profile, is near unity on average for intermediate and low mass halos. This is not in agreement with the predictions from {Lambda}CDM simulations. The indices of the most massive halos are in rough agreement with those cosmological simulations and appear correlated with the halo virial mass. We find that a typical Einasto density profile declines more strongly in its outermost parts than any of the Iso or NFW models whereas it is relatively shallow in its innermost regions. The core nature of those regions of halos thus extends the cusp-core controversy found for the NFW model with low surface density galaxies to the Einasto halo with more massive galaxies like those of THINGS. The Einasto concentrations decrease as a function of halo mass, in agreement with trends seen in numerical simulations. However, they are generally smaller than values expected for simulated Einasto halos. We thus find that, so far, the Einasto halo model provides the best match to the observed RCs and can therefore be considered as a new

  18. Nonazimuthal linear polarization in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Ménard, F.; de Boer, J.; Pinte, C.; Avenhaus, H.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2015-10-01

    Several studies discussing imaging polarimetry observations of protoplanetary disks use the so-called radial Stokes parameters Qφ and Uφ to discuss the results. This approach has the advantage of providing a direct measure of the noise in the polarized images under the assumption that the polarization is only azimuthal, i.e., perpendicular to the direction toward the illuminating source. However, a detailed study of the validity of this assumption is currently missing. We aim to test whether departures from azimuthal polarization can naturally be produced by scattering processes in optically thick protoplanetary disks at near infrared wavelengths. We use the radiative transfer code MCFOST to create a generic model of a transition disk using different grain size distributions and dust masses. From these models we generate synthetic polarized images at 2.2 μm. We find that even for moderate inclinations (e.g., i = 40°), multiple scattering alone can produce significant (up to ~ 4.5% of the Qφ image, peak-to-peak) nonazimuthal polarization reflected in the Uφ images. We also find that different grain populations can naturally produce radial polarization (i.e., negative values in the Qφ images). Despite the simplifications of the models, our results suggest that caution is recommended when interpreting polarized images by only analyzing the Qφ and Uφ images. We find that there can be astrophysical signal in the Uφ images and negative values in the Qφ images, which indicate departures from azimuthal polarization. If significant signal is detected in the Uφ images, we recommend checking the standard Q and U images to look for departures from azimuthal polarization. On the positive side, signal in the Uφ images once all instrumental and data-reduction artifacts have been corrected for means that there is more information to be extracted regarding the dust population and particle density.

  19. INTERFEROMETRY OF ϵ AURIGAE: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ASYMMETRIC ECLIPSING DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Kloppenborg, B. K.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Brummelaar, T. A. ten; Farrington, C. D.; Parks, R.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Sallave-Goldfinger, P. J.; Turner, N.; Stencel, R. E.; Monnier, J. D.; Che, X.; Tycner, C.; Zavala, R. T.; Hutter, D.; Zhao, M.; Pedretti, E.; Thureau, N.

    2015-09-15

    We report on a total of 106 nights of optical interferometric observations of the ϵ Aurigae system taken during the last 14 years by four beam combiners at three different interferometric facilities. This long sequence of data provides an ideal assessment of the system prior to, during, and after the recent 2009–2011 eclipse. We have reconstructed model-independent images from the 10 in-eclipse epochs which show that a disk-like object is indeed responsible for the eclipse. Using new three-dimensional, time-dependent modeling software, we derive the properties of the F-star (diameter, limb darkening), determine previously unknown orbital elements (Ω, i), and access the global structures of the optically thick portion of the eclipsing disk using both geometric models and approximations of astrophysically relevant density distributions. These models may be useful in future hydrodynamical modeling of the system. Finally, we address several outstanding research questions including mid-eclipse brightening, possible shrinking of the F-type primary, and any warps or sub-features within the disk.

  20. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A.; Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Natta, A.; Scholz, A.

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  1. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  2. Atomic data generation and collisional radiative modeling of argon II, argon III, and neon I for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge Manuel

    Accurate knowledge of atomic processes plays a key role in modeling the emission in laboratory as well as in astrophysical plasmas. These processes are included in a collisional-radiative model and the results are compared with experimental measurements for Ar and Ne ions from the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) experiment. The accuracy of our model depends upon the quality of the atomic data we use. Atomic data for near neutral systems present a challenge due to the low accuracy of perturbative methods for these systems. In order to improve our model we rely on non-perturbative methods such as R - Matrix and RMPS ( R -Matrix with Pseudo-States) to include correlation in the collision cross-sections. In the case of Ar + we compared R -Matrix electron-impact excitation data against the results from a new RMPS calculation. The aim was to assess the effects of continuum-coupling effects on the atomic data and the resulting spectrum. We do our spectral modeling using the ADAS suite of codes. Our collisional-radiative formalism assumes that the excited levels are in quasi- static equilibrium with the ground and metastable populations. In our model we allow for N e and T e variation along the line of sight by fitting our densities and temperature profiles with those measured within the experiment. The best results so far have been obtained by the fitting of the experimental temperature and density profiles with Gaussian and polynomial distribution functions. The line of sight effects were found to have a significant effect on the emission modeling. The relative emission rates were measured in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. ASTRAL produces bright intense Ar and Ne plasmas with n e = 10 11 to 10 13 cm -3 and T e = 2 to 10 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to

  3. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  4. Outflows from Accretion Disks around Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2013-02-01

    We solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for accretion disks in the spherical coordinates (rθφ) to obtain the explicit structure along the θ direction. The results display thinner, quasi-Keplerian disks for Shakura-Sunyaev Disks (SSDs) and thicker, sub-Keplerian disks for Advection Dominated Accretion Flows (ADAFs) and slim disks, which are consistent with previous popular analytical models, while an inflow region and an outflow region always exist, which supports the results of some recent numerical simulation works. Our results indicate that the outflows should be common in various accretion disks and stronger in slim disks and ADAFs.

  5. Atomic data generation and collisional radiative modeling of argon II, argon III, and neon I for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge Manuel

    Accurate knowledge of atomic processes plays a key role in modeling the emission in laboratory as well as in astrophysical plasmas. These processes are included in a collisional-radiative model and the results are compared with experimental measurements for Ar and Ne ions from the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) experiment. The accuracy of our model depends upon the quality of the atomic data we use. Atomic data for near neutral systems present a challenge due to the low accuracy of perturbative methods for these systems. In order to improve our model we rely on non-perturbative methods such as R - Matrix and RMPS ( R -Matrix with Pseudo-States) to include correlation in the collision cross-sections. In the case of Ar + we compared R -Matrix electron-impact excitation data against the results from a new RMPS calculation. The aim was to assess the effects of continuum-coupling effects on the atomic data and the resulting spectrum. We do our spectral modeling using the ADAS suite of codes. Our collisional-radiative formalism assumes that the excited levels are in quasi- static equilibrium with the ground and metastable populations. In our model we allow for N e and T e variation along the line of sight by fitting our densities and temperature profiles with those measured within the experiment. The best results so far have been obtained by the fitting of the experimental temperature and density profiles with Gaussian and polynomial distribution functions. The line of sight effects were found to have a significant effect on the emission modeling. The relative emission rates were measured in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. ASTRAL produces bright intense Ar and Ne plasmas with n e = 10 11 to 10 13 cm -3 and T e = 2 to 10 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to

  6. Particle rings and astrophysical accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Norman Rostoker had a wide range of interests and significant impact on the plasma physics research at Cornell during the time he was a Cornell professor. His interests ranged from the theory of energetic electron and ion beams and strong particle rings to the related topics of astrophysical accretion discs. We outline some of the topics related to rings and discs including the Rossby wave instability which leads to formation of anticyclonic vortices in astrophysical discs. These vorticies are regions of high pressure and act to trap dust particles which in turn may facilitate planetesimals growth in proto-planetary disks and could be important for planet formation. Analytical methods and global 3D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations have led to rapid advances in our understanding of discs in recent years.

  7. OPAL Opacities for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C.A.; Rogers, F.J.

    1991-05-01

    The OPAL opacity code developed at LLNL has been applied to astrophysical problems. The computed Rosseland mean opacities show significant differences when compared to the Los Alamos results. These differences have been traced to both atomic and equation of state improvements in the OPAL code. Furthermore, preliminary work suggest that the OPAL calculations considerably improve the agreement between observations and stellar models. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Hydrodynamic Stability and Magnetic Reconnection in Disks and Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jeremy; Kulsrud, Russell

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this grant is to study parametric instability. The simplest example of parametric instability is a harmonic oscillator with a periodic modulation of the spring constant. If the modulation frequency is close to twice the natural frequency of the oscillator, the amplitude of oscillation tends to grow exponentially. The growth rate is proportional to the strength of the modulation, but it also depends upon the closeness to resonance of the two frequencies, and upon natural damping rate or "Q" of the oscillator. Parametric instabilities are very common in physics. A familiar example is a jogger's ponytail--normally a very strongly damped pendulum, it can be destabilized by the variation in effective gravity during the jogger's stride. Observation confirms that the period of the pendulum is half that of the jogger's vertical motion. In astrophysics, parametric instability may occur by external tidal forcing, or by interaction among eigenmodes. In the latter case, an energetic eigenmode may destabilize modes of half its frequency, provided some weak nonlinearity exists to couple them. Under a previous Astrophysical Theory grant (NAGW-2419), the PI discovered a parametric instability of tidally forced disks such as the accretion disks in cataclysmic variables and X ray binaries [2]. The destabilized modes are tightly-wound, incompressible, three-dimensional waves analogous to g-modes and r-modes in stars. Later work has confirmed our analysis [4]. It was hoped that these modes might provide a source of turbulence and angular momentum transport in accretion disks. However, a follow-up investigation of this instability by local numerical simulations, although confirming the analytically estimated growth rates, found negligible angular momentum flux [3]. Other work, partly supported by the ATP, now strongly indicates that the transport mechanism in such disks is magnetohydrodynamic turbulence [6]. Nevertheless, the parametric mechanism may truncate the outer

  9. Modeling Spitzer Observations of VV Ser. II. An Extended Quantum-heated Nebula and a Disk Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Evans, Neal J., II; Geers, Vincent C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Spiesman, William

    2007-02-01

    We present mid-infrared Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the UX Orionis star VV Ser and the surrounding cloud. The 5.6-70 μm images show bright, localized, and nebulous emission extended over 4' centered on VV Ser. This nebulosity is due to transiently heated grains excited by UV photons emitted by VV Ser. Imprinted on the nebulosity is a wedge-shaped dark band, centered on the star. We interpret this as the shadow cast by the inner regions of a near-edge-on disk, allowing the PAHs to be excited only outside of this shadow. We extend an axisymmetric radiative transfer model of the VV Ser disk described in a companion paper to include quantum-heated PAH molecules and very small grains (VSGs) in the thermal cooling approximation. The presence of a disk shadow strongly constrains the inclination as well as the position angle of the disk. The nebulosity at 5.6-8.0 μm and the 2175 Å absorption feature seen in an archival spectrum from the IUE can be fit using only PAHs, consistent with the main carrier of the 2175 Å feature being due to the graphite-like structure of the PAHs. The PAH component is found to be relatively smoothly distributed in the cloud, while the population of VSGs emitting at 20-70 μm is strongly concentrated ~50'' to the southeast of VV Ser. Depending on the adopted PAH opacity, the abundance of PAHs in the surrounding cloud is constrained to 5%+/-2% of the total dust mass. Although relatively rare, quantum-heated nebulosities surrounding single, well-defined stars are well-suited for gaining unique insights into the physics of very small particles in molecular clouds.

  10. The Kozai-Lidov mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. II. Effects of binary and disk parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. (2014b) showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions,more » binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.« less

  11. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  12. Modified Slim-Disk Model Based on Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation Data: The Conflict between Outflow and Photon Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shun; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken

    2009-08-01

    Photon trapping and outflow are two key physics issues associated with supercritical accretion flow. We investigated the conflict between these two processes based on two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulation data, and constructed a simplified (radially) one-dimensional model. Mass loss due to outflow, which is not considered in the slim-disk model, reduces the surface density of the flow, and if very significantly, it can totally suppress the photon-trapping effects. If photon trapping is very significant, conversely, outflow can be suppressed because the radiation-pressure force is reduced. To see what actually occurs, we examined the RHD simulation data and evaluated the accretion and outflow rates as functions of the radius. We have found that the accretion rate monotonically decreases, while the outflow rate increases, as the radius decreases. However, the accretion remains constant at small radii, inside several Schwarzschild radii, since the outflow is suppressed by photon trapping effects. To understand the conflict between the photon trapping and outflow in a simpler way, we modeled the radial distribution of the accretion rate from our simulation data, and built up a new (radially) one-dimensional model, which is similar to the slim-disk model, but incorporates mass loss effects due to the outflow. We find that the surface density (and, hence, the optical depth) is greatly reduced even inside the trapping radius, compared to the case without outflow, whereas the effective temperature distribution hardly changes. That is, the emergent spectra do not sensitively depend on the amount of mass outflow. We conclude that the slim-disk approach is valid for interpreting observations, even if the outflow is taken into account. The observational implications of our findings are briefly discussed in relation to ultra-luminous X-ray sources.

  13. HERschel Observations of Edge-on Spirals (HEROES). II. Tilted-ring modelling of the atomic gas disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaert, F.; Gentile, G.; Baes, M.; De Geyter, G.; Hughes, T. M.; Lewis, F.; Bianchi, S.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Edge-on galaxies can offer important insight into galaxy evolution because they are the only systems where the distribution of the different components can be studied both radially and vertically. The HEROES project was designed to investigate the interplay between the gas, dust, stars, and dark matter (DM) in a sample of 7 massive edge-on spiral galaxies. Aims: In this second HEROES paper, we present an analysis of the atomic gas content of 6 out of 7 galaxies in our sample. The remaining galaxy was recently analysed according to the same strategy. The primary aim of this work is to constrain the surface density distribution, the rotation curve, and the geometry of the gas disks in a homogeneous way. In addition we identify peculiar features and signs of recent interactions. Methods: We have constructed detailed tilted-ring models of the atomic gas disks based on new GMRT 21-cm observations of NGC 973 and UGC 4277 and re-reduced archival H i data of NGC 5907, NGC 5529, IC 2531, and NGC 4217. Potential degeneracies between different models were resolved by requiring good agreement with the data in various representations of the data cubes. Results: From our modelling we find that all but one galaxy are warped along the major axis. In addition, we identify warps along the line of sight in three galaxies. A flaring gas layer is required to reproduce the data for only one galaxy, but (moderate) flares cannot be ruled out for the other galaxies either. A coplanar ring-like structure is detected outside the main disk of NGC 4217, which we suggest could be the remnant of a recent minor merger event. We also find evidence of a radial inflow of 15 ± 5 km s-1 in the disk of NGC 5529, which might be related to the ongoing interaction with two nearby companions. For NGC 5907, the extended, asymmetric, and strongly warped outer regions of the H i disk also suggest a recent interaction. In contrast, the inner disks of these three galaxies (NGC 4217, NGC 5529, and NGC

  14. SPAN: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Green, James L.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links science research and data analysis computers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The purpose of this document is to provide Astronomy and Astrophysics scientists, currently reachable on SPAN, with basic information and contacts for access to correlative data bases, star catalogs, and other astrophysic facilities accessible over SPAN.

  15. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Federman, Steve; Kwong, Victor; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel; Stancil, Phillip; Weingartner, Joe; Ziurys, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomical and planetary research and will remain so for many generations to come. From the level of scientific conception to that of the scientific return, it is our understanding of the underlying processes that allows us to address fundamental questions regarding the origins and evolution of galaxies, stars, planetary systems, and life in the cosmos. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA and NSF; these efforts are necessary for the astronomical research being funded by the agencies. The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop met at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from 14-16 February, 2006 to identify the current laboratory data needed to support existing and future NASA missions and programs in the Astrophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Here we refer to both laboratory and theoretical work as laboratory astrophysics unless a distinction is necessary. The format for the Workshop involved invited talks by users of laboratory data, shorter contributed talks and poster presentations by both users and providers that highlighted exciting developments in laboratory astrophysics, and breakout sessions where users and providers discussed each others' needs and limitations. We also note that the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee are users as well as providers of laboratory data. As in previous workshops, the focus was on atomic, molecular, and solid state physics.

  16. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-10-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post-main-sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects—circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc.—feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and nonlinear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter λ, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the central mass accretion is suppressed by the non-zero central torque. The known decretion disk solutions correspond to the two discrete values of λ, while our new solutions cover a continuum of its physically allowed values, corresponding to either accretion or mass ejection by the central object. A direct relationship between λ and central \\dot{M} and torque is also established. We describe the time evolution of the various disk characteristics for different λ, and show that the observable properties (spectrum and luminosity evolution) of the decretion disks, in general, are different from the standard accretion disks with no central torque.

  17. Astrophysical processes on the Sun

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Clare E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been a series of major solar space missions, namely Yohkoh, SOHO, TRACE, and in the past 5 years, STEREO, Hinode and SDO, studying various aspects of the Sun and providing images and spectroscopic data with amazing temporal, spatial and spectral resolution. Over the same period, the type and nature of numerical models in solar physics have been completely revolutionized as a result of widespread accessibility to parallel computers. These unprecedented advances on both observational and theoretical fronts have led to significant improvements in our understanding of many aspects of the Sun's behaviour and furthered our knowledge of plasma physics processes that govern solar and other astrophysical phenomena. In this Theme Issue, the current perspectives on the main astrophysical processes that shape our Sun are reviewed. In this Introduction, they are discussed briefly to help set the scene. PMID:22665891

  18. Astrophysical Applications of Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander A.

    The paradigm of fractional calculus occupies an important place for the macroscopic description of subdiffusion. Its advance in theoretical astrophysics is expected to be very attractive too. In this report we discuss a recent development of the idea to some astrophysical problems. One of them is connected with a random migration of bright points associated with magnetic fields at the solar photosphere. The transport of the bright points has subdiffusive features that require the fractional generalization of the Leighton's model. Another problem is related to the angular distribution of radio beams, being propagated through a medium with random inhomogeneities. The peculiarity of this medium is that radio beams are trapped because of random wave localization. This idea can be useful for the diagnostics of interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media.

  19. Testing the Propagating Fluctuations Model with a Long, Global Accretion Disk Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-07-01

    The broadband variability of many accreting systems displays characteristic structures; log-normal flux distributions, root-mean square (rms)-flux relations, and long inter-band lags. These characteristics are usually interpreted as inward propagating fluctuations of the mass accretion rate in an accretion disk driven by stochasticity of the angular momentum transport mechanism. We present the first analysis of propagating fluctuations in a long-duration, high-resolution, global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a geometrically thin (h/r ≈ 0.1) accretion disk around a black hole. While the dynamical-timescale turbulent fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses are too rapid to drive radially coherent fluctuations in the accretion rate, we find that the low-frequency quasi-periodic dynamo action introduces low-frequency fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses, which then drive the propagating fluctuations. Examining both the mass accretion rate and emission proxies, we recover log-normality, linear rms-flux relations, and radial coherence that would produce inter-band lags. Hence, we successfully relate and connect the phenomenology of propagating fluctuations to modern MHD accretion disk theory.

  20. THICK-DISK EVOLUTION INDUCED BY THE GROWTH OF AN EMBEDDED THIN DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos, Alvaro; Helmi, Amina; Kazantzidis, Stelios E-mail: ahelmi@astro.rug.n E-mail: villalobos@oats.inaf.i

    2010-07-20

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the structural and kinematical properties of simulated thick disks induced by the growth of an embedded thin disk. The thick disks used in the present study originate from cosmologically common 5:1 encounters between initially thin primary disk galaxies and infalling satellites. The growing thin disks are modeled as static gravitational potentials and we explore a variety of growing-disk parameters that are likely to influence the response of thick disks. We find that the final thick-disk properties depend strongly on the total mass and radial scale length of the growing thin disk, and much less sensitively on its growth timescale and vertical scale height as well as the initial sense of thick-disk rotation. Overall, the growth of an embedded thin disk can cause a substantial contraction in both the radial and vertical direction, resulting in a significant decrease in the scale lengths and scale heights of thick disks. Kinematically, a growing thin disk can induce a notable increase in the mean rotation and velocity dispersions of thick-disk stars. We conclude that the reformation of a thin disk via gas accretion may play a significant role in setting the structure and kinematics of thick disks, and thus it is an important ingredient in models of thick-disk formation.

  1. Observations and modelling of CO and [C i] in protoplanetary disks. First detections of [C i] and constraints on the carbon abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fedele, D.; Baryshev, A.; Boland, W.; Güsten, R.; Aikutalp, A.; Choi, Y.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Karska, A.; Klaassen, P.; Koumpia, E.; Kristensen, L.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Perez Beaupuits, J.-P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Kempen, T. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The gas-solid budget of carbon in protoplanetary disks is related to the composition of the cores and atmospheres of the planets forming in them. The principal gas-phase carbon carriers CO, C0, and C+ can now be observed regularly in disks. Aims: The gas-phase carbon abundance in disks has thus far not been well characterized observationally. We obtain new constraints on the [C]/[H] ratio in a large sample of disks, and compile an overview of the strength of [C i] and warm CO emission. Methods: We carried out a survey of the CO 6-5 line and the [C i] 1-0 and 2-1 lines towards 37 disks with the APEX telescope, and supplemented it with [C ii] data from the literature. The data are interpreted using a grid of models produced with the DALI disk code. We also investigate how well the gas-phase carbon abundance can be determined in light of parameter uncertainties. Results: The CO 6-5 line is detected in 13 out of 33 sources, [C i] 1-0 in 6 out of 12, and [C i] 2-1 in 1 out of 33. With separate deep integrations, the first unambiguous detections of the [C i] 1-0 line in disks are obtained, in TW Hya and HD 100546. Conclusions: Gas-phase carbon abundance reductions of a factor of 5-10 or more can be identified robustly based on CO and [C i] detections, assuming reasonable constraints on other parameters. The atomic carbon detection towards TW Hya confirms a factor of 100 reduction of [C]/[H]gas in that disk, while the data are consistent with an ISM-like carbon abundance for HD 100546. In addition, BP Tau, T Cha, HD 139614, HD 141569, and HD 100453 are either carbon-depleted or gas-poor disks. The low [C i] 2-1 detection rates in the survey mostly reflect insufficient sensitivity for T Tauri disks. The Herbig Ae/Be disks with CO and [C ii] upper limits below the models are debris-disk-like systems. An increase in sensitivity of roughly order of magnitude compared to our survey is required to obtain useful constraints on the gas-phase [C]/[H] ratio in most of the

  2. Numerical Relativity and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the Universe many powerful events are driven by strong gravitational effects that require general relativity to fully describe them. These include compact binary mergers, black hole accretion, and stellar collapse, where velocities can approach the speed of light and extreme gravitational fields (ΦNewt/c2≃1) mediate the interactions. Many of these processes trigger emission across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Compact binaries further source strong gravitational wave emission that could directly be detected in the near future. This feat will open up a gravitational wave window into our Universe and revolutionize our understanding of it. Describing these phenomena requires general relativity, and—where dynamical effects strongly modify gravitational fields—the full Einstein equations coupled to matter sources. Numerical relativity is a field within general relativity concerned with studying such scenarios that cannot be accurately modeled via perturbative or analytical calculations. In this review, we examine results obtained within this discipline, with a focus on its impact in astrophysics.

  3. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  4. Emission of gravitational waves by precession of slim accretion disks dynamically driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, W. D.; Sánchez, L. A.; Mosquera, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted from some astrophysical objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGN), micro-quasars (M-QSRs), and central engines of gamma-ray burst (GRBs), seems to have a similar physical origin: a powerful jet of plasma ejected from a localized system, presumably composed of an accretion disk encircling a compact object. This radiation is generally beamed in the polar directions and in some cases, it appears to have a spiral-like structure that could be explained if the central system itself precesses. In this work, we use the slim disk accretion model, presented by Popham et al. (1999), to studying the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by the precession of the accretion disk around a solar-mass Kerr black hole (KBH). For practical purposes, this model describes the central engine of a class of GRBs when some astrophysical constrains are fulfilled. The induced precession considered here is driven by the Bardeen-Petterson effect, which results from the combination of viscous effects in such disks and the relativistic frame-dragging effect. We evaluate the feasibility of direct detection of the GWs computed for such a model and show that the precession of this kind of systems could be detected by gravitational wave observatories like DECIGO, ultimate-DECIGO, and BBO, with higher probability if such a class of sources are placed at distances less than 1 Mpc.

  5. Gravitational Radiation of a Vibrating Physical String as a Model for the Gravitational Emission of an Astrophysical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ray A.; Modanese, Giovanni

    Vibrating media offer an important testing ground for reconciling conflicts between General Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and other branches of physics. For sources like a Weber bar, the standard covariant formalism for elastic bodies can be applied. The vibrating string, however, is a source of gravitational waves which requires novel computational techniques, based on the explicit construction of a conserved and renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Renormalization (in a classical sense) is necessary to take into account the effect of external constraints, which affect the emission considerably. Our computation also relaxes usual simplifying assumptions like far-field approximation, spherical or plane wave symmetry, TT gauge and absence of internal interference. In a further step towards unification, the method is then adapted to give the radiation field of a transversal Alfven wave in a rarefied astrophysical plasma, where the tension is produced by an external static magnetic field.

  6. Theoretical analysis of the astrophysical S-factor for the capture reaction α + d → {sup 6}Li + γ in the two-body model

    SciTech Connect

    Tursunov, E. M. Turakulov, S. A.; Descouvemont, P.

    2015-03-15

    Theoretical estimates for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li were obtained on the basis of the two-body model involving an α−d potential that has a simple Gaussian form and which describes correctly S-, P-, and D-wave phase shifts, the binding energy, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the S-wave bound state. The wave functions for the bound and continuum channels were calculated with the aid of the highly precise Numerov algorithm. The results for the contributions of the E1 and E2 transition components reveal a good convergence as the upper limit in the effective integrals increases up to 40 fm. The results obtained for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li in the temperature range of 10{sup 6}K ≤ T ≤ 10{sup 10} K agree well with the results of the calculations performed by A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and his coauthors [Phys. Rev. C 83, 055805 (2011)] by using the known asymptotic form of the wave function at low energies and a complicated two-body potential at higher energies.

  7. Archival Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Analysis of Disk-Dominated Cataclysmic Variables: The Importance of the Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godon, Patrick

    We propose to carry out a systematic ultraviolet (UV) spectral analysis of 43 disk- dominated systems in cataclysmic variable (CV) binaries with the inclusion of the contribution from the boundary layer, from NASA UV Space Missions such as HST, FUSE, HUT, IUE and ORFEUS. The mass accretion in CVs is a badly needed parameter to verify the theory of the evolution of CVs, to understand the accretion process itself and the disk instability. However, many disk-dominated systems unexpectedly prove impossible to model using only standard accretion disks and white dwarfs in combination. Our objective is to overcome this difficulty by modeling the UV spectrum of the boundary layer between the star and disk, including its effect on the spectrum of the disk and star for the first time. This will provide the first step needed for the improvement of the disk model in UV spectroscopic analysis of disk-dominated systems in CVs. At the same time the results of this spectral analysis will provide information on the boundary layer and accretion disk of these systems. As a by-product, we will create a web-based catalog of all the archival UV spectra of disk-dominated CVs, which will be added and fused to our existing and growing web-based catalog of FUSE spectra of CVs. Since the WD is the most common end-product of stellar evolution (approx 90% of all the stars in the Galaxy have or will evolve into white dwarfs), and the accretion disk is the most common universal structure resulting from mass transfer with angular momentum, and since both can be directly viewed in CVs in the ultraviolet (UV), an understanding of the consequences of accretion in these systems is the first step in a global understanding of accretion in other systems throughout the universe. These include Young Stellar Objects, galactic binaries (accretion onto neutron stars and black holes) and the most difficult to study, Active Galactic Nuclei. In addition, the formation history of WDs is closely linked to the

  8. Radiative Transfer Models of Mid-Infrared H2O Lines in the Planet-Forming Region of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijerink, R.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Blake, G. A.; Poelman, D. R.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2009-10-01

    The study of warm molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks is of key importance for the study of planet formation and especially for the transport of H2O and organic molecules to the surfaces of rocky planets/satellites. Recent Spitzer observations have shown that the mid-infrared spectra of protoplanetary disks are covered in emission lines due to water and other molecules. Here, we present a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) two-dimensional radiative transfer model of water lines in the 10-36 μm range that can be used to constrain the abundance structure of water vapor, given an observed spectrum, and show that an assumption of LTE does not accurately estimate the physical conditions of the water vapor emission zones, including temperatures and abundance structures. By applying the model to published Spitzer spectra we find that: (1) most water lines are subthermally excited, (2) the gas-to-dust ratio must be as much as 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the canonical interstellar medium ratio of 100-200, (3) the gas temperature must be significantly higher than the dust temperature, in agreement with detailed heating/cooling models, and (4) the water vapor abundance in the disk surface must be significantly truncated beyond ~1 AU. A low efficiency of water formation below T ~ 300 K may naturally result in a lower water abundance beyond a certain radius. However, we find that chemistry, although not necessarily ruled out, may not be sufficient to produce a sharp abundance drop of many orders of magnitude and speculate that the depletion may also be caused by vertical turbulent diffusion of water vapor from the superheated surface to regions below the snow line, where the water can freeze out and be transported to the midplane as part of the general dust settling. Such a vertical cold finger effect is likely to be efficient due to the lack of a replenishment mechanism of large, water-ice coated dust grains to the disk surface.

  9. Magneto-rotational instability in the protolunar disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballido, Augusto; Desch, Steven J.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    We perform the first study of magnetohydrodynamic processes in the protolunar disk (PLD). With the use of published data on the chemical composition of the PLD, along with existing analytical models of the disk structure, we show that the high temperatures that were prevalent in the disk would have led to ionization of Na, K, SiO, Zn and, to a lesser extent, O2. For simplicity, we assume that the disk has a vapor structure. The resulting ionization fractions, together with a relatively weak magnetic field, possibly of planetary origin, would have been sufficient to trigger the magneto-rotational instability, or MRI, as demonstrated by the fact that the Elsasser criterion was met in the PLD: a magnetic field embedded in the flow would have diffused more slowly than the growth rate of the linear perturbations. We calculate the intensity of the resulting magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, as parameterized by the dimensionless ratio α of turbulent stresses to gas pressure, and obtain maximum values α ∼10-2 along most of the vertical extent of the disk, and at different orbital radii. This indicates that, under these conditions, turbulent mixing within the PLD due to the MRI was likely capable of transporting isotopic and chemical species efficiently. To test these results in a conservative manner, we carry out a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a small, rectangular patch of the PLD, located at 4 Earth radii (rE) from the center of the Earth, and assuming once again that the disk is completely gaseous. We use a polytrope-like equation of state. The rectangular patch is threaded initially by a vertical magnetic field with zero net magnetic flux. This field configuration is known to produce relatively weak MRI turbulence in studies of astrophysical accretion disks. We accordingly obtain turbulence with an average intensity α ∼ 7 ×10-6 over the course of 280 orbital periods (133 days at 4rE). Despite this relatively low value of α , the effective turbulent

  10. Slotted-wall research with disk and parachute models in the DSMA low-speed wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, D.; Harris, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    A test program investigated the effects of wall open area ratio (OAR) and model axial position on the measured drag of disk and parachute models in a low-speed wind tunnel. The data and discussion presented in this report provide new insight into the nature of slotted-wall interference for bluff bodies in steady flow and give the first quantitative information on nonsteady wall interference and airflow response during the inflation of a parachute. The report concludes that a fixed OAR of between 5% and 15% should eliminate wall interference during inflation and greatly reduce steady-flow interference for geometric blockages up to 15%. Preliminary arguments suggest that an optimum OAR may be found that alleviates wall interference for large models at low speeds while providing for acceptable testing of smaller models in the transonic speed range. 10 refs., 36 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Thermodynamical Structure of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Turner, N.

    2009-12-01

    The thermodynamics of protoplanetary disks determines chemical and physical evolution of dust and gas in the disks, and thus is relevant for understanding the origin and formation of planetary systems. In this paper, the thermodynamical structure of protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars is studied using three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Local patches of the disk are modeled using the shearing box approximation with vertical gravity. For simplicity, the dust and gas are well mixed and have the same temperature, and ideal MHD is assumed. The frequency-integrated radiation field is evolved using the flux-limited diffusion approximation, adopting thermally averaged opacities. The heating arises from the dissipation of MHD turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability due to differential rotation of the disk, and the cooling comes from infrared radiation losses. Irradiation by the central star is treated by injecting appropriate amount of thermal energy near the disk photosphere for visible lights. The results indicate the heating is more concentrated in the disk atmosphere than in the classical model. The single-point heating rate in the atmosphere fluctuates by orders of magnitude over time intervals comparable to the orbital period due to magnetic reconnection and shocks, while the patch of disk overall sustains dynamical and thermodynamical equilibrium over many cooling times. We will discuss implications of our numerical results for line and continuum emission from protoplanetary disks.

  12. Planetesimal Disk Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R.

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  13. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  14. NASA Announces 2009 Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    searching for transits among hot Neptunes and super-Earths, microlensing planets through modeling algorithms, conducting high-contrast imaging surveys to detect planetary-mass companions, interferometrically imaging of the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, and modeling of super-Earth planetary atmospheres. The 10 fellows in the Einstein program conduct research broadly related to the mission of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos Program. Its science goals include understanding the origin and destiny of the universe, the nature of gravity, phenomena near black holes, and extreme states of matter. The Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass., administers the Einstein Fellowships for NASA. The 17 awardees of the Hubble Fellowship pursue research associated with NASA's Cosmic Origins Program. The missions in this program examine the origins of galaxies, stars, and planetary systems, and the evolution of these structures with cosmic time. The Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., administers the Hubble Fellowships for NASA. The Sagan Fellowship, created in September 2008, supports five scientists whose research is aligned with NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program. The primary goal of this program is to discover and characterize planetary systems and Earth-like planets around other stars. The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, which is operated at the California Institute of Technology in coordination with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., administers the Sagan Fellowship Program

  15. Computational astrophysics: Pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.

    The field of computational astrophysics in pulsating star studies has grown considerably since the advent of the computer. Initially calculations were done on the IBM 704 with 32K of memory and now we use the CRAY YMP computers with considerably more memory. Our early studies were for models of pulsating stars using a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic code (SPEC) with radiation diffusion. The radiative transfer was treated in the equilibrium diffusion approximation and the hydrodynamics was done utilizing the approximation of artificial viscosity. The early calculations took many hours of 704 CPU time. Early in 1965 we decided to improve on the usual treatment of the radiative transfer used in our codes by utilizing the method of moments, the so-called variable Eddington approximation. In this approximation the material energy field is uncoupled from the radiation energy field and the angular dependence is introduced through the Eddington factor. A multigroup frequency dependent method may also be applied. The Eddington factor is determined by snapshots of the stars structure utilizing a y-line approximation. The full radiative transfer approximation appears necessary in order to understand the light curves for W Virginia stars and may be important for the light curves of RR Lyrae stars. A detailed radiative transfer method does not appear to be necessary for the understanding of Cepheid light curves. A recent improvement to our models for pulsating stars is in the use of an adaptive mesh scheme to resolve the sharp features in the nonlinear hydrodynamic structure. From these improved structures, better analysis of the radius, velocity, and light curves could be obtained.

  16. Role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of astrophysical ices in protostellars environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Monteiro Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical ices survival is directly related with the temperature and ionizing radiation field in protostellars environments such as disks and envelopes. Computational models has shown that pure volatile molecules like CO and CH _{4} should survive only inside densest regions of molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks On the other hand, solid molecules such as H _{2}O and CH _{3}OH can be placed around 5 - 10 AU from the central protostar. Unlike of the previous models, we investigate the role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of ices in disks and envelopes. Once that a star-forming region is composed by the formation of many protostars, the external radiation field should be an important component to understand the real localization of the ices along the sight line. To address this topic it was employed the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D based on the Monte Carlo method. The code was used to model the spectrum and the near-infrared image of Elias 29. The initial parameters of the disk and envelope was taken from our previous paper (Rocha & Pilling (2015), ApJ 803:18). The opacities of the ices were calculated from the complex refractive index obtained at laboratory experiments perfomed at Grand Accélerateur National d'Íons Lourds (GANIL), by using the NKABS code from Rocha & Pilling (2014), SAA 123:436. The partial conclusions that we have obtained shows that pure CO volatile molecule cannot be placed at disk or envelope of Elias 29, unlike shown in our paper about Elias 29. Once it was observed in Elias 29 spectrum obtained with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 2.5 - 190 μm, this molecule should be placed in foreground molecular clouds or trapped in the water ice matrix. The next calculations will be able to show where are placed the ices such as CH _{3}OH and CH _{3}CHO observed in Elias 29 spectrum.

  17. On circumstellar disks: Spitzer identifies two possible evolutionary paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.; Marengo, Massimo; Lada, Elizabeth

    Multi-wavelength surveys have vastly improved our understanding of many astrophysical objects, in particular, circumstellar disks. We present our results for the disk population of the young cluster NGC 2264. Our study was based on data obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope combined with previously published optical data. We divide the disk population into 3 classes based on their spectral energy distribution shapes: optically thick disks, homologously depleted anemic disks, and radially depleted transition disks. We find that there are two distinct evolutionary paths for disks: a homologous one, where the disk emission decreases uniformly in NIR and mid-infrared wavelengths (anemic disks) and throughout which most sources pass, and a radially differential one where the emission from the inner region of the disk decreases more rapidly than from the outer region (transition disks). Whether a disk evolves in a homologously or radially depleted fashion is still unknown and may depend on the nature of planet formation in the disk.

  18. Modelling the Accretion History of the Galactic Disk (and the Gravitational Lensing of a High-z Galaxy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Over its long history, the Milky Way is expected to have accreted many dwarf galaxies. The debris from the destruction of most of these dwarf galaxies will by now be fully phase-mixed throughout the Galaxy and hence undetectable as local over-densities in position-space. However, the debris from these systems could have distinct kinematic signatures that may help distinguish these stars from, for example, the Galactic disk. We aim to construct a reliable method of determining the contributions to the Milky Way disk from accreted structures that could be applied to current kinematic data sets, such as SDSS's APOGEE survey. In an effort to mimic the kinematic traits of an accreted satellite, we construct single-orbit models to compare to a cosmologically motivated simulation of satellite accretion. We find that these orbit models adhere to the kinematic signatures of certain types of accreted galaxies better than others, giving us insight on which parameters to trust when searching for accreted populations. As a bonus, we describe a separate project in which we attempt to deduce the intrinsic properties of the 8 o'clock arc, a gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxy at redshift 2.73. Using the lensmodel code and its pixel-based source reconstruction extension pixsrc, we derive a de-lensed image of the galaxy in the source plane.

  19. Comparing the Evolution of the Galaxy Disk Sizes with Cold Dark Matter Models: The Hubble Deep Field.

    PubMed

    Giallongo; Menci; Poli; D'Odorico; Fontana

    2000-02-20

    The intrinsic sizes of the field galaxies with Idisk sizes at different cosmic epochs is within the range predicted by typical CDM models. However, the observed size distribution of faint (MB>-19) galaxies is skewed with respect to the CDM predictions, and an excess of small-size disks (Rd<2 kpc) is already present at z approximately 0.5. The excess persists up to z approximately 3 and involves brighter galaxies. Such an excess may be reduced if luminosity-dependent effects, like starburst activity in interacting galaxies, are included in the physical mechanisms governing the star formation history in CDM models. PMID:10655168

  20. Transport of Solid Material in Dynamically Evolving 1d Disk Models with Pressure Maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarczay-Nehéz, Dóra; Regály, Zsolt; Sándor, Zsolt

    2013-07-01

    Planet formation theory based on the core-accretion scenario suffers from the very fast loss of dust particles, the building blocks of planetesimals. Thus, the available material to build planets is consumed before a significant mass of dust are able to stick together. An effective solution to this problem might be a pressure trap. The radial drift of the dust particles are caused by the difference in the orbital velocity of the gas and the dust particles. At the edges of the accretionally dead zone in a protoplanetary disk (Gammie, 1996), the gradient of the gas pressure vanishes serving a trap for dust particles under inward drift. The increased density of dust particles there may accelerate the formation of planetesimals, and by subsequent collisions even the formation of planets and planetary cores. In the present work we investigate the mass growth due to the dust particle accumulation in pressure maxima. Our results support the idea of rapid planet formation via core-accretion, but we find that the efficiency of dust accumulation depends on the disk physical parameters.

  1. Astrophysical Boundary Layers: A New Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail; Rafikov, Roman R.; Mclellan Stone, James

    2016-04-01

    Accretion is a ubiquitous process in astrophysics. In cases when the magnetic field is not too strong and a disk is formed, accretion can proceed through the mid plane all the way to the surface of the central compact object. Unless that compact object is a black hole, a boundary layer will be formed where the accretion disk touches its surfaces. The boundary layer is both dynamically and observationally significant as up to half of the accretion energy is dissipated there.Using a combination of analytical theory and computer simulations we show that angular momentum transport and accretion in the boundary layer is mediated by waves. This breaks with the standard astrophysical paradigm of an anomalous turbulent viscosity that drives accretion. However, wave-mediated angular momentum transport is a natural consequence of "sonic instability." The sonic instability, which we describe analytically and observe in our simulations, is a close cousin of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. However, it is very vigorous in the boundary layer due to the immense radial velocity shear present at the equator.Our results are applicable to accreting neutron stars, white dwarfs, protostars, and protoplanets.

  2. Musculoskeletal Modeling of the Lumbar Spine to Explore Functional Interactions between Back Muscle Loads and Intervertebral Disk Multiphysics

    PubMed Central

    Toumanidou, Themis; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    During daily activities, complex biomechanical interactions influence the biophysical regulation of intervertebral disks (IVDs), and transfers of mechanical loads are largely controlled by the stabilizing action of spine muscles. Muscle and other internal forces cannot be easily measured directly in the lumbar spine. Hence, biomechanical models are important tools for the evaluation of the loads in those tissues involved in low-back disorders. Muscle force estimations in most musculoskeletal models mainly rely, however, on inverse calculations and static optimizations that limit the predictive power of the numerical calculations. In order to contribute to the development of predictive systems, we coupled a predictive muscle model with the passive resistance of the spine tissues, in a L3–S1 musculoskeletal finite element model with osmo-poromechanical IVD descriptions. The model included 46 fascicles of the major back muscles that act on the lower spine. The muscle model interacted with activity-related loads imposed to the osteoligamentous structure, as standing position and night rest were simulated through distributed upper body mass and free IVD swelling, respectively. Calculations led to intradiscal pressure values within ranges of values measured in vivo. Disk swelling led to muscle activation and muscle force distributions that seemed particularly appropriate to counterbalance the anterior body mass effect in standing. Our simulations pointed out a likely existence of a functional balance between stretch-induced muscle activation and IVD multiphysics toward improved mechanical stability of the lumbar spine understanding. This balance suggests that proper night rest contributes to mechanically strengthen the spine during day activity. PMID:26301218

  3. New Scattered Disk Object and Centaur Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucker, Melissa; Wilcox, P.; Stansberry, J.

    2013-10-01

    We report B, V, and R magnitudes for scattered disk objects and centaurs from observations taken in December 2011 and August 2013 using the Lowell Observatory Perkins Telescope with PRISM and observations taken in March 2012 at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona. Targeted scattered disk objects include 2002 CY224, 2003 UY117, 2006 QJ181, 2008 CT190, 2009 YG19, 2010 FD49, 2010 VZ98. Targeted centaurs include 2002 QX47, 2005 UJ438, 2006 UX184, and 2007 RH283. We will determine if the resultant centaur colors follow the bimodal distribution (B-R either red or gray) previously detected. We will also compare the resultant scattered disk object colors to those published for other scattered disk objects. This work is based on observations with the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and with the VATT: The Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  4. Circumstellar Disks in Very Young Embedded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariñas, Naibí; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    We used FLAMINGOS near-IR photometry and spectroscopy and Spitzer mid-IR photometry to study disk fractions in the 1 to 2 Myr old NGC2264 clusters. We find that stars with masses < 0.3 solar masses have lower disk fractions than stars of solar mass or higher at these early ages. We also find that most disks disappear within the first 4 Myr, which is consistent with previous studies of disk lifetimes. Our study suggests that either some very low mass stars form without disks or that their disks are less massive and/or colder than predicted from models and not detected with Spitzer/Flamingos sensitivities.

  5. Heavy ion irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Eduardo Seperuelo; Domaracka, Alicja; Boduch, Philippe; Rothard, Hermann; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Dartois, Emmanuel; Pilling, Sergio; Farenzena, Lucio; da Silveira, Enio Frota

    Icy grain mantles consist of small molecules containing hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen atoms (e.g. H2O, CO, CO2, NH3). Such ices, present in different astrophysical environments (giant planets satellites, comets, dense clouds, and protoplanetary disks), are subjected to irradiation of different energetic particles: UV radiation, ion bombardment (solar and stellar wind as well as galactic cosmic rays), and secondary electrons due to cosmic ray ionization of H2. The interaction of these particles with astrophysical ice analogs has been the object of research over the last decades. However, there is a lack of information on the effects induced by the heavy ion component of cosmic rays in the electronic energy loss regime. The aim of the present work is to simulate of the astrophysical environment where ice mantles are exposed to the heavy ion cosmic ray irradiation. Sample ice films at 13K were irradiated by nickel ions with energies in the 1-10 MeV/u range and analyzed by means of FTIR spectrometry. Nickel ions were used because their energy deposition is similar to that deposited by iron ions, which are particularly abundant cosmic rays amongst the heaviest ones. In this work the effects caused by nickel ions on condensed gases are studied (destruction and production of molecules as well as associated cross sections, sputtering yields) and compared with respective values for light ions and UV photons.

  6. Slim accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Czerny, B.; Lasota, J.P.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    1988-09-01

    A new branch of equilibrium solutions for stationary accretion disks around black holes is found. These solutions correspond to moderately super-Eddington accretion rates. The existence of the new branch is a consequence of an additional cooling due to general relativistic Roche lobe overflow and horizontal advection of heat. On an accretion rate versus surface density plane the new branch forms, together with the two standard branches (corresponding to the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk models) a characteristically S-shaped curve. This could imply a limit cycle-type behavior for black hole accretion flows with accretion rates close ot the Eddington one. 29 references.

  7. Shock Response of the Clamped Disk in Small Form Factor Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bin; Shu, Dongwei; Shi, Baojun; Lu, Guoxing

    As small form factor (one-inch and smaller) hard disk drives are widely used in portable consumer appliances and gadgets, their mechanical robustness is of greater concern. In the previous work, it is found that when the disk is more tightly clamped, it helps to decrease the shock response of the disk and then avoid the head slap. In this paper, the real boundary condition of the disk for a small form factor hard disk drive from Seagate is investigated numerically. The disk is clamped between the clamp and the hub. The shock response of the disk under a half-sine acceleration pulse is simulated by using the finite element method. In the finite element model, both contact between disk and clamp and contact between disk and hub are considered. According to the simulation results, how to decrease the shock response of the disk is suggested.

  8. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  9. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  10. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbus, Steven A.; Potter, William J.

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one’s a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject.

  11. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics.

    PubMed

    Balbus, Steven A; Potter, William J

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject. PMID:27116247

  12. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics.

    PubMed

    Balbus, Steven A; Potter, William J

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject.

  13. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  14. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  15. Addressing Thermal Model Run Time Concerns of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Guerrero, Sergio; Hawk, John; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Jackson, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) utilizes an existing 2.4 m diameter Hubble sized telescope donated from elsewhere in the federal government for near-infrared sky surveys and Exoplanet searches to answer crucial questions about the universe and dark energy. The WFIRST design continues to increase in maturity, detail, and complexity with each design cycle leading to a Mission Concept Review and entrance to the Mission Formulation Phase. Each cycle has required a Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) analysis to ensure the design can meet the stringent pointing and stability requirements. As such, the models have also grown in size and complexity leading to increased model run time. This paper addresses efforts to reduce the run time while still maintaining sufficient accuracy for STOP analyses. A technique was developed to identify slews between observing orientations that were sufficiently different to warrant recalculation of the environmental fluxes to reduce the total number of radiation calculation points. The inclusion of a cryocooler fluid loop in the model also forced smaller time-steps than desired, which greatly increases the overall run time. The analysis of this fluid model required mitigation to drive the run time down by solving portions of the model at different time scales. Lastly, investigations were made into the impact of the removal of small radiation couplings on run time and accuracy. Use of these techniques allowed the models to produce meaningful results within reasonable run times to meet project schedule deadlines.

  16. Super-spinning compact objects generated by thick accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-03-01

    If astrophysical black hole candidates are the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity, the value of their spin parameter must be subject to the theoretical bound |a{sub *}| ≤ 1. In this work, we consider the possibility that these objects are either non-Kerr black holes in an alternative theory of gravity or exotic compact objects in General Relativity. We study the accretion process when their accretion disk is geometrically thick with a simple version of the Polish doughnut model. The picture of the accretion process may be qualitatively different from the one around a Kerr black hole. The inner edge of the disk may not have the typical cusp on the equatorial plane any more, but there may be two cusps, respectively above and below the equatorial plane. We extend previous work on the evolution of the spin parameter and we estimate the maximum value of a{sub *} for the super-massive black hole candidates in galactic nuclei. Since measurements of the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs require η > 0.15, we infer the ''observational'' bound |a{sub *}|∼<1.3, which seems to be quite independent of the exact nature of these objects. Such a bound is only slightly weaker than |a{sub *}|∼<1.2 found in previous work for thin disks.

  17. Thin accretion disks onto brane world black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Pun, C. S. J.; Harko, T.; Kovacs, Z.

    2008-10-15

    The brane-world description of our universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that might be lower by several orders of magnitude as compared to the Planck scale. An interesting consequence of the brane-world scenario is in the nature of the vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations, with properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black-hole solutions of general relativity. One possibility of observationally discriminating between different types of black holes is the study of the emission properties of the accretion disks. In the present paper we obtain the energy flux, the emission spectrum and accretion efficiency from the accretion disks around several classes of static and rotating brane-world black holes, and we compare them to the general relativistic case. Particular signatures can appear in the electromagnetic spectrum, thus leading to the possibility of directly testing extra-dimensional physical models by using astrophysical observations of the emission spectra from accretion disks.

  18. Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Takabe, H; Arnett, D

    2000-01-19

    Astrophysics has traditionally been pursued at astronomical observatories and on theorists' computers. Observations record images from space, and theoretical models are developed to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to test theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. Intense lasers are now being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively tested against data. We describe here several areas of astrophysics--supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets--where laser experiments are under development to test our understanding of these phenomena.

  19. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  20. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  1. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We first review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks of gas and dust around young stars and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation caused by the heating of the disk surface by ultraviolet radiation. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks, and this talk focuses on the evaporation caused by the presence of a nearby, luminous star rather than the central star itself. We also focus on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We find a possible explanation for the differences between Neptune and Jupiter, and make a prediction concerning recent searches for giant planets in large clusters. We discuss recent models of the infrared spectra from gaseous disks around young stars.

  2. Evidence for a disk in the wind of HD 93521: UV line profiles from an axisymmetric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Ignace, R.; Tripp, T. M.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Recently it has been suggested (Massa 1992; Howarth & Reid 1993), from the C IV ultraviolet resonance line profile of HD 93521, that there is a high-speed component in the polar outflow from the star as well as a low-speed component in the equatorial regions. In this paper we present theoretical calculations of the line profiles that would be produced by such a model. We find from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) observations of HD 93521 that the observed C IV profile can be produced if the star has an inclination angle very close to 90 deg and if the star is surrounded by a thin disk, whose half-width is approximately 3 deg in latitude. The geometry of this disk is similar to what one would expect from the wind-compressed disk model of Bjorkman & Cassinelli, so this star may provide an ideal observational test of that model. In addition to the C IV resonance line, we examine both the Si IV and N V resonance lines. The Si IV line exhibits low-velocity absorption that is similar to that seen in the C IV line, but the emission is much weaker. On the other hand, the N V line has weaker absorption and much stronger emission than the C IV line. N V is a higher ionization state than C IV, so it is likely that N V is one stage above the dominant state, N IV. Apart from fitting individual line profiles, we also examine the differences between the two Hubble Space Telescope observations of HD 93521. We find evidence for a pair of narrow absorption components, seen at low velocity, as well as evidence for a discrete emission feature in the blueshifted absorption cores of the lines. This blueshifted emission at low velocity can cause what instead appears to be an interstella absorption line. Without multiple observations that can reveal the temporary emission, one must be very careful when determining interstellar column densities to stars like HD 93521.

  3. A Spitzer Survey of Mid-infrared Molecular Emission from Protoplanetary Disks. II. Correlations and Local Thermal Equilibrium Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyk, C.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Blake, G. A.; Najita, J. R.; Carr, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    We present an analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of H2O, OH, HCN, C2H2, and CO2 emission, and Keck-NIRSPEC observations of CO emission, from a diverse sample of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be circumstellar disks. We find that detections and strengths of most mid-IR molecular emission features are correlated with each other, suggesting a common origin and similar excitation conditions for this mid-infrared line forest. Aside from the remarkable differences in molecular line strengths between T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and transitional disks discussed in Pontoppidan et al., we note that the line detection efficiency is anti-correlated with the 13/30 μm spectral slope, which is a measure of the degree of grain settling in the disk atmosphere. We also note a correlation between detection efficiency and Hα equivalent width, and tentatively with accretion rate, suggesting that accretional heating contributes to line excitation. If detected, H2O line fluxes are correlated with the mid-IR continuum flux, and other co-varying system parameters, such as L sstarf. However, significant sample variation, especially in molecular line ratios, remains, and its origin has yet to be explained. Local thermal equilibrium (LTE) models of the H2O emission show that line strength is primarily related to the best-fit emitting area, and this accounts for most source-to-source variation in H2O emitted flux. Best-fit temperatures and column densities cover only a small range of parameter space, near ~1018 cm-2 and 450 K for all sources, suggesting a high abundance of H2O in many planet-forming regions. Other molecules have a range of excitation temperatures from ~500to1500 K, also consistent with an origin in planet-forming regions. We find molecular ratios relative to water of ~10-3 for all molecules, with the exception of CO, for which n(CO)/n(H2O) ~ 1. However, LTE fitting caveats and differences in the way thermo-chemical modeling results are reported make comparisons with

  4. A SPITZER SURVEY OF MID-INFRARED MOLECULAR EMISSION FROM PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. CORRELATIONS AND LOCAL THERMAL EQUILIBRIUM MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Salyk, C.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Blake, G. A.; Najita, J. R.; Carr, J. S.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of H{sub 2}O, OH, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} emission, and Keck-NIRSPEC observations of CO emission, from a diverse sample of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be circumstellar disks. We find that detections and strengths of most mid-IR molecular emission features are correlated with each other, suggesting a common origin and similar excitation conditions for this mid-infrared line forest. Aside from the remarkable differences in molecular line strengths between T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and transitional disks discussed in Pontoppidan et al., we note that the line detection efficiency is anti-correlated with the 13/30 {mu}m spectral slope, which is a measure of the degree of grain settling in the disk atmosphere. We also note a correlation between detection efficiency and H{alpha} equivalent width, and tentatively with accretion rate, suggesting that accretional heating contributes to line excitation. If detected, H{sub 2}O line fluxes are correlated with the mid-IR continuum flux, and other co-varying system parameters, such as L{sub *}. However, significant sample variation, especially in molecular line ratios, remains, and its origin has yet to be explained. Local thermal equilibrium (LTE) models of the H{sub 2}O emission show that line strength is primarily related to the best-fit emitting area, and this accounts for most source-to-source variation in H{sub 2}O emitted flux. Best-fit temperatures and column densities cover only a small range of parameter space, near {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} and 450 K for all sources, suggesting a high abundance of H{sub 2}O in many planet-forming regions. Other molecules have a range of excitation temperatures from {approx}500to1500 K, also consistent with an origin in planet-forming regions. We find molecular ratios relative to water of {approx}10{sup -3} for all molecules, with the exception of CO, for which n(CO)/n(H{sub 2}O) {approx} 1. However, LTE

  5. Supersized Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    called R 66. The disk contains complex organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as silicate dust grains. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can be found on Earth, in dirty barbeques and automobile exhaust pipes, among other places. They are thought to be necessary for primitive life to evolve. Silicates are essentially sand, and, in this case, were found in both their crystalline and non-crystalline, or amorphous, forms.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrometer, an instrument that spreads light apart into its basic parts like a prism turning sunlight into a rainbow. In this graph, or spectrum, light from the dust surrounding hypergiant R 66 is plotted according to its component wavelengths (white line). Astronomers determined the contents of this dust by creating a model (gray line) that best fits the observations. The model is the sum total of contributions from various types of dust grains (colored lines).

    In addition to R 66, Spitzer made similar observations of a huge disk around the hypergiant star R 126, only this star's disk did not possess crystalline silicate grains. Both disks might represent either an early or late evolutionary phase of the planet-building process. In either scenario, the possible solar systems would be supersized, with host stars that are 30 and 70 times the mass of our sun, respectively.

  6. Analytical model of optical path difference in an end-pumped Yb:YAG thin-disk laser with nonuniform pumping light.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Zhu, Xiao; Dai, Zhongxiong; Wang, Zexiong; Zhu, Changhong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical model of the thermal effect and optical path difference (OPD) of a thin-disk laser is developed by an arbitrary form pumping spot. Based on the analytical model, the distribution of temperature, stress, and strain can be derived using a super-Gaussian form pumping spot. The total OPD caused by temperature gradient, axial thermal strain, thermal strain-induced birefringence, and deformation of the thin-disk crystal is discussed for different super-Gaussian factors and is separated into spherical and aspherical parts. The analytical results show that the aspherical part of the OPD is the main reason leading to the decrease of the laser beam quality and it is closely related to super-Gaussian factors, which are very useful for thin-disk laser design and evaluation. PMID:25967218

  7. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  8. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  9. Constraining the Structure of the Transition Disk HD 135344B (SAO 206462) by Simultaneous Modeling of Multiwavelength Gas and Dust Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmona, A.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W. F.; Benisty, M.; Menard, F.; Grady, C.; Kamp, I.; Woitke, P.; Olofsson, J.; Roberge, A.; Brittain, S.; Duchene, G.; Meeus, G.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Dent, B.; Le Bouquin, J. E.; Berger, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Constraining the gas and dust disk structure of transition disks, particularly in the inner dust cavity, is a crucial step toward understanding the link between them and planet formation. HD 135344B is an accreting (pre-)transition disk that displays the CO 4.7 micrometer emission extending tens of AU inside its 30 AU dust cavity. Aims: We constrain HD 135344B's disk structure from multi-instrument gas and dust observations. Methods: We used the dust radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermochemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk structure from the simultaneous modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED), VLT/CRIRES CO P(10) 4.75 Micrometers, Herschel/PACS [O(sub I)] 63 Micrometers, Spitzer/IRS, and JCMT CO-12 J = 3-2 spectra, VLTI/PIONIER H-band visibilities, and constraints from (sub-)mm continuum interferometry and near-IR imaging. Results: We found a disk model able to describe the current gas and dust observations simultaneously. This disk has the following structure. (1) To simultaneously reproduce the SED, the near-IR interferometry data, and the CO ro-vibrational emission, refractory grains (we suggest carbon) are present inside the silicate sublimation radius (0.08 is less than R less than 0.2 AU). (2) The dust cavity (R is less than 30 AU) is filled with gas, the surface density of the gas inside the cavity must increase with radius to fit the CO ro-vibrational line profile, a small gap of a few AU in the gas distribution is compatible with current data, and a large gap of tens of AU in the gas does not appear likely. (4) The gas-to-dust ratio inside the cavity is >100 to account for the 870 Micrometers continuum upper limit and the CO P(10) line flux. (5) The gas-to-dust ratio in the outer disk (30 is less than R less than 200 AU) is less than 10 to simultaneously describe the [O(sub I)] 63 Micrometers line flux and the CO P(10) line profile. (6) In the outer disk, most of the gas and dust mass should be located in the midplane, and

  10. DISK MASSES AT THE END OF THE MAIN ACCRETION PHASE: CARMA OBSERVATIONS AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH MODELING OF CLASS I PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, J. A.

    2012-08-10

    We present imaging observations at the 1.3 mm wavelength of Class I protostars in the Taurus star-forming region, obtained with the CARMA interferometer. Of an initial sample of 10 objects, we detected and imaged millimeter wavelength emission from 9. One of the nine is resolved into two sources and detailed analysis of this binary protostellar system is deferred to a future paper. For the remaining eight objects, we use the CARMA data to determine the basic morphology of the millimeter emission. Combining the millimeter data with 0.9 {mu}m images of scattered light, Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra, and broadband spectral energy distributions (all from the literature), we attempt to determine the structure of the circumstellar material. We consider models including both circumstellar disks and envelopes, and constrain the masses (and other structural parameters) of each of these components. We show that the disk masses in our sample span a range from {approx}< 0.01 to {approx}> 0.1 M{sub Sun }. The disk masses for our sample are significantly higher than for samples of more evolved Class II objects. Thus, Class I disk masses probably provide a more accurate estimate of the initial mass budget for star and planet formation. However, the disk masses determined here are lower than required by theories of giant planet formation. The masses also appear too low for gravitational instability, which could lead to high mass accretion rates. Even in these Class I disks, substantial particle growth may have hidden much of the disk mass in hard-to-see larger bodies.

  11. The inner circumstellar disk of the UX Orionis star V1026 Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, J.; Kreplin, A.; Kishimoto, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Kraus, S.; Schertl, D.; Dugué, M.; Duvert, G.; Lagarde, S.; Massi, F.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The UX Ori type variables (named after the prototype of their class) are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence objects. One of the most likely causes of their variability is the obscuration of the central star by orbiting dust clouds. Aims: We investigate the structure of the circumstellar environment of the UX Ori star V1026 Sco (HD 142666) and test whether the disk inclination is large enough to explain the UX Ori variability. Methods: We observed the object in the low-resolution mode of the near-infrared interferometric VLTI/AMBER instrument and derived H- and K-band visibilities and closure phases. We modeled our AMBER observations, published Keck Interferometer observations, archival MIDI/VLTI visibilities, and the spectral energy distribution using geometric and temperature-gradient models. Results: Employing a geometric inclined-ring disk model, we find a ring radius of 0.15 ± 0.06 AU in the H band and 0.18 ± 0.06 AU in the K band. The best-fit temperature-gradient model consists of a star and two concentric, ring-shaped disks. The inner disk has a temperature of 1257+133-53 K at the inner rim and extends from 0.19 ± 0.01 AU to 0.23 ± 0.02 AU. The outer disk begins at 1.35+0.19-0.20 AU and has an inner temperature of 334+35-17 K. The derived inclination of 48.6+2.9-3.6° approximately agrees with the inclination derived with the geometric model (49 ± 5° in the K band and 50 ± 11° in the H band). The position angle of the fitted geometric and temperature-gradient models are 163 ± 9° (K band; 179 ± 17° in the H band) and 169.3+4.2-6.7°, respectively. Conclusions: The narrow width of the inner ring-shaped model disk and the disk gap might be an indication for a puffed-up inner rim shadowing outer parts of the disk. The intermediate inclination of ~50° is consistent with models of UX Ori objects where dust clouds in the inclined disk obscure the central star. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory

  12. Accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Holt, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations of partial X-ray eclipses from 4U1822-37 have shown that the central X-ray source in this system is diffused by a large Compton-thick accretion disk corona (ADC). Another binary, 4U2129-47, also displays a partial eclipse and contains an ADC. The possible origin of an ADC is discussed and a simple hydrostatic evaporated ADC model is developed which, when applied to 4U1822-37, 4U2129+47 and Cyg X-3, can explain their temporal and spectral properties. The quasi-sinusoidal modulation of all three sources can be reconciled with the partial occultation of the ADC by a bulge at the edge of the accretion disk which is caused by the inflowing material. The height of this bulge is an order of magnitude larger than the hydrostatic disk height and is the result of turbulence in the outer region of the disk. The spectral properties of all three sources can be understood in terms of Compton scattering of the original source spectrum by the ADC. Spectral variations with epoch in Cyg X-3 are probably caused by changes in the optical depth of the corona. A consequence of our model is that any accreting neutron star X-ray source in a semi-detached binary system which is close to its Eddington limit most likely contains an optically thick ADC.

  13. Experimental astrophysics with high power lasers and Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Ryutov, D D

    2004-12-10

    With the advent of high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as high-energy lasers and fast Z-pinch, pulsed-power facilities, mm-scale quantities of matter can be placed in extreme states of density, temperature, and/or velocity. This has enabled the emergence of a new class of experimental science, HED laboratory astrophysics, wherein the properties of matter and the processes that occur under extreme astrophysical conditions can be examined in the laboratory. Areas particularly suitable to this class of experimental astrophysics include the study of opacities relevant to stellar interiors; equations of state relevant to planetary interiors; strong shock driven nonlinear hydrodynamics and radiative dynamics, relevant to supernova explosions and subsequent evolution; protostellar jets and high Mach-number flows; radiatively driven molecular clouds and nonlinear photoevaporation front dynamics; and photoionized plasmas relevant to accretion disks around compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars.

  14. LUNA: Nuclear astrophysics underground

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.

    2015-02-24

    Underground nuclear astrophysics with LUNA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso spans a history of 20 years. By using the rock overburden of the Gran Sasso mountain chain as a natural cosmic-ray shield very low signal rates compared to an experiment on the surface can be tolerated. The cross sectons of important astrophysical reactions directly in the stellar energy range have been successfully measured. In this proceeding we give an overview over the key accomplishments of the experiment and an outlook on its future with the expected addition of an additional accelerator to the underground facilities, enabling the coverage of a wider energy range and the measurement of previously inaccessible reactions.

  15. Nuclear astrophysics at DRAGON

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, U.

    2014-05-02

    The DRAGON recoil separator is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance. Over the last years, the DRAGON collaboration has measured several reactions using both radioactive and high-intensity stable beams. For example, the 160(a, g) cross section was recently measured. The reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the 12C(a, g) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In this measurement, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. In addition, results from other recent measurements will be presented.

  16. CASPAR - Nuclear Astrophysics Underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, Frank; Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Wells, Doug; Wiescher, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The work of the LUNA Collaboration at the Laboratori Nationali del Gran Sasso demonstrated the research potential of an underground accelerator for the field of nuclear astrophysics. Several key reactions could be studied at LUNA, some directly at the Gamow peak for solar hydrogen burning. The CASPAR (Compact Accelerator System for Performing Astrophysical Research) Collaboration will implement a high intensity 1 MV accelerator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) and overcome the current limitation at LUNA. The installation of the accelerator in the recently rehabilitated underground cavity at SURF started in Summer 2015 and first beam should be delivered by the end of the year. This project will primarily focus on the neutron sources for the s-process, e.g. 13C(α , n) 16O and 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg , and lead to unprecedented measurements compared to previous studies. A detailed overview of the science goals of CASPAR will be presented.

  17. Astrophysical terms in Armenian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikian, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    There are quite a few astrophysical textbooks (to say nothing about monographs) in Armenian, which are, however out of date and miss all the modern terms concerning space sciences. Many terms have been earlier adopted from English and, especially, from Russian. On the other hand, teachers and lecturers in Armenia need scientific terms in Armenian adequately reproducing either their means when translating from other languages or (why not) creating new ones. In short, a permanently updated astrophysical glossary is needed to serve as explanation of such terms. I am not going here to present the ready-made glossary (which should be a task for a joint efforts of many professionals) but instead just would like to describe some ambiguous examples with comments where possible coming from my long-year teaching, lecturing and professional experience. A probable connection between "iron" in Armenian as concerned to its origin is also discussed.

  18. Nuclear Astrophysics at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo-Pardo, C.

    2010-08-01

    An overview about the future international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research -FAIR- is given, with especial emphasis on the astrophysical aspects of the NUSTAR (NUclear StrucTure, Astrophysics and Reactions) project. Many types of astrophysically relevant experiments will be performed at NUSTAR. A common tool in all of them will be the large acceptance superconducting in-flight fragment separator (Super-FRS). Rare isotopes of all elements up to Uranium will be produced and spatially separated, thus allowing for the study of very short-lived nuclei. At the low energy branch of the SuperFRS the DESPEC-setup will allow for precise β-decay measurements, including neutron emission probabilities, and for the study of the nuclear structure of very exotic species. High precision Penning trap mass measurements will be carried out with the MATS setup installed at the low-energy branch. Large scale mass measurements will be performed using a complex of storage and cooler rings, the NESR and the CR. In summary, a vast amount of new data far off stability will become available. This will be particularly interesting for the study of explosive nucleosynthesis events, like the rapid neutron capture and the rapid proton capture processes. At the high-energy branch of the SuperFRS, the R3B setup will provide access to a large variety of kinematically complete measurements at relativistic energies, such as heavy ion induced electromagnetic excitation, knockout and breakup reactions or light-ion (in)elastic scattering in inverse kinematics. This will enable e.g. to study Gamow-Teller strengths or to determine astrophysical S-factors on exotic nuclei.

  19. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  20. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-07

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  1. Hot stars with disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstrom, Erika D.

    The evolutionary paths of the massive O and B type stars are often defined by angular momentum transformations that involve circumstellar gas disks. This circumstellar gas is revealed in several kinds of observations, and here I describe a series of investigations of the hydrogen line emission from such disk using detailed studies of five massive binaries and a survey of 128 Be stars. By examining three sets of spectra of the active mass-transfer binary system RY Scuti, I determined masses of 7.1±1.2 [Special characters omitt ed.] for the bright supergiant and 30.0±2.1 [Special characters omitted.] for the massive companion that is hidden by an accretion torus. I also present a cartoon model of the complex mass flows in the system. Using optical spectroscopy and X-ray flux data, I investigated the mass transfer processes in four massive X-ray binaries (a massive B star with mass flowing onto a compact, neutron star companion). The B-supergiant system LS I +65 010 transfers mass via stellar winds. I find the X-ray flux modulates with the orbital period. In the other three X-ray binary systems (LS I +61 303, HDE 245770, and X Per), an outflowing circumstellar disk is responsible for the mass transfer, and in all three systems, the disk appears to be truncated by gravitational interactions with the compact companion. The disk in the microquasar system LS I +61 303 is limited in radius by the periastron separation and an increase in both Ha equivalent width and X-ray flux following periastron may be due to a density wave in the disk induced by tidal forces. Observations of HDE 245770 document what appears to be the regeneration of a circumstellar disk. The disk of X Per appears to have grown to near record proportions and the X-ray flux has dramatically increased. Tidal interaction may generate a spiral density wave in the disk and cause an increase in Ha equivalent width and mass transfer to the compact companion. During the course of the analysis of the X

  2. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, N.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer was proposed in 1986 for NASA's Explorer Concept Study Program by an international collaboration of 25 scientists from nine institutions. The one-year feasibility study began in June 1988. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer would obtain high resolution observations of gamma-ray lines, E/Delta E about 1000, at a sensitivity of about 0.000003 ph/sq cm s, in order to study fundamental problems in astrophysics such as nucleosynthesis, supernovae, neutron star and black-hole physics, and particle acceleration and interactions. The instrument would operate from 15 keV to 10 Mev and use a heavily shielded array of nine cooled Ge spectrometers in a very low background configuration. Its 10 deg FWHM field of view would contain a versatile coded mask system which would provide two-dimensional imaging with 4 deg resolution, one-dimensional imaging with 2 deg resolution, and efficiendt measurements of diffuse emission. An unshielded Ge spectrometer would obtain wide-field measurements of transient gamma-ray sources. The earliest possible mission would begin in 1995.

  3. Self-destructing Spiral Waves: Global Simulations of a Spiral-wave Instability in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Nelson, Richard P.; Hartmann, Lee; Richard, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    We present results from a suite of three-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations that shows that spiral density waves propagating in circumstellar disks are unstable to the growth of a parametric instability that leads to break down of the flow into turbulence. This spiral wave instability (SWI) arises from a resonant interaction between pairs of inertial waves, or inertial-gravity waves, and the background spiral wave. The development of the instability in the linear regime involves the growth of a broad spectrum of inertial modes, with growth rates on the order of the orbital time, and results in a nonlinear saturated state in which turbulent velocity perturbations are of a similar magnitude to those induced by the spiral wave. The turbulence induces angular momentum transport and vertical mixing at a rate that depends locally on the amplitude of the spiral wave (we obtain a stress parameter α ˜ 5 × 10-4 in our reference model). The instability is found to operate in a wide range of disk models, including those with isothermal or adiabatic equations of state, and in viscous disks where the dimensionless kinematic viscosity ν ≤ 10-5. This robustness suggests that the instability will have applications to a broad range of astrophysical disk-related phenomena, including those in close binary systems, planets embedded in protoplanetary disks (including Jupiter in our own solar system) and FU Orionis outburst models. Further work is required to determine the nature of the instability and to evaluate its observational consequences in physically more complete disk models than we have considered in this paper.

  4. Forced response of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Brian C.; Kamat, Manohar P.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1993-01-01

    A complete analytic model of mistuned bladed disk assemblies, designed to simulate the dynamical behavior of these systems, is analyzed. The model incorporates a generalized method for describing the mistuning of the assembly through the introduction of specific mistuning modes. The model is used to develop a computational bladed disk assembly model for a series of parametric studies. Results are presented demonstrating that the response amplitudes of bladed disk assemblies depend both on the excitation mode and on the mistune mode.

  5. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J. T.; Pascucci, I.; Espaillat, C.; Woitke, P.; Andrews, S.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2014-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission, with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [O I] 63.18 μm for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program ({sup G}as in Protoplanetary Systems{sup )} by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS in this wavelength. [O I] 63.18 μm traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities ∼2 times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self-consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g., bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g., disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosity, and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.

  6. Self-Consistent Thermal Accretion Disk Corona Models for Compact Objects. I: Properties of the Corona and the Spectrum of Escaping Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Jorn; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We present the properties of accretion disk corona (ADC) models in which the radiation field, the temperature, and the total opacity of the corona are determined self-consistently. We use a nonlinear Monte Carlo code to perform the calculations. As an example, we discuss models in which the corona is situated above and below a cold accretion disk with a plane-parallel (slab) geometry, similar to the model of Haardt & Maraschi. By Comptonizing the soft radiation emitted by the accretion disk, the corona is responsible for producing the high-energy component of the escaping radiation. Our models include the reprocessing of radiation in the accretion disk. Here the photons either are Compton-reflected or photoabsorbed, giving rise to fluorescent line emission and thermal emission. The self- consistent coronal temperature is determined by balancing heating (due to viscous energy dissipation) with Compton cooling, determined using the fully relativistic, angle-dependent cross sections. The total opacity is found by balancing pair productions with annihilations. We find that, for a disk temperature kT(sub BB) approx. less than 200 eV, these coronae are unable to have a self-consistent temperature higher than approx. 140 keV if the total optical depth is approx. less than 0.2, regardless of the compactness parameter of the corona and the seed opacity. This limitation corresponds to the angle-averaged spectrum of escaping radiation having a photon index approx. greater than 1.8 within the 5-30 keV band. Finally, all models that have reprocessing features also predict a large thermal excess at lower energies. These constraints make explaining the X-ray spectra of persistent black hole candidates with ADC models very problematic.

  7. Poster 2:Ab initio calculations of low temperature hydrocarbon spectra for astrophysics: application to the modeling of methane absorption in the Titan atmosphere in a wide IR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Michael; Nikitin, Andrei; Bezard, Bruno; Rannou, Pascal; Coustenis, Athena; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of intensities of spectral transitions in various temperature ranges including very low-T conditions is essential for the modeling of optical properties of planetary atmospheres and for other astrophysical applications. The temperature dependence of spectral features is crucial, but quantified experimental information in a wide spectral range is generally missing. A significant progress has been recently achieved in first principles quantum mechanical predictions (ab initio electronic structure + variational nuclear motion calculations) of rotationally resolved spectra for hydrocarbon molecules such as methane , ethylene and their isotopic species [1,2] . We have recently reported the TheoReTS information system (theorets.univ-reims.fr, theorets.tsu.ru) for theoretical spectra based on variational predictions from molecular potential energy and dipole moment surfaces [3] that permits online simulation of radiative properties including low-T conditions of cold planets. In this work, we apply ab initio predictions of the spectra of methane isotopologues down to T=80 K for the modeling of the transmittance in the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest satellite explored by the Cassini-Huygens space mission. A very good agreement over the whole infrared range from 6,000 to 11,000 cm-1 compared with observations obtained by the Descent Imager / Spectral Radiometer (DISR) on the Huygens probe [4,5] at various altitudes will be reported.

  8. Understanding of Dynamics and Alignment of Astrophysical Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex

    2009-01-01

    For a long time the dynamics of dust particles was approximated by that of absolutely rigid spheroids with no internal structure; the driving was accounted by gas bombarding the surface of the spheroids. The real dust dynamics is very different. First of all, irregular grains have non-zero helicity, which results in strong torques that emerge when grains interact with radiation and/or gaseous flows. This results in grain alignment, which is far more efficient than the competing processes described in textbooks. Second, the processes of alignment can be different for grains which inertia is approximated by spheroids and ellipsoids of inertia. Third, interactions of grains with ions are frequently more important than with the neutral atoms. Our research shows that, in spite of all these complexities, grain dynamics and grain alignment can be understood with sufficiently simple models. In particular, I shall present an analytical model that describes well the alignment of helical grains, present the calculations of the rate of rotation and degree of alignment for grains in different astrophysical environments. In particular, I shall discuss the dynamics of very large grains, which are present in accretion disks and the dynamics of very small grains or PAHs, which are responsible for the anomalous foreground emission.

  9. Photoevaporating Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the central star or from a nearby massive star heats the surfaces of protoplanetary disks and causes the outer, less gravitationally bound part of the disks, to photoevaporate into interstellar space. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks. We focus in this talk on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We discuss recent models of the effects of the radiation from the central low mass star including both the predicted infrared spectra from the heated disks as well as preliminary results on the photoevaporation rates.

  10. Heating and Cooling Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal

    Many of the disks of gas and dust orbiting young Sun-like stars produce mid-infrared emission from water and other oxygen- and carbon-bearing molecules, as discovered in the last few years using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The emission reveals the temperatures, columns and chemical composition of the gas in the disk atmosphere within 2 AU of the star, directly overlying the region where the planets form. Better understanding of the processes governing the line emission is vital for converting this new class of measurements into information about the planets' raw ingredients. We propose to combine MHD models of the turbulence driving the disk accretion flows, with a thermal-chemical model of the disk atmospheres, to predict emergent spectra that will capture the dynamics, heating, and chemical composition. By comparing the predicted and observed spectra we can determine the strength of the turbulence that heats and mixes the gas, and test ideas about the conditions in the disk interior. We will investigate the coupling of the turbulence to the thermal and chemical evolution, seek to locate the line emission's power source, gauge the rate at which the atmosphere and interior exchange material, and obtain new independent measures of the disk mass accretion rates. These efforts will help infrared spectroscopy of protostellar disks reach its full potential as a diagnostic of the environments in which planets form.

  11. ASTROPHYSICS: Astronomers Spot Their First Carbon Bomb.

    PubMed

    Irion, R

    2000-11-17

    Carbon on the surface of an ultradense star detonated in a 3-hour thermonuclear explosion, according to a report at a meeting here last week of the American Astronomical Society's High Energy Astrophysics Division. If confirmed, the burst would be the first known cosmic explosion fueled solely by carbon rather than hydrogen or helium and could verify or revise models of carbon combustion.

  12. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Hale, G.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Ma, Z.; McLane, V.; Norman, E.B.; Shu, N.; Smith, D.L.; Smith, M.S.; Van Wormer, L.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Wu, S.-C.

    1999-08-30

    Measurements in nuclear physics laboratories form the empirical foundation for new, realistic, sophisticated theoretical models of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The predictive power of these models has, in many instances, a strong dependence on the input nuclear data, and more extensive and accurate nuclear data is required for these models than ever before. Progress in astrophysics can be aided by providing scientists with more usable, accurate, and significant amounts of nuclear data in a timely fashion in formats that can be easily incorporated into their models. A number of recent data compilations, evaluations, calculations, and disseminations that address nuclear astrophysics data needs will be described.

  13. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of galaxies. V. The dust and PAH emission SEDs of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Fischera, J.; Kylafis, N. D.; Madore, B. F.

    2011-03-01

    We present a self-consistent model of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spiral galaxies from the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (MIR)/far-infrared (FIR)/submillimeter (submm) based on a full radiative transfer calculation of the propagation of starlight in galaxy disks. This model predicts not only the total integrated energy absorbed in the UV/optical and re-emitted in the infrared/submm, but also the colours of the dust emission based on an explicit calculation of the strength and colour of the UV/optical radiation fields heating the dust, and incorporating a full calculation of the stochastic heating of small dust grains and PAH molecules. The geometry of the translucent components of the model is empirically constrained using the results from the radiation transfer analysis of Xilouris et al. on spirals in the middle range of the Hubble sequence, while the geometry of the optically thick components is constrained from physical considerations with a posteriori checks of the model predictions with observational data. Following the observational constraints, the model has both a distribution of diffuse dust associated with the old and young disk stellar populations as well as a clumpy component arising from dust in the parent molecular clouds in star forming regions. In accordance with the fragmented nature of dense molecular gas in typical star-forming regions, UV light from massive stars is allowed to either freely stream away into the diffuse medium in some fraction of directions or be geometrically blocked and locally absorbed in clumps. These geometrical constraints enable the dust emission to be predicted in terms of a minimum set of free parameters: the central face-on dust opacity in the B-band τ^f_B, a clumpiness factor F for the star-forming regions, the star-formation rate SFR, the normalised luminosity of the old stellar population old and the bulge-to-disk ratio B/D. We show that these parameters are almost orthogonal in their

  14. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of galaxies. V. The dust and PAH emission SEDs of disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Fischera, J.; Kylafis, N. D.; Madore, B. F.

    2011-03-01

    We present a self-consistent model of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spiral galaxies from the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (MIR)/far-infrared (FIR)/submillimeter (submm) based on a full radiative transfer calculation of the propagation of starlight in galaxy disks. This model predicts not only the total integrated energy absorbed in the UV/optical and re-emitted in the infrared/submm, but also the colours of the dust emission based on an explicit calculation of the strength and colour of the UV/optical radiation fields heating the dust, and incorporating a full calculation of the stochastic heating of small dust grains and PAH molecules. The geometry of the translucent components of the model is empirically constrained using the results from the radiation transfer analysis of Xilouris et al. on spirals in the middle range of the Hubble sequence, while the geometry of the optically thick components is constrained from physical considerations with a posteriori checks of the model predictions with observational data. Following the observational constraints, the model has both a distribution of diffuse dust associated with the old and young disk stellar populations as well as a clumpy component arising from dust in the parent molecular clouds in star forming regions. In accordance with the fragmented nature of dense molecular gas in typical star-forming regions, UV light from massive stars is allowed to either freely stream away into the diffuse medium in some fraction of directions or be geometrically blocked and locally absorbed in clumps. These geometrical constraints enable the dust emission to be predicted in terms of a minimum set of free parameters: the central face-on dust opacity in the B-band τ^f_B, a clumpiness factor F for the star-forming regions, the star-formation rate SFR, the normalised luminosity of the old stellar population old and the bulge-to-disk ratio B/D. We show that these parameters are almost orthogonal in their

  15. Euv spectroscopy in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M.; Cruddace, R.; Wood, K.; Barstow, M.

    The bulk of radiation from million-degree plasmas is emitted at EUV wavelengths. Such plasmas are ubiquitous in astrophysics, and examples include the atmospheres of white dwarfs, accretion phenomena in cataclysmic variables, the coronae of active stars, and the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own galaxy and as well as that of others. EUV wavelengths encompass critical spectral features with diagnostic information often not available at other wavelengths. For example in the ISM the bound free continuum of He II (< 228 Angstroms) and the resonance line at 304 Angstroms are the only useful diagnostics of the He II density. EUVE and the ROSAT WFC left a tremendous legacy in broad-band photometry at EUV wavelengths, and the former introduced EUV spectroscopy. However the termination of EUVE left a gap that CHIPS fills only partially as it is optimized for diffuse emission. Moreover, while Chandra has demonstrated the promise of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy, EUV spectrometers have had modest resolution and effective area (EUVE: 1 cm2, Resolution 400; CHIPS: Resolution 150) until recently. Our sounding rocket instrument J-PEX has now made the first successful high-resolution (effective area 3 cm2, Resolution 3000) spectral observation in the EUV, and future instruments with effective area >30 cm2 and Resolution>10,000 are now practical. We will highlight EUV spectroscopy results in non-solar astrophysics and trace the development of instrument capabilities that lead to the next generation of high-resolution EUV spectrometers. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research and NRL, and by NASA Space Astrophysics and Research Analysis grants.

  16. 2.5D global-disk oscillation models of the Be shell star ζ Tauri. I. Spectroscopic and polarimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escolano, C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Okazaki, A. T.; Rivinius, T.; Baade, D.; Štefl, S.

    2015-04-01

    Context. A large number of Be stars exhibit intensity variations of their violet and red emission peaks in their H i lines observed in emission. This is the so-called V/R phenomenon, usually explained by the precession of a one-armed spiral density perturbation in the circumstellar disk. That global-disk oscillation scenario was confirmed, both observationally and theoretically, in the previous series of two papers analyzing the Be shell star ζ Tauri. The vertically averaged (2D) global-disk oscillation model used at the time was able to reproduce the V/R variations observed in Hα, as well as the spatially resolved interferometric data from AMBER/VLTI. Unfortunately, that model failed to reproduce the V/R phase of Br15 and the amplitude of the polarization variation, suggesting that the inner disk structure predicted by the model was incorrect. Aims: The first aim of the present paper is to quantify the temporal variations of the shell-line characteristics of ζ Tauri. The second aim is to better understand the physics underlying the V/R phenomenon by modeling the shell-line variations together with the V/R and polarimetric variations. The third aim is to test a new 2.5D disk oscillation model, which solves the set of equations that describe the 3D perturbed disk structure but keeps only the equatorial (i.e., 2D) component of the solution. This approximation was adopted to allow comparisons with the previous 2D model, and as a first step toward a future 3D model. Methods: We carried out an extensive analysis of ζ Tauri's spectroscopic variations by measuring various quantities characterizing its Balmer line profiles: red and violet emission peak intensities (for Hα, Hβ, and Br15), depth and asymmetry of the shell absorption (for Hβ, Hγ, and Hδ), and the respective position (i.e., radial velocity) of each component. We attempted to model the observed variations by implementing in the radiative transfer code HDUST the perturbed disk structure computed with a

  17. Astrophysical blast wave data

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Nathan; Geissel, Matthias; Lewis, Sean M; Porter, John L.

    2015-03-01

    The data described in this document consist of image files of shadowgraphs of astrophysically relevant laser driven blast waves. Supporting files include Mathematica notebooks containing design calculations, tabulated experimental data and notes, and relevant publications from the open research literature. The data was obtained on the Z-Beamlet laser from July to September 2014. Selected images and calculations will be published as part of a PhD dissertation and in associated publications in the open research literature, with Sandia credited as appropriate. The authors are not aware of any restrictions that could affect the release of the data.

  18. Relativistic slim disks with vertical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, A.; Abramowicz, M.; Bursa, M.; Kluźniak, W.; Lasota, J.-P.; Różańska, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on a scheme for incorporating vertical radiative energy transport into a fully relativistic, Kerr-metric model of optically thick, advective, transonic alpha disks. Our code couples the radial and vertical equations of the accretion disk. The flux was computed in the diffusion approximation, and convection is included in the mixing-length approximation. We present the detailed structure of this "two-dimensional" slim-disk model for α = 0.01. We then calculated the emergent spectra integrated over the disk surface. The values of surface density, radial velocity, and the photospheric height for these models differ by 20%-30% from those obtained in the polytropic, height-averaged slim disk model considered previously. However, the emission profiles and the resulting spectra are quite similar for both types of models. The effective optical depth of the slim disk becomes lower than unity for high values of the alpha parameter and for high accretion rates.

  19. Line Emission from an Accretion Disk Around a Rotating Black Hole: Toward a Measurement of Frame Dragging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Chen, Kaiyou; Miller, Warner A.

    1997-01-01

    Line emission from an accretion disk and a corotating hot spot about a rotating black hole are considered for possible signatures of the frame-dragging effect. We explicitly compare integrated line profiles from a geometrically thin disk about a Schwarzschild and an extreme Kerr black hole, and show that the line profile differences are small if the inner radius of the disk is near or above the Schwarzschild stable-orbit limit of radius 6GM/sq c. However, if the inner disk radius extends below this limit, as is Possible in the extreme Kerr spacetime, then differences can become significant, especially if the disk emissivity is stronger near the inner regions. We demonstrate that the first three moments of a line profile define a three-dimensional space in which the presence of material at small radii becomes quantitatively evident in broad classes of disk models. In the context of the simple, thin disk paradigm, this moment-mapping scheme suggests formally that the iron line detected by the Advanced Satellite,for Cosmology and Astrophysics mission from MCG --6-30-15 (Tanaka et al.) is approximately 3 times more likely to originate from a disk about a rotating black hole than from a Schwarzschild system. A statistically significant detection of black hole rotation in this way may be achieved after only modest improvements in the quality of data. We also consider light curves and frequency shifts in line emission as a function of time for corotating hot spots in extreme Kerr and Schwarzschild geometries. The frequency-shift profile is a valuable measure of orbital parameters and might possibly be used to detect frame dragging even at radii approaching 6GM/sq c if the inclination angle of the orbital plane is large. The light curve from a hot spot shows differences as well, although these too are pronounced only at large inclination angles.

  20. Line emission from an accretion disk around a rotating black hole: Toward a measurement of frame dragging

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.C. |; Chen, K.; Miller, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Line emission from an accretion disk and a corotating hot spot about a rotating black hole are considered for possible signatures of the frame-dragging effect. We explicitly compare integrated line profiles from a geometrically thin disk about a Schwarzschild and an extreme Kerr black hole, and show that the line profile differences are small if the inner radius of the disk is near or above the Schwarzschild stable-orbit limit of radius 6GM/c{sup 2}. However, if the inner disk radius extends below this limit, as is possible in the extreme Kerr spacetime, then differences can become significant, especially if the disk emissivity is stronger near the inner regions. We demonstrate that the first three moments of a line profile define a three-dimensional space in which the presence of material at small radii becomes quantitatively evident in broad classes of disk models. In the context of the simple, thin disk paradigm, this moment-mapping scheme suggests formally that the iron line detected by the {ital Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics} mission from MCG{endash}6-30-15 (Tanaka {ital et al.}) is {approximately}3 times more likely to originate from a disk about a rotating black hole than from a Schwarzschild system. A statistically significant detection of black hole rotation in this way may be achieved after only modest improvements in the quality of data. We also consider light curves and frequency shifts in line emission as a function of time for corotating hot spots in extreme Kerr and Schwarzschild geometries. The frequency-shift profile is a valuable measure of orbital parameters and might possibly be used to detect frame dragging even at radii approaching 6GM/c{sup 2} if the inclination angle of the orbital plane is large. The light curve from a hot spot shows differences as well, although these too are pronounced only at large inclination angles. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  1. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  2. The Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    The Particle Astrophysics Center was established in fall of 2004. Fermilab director Michael S. Witherell has named Fermilab cosmologist Edward ''Rocky'' Kolb as its first director. The Center will function as an intellectual focus for particle astrophysics at Fermilab, bringing together the Theoretical and Experimental Astrophysics Groups. It also encompasses existing astrophysics projects, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, and the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory, as well as proposed projects, including the SuperNova Acceleration Probe to study dark energy as part of the Joint Dark Energy Mission, and the ground-based Dark Energy Survey aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state.

  3. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Holdridge, David V.; Norris, J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  5. STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DISK STRUCTURE IN COEVAL PLANET-FORMING DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Szucs, Laszlo; Apai, Daniel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Dullemond, Cornelis P. E-mail: apai@stsci.ed E-mail: dullemon@mpia.d

    2010-09-10

    Previous studies suggest that the planet-forming disks around very low mass stars/brown dwarfs may be flatter than those around more massive stars, in contrast to model predictions of larger scale heights for gas-disks around lower-mass stars. We conducted a statistically robust study to determine whether there is evidence for stellar-mass-dependent disk structure in planet-forming disks. We find a statistically significant difference in the Spitzer/IRAC color distributions of disks around very low mass and low mass stars all belonging to the same star-forming region, the Chamaeleon I star-forming region. We show that self-consistently calculated flared disk models cannot fit the median spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the two groups. These SEDs can only be explained by flatter disk models, consistent with the effect of dust settling in disks. We find that, relative to the disk structure predicted for flared disks, the required reduction in disk scale height is anti-correlated with the stellar mass; i.e., disks around lower-mass stars are flatter. Our results show that the initial and boundary conditions of planet formation are stellar-mass-dependent, an important finding that must be considered in planet formation models.

  6. PREFACE: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemmerer, D.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2008-01-01

    astrophysical modelling, and new theoretical approaches in nuclear physics are spurned by a wealth of new experimental data. It has been recognized by all participants that a joint effort by these disciplines is required in order to further our understanding of stars in all the phases of their lifespan and of the creation of energy and the chemical elements. The conference took place in the city of Dresden, in the geographical heart of Europe. Dresden is a traditional centre of culture and the fine arts, and its recently reconstructed Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady) symbolizes the desire of Europeans to leave war and division behind them and revive their traditionally lively cultural and scientific exchange. Scientists from all parts of Europe attended NPA3, as well as participants from North America, Japan and the Near East. Especially encouraging was the great echo among young scientists whose devotion promises a bright future to the field. Fresh, dedicated and interdisciplinary efforts are indeed needed to solve some of the astrophysical puzzles presented at NPA3. New satellite observatories, unprecedented computing power, and new experimental facilities such as underground accelerator laboratories and radioactive ion beam facilities will contribute to these efforts. We look forward to hearing about these and other developments in the fourth conference of the Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics series (NPA4) which is to be held in Gran Sasso, Italy in 2009. The financial support of the hosting institution Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, of the Free State of Saxony and of the European Physical Society has been essential in ensuring the success of the conference. We thank the Publisher and the staff of it Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics for the fruitful collaboration in preparing this issue. The conference website is located at http://www.fzd.de/npa3 Cover image of Dresden by C. Preußel, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf Conference photograph

  7. Mean kinetic energy transport and event classification in a model wind turbine array versus an array of porous disks: Energy budget and octant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Elizabeth H.; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-08-01

    An array of model rotating wind turbines is compared experimentally to an array of static porous disks in order to quantify the similarities and differences in the mean kinetic energy transport within the wakes produced in these two cases. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements are done in a wind tunnel bracketing the center turbine in the fourth row of a 4 ×3 array of model turbines. Equivalent sets of rotors and porous disks are created by matching their respective induction factors. The primary difference in the mean velocity components is found in the spanwise mean velocity component, which is as much as 190% different between the rotor and disk case. Horizontal averages of mean kinetic energy transport terms in the region where rotation is most important show percent differences in the range 3%-41%, which decrease to 1%-6% at streamwise coordinates where rotation is less important. Octant analysis is performed on the most significant term related to vertical mean kinetic energy flux u'v' ¯U . The average percent difference between corresponding octants is as much as 68% different in the near wake and as much as 17% different in the far wake. Furthermore, octant analysis elucidates the three-dimensional nature of sweeps and ejections in the near wake of the rotor case. Together, these results imply that a stationary porous disk adequately represents the mean kinetic energy transport of a rotor in the far wake where rotation is less important, while significant discrepancies exist at streamwise locations where rotation is a key phenomenon. This comparison has implications in the use of an actuator disk to model the wind turbine rotor in computational simulations specifically for studies where Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity, or interactions with the atmosphere are of interest.

  8. Frontier Research in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanelli, Franco; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    We want to join about 90 colleagues from the whole world involved in various topics of modern Astrophysics and Particle Physics in order to discuss the most recent experimental and theoretical results for an advance in the comprehension of the Physics governing our Universe. For reaching the aim of the workshop the idea is to use ground- and space-based experimental developments, theoretical developments AND the coming out science results which have already resulted OR WILL result into high impact science papers. The following items will be reviewed: Cosmology: Cosmic Background, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Clusters of Galaxies. Physics of the Diffuse Cosmic Sources. Physics of Cosmic Rays. Physics of Discrete Cosmic Sources. Extragalactic Sources: Active Galaxies, Normal Galaxies, Gamma-Ray Bursts. Galactic Sources: Star Formation, Pre-Main-Sequence and Main-Sequence Stars, Cataclysmic Variables and Novae, Supernovae and SNRs, X-Ray Binary Systems, Pulsars, Black Holes, Gamma-Ray Sources, Nucleosynthesis. Future Physics and Astrophysics: Ongoing and Planned Ground- and Space-based Experiments. The workshop will include few 40-minute general review talks to introduce the current problems, and typically 20-minute talks discussing new experimental and theoretical results. A series of 15-minute talks will discuss the ongoing and planned ground- and space-based experiments. The cadence of the workshop will be biennial. The participation will be only by invitation. Editors: Franco Giovannelli and Lola Sabau-Graziati

  9. Polarimetry in astrophysics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lingzhen

    Astrophysicists are mostly limited to passively observing electromagnetic radiation from a distance, which generally shows some degree of polarization. Polarization often carries a wealth of information on the physical state and geometry of the emitting object and intervening material. In the microwave part of the spectrum, polarization provides information about galactic magnetic fields and the physics of interstellar dust. The measurement of this polarized radiation is central to much modern astrophysical research. The first part of this thesis is about polarimetry in astrophysics. In Chapter 1, I review the basics of polarization and summarize the most important mechanisms that generate polarization in astrophysics. In Chapter 2, I describe the data analysis of polarization observation on M17 (a young, massive star formation region in the Galaxy) from Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and show the physics that we learn about M17 from the polarimetry. Polarimetry also plays an important role in modern cosmology. Inflation theory predicts two types of polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, called E-modes and B-modes. Measurements to date of the E-mode signal are consistent with the predictions of anisotropic Thompson scattering, while the B-mode signal has yet to be detected. The B-mode power spectrum amplitude can be parameterized by the relative amplitude of the tensor to scalar modes r. For the simplest inflation models, the expected deviation from scale invariance (ns = 0.963 ± 0.012) is coupled to gravitational waves with r ≈ 0.1. These considerations establish a strong motivation to search for this remnant from when the universe was about 10-32 seconds old. The second part of this thesis is about the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment, that is designed to have an unprecedented ability to detect the B-mode polarization to the level of r ≤ 0.01. Chapter 3 is an introduction to cosmology, including the

  10. Development report for dual-burst disks

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco, A.M.

    1996-11-01

    Burst disks, commonly used in pressure relief applications, were studied as single-use valves. A dual-burst disk design was chosen for primary investigation for systems involving separation of gases of two significantly different pressures. The two disks are used to seal either end of a piston cavity that has a different cross-sectional area on each side. Different piston surface areas are used to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium, P{sub 1}A{sub 1} = P{sub 2}A{sub 2}. The single-use valve functions when the downstream pressure is reduced to approximately atmospheric pressure, creating a pressure differential that causes the burst disks to fail. Several parameters were studied to determine the optimum design of the burst disk. These parameters include thickness, diameter, area/pressure ratio, scoring, and disk geometry. The disk material was limited to 304L stainless steel. Factors that were considered essential to the optimization of the design were robustness, manufacturability, and burst pressure variability. The thicknesses of the disks that were studied range from 0.003 in. to 0.010 in. A model for predicting burst pressures of the burst disks was derived. The model combines membrane stress theory with force/displacement data to predict the burst pressure of various designs to within {+-}10%. This model results from studies that characterize the behavior of individual small and large disks. Welding techniques used to join the dual-disk assembly are discussed. Laser welds are used to join and seal the disks to the bulkhead. These welds were optimized for repeatability and robustness. Resistance upset welding is suggested for joining the dual-disk assembly to the pressure vessel body. Resistance upset weld parameters were developed for this particular design so as to minimize the side effects on the burst-disk performance and to provide high-quality welds.

  11. Modified gravity inside astrophysical bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Ryo; Langlois, David; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Gleyzes, Jérôme E-mail: yamauchi@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr

    2015-06-01

    Many theories of modified gravity, including the well studied Horndeski models, are characterized by a screening mechanism that ensures that standard gravity is recovered near astrophysical bodies. In a recently introduced class of gravitational theories that goes beyond Horndeski, it has been found that new derivative interactions lead to a partial breaking of the Vainshtein screening mechanism inside any gravitational source, although not outside. We study the impact of this new type of deviation from standard gravity on the density profile of a spherically symmetric matter distribution, in the nonrelativistic limit. For simplicity, we consider a polytropic equation of state and derive the modifications to the standard Lane-Emden equations. We also show the existence of a universal upper bound on the amplitude of this type of modified gravity, independently of the details of the equation of state.

  12. Secular Planetary Perturbations in Circumstellar Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.; Capobianco, C.

    2006-12-01

    Circumstellar debris disks are likely the by-product of collisions among unseen planetesimals. Planetesimals are also the seeds of planets, so it is reasonable to expect that some debris disks might also harbor planets. In fact several such disks, like those orbiting beta Pictoris, Fomalhaut, etc., do appear to be perturbed by unseen planets orbiting within. The signatures of planetary perturbations include: central gaps, warps, and radial offsets in the disk's surface brightness. By modeling the disturbances observed in a circumstellar dust disk, one can then measure or constrain the masses and orbits of the planets that may be lurking within. Of particular interest here are the warps and radial offsets seen in such disks, since these features can be due to secular planetary perturbations (Mouillet et al 1997, Wyatt et al 1999). Secular perturbations are the slowly varying gravitational perturbations that can excite orbital eccentricities and inclinations in a disk, and can also drive a slow orbital precession. Note that a dust grain's motion is completely analytic when suffering secular perturbations (Murray & Dermott 1999), which allows us to rapidly generate a synthetic image of a simulated disk as would be seen in scattered starlight or via thermal emission. And because this model is quite fast, our model can rapidly scan a rather large parameter space in order to determine the planetary configuration that may be responsible for the disk's perturbed appearance. We have applied this dust-disk model to Hubble observations of the β Pictoris dust-disk (from Heap et al 2000), and will report on the planets that may be responsible for the warp seen in this edge-on disk. We will also apply the model to optical and IR observations of debris disks at Fomalhaut, AU Microscopii, and others, with additional results to be reported at conference time.

  13. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  14. Orbital circularization of a planet accreting disk gas: the formation of distant jupiters in circular orbits based on a core accretion model

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: higuchia@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2014-12-10

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ∼ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at ≲ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ∼10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  15. Do elliptical galaxies have thick disks?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, R. C.; Wright, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss new evidence which supports the existence of thick disks in elliptical/SO galaxies. Numerical simulations of weak interactions with thick disk systems produce shell structures very similar in appearance to those observed in many shell galaxies. The authors think this model presents a more plausible explanation for the formation of shell structures in elliptical/SO galaxies than does the merger model and, if correct, supports the existence of thick disks in elliptical/SO galaxies.

  16. Electron-impact excitation of H-like Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni for applications in modeling X-ray astrophysical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malespin, C.; Ballance, C. P.; Pindzola, M. S.; Witthoeft, M. C.; Kallman, T. R.; Loch, S. D.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Accurate atomic data for the less abundance Fe-peak elements are required for use in X-ray astrophysical studies. Aims: We calculate high quality electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for hydrogenic Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. Methods: We use the Dirac R-matrix method, the intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix method, the semi-relativistic distorted-wave method and the fully-relativistic distorted-wave method to calculate collision strengths for each of the ions. The ADAS collisional-radiative codes are used to produce photon emissivity coefficients for each ion. Results: Results are presented for atomic energy levels, spontaneous emission coefficients, electron-impact excitation collision strengths and associated effective collision strengths for each of the five species under consideration. We find relativistic effects can contribute an approximate 10% increase to the background cross section in relation to semi-relativistic collision calculations. We also confirm that radiation damping plays a prominent role for certain near threshold resonances. In order check the integration of our results within collisional-radiative modeling codes, we have used the ADAS package for some preliminary modeling of photon emissivities. The atomic data shall be made available online through the OPEN-ADAS site and the CFADC database Final datasets for each ion are only available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A115

  17. Generalized Langevin equation with colored noise description of the stochastic oscillations of accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Leung, Chun Sing; Mocanu, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    We consider a description of the stochastic oscillations of the general relativistic accretion disks around compact astrophysical objects interacting with their external medium based on a generalized Langevin equation with colored noise and on the fluctuation-dissipation theorems. The former accounts for the general memory and retarded effects of the frictional force. The presence of the memory effects influences the response of the disk to external random interactions, and it modifies the dynamical behavior of the disk, as well as the energy dissipation processes. The generalized Langevin equation of the motion of the disk in the vertical direction is studied numerically, and the vertical displacements, velocities, and luminosities of the stochastically perturbed disks are explicitly obtained for both the Schwarzschild and the Kerr cases. The power spectral distribution of the disk luminosity is also obtained. As a possible astrophysical application of the formalism we investigate the possibility that the intra-day variability of the active galactic nuclei may be due to the stochastic disk instabilities. The perturbations due to colored/nontrivially correlated noise induce a complicated disk dynamics, which could explain some astrophysical observational features related to disk variability.

  18. A cool disk in the Galactic Center?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. F.; Meyer, F.; Meyer-Hofmeister, E.

    2004-07-01

    We study the possibility of a cool disk existing in the Galactic Center in the framework of the disk-corona evaporation/condensation model. Assuming an inactive disk near the gravitational capture distance left over from an earlier evolutionary stage, a hot corona should form above the disk since there is a continuous supply of hot gas from stellar winds of the close-by massive stars. We study the interaction between the disk and the corona. Whether the cool disk can survive depends on the mass exchange between disk and corona which is determined by the energy and pressure balance. If evaporation is the dominant process and the rate is larger than the Bondi accretion rate in the Galactic Center, the disk will be depleted within a certain time and no persistent disk will exist. On the other hand, if the interaction results in hot gas steadily condensing into the disk, an inactive cool disk with little gas accreting towards the central black hole might survive in the Galactic Center. For this case we further investigate the Bremsstrahlung radiation from the hot corona and compare it with the observed X-ray luminosity. Our model shows that, for standard viscosity in the corona (α=0.3), the mass evaporation rate is much higher than the Bondi accretion rate and the coronal density is much larger than that inferred from Chandra observations. An inactive disk can not survive such strong evaporation. For small viscosity (α ⪉ 0.07) we find condensation solutions. But detailed coronal structure computations show that in this case there is too much X-ray radiation from the corona to be in agreement with the observations. From this modeling we conclude that there should be no thin/inactive disk presently in the Galactic Center. However we do not exclude that the alternative non-radiative model of Nayakshin (\\cite{Nayakshin04}) might instead be realized in nature and shortly discuss this question.}

  19. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: On the Dynamical Evolution of a Nebula and Its Effect on Dust Coagulation and the Formation of Centimeter-sized Particles. The Mineralogy and Grain Properties of the Disk Surfaces in Three Herbig Ae/Be Stars. Astrophysical Observations of Disk Evolution Around Solar Mass Stars. The Systematic Petrology of Chondrites: A Consistent Approach to Assist Classification and Interpretation. Understanding Our Origins: Formation of Sun-like Stars in H II Region Environments. Chondrule Crystallization Experiments. Formation of SiO2-rich Chondrules by Fractional Condensation. Refractory Forsterites from Murchison (CM2) and Yamato 81020 (CO3.0) Chondrites: Cathodoluminescence, Chemical Compositions and Oxygen Isotopes. Apparent I-Xe Cooling Rates of Chondrules Compared with Silicates from the Colomera Iron Meteorite. Chondrule Formation in Planetesimal Bow Shocks: Physical Processes in the Near Vicinity of the Planetesimal. Genetic Relationships Between Chondrules, Rims and Matrix. Chondrite Fractionation was Cosmochemical; Chondrule Fractionation was Geochemical. Chondrule Formation and Accretion of Chondrite Parent Bodies: Environmental Constraints. Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates from the Semarkona LL3.0 Chondrite. The Evolution of Solids in Proto-Planetary Disks. New Nickel Vapor Pressure Measurements: Possible Implications for Nebular Condensates. Chemical, Mineralogical and Isotopic Properties of Chondrules: Clues to Their Origin. Maximal Size of Chondrules in Shock-Wave Heating Model: Stripping of Liquid Surface in Hypersonic Rarefied Gas Flow. The Nature and Origin of Interplanetary Dust: High Temperature Components. Refractory Relic Components in Chondrules from Ordinary Chondrites. Constraints on the Origin of Chondrules and CAIs from Short-lived and Long-lived Radionuclides. The Genetic Relationship Between Refractory Inclusions and Chondrules. Contemporaneous Chondrule Formation Between Ordinary and Carbonaceous Chondrites. Chondrules and

  20. Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael S.; Hix, W. Raphael; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Scott, Jason P.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Meyer, Richard A.

    2006-07-12

    A Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics has been developed to streamline the inclusion of the latest nuclear physics data in astrophysics simulations. The infrastructure consists of a platform-independent suite of computer codes that is freely available online at nucastrodata.org. Features of, and future plans for, this software suite are given.

  1. Learning Astrophysics through Mobile Gaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Becciani, U.; Krokos, M.; Bandieramonte, M.; Petta, C.; Pistagna, C.; Riggi, S.; Sciacca, E.; Vitello, F.

    2013-10-01

    SpaceMission is a mobile application (iOS) offering hands-on experience of astrophysical concepts using scientific simulations. The application is based on VisIVO which is a suite of software tools for visual discovery through 3D views generated from astrophysical datasets.

  2. Recognition of compact astrophysical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H. (Editor); Rothschild, R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics and the Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics at the Univ. of Md. collaberated on a graduate level course with this title. This publication is an edited version of notes used as the course text. Topics include stellar evolution, pulsars, binary stars, X-ray signatures, gamma ray sources, and temporal analysis of X-ray data.

  3. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko

    2010-10-20

    We have developed a high-resolution combined physical and chemical model of a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. Our aims were to use our model to calculate the chemical structure of disks on small scales (submilliarcsecond in the inner disk for objects at the distance of Taurus, {approx}140 pc) to investigate the various chemical processes thought to be important in disks and to determine potential molecular tracers of each process. Our gas-phase network was extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry to which we added gas-grain interactions including freezeout and thermal and non-thermal desorption (cosmic-ray-induced desorption, photodesorption, and X-ray desorption), and a grain-surface network. We find that cosmic-ray-induced desorption has the least effect on our disk chemical structure while photodesorption has a significant effect, enhancing the abundances of most gas-phase molecules throughout the disk and affecting the abundances and distribution of HCN, CN, and CS, in particular. In the outer disk, we also see enhancements in the abundances of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. X-ray desorption is a potentially powerful mechanism in disks, acting to homogenize the fractional abundances of gas-phase species across the depth and increasing the column densities of most molecules, although there remain significant uncertainties in the rates adopted for this process. The addition of grain-surface chemistry enhances the fractional abundances of several small complex organic molecules including CH{sub 3}OH, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} to potentially observable values (i.e., a fractional abundance of {approx}>10{sup -11}).

  4. Beauty and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessell, Michael S.

    2000-08-01

    Spectacular colour images have been made by combining CCD images in three different passbands using Adobe Photoshop. These beautiful images highlight a variety of astrophysical phenomena and should be a valuable resource for science education and public awareness of science. The wide field images were obtained at the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) by mounting a Hasselblad or Nikkor telephoto lens in front of a 2K × 2K CCD. Options of more than 30 degrees or 6 degrees square coverage are produced in a single exposure in this way. Narrow band or broad band filters were placed between lens and CCD enabling deep, linear images in a variety of passbands to be obtained. We have mapped the LMC and SMC and are mapping the Galactic Plane for comparison with the Molonglo Radio Survey. Higher resolution images have also been made with the 40 inch telescope of galaxies and star forming regions in the Milky Way.

  5. Black-hole astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.; Bloom, E.; Cominsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  6. High Performance Astrophysics Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Arca-Sedda, M.; Mastrobuono-Battisti, A.; Punzo, D.; Spera, M.

    2012-07-01

    The application of high end computing to astrophysical problems, mainly in the galactic environment, is developing for many years at the Dep. of Physics of Sapienza Univ. of Roma. The main scientific topic is the physics of self gravitating systems, whose specific subtopics are: i) celestial mechanics and interplanetary probe transfers in the solar system; ii) dynamics of globular clusters and of globular cluster systems in their parent galaxies; iii) nuclear clusters formation and evolution; iv) massive black hole formation and evolution; v) young star cluster early evolution. In this poster we describe the software and hardware computational resources available in our group and how we are developing both software and hardware to reach the scientific aims above itemized.

  7. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  8. Plasma phenomenology in astrophysical systems: Radio-sources and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Montani, Giovanni; Petitta, Jacopo

    2014-06-15

    We review the plasma phenomenology in the astrophysical sources which show appreciable radio emissions, namely Radio-Jets from Pulsars, Microquasars, Quasars, and Radio-Active Galaxies. A description of their basic features is presented, then we discuss in some details the links between their morphology and the mechanisms that lead to the different radio-emissions, investigating especially the role played by the plasma configurations surrounding compact objects (Neutron Stars, Black Holes). For the sake of completeness, we briefly mention observational techniques and detectors, whose structure set them apart from other astrophysical instruments. The fundamental ideas concerning angular momentum transport across plasma accretion disks—together with the disk-source-jet coupling problem—are discussed, by stressing their successes and their shortcomings. An alternative scenario is then inferred, based on a parallelism between astrophysical and laboratory plasma configurations, where small-scale structures can be found. We will focus our attention on the morphology of the radio-jets, on their coupling with the accretion disks and on the possible triggering phenomena, viewed as profiles of plasma instabilities.

  9. Thin disk lasers: history and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    During the early 1990s, collaboration between the German Aerospace Center and the University of Stuttgart started to work on the Thin Disk concept. The core idea behind the thin disk design is the use of a thin, disk-shaped active medium that is cooled through one of the flat faces of the disk. This ensures a large surface-to-volume ratio and therefore provides very efficient thermal management. Today, the thin disk concept is used in various commercial lasers - ranging from compact, efficient low power systems to multi-kW lasers, including cw lasers and also pulsed (femtosecond to nanosecond) oscillators and amplifiers. The whole development of the Thin Disk laser was and will be accompanied by numerical modeling and optimization of the thermal and thermo-mechanic behavior of the disk and also the heat sink structure, mostly based on finite element models. For further increasing the energy and efficiency of pulsed Thin Disk lasers, the effects of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) are a core issue. Actual efforts are oriented towards short pulse and ultra-short pulse amplifiers with (multi-)kW average power or Joule-class Thin Disk amplifiers, but also on new designs for cw thin disk MOPA designs.

  10. Effective Q criterion for disk stability in an external potential

    SciTech Connect

    Jog, Chanda J.

    2014-06-01

    The standard Q criterion (with Q > 1) describes the stability against local, axisymmetric perturbations in a disk supported by rotation and random motion. Most astrophysical disks, however, are under the influence of an external gravitational potential, which can significantly affect their stability. A typical example is a galactic disk embedded in a dark matter halo. Here, we do a linear perturbation analysis for a disk in an external potential and obtain a generalized dispersion relation and the effective stability criterion. An external potential, such as that due to the dark matter halo concentric with the disk, contributes to the unperturbed rotational field and significantly increases its stability. We obtain the values for the effective Q parameter for the Milky Way and for a low surface brightness galaxy, UGC 7321. We find that in each case the stellar disk by itself is barely stable and it is the dark matter halo that stabilizes the disk against local, axisymmetric gravitational instabilities. Thus, the dark matter halo is necessary to ensure local disk stability. This result has been largely missed so far because in practice the Q parameter for a galactic disk is obtained using the observed rotational field that already includes the effect of the halo.

  11. Disk Alloy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tim; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack

    2001-01-01

    The advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy ME3 was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables in the NASA HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 "Fin large disks. Scaled-up disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of this program to demonstrate these properties in realistic disk shapes. The objective of the UEET disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature, in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. Scaled-up disks processed in the HSR/EPM Compressor / Turbine Disk program were sectioned, machined into specimens, and tested in tensile, creep, fatigue, and fatigue crack growth tests by NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Scaled-up disks of an advanced regional disk alloy, Alloy 10, were used to evaluate dual microstructure heat treatments. This allowed demonstration of an improved balance of properties in disks with higher strength and fatigue resistance in the bores and higher creep and dwell fatigue crack growth resistance in the rims. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process has 1300 to 1350 O F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements. Chemistry and process enhancements show promise for further increasing temperature capabilities.

  12. Partition functions and equilibrium constants for diatomic molecules and atoms of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.; Collet, R.

    2016-04-01

    Partition functions and dissociation equilibrium constants are presented for 291 diatomic molecules for temperatures in the range from near absolute zero to 10 000 K, thus providing data for many diatomic molecules of astrophysical interest at low temperature. The calculations are based on molecular spectroscopic data from the book of Huber & Herzberg (1979, Constants of Diatomic Molecules) with significant improvements from the literature, especially updated data for ground states of many of the most important molecules by Irikura (2007, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 36, 389). Dissociation energies are collated from compilations of experimental and theoretical values. Partition functions for 284 species of atoms for all elements from H to U are also presented based on data collected at NIST. The calculated data are expected to be useful for modelling a range of low density astrophysical environments, especially star-forming regions, protoplanetary disks, the interstellar medium, and planetary and cool stellar atmospheres. The input data, which will be made available electronically, also provides a possible foundation for future improvement by the community. Full Tables 1-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A96

  13. Giant Planet Migration, Disk Evolution, and the Origin of Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Richard D.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2009-10-01

    We present models of giant planet migration in evolving protoplanetary disks. Our disks evolve subject to viscous transport of angular momentum and photoevaporation, while planets undergo Type II migration. We use a Monte Carlo approach, running large numbers of models with a range in initial conditions. We find that relatively simple models can reproduce both the observed radial distribution of extrasolar giant planets, and the lifetimes and accretion histories of protoplanetary disks. The use of state-of-the-art photoevaporation models results in a degree of coupling between planet formation and disk clearing, which has not been found previously. Some accretion across planetary orbits is necessary if planets are to survive at radii lsim1.5 AU, and if planets of Jupiter mass or greater are to survive in our models they must be able to form at late times, when the disk surface density in the formation region is low. Our model forms two different types of "transitional" disks, embedded planets and clearing disks, which show markedly different properties. We find that the observable properties of these systems are broadly consistent with current observations, and highlight useful observational diagnostics. We predict that young transition disks are more likely to contain embedded giant planets, while older transition disks are more likely to be undergoing disk clearing.

  14. GIANT PLANET MIGRATION, DISK EVOLUTION, AND THE ORIGIN OF TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Richard D.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2009-10-20

    We present models of giant planet migration in evolving protoplanetary disks. Our disks evolve subject to viscous transport of angular momentum and photoevaporation, while planets undergo Type II migration. We use a Monte Carlo approach, running large numbers of models with a range in initial conditions. We find that relatively simple models can reproduce both the observed radial distribution of extrasolar giant planets, and the lifetimes and accretion histories of protoplanetary disks. The use of state-of-the-art photoevaporation models results in a degree of coupling between planet formation and disk clearing, which has not been found previously. Some accretion across planetary orbits is necessary if planets are to survive at radii approx<1.5 AU, and if planets of Jupiter mass or greater are to survive in our models they must be able to form at late times, when the disk surface density in the formation region is low. Our model forms two different types of 'transitional' disks, embedded planets and clearing disks, which show markedly different properties. We find that the observable properties of these systems are broadly consistent with current observations, and highlight useful observational diagnostics. We predict that young transition disks are more likely to contain embedded giant planets, while older transition disks are more likely to be undergoing disk clearing.

  15. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, A. E.; Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear processes drive stellar evolution and so nuclear physics, stellar models and observations together allow us to describe the inner workings of stars and their life stories. This Information on nuclear reaction rates and nuclear properties are critical ingredients in addressing most questions in astrophysics and often the nuclear database is incomplete or lacking the needed precision. Direct measurements of astrophysically-interesting reactions are necessary and the experimental focus is on improving both sensitivity and precision. In the following, we review recent results and approaches taken at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA, http://research.physics.unc.edu/project/nuclearastro/Welcome.html).

  17. Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Champagne, A. E. Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.

    2014-04-15

    Nuclear processes drive stellar evolution and so nuclear physics, stellar models and observations together allow us to describe the inner workings of stars and their life stories. This Information on nuclear reaction rates and nuclear properties are critical ingredients in addressing most questions in astrophysics and often the nuclear database is incomplete or lacking the needed precision. Direct measurements of astrophysically-interesting reactions are necessary and the experimental focus is on improving both sensitivity and precision. In the following, we review recent results and approaches taken at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA, http://research.physics.unc.edu/project/nuclearastro/Welcome.html )

  18. Collaborative Astrophysical Research in Aire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng

    The AIRE (Astrophysical Integrated Research Environment) consists of three main parts: a Data Archive Center (DAC) which collects and manages public astrophysical data; a web-based Data Processing Center (DPC) which enables astrophysicists to process the data in a central server at any place and anytime; and a Collaborative Astrophysical Research Project System (CARPS) with which astrophysicists in different fields can pursue a collaborative reserch efficiently. Two research examples QPO study of RXTE data and wavelet analysis of large amount of galaxies are shown here.

  19. Quantum chemical protocols for modeling reactions and spectra in astrophysical ice analogs: the challenging case of the C⁺ + H₂O reaction in icy grain mantles.

    PubMed

    Woon, David E

    2015-11-21

    Icy grain mantles that accrete on refractory dust particles in the very cold interstellar medium or beyond the snow line in protoplanetary disks serve as minute incubators for heterogeneous chemistry. Ice mantle chemistry can differ significantly from the gas phase chemistry that occurs in these environments and is often richer. Modeling ices and their chemistry is a challenging task for quantum theoretical methods, but theory promises insight into these systems that is difficult to attain with experiments. Density functional theory (DFT) is predominately employed for modeling reactions in icy grain mantles due to its favorable scalability, but DFT has limitations that risk undercutting its reliability for this task. In this work, basic protocols are proposed for identifying the degree to which DFT methods are able to reproduce experimental or higher level theoretical results for the fundamental interactions upon which ice mantle chemistry depends, including both reactive interactions and non-reactive scaffolding interactions. The exemplar of this study is the reaction of C(+) with H2O, where substantial methodological differences are found in the prediction of gas phase relative energetics for stationary points (about 10 kcal mol(-1) for the C-O bond energy of the H2OC(+) intermediate), which in turn casts doubt about employing it to treat the C(+) + H2O reaction on an ice surface. However, careful explorations demonstrate that B3LYP with small correlation consistent basis sets performs in a sufficiently reliable manner to justify using it to identify plausible chemical pathways, where the dominant products were found to be neutral HOC and the CO(-) anion plus one and two H3O(+) cations, respectively. Predicted vibrational and electronic spectra are presented that would serve to verify or disconfirm the pathways; the latter were computed with time-dependent DFT. Conclusions are compared with those of a recent similar study by McBride and coworkers (J. Phys. Chem

  20. Quantum chemical protocols for modeling reactions and spectra in astrophysical ice analogs: the challenging case of the C⁺ + H₂O reaction in icy grain mantles.

    PubMed

    Woon, David E

    2015-11-21

    Icy grain mantles that accrete on refractory dust particles in the very cold interstellar medium or beyond the snow line in protoplanetary disks serve as minute incubators for heterogeneous chemistry. Ice mantle chemistry can differ significantly from the gas phase chemistry that occurs in these environments and is often richer. Modeling ices and their chemistry is a challenging task for quantum theoretical methods, but theory promises insight into these systems that is difficult to attain with experiments. Density functional theory (DFT) is predominately employed for modeling reactions in icy grain mantles due to its favorable scalability, but DFT has limitations that risk undercutting its reliability for this task. In this work, basic protocols are proposed for identifying the degree to which DFT methods are able to reproduce experimental or higher level theoretical results for the fundamental interactions upon which ice mantle chemistry depends, including both reactive interactions and non-reactive scaffolding interactions. The exemplar of this study is the reaction of C(+) with H2O, where substantial methodological differences are found in the prediction of gas phase relative energetics for stationary points (about 10 kcal mol(-1) for the C-O bond energy of the H2OC(+) intermediate), which in turn casts doubt about employing it to treat the C(+) + H2O reaction on an ice surface. However, careful explorations demonstrate that B3LYP with small correlation consistent basis sets performs in a sufficiently reliable manner to justify using it to identify plausible chemical pathways, where the dominant products were found to be neutral HOC and the CO(-) anion plus one and two H3O(+) cations, respectively. Predicted vibrational and electronic spectra are presented that would serve to verify or disconfirm the pathways; the latter were computed with time-dependent DFT. Conclusions are compared with those of a recent similar study by McBride and coworkers (J. Phys. Chem

  1. VADER: A flexible, robust, open-source code for simulating viscous thin accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, M. R.; Forbes, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of thin axisymmetric viscous accretion disks is a classic problem in astrophysics. While models based on this simplified geometry provide only approximations to the true processes of instability-driven mass and angular momentum transport, their simplicity makes them invaluable tools for both semi-analytic modeling and simulations of long-term evolution where two- or three-dimensional calculations are too computationally costly. Despite the utility of these models, the only publicly-available frameworks for simulating them are rather specialized and non-general. Here we describe a highly flexible, general numerical method for simulating viscous thin disks with arbitrary rotation curves, viscosities, boundary conditions, grid spacings, equations of state, and rates of gain or loss of mass (e.g., through winds) and energy (e.g., through radiation). Our method is based on a conservative, finite-volume, second-order accurate discretization of the equations, which we solve using an unconditionally-stable implicit scheme. We implement Anderson acceleration to speed convergence of the scheme, and show that this leads to factor of ∼5 speed gains over non-accelerated methods in realistic problems, though the amount of speedup is highly problem-dependent. We have implemented our method in the new code Viscous Accretion Disk Evolution Resource (VADER), which is freely available for download from

  2. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Hakel, Peter; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Sherrill, Manalo Edgar

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generatedmore » with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar