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Sample records for astylus variegatus coleoptera

  1. Astylus atromaculatus (Coleoptera: Melyridae): abundance and role in pollen dispersal in Bt and non-Bt cotton in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Jacqueline; Hofs, Jean-Luc

    2010-10-01

    In South Africa, modified Bt (Cry1 Ac) cotton cultivars and organic ones coexist. This raises the question of the risk of dissemination of genetically modified (GM) pollen to non-GM crops by visiting insects. We inventoried the flower-visiting insects in Bt and non-Bt cotton fields of the South African Highveld region and investigated their role in pollen dispersal. Their diversity and abundance varied slightly among sites, with Astylus atromaculatus as the predominant insect on both Bt and non-Bt cotton flowers. The other major flower-visiting species were Apis mellifera and solitary Apidae. No differences were found in the abundance of each taxum between Bt and non-Bt cotton except for Scoliidae and Nitidulidae, which were scarce overall (<0.5%) but more abundant on the non-Bt flowers in the central area of the field at one site. The pollen load on A. atromaculatus was as high as on Apis mellifera. Cage tests showed that A. atromaculatus can pollinate female cotton plants by transferring pollen from male donor plants. In the field, the flight range of this insect was generally short (25 m), but it can occasionally reach up to 200 m or even more. This study therefore highlights that A. atromaculatus, commonly regarded as a pest, could be an unexpected but efficient pollinator. Because its population density can be high, this species could mediate unwanted cotton pollen flow when distances between coexiting fields are not sufficient.

  2. Description of the larva of Tetragonoderus (Crossonychus) variegatus Dejean, 1829 (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cyclosomini) with notes on biology.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guilherme Ide Marques Dos

    2015-06-16

    A late instar of the Tetragonoderus (Crossonychus) variegatus Dejean, 1829 larva is described for the first time, and is compared with its first instar, with the larva of another Tetragonoderus species, and with the larva of one Cyclicus species. Habitus and important structures of the larva are illustrated, as well the adult's membranous wings. Some aspects of the natural history of the larva and adult are also noted.

  3. Lumbriculus variegatus loading study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Results from sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus with evaluating the effects of organism loading densityThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Burkhard , L., D. Hubin-Barrows, N. Billa, T. Highland , R. Hockett , D. Mount , and T. Norberg-King. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading. ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY. Springer, New York, NY, USA, 71(7): 70-77, (2016).

  4. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on seven sediments with a series of ratios of total organic carbon in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) that spanned the recommendation of no less than 50:1. With increasing loading of organi...

  5. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on seven sediments with a series of ratios of total organic carbon in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) that spanned the recommendation of no less than 50:1. With increasing loading of organi...

  6. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of feeding

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on seven sediments with a series of ratios of total organic carbon in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) that spanned the recommendation of no less than 50:1. With increasing loading of organi...

  7. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of feeding

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on seven sediments with a series of ratios of total organic carbon in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) that spanned the recommendation of no less than 50:1. With increasing loading of organi...

  8. Bioaccumulation of triclocarban in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christopher P; Paesani, Zachary J; Chalew, Talia E Abbott; Halden, Rolf U

    2009-12-01

    The antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) has been detected in streams and municipal biosolids throughout the United States. In addition, TCC and potential TCC transformation products have been detected at high levels (ppm range) in sediments near major cities in the United States. Previous work has suggested that TCC is relatively stable in these environments, thereby raising concerns about the potential for bioaccumulation in sediment-dwelling organisms. Bioaccumulation of TCC from sediments was assessed using the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Worms were exposed to TCC in sediment spiked to 22.4 ppm to simulate the upper bound of environmental concentrations. Uptake from laboratory-spiked sediment was examined over 56 d for TCC and 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide (DCC), a chemical impurity in and potential transformation product of TCC. The clearance of TCC from worms placed in clean sediment was also examined over 21 d after an initial 35-d exposure to TCC in laboratory-spiked sediment. Concentrations of TCC and DCC were monitored in the worms, sediment, and the overlying water using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Experimental data were fitted using a standard biodynamic model to generate uptake and elimination rate constants for TCC in L. variegatus. These rate constants were used to estimate steady-state lipid (lip)- and organic carbon (OC)-normalized biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for TCC and DCC of 2.2+/-0.2 and 0.3+/-0.1 g OC/g lip (goc/glip), respectively. Alternatively, directly measured BSAFs for TCC and DCC after 56 d of exposure were 1.6+/-0.6 and 0.5+/-0.2 goc/glip, respectively. Loss of TCC from pre-exposed worms followed first-order kinetics, and the fitted elimination rate constant was identical to that determined from the uptake portion of the present study. Overall, study observations indicate that TCC bioaccumulates from sediments in a manner that is consistent with the traditional hydrophobic organic

  9. Multixenobiotic resistance efflux activity in Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Vehniäinen, Eeva-Riikka; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2015-04-01

    Multixenobiotic resistance is a phenomenon in which ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family proteins transfer harmful compounds out of cells. Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus are model species in aquatic ecotoxicology, but the presence and activity of ABC proteins have not been well described in these species. The aim of this work was to study the presence, activity, and inhibition of ABC transport proteins in D. magna and L. variegatus. The presence of abcb1 and abcc transcripts in 8-9-day-old D. magna was investigated by qRT-PCR. The activity of MXR in D. magna and L. variegatus was explored by influx of the fluorescent ABC protein substrates rhodamine B and calcein-AM, with and without the model inhibitors verapamil (unspecific ABC inhibitor), reversin 205 (ABCB1 inhibitor) and MK571 (ABCC inhibitor). Juvenile D. magna possessed all examined abcb and abcc transcripts, but only reversin 205 inhibited MXR activity. The MXR activity in L. variegatus was inhibited by MK571, and to a lesser extent by verapamil, whereas reversin 205 seemed to stimulate the transport activity. Whereas calcein-AM worked better as an MXR substrate in D. magna, rhodamine B was a better substrate for L. variegatus MXR activity measurements. This is the first report on MXR activity in the order Lumbriculida, subclass Oligochaeta, and class Clitellata.

  10. Bioaccumulation of Triclocarban in Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Christopher P.; J.Paesani, Zachary; Abbot Chalew, Talia E.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) has been detected in streams and municipal biosolids throughout the United States. In addition, TCC and potential TCC transformation products have been detected at high levels (ppm range) in sediments near major United States cities. Previous work has suggested that TCC is relatively stable in these environments, thereby raising concerns about the potential for bioaccumulation in sediment-dwelling organisms. Bioaccumulation of TCC from sediments was assessed using the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Worms were exposed to TCC in sediment spiked to 22.4 ppm to simulate the upper bound of environmental concentrations. Uptake from laboratory-spiked sediment was examined over 56 days for TCC and 4,4′dichlorocarbanilide (DCC), a chemical impurity in and potential transformation product of TCC. The clearance of TCC from worms placed in clean sediment was also examined over 21 d after an initial 35-d exposure to TCC in laboratory-spiked sediment. Concentrations of TCC and DCC were monitored in the worms, sediment, and the overlying water using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Experimental data were fitted using a standard biodynamic model to generate uptake and elimination rate constants for TCC in L. variegatus. These rate constants were used to estimate steady-state lipid and organic-carbon normalized biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for TCC and DCC of 2.2 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.1 goc/glip, respectively. Alternatively, directly-measured BSAFs for TCC and DCC after 56 days of exposure were 1.6 ± 0.6 and 0.5 ± 0.2 goc/glip, respectively. Loss of TCC from pre-exposed worms followed first-order kinetics, and the fitted elimination rate-constant was identical to that determined from the uptake portion of the present study. Overall, study observations indicate that TCC bioaccumulates from sediments in a manner that is consistent with the traditional hydrophobic organic contaminant paradigm. PMID

  11. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus: effects of feeding.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Lawrence P; Hubin-Barrows, Dylan; Billa, Nanditha; Highland, Terry L; Hockett, James R; Mount, David R; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Hawthorne, Steven; Miller, David J; Grabanski, Carol B

    2015-05-01

    Standard sediment-bioaccumulation test methods specify that Lumbriculus variegatus should not be fed during the 28-day exposure. This lack of feeding can lead to decreases in L. variegatus weight and lipid content during the 28-day exposure period. Differences in intrinsic nutritional content of sediments could lead to additional variability in organism performance and/or contaminant uptake. To evaluate the potential benefits of feeding, sediment-bioaccumulation tests were performed comparing treatments with and without supplemental feeding with tropical fish food and also comparing performance food introduced as blended slurry versus fine flakes. The ration of food provided had to be limited to 6 mg/300-mL beaker with 250 mg of L. variegatus (ww) receiving three feedings per week to maintain acceptable dissolved oxygen (DO) in the test chambers. Relative weight change during exposure varied across sediments in the absence of food from very little change to as much as a 40 % decrease from starting weight. Feeding slurry and flake foods increased the total weight of recovered organisms by 32 and 48 %, respectively, but they did not decrease variability in weight changes across sediments. Lipid contents of the organisms decreased similarly across all feeding treatments during the test. At test termination, lipid contents of L. variegatus across unfed, slurry-fed, and flake-fed treatments were not significantly different per Tukey's honest significant difference test with 95 % family-wise confidence. Feeding resulted in polychlorinated biphenyl residues in L. variegatus being generally slightly less (median 78 %) and slightly greater (median 135 %) than the unfed treatments with slurry and flake formulated foods, respectively.

  12. Bioavailability and biotransformation of sediment-associated pyrethroid insecticides in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    You, Jing; Brennan, Amanda; Lydy, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, bioaccumulation potential of two pyrethroid insecticides, bifenthrin and permethrin, was measured using a Lumbriculus variegatus sediment bioaccumulation test. Two sediments differing in their physical characteristics and two different aging periods were tested. Desorption rates measured by Tenax extraction suggested that pyrethroids were bioavailable to L. variegatus, however bioavailability varied among chemicals, sediments and aging time, and was greater for permethrin than bifenthrin. The relatively low biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) values resulted from the extensive biotransformation of pyrethroids by L. variegatus. Biotransformation capacity of L. variegatus to permethrin was further studied with a water-only exposure, and the percentage parent compound dropped to 36.0% after 14 d. These results indicated sediment-associated pyrethroids were bioavailable to L. variegatus, however bioaccumulation was limited because L. variegatus was capable of biotransforming the pyrethroids.

  13. Effects of the Pyrethroid Esfenvalerate on the Oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Bordalo, M D; Soares, A M V M; Pestana, J L T

    2016-04-01

    Esfenvalerate is a neurotoxic pyrethroid insecticide widely used for agricultural and residential purposes and is considered toxic to nontarget organisms such as fish and aquatic invertebrates. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of esfenvalerate on the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. In the acute test, organisms showed visible signs of stress but no LC50 value could be determined. In the 28-day chronic test, a significant decrease in reproduction was observed with a NOEC value of 0.25 µg/kg and a LOEC value of 2.34 µg/kg. As for biomass per worm, a significant decrease was also observed with a NOEC value of 2.34 µg/kg and a LOEC value of 36.36 µg/kg. Reproductive impairment and reductions in biomass of L. variegatus exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of esfenvalerate observed in laboratory tests suggests potential deleterious effects of this pyrethroid on oligochaete natural populations.

  14. Bioaccumulation of Legacy and Emerging Organochlorine Contaminants in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Dang, Viet D; Kroll, Kevin J; Supowit, Samuel D; Halden, Rolf U; Denslow, Nancy D

    2016-07-01

    Freshwater sediment-dwelling Lumbriculus variegatus is known to serve as a vector for the transfer of contaminants from sediments to higher trophic level organisms, but limited data exist on the bioaccumulation of chemicals associated with sediments containing high total organic carbon (TOC). In the current study, sediments from the north shore area of Lake Apopka (Florida, USA), containing very high TOC [39 % (w/w)], were spiked with four chemicals-p,p'-dichlorordiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), dieldrin, fipronil, and triclosan-individually or in a mixture of the four and then used for bioaccumulation studies. Tissue concentrations of chemicals in L. variegatus were measured at 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of exposure, and the bioaccumulation potential was evaluated using biosediment accumulation factors [BSAF (goc/glipid)]. Increase in total body burdens of all four chemicals in L. variegatus was rapid at day 2 and reached a steady-state level after 7 days in both single and mixture experiments. Tissue concentrations of fipronil peaked after 2 days and then decreased by 70 % in sediment experiments suggesting that in addition to the degradation of fipronil that occurred in the sediment, L. variegatus may also be able to metabolize fipronil. The calculated 28-day BSAF values varied among the chemicals and increased in the order fipronil (1.1) < triclosan (1.4) < dieldrin (21.8) < p,p'-DDE (49.8) in correspondence with the increasing degree of their hydrophobicity. The relatively high BSAF values for p,p'-DDE and dieldrin probably resulted from lower-than-expected sorption of chemicals to sediment organic matter either due to the nature of the plant-derived organic matter, as a result of the relatively short equilibration time among the various compartments, or due to ingestion of sediment particles by the worms.

  15. Sublethal toxicity and biotransformation of pyrene in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, K; Leppänen, M T; Kukkonen, J V K

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the toxicity and biotransformation of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene in the oligochaete aquatic worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. PAHs are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that pose a hazard to aquatic organisms, and metabolizing capability is poorly known in the case of many invertebrate species. To study the toxicity and biotransformation of pyrene, the worm was exposed for 15 days to various concentrations of water-borne pyrene. The dorsal blood vessel pulse rate was used as a sublethal endpoint. Pyrene biotransformation by L. variegatus was studied and the critical body residues (CBR) were estimated for pyrene toxicity. The toxicokinetics of pyrene uptake was evaluated. A combination of radiolabeled (14C) and nonlabeled pyrene was used in the exposures, and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and high-pressure liquid chromatography were employed in both water and tissue residue analyses. The results showed that L. variegatus was moderately able to metabolize pyrene to 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP), thus demonstrating that the phase-I-like oxidizing enzyme system metabolizes pyrene in L. variegatus. The amount of the 1-HP was 1-2% of the amount of pyrene in the worm tissues. The exposure to pyrene reduced the blood vessel pulse rate significantly (p<0.05), showing that pyrene had a narcotic effect. The estimated CBRs remained constant during the exposure time, varying from 0.120 to 0.174 mmol pyrene/kg worm wet weight. The bioconcentration factors (BCF) decreased as exposure concentration increased. It was suggested that the increased toxicity of pyrene accounted for the decrease in BCFs by lowering the activity of the organism.

  16. Toxicological availability of nickel to the benthic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, M B; Roman, Y E; Nguyen, L T H; Janssen, C R; De Schamphelaere, K A C

    2007-08-01

    It is generally accepted that the bioavailability of metals in sediments is influenced by the presence of acid volatile sulfides (AVS). The pore water hypothesis predicts that, if the molar concentration of simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in a sediment is smaller than the molar concentration of AVS, the free metal ion activity in the pore water is very small and that consequently no metal toxicity in short-term toxicity tests is observed. In this study we examined (1) if this concept can be extended to predict the absence of chronic Ni toxicity to the oligochaete deposit-feeding worm Lumbriculus variegatus and (2) if the organic carbon normalized excess SEM; i.e. [SEM-AVS]/f(OC) predicts the magnitude of Ni toxicity to L. variegatus. A 28-day toxicity experiment was performed in which biomass production of L. variegatus was determined in two natural sediments with different [AVS] and f(OC), spiked at different Ni concentrations. The absence of toxicity is predicted correctly by the [SEM-AVS]<0 criterion when only the 0-1 cm surface layer of the sediment is considered, but not when the whole bulk sediment is considered (0-3 cm). In both sediments, the same [SEM-AVS]/f(OC) at the surface corresponds with a similar decrease in L. variegatus biomass. Thus, [SEM-AVS]/f(OC) in the surface layer accurately predicts the magnitude of toxicity. This measure is therefore a good estimator of toxicologically available Ni. On the other hand, the free Ni(2+) ion activity in the overlying water appeared to be an equally good predictor of the magnitude of toxicity. Consequently, it was not possible to determine the relative importance of the overlying water and pore water exposure route with the semi-static laboratory experiments.

  17. Comparative evaluation of Na(+) uptake in Cyprinodon variegatus variegatus (Lacepede) and Cyprinodon variegatus hubbsi (Carr) (Cyprinodontiformes, Teleostei): Evaluation of NHE function in high and low Na(+) freshwater.

    PubMed

    Brix, Kevin V; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Mager, Edward M; Grosell, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The euryhaline pupfish, Cyprinodon variegatus variegatus (Cvv), can successfully osmoregulate in ≥2 mM Na(+) and a freshwater population (Cyprinodon variegatus hubbsi; Cvh) osmoregulates at ≥0.1mM Na(+). We previously demonstrated that Cvv relies on an apical NKCC and NHE in the gill for Na(+) uptake in high (7mM) and intermediate (2 mM) Na(+) concentrations, while Cvh relies only on NHE for Na(+) uptake. This study investigated whether differential NHE isoform use explains differences in Na(+) uptake kinetics between these two populations. We further studied whether Cvh uses a NHE-Rh metabolon or carbonic anhydrase (CA) to overcome thermodynamic challenges of NHE function in dilute freshwater. Transfer to more dilute freshwater resulted in upregulation of nhe-2 (Cvv only) and nhe-3 (Cvv and Cvh). Relative expression of nhe-3 compared to nhe-2 was 2-fold higher in Cvv, but 200-fold higher in Cvh suggesting that nhe-3 expression is an important freshwater adaptation for Cvh. Simultaneous measurement of Na(+) and Tamm flux under various conditions provided no support for a NHE-Rh metabolon in either population. Carbonic anhydrase activity in Cvv was comparable in 7 and 2 mM Na(+) acclimated fish. In Cvh, CA activity increased by 75% in 0.1 mM Na(+) acclimated fish compared to 7 mM Na(+) fish. Ethoxzolamide had variable effects, stimulating and reducing Na(+) uptake in Cvv acclimated to 7 and 2 mM Na(+), while reducing Na(+) uptake in 7 and 0.1mM Na(+) acclimated Cvh. This suggests that CA plays important, but different roles in regulating Na(+) uptake in Cvv and Cvh.

  18. Time course of metal loss in Lumbriculus variegatus following sediment exposure.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Timothy D; Lott, Kevin G; Leonard, Edward N; Mount, David R

    2003-04-01

    After exposure for 21 d to sediment spiked with Cd, Pb, Cu, or Zn, oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) held in clean water depurated metal rapidly over the first few hours but much more slowly from 8 h up to 32 h. Results are consistent with previous work suggesting a 6-h depuration period as generally appropriate for sediment bioaccumulation studies with L. variegatus.

  19. Oviposition site of the southern torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton variegatus) in northwestern California

    Treesearch

    Nancy E. Karraker; Lisa M. Ollivier; Garth R. Hodgson

    2005-01-01

    Oviposition sites and reproductive ecology of the southern-torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton variegatus) remain poorly documented. This species oviposits in cryptic locations making the detection of eggs difficult. Here we describe the discovery of 1 clutch of eggs of R. variegatus from northern California, which further expands our...

  20. Assessment of Alternative Substrates for Culturing Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    The freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, is tank-cultured to provide organisms for aquatic-habitat assessments, regeneration research and as a clean source of live food for aquarium fishes. Shredded paper is the typical substrate in cultures used to rear L. variegatus for these purposes. However, the effort needed to separate large numbers from decomposing paper can be prohibitive. Burlap and nylon mesh material were compared to paper as potential alternatives that could reduce this effort. Oligochaete production and the amount of time needed to separate animals from substrate were compared for eight weeks among experimental cultures containing burlap, nylon mesh and paper. Cultures with paper substrate increased in number and weight two to three times faster than those with burlap or nylon mesh substrates. The time needed to separate animals from substrate was initially two to three times longer with paper substrate than with burlap or nylon mesh substrates, but this difference increased to between 10 and 40 times longer after six weeks as the paper substrate decomposed. Feeding rates varied by treatment and were based on average wet weight at the time of water replacement. Elevated ammonia and nitrite concentrations resulting from excess food may have reduced production in nylon mesh treatments and was lethal in paper treatments during the final phases of the study. The type of substrate recommended may depend on the desired production rate of oligochaetes, space available for cultures and the amount of effort available for substrate renewal and separating the animals from the cultures.

  1. Comparison of Cultured and Wild Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) Health Condition Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four standard health condition metrics (hepatosomatic index, HSI; gonadosomatic index, GSI; fecundity, condition factor) were compared between cultured and wild caught sheepshead minnow (Cyrprinodon variegatus) to determine if laboratory cultured were representative of wild popul...

  2. Effects of Feeding Rate and Loading Density on Bioaccumulation of PCBs in Oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment tests with aquatic organisms can provide valuable information about potential toxicity and the bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the organisms. The USEPA 28-day Lumbriculus variegatus bioaccumulation test for sediments when successfully perfor...

  3. Evaluation of PCB bioaccumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in field-collected sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) contaminated sediment samples from the Hudson, Grasse, and Fox Rivers Superfund sites with concurrent measurement of PCB concentrations in sediment interstitial water. Th...

  4. Comparison of Cultured and Wild Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) Health Condition Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four standard health condition metrics (hepatosomatic index, HSI; gonadosomatic index, GSI; fecundity, condition factor) were compared between cultured and wild caught sheepshead minnow (Cyrprinodon variegatus) to determine if laboratory cultured were representative of wild popul...

  5. Evaluation of PCB bioaccumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in field-collected sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) contaminated sediment samples from the Hudson, Grasse, and Fox Rivers Superfund sites with concurrent measurement of PCB concentrations in sediment interstitial water. Th...

  6. Effects of Feeding Rate and Loading Density on Bioaccumulation of PCBs in Oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment tests with aquatic organisms can provide valuable information about potential toxicity and the bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the organisms. The USEPA 28-day Lumbriculus variegatus bioaccumulation test for sediments when successfully perfor...

  7. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Lawrence P; Hubin-Barrows, Dylan; Billa, Nanditha; Highland, Terry L; Hockett, James R; Mount, David R; Norberg-King, Teresa J

    2016-07-01

    At contaminated sediment sites, the bioavailability of contaminants in sediments is assessed using sediment-bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegates (Lv). The testing protocols recommend that ratio of total organic carbon (TOC) in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) should be no less than 50:1. Occasionally, this recommendation is not followed, especially with sediments having low TOC, e.g., <1 %. This study evaluated the impacts and resulting biases in the testing results when the recommendation of "no less than 50:1" is not followed. In the study, seven sediments were tested with a series of TOC/Lv ratios that spanned the recommendation. With increasing loading of organisms, growth of the organisms decreased in six of the seven sediments tested. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the L. variegatus were measured in six of the seven sediments tested, and differences in PCB residues among loading ratios across all sediments were small, i.e., ±50 %, from those measured at the minimum recommended ratio of 50:1 TOC/Lv. In all sediment, PCB residues increased with increasing loading of the organisms for the mono-, di-, and tri-chloro-PCBs. For tetra-chloro and heavier PCBs, residues increased with increasing loading of organisms for only two of the six sediments. PCB residues were not significantly different between TOC/Lv loadings of 50:1 and mid-20:1 ratios indicating that equivalent results can be obtained with TOC/Lv ratios into the mid-20:1 ratios. Overall, the testing results suggest that when testing recommendation of 50:1 TOC/Lv is not followed, potential biases in the biota-sediment accumulations factors from the sediment-bioaccumulation test will be small.

  8. Alternative substrates for culturing the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus is tank cultured to provide organisms for aquatic habitat assessments and regeneration research and to produce a clean source of live food for aquarium fishes. Shredded paper is the typical substrate in small-scale culture of L variegants, however, the effort needed to separate large numbers of individuals from decomposing paper can be prohibitive. Burlap and nylon mesh materials were compared with paper as potential alternatives for reducing this effort. Production and the time needed to separate L. variegatus from substrate were compared for 8 weeks among cultures with burlap, mesh, and paper substrates. Cultures with paper increased in number and weight faster than those with burlap or mesh, but cultures using the alternative substrates also expanded their populations quickly. The time required to separate oligochaetes from substrate was initially longer with paper and became significantly longer at 6 weeks as the paper decomposed. Burlap frayed, but mesh exhibited no degradation. Elevated ammonia and nitrite concentrations may have suppressed production in mesh treatments throughout the study, and ammonia was lethal in paper treatments during the final 2 weeks. Slow initial production in burlap treatments may have been due 10 chemical applications to the fabric, which may limit the utility of burlap as a substrate. Culture systems that maintain adequate water quality could increase production from burlap and mesh substrates to levels observed with paper substrate. Mesh is recommended because it is nontoxic and nonbiodegradable and can significantly reduce the effort required to obtain oligochaetes and to maintain and monitor the cultures.

  9. Bioaccumulation, sublethal toxicity, and biotransformation of sediment-associated pentachlorophenol in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, K; Sorsa, K; Lyytikäinen, M; Leppänen, M T; Kukkonen, J V K

    2008-01-01

    The xenobiotics accumulated in sediments represent a hazard to organisms. In order to study the toxic effects of xenobiotics in organisms, body residue has been proposed as a more relevant dose-metric than the environmental concentration of the chemical. In this study, the benthic oligochaetes Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to sediment-spiked pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a chronic study at different exposure concentrations. The aim was to examine sublethal toxic effects in sediment-dwelling and sediment-ingesting organisms, and to link the effects with chemical body residues. Growth, reproduction, and egestion rate were used as sublethal endpoints. Bioaccumulation, sublethal toxic effects, and biotransformation of PCP were investigated by exposing organisms to both artificial and natural sediments with similar organic carbon content. Sediment characteristics were assumed to have an effect on toxicity since PCP retarded both growth and reproduction in L. variegatus in the artificial sediment. In natural sediment, growth, and reproduction was also reduced in control treatments, probably indicating poor nutritional quality. Most of the extracted chemicals in L. variegatus tissues were water-soluble metabolites, indicating that L. variegatus was capable of biotransforming PCP. The extractable parent PCP body residues (CBR(50)) for L. variegatus growth and reproduction were in agreement with the values estimated for respiratory uncouplers in the literature.

  10. Effect of the exposure to metal lead on the regenerative ability of Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Sardo, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Lourdes; Gerhardt, Almut; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2011-01-01

    Lumbriculus variegatus is a recommended species for use in sediment toxicity tests and is known to have a remarkable power of segmental regeneration. Here, we tested the effects of a chemical stressor on the regenerative ability of L. variegatus and investigated the potential of regenerative ability as an additional new parameter in standard toxicity tests. The worms were cut into two equal segments, and exposed to various concentrations of lead. Two assays were performed: one with sediment spiked with lead and the other with water spiked with lead. The endpoints were segmental regeneration, survival and behaviour. Regenerative ability was clearly affected by exposure to lead-contaminated sediment and lead-contaminated water. Organisms exposed to lead grew more slowly than those not exposed; worms exposed to contaminated water showed higher mortalities than those exposed to contaminated sediment. Results showed that L. variegatus' regenerative ability, as a developmental test parameter, is more sensitive than mortality.

  11. Behavioral effects of ivermectin in a freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Drewes, C D; Hsu, W H

    2001-07-01

    Ivermectin is a potent antiparasitic drug against nematode and arthropod parasites. In this study, we examined the lethal and sublethal effects of ivermectin in a freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. The median lethal concentration (LC50) at 72 h after ivermectin exposure was 560 nM. Sublethal endpoints focused on several stimulus-evoked locomotor behaviors: escape reflexes controlled by giant interneuron pathways, swimming and reversal, and crawling. Swimming, reversal, and crawling are controlled by nongiant interneuron pathways. Ivermectin inhibited swimming, reversal, crawling frequency, and crawling speed in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) at 3 h of 1.1, 16, 91, and 51 nM, respectively. Ivermectin at 0.3 nM also significantly decreased the frequency of helical swimming waves. Picrotoxin, a Cl- channel blocker, antagonized the ivermectin-induced decrease in swimming frequency, crawling frequency, and crawling speed. There were no adverse effects on escape reflex 3 h after exposure to 300 nM ivermectin. Electrophysiological recordings showed that ivermectin had no effects on the conduction velocity of giant fiber systems. The results indicated that locomotor behaviors controlled by nongiant locomotor pathways were more sensitive to ivermectin than pathways controlled by giant interneurons and that Cl- channels may be involved in mediating ivermectin's inhibitory effects.

  12. Sludge reduction by lumbriculus variegatus in Ahvas wastewater treatment plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sludge production is an avoidable problem arising from the treatment of wastewater. The sludge remained after municipal wastewater treatment contains considerable amounts of various contaminants and if is not properly handled and disposed, it may produce extensive health hazards. Application of aquatic worm is an approach to decrease the amount of biological waste sludge produced in wastewater treatment plants. In the present research reduction of the amount of waste sludge from Ahvaz wastewater treatment plant was studied with the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus in a reactor concept. The sludge reduction in the reactor with worm was compared to sludge reduction in a blank reactor (without worm). The effects of changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration up to 3 mg/L (run 1) and up to 6 mg/L (run 2) were studied in the worm and blank reactors. No meaningful relationship was found between DO concentration and the rate of total suspended solids reduction. The average sludge reductions were obtained as 32% (run 1) and 33% (run 2) in worm reactor and 16% (run 1) and 12% (run 2) in the blank reactor. These results showed that the worm reactors may reduce the waste sludge between 2 and 2.75 times higher than in the blank conditions. The obtained results showed that the worm reactor has a high potential for use in large-scale sludge processing. PMID:23369451

  13. Sludge reduction by lumbriculus variegatus in Ahvas wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Basim, Yalda; Farzadkia, Mahdi; Jaafarzadeh, Nematollah; Hendrickx, Tim

    2012-08-02

    Sludge production is an avoidable problem arising from the treatment of wastewater. The sludge remained after municipal wastewater treatment contains considerable amounts of various contaminants and if is not properly handled and disposed, it may produce extensive health hazards. Application of aquatic worm is an approach to decrease the amount of biological waste sludge produced in wastewater treatment plants. In the present research reduction of the amount of waste sludge from Ahvaz wastewater treatment plant was studied with the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus in a reactor concept. The sludge reduction in the reactor with worm was compared to sludge reduction in a blank reactor (without worm). The effects of changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration up to 3 mg/L (run 1) and up to 6 mg/L (run 2) were studied in the worm and blank reactors. No meaningful relationship was found between DO concentration and the rate of total suspended solids reduction. The average sludge reductions were obtained as 32% (run 1) and 33% (run 2) in worm reactor and 16% (run 1) and 12% (run 2) in the blank reactor. These results showed that the worm reactors may reduce the waste sludge between 2 and 2.75 times higher than in the blank conditions. The obtained results showed that the worm reactor has a high potential for use in large-scale sludge processing.

  14. Use of whole-body and subcellular Cu residues of Lumbriculus variegatus to predict waterborne Cu toxicity to both L. variegatus and Chironomus riparius in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tania Y T; Pais, Nish M; Dhaliwal, Tarunpreet; Wood, Chris M

    2012-06-01

    We tested the use of whole-body and subcellular Cu residues (biologically-active (BAM) and inactive compartments (BIM)), of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to predict Cu toxicity in fresh water. The critical whole-body residue associated with 50% mortality (CBR(50)) was constant (38.2-55.6 μg g(-1) fresh wt.) across water hardness (38-117 mg L(-1) as CaCO(3)) and exposure times during the chronic exposure. The critical subcellular residue (CSR(50)) in metal-rich granules (part of BIM) associated with 50% mortality was approximately 5 μg g(-1) fresh wt., indicating that Cu bioavailability is correlated with toxicity:subcellular residue is a better predictor of Cu toxicity than whole-body residue. There was a strong correlation between the whole-body residue of L. variegatus (biomonitor) and survival of Chironomus riparius (relatively sensitive species) in a hard water Cu co-exposure. The CBR(50) in L. variegatus for predicting mortality of C. riparius was 29.1-45.7 μg g(-1) fresh wt., which was consistent within the experimental period; therefore use of Cu residue in an accumulator species to predict bioavailability of Cu to a sensitive species is a promising approach.

  15. UPTAKE AND DEPURATION OF NON-IONIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM SEDIMENT BY THE OLIGOCHAETE, LUMBRICULUS VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uptake of sediment-associated contaminants by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was evaluated after 1,3,7,14,28, and 56 d of exposure to a field-collected sediment contaminated with DDT and its metabolites DDD and DDE or to a field-collected sediment contaminated with PAHs...

  16. Effects of terbutryn on aufwuchs and Lumbriculus variegatus in artificial indoor streams.

    PubMed

    Brust, K; Licht, O; Hultsch, V; Jungmann, D; Nagel, R

    2001-09-01

    The effects of the herbicide terbutryn on a simple lotic food web were investigated during a 72-d exposure period in five artificial indoor streams in a greenhouse. The model compound terbutryn, an s-triazine and an inhibitor of photosynthesis, was applied once in each stream at nominal concentrations of 0.6, 6, 60, or 600 microg/L. Terbutryn concentrations in the water were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and an overall time to 50% dissipation (DT50) of 28 d was calculated. The development of aufwuchs and the population growth and development of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were investigated. We determined that terbutryn was toxic to L. variegatus at 23.7 mg/L (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) and 16.5 mg/L (96-h median effective concentration [EC50]) in static acute toxicity tests. Terbutryn decreased aufwuchs production at 0.6 microg/L in the experimental streams. Population growth of L. variegatus was decreased by 50% at 6 microg/L. The effect of terbutryn on the aufwuchs was a direct effect of decreases in the periphyton. However, the effects on L. variegatus were an indirect effect of terbutryn as a consequence of decrease in the aufwuchs food source and occurred at three-orders-of-magnitude-lower concentrations of terbutryn than the acute toxicity effects. Our study demonstrates the utility of indoor lotic microcosm studies for evaluating both direct and indirect effects of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems.

  17. UPTAKE AND DEPURATION OF NON-IONIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM SEDIMENT BY THE OLIGOCHAETE, LUMBRICULUS VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uptake of sediment-associated contaminants by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was evaluated after 1,3,7,14,28, and 56 d of exposure to a field-collected sediment contaminated with DDT and its metabolites DDD and DDE or to a field-collected sediment contaminated with PAHs...

  18. Effects of Feeding and Organism Loading Rate on the Bioaccumulation of PCBs in Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the aquatic world, most environmental contaminants like PCBs eventually accumulate in the sediments.Thus sediment-associated contamination can introduce significant level of contaminants into the food chain. The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was approved as one o...

  19. Host specificity of Ischnodemus variegatus, an herbivore of West Indian marsh grass (Hymenachne amplexicaulis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    West Indian marsh grass, Hymenachne amplexicaulis (Poaceae), is an emergent wetlands weed that is native to South/Central America and the Caribbean, and is invasive in Florida and Australia. The neotropical bug, Ischnodemus variegatus (Signoret) (Hemiptera: Blissidae) was found feeding on H. amplexi...

  20. LIFE-CYCLE TOXICITY OF BIS(TRIBUTYLTIN) OXIDE TO THE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of tributyltin (TBT) to the life cycle of the estuarine fish C yprinodon variegatus were examined in a 180-day flow-through exposure. The study was initiated with embryos less than 24 h postfertilization and monitored through hatch, maturation, growth, and reproductio...

  1. INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

  2. INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

  3. Effects of Feeding and Organism Loading Rate on the Bioaccumulation of PCBs in Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the aquatic world, most environmental contaminants like PCBs eventually accumulate in the sediments.Thus sediment-associated contamination can introduce significant level of contaminants into the food chain. The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was approved as one o...

  4. Genetic variation in the popular lab worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida: Clitellata: Lumbriculidae) reveals cryptic speciation.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Daniel R; Price, David A; Erséus, Christer

    2009-05-01

    Genetic variation in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus from Europe, North America and Japan was studied by sequencing and analysing the mitochondrial 16S and COI genes, and the nuclear ITS region. What hitherto has been regarded as L. variegatus was found to consist of at least two distinct clades (I and II), both of which occur in Europe as well as North America (clade I also in Japan). Specimens from a single locality in Sierra Nevada, California, also morphologically identified as L. variegatus, represent a third clade, which appears to be more closely related to clade II than to clade I, based on 16S data only. Average COI genetic distances were 17.7% between clades I and II, 0.6% within clade I, and 1.3% within clade II. Further, for these two clades, the mitochondrial (16S and COI) gene trees, which consider only the maternal lineages, are congruent with the ITS gene tree, which is the result of recombinations of paternal as well as maternal genomes. Finally, chromosome counts revealed clade I specimens to be highly polyploid, and clade II specimens to be diploid. We therefore conclude that clades I-II are separately evolving lineages, and that they should be regarded as separate species. This will have to be taken into account in the continued use of L. variegatus as a model organism in biological sciences.

  5. The effect of lead contamination on bioturbation by Lumbriculus variegatus in a freshwater microcosm.

    PubMed

    Blankson, Emmanuel R; Deb Adhikary, Nihar R; Klerks, Paul L

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of lead (Pb) on bioturbation by the oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus, using freshwater microcosms. The experiment used lead at "0", 140, 700, and 3500 μg/g in sediment, and used two different laboratory populations of L. variegatus. A molecular genetic analysis and bioassays were conducted to determine if the two populations differed genetically and whether they differed in Pb-sensitivity. The bioturbation of L. variegatus was estimated using luminophores placed at the sediment-water interface at the beginning of the experiment. After the 14 d experiment the luminophore profiles in sediment were used to estimate the biodiffusion and bioadvection coefficients, using the diffusion-advection model. The results showed that the biodiffusion and bioadvection coefficients were generally negatively related to the Pb concentrations in the sediment. Lead at 700 and 3500 μg/g reduced both coefficients, while Pb at 140 μg/g did not. Luminophore profiles in the "0" and 140 μg/g treatments were indicative of a non-local transport, while a diffusive transport was observed at the higher Pb levels. The two laboratory populations of L. variegatus used in the experiment differed in their sensitivity to Pb when mortality was used as the endpoint, but they did not differ in sediment bioturbation or the Pb-sensitivity of this process. Moreover, the genetic analysis did not detect any genetic differences between the populations. This study demonstrated that elevated levels of Pb can impact ecosystem functioning by decreasing the bioturbation activity of benthic organisms such as L. variegatus.

  6. Toxicokinetics and toxicity of sediment-associated pyrene to Lumbriculus variegatus (oligochaeta)

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkonen, J. . Dept. of Biology); Landrum, P.F. )

    1994-09-01

    The oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus has been proposed for whole-sediment bioassays to assess sediment contamination. The work examines Lumbriculus variegatus exposure to pyrene-dosed Lake Michigan sediment at 0.4 ng g[sup [minus]1] and 64, 132, 206, and 269 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. Both bioaccumulation and survival were followed to enhance Lumbriculus variegatus development as a bioassay organism. Lumbriculus variegatus accumulated sediment-associated pyrene rapidly and achieved apparent steady state within 48 to 168 h. The pyrene uptake clearances ranged from 0.039 to 0.132 and decreased with increasing pyrene concentration. At high pyrene concentrations, the worms avoided the sediment, which reduced accumulation and likely minimized the mortality response. In addition, the effect of organism loading on bioaccumulation was determined at different animal densities, 1:10, 1:50, and 1:100 g dry weight Lumbriculus variegatus:g sediment organic carbon, and a sediment pyrene concentration of 0.4 mg g[sup [minus]1]. Surprisingly, the bioaccumulation declined as organism density decreased. Pyrene elimination was rapid in clean sediment but was much slower in water. Bioavailability apparently declined for exposures in sediment stored 1.5 months, based on the estimate of k[sub e] from nonlinear regression compared to direct measures of elimination. The apparent decline was attributed to both a decline in lipid content during the experiment and changes in pyrene bioavailability. Finally, for bioaccumulation studies, gut purging at a set time may result in an underestimate of contaminant concentration in organisms. An elimination study with extrapolation to the initial body burden can ensure that biases due to incomplete elimination of gut contents and body burden losses during the purging process are minimized.

  7. The effect of bioturbation by Lumbriculus variegatus on transport and distribution of lead in a freshwater microcosm.

    PubMed

    Blankson, Emmanuel R; Klerks, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the effect of bioturbation by the oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus on the transport and environmental distribution of lead (Pb). Experiments used L. variegatus at densities of 0 ind./m(2), 2093 ind./m(2), and 8372 ind./m(2), in freshwater microcosms with Pb-spiked sediment. At the end of the 14-d experiment, Pb levels in the water column, tissues of L. variegatus, and sediment were determined, and bioturbation was quantified using luminophores. The bioturbation by L. variegatus increased Pb transport from the sediment to the water column. However, it did not significantly affect Pb bioaccumulation by L. variegatus or Pb levels in the sediment. The biodiffusion coefficient (Db) was positively related to worm density, but did not differ between Pb-spiked sediment and uncontaminated sediment. The latter finding suggests that Pb at the 100 μg/g concentration used in the present study did not affect L. variegatus bioturbation. The present study shows that bioturbation can enhance Pb transfer across the sediment-water interface and thus enhance Pb availability to organisms in the water column.

  8. Adverse effects of fullerenes (nC60) spiked to sediments on Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, K; Petersen, E J; Leppänen, M T; Akkanen, J; Kukkonen, J V K

    2011-12-01

    Effects of fullerene-spiked sediment on a benthic organism, Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta), were investigated. Survival, growth, reproduction, and feeding rates were measured to assess possible adverse effects of fullerene agglomerates produced by water stirring and then spiked to a natural sediment. L. variegatus were exposed to 10 and 50 mg fullerenes/kg sediment dry mass for 28 d. These concentrations did not impact worm survival or reproduction compared to the control. Feeding activities were slightly decreased for both concentrations indicating fullerenes' disruptive effect on feeding. Depuration efficiency decreased in the high concentration only. Electron and light microscopy and extraction of the worm fecal pellets revealed fullerene agglomerates in the gut tract but not absorption into gut epithelial cells. Micrographs also indicated that 16% of the epidermal cuticle fibers of the worms were not present in the 50 mg/kg exposures, which may make worms susceptible to other contaminants.

  9. Pharmacological properties of the repellent secretion of Zonocerus variegatus (Orthoptera: Prygomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Idowu, A B; Idowu, O A

    1999-12-01

    The odours of the whole body and the secretion of Zonocerus variegatus were easily recognised and perceived by human volunteers. However, the secretion odour is not related to the odour of the food plant consumed by the grasshopper. The repellency of Z. variegatus becomes more pronounced in the 6th. and adult instars whose gland lumens contain an appreciable volume of secretion. The secretion odour is so strong that even dilution does not affect its repulsiveness to humans. The secretion had pharmacological properties: it induced contraction in rat (Rattus rattus) stomach smooth muscle preparations and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) ileum, and induced oedema formation in the rat hind paw. The secretion was not lethal to the animals used in this study, effects were temporary and recovery occurs after a short time.

  10. Seasonal and Meteorological Effects on Activity of Chrysops Variegatus (Diptera: Tabanidae) in Paraguay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    to Chrysops vuriegutus by Fairchild ( 197 1)) during nearly 3 years of study in Cam- pinas , Brazil. All were collected during the warmer, wetter...relative humidities ranging from 58% to 91%. In a one-year study in Manaus, Brazil, Rafael (1982) collected 17 female Chqsops variegatus during...summer months while Bouvier (19523 found adults only in non-winter months. On the other hand, Fairchild (1942) and Rafael (1982) found adults throughout

  11. Bioaccumulation of fullerene (C60) and corresponding catalase elevation in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafan; Wages, Mike; Yu, Shuangying; Maul, Jonathan D; Mayer, Greg; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Cobb, George P

    2014-05-01

    Fullerene (C(60)), with its unique physical properties and nanometer size, has been mass-produced for many applications in recent decades. The increased likelihood of direct release into the environment has raised interest in understanding both the environmental fate and corresponding biological effects of fullerenes to living organisms. Because few studies have emphasized fullerene uptake and resulting biochemical responses by living organisms, a toxicity screening test and a 28-d bioaccumulation test for Lumbriculus variegatus were performed. No mortality was observed in the range of 0.05 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment to 11.33 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment. A biota-sediment accumulation factor of micron-sized fullerene agglomerates (µ-C(60)) was 0.032 ± 0.008 at day 28, which is relatively low compared with pyrene (1.62 ± 0.22). Catalase (CAT) activity, an oxidative stress indicator, was elevated significantly on day 14 for L. variegatus exposed to µ-C(60) (p = 0.034). This peak CAT activity corresponded to the highest body residues observed in the present study, 199 ± 80 µg C(60) /kg dry weight sediment. Additionally, smaller C(60) agglomerate size increased bioaccumulation potential in L. variegatus. The relationship between C(60) body residue and the increased CAT activity followed a linear regression. All results suggest that C(60) has a lower bioaccumulation potential than pyrene but a higher potential to induce oxidative stress in L. variegatus.

  12. Cadmium biodynamics in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and its implications for trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lingtian; Lambert, Daniel; Martin, Caitrin; Cain, Daniel J; Luoma, Samuel N; Buchwalter, David

    2008-01-31

    It has become increasingly apparent that diet can be a major source of trace metal bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. In this study, we examined cadmium uptake, efflux, and subcellular compartmentalization dynamics in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. L. variegatus is an important component of freshwater food webs in Europe and North America and is potentially useful as a standard food source for laboratory-based trophic transfer studies. Cadmium accumulation and depuration were each followed for 10 days. Rate constants of uptake (k(u)) and efflux (k(e)) were estimated and subcellular Cd compartmentalization was followed over the course of uptake and efflux. The partitioning of Cd into operationally-defined subcellular compartments was relatively consistent throughout the 20-day experiment, with the majority of Cd accumulating in the cytosol. No major changes in Cd compartmentalization were observed over uptake or depuration, but there appeared to be some exchange between heat-stable and heat-labile cytosolic protein fractions. Cadmium accumulation from solution was strongly affected by ambient calcium concentrations, suggesting competition between Cd and Ca for uptake sites. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate the whole body calcium content of L. variegatus as a potential tool for examining calcium influences on dietary Cd dynamics. The potential for this species to be an important conduit of Cd to higher trophic levels is discussed, along with its potential as a standardized food source in metal trophic transfer studies.

  13. Cadmium biodynamics in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and its implications for trophic transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xie, Lingtian; Lambert, D.; Martin, C.; Cain, D.J.; Luoma, S.N.; Buchwalter, D.

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that diet can be a major source of trace metal bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. In this study, we examined cadmium uptake, efflux, and subcellular compartmentalization dynamics in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. L. variegatus is an important component of freshwater food webs in Europe and North America and is potentially useful as a standard food source for laboratory-based trophic transfer studies. Cadmium accumulation and depuration were each followed for 10 days. Rate constants of uptake (ku) and efflux (ke) were estimated and subcellular Cd compartmentalization was followed over the course of uptake and efflux. The partitioning of Cd into operationally-defined subcellular compartments was relatively consistent throughout the 20-day experiment, with the majority of Cd accumulating in the cytosol. No major changes in Cd compartmentalization were observed over uptake or depuration, but there appeared to be some exchange between heat-stable and heat-labile cytosolic protein fractions. Cadmium accumulation from solution was strongly affected by ambient calcium concentrations, suggesting competition between Cd and Ca for uptake sites. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate the whole body calcium content of L. variegatus as a potential tool for examining calcium influences on dietary Cd dynamics. The potential for this species to be an important conduit of Cd to higher trophic levels is discussed, along with its potential as a standardized food source in metal trophic transfer studies. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing the acute hazards of zinc oxide nanomaterials to Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Shona; Stone, Vicki; Stolpe, Björn; Fernandes, Teresa F

    2015-08-01

    These studies were undertaken in order to propose and test new methods for the assessment of the acute hazard of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to the sediment dwelling oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus. In order to support the developing nanotechnology sector, comprehensive studies must be conducted to assess the toxicity of nanomaterials (NMs) using environmentally relevant organisms. An important part of such studies will entail characterising and understanding the physicochemical properties of these NMs. In this study NMs were characterised using a range of techniques, in order to assess agglomeration/aggregation and dissolution. Toxicology studies included a behavioural assay and the measurement of oxidative stress. When considering the toxicology results from all experiments using L. variegatus within this paper ZnO NPs (0-10 mg/l) were found to cause acute toxicity in terms of behavioural response, but not to cause acute oxidative stress in terms of glutathione (GSH) depletion. It was also concluded that the behavioural assay and the GSH assay were both suitable techniques for assessing the acute hazard of NMs to L. variegatus.

  15. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegatus) blood sera affects proteolytic and hemolytic activities of rattlesnake venoms.

    PubMed

    Biardi, James E; Coss, Richard G

    2011-02-01

    Rock squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from two sites in south central New Mexico, where prairie (Crotalus viridis viridis) and western diamondback (Crotalus atrox) rattlesnakes are common predators, were assayed for inhibition of rattlesnake venom digestive and hemostatic activities. At statistically significant levels rock squirrel blood sera reduced the metalloprotease and hemolytic activity of venoms from C. v. viridis and C. atrox more than venom from an allopatric snake species, the northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus). In contrast, general proteolytic activity of venom from C. oreganus was inhibited more by S. variegatus serum defenses than activity of venom from sympatric snakes. For all three venoms, incubation with squirrel sera increased the level of fibrinolysis over venom-only treatments. These results suggest that rock squirrels (S. variegatus) can defend against metalloproteases and other proteases after envenomation from at least two of five rattlesnake predators they might encounter. However, there were statistically significant differences between general proteolytic activity and fibrinolytic activity of C. v. viridis and C. atrox venom, suggesting that rock squirrels might be differentially vulnerable to these two predators. The hypothesis that prey resistance influences snake venom evolution in a predator-prey arms race is given further support by the previously cryptic variation in venoms detected when assayed against prey defenses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastrointestinal parasites and ectoparasites of Bradypus variegatus and Choloepus hoffmanni sloths in captivity from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sibaja-Morales, Karen D; de Oliveira, Jaqueline B; Jiménez Rocha, Ana E; Hernández Gamboa, Jorge; Prendas Gamboa, Jorge; Arroyo Murillo, Francisco; Sandí, Janet; Nuñez, Yessenia; Baldi, Mario

    2009-03-01

    Sloths may serve as host to a wide range of parasites. However, there is little information available on the types of parasites that affect Costa Rica's sloth population. During a 1-yr period, 65 specimens of Costa Rican sloth species (Choloepus hoffmanni; n = 56) and Bradypus variegates; n = 9) from a local zoo were sampled. Fecal samples were evaluated using two different diagnostic techniques, Sheather's flotation and sedimentation. Concurrently, these sloths were examined for ectoparasites. Gastrointestinal parasites were found in 14 sloths (21.5%), from which 13 animals were C. hoffmanni and one was B. variegatus. Gastrointestinal parasites were recognized as Coccidia 71.4% (10/14), Cestoda 21.4% (3/14), and Spiruroidea 7.1% (1/14). Coccidia and cestodes were seen in C. hoffmanni, and spirurids were identified in B. variegatus. Among 27 sloths examined, only six had dermal problems (five C. hoffmanni and two B. variegatus). Ectoparasites recovered were Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari, Sarcoptidae) mites and Amblyomma varium (Acari, Ixodidae) ticks. This is the first time that cestode strobilae and nematode eggs are reported in sloth feces and that Monezia benedeni and L. leptocephalus were found in captive sloths.

  17. Inhibition of pyrene biotransformation by piperonyl butoxide and identification of two pyrene derivatives in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Carrasco Navarro, Víctor; Brozinski, Jenny-Maria; Leppänen, Matti T; Honkanen, Jani O; Kronberg, Leif; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2011-05-01

    Using the freshwater annelid Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta), the presence of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes was investigated by analyzing metabolites of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene in treatments with and without the CYP inhibitor piperonyl butoxide (PBO). The results show a low biotransformation capability of L. variegatus (7% of total pyrene body burden as metabolites at 168 h). Addition of PBO resulted in a significant reduction of metabolites, suggesting the presence of a CYP in L. variegatus. Besides 1-hydroxypyrene, three peaks representing unknown metabolites were detected in LC-FLD (liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection) chromatograms of L. variegatus. Deconjugations showed that sulfonation and glucosidation are involved in the formation of these unknowns. Further studies with the time of flight mass analyzer provided the identification of the glucose-sulfate conjugate of 1-hydroxypyrene. The same metabolites were detected in the solvent-nonextractable fraction by incubation of the tissue residues with proteinase K, suggesting that part of these metabolites are bound to proteins. Overall, the slow biotransformation of pyrene by L. variegatus (involving CYP) supports the use of this species in standard bioaccumulation tests; however, the tissue-bound metabolite fraction described in the current study deserves further investigation for its toxicity and availability to upper trophic levels through diet.

  18. Use of the aquatic oligochaete lumbriculus variegatus for assessing the toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.L.; Ankley, G.T.; Benoit, D.A.; Mattson, V.R. )

    1993-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe test methods utilizing the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to assess the acute and chronic toxicity and the presence of bioaccumulatable compounds in contaminated sediments. Lumbriculus variegatus was chosen as a test species because (a) it represents an ecologically relevant component of freshwater ecosystems; (b) it is suitable for long-term testing and evaluation of chronic toxicity end points (e.g., growth, reproduction); (c) it is exposed via all important routes of concern, including ingesting of contaminated particles; and (d) it has sufficient biomass to assess bioaccumulation of contaminants. Also, Lumbriculus variegatus is easily cultured and handled. Described herein are culturing procedures and test protocols for Lumbriculus variegatus, as well as two examples of the types of experimental data generated when using the oligochaete in test with contaminated sediments. Two case studies are presented in which L. variegatus was used to assess the bioaccumulation of metals (cadmium, nickel) from contaminated sediments and assess the toxicity of sediment samples collected from the copper-contaminated Keweenaw Waterway system in Michigan.

  19. Identifying management units in non-endangered species: the example of the sloth Bradypus variegatus Schinz, 1825.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Barros, N; Miyaki, C Y; Morgante, J S

    2007-12-01

    In this study we propose the analysis of genetic diversity of the common three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus, in an attempt to understand population structure, identify divergent intraspecific units, and contribute to the knowledge of biodiversity in the neotropical forests. We analyzed a 387 bp segment of the mitochondrial DNA control region in 28 individuals distributed in different localities of both Atlantic and Amazon forests. Our results demonstrated that the genetic diversity of B. variegatus is distributed in six management units, MUs. The observed MUs encompass six phylogenetic lineages and represent respectively north and south regions of Atlantic forest, three regions within the Amazon forest, and a transition region between these two biomes. Considering the fact that these MUs are concordant with phylogroups and endemism areas already described for other vertebrate species, we can say that the study of B. variegatus, a widely distributed and not endangered species, can help to identify areas for conservation biology purposes in neotropical rain forests.

  20. Effects of azinphos-methyl exposure on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses in Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Verrengia Guerrero, Noemí R; Cochón, Adriana C

    2008-07-01

    Azinphos-methyl is an organophosphate insecticide used for pest control on a number of food crops in many parts of the world. The oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and pigmented and non-pigmented specimens of the gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata are freshwater invertebrates that have been recommended for contamination studies. Recently, it has been shown that L. variegatus worms exhibit a higher cholinesterase (ChE) activity and a greater sensitivity to in vivo ChE inhibition by azinphos-methyl than pigmented B. glabrata snails. The aims of the present study were (1) to investigate if, in addition to its anticholinesterase action, azinphos-methyl has also pro-oxidant activity in L. variegatus and B. glabrata, and (2) to examine if species that are highly susceptible to the neurotoxic effects of organophosphates also suffer a greater degree of oxidative stress. Therefore, total glutathione (t-GSH) levels and activities of cholinesterase (ChE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) were measured in the whole body soft tissue of organisms exposed for 48 and 96 h to a level of azinphos-methyl that produces 50% of inhibition on ChE. Results showed different patterns of antioxidant responses between the gastropods and the oligochaetes, and even between the two phenotypes of gastropods: (1) in exposed L. variegatus t-GSH levels increased and CAT and SOD activities decreased with respect to control organisms, (2) in pigmented gastropods, SOD decreased while CAT transiently diminished, and (3) in non-pigmented gastropods, SOD activity showed a biphasic response. GST and G6PDH were not altered by azinphos-methyl exposure. Of note, t-GSH levels were 4-fold times higher in L. variegatus than in both phenotypes of B. glabrata. This may suggest that GSH could play a more important role in antioxidant defense in L. variegatus than in B. glabrata.

  1. Injuries from Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Southcott, R V

    The effects of Coleoptera (beetles) on humans in the Australian region are surveyed. Ill-effects range from the immediate trauma of a bite, possibly with minor effects from the beetle's salivary secretions, to the effects of the vesicating beetles of the families Meloidae, Oedemeridae and Staphylinidae, and also the acute corneal erosion that is attributed to the small beetle Orthoperus sp. (family Corylophidae) in southeastern Australia. Reference also is made to other effects that are known as a result of beetle metabolites or structures, such as "carpet beetle dermatitis" from the irritating hairs of Anthrenus larvae (family Dermestidae), and inhalational asthma from beetles, notably the grain weevil Sitophilus, the causative agent of certain cases of grain-worker's asthma. Beetles as human intestinal inhabitants, and their role as intermediary hosts of metazoal diseases are discussed.

  2. Comparison of field and laboratory exposures of Lumbriculus variegatus to polychlorinated biphenyl-impacted river sediments.

    PubMed

    Beckingham, Barbara; Ghosh, Upal

    2010-12-01

    A method is described for conducting 14-d in situ sediment bioaccumulation tests with the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, at the bottom of a slow-flowing river. The in situ test exposure chambers were constructed from cylindrical plastic tubes with flow-through mesh screens and were attached to a wire basket that was weighted to the river bottom at seven sites in the lower Grasse River in New York State, USA. This design was successful in exposing L. variegatus to native sediment and overlying water under field conditions, with adequate organism mass recovery (87 ± 19%). Results compared well with ex situ laboratory bioaccumulation conducted in parallel, expressed in terms of tissue concentration, biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs), and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs). Bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in L. variegatus (µg PCB/g wet wt) in laboratory and field tests was found to be within a factor of 2. The small variation between in situ and ex situ may have been caused by differences in water exchange rate under the two exposure scenarios, or other factors affecting organism behavior. Values of BSAF showed a hyperbolic trend with K(OW) , peaking at BSAF of 7 for congeners with log K(OW) of 6. Bioaccumulation factors also peaked at a value of 10(6.5) for congeners with log K(OW) value of 6 but remained steady around that value for the higher K(OW) congeners. These observations may reflect under-equilibration or reduced bioavailability of more hydrophobic PCBs in worm tissues or other analytical artifacts.

  3. Quantification of the Bioturbation Activity of Lumbriculus Variegatus Worms Using Fluorescent Particulate Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. M.; Roche, K. R.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Important biological, physical and chemical processes, such as fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and contaminants, occur across sediment-water interfaces. These processes are influenced by bioturbation activities of benthic animals. Bioturbation is thought to be significant in releasing metals to the water column from contaminated sediments, but metals contamination also affects organism activity. Consequently, the aim of this study was to consider the interactions of biological activity, sediment chemistry, pore water transport, and chemical reactions in sediment mixing and the flux and toxicity of metals in sediments. Prior studies have modeled bioturbation as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not describe accurately sediment mixing due to bioturbation. To this end, we used the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model to assess sediment mixing caused by bioturbation activity of Lumbriculus variegatus worms. We performed experiments using fine-grained sediments with different levels of zinc contamination from Lake DePue, which is a Superfund Site in Illinois. The tests were conducted in an aerated fresh water chamber. Fluorescent particulate tracers were added to the sediment surface to quantify mixing processes and the influence of metals contaminants on L. variegatus bioturbation activity. We observed sediment mixing and organism activity by time-lapse photography over 14 days. Then, we analyzed the images to characterize the fluorescent particle concentration as a function of sediment depth and time. Results reveal that sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. These results suggest that anomalous sediment mixing is probably a ubiquitous process, as this behavior has only been observed previously in marine sediments. Also, the experiments indicate that bioturbation and sediment mixing decreased in the presence of higher metals concentrations in sediments. This process is expected to decrease

  4. Trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites and nonextractable fraction from Oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) to juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Carrasco Navarro, V; Leppänen, M T; Honkanen, J O; Kukkonen, J V K

    2012-06-01

    The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites was evaluated by a 2-month exposure of the freshwater annelid Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) to pyrene, followed by feeding to juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta). The results obtained by scintillation counting (SC) proved that the pyrene metabolites produced by L. variegatus were transferred to juvenile S. trutta through diet. More detailed analyses by LC-FLD (liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection) showed that an unknown pyrene metabolite originating from L. variegatus was present in fish liver. This metabolite, although yet not properly identified, may be the glucose conjugate of 1-hydroxy-pyrene. This metabolite was not present in chromatograms of fish that were fed pyrene-spiked food pellets. In addition, the strongly bound tissue residue of L. variegatus, which was nonextractable neither by organic solvents nor by the proteolytic enzyme Proteinase K, was most likely not available for the fish through diet. Altogether, the present study shows that the metabolites of pyrene produced at low levels of the food chain may be potentially available for upper levels through diet, raising a concern about their potential toxicity to predators and supporting their inclusion in the risk assessment of PAHs.

  5. USE OF THE OLIGOCHAETE, LUMBRICULUS VARIEGATUS, AS A PREY ORGANISM FOR THE TOXICANT EXPOSURE OF FISH THROUGH THE DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, has several characteristics that make it desirable as a prey organism for conducting dietary exposure studies with fish, but its sufficiency as a stand alone diet has not been evaluated. We conducted 21-d and 30-d experiments with young fa...

  6. USE OF THE OLIGOCHAETE, LUMBRICULUS VARIEGATUS, AS A PREY ORGANISM FOR THE TOXICANT EXPOSURE OF FISH THROUGH THE DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, has several characteristics that make it desirable as a prey organism for conducting dietary exposure studies with fish, but its sufficiency as a stand alone diet has not been evaluated. We conducted 21-d and 30-d experiments with young fa...

  7. INDUCTION OF ZONA RADIATA PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENINS IN ESTRADIOL AND NONYLPHENOL EXPOSED MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knoebl, Iris, Michael J. Hemmer and Nancy D. Denslow. 2004. Induction of Zona Radiata Proteins and Vitellogenins in Estradiol and Nonylphenol Exposed Male Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):547-551. (ERL,GB X1059).

    Several genes normall...

  8. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus (EPA test method 100.3) effects of feeding and organism loading rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methodology of USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specifies that the Lumbriculus variegatus should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry weight of no less than 50:1. It ...

  9. Effects of feeding and organism loading rate on PCB accumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in sediment bioaccumulation testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methods published by USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specify that the Lumbriculus variegatus, a freshwater oligochaete, should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry we...

  10. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus (EPA test method 100.3) effects of feeding and organism loading rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methodology of USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specifies that the Lumbriculus variegatus should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry weight of no less than 50:1. It ...

  11. Effects of feeding and organism loading rate on PCB accumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in sediment bioaccumulation testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methods published by USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specify that the Lumbriculus variegatus, a freshwater oligochaete, should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry we...

  12. INDUCTION OF ZONA RADIATA PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENINS IN ESTRADIOL AND NONYLPHENOL EXPOSED MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knoebl, Iris, Michael J. Hemmer and Nancy D. Denslow. 2004. Induction of Zona Radiata Proteins and Vitellogenins in Estradiol and Nonylphenol Exposed Male Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):547-551. (ERL,GB X1059).

    Several genes normall...

  13. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xueli Sun; Upal Ghosh

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. The GAC used was bituminous coal-based type TOP. For sediment treated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 {mu}m size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 {mu}m size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Investigating arsenic bioavailability and bioaccumulation by the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Nasi, Marcelo; Piol, María N; Di Risio, Cecilia; Guerrero, Noemí R Verrengia

    2011-10-01

    The complex and variable composition of natural sediments makes it difficult to predict the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of sediment-bound contaminants. Several approaches, including an experimental model using artificial particles as analogues for natural sediments, have been proposed to overcome this problem. For this work, we applied this experimental device to investigate the uptake and bioaccumulation of As(III) by the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Five different particle systems were selected, and particle-water partition coefficients for As(III) were calculated. The influence of different concentrations of commercial humic acids was also investigated, but this material had no effect on bioaccumulation. In the presence of particulate matter, the bioaccumulation of As(III) by the oligochaetes did not depend solely on the levels of chemical dissolved but also on the amount sorbed onto the particles and the strength of that binding. This study confirms that the use of artificial particles may be a suitable experimental model for understanding the possible interactions that may occur between contaminants and particulate matter. In addition, it was found that the most hydrophobic resin induced an increase in arsenic bioavailability, leading to the highest bioaccumulation to L. variegatus compared with animals that were exposed to water only.

  15. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xueli; Ghosh, Upal

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. For sedimenttreated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 microm size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 microm size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility.

  16. Lethal body burdens of chlorophenols and mixtures of chlorophenols in an oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkonen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The lethal body burdens (LBB) of a few chlorophenol congeners were measured in the oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. LBB is defined as the concentration of the compound in the organism on molar basis to cause a death. Groups of 40 organisms were exposed to different chlorophenol concentrations in artificial soft freshwater to achieve differential mortality. Exposure times were either 24 hours or 48 hours. Besides exposures with individual congener, mixtures of chlorophenols were also tested. After each exposure, the surviving organisms were collected and the body burden of chlorophenols were measured by GC with electron capture detection. Only the surviving organisms were analyzed, because dead worms started to decay rather quickly. The analyzed tissue concentrations were actually lower than in surviving organisms. The trichlorophenols and pentachlorophenol have a LBB of 0.4--0.7 {micro}mol/g wet weight. The 2,6-dichlorophenol has a slightly higher LBB of 1.0--1.6 {micro}mol/g wet weight. The LBB of chlorophenol mixtures (two congeners at a time) were of the same, on molar basis, as individual congeners demonstrating fully additive toxicity. The lethal body burdens of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol in Lumbriculus variegatus were the same for these water-only exposures as previously reported for these compounds in two different sediments. The use of lethal body burden approach in sediment toxicology is further discussed.

  17. Phototoxic response of Lumbriculus variegatus to sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, P.D.; Ankley, G.T.; Kosian, P.A.

    1995-05-01

    The toxicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic organisms can be greatly increased upon exposure of the organisms to ultraviolet (UV) radiation present in sunlight. The phenomenon of photoactivation of PAHs had received some attention in the laboratory; however, evaluation of the photoinduced toxicity of PAHs in field settings has been limited. In these studies, in situ chambers made from Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tubes were used to evaluate the phototoxic response of laboratory-cultured oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) in sediments contaminated with PAHs. These experiments were conducted using both sunlight-exposed and shaded test chambers. In addition to the PAH-contaminated site, a reference site lacking PAHs was tested as a control. Survival of L. variegatus at the PAH-contaminated site was significantly less in chambers exposed to sunlight than in chambers held in the dark, or chambers from the reference site. Concurrent laboratory studies with sediment collected from the two sites and an artificial source of UV light corroborated observations made in the field. Although a number of PAHs were present at elevated concentrations in the test sample, further work is required to determine exactly which were responsible for the observed phototoxicity.

  18. Biogenic amines modulate pulse rate in the dorsal blood vessel of Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Kevin M; Grupe, Rebecca E; Lobsang, Tenzin T; Yang, Xong

    2010-05-01

    The biogenic amines are widespread regulators of physiological processes, and play an important role in regulating heart rate in diverse organisms. Here, we present the first pharmacological evidence for a role of the biogenic amines in the regulation of dorsal blood vessel pulse rate in an aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (Müller, 1774). Bath application of octopamine to intact worms resulted in an acceleration of pulse rate, but not when co-applied with the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor MDL-12,330a. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor theophylline mimicked the effects of OA, but the polar adenosine receptor antagonist 8(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline was significantly less potent than theophylline. Pharmacologically blocking synaptic reuptake of the biogenic amines using the selective 5-HT reuptake blocker fluoxetine or various tricyclic antidepressants also accelerated heart rate. Depletion of the biogenic amines by treatment with the monoamine vesicular transporter blocker reserpine dramatically depressed pulse rate. Pulse rate was partially restored in amine-depleted worms after treatment with octopamine or dopamine, but fully restored following treatment with serotonin. This effect of 5-HT was weakly mimicked by 5-methoxytryptamine, but not by alpha-methylserotonin; it was completely blocked by clozapine and partially blocked by cyproheptadine. Because they are known to orchestrate a variety of adaptive behaviors in invertebrates, the biogenic amines may coordinate blood flow with behavioral state in L.variegatus.

  19. Bioaccumulation of perfluorochemicals in sediments by the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christopher P; McLeod, Pamela B; MacManus-Spencer, Laura A; Luthy, Richard G

    2007-07-01

    Bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl sulfonates, perfluorocarboxylates, and 2-(N-ethylperfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetic acid (N-EtFOSAA) from laboratory-spiked and contaminated field sediments was assessed using the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Semistatic batch experiments were conducted to monitor the biological uptake of these perfluorochemicals (PFCs) over 56 days. The elimination of PFCs was measured as the loss of PFCs in L. variegatus exposed to PFC-spiked sediment for 28 days and then transferred to clean sediment. The resultant data suggest that PFCs in sediments are readily bioavailable and that bioaccumulation from sediments does not continually increase with increasing perfluorocarbon chain length. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorononanoate were the most bioaccumulative PFCs, as measured by laboratory-based estimated steady-state biota sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) and BSAFs measured using contaminated field sediments. Elimination rate constants for perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluorocaroboxylates were generally smaller than those previously measured for other organic contaminants. Last, a PFOS precursor, N-EtFOSAA, accumulated in the worm tissues and appeared to undergo biotransformation to PFOS and other PFOS precursors. This suggests that N-EtFOSAA, which has been detected in sediments and sludge often at levels exceeding PFOS, may contribute to the bioaccumulation of PFOS in aquatic organisms.

  20. Fecal estradiol and progesterone metabolite levels in the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, M; Duarte, D P F; Gilmore, D P; Costa, C P da

    2006-02-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the possibility of measuring fecal steroid hormone metabolites as a noninvasive technique for monitoring reproductive function in the three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus. Levels of the estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) metabolites were measured by radioimmunoassay in fecal samples collected over 12 weeks from 4 captive female B. variegatus sloths. The validation of the radioimmunoassay for evaluation of fecal steroid metabolites was carried out by collecting 10 blood samples on the same day as defecation. There was a significant direct correlation between the plasma and fecal E2 and P4 levels (P < 0.05, Pearson's test), thereby validating this noninvasive technique for the study of the estrous cycle in these animals. Ovulation was detected in two sloths (SL03 and SL04) whose E2 levels reached 2237.43 and 6713.26 pg/g wet feces weight, respectively, for over four weeks, followed by an increase in P4 metabolites reaching 33.54 and 3242.68 ng/g wet feces weight, respectively. Interestingly, SL04, which presented higher levels of E2 and P4 metabolites, later gave birth to a healthy baby sloth. The results obtained indicate that this is a reliable technique for recording gonadal steroid secretion and thereby reproduction in sloths.

  1. Uptake and depuration of nonionic organic contaminants from sediment by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Wang, F.N.; Dwyer, J.; Ankley, G.T.; Mount, D.R.; Huckins, J.; Petty, J.; Landrum, P.F.

    2003-01-01

    Uptake of sediment-associated contaminants by the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was evaluated after 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 d of exposure to a field-collected sediment contaminated with DDT and its metabolites, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), or to a field-collected sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Depuration of contaminants by oligochaetes in a control sediment or in water was also evaluated over a 7-d period after 28 d of exposure to the field-collected sediments. Accumulation of PAHs with a log octanol-water partitioning coefficient (log Kow) 5.6 or DDD and DDE typically exhibited a steady increase from day 1 to about day 14 or 28, followed by a plateau. Therefore, exposures conducted for a minimum of 14 to 28 d better reflected steady-state concentrations for DDT and its metabolites and for PAHs. Depuration rates for DDT and its metabolites and high-Kow PAHs were much higher in organisms held in clean sediment relative to both water-only depuration and model predictions. This suggests that depuration in clean sediment may artificially accelerate depuration of hydrophobic compounds. Comparisons between laboratory-exposed L. variegatus and oligochaetes collected in the field from these sediments indicate that results of laboratory tests can be extrapolated to the field with a reasonable degree of certainty.

  2. Stereochemistry of Fuscumol and Fuscumol Acetate Influences Attraction of Longhorned Beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of the Subfamily Lamiinae.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G P; Meier, L R; Zou, Y; Millar, J G; Hanks, L M; Ginzel, M D

    2016-10-01

    The chemical structures of aggregation-sex pheromones of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are often conserved among closely related taxa. In the subfamily Lamiinae, adult males and females of several species are attracted by racemic blends of (E)-6,10-dimethyl-5,9-undecadien-2-ol (termed fuscumol) and the structurally related (E)-6,10-dimethyl-5,9-undecadien-2-yl acetate (fuscumol acetate). Both compounds have a chiral center, so each can exist in two enantiomeric forms. Males of many species of longhorned beetles only produce one stereoisomer of each pheromone component, and attraction may be reduced by the presence of stereoisomers that are not produced by a particular species. In a previous publication, analysis of headspace volatiles of adult beetles of the lamiine species Astyleiopus variegatus (Haldeman) revealed that males sex-specifically produced (S)-fuscumol and (S)-fuscumol acetate. Here, we describe field trials which tested attraction of this species to single enantiomers of fuscumol and fuscumol acetate, or to blends of enantiomers. We confirmed attraction of A. variegatus to its species-specific blend, but during the course of the trials, found that several other species also were attracted. These included Aegomorphus modestus (Gyllenhall), attracted to (S)-fuscumol acetate; Astylidius parvus (LeConte), attracted to (R)-fuscumol; Astylopsis macula (Say), attracted to (S)-fuscumol; and Graphisurus fasciatus (DeGeer), attracted to a blend of (R)-fuscumol and (R)-fuscumol acetate. These results suggest that chirality may be important in the pheromone chemistry of lamiines, and that specific stereoisomers or mixtures of stereoisomers are likely produced by each species.

  3. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of sediment associated herbicides (ioxynil, pendimethalin, and bentazone) in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) and Chironomus riparius (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, Kimmo A; Sormunen, Arto J; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2003-11-01

    The benthic macroinvertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius were used in toxicity and bioaccumulation tests to determine the toxic concentrations and accumulation potential of sediment associated herbicides. The tested chemicals were ioxynil, bentazone, and pendimethalin. The bioaccumulation tests with L. variegatus were performed in four different sediments, each having different characteristics. Water-only LC(50) tests were performed with both L. variegatus and C. riparius. A sublethal effect of model compounds in sediments was assessed by a C. riparius larvae growth-inhibition test. Of the model compounds, ioxynil appeared to be the most toxic, with LC(50) values 1.79 and 2.79 mgL(-1) for L. variegatus and C. riparius, respectively. The LC(50) water concentrations for bentazone were 79.11 and 62.31 mgL(-1) for L. variegatus and C. riparius, respectively. Similarly, ioxynil revealed the highest bioaccumulation potential in bioaccumulation tests. The most important characters affecting chemical fate in the sediment seemed to be the organic matter content and the particle size fraction. The sediments with low organic material and coarse particle size consistently showed high bioaccumulation potential and vice versa. In C. riparius growth tests bentazone had a statistically significant effect on larval growth at sediment concentrations of 1160 and 4650 mgkg(-1) (P<0.05). It is noteworthy that standard deviations tend to be greater at high chemical concentrations, which addresses the fact that part of the individuals started to suffer. Ioxynil had an effect on the larval growth in other test sediment at the highest concentration (15.46 mgkg(-1)dw), in which head capsule length correlated with larval weight, decreasing toward higher exposure concentrations. The current results show the importance of sediment organic matter as a binding site of xenobiotics.

  4. Uptake and accumulation of sediment-associated 4-nonylphenol in a benthic invertebrate (Lumbriculus variegatus, freshwater oligochaete).

    PubMed

    Croce, Valeria; De Angelis, Silvia; Patrolecco, Luisa; Polesello, Stefano; Valsecchi, Sara

    2005-05-01

    In the present work, the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed for 56 d to lake sediment spiked with 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), which is a breakdown product of alkylphenol polyethoxylates, an important class of nonionic surfactants. During the exposure period, the content of 4-NP was determined in the oligochaetes, sediment, overlying water, and pore water in order to monitor the distribution of the 4-NP in the compartments of the test system. Concentration of 4-NP in L. variegatus increased linearly over the course of the test, with an uptake rate coefficient of 1.9 x 10(-2) (+/- 0.2 x 10(-2); [g carbon/(g lipid x h)]). No steady state was reached at the end of the exposure period, suggesting that the elimination of 4-NP by the organism was negligible. Ingested sediments played an important role in the accumulation of 4-NP in L. variegatus, which may achieve very high 4-NP body concentrations. The 56-d biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) was 24 +/- 7 g carbon/g lipid. L. variegatus also was exposed to 4-NP-contaminated field sediment, and field oligochaetes and sediments were collected for 4-NP pollution assessment in aquatic ecosystem. The 4-NP uptake with natural sediment was in accordance with that measured with spiked sediments, suggesting that the bioavailability of sediment-associated 4-NP for L. variegatus was not affected by 4-NP sediment concentration and abiotic sediment characteristics. The BSAFs measured in field oligochaetes, ranging from 39 to 55 g carbon/g lipid, was relatively higher than the bioaccumulation factor measured in laboratory tests. The results suggest that 4-NP concentration can reach high levels in benthic oligochaetes; this can be an important way of exposure for their pelagic predators.

  5. Phylogeography and genetic identification of the newly-discovered populations of torrent salamanders (Rhyacotriton cascade and R. variegatus) in the central Cascades (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, R.S.; Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Newly discovered populations of Rhyacotritonidae were investigated for taxonomic identity, hybridization, and sympatry. Species in the genus Rhyacotriton have been historically difficult to identify using morphological characters. Mitochondrial (mtDNA) 16S ribosomal RNA sequences (491 bp) and allozymes (6 loci) were used to identify the distribution of populations occurring intermediate between the previously described ranges of R. variegatus and R. cascadae in the central Cascade Mountain region of Oregon. Allozyme and mitochondrial sequence data both indicated the presence of two distinct evolutionary lineages, with each lineage corresponding to the allopatric distribution of R. cascadae and R. variegatus. Results suggest the Willamette River acts as a phylogeographic barrier limiting the distribution of both species, although we cannot exclude the possibility that reproductive isolation also exists that reinforces species' distributions. This study extends the previously described geographical ranges of both R. cascadae and R. variegatus and defines an eastern range limit for R. variegatus conservation efforts.

  6. Assessment of microplastic toxicity to embryonic development of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Nobre, C R; Santana, M F M; Maluf, A; Cortez, F S; Cesar, A; Pereira, C D S; Turra, A

    2015-03-15

    Apart from the physiological impacts on marine organisms caused by ingesting microplastics, the toxicity caused by substances leaching from these particles into the environment requires investigation. To understand this potential risk, we evaluated the toxicity of virgin (raw) and beach-stranded plastic pellets to the development of embryos of Lytechinus variegatus, simulating transfers of chemical compounds to interstitial water and water column by assays of pellet-water interface and elutriate, respectively. Both assays showed that virgin pellets had toxic effects, increasing anomalous embryonic development by 58.1% and 66.5%, respectively. The toxicity of stranded pellets was lower than virgin pellets, and was observed only for pellet-water interface assay. These results show that (i) plastic pellets act as a vector of pollutants, especially for plastic additives found on virgin particles; and that (ii) the toxicity of leached chemicals from pellets depends on the exposure pathway and on the environmental compartment in which pellets accumulate.

  7. A laboratory assay to assess avoidance of contaminated sediments by the freshwater oligochaete lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed

    West; Ankley

    1998-07-01

    Responses of benthic organisms to contaminated sediments in the laboratory historically have been assessed as survival, growth, and reproduction. However, these responses do not include behavioral aspects of organisms, which also can influence species distribution and abundance in benthic communities. This study documents avoidance behavior of the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to contaminated sediments in the laboratory, utilizing a chamber specifically built to facilitate the measurement of this response. A number of field-collected sediments from sites with known contamination, several of which exhibited little or no toxicity in standard tests examining growth and/or survival, were evaluated. The oligochaetes exhibited marked avoidance to many of the sediments, indicating the potential utility of this assay in identifying effects of contaminated sediments on benthic community structure.

  8. Bioaccumulation of atrazine and chlorpyrifos to Lumbriculus variegatus from lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, A P K; Tuikka, A; Akkanen, J; Kukkonen, J V K

    2008-11-01

    The bioaccumulation of the pesticides chlorpyrifos and atrazine to the benthic oligochaeta Lumbriculus variegatus from four diverse artificially contaminated lake sediments (OC 0.13-21.5%) was studied in the laboratory. The steady state of bioaccumulation was not reached within 10d. Chlorpyrifos showed stronger bioaccumulation than the less lipophilic atrazine, the biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) being 6.2-99 for the former and 1.9-5.3 for the latter. While bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) dropped with increasing organic content of the sediments, the high level and considerable range of the obtained BSAFs indicate other sediment qualities, such as the age and characteristics of the organic material, having a strong effect on the bioavailability of these compounds. The slow and incomplete desorption of chlorpyrifos from the most inorganic sediment indicates also that this compound may be strongly bound to some type of inorganic material. Any specific influential sediment fraction or characteristic could not be identified.

  9. Bioavailability of sediment-associated PAHs by Lumbriculus variegatus in sediment cores

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A. |; VanHoof, P.L.; Landrum, P.F.

    1994-12-31

    Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed four weeks to sediment core sections. Sediment was taken from Lake George in northern Michigan and known to be historically contaminated with PAHs. Bioaccumulation was maximal at the 12--16 cm depth where sediment PAH concentrations were greatest. Accumulation was minimal in surficial and 44--48 cm sections. Accumulation peaked at about 96 h, then declined over the remainder of the study for some of the lower molecular weight PAHs. For most higher molecular weight compounds, accumulation peaked at 2 weeks, then slightly declined at 4 weeks. Uptake rate coefficients stayed relatively constant for specific PAH congeners over the range of sediment depths, suggesting constant bioavailability with sediment aging. Accumulation factors (AFs) of selected congeners were also consistent among sediment depths and were comparable to those calculated for other species reported in previous studies.

  10. Cytotoxic Activity of Six Samples of Brazilian Propolis on Sea Urchin (Lytechinus variegatus) Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes-Silva, C. C.; Freitas, J. C.; Salatino, A.; Salatino, M. L. F.

    2013-01-01

    The cytotoxic activities of extracts of four samples of propolis from the state of Minas Gerais (Southeast Brazil) and two from the state of Paraná (South Brazil) were evaluated using sea urchin (Lytechinus variegatus) eggs. Cytotoxic activity was observed, characterized mainly by the inhibition of the first cleavage of newly fertilized eggs. Methanol extracts at 32 µg mL−1 of all samples were highly active (97–100%). Extracts were also prepared by successive treatments of the samples with hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol. High activity was observed using the ethyl acetate fractions of all samples, but hexane and chloroform fractions of some samples also had high activity. Based on the chemical composition of the extracts and fractions (published previously), it is hypothesized that the cytotoxic activities observed are due mainly to artepillin C, p-coumaric acid, and kaempferide. The results suggest that caffeoylquinic acids have no cytotoxic activity in sea urchin eggs. PMID:23662146

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the rocky reef fish Cheilodactylus variegatus Valenciennes, 1833 (Teleostei: Cheilodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Quezada-Romegialli, Claudio; Véliz, David; Docmac, Felipe; Harrod, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Cheilodactylus variegatus is a common benthivorous marine fish inhabiting in rocky subtidal habitats in the eastern south Pacific coast of Chile and Peru. However, its biology and ecology are relatively understudied and its taxonomic assignment has been debated recently. The complete mitochondrial genome was assembled de novo and mapped to a reference using 5.97 million of reads obtained through Ion Torrent next generation sequencing, resulting in a circular sequence of 16,652 bp in length. Gene composition and arrangement comprised to that reported for most fishes and contained the typical structure of 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and 1 non-coding region. This mitogenome provides a valuable resource for studies of fish molecular systematics, phylogeography and population genetics.

  12. EXTENDING THE VIABILITY OF SPERMATOZOA AND EGGS OF THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS.

    PubMed

    Malgarin, Jéssica; Resgalla, Charrid

    2015-01-01

    The storage of spermatozoa and eggs of the sea urchin Lytecninus variegatus can meet the demand of different human activities. To develop a protocol easy to reproduce for spermatozoa cryopreservation and cooling of the eggs of the sea urchin. Different formulations of artificial sea water were tested for their effectiveness in the freezing of sea urchin spermatozoa and storage of the eggs. Protocol for freezing of spermatozoa in liquid nitrogen presented the positive results when the cryoprotectant solution was diluted in artificial seawater free of calcium and magnesium. For the conservation of the eggs by cooling, the calcium-free artificial sea water, the calcium- and magnesium-free sea water, and the low-sodium water proved more efficient in preserving the integrity of the eggs. The results showed success in the freezing protocol of spermatozoa and cooling of the eggs mainly in artificial calcium- and magnesium-free sea water.

  13. Toxicokinetics of sediment-associated polybrominated diphenylethers (flame retardants) in benthic invertebrates (Lumbriculus variegatus, Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2004-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants showing rapid temporal increase in some sample types. The compounds are known to biomagnify in aquatic food webs and are assumed to archive into sediments and soils. Currently, no direct evidence indicates whether sediment-associated PBDEs are available for biota. The aim of the present study was to explore the uptake and elimination of two common congeners (47 and 99) in sediment-inhabiting invertebrates to shed light on possible bioavailability of sediment-associated PBDEs. Two clean lake sediments were spiked with environmentally relevant concentrations of 14C-labeled tetra- and pentabromo diphenylether, and oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were exposed for three or four weeks to allow kinetic accumulation calculations. Subsequent depuration tests were performed after three weeks of exposure to obtain depuration rates. Both congeners were clearly bioavailable, and only slight differences in steady-state tissue concentrations were found between the four sediment-ingesting oligochaete treatments (biota sediment accumulation factors [BSAFs], 3.0-3.7). The tetrabromo diphenylether-exposed oligochaetes that did not ingest sediment had clearly lower influx rates (0.1 vs 1-3 nmol h(-1)) than sediment-ingesting worms. Also, the estimated BSAF (1.8) was statistically different from that of the sediment-ingesting oligochaetes. These findings support the significance of feeding behavior in bioaccumulation of very hydrophobic organic contaminants. Depuration of both congeners was biphasic, indicating two kinetically different compartments in L. variegatus. Compartment A made up 73 to 92% of total radioactivity in tissues and had relatively fast depuration rates (half-lives, 10.5-47.5 h); the smaller compartment B had very slow depuration rates. No significant biotransformation of PBDEs was evident. The present study clearly demonstrates that the sediment-associated PBDEs, like other

  14. Bioaccumulation and biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during sediment tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Lyytikäinen, Merja; Pehkonen, Sari; Akkanen, Jarkko; Leppänen, Matti; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2007-12-01

    In some kinetic studies with aquatic invertebrates, the bioaccumulation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been observed to peak at the beginning of the test. This has been explained by the depletion of PAHs from pore water due to limited desorption during the bioaccumulation test or, alternatively, by the activation of biotransformation mechanisms in the organisms. In the present study, we exposed the aquatic oligochaetes, Lumbriculus variegatus, to creosote oil-contaminated sediments to examine the bioaccumulation of PAHs and to clarify the importance of contaminant depletion and biotransformation for it. The contaminant depletion was studied by replanting test organisms into fresh, nondepleted test sediments at 3-d intervals over 12 d and by comparing the resulting body burdens to those of the organisms that were not replanted. The biotransformation capability of L. variegatus was assessed by following the concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP), a phase I metabolite of pyrene, in oligochaete tissue during a 15-d test. We observed that the bioaccumulation of most PAHs indeed peaked at the beginning of the test. The concentrations in the replanted organisms were only 1.5 to 2 times higher than in nonreplanted organisms during the first 9 d of the test and, by day 12, no differences were detected. 1-Hydroxypyrene was detected in oligochaete tissue throughout the exposures, and concentrations decreased over time. However, the proportion of 1-HP to pyrene increased linearly during the test. These results indicated that the depletion of contaminants has only a minor effect on their bioaccumulation in oligochaetes and that the cause for the observed bioaccumulation curve shape is rapid elimination of the contaminants and, possibly to some degree, their metabolites.

  15. Influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Monson, P.D.; West, C.W.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria establish permissible levels of ammonia in the nation`s fresh waters. These criteria are based on accumulated research suggesting that, for most aquatic species (primarily fishes), the toxicity of un-ionized ammonia predominates over that of the ammonium ion. The development of a sediment-quality criterion for ammonia requires evaluation of the relative toxicity of the two ammonia forms to benthic and epibenthic macroinvertebrates to determine whether the water-quality toxicity model can be applied to sediments. Flow-through ammonia toxicity tests were conducted over 10 d with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and the larval midge Chironomus tentans at four pH values (6.3, 7.2, 7.8, and 8.6) using a unique pH control system. Total ammonia was more toxic at elevated than at low pH to both species, suggesting that un-ionized ammonia (more prevalent at high pH) is important in determining the toxicity of ammonia to these two species. Hardness or alkalinity differences in the range of 30 to 200 mg/kg (as CaCO{sub 3}) did not appear to affect the toxicity of ammonia to the two species in separate 4-d tests. Based on results of the 10-d tests, the joint toxicity/pH model that establishes the water-quality criterion value for ammonia appears to be sufficiently protective of L. variegatus and C. tentans, by factors of at least 3 and 10, respectively. However, this study did not address potential differences in exposure of benthic organisms to ammonia in sediments vs. that in the water column; nor were the chronic effects of ammonia on these species measured in this study.

  16. Bioconcentration and acute toxicity of polycyclic musks in two benthic organisms (Chironomus riparius and Lumbriculus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Artola-Garicano, Elsa; Sinnige, Theo L; van Holsteijn, Ineke; Vaes, Wouter H J; Hermens, Joop L M

    2003-05-01

    In the current study, the bioconcentration behavior and acute toxicity of two polycyclic musks, Tonalide 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN) and Galaxolide 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta[gamma]-2-benzopyran (HHCB), were studied in two benthic organisms. Polycyclic musks are frequently used fragrances, and they have been detected in different compartments of the environment. The aim of this study was to fill some empirical data gaps for AHTN and HHCB for benthic organisms. Results show that differences exist between both organisms. Chironomus riparius exhibited bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for AHTN and HHCB substantially lower than predicted for nontransformed organics. The BCFs for both chemicals increased after coexposure of the organism to the cytochrome P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide. Thus, the low BCF values were the result of rapid biotransformation of AHTN and HHCB in the midge larvae. Bioconcentration kinetics indicated that both chemicals induced their own cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism. Acute toxicity of AHTN to midge larvae was reduced compared to predicted baseline toxicity and was similar for HHCB. Bioconcentration of AHTN and HHCB in the worm (Lumbriculus variegatus) is in agreement with predictions based on the octanol-water partition coefficients of these chemicals. Acute toxicity was found to be similar to predicted values for baseline toxicity. Summarizing, for AHTN and HHCB, acute toxicity and bioconcentration behavior in L. variegatus was in accordance with predicted data for nontransformed organics. In C. riparius, bioconcentration as well as toxicity were reduced.

  17. Uptake and depuration of nonionic organic contaminants from sediment by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Christopher G; Brunson, Eric L; Wang, Ning; Dwyer, F James; Ankley, Gerald T; Mount, David R; Huckins, James; Petty, Jim; Landrum, Peter F

    2003-04-01

    Uptake of sediment-associated contaminants by the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was evaluated after 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 d of exposure to a field-collected sediment contaminated with DDT and its metabolites, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), or to a field-collected sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Depuration of contaminants by oligochaetes in a control sediment or in water was also evaluated over a 7-d period after 28 d of exposure to the field-collected sediments. Accumulation of PAHs with a log octanol-water partitioning coefficient (log Kow) <5.6 typically reached a peak at day 3, followed by a lower plateau between days 7 and 56 of the sediment exposure. Similarly, 4,4'-DDT exhibited a peak in accumulation at day 14 followed by a decline at days 28 and 56. In contrast, accumulation of PAHs with a log Kow >5.6 or DDD and DDE typically exhibited a steady increase from day 1 to about day 14 or 28, followed by a plateau. Therefore, exposures conducted for a minimum of 14 to 28 d better reflected steady-state concentrations for DDT and its metabolites and for PAHs. Depuration rates for DDT and its metabolites and high-Kow PAHs were much higher in organisms held in clean sediment relative to both water-only depuration and model predictions. This suggests that depuration in clean sediment may artificially accelerate depuration of hydrophobic compounds. Comparisons between laboratory-exposed L. variegatus and oligochaetes collected in the field from these sediments indicate that results of laboratory tests can be extrapolated to the field with a reasonable degree of certainty.

  18. Sediment toxicity and lethal body burdens of chlorophenols in an oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkonen, J.; Halme, A.; Nikkilae, A.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicokinetics, acute toxicity and lethal body burden of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Lumbriculus variegatus were measured in two different clean sediments. The sediments had an organic carbon content of 0.5% and 6.5%. The uptake rate coefficients (k{sub s}) of TCP at low TCP concentration (0.25 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1}) were 0.67 and 0.13 g dry sed. g{sup {minus}1} org. h{sup {minus}1} in low and high organic carbon content sediments, respectively. Organic carbon normalized uptake rate coefficient (k{sub oc}) was 0.0034 gOC g{sup {minus}1} org. h{sup {minus}1} for the low organic content sediment and 0.0085 gOC g{sup {minus}1} org. h{sup {minus}1} for the high organic content sediment showing that the organic carbon content does not explain all of the difference between the sediments. Similar to that, LC{sub 50} (24h) for the TCP was 37.4 and 121.5 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} dw in low and high organic carbon content sediments, respectively. If organic carbon normalization is done the figures are 7,880 and 1,869 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} OC. However, the lethal body burden of TCP in Lumbriculus variegatus is between 0.5--0.9 {micro}mol g{sup {minus}1} in both sediments. Similar type of results will be shown for PCP and the use of lethal body burden approach in sediment toxicology will be discussed.

  19. Evaluation of vulnerability of Suillus variegatus and Suillus granulatus mushrooms to sequester mercury in fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Saba, Martyna; Falandysz, Jerzy; Nnorom, Innocent C

    2016-08-02

    This work determined the mercury (Hg) contents and bioconcentration potential of two Suillus mushrooms, and the probable dietary intake of this element from a mushroom meal. The determination of total Hg content of fungal and soil samples was performed using cold-vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy by a direct sample thermal decomposition coupled with gold wool trap of Hg and its further desorption and quantitative measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. The median values of Hg contents (mg kg(-1) dry biomass) in 213 specimens of S. variegatus from 12 background areas varied widely from 0.087 to 0.51 for caps and from 0.041 to 0.24 for stipes. In 52 specimens of S. granulatus, the Hg contents ranged from 0.30 to 0.41 for caps and from 0.058 to 0.14 for stipes. Both species could be classified as moderate accumulators of Hg and the median bioconcentration factor values ranged from 7.0 to 14 (caps) and 2.1 to 13 (stipes) for S. variegatus and 9.5 (caps) and 1.3 (stipes) for S. granulatus. The estimated intake rates of Hg with the consumption of 300-g caps were from 0.0026 to 0.015 per capita or from 0.000037 to 0.00022 mg kg(-1) body mass and this do not indicate any cause for concern associated with eating a meal once or more in a week during the mushrooming season.

  20. Assessment of the effects of the pesticide imidacloprid on the behaviour of the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Sardo, A M; Soares, A M V M

    2010-04-01

    Contaminants, such as pesticides, can cause direct toxic effects when released into aquatic environments. Suitably sensitive species can help us understand and predict the impacts of such pollutants. Automated sediment toxicity testing and biomonitoring has grown rapidly, and biomonitoring instruments have proven appropriate for studying the effects of pollutants. A new approach in online biomonitoring, using the multispecies freshwater biomonitor was developed in the present study, using whole-sediment toxicity tests and behavioural responses of the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Endpoints, such as mortality and growth, were used to study the effects of the pesticide imidacloprid and to achieve a gradient of responses; exposures to contaminated sediments were performed over 10 days' duration (short-term tests). High mortality was observed in the three highest concentrations of imidacloprid, and inhibition of behaviour was monitored along a gradient of pesticide concentration. Exposure to imidacloprid-contaminated sediments affected growth, behaviour, and avoidance in L. variegatus.

  1. Inhibition of cholinesterases and carboxylesterases of two invertebrate species, Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus, by the carbamate pesticide carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Guerrero, Noemi R Verrengia; Cochón, Adriana C

    2010-01-31

    In this study, the effects of sublethal concentrations of the carbamate carbaryl on the cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CES) activities present in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and in the pigmented Biomphalaria glabrata gastropod were investigated. The results showed that ChE activity from both species was inhibited by in vivo and in vitro exposure to carbaryl, with EC(50) and IC(50) values approximately 20 times lower for the oligochaete than for the gastropod. On the other hand, the recovery process in uncontaminated media was more efficient in oligochaetes than in snails. Thus, in only 2h the oligochaetes showed no inhibition with respect to control values whereas the snails did not reach control values even after 48h of being in pesticide-free water. CES activity was investigated in whole body soft tissue homogenates using three different substrates: p-nitrophenyl butyrate, 1-naphthyl acetate (NA) and 2-NA. In addition, the presence of multiple CES isozymes in L. variegatus and B. glabrata extracts, with activity towards 1- and 2-NA, was confirmed by native polyacrylamide electrophoresis. In both species, the activities measured using the naphthyl substrates were higher than the activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate. In addition, B. glabrata showed a higher CES activity than L. variegatus independently of the substrate used. In L. variegatus, in vivo CES activity towards the different substrates was less sensitive to carbaryl inhibition than ChE activity. In contrast, in B. glabrata, CES activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate was inhibited at lower insecticide concentrations than ChE. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the sensitivity of non-target freshwater invertebrate Type B-esterases towards pesticides.

  2. Comparing the effects of nanosilver size and coating variations on bioavailability, internalization, and elimination, using Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jessica G; Kennedy, Alan J; Bednar, Anthony J; Ranville, James F; Laird, Jennifer G; Harmon, Ashley R; Hayes, Charolett A; Gray, Evan P; Higgins, Christopher P; Lotufo, Guilherme; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2013-09-01

    As the production and applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) increase, it is essential to characterize fate and effects in environmental systems. Nanosilver materials may settle from suspension; therefore, the authors' objective was to utilize environmentally relevant bioassays and study the impact, bioaccumulation, tissue distribution, uptake, and depuration of AgNPs on a sediment-dwelling invertebrate, Lumbriculus variegatus. Hydrodynamic diameters of uncoated 30-nm, 80-nm, and 1500-nm AgNP powders and a polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) AgNP suspension were measured utilizing dynamic light scattering in freshwater media (0-280 µS/cm). Aggregation for 30 nm, 80 nm, and 1500 nm silver increased with conductivity but was minimal for PVP silver. Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to AgNPs or silver nitrate (AgNO3 ) spiked into sediment (nominally 100 mg/kg) and water (PVP 30 nm and 70 nm Ag, nominally 5 mg/L). Uptake was assessed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and hyperspectral imaging. Particle sizes were examined through field flow fractionation-ICP-MS (FFF-ICP-MS) and ICP-MS in single particle mode (SP-ICP-MS). Lumbriculus variegatus were also depurated for 6 h, 8 h, 24 h, and 48 h to determine gut clearance. Bioaccumulation factors of sediment-exposed L. variegatus were similar regardless of particle size or coatings. The FFF-ICP-MS and SP-ICP-MS detected AgNPs for up to 48 h post depuration. The present study provides information on bioaccumulation and interactions of AgNPs within biological systems.

  3. Triclosan exposure results in alterations of thyroid hormone status and retarded early development and metamorphosis in Cyprinodon variegatus.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Joseph G; Frédérich, Bruno; Dussenne, Mélanie; Klaren, Peter H M; Silvestre, Frédéric; Das, Krishna

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid hormones are critically involved in somatic growth, development and metamorphosis of vertebrates. The structural similarity between thyroid hormones and triclosan, an antimicrobial compound widely employed in consumer personal care products, suggests triclosan can have adverse effects on the thyroid system. The sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, is now used in ecotoxicological studies that have recently begun to focus on potential disruption of the thyroid axis by endocrine disrupting compounds. Here, we investigate the in vivo effects of exposure to triclosan (20, 50, and 100μgL(-1)) on the thyroid system and the embryonic and larval development of C. variegatus. Triclosan exposure did not affect hatching success, but delayed hatching time by 6-13h compared to control embryos. Triclosan exposure affected the ontogenetic variations of whole body thyroid hormone concentrations during the larval phase. The T3 peak around 12-15 dph, described to be indicative for the metamorphosis climax in C. variegatus, was absent in triclosan-exposed larvae. Triclosan exposure did not produce any deformity or allometric repatterning, but a delayed development of 18-32h was observed. We conclude that the triclosan-induced disruption of the thyroid system delays in vivo the start of metamorphosis in our experimental model. We observed a global developmental delay of 24-45h, equivalent to 4-7% prolongation of the developmental time in C. variegatus. The costs of delayed metamorphosis can lead to reduction of juvenile fitness and could be a determining factor in the outcome of competitive interactions.

  4. Farmers' perception on the importance of variegated grasshopper (Zonocerus variegatus (L.)) in the agricultural production systems of the humid forest zone of Southern Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kekeunou, Sévilor; Weise, Stephan; Messi, Jean; Tamò, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background Zonocerus variegatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae) is known as an agricultural pest in West and Central Africa. However, its importance in the agricultural production system in Cameroon has not been investigated. The study assesses farmers' perception on the importance of Z. variegatus in the agricultural production systems of the humid forest zone of Southern Cameroon. Methods Research was carried out in 5 villages of each of three Agro-Ecological, Cultural and Demographic Blocks (AECD-Blocks) of the Forest Margin Benchmark Area (FMBA). In each village, a semi-structured survey was used; male and female groups of farmers were interviewed separately. Results Z. variegatus is present throughout the humid forest zone of Southern Cameroon, where it is ranked as the third most economically important insect pest of agriculture. In the farmers' opinion, Z. variegatus is a polyphagous insect with little impact on young perennial crops. The length of the pre-farming fallow does not affect Z. variegatus pest pressure in the following crops. The increased impact of the grasshopper observed today in the fields, compared to what existed 10 years ago is as a result of deforestation and increase in surface of herbaceous fallow. The damage caused by Z. variegatus is higher in fields adjacent to C. odorata and herbaceous fallows than in those adjacent to forests and shrubby fallows. The fight against this grasshopper is often done through physical methods carried out by hand, for human consumption. The farmers highlight low usage of the chemical methods and a total absence of biological and ecological methods. Conclusion Farmers' perception have contributed to understanding the status of Z. variegatus in the humid forest zone of Southern Cameroon. The results are in general similar to those obtained in other countries. PMID:16573815

  5. Accumulation dynamics and acute toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus: implications for metal modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farhan R; Paul, Kai B; Dybowska, Agnieszka D; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Lead, Jamie R; Stone, Vicki; Fernandes, Teresa F

    2015-04-07

    Frameworks commonly used in trace metal ecotoxicology (e.g., biotic ligand model (BLM) and tissue residue approach (TRA)) are based on the established link between uptake, accumulation and toxicity, but similar relationships remain unverified for metal-containing nanoparticles (NPs). The present study aimed to (i) characterize the bioaccumulation dynamics of PVP-, PEG-, and citrate-AgNPs, in comparison to dissolved Ag, in Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus; and (ii) investigate whether parameters of bioavailability and accumulation predict acute toxicity. In both species, uptake rate constants for AgNPs were ∼ 2-10 times less than for dissolved Ag and showed significant rank order concordance with acute toxicity. Ag elimination by L. variegatus fitted a 1-compartment loss model, whereas elimination in D. magna was biphasic. The latter showed consistency with studies that reported daphnids ingesting NPs, whereas L. variegatus biodynamic parameters indicated that uptake and efflux were primarily determined by the bioavailability of dissolved Ag released by the AgNPs. Thus, principles of BLM and TRA frameworks are confounded by the feeding behavior of D. magna where the ingestion of AgNPs perturbs the relationship between tissue concentrations and acute toxicity, but such approaches are applicable when accumulation and acute toxicity are linked to dissolved concentrations. The uptake rate constant, as a parameter of bioavailability inclusive of all available pathways, could be a successful predictor of acute toxicity.

  6. Bioaccumulation of 14C-17alpha-ethinylestradiol by the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus in spiked artificial sediment.

    PubMed

    Liebig, Markus; Egeler, Philipp; Oehlmann, Jörg; Knacker, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    A bioaccumulation study was performed with the endobenthic freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus MULLER exposed to the radiolabelled synthetic steroid 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (14C-EE2) in a spiked artificial sediment. Concentration of total radioactivity increased constantly and almost linearly during 35 days of exposure. The accumulation factor normalised to worm lipid content and sediment TOC (AFlipid/OC) was 75 at the end of the uptake period, but a steady state was not reached. Uptake kinetics were calculated fitting the measured AFs to a kinetic rate equation for constant uptake from sediment using iterative non-linear regression analysis. After 10 days of elimination in contaminant-free sediment 50% of the accumulated total radioactivity was excreted by the worms. Extracts from L. variegatus sampled at the end of the uptake phase were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The results showed that 6% of the total radioactivity incorporated by the worms was 14C-EE2. After treatment of extracts with beta-glucuronidase the amount of 14C-EE2 increased to 84%. These results suggest that L. variegatus has the potency to accumulate high amounts of conjugated EE2. Hence, a transfer of EE2 to benthivores and subsequent secondary poisoning of predators might be possible.

  7. Effects of activated carbon ageing in three PCB contaminated sediments: Sorption efficiency and secondary effects on Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Waissi-Leinonen, Greta; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Werner, David; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2015-11-15

    The sorption efficiency and possible secondary effects of activated carbon (AC) (ø 63-200 μm) was studied with Lumbriculus variegatus in three PCB contaminated sediments applying long AC-sediment contact time (3 years). AC amendment efficiently reduced PCB bioavailability as determined with both, L. variegatus bioaccumulation test and passive samplers. However, dose related secondary effects of AC on egestion rate and biomass were observed (applied doses 0.25% and 2.5% sediment dry weight). The sorption capacity and secondary effects remained similar when the experiments were repeated after three years of AC-sediment contact time. Further, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples revealed morphological changes in the L. variegatus gut wall microvilli layer. Sediment properties affected both sorption efficiency and secondary effects, but 2.5% AC addition had significant effects regardless of the sediment. In, conclusion, AC is an efficient and stable sorbent to decrease the bioavailability of PCBs. However, sediment dwelling organisms, such as Oligochaete worms in this study, may be sensitive to the carbon amendments. The secondary effects and possible morphological changes in benthic organisms should not be overlooked as in many cases they form the basis of the aquatic food webs.

  8. Can behavioural responses of Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) assess sediment toxicity? A case study with sediments exposed to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Sardo, A M; Soares, A M V M

    2010-02-01

    The São Domingos mine (Portugal) is, potentially, a good site for ecotoxicological studies, due to a pH and metal gradient of acid mine drainage. In this study, the toxicity of several mine sediments was evaluated using the aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus as a test organism. Our hypothesis was that exposure to contaminated sediments would cause behavioural early warning responses in L. variegatus. Five sites, with pH ranging from 2.5 to 6.5, and with associated metals, were investigated. The results showed poor sediment quality in most of the collected sediments and Fe, S and As were the dominant elements in the samples. High mortalities were observed, ranging from 32.6 to 100%, indicating severe contamination. The collected sediments did not support good L. variegatus growth and significantly changed its behaviour. Early warning responses consisted of decreased locomotion and decreased peristaltic movements. A behaviour inhibition will affect the ecosystem balance by limiting the organisms' ability to avoid capture, which leads to a higher risk of predation.

  9. Use of the oligochaete, Lumbricuilus variegatus, as a prey organism for toxicant exposure of fish through the diet.

    PubMed

    Mount, David R; Highland, Terry L; Mattson, Vincent R; Dawson, Timothy D; Lott, Kevin G; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2006-10-01

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, has several characteristics that make it desirable as a prey organism for conducting dietary exposure studies with fish. We conducted 21- and 30-d experiments with young fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), respectively, to determine whether a diet consisting solely of L. variegatus would support normal growth and to compare performance with standard diets (Artemia nauplii, frozen brine shrimp, or trout chow). All diets were readily accepted, and fish survived and grew well. Food conversion in both fathead minnows and rainbow trout was as high as or higher for the oligochaete diet compared with others, although this comparison is influenced by differences in ration, ingestion rate, or both. The oligochaete diet had gross nutritional analysis similar to the other diets, and meets fish nutrition guidelines for protein and essential amino acids. Methodologies and practical considerations for successfully using oligochaetes as an experimental diet are discussed. Considering their ready acceptance by fish, their apparent nutritional sufficiency, the ease of culturing large numbers, and the ease with which they can be loaded with exogenous chemicals, we believe that L. variegatus represents an excellent choice of exposure vector for exposing fish to toxicants via the diet.

  10. Use of the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, as a prey organism for toxicant exposure of fish through the diet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mount, D.R.; Highland, T.L.; Mattson, V.R.; Dawson, T.D.; Lott, K.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, has several characteristics that make it desirable as a prey organism for conducting dietary exposure studies with fish. We conducted 21- and 30-d experiments with young fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), respectively, to determine whether a diet consisting solely of L. variegatus would support normal growth and to compare performance with standard diets (Artemia nauplii, frozen brine shrimp, or trout chow). All diets were readily accepted, and fish survived and grew well. Food conversion in both fathead minnows and rainbow trout was as high as or higher for the oligochaete diet compared with others, although this comparison is influenced by differences in ration, ingestion rate, or both. The oligochaete diet had gross nutritional analysis similar to the other diets, and meets fish nutrition guidelines for protein and essential amino acids. Methodologies and practical considerations for successfully using oligochaetes as an experimental diet are discussed. Considering their ready acceptance by fish, their apparent nutritional sufficiency, the ease of culturing large numbers, and the ease with which they can be loaded with exogenous chemicals, we believe that L. variegatus represents an excellent choice of exposure vector for exposing fish to toxicants via the diet. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  11. The Pleistocene history of the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus): Non-equilibrium evolutionary dynamics within a diversifying species complex.

    PubMed

    Haney, Robert A; Silliman, Brian R; Fry, Adam J; Layman, Craig A; Rand, David M

    2007-06-01

    The sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, is a widespread fish species that typically inhabits coastal tidal marsh and mangrove swamp environments, ranging from Cape Cod, Massaschusetts to northern Mexico and into the Caribbean. This wide range crosses several biogeographic boundaries which are coincident with genetic structuring within numerous species originating in the Pleistocene. In addition, the more northerly reaches of this species range have been further subject to the evolutionary consequences of Pleistocene glaciation due to local extinction and recolonization of formerly glaciated sites. C. variegatus thus provides an excellent vertebrate model system within which to test the extent of genetic differentiation among populations in a dominant coastal ecosystem and examine patterns of historical demography in populations distributed along a latitudinal gradient. Using mitochondrial control region and ND2 sequence data, we discovered monophyletic clades within C. variegatus with divergence times within the Pleistocene, and very low gene flow between most sites. Intraspecific genetic breaks appear to correspond broadly to biogeographic or oceanic boundaries. Pleistocene climate change appears to have had dramatic impacts on the size and distribution of populations within and near the glacial margins, but has also affected populations far from formerly glaciated regions.

  12. The effect of lead from sediment bioturbation by Lumbriculus variegatus on Daphnia magna in the water column.

    PubMed

    Blankson, Emmanuel R; Klerks, Paul L

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the bioavailability and potential toxicity to Daphnia magna of lead released to the water column due to bioturbation by Lumbriculus variegatus. Experiments used microcosms with Pb-spiked sediment, with or without worms in the sediment, and with D. magna present in the water column. The daphniids were allowed free movement or were restricted to flow-through containers, in order to assess the influence of their direct contact with the contaminated sediment. A control group consisted of D. magna in clean moderately hard reconstituted water. At the end of the 12-day experiment, D. magna survival, reproduction, biomass, and Pb-bioaccumulation were determined. Water column turbidity and Pb levels were quantified to assess their influence on the Pb toxicity and bioaccumulation. The bioturbation by L. variegatus increased Pb levels and turbidity in the water column. While this resulted in an increased Pb bioaccumulation by the D. magna, the water column Pb levels and the Pb bioaccumulation were insufficient to bring about toxic effects for the survival, reproduction, and biomass of the daphniids. Contact of D. magna with the sediment resulted in an increase in their Pb bioaccumulation, with water turbidity and Pb data, suggesting that these crustaceans also acted as bioturbators. The increase in Pb bioaccumulation in D. magna as a consequence of bioturbation by L. variegatus demonstrates the potential for bioturbation to enhance contaminant toxicity to organisms in the water column, though this potential appeared relatively low in the case of lead.

  13. Inhibition of cholinesterase activity by azinphos-methyl in two freshwater invertebrates: Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Guerrero, Noemi Verrengia; de D'Angelo, Ana María Pechén; Cochón, Adriana C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, some biochemical features and the extent of inhibition induced by the organophosphorous pesticide azinphos-methyl on the cholinesterase (ChE) activity present in whole soft tissue of two freshwater invertebrate species, the gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were investigated. Both invertebrate organisms presented marked differences in ChE activity, type of enzymes and subcellular location. Acetylthiocholine was the substrate preferred by B. glabrata ChE. The enzyme activity was located preferentially in the supernatant of 11,000 x g centrifugation and was inhibited by increasing concentrations of substrate but not by iso-OMPA. Results showed that there were progressive inhibitions of the enzyme activity, with values 21%, 59%, 72%, 76%, and 82% lower than the control at levels of 1, 10, 50, 100 and 1000 microM of eserine, respectively. In contrast, L. variegatus ChE activity was distributed both in the supernatant and pellet fractions, with values approximately 6 and 20 times higher than B. glabrata, respectively. Studies with butyrylthiocholine and iso-OMPA suggested that about 72% of the activity corresponded to butyrylcholinesterase. A strong enzyme inhibition (88-94%) was found at low eserine concentrations (1-10 microM). ChE activity from L. variegatus and B. glabrata was inhibited by in vivo exposure to azinphos-methyl suggesting that both species can form the oxon derivative of this pesticide. However, both invertebrate species showed a very different susceptibility to the insecticide. The NOEC and EIC50 values were 500 and 1000 times lower for L. variegatus than for B. glabrata, reflecting that the oligochaetes were much more sensitive organisms. A different pattern was also observed for the recovery of the enzymatic activity when the organisms were transferred to clean water. The recuperation process was faster for the oligochaetes than for the gastropods. Mortality was not observed in either of the

  14. Toxicity Testing of Silver Nanoparticles in Artificial and Natural Sediments Using the Benthic Organism Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Juho Elias; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Vehniäinen, Eeva-Riikka; Väisänen, Ari; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Akkanen, Jarkko; Kukkonen, Jussi Vilho Kalevi

    2016-10-01

    The increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in industrial and consumer products worldwide has resulted in their release to aquatic environments. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effects of AgNP on pelagic species, whereas few studies have assessed the risks to benthic invertebrates despite the fact that the sediments act as a large potential sink for NPs. In this study, the toxicity of sediment-associated AgNP was evaluated using the standard sediment toxicity test for chemicals provided by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. The freshwater benthic oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to sediment-associated AgNP in artificial and natural sediments at concentrations ranging from 91 to 1098 mg Ag/kg sediment dry weight. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as a reference compound for Ag toxicity. The measured end points of toxicity were mortality, reproduction, and total biomass. In addition, the impact of sediment-associated AgNP on the feeding rate of L. variegatus was studied in a similar test set-up as mentioned previously. The addition of AgNP into the sediment significantly affected the feeding rate and reproduction of the test species only at the highest concentration (1098 mg/kg) of Ag in the natural sediment with the lowest pH. In comparison, the addition of AgNO3 resulted in reproductive toxicity in every tested sediment, and Ag was more toxic when spiked as AgNO3 than AgNP. In general, sediments were observed to have a high capacity to eliminate the AgNP-derived toxicity. However, the capacity of sediments to eliminate the toxicity of Ag follows a different pattern when spiked as AgNP than AgNO3. The results of this study emphasize the importance of sediment-toxicity testing and the role of sediment properties when evaluating the environmental effects and behavior of AgNP in sediments.

  15. Comparative phylogeography of the Atlantic forest endemic sloth (Bradypus torquatus) and the widespread three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus) (Bradypodidae, Xenarthra).

    PubMed

    de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; Silva, Juliana A B; Miyaki, Cristina Y; Morgante, J S

    2006-01-01

    The comparative phylogeographic study of the maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus) and the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus) was performed using a segment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. We examined 19 B. torquatus from two regions and 47 B. variegatus from three distant regions of Atlantic forest. This first characterization of molecular diversity indicates a great diversity (B. torquatus: h = 0.901 +/- 0.039 and pi = 0.012 +/- 0.007; B. variegatus: h = 0.699 +/- 0.039 and pi = 0.010 +/- 0.006) and very divergent mitochondrial lineages within each sloth species. The different sampled regions carry distinct and non-overlapping sets of mtDNA haplotypes and are genetically divergent. This phylogeographic pattern may be characteristic of sloth species. In addition, we infer that two main phylogeographic groups exist in the Atlantic forest representing a north and south distinct divergence.

  16. Comparative toxicology for risk assessment of marine fishes and crustaceans. [Cyprinodon variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.W. II; Rosen, A.E. )

    1988-05-01

    The goal of this study was to collect data on the effects of chemicals on marine fishes and crustaceans and to evaluate the predictive power of the data for assessing risks to marine resources. The data sets consisted of acute median lethal concentrations (LC{sub 50s}) and chronic maximum acceptable toxicant concentrations (MATCs). They were analyzed with regression models and simple comparisons. The conclusions include the following: (1) the variability found in the marine data was comparable to that found in freshwater data; (2) the standard marine test fish Cyprinodon variegatus appears to be representative of marine fishes; (3) the responses of marine crustaceans are so highly diverse that the concept of a representative crustacean is questionable; (4) mysid and penaeid shrimp appear to be particularly sensitive to toxic chemicals. These conclusions are subject to the constraints of the existing limited data base and should be confirmed by a systematic study of the relative sensitivity of marine organisms to chemicals with diverse modes of action.

  17. Sediment bioaccumulation test with upper Mississippi River sediments using the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.

    1995-12-31

    The test is part of the U.S.G.S. investigation Flood Effects on Surficial Bed Sediments Stored in the Navigational Pools of the Upper Mississippi River. In the laboratory Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed 28 days to sediments collected from 13 upper Mississippi River stations. The laboratory exposure was conducted using guidelines published in USEPA Methods for Measuring the Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Sediment associated Contaminants with Freshwater Invertebrates. For comparison to laboratory results, native oligochaetes were isolated in the field from subsamples of each of the 13 sediments. Both laboratory exposed and field collected oligochaetes were allowed to clear their gut contents for 24 hours after sampling. After elimination, the oligochaete samples were stored frozen until analyzed. Organic contaminants were measured in the both sets of oligochaetes and the concentrations were compared. In general the concentrations of contaminants in both laboratory an field-collected oligochaetes were low. For many of the compounds measured, there was good agreement between laboratory exposed and field collected oligochaetes.

  18. Evaluation of PCB bioaccumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in field-collected sediments.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Lawrence P; Mount, David R; Highland, Terry L; Hockett, J Russell; Norberg-King, Teresa; Billa, Nanditha; Hawthorne, Steven B; Miller, David J; Grabanski, Carol B

    2013-07-01

    Review of data from several contaminated sediment sites suggested that biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) declined with increasing contaminant concentrations in the sediment. To evaluate the consistency and possible causes of this behavior, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediment samples from the Hudson, Grasse, and Fox River Superfund sites were used in sediment bioaccumulation tests with the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, with PCB concentrations in interstitial water (IW) quantified using polyoxymethylene passive samplers. Measured BSAFs tended to decrease with increasing PCB concentration in sediment, especially for the more highly chlorinated congeners. Measures of partitioning between sediment, IW, and oligochaetes showed that measured sediment-IW partition coefficients (KTOC ) tended to increase slightly with increasing sediment contamination, whereas the ratio of tissue PCB to IW PCB tended to decrease with increasing concentration in IW. Variation in accumulation among sediments was clearly influenced by bioavailability, as reflected by IW measurements, although the specific cause of varying KTOC was not clear. Calculated partitioning between IW and organism lipid (Klipid ) indicated that accumulation was generally 5 to 10-fold higher than would be predicted if Klipid was approximately equal to the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW ). While affirming previous observations of decreasing BSAFs with increasing PCB contamination, the relatively shallow slope of the observed relationship in the current data may suggest that this concentration dependence is not a major uncertainty in sediment risk assessment, particularly if measurements of PCBs in IW are incorporated.

  19. Responses of Lumbriculus variegatus to activated carbon amendments in uncontaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Werner, David; Leppänen, Matti T; Siavalas, George; Christanis, Kimon; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2012-12-04

    Activated carbon (AC) amendment is a recently developed sediment remediation method. The strong hydrophobic organic contaminant sorption efficiency of AC has been shown in several studies, but effects on benthic organisms require more investigation. The AC induced effects on egestion rate, growth and reproduction of Lumbriculus variegatus were studied by applying bituminous coal based AC in three different particle size fractions, namely <63 μm (90%, AC(p)), 63-200 μm (AC(m)) and 1000 μm (AC(g)), to natural uncontaminated (HS) and artificial sediment (AS). Egestion rate, growth and reproduction decreased with increasing AC concentration and finer AC particle fractions, effects being stronger on HS than on AS sediment. Lipid content in AS was reduced already at the lowest AC doses applied (AC(p) and AC(m) 0.05%, AC(g) 0.25%). In addition, hormesis-like response was observed in growth (AS) and reproduction (AS, HS) indicating that AC may disturb organisms even at very low doses. Potential ecological effects need to be further evaluated in an amendment- and site-specific manner.

  20. Response of Lumbriculus variegatus transcriptome and metabolites to model chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Agbo, Stanley O; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Keinänen, Markku; Keski-Saari, Sarita; Akkanen, Jarkko; Leppänen, Matti T; Wang, Zhixin; Wang, Hailin; Price, David A; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of the underlying molecular events leading to xenobiotic toxicity is challenging especially when techniques are applied in isolation. We examined transcriptional and metabolic changes in Lumbriculus variegatus exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), cadmium (Cd) or pentachlorophenol (PCP) by DNA microarrays (7422 ESTs) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. In addition, the DNA damage response of worms exposed to B(a)P was assessed by a capillary electrophoresis laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) immunoassay. We found elevated expression of oxidative stress responsive genes, which correlated positively with the changes in antioxidant vitamin precursors including alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol. Other genes with strong differential expressions were mostly involved in actin related processes and proteolysis, despite an apparent delayed Cd response. Phosphates, sugars and fatty acids were effectively reduced and suggested that chemical treatments may have interfered with energy metabolism. The increased amount of B(a)P diol-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts in exposed worms appeared to correlate with the variability in uridine, inosine and xanthine, which are key components of nucleoside metabolism. This suggests that DNA damage was imminent or peaked within 6h. The results conformed to transcriptional changes in B(a)P exposed worms and compliment other approaches to elucidate underlying molecular changes.

  1. Comprehensive sediment toxicity assessment of Hessian surface waters using Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Galluba, Simone; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was a sediment assessment of predominantly small rivers in the German federal state of Hesse. For this purpose, sediment samples were taken at 50 study sites with different contamination levels. The benthic invertebrates Chironomus riparius (Diptera) and Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) were used as test species and exposed to whole sediments in chronic laboratory experiments. The bioassays were carried out on the basis of OECD guidelines 218 and 225 for the testing of chemicals. For about 50 % of the study sites chemical analytical data for pollutants from environmentally important substance classes like metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organotin compounds were available. These data were used to analyze correlations between effects in the bioassays and measured chemical contaminations at sampling sites. For 22 % of the sediments ecologically relevant adverse effects were observed. In the majority of these cases effects occurred in only one of the biotests, and only one sediment sample exerted a negative effect on both test organisms. There was no significant correlation between biological responses and chemical data considering substance classes. However, there was a weak positive correlation between arsenic concentration and both worm number and worm biomass as well as a weak positive correlation between single PAHs and worm biomass. In some sediment tests elevated ammonia concentrations occurred in the overlying water so that an influence of these partially toxic concentrations on the test results cannot be ruled out.

  2. Copper-induced changes in locomotor behaviors and neuronal physiology of the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    O'Gara, Bruce A; Bohannon, V Kim; Teague, Matthew W; Smeaton, Michael B

    2004-07-30

    The behavioral and neurotoxic effects of copper exposure were examined in the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. The 24 h LC50 for worms exposed to copper sulfate in an artificial pond water was 0.45 microM. Almost all animals that died due to copper exposure died during the first day of exposure. Immersion in water containing 0.2 or 0.4 microM copper produced time- and concentration-dependent reductions in the ability of tactile stimulation to evoke two stereotyped locomotory behaviors, body reversal and helical swimming. Helical swimming was more severely affected by copper exposure than was body reversal behavior. Upon return to clean water, both behaviors returned to normal levels within 1-2 days. Noninvasive electrophysiological testing indicated that copper exposure produced time- and concentration-dependent reductions in the conduction velocities of the medial and lateral giant nerve fibers. An 8 h exposure to 0.2 microM copper produced significant reductions in giant fiber conduction velocities that returned to normal levels within 3 days of return to clean water. It is likely that copper exposure can significantly degrade the ability of aquatic oligochaetes to avoid predators.

  3. Additive toxicity of binary mixtures of phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Erickson, R J; Ankley, G T; DeFoe, D L; Kosian, P A; Makynen, E A

    1999-01-01

    Toxicity of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can increase by an order of magnitude, or more, in the presence of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In the environment, PAHs exist as complex mixtures, which generally would include multiple PAHs that could cause photoinduced toxicity. Hence, to accurately predict the potential ecological risk of phototoxic PAHs, it is critical to understand their joint toxicity. In this study, we exposed the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to the phototoxic PAHs anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, both singly and as binary mixtures for 96 h. Following this, the animals were exposed to UV light for an additional 96 h, during which periodic observations of mortality were made. Time-dependent phototoxicity of the binary PAH mixtures, expressed as a function of the product of UV light intensity and PAH dose (in the tissue of the animals), was adequately described using a concentration addition model. Given the probability that the PAHs examined acted via a common mechanism of action, this result was consistent with expectations. These data highlight the need to consider the combined photoactivation potential of PAH mixtures and provide the technical basis for a modeling approach to predict their ecological risk.

  4. Blood pressure regulation in the three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Duarte, D P F; da Costa, C P; Cabral, A M S; Silva, E M; Gilmore, D P

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the baroreflex in blood pressure control in sloths, Bradypus variegatus, since these animals show labile levels in this parameter. Unanesthetized cannulated sloths were positioned in an experimental chair and the arterial catheter was coupled to a strain gauge pressure transducer. Blood pressure was monitored before, during and after the administration of phenylephrine (0.0625 to 4 microg/kg) and sodium nitroprusside (0.0625 to 2 microg/kg), bringing about changes in mean blood pressure from +/-30 mmHg in relation to control values. The relation between heart rate changes due to blood pressure variation was estimated by linear regression analysis. The slope was considered the reflex baroreceptor gain. The results (means+/-SD) showed that the reflex baroreceptor gain was -0.3+/-0.1 bpm/mmHg (r=0.88) to phenylephrine and -0.5+/-0.1 bpm/mmHg (r=0.92) to sodium nitroprusside, denoting a reduced reflex baroreceptor gain when compared with other mammals, suggesting that in sloths the baroreceptors are minimally involved in the buffering reflex response to these drugs. These findings suggest that the labile blood pressure could be influenced or be a result of this lowering in the reflex baroreceptor gain.

  5. Stomach lysozymes of the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus), an arboreal folivore from the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, M Andreína; Concepción, Juan Luís; Rangel, José David Rosales; Ruiz, Marie Christine; Michelangeli, Fabián; Domínguez-Bello, María G

    2007-07-01

    Lysozymes are antimicrobial defences that act as digestive enzymes when expressed in the stomach of herbivores with pre-gastric fermentation. We studied this enzyme in the complex stomach of the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus), a folivore with pre-gastric fermentation. Lysozymes were identified by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting in all portions: diverticulum, pouch, glandular and muscular prepyloric area with 14.3 kDa of molecular mass. Purified lysozymes from all areas but the diverticulum were characterized by MALDI-TOF, optimal pH, optimal ionic strength, and specific activity. The differences observed suggested at least three isoforms. The optimal pHs were similar to the pH of the stomach portion where the enzymes were isolated. The lysozyme from the pouch (fermentation chamber) exhibited higher specific activity and concentration than the others. The specific activity of the enzyme from the acid muscular prepyloric portion was comparable to that reported in the cow abomasums; however, its concentration was lower than that observed in cow. This distinctive pattern of secretion/specific activity and overall low concentration suggests different roles for the lysozymes in this herbivore compared to Artiodactyla. We postulate that sloth stomach lysozymes may still be antimicrobial defences by protecting the microbial flora of the fermentation chamber against foreign bacteria.

  6. Induction of ambicoloration by exogenous cortisol during metamorphosis of spotted halibut Verasper variegatus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiyuki; Donai, Hayato; Okauchi, Masanori; Tagawa, Masatomo; Araki, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Cortisol, the main glucocorticoid in fish, increases during flatfish metamorphosis and peaks before the surge of thyroxine. A large body of evidence indicates the essential role of thyroxine in flatfish metamorphosis, whereas information on cortisol is limited. We administered cortisol to spotted halibut Verasper variegatus larvae in order to examine the effect on pigmentation during metamorphosis. Administration of 10 μg cortisol per mL of water from before the onset of metamorphosis (stage E) to metamorphic climax (stage G) induced the development of adult type pigment cells on the blind side of the metamorphosed juveniles and increased the occurrence of ambicolored juveniles. When 10 μg/mL cortisol was administered during stage D, stages E-F, stage G or stage H, only the administration during stages E-F induced the development of adult type pigment cells on the blind side. In addition, the expression of the gene dopachrome tautomerase (dct), a marker of melanoblasts, was enhanced at Stage E by cortisol administration. These results clearly indicated, for the first time, the enhancement of pigmentation by exogenous high-dose cortisol. Since endogenous cortisol is secreted in response to various kinds of stress in rearing conditions, these results indicate a possible influence of stress conditions in the occurrence of ambicoloration in flatfish.

  7. Overgrazing of a large seagrass bed by the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus in Outer Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, C.D.; Sharp, W.C.; Kenworthy, W.J.; Hunt, J.H.; Lyons, W.G.; Prager, E.J.; Valentine, J.F.; Hall, M.O.; Whitfield, P.E.; Fourqurean, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Unusually dense aggregations of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus overgrazed at least 0.81 km2 of seagrass habitat in Outer Florida Bay (USA) between August 1997 and May 1998. Initially, sea-urchin densities were as high as 364 sea urchins m-2, but they steadily declined to within a range of 20 to 50 sea urchins m-2 by December 1998. Prior to this event, sea-urchin densities were 95% of the short-shoot apical meristems were removed by sea-urchin grazing in our study area. Such extensive loss may severely limit recovery of this seagrass community by vegetative reproduction. Effects of the removal of seagrass biomass have already resulted in the depletion of epifaunal-infaunal mollusk assemblages and resuspension of fine-grained (<64 ??m) surface sediments - which have caused significant changes in community structure and in the physical properties of the sediments. These changes, coupled with the loss of essential fishery habitat, reductions in primary and secondary production, and degradation of water quality, may lead to additional, longer-term, indirect effects that may extend beyond the boundaries of the grazed areas and into adjacent coastal ecosystems.

  8. Endogenous lentivirus in Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus), a close relative of primates.

    PubMed

    Hron, Tomáš; Fábryová, Helena; Pačes, Jan; Elleder, Daniel

    2014-10-04

    A significant fraction of mammalian genomes is composed of endogenous retroviral (ERV) sequences that are formed by germline infiltration of various retroviruses. In contrast to other retroviral genera, lentiviruses only rarely form ERV copies. We performed a computational search aimed at identification of novel endogenous lentiviruses in vertebrate genomes. Using the in silico strategy, we have screened 104 publicly available vertebrate genomes for the presence of endogenous lentivirus sequences. In addition to the previously described cases, the search revealed the presence of endogenous lentivirus in the genome of Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus). At least three complete copies of this virus, denoted ELVgv, were detected in the colugo genome, and approximately one hundred solo LTR sequences. The assembled consensus sequence of ELVgv had typical lentivirus genome organization including three predicted accessory genes. Phylogenetic analysis placed this virus as a distinct subgroup within the lentivirus genus. The time of insertion into the dermopteran lineage was estimated to be more than thirteen million years ago. We report the discovery of the first endogenous lentivirus in the mammalian order Dermoptera, which is a taxon close to the Primates. Lentiviruses have infiltrated the mammalian germline several times across millions of years. The colugo virus described here represents possibly the oldest documented endogenization event and its discovery can lead to new insights into lentivirus evolution. This is also the first report of an endogenous lentivirus in an Asian mammal, indicating a long-term presence of this retrovirus family in Asian continent.

  9. Ecotoxicological assessment of acid mine drainage: electrophysiological changes in earthworm (Aporrectodea caliginosa) and aquatic oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Ravi; Buser, Andreas; Lindsay, Phil; Wellby, Martin

    2011-05-01

    Ecological health of 15 sites in two mining areas on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand, was assessed using a non-invasive electrophysiological technique. The conduction velocity (CV) changes in the medial giant fibres (MGF) of the terrestrial earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa were measured on days 0, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 following exposure to soil and/or sediment from six acid mine drainage (AMD) sites, and aquatic oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus at 0, 3, 6, and 24 h following exposure to water from 14 AMD sites. The colour of the soil/sediments varied from red-brown to black with pH ranging from 4.46 to 7.37. The colour of AMD water samples varied from clear, black, brown to orange, and the pH ranged from 2.99 to 7.66. The CV decreased progressively in A. caliginosa exposed to most soil and sediment samples from the AMD sites (compared with controls exposed to soil from an organic farm) and this was most evident in measurements taken at 7 days. Based on the CV measurements taken on day 7, sites 3 > 2 > 1 were significantly (P < 0.05) the most toxic to earthworms. The CV of L. variegatus exposed to AMD water sampled from many sites also decreased progressively and this was significantly lower than the controls in the measurements taken at 24 h from sites 3 > 9 > 7 > 11. It is proposed that MGF CV in A. caliginosa and L. variegatus worms can be used as a non-invasive, sensitive, biomarker to monitor the toxicity of AMD sites.

  10. Mixing and capping techniques for activated carbon based sediment remediation - Efficiency and adverse effects for Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sebastian; Nybom, Inna; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Hale, Sarah E; Cornelissen, Gerard; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2017-05-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been proven to be highly effective for the in-situ remediation of sediments contaminated with a wide range of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, adverse biological effects, especially to benthic organisms, can accompany this promising remediation potential. In this study, we compare both the remediation potential and the biological effects of several AC materials for two application methods: mixing with sediment (MIX) at doses of 0.1 and 1.0% based on sediment dw and thin layer capping (TLC) with 0.6 and 1.2 kg AC/m(2). Significant dose dependent reductions in PCB bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus of 35-93% in MIX treatments were observed. Contaminant uptake in TLC treatments was reduced by up to 78% and differences between the two applied doses were small. Correspondingly, significant adverse effects were observed for L. variegatus whenever AC was present in the sediment. The lowest application dose of 0.1% AC in the MIX system reduced L. variegatus growth, and 1.0% AC led to a net loss of organism biomass. All TLC treatments let to a loss of biomass in the test organism. Furthermore, mortality was observed with 1.2 kg AC/m(2) doses of pure AC for the TLC treatment. The addition of clay (Kaolinite) to the TLC treatments prevented mortality, but did not decrease the loss in biomass. While TLC treatments pose a less laborious alternative for AC amendments in the field, the results of this study show that it has lower remediation potential and could be more harmful to the benthic fauna.

  11. The potential of TiO2 nanoparticles as carriers for cadmium uptake in Lumbriculus variegatus and Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nanna B; Legros, Samuel; Von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Baun, Anders

    2012-08-15

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (e.g. in industrial applications and consumer products) is increasing. Consequently, these particles will be released into the aquatic environment. Through aggregation/agglomeration and sedimentation, sediments are expected ultimately to be sinks for nanoparticles. Both in the water phase and in the sediments engineered nanoparticles will mix and interact with other environmental pollutants, including metals. In this study the toxicity of cadmium to two freshwater organisms, water column crustacean Daphnia magna and sediment oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, was investigated both in the absence and presence of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (P25 Evonic Degussa, d: 30 nm). The uptake of cadmium in sub-lethal concentrations was also studied in the absence and presence of 2 mg/L TiO(2) nanoparticles. Formation of larger nanoparticles aggregates/agglomerates was observed and sizes varied depending on media composition (358±13 nm in US EPA moderately hard synthetic freshwater and 1218±7 nm in Elendt M7). TiO(2) nanoparticles are potential carriers for cadmium and it was found that 25% and 6% of the total cadmium mass in the test system for L. variegatus and D. magna tests were associated to suspended TiO(2) particles, respectively. μXRF (micro X-ray fluorescence) analysis confirmed the uptake of TiO(2) in the gut of D. magna. For L. variegatus μXRF analysis indicated attachment of TiO(2) nanoparticles to the organism surface as well as a discrete distribution within the organisms. Though exact localisation in this organism was more difficult to assess, the uptake seems to be within the coelomic cavity. Results show that the overall body burden and toxicity of cadmium to L. variegatus was unchanged by addition of TiO(2) nanoparticles, showing that cadmium adsorption to TiO(2) nanoparticles did not affect overall bioavailability. Despite facilitated uptake of cadmium by TiO(2) nanoparticles in D. magna, resulting in

  12. Circadian rhythms in blood pressure in free-ranging three-toed sloths (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Duarte, D P F; Silva, V L; Jaguaribe, A M; Gilmore, D P; Da Costa, C P

    2003-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) profiles were monitored in nine free-ranging sloths (Bradypus variegatus) by coupling one common carotid artery to a BP telemetry transmitter. Animals moved freely in an isolated and temperature-controlled room (24 degrees C) with 12/12-h artificial light-dark cycles and behaviors were observed during resting, eating and moving. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were sampled for 1 min every 15 min for 24 h. BP rhythm over 24 h was analyzed by the cosinor method and the mesor, amplitude, acrophase and percent rhythm were calculated. A total of 764 measurements were made in the light cycle and 721 in the dark cycle. Twenty-four-hour values (mean +/- SD) were obtained for SBP (121 +/- 22 mmHg), DBP (86 +/- 17 mmHg), mean BP (MBP, 98 +/- 18 mmHg) and heart rate (73 +/- 16 bpm). The SBP, DBP and MBP were significantly higher (unpaired Student t-test) during the light period (125 +/- 21, 88 +/- 15 and 100 +/- 17 mmHg, respectively) than during the dark period (120 +/- 21, 85 +/- 17 and 97 +/- 17 mmHg, respectively) and the acrophase occurred between 16:00 and 17:45 h. This circadian variation is similar to that observed in cats, dogs and marmosets. The BP decreased during "behavioral sleep" (MBP down from 110 +/- 19 to 90 +/- 19 mmHg at 21:00 to 8:00 h). Both feeding and moving induced an increase in MBP (96 +/- 17 to 119 +/- 17 mmHg at 17:00 h and 97 +/- 19 to 105 +/- 12 mmHg at 15:00 h, respectively). The results show that conscious sloths present biphasic circadian fluctuations in BP levels, which are higher during the light period and are mainly synchronized with feeding.

  13. Growth rates are related to production efficiencies in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Heflin, L E; Gibbs, V K; Jones, W T; Makowsky, R; Lawrence, A L; Watts, S A

    2013-09-01

    Growth rates of newly-metamorphosed urchins from a single spawning event (three males and three females) were highly variable, despite being held en masse under identical environmental and nutritional conditions. As individuals reached ~5 mm diameter (0.07-0.10 g wet weight), they were placed in growth trials (23 dietary treatments containing various nutrient profiles). Elapsed time from the first individual entering the growth trials to the last individual entering was 121 days (N = 170 individuals). During the five-week growth trials, urchins were held individually and proffered a limiting ration to evaluate growth rate and production efficiency. Growth rates among individuals within each dietary treatment remained highly variable. Across all dietary treatments, individuals with an initially high growth rate (entering the study first) continued to grow at a faster rate than those with an initially low growth rate (entering the study at a later date), regardless of feed intake. Wet weight gain (ranging from 0.13 -3.19 g, P < 0.0001, R(2) = 0.5801) and dry matter production efficiency (ranging from 25.2-180.5%, P = 0.0003, R(2) = 0.6162) were negatively correlated with stocking date, regardless of dietary treatment. Although canalization of growth rate during en masse early post-metamorphic growth is possible, we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in growth rates are, in part, the result of differences (possibly genetic) in production efficiencies of individual Lytechinus variegatus. That is, some sea urchins are more efficient in converting feed to biomass. We further hypothesize that this variation may have evolved as an adaptive response to selective pressure related to food availability.

  14. Growth rates are related to production efficiencies in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, L.E.; Gibbs, V.K.; Jones, W.T.; Makowsky, R.; Lawrence, A.L.; Watts, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Growth rates of newly-metamorphosed urchins from a single spawning event (three males and three females) were highly variable, despite being held en masse under identical environmental and nutritional conditions. As individuals reached ~5 mm diameter (0.07–0.10 g wet weight), they were placed in growth trials (23 dietary treatments containing various nutrient profiles). Elapsed time from the first individual entering the growth trials to the last individual entering was 121 days (N = 170 individuals). During the five-week growth trials, urchins were held individually and proffered a limiting ration to evaluate growth rate and production efficiency. Growth rates among individuals within each dietary treatment remained highly variable. Across all dietary treatments, individuals with an initially high growth rate (entering the study first) continued to grow at a faster rate than those with an initially low growth rate (entering the study at a later date), regardless of feed intake. Wet weight gain (ranging from 0.13 −3.19 g, P < 0.0001, R2 = 0.5801) and dry matter production efficiency (ranging from 25.2–180.5%, P = 0.0003, R2 = 0.6162) were negatively correlated with stocking date, regardless of dietary treatment. Although canalization of growth rate during en masse early post-metamorphic growth is possible, we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in growth rates are, in part, the result of differences (possibly genetic) in production efficiencies of individual Lytechinus variegatus. That is, some sea urchins are more efficient in converting feed to biomass. We further hypothesize that this variation may have evolved as an adaptive response to selective pressure related to food availability. PMID:25435593

  15. The contrasting roles of sedimentary plant-derived carbon and black carbon on sediment-spiked hydrophobic organic contaminant bioavailability to Diporeia species and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Mitra, Siddhartha; Landrum, Peter F; Gossiaux, Duane C; Gunnarsson, Jonas; Weston, Donald

    2005-04-01

    In bioavailability studies, the biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) is invoked to describe the thermodynamic partitioning of a hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) between the organism lipid and the organic carbon fraction of the sedimentary matrix and accounts for differences in bioavailability among sediments. Bioaccumulation experiments were performed with Lumbriculus variegatus and Diporeia species exposed in seven sediments dosed with 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) or pyrene (PY) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCBP). The BSAF values for the nonplanar HCBP were consistent with equilibrium partitioning theory (EQP) and averaged 2.87 for L. variegatus and 1.45 for Diporeia, while the BSAF values for the planar compounds (BaP, PY, TCBP) were generally lower than estimated from EQP (<1). Correcting the BSAF values of the planar compounds for enhanced sorption due to black carbon improved the BSAF values for L. variegatus, generally resulting in values consistent with EQP, but substantial variation remained for Diporeia. The BSAF values for the planar compounds showed significant positive correlations with plant-derived carbon in sediments (lignin and pigments) but were more consistent for L. variegatus than for Diporeia. These correlations imply that compounds sorbed to plant-derived carbon are more bioavailable since this material is more likely ingested providing a second exposure route.

  16. Temperature-dependent development, survival and potential distribution of Ischnodemus variegatus (Hemiptera: Blissidae), an herbivore of West Indian marsh grass (Hymenachne amplexicaulis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bug Ischnodemus variegatus (Signnoret) (Hemiptera: Blissidae) is a fortuitous herbivore of the invasive grass Hymenachne amplexicaulis (Poaceae). This grass is a problematic weed in Florida and Australia but a highly valued forage in Mexico, Cuba and Venezuela. We studied the influence of nine c...

  17. VITELLOGENIN MRNA REGULATION AND PLASMA CLEARANCE IN MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS AFTER CESSATION OF EXPOSURE TO 17B-ESTRADIOL AND P-NONYLPHENOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to determine the kinetics of hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA regulation and plasma VTG accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after cessation of exposure to either 17b-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (NP)...

  18. Exposure of Three Generations of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the Androgen 17β-trenbolone: Effects on Survival, Development, and Reproduction.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating long-term effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on a species is important to assessing the overall risk to the populations. This study reports the results of a 42-week exposure of estuarine sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the androgen, 17B-tre...

  19. Multigenerational Exposure of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to 17β-estradiol. I. Organism-Level Effects Over Three GenerationsLife Cycles

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on reproductive processes through two complete generations of the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, and determined the need for multiple generation exposure testing for assessing the risks of endocrine disrupting chemic...

  20. Effects of Louisiana crude oil on the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during a life-cycle exposure to laboratory oiled sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the long-term effects of crude oil exposure is critical for ascertaining population-level ecological risks of spill events. A 19-week complete life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to reference (uncont...

  1. ULCERATIVE AND NECROTIZING GASTRITIS IN A CAPTIVE SLOTH (BRADYPUS VARIEGATUS, XENARTHRA, BRADYPODIDAE) DUE TO SEVERE PARASITISM WITH PARALEIURIS LOCCHII (NEMATODA, SPIROCERCIDAE).

    PubMed

    Michel, Ana Flávia Ribeiro Machado; Silva, Fabiana Lessa; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; de Carvalho, Tatiane Furtado; Pinto, Jaqueline Maria Silva; Santos, Renato Lima

    2017-03-01

    This is the first reported case of lethal gastric parasitism by the nematode Paraleiuris locchii in a captive sloth ( Bradypus variegatus ). There were more than 600 parasites in the stomach of the sloth, associated with extensive areas of ulceration and necrosis. The animal developed emaciation, dehydration, and anemia that progressed to death.

  2. Exposure of Three Generations of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the Androgen 17β-trenbolone: Effects on Survival, Development, and Reproduction.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating long-term effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on a species is important to assessing the overall risk to the populations. This study reports the results of a 42-week exposure of estuarine sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the androgen, 17B-tre...

  3. Multigenerational Exposure of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to 17β-estradiol. I. Organism-Level Effects Over Three GenerationsLife Cycles

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on reproductive processes through two complete generations of the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, and determined the need for multiple generation exposure testing for assessing the risks of endocrine disrupting chemic...

  4. Effects of Louisiana crude oil on the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during a life-cycle exposure to laboratory oiled sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the long-term effects of crude oil exposure is critical for ascertaining population-level ecological risks of spill events. A 19-week complete life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to reference (uncont...

  5. Endocrine modulation and toxic effects of two commonly used UV screens on the aquatic invertebrates Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Claudia; Oetken, Matthias; Dittberner, Olaf; Wagner, Martin; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2008-03-01

    The two UV screens 3-benzylidene-camphor (3-BC) and 3-(4'-methylbenzylidene)-camphor (4-MBC) were tested regarding their toxicity and estrogenic activity. The Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) and two sediment assays with the freshwater invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Potamopyrgus antipodarum were performed. In the YES, both substances activated the human estrogen receptor alpha with EC50 values of 44.2 microM for 3-BC and 44.3 microM for 4-MBC, whereby 4-MBC attained only 8% of the maximal response of 17beta-estradiol. For P. antipodarum embryo production increased after exposure to both substances (EC50 of 4.60 microM 4-MBC=1.17 mg kg(-1)dw) while mortality increased at high concentrations. The reproduction of L. variegatus was decreased by 3-BC with an EC50 of 5.95 microM (=1.43 mg kg(-1)dw) and also by 4-MBC, where no EC50 could be calculated. While reproduction decreased, the worms' weight increased after exposure to 3-BC with an EC50 of 26.9 microM (=6.46 mg kg(-1) dw), hence the total biomass remained unaffected.

  6. The response of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and Temnochila chlorodia (Coleoptera: Trogossitidae) to Ips paraconfusus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) pheromone components and verbenone

    Treesearch

    Christopher J. Fettig; Stepehen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Robert R. Borys

    2007-01-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, 1860 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a common bark beetle species found throughout much of North America and China. In 2004, we observed that California fivespined ips, Ips paraconfusus Lanier, 1970 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), attack densities in logging debris were inversely related to D...

  7. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  8. Revision of Benedictus Scherer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The alpine flea beetle genus Benedictus Scherer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae) is revised. Twenty new species, namely B. chilalla, B. dochula, B. ha, B. nobding, B. thumsila and B. yatongla from Bhutan, B. belousovi, B. cangshanicus, B. kabaki, B. kurbatovi, B. nigrinus, B. sichuanensis a...

  9. Biological responses of Lumbriculus variegatus exposed to fluoranthene-spiked sediment.

    PubMed

    Landrum, P F; Gedeon, M L; Burton, G A; Greenberg, M S; Rowland, C D

    2002-04-01

    Lumbriculus variegatus was used as a bioassay organism to examine the impact of the sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene on behavior, reproduction, and toxicokinetics. The number of worms increased between the beginning and end of the experiment at 59 microg x g(-1) fluoranthene, but at the next higher treatment (108 microg x g(-1)) the number of worms found was lower and not different from the control. Worms exposed to 95 microg x g(-1) also exhibited increased reproduction when fed a yeast-cerophyl-trout chow mixture. On a total biomass basis, only the 95 microg x g(-1) exposure with food exhibited a statistically significant increase over the nonfed control. Evaluation of reproduction at the two highest treatments was compromised by a brief aeration failure 2 days before the end of the experiment. The behavioral responses were followed as changes in biological burial rate (sediment reworking rate) of a 137Cs-labeled marker layer. The biological burial rate increased toward a plateau as the concentration increased from the control (3.9 microg x g(-1) dry weight total PAH) to 355 microg x g(-1) dry weight fluoranthene in sediment. The aeration failure had minimal impact on the determination of reworking rate because all the data for the rate determination were collected prior to the aeration failure. Uptake and elimination rates declined with increasing treatment concentration across the range of fluoranthene concentrations, 59-355 microg x g(-1) dry weight sediment. The disconnect between the increasing biological burial rates and the decreasing toxicokinetics rates with increasing exposure concentration demonstrates that the toxicokinetic processes are dominated by uptake and elimination to interstitial water. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in the organisms on a wet weight basis divided by the concentration in sediment on a dry weight basis) ranged from 0.92 to 1.88 on day 10 and declined to a range of 0.52 to 0.99 on

  10. The effects of dietary silver on larval growth in the echinoderm Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Brix, Kevin V; Gillette, Phillip; Pourmand, Ali; Capo, Tom R; Grosell, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the euryhaline copepod Acartia tonsa is extremely sensitive to dietborne silver (Ag) exposure, with a 20 % inhibition (EC(20)) of survival occurring when copepods are fed algae with 1.6 μg g(-1) dry weight (dw) Ag, corresponding to a waterborne Ag concentration of 0.46 μg l(-1) Ag. In contrast, 43 μg l(-1) Ag is required to elicit similar effects in copepods exposed to Ag by way of water. In the current study, we investigated whether another planktonic marine organism might also be sensitive to dietary Ag. Specifically, we tested larvae of the echinoderm, Lytechinus variegatus in an 18-day study in which larvae were continuously exposed to Ag-laden algae (Isochrysis galbana). After 7 days of exposure, no significant effects were observed on larval growth up to the highest concentration tested (10.68 μg g(-1) dw Ag in algae after exposure to 3.88 μg l(-1) waterborne Ag). After 18 days, significant effects were observed in all Ag treatments resulting in a lowest-observable effect concentration of 0.68 μg g(-1) dw Ag in algae and corresponding waterborne Ag concentration of 0.05-0.07 μg l(-1) Ag (depending on background Ag [see Results]). However, the dose-response relationship was quite flat with a similar level of growth inhibition (approximately 15 %) in all Ag treatments, resulting in an EC(20) of >10.68 μg g(-1) dw Ag in algae (>3.88 μg l(-1) Ag in water). This flat dose-response relationship is characteristic of dietary metal (silver, copper, cadmium, nickel, and zinc) toxicity to copepods as well, although the effect is slightly more robust (approximately 20-30 % inhibition of survival or reproduction). We conclude that echinoderm larvae may be similar to copepods in their sensitivity to dietary Ag, although a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the apparent flat dose-response relationships is clearly needed.

  11. Changes in polyamine content and localization of Pinus sylvestris ADC and Suillus variegatus ODC mRNA transcripts during the formation of mycorrhizal interaction in an in vitro cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Karoliina; Sutela, Suvi; Häggman, Hely; Scagel, Carolyn; Vuosku, Jaana; Jokela, Anne; Sarjala, Tytti

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of polyamines (PAs) in the interaction between Pinus sylvestris L. seedlings and an ectomycorrhizal fungus Suillus variegatus (Swatz: Fr.) O. Kunze was studied in an in vitro cultivation system. PA concentrations in seedlings were analysed after 1, 3, and 5 weeks in dual culture with S. variegatus, and changes in PA pools were compared with the growth of the seedlings. Pinus sylvestris arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and S. variegatus ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) mRNA transcripts were localized during the formation of mycorrhizas. During mycorrhiza formation, Suillus variegatus ODC transcripts were found in developing hyphal mantle and Hartig net, and P. sylvestris ADC transcripts in specific root parenchyma cells adjacent to tracheids and in mitotic cells of the root apical meristem. However, no unambiguous difference in ADC transcript localization between inoculated and non-inoculated roots was observed. Regardless of the unchanged distribution of ADC transcripts, inoculation with S. variegatus increased free putrescine, spermidine, and spermine concentrations in roots within the first week in dual culture. The concentration of free and conjugated putrescine and conjugated spermidine also increased in the needles due to the fungus. The fungus-induced lateral root formation and main root elongation were greatest between the first and third week in dual culture, coinciding with retarded accumulation or a decrease of free PAs. These results show that accumulation of PAs in the host plant is one of the first indicators of the establishment of ectomycorrhizal interaction between P. sylvestris and S. variegatus in the in vitro system.

  12. [Structure analysis of mtDNA control region of spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and its related species].

    PubMed

    He, Chong-Bo; Cao, Jie; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Zun-Chun; Ge, Long-Li; Gao, Xiang-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2007-07-01

    Spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) is the only species of Genus Verasper in China. The fish was naturally distributed in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea in northern China and Kyushu in Japan and in Korean sea area. Using PCR product direct sequencing, mitochondrial control region sequences of 24 individuals of spotted halibut was confirmed and analyzed. 4 control region haplotypes, resulting from length heteroplamy of the tandem repeat region, was obtained from these 24 fish. Sequence analysis demonstrated that there were four similar structures in the control region, i.e., extended terminal associated sequences (ETAS), central conserved sequence block (CSB), conserved sequence block (CSB), and repeat region, in V. moseri, Limanda ferruginea, Reinhardtius hippoglossoides, Heppoglossoides platessoides, Paralichthys olivaceous, Solea solea, S. senegalensis, and S. lascari. By comparing with other vertebrates, we found that there were similar repeated sequences immediately after the CSB-3 in all of the anuran species.

  13. Salinity and temperature effects on chronic toxicity of 2,4-dinitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol to sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    SciTech Connect

    Linton, T.K. ); Mayer, F.L. . Environmental Protection Agency); Simon, T.L. . Environmental Protection Agency); Malone, J.A. . Environmental Protection Agency); Marking, L.L. . Fish and Wildlife Service)

    1994-01-01

    Toxicity tests were conducted to determine the effects of nine combinations of salinity and temperature on the toxicity of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). The highest tested concentration having no observed effect (NOEC) on mortality and growth was derived weekly. The NOECs at test termination indicated that the survival and growth of fish exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol were not significantly affected by salinity, temperature, or the salinity temperature interaction. However, 28-d NOECs of fish surviving from 4-nitrophenol exposures were significantly affected by temperature, but the highest value exceeded the lowest by only a factor of two. The overall data suggest that variations of salinity and temperature do not change the NOEC; only the exposure time required to attain the same NOEC is altered.

  14. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H J H; Temmink, H; Buisman, C J N

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates.

  15. Modeling lead bioavailability and bioaccumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus using artificial particles. Potential use in chemical remediation processes.

    PubMed

    Miño, Lelia A; Folco, Sabina; Pechén de D'Angelo, Ana M; Verrengia Guerrero, Noemí R

    2006-04-01

    Artificial particles, specifically a diverse selection of chromatographical resins, have been recommended and used as a useful experimental model to predict the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of sediment-bound organic chemicals. In this work the same experimental model was adopted to investigate the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of lead by the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Particle-water partition coefficients were also determined. Sand particles and the anionic exchange resin promoted a similar uptake and bioaccumulation of lead. Instead, in the presence of the cationic exchanger the metal was not detected in the animals. For neutral particles, the uptake and accumulation depended on the chemistry of the functional groups at the active sites. In addition, a significant negative correlation was found between bioaccumulation and the particle-water partition coefficients. These studies may help to develop alternative methods for chemical remediation of lead-contaminated aquatic systems.

  16. Effects of platinum (Pt4+) on Lumbriculus variegatus Müller (Annelida, Oligochaetae): acute toxicity and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Veltz, I; Arsac, F; Biagianti-Risbourg, S; Habets, F; Lechenault, H; Vernet, G

    1996-07-01

    The acute toxicity and bioaccumulation (rates, kinetic) of tetravalent platinum in Lumbriculus variegatus under different physicochemical conditions (temperature and total water hardness) were investigated. Increased Pt4+ concentration (from 0.05 to 50 mg/L), exposure (up to 30 days), temperature (from 4 to 20 degrees C) and decreasing water hardness (from 300 to 0 mg/L CaCO3) increased Pt toxicity. The metal accumulated at a constant rate that was concentration, temperature and time dependent. The median lethal concentration (96h LC50) varied greatly from 0.397 mg/L in distilled water to 30 mg/L in the hard water from Champagne. Thus, L. var. can tolerate high levels of Pt. As a result, L. var. can be used in the laboratory to analyze mechanisms of adaptation to the induced stress and in the field as an indicator of Pt pollution.

  17. Bioaccumulation of PAHs from creosote-contaminated sediment in a laboratory-exposed freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tarja; Oikari, Aimo

    2004-10-01

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was used for a bioaccumulation assay in the creosote-contaminated sediment of Lake Jämsänvesi in a 28-day experiment. The PAH concentrations of the whole body tissue of worms, sediments and water samples were determinated by GC-MS. Chemical analyses showed that benzo(k)fluoranthene, anthracene and fluorene were the main PAH compounds present in the tissue of oligochaetes, just as in the sediment. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) of the individual PAHs varied from 1.2 to 5.7. It is concluded that oligochaetes have a marked ability to accumulate and retain PAHs from creosote-contaminated sediment.

  18. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H. J. H.; Temmink, H.; Buisman, C. J. N.

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates. PMID:26937632

  19. Juvenile growth of the tropical sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus exposed to near-future ocean acidification scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Rebecca; Bland, Charnelle; Gillette, Phillip; Serafy, Joseph E.; Langdon, Chris; Capo, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of elevated pCO2 exposure on the juvenile growth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, we reared individuals for three months in one of three target pCO2 levels: ambient seawater (380 µatm) and two scenarios that are projected to occur by the middle (560 µatm) and end (800 µatm) of this century. At the end of 89 days, urchins reared at ambient pCO2 weighed 12% more than those reared at 560 µatm and 28% more than those reared at 800 µatm. Skeletons were analyzed using scanning electron miscroscopy, revealing degradation of spines in urchins reared at elevated pCO2 (800 µatm). Our results indicate that elevated pCO2 levels projected to occur this century may adversely affect the development of juvenile sea urchins. Acidification-induced changes to juvenile urchin development would likely impair performance and functioning of juvenile stages with implications for adult populations. PMID:22833691

  20. Juvenile growth of the tropical sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus exposed to near-future ocean acidification scenarios.

    PubMed

    Albright, Rebecca; Bland, Charnelle; Gillette, Phillip; Serafy, Joseph E; Langdon, Chris; Capo, Thomas R

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of elevated pCO(2) exposure on the juvenile growth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, we reared individuals for three months in one of three target pCO(2) levels: ambient seawater (380 µatm) and two scenarios that are projected to occur by the middle (560 µatm) and end (800 µatm) of this century. At the end of 89 days, urchins reared at ambient pCO(2) weighed 12% more than those reared at 560 µatm and 28% more than those reared at 800 µatm. Skeletons were analyzed using scanning electron miscroscopy, revealing degradation of spines in urchins reared at elevated pCO(2) (800 µatm). Our results indicate that elevated pCO(2) levels projected to occur this century may adversely affect the development of juvenile sea urchins. Acidification-induced changes to juvenile urchin development would likely impair performance and functioning of juvenile stages with implications for adult populations.

  1. Toxicokinetics, toxicity and lethal body residues of two chlorophenols in the oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, in different sediments.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Anna; Halme, Anssi; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2003-04-01

    Bioavailability, toxicokinetics and toxicity (LC(50)) of water- and sediment-associated 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were measured in Lumbriculus variegatus Müller in a set of experiments. The critical body residue approach was applied by measuring also the lethal body residues (LBR(50)). Freshwater and three different sediments with various sediment organic carbon (SOC) concentrations were used as exposure media. SOC decreased the bioavailability of both chlorophenols, and the uptake rates decreased by 81% and 91% for 2,4,5-TCP and PCP, respectively, in the sediment with a SOC of 6.9% compared to those in sediment with a SOC of 0.5%. SOC appeared to be an important factor controlling the bioavailability as after the carbon normalisation the difference between the sediments was much smaller. The 96-h LC(50) values for instance for PCP were 145.3 microg/l in freshwater, and 6.8 and 8.1 microg/g dry weight in sediments with SOC concentrations of 0.5% and 2.4%, respectively. The LBR(50) values, were practically the same in freshwater and sediments: between 1.0 and 1.6 and from 0.4 to 0.9 micromol/g wet weight for 2,4,5-TCP and PCP, respectively, demonstrating the usefulness of this method for accurate, and more comparable, measurement of toxicity of chemicals with the same mode of toxic action in varying conditions. L. variegatus expressed a dose-response sediment avoidance behaviour but the PCP tissue concentrations were not affected by this behaviour.

  2. The bioaccumulation and effects of selenium in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus via dissolved and dietary exposure routes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lingtian; Wu, Xing; Chen, Hongxing; Luo, Yongju; Guo, Zhongbao; Mu, Jingli; Blankson, Emmanuel R; Dong, Wu; Klerks, Paul L

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic organisms take up selenium from solution and from their diets. Many questions remain regarding the relative importance of selenium accumulation from these sources and resulting effects in benthic invertebrates. The present study addressed the toxicity and accumulation of Se via dissolved and dietary exposures to three different Se species, in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Worms were exposed to 20μg/g dry weight of selenite (Se(IV)), selenate (Se(VI)), or seleno-l-methionine (Se-Met) in their diet (sediment) or to 15μg/L dissolved Se in water-only exposures. While the dissolved and sediment Se levels differed greatly, such levels may co-occur at a Se-contaminated site. Se accumulation, worm population growth, lipid peroxidation (as TBARS), and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were quantified at the end of the 2-week exposure. The sediment Se-Met exposure caused 100% mortality, while worm densities were reduced by the other exposures except the Se(VI) one. Se bioaccumulation was generally higher for the sediment-Se exposure than the dissolved-Se ones, and was higher for Se(IV) than Se(VI) in the dissolved-Se exposure but not the sediment-Se one. The Se accumulation was highest for Se-Met. The oligochaetes that accumulated Se had higher levels of lipid peroxidation and reduced Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. The present study's findings of differences in Se accumulation and toxicity for the three Se species, with effects generally but not exclusively a function of Se body burdens, underscore the need for research on these issues in invertebrates. Moreover, the results imply that the dietary uptake route is the predominant one for Se accumulation in L. variegatus.

  3. An abundance of Epsilonproteobacteria revealed in the gut microbiome of the laboratory cultured sea urchin, Lytechinus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Joseph A.; Koo, Hyunmin; Dennis, Lacey N.; Kumar, Ranjit; Ptacek, Travis; Morrow, Casey D.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Powell, Mickie L.; Bej, Asim K.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have examined the bacterial community composition of the laboratory cultured sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus gut microbiome and its culture environment using NextGen amplicon sequencing of the V4 segment of the 16S rRNA gene, and downstream bioinformatics tools. Overall, the gut and tank water was dominated by Proteobacteria, whereas the feed consisted of a co-occurrence of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes at a high abundance. The gut tissue represented Epsilonproteobacteria as dominant, with order Campylobacterales at the highest relative abundance (>95%). However, the pharynx tissue was dominated by class Alphaproteobacteria. The gut digesta and egested fecal pellets had a high abundance of class Gammaproteobacteria, from which Vibrio was found to be the primary genus, and Epsilonproteobacteria, with genus Arcobacter occurring at a moderate level. At the class level, the tank water was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the feed by Alphaproteobacteria. Multi-Dimensional Scaling analysis showed that the microbial community of the gut tissue clustered together, as did the pharynx tissue to the feed. The gut digesta and egested fecal pellets showed a similarity relationship to the tank water. Further analysis of Campylobacterales at a lower taxonomic level using the oligotyping method revealed 37 unique types across the 10 samples, where Oligotype 1 was primarily represented in the gut tissue. BLAST analysis identified Oligotype 1 to be Arcobacter sp., Sulfuricurvum sp., and Arcobacter bivalviorum at an identity level >90%. This study showed that although distinct microbial communities are evident across multiple components of the sea urchin gut ecosystem, there is a noticeable correlation between the overall microbial communities of the gut with the sea urchin L. variegatus culture environment. PMID:26528245

  4. Genomes of Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Lytechinus variegatus: are there any genomic explanations for the two order of magnitude difference in the lifespan of sea urchins?

    PubMed

    Sergiev, Petr V; Artemov, Artem A; Prokhortchouk, Egor B; Dontsova, Olga A; Berezkin, Grigory V

    2016-02-01

    Sea urchins are marine invertebrates of extreme diversity of life span. Red sea urchin S. franciscanus is among the longest living creatures of the Ocean. Its lifetime is estimated to exceed a century, while the green sea urchin L. variegatus hardly survives more than four years. We sequenced and compared the genomes of these animals aiming at determination of the genetic basis of their longevity difference. List of genes related to the longevity of other animal species was created and used for homology search among the genomic data obtained in this study. Amino acid sequences of longevity related proteins of S. fransciscanus and L. variegatus as well as from a set of model species, were aligned and grouped on the basis of the species lifespan. Amino acid residues specific for a longevity group were identified. Proteins containing amino acids whose identity correlated with the lifespan were clustered on the basis of their function.

  5. Genomes of Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Lytechinus variegatus: are there any genomic explanations for the two order of magnitude difference in the lifespan of sea urchins?

    PubMed Central

    Sergiev, Petr V.; Artemov, Artem A.; Prokhortchouk, Egor B.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Berezkin, Grigory V.

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins are marine invertebrates of extreme diversity of life span. Red sea urchin S. franciscanus is among the longest living creatures of the Ocean. Its lifetime is estimated to exceed a century, while the green sea urchin L. variegatus hardly survives more than four years. We sequenced and compared the genomes of these animals aiming at determination of the genetic basis of their longevity difference. List of genes related to the longevity of other animal species was created and used for homology search among the genomic data obtained in this study. Aminoacid sequences of longevity related proteins of S. franciscanus and L. variegatus as well as from a set of model species, were aligned and grouped on the basis of the species lifespan. Aminoacid residues specific for a longevity group were identified. Proteins containing aminoacids whose identity correlated with the lifespan were clustered on the basis of their function. PMID:26851889

  6. Application of a unique test design to determine the chronic toxicity of boron to the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus and fatmucket mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea.

    PubMed

    Hall, Scott; Lockwood, Rick; Harrass, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    The chronic (21- and 28-day) toxicity of boron was determined for two freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates: the fatmucket mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea and the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus. The rapid depletion of boric acid from spiked sediments in tests using flow-through overlying waters was addressed by constant addition of boric acid to overlying water at concentrations matching those of the targeted porewater exposures. This proved highly successful in maintaining constant whole-sediment and sediment porewater boron concentrations. Boron sublethal 25 % inhibition concentration values based on porewater concentrations were 25.9 mg B/L (L. variegatus) and 38.5 mg B/L (L. siliquoidea), indicating similar test organism sensitivity. Expressed as dry whole-sediment values, the respective L. variegatus and L. siliquoidea sublethal (growth) IC25 values for whole-sediment exposures were 235.5 mg B/kg sediment dry weight (dw) and 310.6 mg B/kg dw. The worm lethality-based end points indicated greater sensitivity than the sublethal end points, bringing into question the validity of a "lethality" end point for L. variegatus given its fragmentation mode of reproduction. For comparison, water-only mussel exposures were tested resulting in an IC25 value of 34.6 mg B/L, which was within 20 % of the porewater value. This suggests that the primary route of boron exposure was through the aqueous phase. The results of this study indicated that for test materials that are readily water soluble, standard sediment test designs may be unsuitable, but water-only exposures can provide toxicological data representative of sediment tests.

  7. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in long-term tests with the freshwater benthic invertebrates Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.W.; Ankley, G.T.; Nichols, J.W.; Elonen, G.E.; Nessa, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    Two species of freshwater benthic invertebrates, Chronomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus, were exposed to three dietary concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and toxicity and bioaccumulation were determined. No toxic effects were observed in full life cycle tests with either species at tissue residue concentrations up to 9,533 ng TCDD/g lipid. The observed lack of sensitivity of the two species to TCDD was consistent with a presumed absence of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in aquatic invertebrates. Predictions of lipid-normalized tissue concentrations were made based on lipid-normalized TCDD concentrations in the food and were within 15% of targeted concentrations in both species. Depuration studies indicated that TCDD elimination followed first-order kinetics, with elimination rate constants of 0.0014 to 0.0022 h{sup {minus}1} for L. variegatus and 0.0070 to 0.0099 h{sup {minus}1} for C. tentans. Half-lives ranged from 315 to 495 h in L. variegatus and from 70 to 99 h in C. tentans. The ability of invertebrates to accumulate relatively high concentrations of TCDD in the absence of toxic effects may be relevant to the transfer of contaminants through aquatic food webs to potentially sensitive vertebrate species.

  8. Bioaccumulation of perfluorinated carboxylates and sulfonates and polychlorinated biphenyls in laboratory-cultured Hexagenia spp., Lumbriculus variegatus and Pimephales promelas from field-collected sediments.

    PubMed

    Prosser, R S; Mahon, K; Sibley, P K; Poirier, D; Watson-Leung, T

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and perfluorinated carboxylates and sulfonates (PFASs) are persistent pollutants in sediment that can potentially bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. The current study investigates variation in the accumulation of PCBs and PFASs in laboratory-cultured Hexagenia spp., Lumbriculus variegatus and Pimephales promelas from contaminated field-collected sediment using 28-day tests. BSAF(lipid) (lipid-normalized biota-sediment accumulation factor) values for total concentration of PCBs were greater in Hexagenia spp. relative to L. variegatus and P. promelas. The distribution of congeners contributing to the total concentration of PCBs in tissue varied among the three species. Trichlorobiphenyl congeners composed the greatest proportion of the total concentration of PCBs in L. variegatus while tetra- and pentabiphenyl congeners dominated in Hexagenia spp. and P. promelas. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was present in all three species at concentrations greater than all other PFASs analyzed. Hexagenia spp. also produced the greatest BSAF(lipid) and BSAF(ww) (non-lipid-normalized biota-sediment accumulation factor) values for PFOS relative to the other two species. However, this was not the case for all PFASs. The trend of BSAF values and number of carbon atoms in the perfluoroalkyl chain of perfluorinated carboxylates varied among the three species but was similar for perfluorinated sulfonates. Differences in the dominant pathways of exposure (e.g., water, sediment ingestion) likely explain a large proportion of the variation in accumulation observed across the three species.

  9. Parasitism and olfactory responses of Dastarcus helophoroides (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) to different Cerambycid hosts

    Treesearch

    Jian-Rong Wei; Zhong-Qi Yang; Therese M. Poland; Jia-Wei. Du

    2009-01-01

    Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) is an important natural enemy of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It is distributed throughout most Provinces in China. We investigated whether there were differences among D. helophoroides populations collected from different hosts in different...

  10. PRODUCTION AND ECONOMIC OPTIMIZATION OF DIETARY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE IN THE CULTURE OF JUVENILE SEA URCHIN Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura E; Makowsky, Robert; Taylor, J Christopher; Williams, Michael B; Lawrence, Addison L; Watts, Stephen A

    2016-10-01

    Juvenile Lytechinus variegatus (ca. 3.95± 0.54 g) were fed one of 10 formulated diets with different protein (ranging from 11- 43%) and carbohydrate (12 or 18%; brackets determined from previous studies) levels. Urchins (n= 16 per treatment) were fed a daily sub-satiation ration equivalent to 2.0% of average body weight for 10 weeks. Our objective was (1) to create predictive models of growth, production and efficiency outcomes and (2) to generate economic analysis models in relation to these dietary outcomes for juvenile L. variegatus held in culture. At dietary protein levels below ca. 30%, models for most growth and production outcomes predicted increased rates of growth and production among urchins fed diets containing 18% dietary carbohydrate levels as compared to urchins fed diets containing 12% dietary carbohydrate. For most outcomes, growth and production was predicted to increase with increasing level of dietary protein up to ca. 30%, after which, no further increase in growth and production were predicted. Likewise, dry matter production efficiency was predicted to increase with increasing protein level up to ca. 30%, with urchins fed diets with 18% carbohydrate exhibiting greater efficiency than those fed diets with 12% carbohydrate. The energetic cost of dry matter production was optimal at protein levels less than those required for maximal weight gain and gonad production, suggesting an increased energetic cost (decreased energy efficiency) is required to increase gonad production relative to somatic growth. Economic analysis models predict when cost of feed ingredients are low, the lowest cost per gram of wet weight gain will occur at 18% dietary carbohydrate and ca. 25- 30% dietary protein. In contrast, lowest cost per gram of wet weight gain will occur at 12% dietary carbohydrate and ca. 35- 40% dietary protein when feed ingredient costs are high or average. For both 18 and 12% levels of dietary carbohydrate, cost per gram of wet weight gain is

  11. The genus Leptostylopsis of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Acanthocinini)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The generic differences and similarities between Leptostylus LeConte and Leptostylopsis Dillon (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Acanthocinini) are discussed. Leptostylopsis is redescribed and the following species are transferred from Leptostylus to Leptostylopsis: Leptostylopsis annulipes (Fisher 1942)...

  12. Host plant preference in Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field and laboratory-choice tests were conducted to better understand host plant preference by the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in Virginia. In laboratory olfactometer studies, L. decemlineata preferred potato over both tomato and eggplant foli...

  13. New synonymy in Cuban Tilloclytus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Anaglyptini)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Examination of holotypes of Tilloclytus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Anaglyptini) in the Fernando de Zayas collection (Havana, Cuba) and the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University reveals that T. elongatus Zayas (1975) is a new synonym of T. rufipes Fisher (1942)....

  14. Tumidusternus, a new genus of Aspidimerini from China (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lizhi; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Xiaosheng; Wang, Xingmin; Ren, Shunxiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumidusternus gen. n., along with Tumidusternus fujianensis sp. n. (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Aspidimerini) from China is described and illustrated. A key to the tribe Aspidimerini is given. PMID:26257552

  15. Methiini and Oemini of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of Methiini (Tessaropa hispaniolae Lingafelter, Methia dolichoptera) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) from Hispaniola are diagnosed, described, and illustrated. The Dominican Republic represents a New Country Record for Malacopterus tenellus (Fabricius) (Oemini), and all hispaniolan local...

  16. Sequence and organization of the complete mitochondrial genomes of spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and barfin flounder (Verasper moseri).

    PubMed

    He, Chongbo; Han, Jiabo; Ge, Longli; Zhou, Zunchun; Gao, Xianggang; Mu, Yunlei; Liu, Weidong; Cao, Jie; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2008-06-01

    In this work, the mitochondrial genomes for spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and barfin flounder (Verasper moseri) were completely sequenced. The entire mitochondrial genome sequences of the spotted halibut and barfin flounder were 17,273 and 17,588 bp in length, respectively. The organization of the two mitochondrial genomes was similar to those reported from other fish mitochondrial genomes containing 37 genes (2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and 13 protein-coding genes) and two non-coding regions (control region (CR) and WANCY region). In the CR, the termination associated sequence (ETAS), six central conserved block (CSB-A,B,C,D,E,F), three conserved sequence blocks (CSB1-3) and a region of 61-bp tandem repeat cluster at the end of CSB-3 were identified by similarity comparison with fishes and other vertebrates. The tandem repeat sequences show polymorphism among the different individuals of the two species. The complete mitochondrial genomes of spotted halibut and barfin flounder should be useful for evolutionary studies of flatfishes and other vertebrate species.

  17. Perfluorinated chemicals in surface waters and sediments from northwest Georgia, USA, and their bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, Peter J.; Washington, John W.; Hassan, Sayed M.; Jenkins, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) were measured in surface waters and sediments from the Coosa River watershed in northwest Georgia, USA, to examine their distribution downstream of a suspected source. Samples from eight sites were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sediments were also used in 28-d exposures with the aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, to assess PFC bioaccumulation. Concentrations of PFCs in surface waters and sediments increased significantly below a land-application site (LAS) of municipal/industrial wastewater and were further elevated by unknown sources downstream. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with eight or fewer carbons were the most prominent in surface waters. Those with 10 or more carbons predominated sediment and tissue samples. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the major homolog in contaminated sediments and tissues. This pattern among sediment PFC concentrations was consistent among sites and reflected homolog concentrations emanating from the LAS. Concentrations of PFCs in oligochaete tissues revealed patterns similar to those observed in the respective sediments. The tendency to bioaccumulate increased with PFCA chain length and the presence of the sulfonate moiety. Biota-sediment accumulation factors indicated that short-chain PFCAs with fewer than seven carbons may be environmentally benign alternatives in aquatic ecosystems; however, sulfonates with four to seven carbons may be as likely to bioaccumulate as PFOS.

  18. Perfluorinated chemicals in surface waters and sediments from northwest Georgia, USA, and their bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Lasier, Peter J; Washington, John W; Hassan, Sayed M; Jenkins, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Concentrations of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) were measured in surface waters and sediments from the Coosa River watershed in northwest Georgia, USA, to examine their distribution downstream of a suspected source. Samples from eight sites were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sediments were also used in 28-d exposures with the aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, to assess PFC bioaccumulation. Concentrations of PFCs in surface waters and sediments increased significantly below a land-application site (LAS) of municipal/industrial wastewater and were further elevated by unknown sources downstream. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with eight or fewer carbons were the most prominent in surface waters. Those with 10 or more carbons predominated sediment and tissue samples. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the major homolog in contaminated sediments and tissues. This pattern among sediment PFC concentrations was consistent among sites and reflected homolog concentrations emanating from the LAS. Concentrations of PFCs in oligochaete tissues revealed patterns similar to those observed in the respective sediments. The tendency to bioaccumulate increased with PFCA chain length and the presence of the sulfonate moiety. Biota-sediment accumulation factors indicated that short-chain PFCAs with fewer than seven carbons may be environmentally benign alternatives in aquatic ecosystems; however, sulfonates with four to seven carbons may be as likely to bioaccumulate as PFOS.

  19. Bioaccumulation kinetics of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane from field-collected sediment in the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baozhong; Li, Huizhen; Wei, Yanli; You, Jing

    2013-12-01

    The extensive use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) has made them widespread contaminants in abiotic environments, but data regarding their bioavailability to benthic organisms are sparse. The bioaccumulation potential of PBDEs and DBDPE from field-collected sediment was evaluated in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus using a 49-d exposure, including a 28-d uptake and a 21-d elimination phase. All PBDEs and DBDPE were bioavailable to the worms with biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) ranging from 0.0210 g organic carbon/g lipid to 4.09 g organic carbon/g lipid. However, the bioavailability of highly brominated compounds (BDE-209 and DBDPE) was poor compared with that of other PBDEs, and this was confirmed by their relatively low freely dissolved concentrations (C(free)) measured by solid-phase microextraction. The inverse correlation between BSAFs and hydrophobicity was explained by their uptake (k(s)) and elimination (k(e)) rate constants. While ke changed little for PBDEs, ks decreased significantly when chemical hydrophobicity increased. The difference in bioaccumulation kinetics of brominated flame retardants in fish and the worms was explained by their physiological difference and the presence of multiple elimination routes. The appropriateness of 28-d bioaccumulation testing for BSAF estimation was validated for PBDEs and DBDPE. In addition, C(free) was shown to be a good indicator of bioavailability.

  20. Bioaccumulation of glyphosate and its formulation Roundup Ultra in Lumbriculus variegatus and its effects on biotransformation and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Klingelmann, Eva; Wiegand, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    The bioaccumulation potential of glyphosate and the formulation Roundup Ultra, as well as possible effects on biotransformation and antioxidant enzymes in Lumbriculus variegatus were compared by four days exposure to concentrations between 0.05 and 5 mg L(-1) pure glyphosate and its formulation. Bioaccumulation was determined using (14)C labeled glyphosate. The bioaccumulation factor (BCF) varied between 1.4 and 5.9 for the different concentrations, and was higher than estimated from logP(ow). Glyphosate and its surfactant POEA caused elevation of biotransformation enzyme soluble glutathione S-transferase at non-toxic concentrations. Membrane bound glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly elevated in Roundup Ultra exposed worms, compared to treatment with equal glyphosate concentrations, but did not significantly differ from the control. Antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase was significantly increased by glyphosate but in particular by Roundup Ultra exposure indicating oxidative stress. The results show that the formulation Roundup Ultra is of more ecotoxicological relevance than the glyphosate itself.

  1. Chronic exposure of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs): bioavailability and effects on reproduction.

    PubMed

    Paumen, Miriam León; Stol, Paul; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Kraak, Michiel H S; Van Gestel, Cornelius A M; Admiraal, Wim

    2008-05-01

    This study aimed to monitor PAC availability to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus during 28 days of exposure to spiked sediments, in order to obtain reliable chronic effect concentrations for reproduction. Sediment toxicity tests were performed using three pairs of PAC isomers: two homocyclic compounds (anthracene and phenanthrene), two azaarenes (acridine and phenanthridine), and the two main transformation products of the azaarenes (acridone and phenanthridone). During the experiment, available PAC concentrations in pore water (estimated using solid phase microextraction) decreased more than total PAC concentrations in the sediment. Relating effect concentrations to PAC concentrations in pore water and in organisms showed that the two homocyclic compounds caused narcotic effects during chronic exposure, but only one of the four tested heterocyclic PACs caused narcotic effects. The transformation product phenanthridone was not toxic at the tested concentrations (up to 4000 micromol/kg dry sediment), whereas EC50 values for the parent compound phenanthridine and the isomer acridone were below the estimated limit for narcosis, suggesting a specific mode of action. These results demonstrated the unpredictable (isomer) specific toxicity of azaarenes and their transformation products, emphasizing the need of chronic toxicity testing to gain insight into the long-term effects of heterocyclic PACs, which have been overlooked in risk assessment.

  2. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.W.; Ankley, G.T.; Elonen, G.E.; Phipps, G.W.; Fernandez, J.D.; Libal, J.J.; Nessa, D.

    1994-12-31

    Invertebrate exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD is important, not necessarily because of their sensitivity (which appears to be less than that of fish) , but as a vector from chemical reservoirs in sediments, through the food chain, to sensitive species. Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus are not only vectors for TCDD to fish species, but C. tentans may also be a direct vector to avian species which feed upon emergent insects. For this reason determination of the kinetics of TCDD uptake by invertebrates is important, especially for those with short life spans such as midges, or those that reproduce as rapidly as oligochaetes. In these experiments, these two species were fed contaminated food at three different TCDD levels spanning three orders of magnitude. Tissue residue levels were measured over a time period which included several different life stages and points in the reproductive cycle of the two species and uptake and deputation rates determined. As expected, no significant impacts of TCDD on growth, reproduction or biomass of the invertebrates were observed. From this information predictions can be made on bioaccumulation of TCDD from differing levels of contamination, and potential food chain transfer of the compound to more sensitive species.

  3. Bioavailability of polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in biosolids and spiked sediment to the aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Hale, Robert C

    2005-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have become distributed ubiquitously in the environment. High concentrations have been reported in U.S. sewage sludge (biosolids). The burgeoning practice of land-applying biosolids as fertilizer creates an avenue for reintroduction of PBDEs to surface waters and aquatic sediments. Bioavailability of biosolids- and sediment-associated PBDEs was assessed using the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Oligochaetes were exposed to composted biosolids (1,600 ng/g total PBDEs) and artificial sediment spiked with penta- and deca-brominated diphenyl ether (BDE) formulations (1,300 ng/g total PBDEs). Uptake (28-d exposure) and depuration (21 d) of eight congeners were studied. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in both substrates were bioavailable, but bioaccumulation was 5 to 10 times greater from spiked artificial sediment. The congeners BDE 47 and BDE 99 were the most prevalent congeners in oligochaetes after exposure. Congener BDE 47 was more bioaccumulative, possibly due to the threefold greater depuration rate of BDE 99. Bioaccumulation of penta- and hexa-brominated congeners appeared to be affected more strongly by substitution pattern than degree of bromination. Uptake of BDE 209, the dominant congener in deca-BDE, was minimal. Accumulation of certain PBDE congeners from biosolids and sediments by benthos provides a pathway for transfer to higher trophic levels, and congener discrimination may increase with each trophic transfer.

  4. Take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus)

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Greg; Lim, Norman T.-L; Spence, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Arboreal animals negotiate a highly three-dimensional world that is discontinuous on many spatial scales. As the scale of substrate discontinuity increases, many arboreal animals rely on leaping or gliding locomotion between distant supports. In order to successfully move through their habitat, gliding animals must actively modulate both propulsive and aerodynamic forces. Here we examined the take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging gliding mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) using a custom-designed three-dimensional accelerometry system. We found that colugos increase the propulsive impulse to affect longer glides. However, we also found that landing forces are negatively associated with glide distance. Landing forces decrease rapidly as glide distance increases from the shortest glides, then level off, suggesting that the ability to reorient the aerodynamic forces prior to landing is an important mechanism to reduce velocity and thus landing forces. This ability to substantially alter the aerodynamic forces acting on the patagial wing in order to reorient the body is a key to the transition between leaping and gliding and allows gliding mammals to travel long distances between trees with reduced risk of injury. Longer glides may increase the access to distributed resources and reduce the exposure to predators in the canopy or on the forest floor. PMID:18252673

  5. Sloths like it hot: ambient temperature modulates food intake in the brown-throated sloth (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Rebecca N; Haupt, Ryan J; Avey-Arroyo, Judy A; Wilson, Rory P

    2015-01-01

    Sloths are considered to have one of the lowest mass-specific metabolic rates of any mammal and, in tandem with a slow digestive rate, have been theorized to have correspondingly low rates of ingestion. Here, we show in a study conducted over five months, that three captive Bradypus variegatus (Brown-throated sloths) had a remarkably low mean food intake of 17 g kg(-1)day(-1) (SD 4.2). Food consumption was significantly affected by ambient temperature, with increased intake at higher temperatures. We suggest that the known fluctuation of sloth core body temperature with ambient temperature affects the rate at which gut fauna process digesta, allowing for increased rates of fermentation at higher temperatures. Since Bradypus sloths maintain a constantly full stomach, faster rates of fermentation should enhance digestive throughput, increasing the capacity for higher levels of food intake, thereby allowing increased energy acquisition at higher ambient temperatures. This contrasts with other mammals, which tend to show increased levels of food intake in colder conditions, and points to the importance of temperature in regulating all aspects of energy use in sloths.

  6. EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE LEVELS ON WEIGHT GAIN AND GONAD PRODUCTION IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura E; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, John M; Lawrence, Addison L; Watts, Stephen A

    2012-08-15

    Adult Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (ranging from 12 to 36%) and carbohydrate (ranging from 21 to 39 %) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily sub-satiation ration of 1.5% of average body weight for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion analysis was used to compare six different hypothesized dietary composition models across eight growth measurements. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of total weight gain. Diets with the highest (> 68.6 mg P kcal(--1)) protein: energy ratios produced the most wet weight gain after 9 weeks. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for most growth parameters examined in this study. However, the model containing a protein × carbohydrate interaction effect was the best model for protein efficiency ratio (PER). PER decreased with increasing dietary protein level, more so at higher carbohydrate levels. Food conversion ratio (FCR) was best modeled by total dietary energy levels: Higher energy diets produced lower FCRs. Dietary protein level was the best model of gonad wet weight gain. These data suggest that variations in dietary nutrients and energy differentially affect organismal growth and growth of body components.

  7. Sloths like it hot: ambient temperature modulates food intake in the brown-throated sloth (Bradypus variegatus)

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Ryan J.; Avey-Arroyo, Judy A.; Wilson, Rory P.

    2015-01-01

    Sloths are considered to have one of the lowest mass-specific metabolic rates of any mammal and, in tandem with a slow digestive rate, have been theorized to have correspondingly low rates of ingestion. Here, we show in a study conducted over five months, that three captive Bradypus variegatus (Brown-throated sloths) had a remarkably low mean food intake of 17 g kg−1day−1 (SD 4.2). Food consumption was significantly affected by ambient temperature, with increased intake at higher temperatures. We suggest that the known fluctuation of sloth core body temperature with ambient temperature affects the rate at which gut fauna process digesta, allowing for increased rates of fermentation at higher temperatures. Since Bradypus sloths maintain a constantly full stomach, faster rates of fermentation should enhance digestive throughput, increasing the capacity for higher levels of food intake, thereby allowing increased energy acquisition at higher ambient temperatures. This contrasts with other mammals, which tend to show increased levels of food intake in colder conditions, and points to the importance of temperature in regulating all aspects of energy use in sloths. PMID:25861559

  8. [Larvae and postlarvae production of the green-white sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) in culture conditions].

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Esperanza; Lodeiros Seijo, César

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the biological feasibility of massive larvae and postlarvae production of the Caribbean green-white urchin Lytechinus variegatus. Experiments were designed to choose the initial larval density and microalgae diets under culture, to study metamorphosis, postlarval and juvenile growth. Massive production of competent larvae 650 microm long at 12-13 days is possible using larval densities of 0.25 to 1 larva/ml. The microalgae Rhodomonas sp. was suitable for the optimization of larval growth and survival. Metamorphosis of 100% of the larvae can be induced with films of bentic diatoms (Navicula sp. and Amphora sp.), after 96 h; however, diatoms are not adequate for postlarval development and a food supply of Ulva lactuta is necessary for proper growth. For juveniles, a diet of macroalgae (U. lactuta) and/or commercial marine shrimp culture pellet food is enough for growth, but the best results were obtained with shrimp or U. lactuta used alone (85-86%, against 46% with the mixed diet). We recommend future experiments on nutritional requirements to optimize growth of these and subsequent stages.

  9. Structure of first- and second-stage mineralized elements in teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Robach, J. S.; Stock, S. R.; Veis, A.

    2009-01-01

    Microstructure of the teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus was investigated using optical microscopy, SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy). The study focused on the internal structure of the first-stage mineral structures of high Mg calcite (primary, secondary and carinar process plates; prisms) and on morphology of the columns of second-stage mineral (very high Mg calcite) that cement the first-stage material together. Optical micrographs under polarized light revealed contrast in the centers (midlines) of carinar process plates and in prisms in polished sections; staining of primary and carinar process plates revealed significant dye uptake at the plate centers. Demineralization with and without fixation revealed that the midlines of primary and carinar process plates (but not secondary plates) and the centers of prisms differed from the rest of the plate or prism, and SIMS showed proteins concentrated in these plate centers. SEM was used to study the morphology of columns, the fracture surfaces of mature teeth and the 3D morphology of prisms. These observations of internal structures in plates and prisms offer new insight into the mineralization process and suggest an important role for protein inclusions within the first-stage mineral. Some of the 3D structures not reported previously, such as twisted prisms and stacks of carinar process plates with nested wrinkles, may represent structural strengthening strategies. PMID:19616101

  10. Optimizing dietary levels of menhaden and soybean oils and soybean lecithin for pre-gonadal somatic growth in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Victoria K; Heflin, Laura E; Jones, Warren T; Powell, Mickie L; Lawrence, Addison L; Makowsky, Robert; Watts, Stephen A

    2015-09-01

    Dietary lipids serve as important sources of energy and essential fatty acids for aquatic animals. Sources of animal and plant oils are increasingly limited as well as expensive, and dietary requirements associated with the inclusion of these oils must be carefully evaluated to facilitate sustainable and affordable formulations. In this study, we investigated quantities of menhaden oil (MO) with and without soybean lecithin or soybean oil (SO) to determine appropriate levels for optimal somatic growth for pre-gonadal juvenile Lytechinus variegatus. We prepared semi-purified diets that varied in neutral lipid content (0, 2, 4, or 8% dry matter) and soy lecithin (0 or 2%) and exchanged lipids reciprocally with purified starch while holding constant all other nutrients. We maintained laboratory-reared juvenile L. variegatus (average initial wet weight 82 ± 0.7 mg, mean ± SE , n = 9 treatment(-1)) in recirculating seawater systems and fed each daily a sub-satiation ration for five weeks. We assessed wet weights and test diameters every two weeks and at the end of the experiment (5 wk). Level of MO with or without soybean lecithin did not significantly affect wet weight gain; however, increasing levels of SO in the diet reduced wet weight gain and dry matter production efficiency and increased feed conversion ratio. Dry gut weight was positively correlated with level of MO. Lipid level in the gut increased with increasing dietary lipid level, regardless of source. These data suggest the composition of the SO is inhibitory for either nutrient absorption or metabolic processes associated with growth at this life stage. Diets containing total lipid levels of approximately 5 to 6% that include sources of n-3 fatty acids may support optimal growth for pre-gonadal juvenile L. variegatus.

  11. Correlations between potassium, rubidium and cesium ((133)Cs and (137)Cs) in sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in a Swedish boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Vinichuk, M; Rosén, K; Johanson, K J; Dahlberg, A

    2011-04-01

    An analysis of sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal fungi Suillus variegatus assessed whether cesium ((133)Cs and (137)Cs) uptake was correlated with potassium (K) or rubidium (Rb) uptake. The question was whether intraspecific correlations of Rb, K and (133)Cs mass concentrations with (137)Cs activity concentrations in sporocarps were higher within, rather than among, different fungal species, and if genotypic origin of sporocarps within a population affected uptake and correlation. Sporocarps (n = 51) from a Swedish forest population affected by the fallout after the Chernobyl accident were studied. The concentrations were 31.9 ± 6.79 g kg(-1) for K (mean ± SD, dwt), 0.40 ± 0.09 g kg(-1) for Rb, 8.7 ± 4.36 mg kg(-1) for (133)Cs and 63.7 ± 24.2 kBq kg(-1) for (137)Cs. The mass concentrations of (133)Cs correlated with (137)Cs activity concentrations (r = 0.61). There was correlation between both (133)Cs concentrations (r = 0.75) and (137)Cs activity concentrations (r = 0.44) and Rb, but the (137)Cs/(133)Cs isotopic ratio negatively correlated with Rb concentration. Concentrations of K and Rb were weakly correlated (r = 0.51). The (133)Cs mass concentrations, (137)Cs activity concentrations and (137)Cs/(133)Cs isotopic ratios did not correlate with K concentrations. No differences between, within or, among genotypes in S. variegatus were found. This suggested the relationships between K, Rb, (133)Cs and (137)Cs in sporocarps of S. variegatus is similar to other fungal species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimizing dietary levels of menhaden and soybean oils and soybean lecithin for pre-gonadal somatic growth in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Victoria K.; Heflin, Laura E.; Jones, Warren T.; Powell, Mickie L.; Lawrence, Addison L.; Makowsky, Robert; Watts, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary lipids serve as important sources of energy and essential fatty acids for aquatic animals. Sources of animal and plant oils are increasingly limited as well as expensive, and dietary requirements associated with the inclusion of these oils must be carefully evaluated to facilitate sustainable and affordable formulations. In this study, we investigated quantities of menhaden oil (MO) with and without soybean lecithin or soybean oil (SO) to determine appropriate levels for optimal somatic growth for pre-gonadal juvenile Lytechinus variegatus. We prepared semi-purified diets that varied in neutral lipid content (0, 2, 4, or 8% dry matter) and soy lecithin (0 or 2%) and exchanged lipids reciprocally with purified starch while holding constant all other nutrients. We maintained laboratory-reared juvenile L. variegatus (average initial wet weight 82 ± 0.7 mg, mean ± SE , n = 9 treatment−1) in recirculating seawater systems and fed each daily a sub-satiation ration for five weeks. We assessed wet weights and test diameters every two weeks and at the end of the experiment (5 wk). Level of MO with or without soybean lecithin did not significantly affect wet weight gain; however, increasing levels of SO in the diet reduced wet weight gain and dry matter production efficiency and increased feed conversion ratio. Dry gut weight was positively correlated with level of MO. Lipid level in the gut increased with increasing dietary lipid level, regardless of source. These data suggest the composition of the SO is inhibitory for either nutrient absorption or metabolic processes associated with growth at this life stage. Diets containing total lipid levels of approximately 5 to 6% that include sources of n-3 fatty acids may support optimal growth for pre-gonadal juvenile L. variegatus. PMID:26146422

  13. The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in Coleoptera

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Paulien; van Beek, Rick; Hoogenboom, Tamara; zu Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of asymmetry in male genitalia is a pervasive and recurrent phenomenon across almost the entire animal kingdom. Although in some taxa the asymmetry may be a response to the evolution of one-sided, male-above copulation from a more ancestral female-above condition, in other taxa, such as Mammalia and Coleoptera, this explanation appears insufficient. We carried out an informal assessment of genital asymmetry across the Coleoptera and found that male genital asymmetry is present in 43% of all beetle families, and at all within-family taxonomic levels. In the most diverse group, Cucujiformia, however, genital asymmetry is comparatively rare. We also reconstructed the phylogeny of the leiodid tribe Cholevini, and mapped aspects of genital asymmetry on the tree, revealing that endophallus sclerites, endophallus, median lobe and parameres are, in a nested fashion, increasingly unlikely to have evolved asymmetry. We interpret these results in the light of cryptic female choice versus sexually antagonistic coevolution and advocate further ways in which the phenomenon may be better understood. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821530

  14. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) and 4-(2-dodecyl)-benzene sulfonate (LAS) in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) and Chironomus riparius (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, K; Kukkonen, J V K

    2006-05-10

    The discharge of surfactants, such as 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), into water bodies leads to accumulation of the chemicals in the sediments and may thus pose a problem to benthic organisms. To study the bioaccumulation of surfactants, Oligochaeta worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to sediment-spiked, [14C]-labeled 4-NP and 4-(2-dodecyl)-benzene sulfonate (C12-LAS) in three different sediments (S1-S3). The sediments were characterized for organic carbon (OC) content and particle size distribution. The acute toxicity was examined by exposing L. variegatus and three to four instar Chironomus riparius (Insecta) larvae in water-only exposure to 4-NP and LAS at different concentrations. After 48-h exposure, lethal water concentrations (LC50) and lethal body residues (LBR50) were estimated using liquid scintillation counting. Chronic toxicity was evaluated in two different sediments by exposing first instar C. riparius larvae to sediment-spiked chemicals at different concentrations. After 10 days, the sublethal effects of surfactants were observed by measuring wet weight and head capsule length. Finally, another 10-day test was set up in order to measure the LAS body residues associated with sublethal effects in C. riparius in S2 sediment. The bioaccumulation test revealed that the bioaccumulation of both 4-NP and LAS increased as the sediment organic matter content decreased. It is assumed that the chemical binding to organic material decreased chemical bioavailability. The acute toxicity tests showed that L. variegatus was more tolerant of 4-NP, and C. riparius was more tolerant of LAS when based on water exposure concentration. The LBR-estimates revealed, however, that L. variegatus tolerated clearly higher tissue residues of both chemicals compared with C. riparius. Both chemicals had sublethal effects on C. riparius growth in sediment exposure, reducing larvae wet weight and head capsule size. 4-NP, however, showed an irregular

  15. Otoacariasis due to Edentalges bradypus Fonseca 1954 (Acari; Psoroptidae) infestation in the brown-throated three-toed sloth Bradypus variegatus from Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Clarissa Pimentel; Verocai, Guilherme Gomes; de Arruda, Julio Almeida Alencar Matos; Pires, Jeferson Rocha; Takitani, Andréa Yuri; Faccini, João Luiz Horacio

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the first description of gross pathological aspects of otoacariasis due to Edentalges bradypus Fonseca 1954 (Acari; Psoroptidae) infestation in the brown-throated three-toed sloth Bradypus variegatus Schinz, 1825 (Xenarthra; Bradypodidae) in Brazil. Mites were collected from massive skin crusts seen in both external ear canals and around both eyes of an extremely debilitated advanced-aged female sloth brought to the Wildlife Care Section of Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  16. Effect of 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl on the reworking behavior of Lumbriculus variegatus exposed to contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Landrum, Peter F; Leppänen, Matti; Robinson, Sander D; Gossiaux, Duane C; Burton, G Allen; Greenberg, Marc; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Eadie, Brian J; Lansing, Margaret B

    2004-01-01

    The reworking response (bioturbation) of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was measured by following the burial rate and spread of a 137Cs marker layer translating worm activity into a biological burial rate (Wb) and a biological diffusion rate constant (Db) for surficial sediment mixing. Reworking was measured at 10 and 22 degrees C in two sediments: a reference site sediment dosed with 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCBP) and a field-collected sediment from a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated site in Dicks Creek (DCC, Middletown, OH, USA). The body residue associated with response to TCBP also was determined. Reduction in the temperature from 22 to 10 degrees C reduced both Wb and Db by a factor of approximately two. The internal TCBP concentration to reduce the Wb by 50% was 96 nmol/g (95% CI 45-225 nmol/g) and 124 nmol/g (40-547 nmol/g) (28 and 36 microg/g) wet weight at 22 and 10 degrees C, respectively, and was independent of temperature. The Wb for the DCC sediment was lower than observed for the highest TCBP treatment. The internal body residue for total PCB for worms exposed to DCC sediment was 20-fold lower than TCBP in worms exposed to the lowest TCBP treatment on a molar basis. Comparing body residues of total PCB to TCBP assumes that the PCB congeners act additively on a molar basis. The DCC site contained a higher proportion of coarse material and a lower organic carbon concentration. The difference in sediment characteristics was assumed to be responsible for differences in the Wb.

  17. Changes in Lumbriculus variegatus metabolites under hypoxic exposure to benzo(a)pyrene, chlorpyrifos and pentachlorophenol: consequences on biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Agbo, Stanley O; Keinänen, Markku; Keski-Saari, Sarita; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Akkanen, Jarkko; Leppänen, Matti T; Mayer, Philipp; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2013-09-01

    The regulation of endogenous metabolites is still not fully understood in aquatic invertebrates exposed concurrently to toxicants and hypoxia. Despite the prevalence of hypoxia in the aquatic environment, toxicity estimations seldom account for multiple stressors thereby differing from natural conditions. In this study, we examined the influence of hypoxia (<30% O2) on contaminant uptake and the composition of intracellular metabolites in Lumbriculus variegatus exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P, 3μgL(-1)), chlorpyrifos (CPF, 100μgL(-1)) or pentachlorophenol (PCP, 100μgL(-1)). Tissue extracts of worms were analyzed for 123 metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and metabolite levels were then related to treatments and exposure time. Hypoxia markedly increased the accumulation of B(a)P and CPF, which underlines the significance of oxygen in chemical uptake. The oxygen effect on PCP uptake was less pronounced. Succinate and glycerol-3-phosphate increased significantly (p<0.0001) following hypoxic treatment, whereas sugars, cysteine, and cholesterol were effectively repressed. The buildup of succinate coupled with the corresponding decline in intracellular 2-oxo- and 2-hydroxy glutaric acid is indicative of an active hypoxia inducible factor mechanism. Glutamate, and TCA cycle intermediates (fumarate, and malate) were disturbed and evident in their marked suppression in worms exposed concurrently to hypoxia and PCP. Clearly, hypoxia was the dominant stressor for individuals exposed to B(a)P or CPF, but to a lesser extent upon PCP treatment. And since oxygen deprivation promotes the accumulation of different toxicants, there may be consequences on species composition of metabolites in natural conditions.

  18. Pesticide exposure on sloths (Bradypus variegatus and Choloepus hoffmanni) in an agricultural landscape of Northeastern Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Pinnock Branford, Margaret Verónica; de la Cruz, Elba; Solano, Karla; Ramírez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2008, wild Bradypus variegatus and Choloepus hoffmanni inhabiting an agricultural landscape and captive animals from a rescue center in Northeastern Costa Rica were studied to assess exposure to pesticides. A total of 54 animals were sampled: 42 wild sloths captured at an agricultural landscape and 12 captive animals from a rescue center. Pesticides' active ingredients were determined in three sample matrices: hair, aqueous mixture (paws' wash) and cotton gauze (mouth clean) based on multi-residue gas chromatography methods. Recoveries tests ranged from 73 to 146% and relative standard deviations were less than 20% throughout all the recovery tests. Active ingredients detected in sloths samples were ametryn, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, difenoconazole, ethoprophos and thiabendazole. These active ingredients were used in intensive agricultural production for bananas, pineapples and other crops. Blood plasma cholinesterase activity (PChE) was determined by the Ellman method modified for micro plates. Enzyme activity determination was normalized to protein content in the samples according to Bradford method. Wild sloth PChE activity was similar for both species while sloths in captivity showed differences between species. Enzyme activity was significantly lower for two-toed sloths. This study showed that sloths were exposed to pesticides that caused acute and chronic effect in mammals and can also be a threat to other wildlife species. There is a need to better understand the potential effects of exposure to pesticides in sloths and other wild mammal populations, especially those threatened or endangered. More studies in this field must be carried out on the wildlife fauna inhabiting the agricultural landscape and its surroundings.

  19. Assessment of radium-226 bioavailability and bioaccumulation downstream of decommissioned uranium operations, using the caged oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Wiramanaden, Cheryl I E; Orr, Patricia L; Russel, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the integrated effects of several geochemical processes that control radium-226 ((226) Ra) mobility in the aquatic environment and bioaccumulation in in situ caged benthic invertebrates. Radium-226 bioaccumulation from sediment and water was evaluated using caged oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) deployed for 10 d in 6 areas downstream of decommissioned uranium operations in Ontario and Saskatchewan, Canada. Measured (226) Ra radioactivity levels in the retrieved oligochaetes did not relate directly to water and sediment exposure levels. Other environmental factors that may influence (226) Ra bioavailability in sediment and water were investigated. The strongest mitigating influence on (226) Ra bioaccumulation factors was sediment barium concentration, with elevated barium (Ba) levels being related to use of barium chloride in effluent treatment for removing (226) Ra through barite formation. Observations from the present study also indicated that (226) Ra bioavailability was influenced by dissolved organic carbon in water, and by gypsum, carbonate minerals, and iron oxyhydroxides in sediment, suggestive of sorption processes. Environmental factors that appeared to increase (226) Ra bioaccumulation were the presence of other group (II) ions in water (likely competing for binding sites on organic carbon molecules), and the presence of K-feldspars in sediment, which likely act as a dynamic repository for (226) Ra where weak ion exchange can occur. In addition to influencing bioavailability to sediment biota, secondary minerals such as gypsum, carbonate minerals, and iron oxyhydroxides likely help mitigate (226) Ra release into overlying water after the dissolution of sedimentary barite. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:507-517. © 2014 SETAC.

  20. LIFE CYCLE STUDIES WITH TWO MARINE SPECIES AND BISPHENOL A: THE MYSID SHRIMP (AMERICAMYSIS BAHIA) AND SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS).

    PubMed

    Mihaich, Ellen; Staples, Charles; Ortego, Lisa; Klečka, Gary; Woelz, Jan; Dimond, Steve; Hentges, Steven

    2017-08-23

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume compound primarily used to produce epoxy resins and polycarbonate plastic. Exposure to low concentrations of BPA occurs in freshwater and marine systems, primarily from wastewater treatment plant discharges. The dataset for chronic toxicity of BPA to freshwater organisms includes studies on fish, amphibians, invertebrates, algae and aquatic plants. To broaden the dataset, a 1.5-generation test with sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) and a full life-cycle test with mysid shrimp (Americamysis bahia) were conducted. Testing focused on apical endpoints of survival, growth and development, and reproduction. The NOEC and LOEC values of 170 and 370 µg/L for mysid and 66 and 130 µg/L for sheepshead were based on reduced fecundity. HC5 values of 18 µg/L were calculated from species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) with freshwater-only data and combined freshwater and marine data. Inclusion of marine data resulted in no apparent difference in SSD shape, R(2) values for the distributions, or HC5 values. Upper-bound 95(th) percentile concentrations of BPA measured in marine waters of North America and Europe (0.024 and 0.15 µg/L, respectively) are below the HC5 value of 18 µg/L. These results suggest that marine and freshwater species are of generally similar sensitivity and that chronic studies using a diverse set of species can be combined to assess the aquatic toxicity of BPA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a methodology for successful multigeneration life-cycle testing of the estuarine sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus.

    PubMed

    Cripe, G M; Hemmer, B L; Goodman, L R; Vennari, J C

    2009-04-01

    Evaluation of effects on fish reproduction and development during chemical exposures lasting for multiple generations is sometimes limited by variable reproductive responses and the time required for the exposure. Established testing methods and the short life cycle of the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, make this species particularly suitable for use in identifying potential impacts of contaminants in estuarine and marine environments. This study describes the refinement of life-cycle exposure methods that increased the reliability of reproduction in sheepshead minnows and reduced the time to maturation for larvae and juvenile fishes. A test of three spawning chamber designs, three sex ratios, and two photoperiods identified conditions that reduced the coefficient of variation in egg production from >100% to as little as 32%. The most reliable results were produced with groups of three female and two male fishes (all of similar size) when they were placed in a rectangular chamber and acclimated for 12 days. A test water temperature of 26.5 +/- 2 degrees C and a 14L:10D photoperiod resulted in fish producing a mean of 74 embryos per female per day, with a coefficient of variation of 31.8%. Egg fertility exceeded 90%, with a hatch rate of 95% for normal embryos (>or=80% yolk) and a hatch rate of or=2.7 cm standard length) was critical for spawning readiness. Adult fish were prepared for the spawning assessment by adding frozen brine shrimp to their diet. Results of these experiments provide methods that are of particular interest in assessment of endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are known to affect reproduction.

  2. Physiologic and serum biochemistry values in free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed (Choloepus hoffmanni) and brown-throated three-toed (Bradypus variegatus) sloths immobilized using dexmedetomidine and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Cole, Gretchen A; Vaughan, Christopher; Sladky, Kurt K

    2013-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist and dextrorotary enantiomer of medetomidine, was combined with ketamine and used to immobilize 14 free-ranging Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloths) and 11 Bradypus variegatus (brown-throated three-toed sloths) in Upala, Costa Rica. Following intramuscular injection of ketamine (2.1 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (11 microg/kg), heart rate, respiratory rate, and indirect systolic blood pressure were measured every 5 min for a total of 25 min. An iStat (CG8+) was used to evaluate serum biochemical and hematologic values during anesthesia. After 30 min of anesthesia, atipamezole (0.13 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, which resulted in rapid and smooth recoveries. Mean heart rate and respiratory rate remained unchanged in both C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus over time. Progressive decreases in mean indirect systolic blood pressure were documented in both species. Results of this study suggest a combination of dexmedetomidne and ketamine is a safe and effective anesthetic protocol for use in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. Similar to other alpha-2 adrenergic agonist-based immobilization protocols, close monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters are recommended. This study also provides serum biochemical and hematologic data in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus.

  3. The effects of chronic inorganic and organic phosphate exposure on bactericidal activity of the coelomic fluid of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Böttger, S Anne; McClintock, James B

    2009-07-01

    The sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus can survive chronic exposure to sodium phosphate (inorganic phosphate) concentrations as high as 3.2 mg L-1, and triethyl phosphate (organic phosphate) concentrations of 1000 mg L-1. However, chronic exposure to low (0.8 mg L-1 inorganic and 10 mg L-1 organic phosphate), medium (1.6 mg L-1 inorganic and 100 mg L-1 organic phosphate) or high (3.2 mg L-1 inorganic and 1000 mg L-1 organic phosphate) sublethal concentrations of these phosphates inhibit bactericidal clearance of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Bacteria were exposed to coelomic fluid collected from individuals maintained in either artificial seawater, or three concentrations of either inorganic phosphate or organic phosphate. Sterile marine broth, natural seawater and cell free coelomic fluid (cfCF) were employed as controls. Bacterial survival indices were measured at 0, 24 and 48 h periods once a week for four weeks. Bacteria were readily eliminated from the whole coelomic fluid (wCF) of individuals maintained in artificial seawater. Individuals maintained in inorganic phosphates were able to clear bacteria following a two week exposure period, while individuals maintained at even low concentrations of organic phosphates failed to clear all bacteria from their coelomic fluid. Exposure to phosphates represses antimicrobial defenses and may ultimately compromise survival of L. variegatus in the nearshore environment.

  4. The impact of rising sea temperature on innate immune parameters in the tropical subtidal sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus and the intertidal sea urchin Echinometra lucunter.

    PubMed

    Branco, Paola Cristina; Borges, João Carlos Shimada; Santos, Marinilce Fagundes; Jensch Junior, Bernard Ernesto; da Silva, José Roberto Machado Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Ocean temperatures are rising throughout the world, making it necessary to evaluate the impact of these temperature changes on sea urchins, which are well-known bioindicators. This study evaluated the effect of an increase in temperature on the immune response of the subtidal Lytechinus variegatus and the intertidal Echinometra lucunter sea urchins. Both species were exposed to 20 (control), 25 and 30 °C temperatures for 24 h, 2, 7 and 14 days. Counting of coelomocytes and assays on the phagocytic response, adhesion and spreading of coelomocytes were performed. Red and colorless sphere cells were considered biomarkers for heat stress. Moreover, a significant decrease in the phagocytic indices and a decrease in both cell adhesion and cell spreading were observed at 25 and 30 °C for L. variegatus. For E. lucunter, the only alteration observed was for the cell proportions. This report shows how different species of sea urchins respond immunologically to rising temperatures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. pH-dependent toxicity of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Dierkes, J.R.; Monson, P.D. ); Ankley, G.T. . Environmental Protection Agency)

    1993-07-01

    The speciation and bioavailability of metals are known to be affected by pH. Although many studies have focused on effects on metals of pH changes resulting from lake acidification, metal toxicity changes at higher pH values are of great interest to those performing effluent and sediment toxicity testing and toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). In addition, most previous studies have addressed metal toxicity changes with pH to water-column organisms rather than to benthic or epibenthic species. The authors tested the acute toxicity of five metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca, and Lubriculus variegatus at three pH values in very hard reconstituted water. Toxicity of Cd, Ni, and zn was greatest at pH 8.3 and least at pH 6.3 to most of these species. Conversely, the toxicity of Cu and Pb was greatest at pH 6.3 and least at pH 8.3 to most of the species. The acute toxicity of most of the metals to Lumbriculus variegatus was very low and occasionally was above the aqueous solubility of the metal salts in the reconstituted water.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of the Keel of the Short-Spined Sea Urchin Lytechinus variegatus: Absorption Microtomography (microCT) and Small Beam Diffraction Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, S. R.; Barss, J.; Dahl, T.; Veis, A.; Almer, J. D.; De Carlo, F.

    2003-05-01

    In sea urchin teeth, the keel plays an important structural role, and this paper reports results of microstructural characterization of the keel of Lytechinus variegatus using two noninvasive synchrotron x-ray techniques: x-ray absorption microtomography (microCT) and x-ray diffraction mapping. MicroCT with 14 keV x-rays mapped the spatial distribution of mineral at the 1.3 microm level in a millimeter-sized fragment of a mature portion of the keel. Two rows of low absorption channels (i.e., primary channels) slightly less than 10 microm in diameter were found running linearly from the flange to the base of the keel and parallel to its sides. The primary channels paralleled the oral edge of the keel, and the microCT slices revealed a planar secondary channel leading from each primary channel to the side of the keel. The primary and secondary channels were more or less coplanar and may correspond to the soft tissue between plates of the carinar process. Transmission x-ray diffraction with 80.8 keV x-rays and a 0.1 mm beam mapped the distribution of calcite crystal orientations and the composition Ca(1-x)Mg(x)CO(3) of the calcite. Unlike the variable Mg concentration and highly curved prisms found in the keel of Paracentrotus lividus, a constant Mg content (x = 0.13) and relatively little prism curvature was found in the keel of Lytechinus variegatus.

  7. The Ochodaeidae of Argentina (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, M.J.; Ocampo, Federico C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Ochodaeidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of Argentina are revised. Previously, two species of Ochodaeinae were known from the country, both in the genus Parochodaeus Nikolajev: Parochodaeus campsognathus (Arrow) and Parochodaeus cornutus (Ohaus). An additional 7 species of Parochodaeus from Argentina are described here as new. In addition, Gauchodaeus patagonicus, new genus and new species in the subfamilyChaetocanthinae, is described. This is the first record of the subfamily Chaetocanthinae in South America. Redescriptions, diagnoses, and maps are provided for each species. We also provide a key to genera and a key to species of Parochodaeus of Argentina. With this work, the number of ochodaeid species known from Argentina is increased from 2 to 10. PMID:22451781

  8. The ochodaeidae of Argentina (coleoptera, scarabaeoidea).

    PubMed

    Paulsen, M J; Ocampo, Federico C

    2012-01-01

    The Ochodaeidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of Argentina are revised. Previously, two species of Ochodaeinae were known from the country, both in the genus Parochodaeus Nikolajev: Parochodaeus campsognathus (Arrow) and Parochodaeus cornutus (Ohaus). An additional 7 species of Parochodaeus from Argentina are described here as new. In addition, Gauchodaeus patagonicus, new genus and new species in the subfamilyChaetocanthinae, is described. This is the first record of the subfamily Chaetocanthinae in South America. Redescriptions, diagnoses, and maps are provided for each species. We also provide a key to genera and a key to species of Parochodaeus of Argentina. With this work, the number of ochodaeid species known from Argentina is increased from 2 to 10.

  9. Evaluation of vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in wood

    Treesearch

    Zhangjing Chen; Marshall S. White; Melody A. Keena; Therese M. Poland; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    The potential for using vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in solid-wood packing materials (SWPM) and other wood products was assessed. Current...

  10. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  11. Seasonal abundance, arrival and emergence patterns of predaceous hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae) associated with Ips engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in Louisiana

    Treesearch

    William P. Shepherd; Richard A. Goyer

    2003-01-01

    The most common predaceious hister beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae) found associated with Ips engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in southern Louisiana were Platysoma attenuata LeConte, P. cylindrica (Paykull), P. parallelum (Say), and Plegaderus transversus (Say). The seasonal abundance of...

  12. The Vitamin E analog Trolox reduces copper toxicity in the annelid Lumbriculus variegatus but is also toxic on its own.

    PubMed

    O'Gara, Bruce A; Murray, Phillip M; Hoyt, Erik M; Leigh-Logan, Tifany; Smeaton, Michael B

    2006-07-01

    The ability of the water-soluble Vitamin E analog, Trolox, to prevent the toxic effects of copper exposure on the behavior and neuronal physiology of the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was examined. Trolox produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 24 h LC(50) for copper exposure, with 100 microM Trolox elevating the LC(50) by almost seven-fold (from 0.36 to 2.43 microM). Copper exposure (0.2 microM) for 24h produced a reduction in the conduction velocity of the medial and lateral giant nerve fibers, which was prevented by 100 microM Trolox. Copper exposure (0.2 microM) for 24h also reduced the effectiveness of substrate vibration in eliciting giant nerve fiber spikes. Trolox prevented this reduction in sensory responsiveness. Trolox (100 microM) partially reversed the copper-induced (0.4 microM) decrease in touch-evoked helical swimming behavior, but had no effect on the copper-induced decrement in touch-evoked body reversal. Copper exposure (0.2 microM) for 24 h reduced the amount of spontaneous locomotion (crawling); however, Trolox did not reverse this effect. However, Trolox exposure alone produced a decrease in the distance crawled that was similar in magnitude to copper exposure. In normal worms, rapid spiking activity of the medial giant nerve fiber produces facilitation in the amplitude of the resulting muscle potentials produced by the longitudinal body wall muscles. Copper exposure had no effect on the amount of muscle potential facilitation, but Trolox exposure (100 microM) produced a significant decrease in facilitation. The results of this study indicate that many of the toxic effects of copper exposure on Lumbriculus are prevented or reduced by the antioxidant Trolox. However, the results of this study also indicate that Trolox has toxic effects on behavior and neuronal physiology. The results presented here document one of the few published reports of the detrimental effects of Vitamin E or its analogs on nervous system

  13. The effect of sediment characteristics on bioturbation-mediated transfer of lead, in freshwater laboratory microcosms with Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Blankson, Emmanuel R; Klerks, Paul L

    2017-03-01

    While it has been well established that sediment bioturbators can affect the fate of metals in aquatic systems and that the fate of metals there can depend on sediment characteristics, the interaction between these influences is not well known. The present study therefore investigated whether the influence of a sediment bioturbator on the fate of metals is affected by sediment characteristics. This was investigated using two laboratory microcosm experiments with lead-contaminated sediment and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. The first experiment used sediment collected from five Toledo Bend reservoir sites that differed in sediment characteristics, and analyses looked at the influence of sediment organic matter, sediment silt/clay content, sediment pH, and pore-water pH. In the second experiment, organic matter and silt/clay content of Toledo Bend reservoir sediment were varied experimentally using alpha-cellulose and clay, and Pb transfer to the water column and bioaccumulation were again quantified. Both experiments were conducted with sediment spiked with Pb to a concentration of 100 µg/g, at an oligochaete density of 6279 ind./m². In the first experiment, the Pb concentrations in the water column and those in the worms at the end of the 14-day experiment differed among sediment-collection sites. Silt/clay content and sediment pH were the two most important variables influencing Pb transfer from sediment to the water column. A multiple regression model with these variables explained 58% of the variability in this lead transfer. For Pb accumulation by the worms, sediment organic matter and pore-water pH were the two most important variables. This regression model explained 85% of the variability in tissue Pb levels. In the second experiment, where the individual effects of the organic matter and silt/clay content on Pb transport and distribution were assessed, the use of sediment with more organic matter resulted in a reduction in both the Pb

  14. New species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) from Colombia and Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A

    2015-12-02

    Three new species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) are described: Chrysaperda mimica sp. nov. and Malacoscylus nearnsi sp. nov. from Ecuador, and Eulachnesia boteroi sp. nov. from Colombia.

  15. Temperature-dependent development of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is a nonnative pest that vectors the pathogenic fungus Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt in trees of the family Lauraceae. Laurel wilt is present in the commercial growing areas of avocado (Perse...

  16. Morphometric analysis of instar variation in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurements of head capsule, mandible, metanotum, and body weight were done on larvae of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionide) from the second to the last instar. Instar number varied from 14 to 18, but 15 or 16 instars were the most common. The value of dimensional measurements was evalua...

  17. An annotated checklist of Malachiidae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirutenko, Vladyslav; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-09-09

    A checklist of Iranian Malachiidae (Coleoptera) is given in this paper. Eighty two species from 22 genera (subfamily Malachiinae) are listed in the fauna of Iran. Of these species, 31 are endemic to Iran, and one Anthocomus pupillatus Abeille de Perrin, 1890 is a new record for this country.

  18. Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Initial Flight and Shoot

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2002-01-01

    The exotic pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), established in the north central and northeastern United States (U.S.) and adjacent regions in Canada, is regulated by a federal quarantine that restricts movement of pine material during specific times of the year based on the beetle's life history. Although climatic...

  19. Checklist of the Coleoptera of New Brunswick, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All 3,062 species of Coleoptera from 92 families known to occur in New Brunswick, Canada, are recorded, along with their author(s) and year of publication using the most recent classification framework. Adventive and Holarctic species are indicated. There are 366 adventive species in the province, 12.0% of the total fauna. PMID:27110174

  20. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  1. Mating frequency and fecundity in Agrilus anxius (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Claire E. Rutledge; Melody A. Keena

    2012-01-01

    Bronze birch borers (Agrilus anxius Gory) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a key pest of birches in North America, have the potential to be a major threat to Eurasian birch forests. Therefore, the consequences of single versus multiple mating on the longevity, fecundity and fertility of female A. anxius were examined. There were three...

  2. Diet based fitness variability of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coccinella novemnotata (Herbst) is a species of North American native lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that has come under great ecological duress over the past 30 years and is experiencing a significant decline throughout its native range. This species once was widely distributed across mos...

  3. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    Brian Strom; Smith S.L.; Brownie C.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dedroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey...

  4. Using Malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Ulyshen; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages...

  5. A new species of Cephalocyclus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Minor, Pablo; Dellacasa, Marco; Dellacasa, Giovanni

    2015-06-22

    Cephalocyclus moroni new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from humid forest in the mountains of Manantlán, Jalisco, Mexico is described and illustrated. It is similar to Cephalocyclus ordonezi Dellacasa, Dellacasa, & Gordon, 2007 and Cephalocyclus stebnickae Deloya & Ibañez-Bernal, 2000, both from Mexico.

  6. Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea).

    PubMed

    Paulsen, M J

    2016-08-24

    Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) are described: Glaresis smithi Paulsen, new species from Argentina, and Glaresis mondacai Paulsen, new species from Chile and Peru. The species are compared to their closest congener, Glaresis fritzi Martínez et al., and a key is provided for the known South American species of the genus Glaresis Erichson.

  7. Salinity and temperature effects on chronic toxicity of 2,4-dinitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol to sheepshead minnows (cyprinodon-variegatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linton, T.K.; Mayer, F.L.; Simon, T.L.; Malone, J.A.; Marking, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Toxicity tests (28-d early-life-stage) were conducted to determine the effects of nine combinations of salinity (15, 20, 25 ppt) and temperature (22, 27, 32-degrees-c) on the toxicity of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-dnp) and 4-nitrophenol (4-np) to sheepshead minnows (cyprinodon variegatus). The highest tested concentration having no observed effect (noec) on mortality and growth was derived weekly. The noecs at test termination indicated that the survival and growth of fish exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol were not significantly affected by salinity, temperature, or the salinity temperature interaction. However, 28-d noecs of fish surviving from 4-nitrophenol exposures were significantly affected by temperature, but the highest value exceeded the lowest by only a factor of two. The overall data suggest that variations of salinity and temperature do not change the noec; only the exposure time required to attain the same noec is altered.

  8. Dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum in free-living Bradypus variegatus (Schiz, 1825) in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Gileno Antônio Araújo; da Silva, Leonildo Bento Galiza; da Silva, Davi Rubem; de Moraes Peixoto, Rodolfo; Lino, Gileno Câmara; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2008-01-01

    Three cases of dermatophytosis in free living brown-throated three-toed sloths (Bradypus variegatus) in the Zona da Mata, North of Pernambuco State, Brazil, were studied. Two animals presented areas of alopecia on the pelvic member and thorax and one animal on the pelvic member only. The three animals presented scabs. Hair and scabs samples were submitted to microscopical examination after treatment with a 30 % KOH and cultivated in Mycosel Agar. The direct examination indicated the presence of arthrospores in the hair. Colonies grown after seven days of culture were confirmed as Microsporum based on examination of the structure of the macroconidia. This is the first observation of dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum in free living sloths in the State of Pernambuco. PMID:24031255

  9. Whole-body accumulation of copper predicts acute toxicity to an aquatic oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) as pH and calcium are varied.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joseph S; Boese, Connie J; Collyard, Scott A

    2002-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that whole-body accumulation of Cu at 50% mortality (i.e. the median lethal accumulation, LA50 value) in a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) is constant across a wide range of water quality, whereas the LC50 values of Cu(total) and the cupric ion (Cu(2+)) in solution are not. We exposed the worms in intermittent-flow, water-only chambers to a series of Cu concentrations at a variety of combinations of pH and water hardness (pH 6.5, 7.5 and 8.5 crossed with hardnesses of 0.5, 2, 4, 6 and 15 mEql(-1)) at 17-20 degrees C. In addition to monitoring mortality at 48 h, we determined whole-body Cu uptake in half of the replicate chambers at 6 h. LC50 values of Cu(total) and Cu(2+) increased as water hardness increased, as expected from traditional LC50 vs. hardness regressions. Moreover, LC50 values of Cu(total) remained approximately constant and LC50 values of Cu(2+) decreased considerably as pH increased, as expected from principles of cation competition and binding by inorganic ligands. However, LA50 values of Cu(body) remained approximately constant (0.17-0.34 micromol Cug(-1) dry wt.) in all pH x hardness combinations. Thus, consistent with the biotic-ligand model, Cu accumulation might be a constant predictor of acute mortality to L. variegatus whereas aqueous Cu concentrations are not.

  10. Bioaccumulation of paraquat by Lumbriculus variegatus in the presence of dissolved natural organic matter and impact on energy costs, biotransformation and antioxidative enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Claudia; Pehkonen, Sari; Akkanen, Jarkko; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2007-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter from natural sources (DNOM) is omnipresent in aquatic ecosystems. Besides affecting bioavailability of substances including xenobiotics, it directly influences physico-chemistry of the habitat and there is increasing evidence for it is interaction with organisms. We investigated direct and interacting effects of DNOM from three sources, Lake Valkea-Kotinen, Svartberget Brook, and Lake Fuchskuhle with the herbicide paraquat on the oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Bioavailability of paraquat to L. variegates as well as activities of antioxidative enzymes catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) and biotransformation enzyme soluble glutathione S-transferase (sGST) were assessed without and in the presence of DNOM. Furthermore, metabolic heat dissipation due to the exposure was quantified. Uptake of paraquat into the worms was concentration dependently reduced by DNOM, and with differences concerning the DNOM sources. sGST and CAT responded with increased activities to DNOM (5 and 25 mg C l-1) and paraquat (5.0, 50, and 500 microg l-1) separately. Paraquat at 5.0 microg l-1 and DNOM in combination caused increased activities of sGST, especially at 5 mgC l-1, but inhibition of CAT activities. The latter probably occurred due to saturation of the enzyme. Changes in enzyme activities were independent from the source of DNOM. Increasing DNOM concentrations raised metabolic heat dissipation in L. variegatus with maximum at 3h of exposure. In the combined treatments, metabolic heat dissipation changed more due to the source of DNOM than due to the bioavailability of paraquat.

  11. Effects of sediment-bound polydimethylsiloxane on the bioavailability and distribution of benzo[a]pyrene in lake sediment to Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkonen, J. |; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-03-01

    Oligochaetes, Lumbriculus variegatus, were exposed to Lake Michigan sediment spiked in the laboratory with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at two different concentrations. Additionally, these sediment samples and one without PDMS were spiked with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The accumulation of PDMS and BaP, survival, wet weight, and defecation of the animals were monitored. Lumbriculus variegatus accumulated sediment-associated BaP rapidly and achieved steady state within 96 to 168 h. The BaP uptake clearances were 0.069, 0.060, and 0.056 for BaP only, BaP with low-dose PDMS, and BaP with high-dose PDMS exposures, respectively. The BaP bioaccumulation factor was reduced by PDMS in the sediment. Only very low concentrations of PDMS were found associated with the worms, which suggests some surface sorption or association with material in the gut. Elimination of BaP in clean sediment was rapid, but elimination in water was much slower. Elimination rate constants for BaP, k{sub c}, were 0.0229 {+-} 0.0011 h{sup {minus}1} for sediment and 0.0004 {+-} 0.0004 h{sup {minus}1} water-only depuration. The PDMS was excreted within 10 h both in sediment and water-only depuration exposures, indicating that most of the measured body burden was due to the sediment-associated material inside the organisms` gut. Animals were not purged before analyses, and several approaches were investigated for estimating the contribution of the intestinal contents. Based on both measurements and calculations, sediment-associated BaP in the gut contributes less than 10% of total body burden. Thus, a 10-h water-only purge was found to be the most appropriate method for eliminating the gut-content influence on the body burden.

  12. Characterization of a myostatin gene (MSTN1) from spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and association between its promoter polymorphism and individual growth performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjun; Fan, Jingfeng; Liu, Shuxi; Yang, Qing; Mu, Guiqiang; He, Chongbo

    2012-04-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily which could play an important role in negatively regulating skeletal muscle growth and development in mammal and non-mammal species. In the present study, a MSTN1 gene (designated as VvMSTN1) was cloned and characterized in one flatfish species, spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus). In the 3078 bp genomic sequence, three exons, two introns and a promoter sequence were identified. Sequence analysis of the promoter region revealed that it contained several cis-regulatory elements such as CAAT-box, TATA-box and E-boxes. The deduced protein sequence included a signal peptide, a TGF-β propeptide in the N-terminal region and the TGF-β active peptide in the C-terminal region. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that VvMSTN1 is an orthologue of teleost MSTN1 proteins which arose along with MSTN2 during a duplication event at the base of teleost evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that VvMSTN1 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in all nine tested tissues, with the most transcriptionally abundant in skeletal muscle. A primary assessment of sequence variability revealed five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) existed in the promoter region, among which three (G-653T, T-355C and G-253A) were genotyped with an advanced melting temperature (T(m))-shift method and tested for their association with growth traits (body length, body depth and total mass). Results indicated that genotype CC of locus T-355C had significantly higher growth traits than genotype TC and TT (P<0.05) in female spotted halibut. These results suggest that V. variegatus MSTN could be selected as a candidate gene for the future molecular breeding of stains with enhanced individual growth performance.

  13. Effects of Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida, Oligochaete) bioturbation on zinc sediment chemistry and toxicity to the epi-benthic invertebrate Chironomus tepperi (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Valentina; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Golding, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Classical laboratory-based single-species sediment bioassays do not account for modifications to toxicity from bioturbation by benthic organisms which may impact predictions of contaminated sediment risk to biota in the field. This study aims to determine the effects of bioturbation on the toxicity of zinc measured in a standard laboratory bioassay conducted with chironomid larvae (Chironomus tepperi). The epi-benthic chironomid larvae were exposed to two different levels of sediment contamination (1600 and 1980 mg/kg of dry weight zinc) in the presence or absence of annelid worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) which are known to be tolerant to metal and to have a large impact on sediment properties through bioturbation. Chironomids had 5-6x higher survival in the presence of L. variegatus which shows that bioturbation had a beneficial effect on the chironomid larvae. Chemical analyses showed that bioturbation induced a flux of zinc from the pore water into the water column, thereby reducing the bioavailability of zinc in pore water to the chironomid larvae. This also suggested that pore water was the major exposure path for the chironomids to metals in sediment. During the study, annelid worms (Oligochaetes) produced a thin layer of faecal pellets at the sediment surface, a process known to: (i) create additional adsorption sites for zinc, thus reducing its availability, (ii) increase the microbial abundance that in turn could represent an additional food source for opportunistic C. tepperi larvae, and (iii) modify the microbial community's structure and alter the biogeochemical processes it governs thus indirectly impact zinc toxicity. This study represents a contribution in recognising bioturbating organisms as "ecological engineers" as they directly and indirectly influence metal bioavailability and impact other sediment-inhabiting species. This is significant and should be considered in risk assessment of zinc levels (and other metals) in contaminated sediment

  14. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  15. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in northeast China, with notes on two species of parasitic Coleoptera

    Treesearch

    Xiao-Yi Wang; Liang-Ming Cao; Zhong-Qi Yang; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Leah S. Bauer

    2016-01-01

    To investigate natural enemies of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in northeastern China, we conducted field surveys of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) trees in semi-natural forests and plantations at variable EAB densities from 2008 to 2013. Our surveys revealed a complex of...

  16. Intercept™ Panel Trap (INT PT) effective in management of forest Coleoptera

    Treesearch

    D. Czokajlo; J. McLaughlin; L. I. Abu Ayyash; S. Teale; J. Wickham; J. Warren; R. Hoffman; B. Aukema; K. Raffa; P. Kirsch

    2003-01-01

    Trap efficacy in capturing economically important forest Coleoptera was measured in field trials comparing the Intercept Panel Trap (INT PT) with the Multi-Funnel Trap. The INT PT was designed to provide a better option for the monitoring of forest Coleoptera. The trap is made of corrugated plastic and is very robust under rigorous field conditions, but still...

  17. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Poorani, J

    2015-01-01

    The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

  18. A checklist of stag beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Luca; Ghahari, Hassan; Sprecher-Uebersax, Eva; Zilioli, Michele

    2014-11-26

    An updated checklist of the Lucanidae (Coleoptera) from Iran is given. New locality records are listed and some dubious distributional records are discussed. Dorcus vavrai Nonfried, 1905 is placed in synonymy with Dorcus peyronis Reiche and Saulcy, 1856 (new synonymy) The female of Lucanus xerxes Král, 2004 is described. A key for the identification of the Iranian stag beetle species is also provided and all the species are figured.

  19. Sex- and Size-Related Patterns of Carrion Visitation in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    PubMed

    Mądra-Bielewicz, Anna; Frątczak-Łagiewska, Katarzyna; Matuszewski, Szymon

    2016-12-28

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) based on successional patterns of adult insects is largely limited, due to the lack of potential PMI markers. Sex and size of adult insects could be easily used for such estimation. In this study, sex- and size-related patterns of carrion attendance by adult insects were analyzed in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). For both species, abundance of males and females changed similarly during decomposition. A slightly female-biased sex ratio was recorded in N. littoralis. Females of N. littoralis started visiting carcasses, on average, one day earlier than males. There was a rise in size of males of N. littoralis at the end of decomposition, whereas for females of both species and males of C. maxillosus, no size-related patterns of carrion visitation were found. Current results demonstrate that size and sex of adult carrion beetles are poor indicators of PMI.

  20. Assessing the bioaccumulation of contaminants from sediments of the Upper Mississippi River using field-collected oligochaetes and laboratory- exposed Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    Concern with the redistribution of contaminants associated with sediment in the upper Mississippi River (UMR) arose after the flood of 1993. This project is designed to evaluate the status of sediments in the UMR and is one article in a series designed to assess the extent of sediment contamination in navigational pools of the river. Companion articles evaluate sediment toxicity and benthic community composition in navigation pools of the river. The objectives of the present study were to: (1) to assess the bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants in the UMR using laboratory exposures with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, and (2) to compare bioaccumulation in laboratory-exposed oligochaetes to field-collected oligochaetes. Sediment samples and native oligochaetes were collected from 23 navigational pools on the Upper Mississippi River and the Saint Croix River. Contaminant concentrations measured in the L. variegatus after 28-day exposures to sediment in the laboratory were compared to contaminant concentrations in field-collected oligochaetes from the 13 pools where these sediments were collected. Contaminant concentrations were relatively low in sediments and tissues from the pools evaluated. Only polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were frequently measured above detection limits. The majority of the biota- sediment-accumulation factors (BSAFs) for PAHs were within a range of about 1.0 to 2.6, suggesting that the theoretical BSAF value of 1.7 could be used to predict these mean BSAFs with a reasonable degree of certainty. A positive correlation was observed between lipid-normalized concentrations of PAHs detected in laboratory-exposed and field-collected oligochaetes across all sampling locations. Rank correlations for concentrations of individual compounds between laboratory-exposed and field-collected oligochaetes were strongest for benzo(e)pyrene, perylene, benzo(b,k)fluoranthene, and pyrene

  1. Assessing the Bioaccumulation of Contaminants from Sediments of the Upper Mississippi River Using Field-Collected Oligochaetes and Laboratory-Exposed Lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed

    Brunson; Canfield; Dwyer; Ingersoll; Kemble

    1998-08-01

    Concern with the redistribution of contaminants associated with sediment in the upper Mississippi River (UMR) arose after the flood of 1993. This project is designed to evaluate the status of sediments in the UMR and is one article in a series designed to assess the extent of sediment contamination in navigational pools of the river. Companion articles evaluate sediment toxicity and benthic community composition in navigation pools of the river. The objectives of the present study were to: (1) to assess the bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants in the UMR using laboratory exposures with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, and (2) to compare bioaccumulation in laboratory-exposed oligochaetes to field-collected oligochaetes. Sediment samples and native oligochaetes were collected from 23 navigational pools on the Upper Mississippi River and the Saint Croix River. Contaminant concentrations measured in the L. variegatus after 28-day exposures to sediment in the laboratory were compared to contaminant concentrations in field-collected oligochaetes from the 13 pools where these sediments were collected. Contaminant concentrations were relatively low in sediments and tissues from the pools evaluated. Only polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were frequently measured above detection limits. The majority of the biota-sediment-accumulation factors (BSAFs) for PAHs were within a range of about 1.0 to 2.6, suggesting that the theoretical BSAF value of 1.7 could be used to predict these mean BSAFs with a reasonable degree of certainty. A positive correlation was observed between lipid-normalized concentrations of PAHs detected in laboratory-exposed and field-collected oligochaetes across all sampling locations. Rank correlations for concentrations of individual compounds between laboratory-exposed and field-collected oligochaetes were strongest for benzo(e)pyrene, perylene, benzo(b,k)fluoranthene, and pyrene

  2. The mitochondrial genome of Paragyrodactylus variegatus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea): differences in major non-coding region and gene order compared to Gyrodactylus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; King, Stanley D; Cone, David K; You, Ping

    2014-08-17

    Paragyrodactylus Gvosdev and Martechov, 1953, a viviparous genus of ectoparasite within the Gyrodactylidae, contains three nominal species all of which infect Asian river loaches. The group is suspected to be a basal lineage within Gyrodactylus Nordmann, 1832 sensu lato although this remains unclear. Further molecular study, beyond characterization of the standard Internal Transcribed Spacer region, is needed to clarify the evolutionary relationships within the family and the placement of this genus. The mitochondrial genome of Paragyrodactylus variegatus You, King, Ye and Cone, 2014 was amplified in six parts from a single worm, sequenced using primer walking, annotated and analyzed using bioinformatic tools. The mitochondrial genome of P. variegatus is 14,517 bp, containing 12 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and a major non-coding region (NCR). The overall A + T content of the mitochondrial genome is 76.3%, which is higher than all reported mitochondrial genomes of monogeneans. All of the 22 tRNAs have the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except tRNACys, tRNASer1 and tRNASer2 that lack the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. There are six domains (domain III is absent) and three domains in the inferred secondary structures of the large ribosomal subunit (rrnL) and small ribosomal subunit (rrnS), respectively. The NCR includes six 40 bp tandem repeat units and has the double identical poly-T stretches, stem-loop structure and some surrounding structure elements. The gene order (tRNAGln, tRNAMet and NCR) differs in arrangement compared to the mitochondrial genomes reported from Gyrodactylus spp. The Duplication and Random Loss Model and Recombination Model together are the most plausible explanations for the variation in gene order. Both morphological characters and characteristics of the mitochondrial genome support Paragyrodactylus as a distinct genus from Gyrodactylus. Considering their specific

  3. Family-group names in Coleoptera (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Patrice; Bousquet, Yves; Davies, Anthony E.; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.; Lawrence, John F.; Lyal, Chris H. C.; Newton, Alfred F.; Reid, Chris A. M.; Schmitt, Michael; Ślipiński, S. Adam; Smith, Andrew B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant) based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. nov. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae), Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae), Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae), Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae); Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein) syn. nov. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae), Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae), Sclerastes

  4. Comparing behavioral and chronic endpoints to evaluate the response of Lumbriculus variegatus to 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl sediment exposures.

    PubMed

    Landrum, Peter F; Leppänen, Matti; Robinson, Sander D; Gossiaux, Duane C; Burton, G Allen; Greenberg, Marc; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Eadie, Brian J; Lansing, Margaret B

    2004-01-01

    The response of Lumbriculus variegatus to 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCBP) was examined with feeding behavior and changes in carbon assimilation by using stable carbon isotopes at 22 and 10 degrees C. The classical measure of feeding behavior determined on a subset of sediment for which the biological burial rate was determined in a companion study allowed direct method comparison. This comparison helped address relationships between biological burial rate, feeding rate, and bioaccumulation. The change in stable isotope composition reflects the total metabolic activity by measuring carbon assimilation rate and was compared to feeding rate, biological burial rate (as determined in the companion study), and reproduction. Decreasing the temperature from 22 to 10 degrees C resulted in a twofold reduction in feeding rate and carbon assimilation. The fractional decline in feeding rate relative to the control mimicked the decline in the biological burial rate with increasing TCBP concentration that was found in the companion study. The bioaccumulation factor declined with increasing TCBP sediment concentration, tracking the feeding rate decline. Stable isotope measures showed differences in metabolic rates between the exposure temperatures but did not distinguish a metabolic rate change at 22 degrees C among TCBP treatments. Likewise, reproduction declined from 22 to 10 degrees C, with no reproduction at 10 degrees C. Like the stable isotope measure, no dose response was found among TCBP treatments at 22 degrees C. The reduction in carbon assimilation rate tracked the reduction in reproduction with lower temperature.

  5. Toxicokinetics of sediment-sorbed benzo[a]pyrene and hexachlorobiphenyl using the freshwater invertebrates Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Lance J; Wheeler, Matthew; Bailer, A John; Lydy, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of long-term sediment aging on the toxicokinetics of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) using three freshwater benthic invertebrates. Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to BaP- and HCBP-spiked sediments that were aged for 7 d or 1.5 years. The toxicokinetics of the two compounds were determined for each test organism using a two-compartment model. The modeling of BaP was more complex because biotransformation was included within the model. The results of this study showed that the HCBP uptake clearance rates (k(s)) for each species were generally an order of magnitude greater than those determined for BaP and this difference was most likely due to preferential and rapid binding of BaP to sediment particles. Overall, the bioavailability of HCBP in spiked sediments tended to decrease with duration of aging, based on k(s) values and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs). However, the decreases in bioavailability appear to be species specific. Benzo[a]pyrene did not decline in bioavailability for the species tested because it may resist movement into the micropores of the sediment due to its large size. In addition to the bioassays, this article outlines a method for toxicokinetic modeling of biotransformed compounds and methods for statistical comparisons of kinetic parameters (i.e., k(s), k(d)...) and BAF values.

  6. Hypoxia depresses CYP1A induction and enhances DNA damage, but has minimal effects on antioxidant responses in sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) larvae exposed to dispersed crude oil.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subham; DiGiulio, Richard T; Drollette, Brian D; L Plata, Desire; Brownawell, Bruce J; McElroy, Anne E

    2016-08-01

    The growing incidence of hypoxic regions in coastal areas receiving high volumes of anthropogenic discharges requires more focused risk assessment of multiple stressors. One area needing further study is the combined effect of hypoxia and oil exposure. This study examined the short-term sublethal effects of co-exposure to hypoxia and water accommodated fractions (WAF) and chemically enhanced WAFs (CEWAFs) of Southern Louisiana Crude oil on detoxification, antioxidant defenses and genotoxicity in early life stage sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus). CYP1A induction (evaluated by measuring EROD activity), activity of a number of key antioxidant enzymes (GST, GR, GPx, SOD, CAT, and GCL), levels of antioxidants (tGSH, GSH, and GSSG), evidence of lipid peroxidation (evaluated using the TBARS assay), and DNA damage (evaluated using the comet assay) provided a broad assessment of responses. Contaminant detoxification pathways induced by oil exposure were inhibited by co-exposure to hypoxia, indicating a maladaptive response. The interactive effects of oil and hypoxia on antioxidant defenses were mixed, but generally indicated less pronounced alterations, with significant increases in lipid peroxidation not observed. Hypoxia significantly enhanced DNA damage induced by oil exposure indicating the potential for significant deleterious effects post exposure. This study demonstrates the importance of considering hypoxia as an enhanced risk factor in assessing the effects of contaminants in areas where seasonal hypoxia may be prevalent.

  7. Hypoxia Enhances the Toxicity of Corexit EC9500A and Chemically Dispersed Southern Louisiana Sweet Crude Oil (MC-242) to Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) Larvae.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subham; Huang, Irvin J; McElroy, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Oil exploration and production activities are common in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as many other coastal and near coastal areas worldwide. Seasonal hypoxia is also a common feature in the Northern Gulf, and many other coastal areas, which is likely to increase in severity and extent with continuing anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Hypoxia has well established physiological effects on many organisms, and it has been shown to enhance the toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (persistent components of petroleum) in fish. The goal of this study was to examine the combined effects of hypoxia and exposure to contaminants associated with oil spills. We evaluated the effects of short term (48 hr) exposures to Corexit EC9500A, water accommodated fractions (WAF), and chemically enhanced water accommodated fractions (CEWAF) prepared from Southern Louisiana Sweet Crude Oil (MC 242) on survival of sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) larvae held under normoxic (ambient air) or hypoxic (2 mg/L O2) conditions. Results demonstrated that hypoxia significantly enhances mortality observed in response to Corexit or CEWAF solutions. In the latter case, significant interactions between the two stressors were also observed. Our data supports the need to further evaluate the combined stresses imparted by hypoxia and exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons and dispersants.

  8. Predicting the toxicity of major ions in seawater to mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnow (Menidia beryllina)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillard, D.A.; DuFresne, D.L.; Caudle, D.D.; Tietge, J.E.; Evans, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Although marine organisms are naturally adapted to salinities well above those of freshwater, elevated concentrations of specific ions have been shown to cause adverse effects on some saltwater species. Because some ions are also physiologically essential, a deficiency of these ions can also cause significant effects. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity associated with major ions, mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnows (Menidia beryllina) were exposed to saline solutions containing calcium, magnesium, potassium, strontium, bicarbonate, borate, bromide, and sulfate at concentrations above and below what would be found in seawater. Solution salinity was maintained at approximately 31% by increasing or decreasing sodium and chloride concentrations. Logistic regression models were developed with both the ion molar concentrations and ion activity. Toxicity to all three species was observed when either a deficiency or an excess of potassium and calcium occurred. Significant mortality occurred in all species when exposed to excess concentrations of magnesium, bicarbonate, and borate. The response to the remaining ions varied with species. Sheepshead minnows were the most tolerant of both deficient and elevated levels of the different ions. Mysid shrimp and inland silverside minnows demonstrated similar sensitivities to several ions, but silverside minnow response was more variable. As a result, the logistic models that predict inland silverside minnow survival generally were less robust than for the other two species.

  9. Toxicity of botanical formulations to nursery-infesting white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The toxicity of eight commercially-available botanical formulations were evaluated against 3rd instars of the nursery-infesting white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Popillia japonica Newman, Exomala orientalis (Waterhouse), Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), and Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. In vi...

  10. An annotated checklist of the New World pentodontine scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Pentodontini).

    PubMed

    López-García, Margarita M; Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor J; Cave, Ronald D; Amat-García, Germán

    2016-09-26

    An updated and annotated checklist of the Pentodontini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) of the New World is presented. The tribe is composed of 32 genera and 151 species, including the introduced species Heteronychus arator (Fabricius).

  11. Primary types of Chinese longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary types of Chinese (mainland China, Taiwan, and Tibet) longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution are catalogued and figured, current through 2012. Data on the original combination, current name, current tribal classification, and ...

  12. Primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) are catalogued and figured, current through 2012 (but also including some 2013 holotypes). Data on the original combination, current combina...

  13. Apostasimerini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Baridinae). Rectification of authorship, year of publication, rank, and taxa included

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The following nomenclatural changes are proposed in the Coleoptera, Curculionidae: the author of Apostasimerini is Schoenherr (1844), not Lacordaire (1866); Madopterini Lacordaire, 1866 is demoted to subtribe of Apostasimerini; Erirhinus mourei Bondar, 1943 is a new synonym of Apostasimerus serriros...

  14. Two new fossil species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic and Dominican Amber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are described and illustrated from fossil resin: Cryptocephalus groehni sp. nov (Baltic amber) and Cryptocephalus kheelorum sp. nov. (Dominican amber). These are the first described species of Cryptocephalinae from fossil resin. ...

  15. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated.

  16. Primary types of Chinese longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary types of Chinese (mainland China, Taiwan, and Tibet) longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution are catalogued and figured, current through 2012. Data on the original combination, current name, current tribal classification, and ...

  17. A new species of Phymatodes Mulsant (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species Phymatodes (Poecilium) latefasciatus sp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiini) from China is described and illustrated. Features distinguishing the new species from its congeners are presented. PMID:24478575

  18. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India.

    PubMed

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Micraspispusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far.

  19. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  20. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  1. Host range specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Treesearch

    Samita Limbu; Katie Cassidy; Melody Keena; Patrick Tobin; Kelli Hoover

    2015-01-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is...

  2. New records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boobar, L.R.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Perillo, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Locations, habitat descriptions, and collection dates are listed for new records of 4 genera and 12 species of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in Maine. Previously, 17 genera and 53 species of the aquatic beetle were reported from Maine.

  3. Effects of Insecticide Exposure on Movement and Population Size Estimates of Predatory Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Population size estimates of arthropod predators and parasitoids may paradoxically increase following insecticide applications. Previous research with ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) suggests such unusual results reflect increased arthropod movement and capture in traps rather than real chang...

  4. Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larval development and predation of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Treesearch

    Samita Limbu; Melody A. Keena; David Long; Nancy Ostiguy; Kelli. Hoover

    2015-01-01

    Development time and prey consumption of Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larvae by instar, strain, and temperature were evaluated. S. camptodromus, a specialist predator of hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae (Annand) (Hemiptera:...

  5. Pseudomacrochenus wusuae sp. n., a new species from Sichuan, China (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Liu, Bin; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pseudomacrochenus wusuae sp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Lamiini) is described from Sichuan, China. Relevant morphological characters are illustrated by colour plates and a differential diagnosis of the new species from its relatives is provided. PMID:28331404

  6. Similarities in pheromonal communication of flea beetles Phyllotreta cruciferae Goeze and Ph. vittula Redtenbacher (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remarkable similarities have been found in the pheromonal communication of Phyllotreta vittula Redtenbacher and of Ph. cruciferae Goeze (European population) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae). In previous European field tests with Ph. cruciferae, only the major male-produced sesquiterpene identified from ...

  7. Timing of onset of evening activity of adult chinese rose beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult Chinese rose beetles, Adoretus sinicus (Burmeister) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Adoretini), present in China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, the Marianas Islands, the Caroline Islands, and the Hawaiian Islands, are nighttime defoliators that feed on a wide vari...

  8. A catalogue of Lithuanian beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Tamutis, Vytautas; Tamutė, Brigita; Ferenca, Romas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the first complete and updated list of all 3597 species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) belonging to 92 familiesfound and published in Lithuania until 2011, with comments also provided on the main systematic and nomenclatural changes since the last monographic treatment in two volumes (Pileckis and Monsevičius 1995, 1997). The introductory section provides a general overview of the main features of the territory of Lithuania, the origins and formation of the beetle fauna and their conservation, the faunistic investigations in Lithuania to date revealing the most important stages of the faunistic research process with reference to the most prominent scientists, an overview of their work, and their contribution to Lithuanian coleopteran faunal research. Species recorded in Lithuania by some authors without reliable evidence and requiring further confirmation with new data are presented in a separate list, consisting of 183 species. For the first time, analysis of errors in works of Lithuanian authors concerning data on coleopteran fauna has been conducted and these errors have been corrected. All available published and Internet sources on beetles found in Lithuania have been considered in the current study. Over 630 literature sources on species composition of beetles, their distribution in Lithuania and neighbouring countries, and taxonomic revisions and changes are reviewed and cited. An alphabetical list of these literature sources is presented. After revision of public beetle collections in Lithuania, the authors propose to remove 43 species from the beetle species list of the country on the grounds, that they have been wrongly identified or published by mistake. For reasons of clarity, 19 previously noted but later excluded species are included in the current checklist with comments. Based on faunal data from neighbouring countries, species expected to occur in Lithuania are matnioned. In total 1390 species are attributed to this

  9. Lilioceris groehni sp. n.: the first authentic species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber.

    PubMed

    Bukejs, Andris; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Based on a single well-preserved specimen from Eocene Baltic amber, Lilioceris groehnisp. n. is described and illustrated using phase-contrast X-ray microtomography. It is the first described species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber. A check-list of fossil Criocerinae is provided. Placement of Crioceris pristiana (Germar, 1813) is discussed, this species is removed from Criocerinae and placed in Coleoptera incertae sedis.

  10. Lilioceris groehni sp. n.: the first authentic species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber

    PubMed Central

    Bukejs, Andris; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on a single well-preserved specimen from Eocene Baltic amber, Lilioceris groehni sp. n. is described and illustrated using phase-contrast X-ray microtomography. It is the first described species of Criocerinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic amber. A check-list of fossil Criocerinae is provided. Placement of Crioceris pristiana (Germar, 1813) is discussed, this species is removed from Criocerinae and placed in Coleoptera incertae sedis. PMID:27853400

  11. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-07-08

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species.

  12. Determination of Coleoptera fauna on carcasses in Ankara province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Senem; Sert, Osman

    2009-01-10

    In this study, 40 species from Staphylinidae, Histeridae, Dermestidae, Silphidae, Nitidulidae and Cleridae families of Coleoptera which were found in 12 pig (Sus scrofa L.) carcasses were identified and recorded during a one-year period at the Hacettepe University Beytepe Campus located in Ankara, Turkey. According to the duration of their presence on the carcasses, 22 of these species were accepted to be important in decomposition. Their distribution over the months and the duration of their presence in the various decomposition stages over the seasons were determined.

  13. Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera) of Canada and Alaska. Second edition

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Yves; Bouchard, Patrice; Davies, Anthony E.; Sikes, Derek S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract All 8237 species-group taxa of Coleoptera known to occur in Canada and Alaska are recorded by province/territory or state, along with their author(s) and year of publication, in a classification framework. Only presence of taxa in each Canadian province or territory and Alaska is noted. Labrador is considered a distinct geographical entity. Adventive and Holarctic species-group taxa are indicated. References to pertinent identification keys are given under the corresponding supraspecific taxa in the data archive. PMID:24363590

  14. Endemism patterns in the Italian leaf beetle fauna (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Maurizio; Urbani, Fabrizia; D’Alessandro, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this contribution the results of a zoogeographical analysis, carried out on the 123 endemic leaf beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) occurring in Italy and its immediately adjacent regions, are reported. To assess the level of faunistic similarity among the different geographic regions studied, a cluster analysis was performed, based on the endemic component. This was done by calculating the Baroni Urbani & Buser’s similarity index (BUB). Finally, a parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE) was used to identify the most important areas of endemism in Italy. PMID:24163584

  15. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini).

    PubMed

    Łączyński, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-05-20

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  16. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini)

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-01-01

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp. nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. PMID:25373218

  17. New taxa, notes and new synonymy in Neoibidionini (Cerambycidae, Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Martins, Ubirajara R; Galileo, Maria Helena M

    2014-04-11

    New taxa, notes, and new synonymy in Neoibidionini (Cerambycidae, Coleoptera) are given. New taxa are described from Ecuador: Compsibidion inflatum sp. nov., Bezarkia gen. nov. and B. suturalis sp. nov., Corimbion antennatum sp. nov. and Neocompsa muira sp. nov.; from México: Neocompsa chiapensis sp. nov., and from French Guyana: Kunaibidion giesberti sp. nov. Pygmodeon maculatum Martins & Galileo, 2012 is considered a new synonym of Heterachthes xyleus Martins, 1974 which is transferred to the genus Pygmodeon as a new combination. Notes on variability and new records of Asynapteron equatorianum (Martins, 1960) are presented.

  18. Revision of the Australian ceratocanthinae (coleoptera, scarabaeoidea, hybosoridae).

    PubMed

    Ballerio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The Australian fauna of Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae) is revised. Two genera are present, both shared with Asia, with a total of seven species, all localized in eastern Queensland and all except one, endemic to Australia. Cyphopisthes is comprised of three species, two of them new (Cyphopisthes yorkensis sp. n. and Cyphopisthes monteithi sp. n., the latter, together with Cyphopisthes descarpentriesi Paulian, 1977 displaying an unusual ecology, with occurrence in the southern Queensland dry rainforest/scrub habitats), and Pterorthochaetes is comprised of four species, two of them new (Pterorthochaetes danielsi sp. n. and Pterorthochaeres storeyi sp. n.). Descriptions, distribution, ecological remarks and a key to species are provided.

  19. Passalidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ferbans, Larry; Reyes-Castillo, Pedro; Schuster, Jack C

    2015-05-12

    We present a synthesis of the state of knowledge concerning the species of Passalidae (Coleoptera) of the West Indies and we present a key to the species. The recently described genus Antillanax Boucher renders the subgenus Passalus (Pertinax) Kaup paraphyletic, therefore we place Antillanax in synonymy with Passalus (Pertinax) and we propose a new combination for Passalus (Pertinax) doesburgi (Boucher). The island richest in species is Hispaniola, with five species, three of them endemic. Excluding Trinidad and Tobago, the passalid fauna of the West Indies comprises 13 species; this is low richness, but with high endemism (50%), especially for the Greater Antilles.

  20. Revision of the Australian Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Ballerio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Australian fauna of Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae) is revised. Two genera are present, both shared with Asia, with a total of seven species, all localized in eastern Queensland and all except one, endemic to Australia. Cyphopisthes is comprised of three species, two of them new (Cyphopisthes yorkensis sp. n. and Cyphopisthes monteithi sp. n., the latter, together with Cyphopisthes descarpentriesi Paulian, 1977 displaying an unusual ecology, with occurrence in the southern Queensland dry rainforest/scrub habitats), and Pterorthochaetes is comprised of four species, two of them new (Pterorthochaetes danielsi sp. n. and Pterorthochaeres storeyi sp. n.). Descriptions, distribution, ecological remarks and a key to species are provided. PMID:24146587

  1. Review of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare; Nicolas, Vincent; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Fürsch, Helmut

    2017-02-22

    The Iranian species of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are reviewed. The current list includes 12 species, all placed in a single genus Hyperaspis Chevrolat, 1836. Hyperapsis asiatica Lewis, 1896 and H. pumila Mulsant, 1850 are excluded from the Iranian list of Coccinellidae. Diagnoses of the tribe Hyperaspidini and the genus Hyperaspis are given. Images of adult beetles and diagnostic characters of the male genitalia of all species distributed in Iran are shown. A key to identification of the species is presented. Distribution records are provided for each species along with information on host plants and prey species when available.

  2. Acute toxicity of 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, terbufos and trichlorfon to grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp. ) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) as affected by salinity and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Brecken-Folse, J.A. . Environmental Protection Agency) Mayer, F.L. . Environmental Protection Agency); Pedigo, L.E. ); Marking, L.L. . National Fisheries Research Center)

    1994-01-01

    The toxicities of two industrial chemicals (4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and two organophosphate insecticides (terbufos and trichlorfon) to juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were determined by static, 96-h toxicity tests in a factorial design with 12 combinations of salinity and temperature (15, 20, 25, 30 ppt [times] 17, 22, 27 C). Concentrations of the toxicants, including bioconcentration, were determined as appropriate by gas or liquid chromatography and the use of [sup 14]C-labeled compounds. The 96-h LC50s for 4-nitrophenol ranged from 12 to 31 mg/L and for 2,4-dinitrophenol from 13 to 50 mg/L. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 4-nitrophenol and both test organisms. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows, but toxicity to grass shrimp increased as salinity increased. Toxicity decreased with increased temperature for grass shrimp exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows exposed to 4-nitrophenol, increased with temperature for sheepshead minnows exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol, and no change was observed for grass shrimp exposed to 4-nitrophenol. Bioconcentration of phenols in both test organisms increased as concentration increased. The 96-h LC50s for terbufos ranged from 3.4 to 6.6 [mu]g/L and for trichlorfon from 6.3 to 19,300 [mu]g/L. Terbufos and trichlorfon toxicity to grass shrimp and sheepshead minnows increased with increased temperature. BCFs for terbufos were greater in sheepshead minnows than grass shrimp, but were reversed for trichlorfon.

  3. Accumulation of hexahydro- 1,3,5-trinitro- 1,3,5-triazine in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and aquatic oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Belden, Jason B; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Lydy, Michael J

    2005-08-01

    The extensively used military explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) has been widely released to the environment during production, usage, and disposal operations. Toxic effects of RDX have been reported in terrestrial and aquatic receptors, but investigations regarding the bioaccumulation potential of RDX in aquatic systems are scarce. The objective of the present study was to describe the toxicokinetics of RDX during aqueous exposure for the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and aquatic oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) and to compare the amount of RDX accumulation in juvenile catfish following aqueous exposure only, dietary exposure only, and a combination of dietary and aqueous exposure. The toxicokinetics measurements included bioconcentration factors (BCFs), uptake rates, elimination rates, and biological half-lives. First-order, single-compartment models described the toxicokinetics for both species. Uptake of RDX into oligochaetes was relatively rapid (uptake clearance constant [k(u)] of 5.17 ml/g/h) compared to that in catfish (k(u) = 1.28 ml/g/h). However, elimination also was more rapid in oligochaetes, with biological half-lives of 0.28 and 1.09 h for oligochaetes and catfish, respectively. Thus, both species had very similar estimated BCFs of 2.1 ml/g for oligochaetes and 2.0 ml/g for catfish. Accumulation of RDX in fish that were fed oligochaetes exposed to an exceedingly high water concentration of RDX was minimal. The present investigation indicates that RDX uptake via the aqueous route is the expected dominant uptake pathway, with dietary uptake contributing minimally to the overall body burden in fish inhabiting RDX-contaminated sites. Because of the exceedingly low bioaccumulative potential and low reported toxicity of RDX, the presence of this explosive in aquatic systems is unlikely to pose unacceptable risks to invertebrates and fish.

  4. SEROSURVEY OF SELECTED ARBOVIRAL PATHOGENS IN FREE-RANGING, TWO-TOED SLOTHS (CHOLOEPUS HOFFMANNI) AND THREE-TOED SLOTHS (BRADYPUS VARIEGATUS) IN COSTA RICA, 2005-07.

    PubMed

    Medlin, Scott; Deardorff, Eleanor R; Hanley, Christopher S; Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Siudak-Campfield, Asia; Dallwig, Rebecca; da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Tesh, Robert B; Martin, Maria Pia; Weaver, Scott C; Vaughan, Christopher; Ramirez, Oscar; Sladky, Kurt K; Paul-Murphy, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    We screened for antibodies to 16 arboviruses in four populations of free-ranging sloths in Costa Rica. Blood samples were taken from 16 Hoffman's two-toed sloths (HTSs; Choloepus hoffmanni ) and 26 brown-throated sloths (BTSs; Bradypus variegatus ) over a 3-yr period. We used serologic assays to detect antibodies against 10 arboviruses previously described in sloths (St. Louis encephalitis [SLEV], Changuinola, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Ilheus [ILHV], Oropouche, Mayaro, Utinga, Murutucu, Punta Toro, and vesicular stomatitis [VSV] viruses) and six arboviruses not described in sloths (Rio Grande, West Nile [WNV], eastern equine encephalitis, Piry, Munguba, and La Crosse viruses). Overall, 80% of sloths had detectable antibodies to SLEV, 67% had antibodies to ILHV, 32% to Punta Toro virus, 30% to Changuinola virus, 15% to WNV, 14% to VSV, 11% to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, and 10% to Rio Grande virus. No samples had detectable antibodies to the remaining eight viruses. We found a significant increase in prevalence of antibody to VSV in HTSs between 2005 and 2007, and for WNV antibody between 2005 and 2006. We found no significant differences in the prevalences of antibodies to the sampled viruses between the two locations. Antibody prevalences were significantly higher in HTSs than in BTSs for SLEV in 2005. Antibody-positive results for ILHV were likely due to cross-reaction with SLEV. The novel finding of antibodies to Rio Grande virus in sloths could be due to cross-reaction with another phlebovirus. These findings might have implications for land management and domestic animal health. Due to the nature of the study, we could not determine whether sloths could represent amplification hosts for these viruses, or whether they were only exposed and could be used as sentinel species. Further studies are needed to fully characterize arboviral exposure in sloths.

  5. EFFECT OF DIET QUALITY ON NUTRIENT ALLOCATION TO THE TEST AND ARISTOTLE'S LANTERN IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS (LAMARCK, 1816).

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura Elizabeth; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, Addison L; Lawrence, John M

    2012-08-01

    Small adult (19.50 ± 2.01g wet weight) Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (12 to 36% dry weight as fed) and carbohydrate (21 to 39 % dry weight) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily ration of 1.5% of the average body weight of all individuals for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion scores were used to compare six different dietary composition hypotheses for eight growth measurements. For each physical growth response, different mathematical models representing a priori hypotheses were compared using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) score. The AIC is one of many information-theoretic approaches that allows for direct comparison of non-nested models with varying number of parameters. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of test diameter increase. Dietary protein level was the best model of test with spines wet weight gain and test with spines dry matter production. When the Aristotle's lantern was corrected for size of the test, there was an inverse relationship with dietary protein level. Log transformed lantern to test with spines index was also best associated with the dietary protein model. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for growth parameters. However, the protein × carbohydrate interaction model was the best model of organic content (% dry weight) of the test without spines. These data suggest that there is a differential allocation of resources when dietary protein is limiting and the test with spines, but not the Aristotle's lantern, is affected by availability of dietary nutrients.

  6. SEROSURVEY OF SELECTED ARBOVIRAL PATHOGENS IN FREE-RANGING, TWO-TOED SLOTHS (CHOLOEPUS HOFFMANNI) AND THREE-TOED SLOTHS (BRADYPUS VARIEGATUS) IN COSTA RICA, 2005–07

    PubMed Central

    Medlin, Scott; Deardorff, Eleanor R.; Hanley, Christopher S.; Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Siudak-Campfield, Asia; Dallwig, Rebecca; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Tesh, Robert B.; Pia Martin, Maria; Weaver, Scott C.; Vaughan, Christopher; Ramirez, Oscar; Sladky, Kurt K.; Paul-Murphy, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    We screened for antibodies to 16 arboviruses in four populations of free-ranging sloths in Costa Rica. Blood samples were taken from 16 Hoffman’s two-toed sloths (HTSs; CHOLOEPUS HOFFMANNI) and 26 brown-throated sloths (BTSs; BRADYPUS VARIEGATUS) over a 3-yr period. We used serologic assays to detect antibodies against 10 arboviruses previously described in sloths (St. Louis encephalitis [SLEV], Changuinola, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Ilheus [ILHV], Oropouche, Mayaro, Utinga, Murutucu, Punta Toro, and vesicular stomatitis [VSV] viruses) and six arboviruses not described in sloths (Rio Grande, West Nile [WNV], eastern equine encephalitis, Piry, Munguba, and La Crosse viruses). Overall, 80% of sloths had detectable antibodies to SLEV, 67% had antibodies to ILHV, 32% to Punta Toro virus, 30% to Changuinola virus, 15% to WNV, 14% to VSV, 11% to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, and 10% to Rio Grande virus. No samples had detectable antibodies to the remaining eight viruses. We found a significant increase in prevalence of antibody to VSV in HTSs between 2005 and 2007, and for WNV antibody between 2005 and 2006. We found no significant differences in the prevalences of antibodies to the sampled viruses between the two locations. Antibody prevalences were significantly higher in HTSs than in BTSs for SLEV in 2005. Antibody-positive results for ILHV were likely due to cross-reaction with SLEV. The novel finding of antibodies to Rio Grande virus in sloths could be due to cross-reaction with another phlebovirus. These findings might have implications for land management and domestic animal health. Due to the nature of the study, we could not determine whether sloths could represent amplification hosts for these viruses, or whether they were only exposed and could be used as sentinel species. Further studies are needed to fully characterize arboviral exposure in sloths. PMID:27479900

  7. EFFECT OF DIET QUALITY ON NUTRIENT ALLOCATION TO THE TEST AND ARISTOTLE’S LANTERN IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS (LAMARCK, 1816)

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, Laura Elizabeth; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, Addison L; Lawrence, John M

    2014-01-01

    Small adult (19.50 ± 2.01g wet weight) Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (12 to 36% dry weight as fed) and carbohydrate (21 to 39 % dry weight) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily ration of 1.5% of the average body weight of all individuals for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion scores were used to compare six different dietary composition hypotheses for eight growth measurements. For each physical growth response, different mathematical models representing a priori hypotheses were compared using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) score. The AIC is one of many information-theoretic approaches that allows for direct comparison of non-nested models with varying number of parameters. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of test diameter increase. Dietary protein level was the best model of test with spines wet weight gain and test with spines dry matter production. When the Aristotle’s lantern was corrected for size of the test, there was an inverse relationship with dietary protein level. Log transformed lantern to test with spines index was also best associated with the dietary protein model. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for growth parameters. However, the protein × carbohydrate interaction model was the best model of organic content (% dry weight) of the test without spines. These data suggest that there is a differential allocation of resources when dietary protein is limiting and the test with spines, but not the Aristotle’s lantern, is affected by availability of dietary nutrients. PMID:25431520

  8. Effects of Louisiana crude oil on the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during a life-cycle exposure to laboratory oiled sediment.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Hemmer, Becky L; Lilavois, Crystal R; Krzykwa, Julie; Almario, Alex; Awkerman, Jill A; Barron, Mace G

    2016-11-01

    Determining the long-term effects of crude oil exposure is critical for ascertaining population-level ecological risks of spill events. A 19-week complete life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to reference (uncontaminated) sediment spiked with laboratory weathered South Louisiana crude (SLC) oil at five concentrations as well as one unspiked sediment control and one seawater (no sediment) control. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to the oiled sediments at measured concentrations of < 1 (sediment control), 50, 103, 193, 347, and 711 mg total polyaromatic hydrocarbons (tPAH)/kg dry sediment. Juveniles were exposed through the reproductively active adult phase at measured concentrations of <1 (sediment control), 52, 109, 199, 358, and 751 mg tPAH/kg sediment. Throughout the exposure, fish were assessed for growth, survival, and reproduction. Resulting F1 embryos were then collected, incubated, and hatched in clean water to determine if parental full life-cycle exposure to oiled sediment produced trans-generational effects. Larvae experienced significantly reduced standard length (5-13% reduction) and wet weight (13-35% reduction) at concentrations at and above 50 and 103 mg tPAH/kg sediment, respectively. At 92 and 132 days post hatch (dph), standard length was reduced (7-13% reduction) at 199 and 109 mg tPAH/kg dry sediment, respectively, and wet weight for both time periods was reduced at concentrations at and above 109 mg tPAH/kg dry sediment (21-38% reduction). A significant reduction (51-65%) in F0 fecundity occurred at the two highest test concentrations, but no difference was observed in F1 embryo survival. This study is the first to report the effects of chronic laboratory exposure to oiled sediment, and will assist the development of population models for evaluating risk to benthic spawning fish species exposed to oiled sediments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1627

  9. Capture of Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in floor traps: the effect of previous captures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of prior captures on the trapping performance of floor traps was evaluated for the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in laboratory conditions. The effect...

  10. Effects of prescribed fire and fire surrogates on Saproxylic coleoptera in the Southern Appalachians of North Carolina

    Treesearch

    Joshua W. Campbell; James L. Hanula; Thomas A. Waldrop

    2008-01-01

    We examined the effects of forest management practices (prescribed burning, mechanical, and prescribed burn plus mechanical) on saproxylic forest Coleoptera in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. During the 2-yr study, we captured 37,191 Coleoptera with baited multiple- unnel traps and pipe traps, comprising 20 families and 122 species that were used...

  11. Ipsenol and Ipsdienol Attract Monochamus titillator (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Associated Large Pine Woodborers in Southeastern United States

    Treesearch

    D. R. Miller; C. Asaro

    2005-01-01

    We determined the responses of the southern pine sawyer, Monochamus titillator (F.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), to the pheromones (ipsenol, ipsdienol, and lanierone) used by pine engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in the southeastern United States. (±)-Ipsenol, (±)- ipsdienol, or a combination increased catches of M. titillator...

  12. Possible origin of B chromosome in Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Amorim, Igor Costa; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Marília França; Moura, Rita Cássia

    2016-08-01

    B chromosomes have so far been described in about 80 species of Coleoptera, mainly using conventional staining analysis. In this study, 152 individuals of the dung beetle Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera), collected from three isolated geographical areas in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed to determine the frequency, prevalence, distribution, meiotic behavior, and possible B chromosome origin. The cytogenetic analysis consisted of conventional staining, C-banding, triple fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DA/DAPI), and fluorescent in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and H3 histone gene as probes, as well as microdissection and chromosome painting of the B chromosome. The B chromosomes were detected in all populations analyzed. Analysis revealed the heterochromatic nature and the presence of G+C-rich blocks and 18S rDNA on the B chromosome. FISH with DNA from microdissected B chromosome painted the entire extension of the B chromosome for all populations, besides the pericentromeric regions of all the autosomes, as well as the X chromosome. Finally, cross-hybridization in nine related species of Dichotomius using the microdissected B chromosome as probe did not reveal any hybridization signal. The results suggest an intraspecific and monophyletic origin for B chromosomes in D. sericeus, probably from the second or third autosomal pair.

  13. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. New information Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolus sororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species. PMID:26177296

  14. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system.

  15. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  16. Acoustic detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) trees and offshoots in Saudi Arabian orchards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal-tissue feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect until after they have caused severe economic damage; consequently, infestations may remain undetected until they are widespread in an orchard....

  17. Ocean acidification affects parameters of immune response and extracellular pH in tropical sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus and Echinometra luccunter.

    PubMed

    Leite Figueiredo, Débora Alvares; Branco, Paola Cristina; Dos Santos, Douglas Amaral; Emerenciano, Andrews Krupinski; Iunes, Renata Stecca; Shimada Borges, João Carlos; Machado Cunha da Silva, José Roberto

    2016-11-01

    The rising concentration of atmospheric CO2 by anthropogenic activities is changing the chemistry of the oceans, resulting in a decreased pH. Several studies have shown that the decrease in pH can affect calcification rates and reproduction of marine invertebrates, but little attention has been drawn to their immune response. Thus this study evaluated in two adult tropical sea urchin species, Lytechinus variegatus and Echinometra lucunter, the effects of ocean acidification over a period of 24h and 5days, on parameters of the immune response, the extracellular acid base balance, and the ability to recover these parameters. For this reason, the phagocytic capacity (PC), the phagocytic index (PI), the capacity of cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell spreading area of phagocytic amebocytes in vitro, and the coelomic fluid pH were analyzed in animals exposed to a pH of 8.0 (control group), 7.6 and 7.3. Experimental pH's were predicted by IPCC for the future of the two species. Furthermore, a recovery test was conducted to verify whether animals have the ability to restore these physiological parameters after being re-exposed to control conditions. Both species presented a significant decrease in PC, in the pH of coelomic fluid and in the cell spreading area. Besides that, Echinometra lucunter showed a significant decrease in cell spreading and significant differences in coelomocyte proportions. The recovery test showed that the PC of both species increased, also being below the control values. Even so, they were still significantly higher than those exposed to acidified seawater, indicating that with the re-establishment of the pH value the phagocytic capacity of cells tends to restore control conditions. These results demonstrate that the immune system and the coelomic fluid pH of these animals can be affected by ocean acidification. However, the effects of a short-term exposure can be reversible if the natural values ​​are re-established. Thus, the effects of

  18. Accumulation and depuration of sediment-sorbed C{sub 12}- and C{sub 16}-polychlorinated alkanes by oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, A.T.; Wiens, S.C.; Webster, G.R.B.; Bergman, A.; Muir, D.C.G.

    1998-10-01

    Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were exposed to sediment spiked with four {sup 14}C-polychlorinated alkanes (PCAs) (C{sub 12}H{sub 20}Cl{sub 6} [56% Cl by weight], C{sub 12}H{sub 16}Cl{sub 10} [69% Cl], C{sub 16}H{sub 31}Cl{sub 3} [35% Cl], and C{sub 16}H{sub 21}Cl{sub 13} [69% Cl]) to measure bioaccumulation parameters and biotransformation. Chlorinated paraffins are industrial products that consist of thousands of different PCAs. Chlorinated paraffins are hydrophobic and are reported to have relatively high concentrations in sediment compared with other persistent organochlorines; however, no data exist on their bioavailability from sediment. The PCAs C{sub 12}H{sub 20}Cl{sub 6}, C{sub 12}H{sub 16}Cl{sub 10}, and C{sub 16}H{sub 31}Cl{sub 3} were readily available to sediment-ingesting oligochaetes, whereas C{sub 16}H{sub 21}Cl{sub 13} had lower bioavailability. Uptake rates of the C{sub 12}-PCAs were greater than the C{sub 16}-PCAs, but half-lives (t{sub {1/2}}s) were greater for the C{sub 16}-PCAs (t{sub {1/2}} = 30-33 d) than for the C{sub 12}-PCAs (t{sub {1/2}} = 12-14 d). Biota-sediment accumulation factors were >1 for C{sub 12}H{sub 20}Cl{sub 6}, C{sub 12}H{sub 16} Cl{sub 10}, and C{sub 16}H{sub 31}Cl{sub 3}, but <1 for C{sub 16}H{sub 21}Cl{sub 13}. Comparison of toluene-extractable and -nonextractable {sup 14}C suggest that PCAs were biotransformed in aerobic sediments and by oligochaetes, and that the susceptibility to degradation in sediments decreases with increasing chlorine content. The relative abundance of individual PCAs may differ between sediment and benthic invertebrates because of differences in the bioaccumulation and degradation of PCAs of varying carbon chain length and chlorine content.

  19. Exposure of three generations of the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the androgen, 17beta-trenbolone: effects on survival, development, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Geraldine M; Hemmer, Becky L; Raimondo, Sandy; Goodman, Larry R; Kulaw, Dannielle H

    2010-09-01

    Estimating long-term effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on a species is important to assessing the overall risk to the populations. The present study reports the results of a 42-week exposure of estuarine sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the androgen, 17beta-trenbolone (Tb) conducted to determine if partial-(F0) or single-generation (F1) fish exposures identify multigenerational (F0-F3) effects of androgens on fish. Adult F0 fish were exposed to 0.007, 0.027, 0.13, 0.87,and 4.1 microg Tb/L, the F1 generation to < or =0.87 microg Tb/L, the F2 fish to < or =0.13 microg Tb/L, and the F3 fish to < or =0.027 microg Tb/L. The highest concentrations with reproducing populations at the end of the F0, F1, and F2 generations were 4.1, 0.87, and 0.027 microg Tb/L, respectively. Reproduction in the F0, F1, and F2 generations was significantly reduced at 0.87, 0.027, and 0.027 microg Tb/L, respectively. Fish were significantly masculinized in the F1 generation exposed to 0.13 microg Tb/L or greater. Female plasma vitellogenin was significantly reduced in F0 fish exposed to > or =0.87 microg Tb/L. Gonadosomatic indices of the F0 and F1 generations were significantly increased at 0.87 and 0.13 microg Tb/L in the F0 and F1 generation, respectively, and were accompanied by ovarian histological changes. Reproduction was the most consistently sensitive measure of androgen effects and, after a life-cycle exposure, the daily reproductive rate predicted concentrations affecting successive generations. The present study provides evidence that a multiple generation exposure of fish to some endocrine-disrupting chemicals can result in developmental and reproductive changes that have a much greater impact on the success of a species than was indicated from shorter term exposures.

  20. Coleoptera associated with macrophytes of the genus Salvinia in four oxbow lakes in two river basins in southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paula-Bueno, M C; Fonseca-Gessner, A A

    2015-11-01

    Macrophytes in oxbow lakes represent an important substrate for the Coleoptera. Two oxbow lakes the Rio Paranapanema were studied and the other two Rio Mogi-Guaçu, in the State de São Paulo, Brasil. In this study, there is greater similarity between the communities of Coleoptera of lakes greater connectivity with the main river channel or the difference in the species of Salvinia collected in the lakes studied interferes Coleoptera fauna that uses as substrate. A total of 9,222 specimens of Coleoptera were collected and identified in 10 families and 40 genera. The analysis MDS for abundance of Coleoptera showed the grouping of the oxbow lakes the Paranapanema River and a distancing the oxbow lakes the Mogi-Guaçu. The PERMANOVA test did not reveal any difference in the fauna between the wet and dry periods. It was concluded that the connectivity between river and lake is not decisive for the richness and abundance of aquatic fauna of Coleoptera. Therefore, the richness and abundance of aquatic Coleoptera associated vary with the species of Salvinia used as substrate.

  1. Substrate discrimination in burying beetles, Nicrophorus orbicollis (Coleoptera: Silphidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin Louise

    1991-01-01

    Burying beetles Nicrophorus orbicollis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) secure and bury small vertebrate carcasses as a food resource for their offspring and themselves. Burial may take place at the point of carcass discovery or at some distance from that site. Burying beetles were tested to determine if they discriminate between different substrates when burying a carcass. Three substrates were presented simultaneously. Substrate one contained soil from typical beetle habitat; substrates two and three contained 2:1 and 5:1 ratios, respectively, of soil and a senescent prairie grass (Panicum virgatum), which added a bulk structural component to the soil. Beetles generally moved and buried the carcass within 24 hours. Results for both paired and individual trials suggest that burying beetles discriminate between substrates, preferring substrates with added bulk over those without.

  2. First Occurrence of Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Ricalde, M P

    2017-05-24

    Specimens of the mango stone weevil Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) were found in fruits of mango from a tree in the residential area of the Rio de Janeiro, RJ. This is the first report of the S. mangiferae in Brazil, currently regulated as an absent quarantine pest in the country. A taxonomist specialized in Curculionidae confirmed the identification based on morphological diagnostics characteristics. This detection is a relevant finding, because Brazil is a major producer and exporter of mango and the main areas of mango for exportation are located very far from this detection point. This pest damages seed and embryo of mango fruits and it causes reduction of fruit size and its premature dropping. The detection was notified to the Plant Health Department, division of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MAPA), which is the National Plant Protection Organization of Brazil.

  3. Biology and Management of Billbugs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Turfgrass

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Madeleine M.; Ramirez, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Billbugs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Sphenophorus spp.) are a complex of weevil pests affecting turfgrass throughout the United States. Billbug larvae cause damage by feeding in stems, on roots, and on the crowns of turf, causing severe discoloration and eventual plant death. Monitoring efforts have focused on nondestructive pitfall sampling of ground-active billbug adults and on destructive sampling using soil cores for larval stages in the soil. Given the cryptic nature of the susceptible larval stages, billbugs are typically managed by preventive applications of long-residual, systemic insecticides, including neonicotinoids and anthranilic diamides. Despite knowledge of effective management practices including pest-resistant turf varieties, irrigation management, and microbial controls that contribute to an IPM approach, billbug management continues to rely heavily on prophylactic synthetic insecticides. This review will summarize the identification and biology of billbugs and strategies for their management. PMID:27065080

  4. Tolerance of wheat (Poales: Poaceae) seedlings to wireworm (Coleoptera: Elateridae).

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Ryan W; Froese, Paul S; Carter, Arron H

    2014-04-01

    Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae), the subterranean larval stage of the click beetle, are becoming more prevalent in many cropping systems and posing an increasing economic threat to wheat growers in the Pacific Northwest following the cancellation of the insecticide lindane in 2006. Current insecticide seed treatments alone are not adequate for wireworm control. The objective of this study was to evaluate a diverse set of 163 wheat genotypes for tolerance to wireworm feeding. Entries were planted in replicated field trials over 3 yr and evaluated for their performance when grown in the presence of wireworms. Entries were rated based on survival and given a tolerance score. Results indicated that differences exist among wheat genotypes in their level of tolerance to wireworm feeding. In particular, consistently high-ranking genotypes of interest may be 'BR 18', 'Sonalika', 'Safed Lerma', and 'Hollis'. These genotypes, used in conjunction with other cultural or chemical control methods, may help provide an economic means of controlling wireworms.

  5. A study on the Neotropical Anthaxiini (Coleoptera, Buprestidae, Buprestinae)

    PubMed Central

    Bílý, Svatopluk

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Revision of the Neotropical genera of the subtribe Anthaxiina Gory & Laporte, 1839 (Coleoptera, Buprestidae, Buprestinae, Anthaxiini). Five new genera are described: Anthaxita gen. n., Charlesina gen. n., Cobosina gen. n., Marikia gen. n. and Sanchezia gen. n. Genus Agrilaxia Kerremans, 1903 is divided into two subgenera: Agrilaxia and Costiptera subgen. n. and the genus Bilyaxia Hołyński, 1989 is divided into three subgenera: Bilyaxia, Paraguayetta subgen. n. and Tomasia subgen. n. One new species is described: Anthaxita peruviana sp. n., and two informal species-groups are suggested within Agrilaxia (Costiptera subgen. n.): Agrilaxia (Costiptera) modesta (Kerremans, 1897) species-group and Agrilaxia (Costiptera) occidentalis (Kerremans, 1900) species-group. Lectotype is designated for Agrilaxia mrazi Obenberger, 1932. A key of all genera/subgenera is provided and all treated taxa are illustrated. PMID:23794907

  6. Diversity of forensic rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) associated with decaying pig carcass in a forest biotope.

    PubMed

    Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Frederick, Christine; Verheggen, Francois J; Drugmand, Didier; Haubruge, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Most forensic studies are focused on Diptera pattern colonization while neglecting Coleoptera succession. So far, little information is available on the postmortem colonization by beetles and the decomposition process they initiate under temperate biogeoclimatic countries. These beetles have, however, been referred to as being part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. Forensic entomologists need increased databases detailing the distribution, ecology, and phenology of necrophagous insects, including staphylinids (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). While pig carcasses are commonly used in forensic entomology studies to surrogate human decomposition and to investigate the entomofaunal succession, very few works have been conducted in Europe on large carcasses. Our work reports the monitoring of the presence of adult rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) on decaying pig carcasses in a forest biotope during four seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter). A total of 23 genera comprising 60 species of rove beetles were collected from pig carcasses.

  7. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system. PMID:27973569

  8. Walking stability of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    PubMed

    Pires, E M; Nogueira, R M; Pina, D S; Manica, C L M; Faroni, L R A; Moreira, P S A

    2016-04-19

    Results obtained in studies can contribute to the advancement of science and innovative methods and techniques for developing practical activities. Reporting conditions that may restrict the implementation of research is critical to ensure the optimal development of further technical studies. The objective of this study was to assess the walking stability of R. dominica on a flat and smooth surface. The study was based on the determination of mortality, morphology and walking stability of the insect outside the grain mass, on a flat and smooth surface. Mortality of adults of this Coleoptera in conditions with and without food was similar, which explains the difficulty that this insect had for accessing the food source on the flat and smooth surface. The measurements of body length (BOL), width (BOW) and height (BOH) of R. dominica were compared with those of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), which showed good ability to walk in these conditions. This study indicated that the former presents lower BOL and BOW, and greater BOH than the second, and all these variables showed differences when analyzed simultaneously by means of the construction of multivariate morphometric indices (Width × Height, Length × Height and Height × Length × Width). These morphometric variables, together with the definition of the geometry most similar to the body shape, resulted in determination of the center of gravity (CG) and static rollover threshold (SRTgeom) for both species. Rhyzopertha dominica and T. castaneum presented CGs considered high and low, respectively, and together with the values obtained for SRTgeom, may justify that R. dominica can be considered a less stable species during movement, and presents greater risk of rollover on flat and smooth surfaces.

  9. Coleoptera species inhabiting prairie wetlands of the Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, B.A.; Swanson, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aquatic Coleoptera of a prairie wetland complex in Stutsman County, North Dakota, were collected from April 1979 to November 1980. Identification of 2594 individuals confirmed 57 species, including seven new records for North Dakota. Two seasonally flooded and two semipermanent wetlands, totaling 7.43 ha, contained 53% of the Dytiscidae, 43% of the Haliplidae, 38% of the Hydrophilidae, and 22% of the Gyrinidae species previously identified from North Dakota. Although 49.1% of the Coleoptera species occurred in both types of wetlands, the occurrence of 29 species varied by wetland class.

  10. Responses by Dendroctonus frontalis and Dendroctonus mesoamericanus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Ssemiochemical lures in Chiapas, Mexico: possible roles of pheromones during joint host attacks

    Treesearch

    Alicia Nino-Dominguez; Brian T. Sullivan; Jose H. Lopez-Urbina; Jorge E. Macias-Samano

    2016-01-01

    In southern Mexico and Central America, the southern pine beetle Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) commonly colonizes host trees simultaneously with Dendroctonus mesoamericanus Armend

  11. Host plant oviposition preference of Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera:Apionidae), a potential biological control agent of yellow starthistle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera: Apionidae) is a weevil native to Europe and western Asia that is being evaluated as a prospective classical biological control agent of Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle) in the United States. Choice oviposition experiments were conducted under laboratory ...

  12. Ancyronyx reticulatus and A. pulcherrimus, two new riffle beetle species from Borneo, and discussion about elmid plastron structures (Coleoptera: Elmidae).

    PubMed

    Kodada, Ján; Jäch, Manfred A; Ciampor, Fedor

    2014-02-03

    Two new species of Ancyronyx Erichson, 1847 (Coleoptera: Elmidae) are described from Borneo: A. pulcherrimus (Brunei) and A. reticulatus (Sabah). Habitus views, illustrations of important characters as well as plastron structures of Ancyronyx reticulatus are presented and discussed.

  13. Non-constant thermal regimes enhance overwintering success and accelerate diapause development for Smicronyx fulvus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent populations of the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) have been inconsistent or declining, particularly in North Dakota. Consequently, field and laboratory research on weevil biology, including development of resistant germplasm, have been limited....

  14. Detection of reproducing populations of Coccinella novemnotata within coccinellid assemblages (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in western South Dakota and western Nebraska

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adults of three native species of lady beetles [Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and Adalia bipunctata (L.); Coleoptera: Coccinellidae] of conservation interest were detected during recent surveys at several locations in western South Dakota and western ...

  15. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the entomopathogens for the management of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) on spring wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wireworms, the larval stage of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae), are serious soil dwelling pests of small grain, corn, sugar beet and potato crops. Limonius californicus (Mannerheim) and Hypnoidus bicolor (Eschscholtz) are the predominant wireworm species infesting wheat in Montana, particula...

  16. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessments by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard W. Mankin; Yigen Chen; Jian J. Duan; Therese M. Poland; Leah S. Bauer

    2011-01-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  17. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack from plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important apple pest that significantly hinders sustainable apple production in eastern North America. The potential for host plant resistance to plum curculio among apple (Malus) germplasm has never been rigorously ev...

  18. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  19. Coexistence and competition between Tomicus Yunnanensis and T. minor (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in yunnan pine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Competition and cooperation between bark beetles, Tomicus yunnanensis and Tomicus minor (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) were examined when they coexisted together in living Yunnan pine trees (Pinus yunnanensis L.) in Yunnan province in southwest China. T. yunnanensis bark beetles were observed to initiate ...

  20. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Wang, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianjun; Nápoles, Jesús Romero; Ji, Yingchao; Jiang, Chunyan; Zhang, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchusaffinis Frolich, 1799, Bruchusatomarius L., 1761, Bruchusloti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinuskergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species.

  1. Influence of temperature on spring flight initiation for southwestern ponderosa pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    M. L. Gaylord; K. K. Williams; R. W. Hofstetter; J. D. McMillin; T. E. Degomez; M. R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Determination of temperature requirements for many economically important insects is a cornerstone of pest management. For bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), this information can facilitate timing of management strategies. Our goals were to determine temperature predictors for flight initiation of three species of Ips bark beetles...

  2. Molecular Diagnostic for Boll Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Based on Amplification of Three Species-specific Microsatellites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of cultivated cotton in the Americas, and reinfestation of zones from which they have been eradicated is of perpetual concern. Extensive arrays of pheromone traps monitor for reintroductions, but occasionally...

  3. Flight propensty of Anoplophora glabripennis, an Asian longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    J. A. Francese; B. Wang; D. R. Lance; Z. Xu; S. Zong; Y. Luo; A. J. Sawyer; V. C. Mastro

    2003-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) (Motschulsky), is a recently introduced pest of hardwoods. Research to study its flight behavior was conducted in the field in Ningxia Autonomous Region, Peoples' Republic of China. To study the flight propensity of A. glabripennis, adult beetles were observed in population...

  4. Host boring preferences of the tea shot-hole borer Euwallacea fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The non-native shot-hole borer, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), was discovered in Florida’s avocado production area in Homestead in 2010. It is a highly polyphagous ambrosia beetle that carries Fusarium fungal symbionts. In susceptible host trees, the fung...

  5. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    M. Lourdes Chamorro; Eduard Jendek; Robert A. Haack; Toby Petrice; Norman E. Woodley; Alexander S. Konstantinov; Mark G. Volkovitsh; Xing-Ke Yang; Vasily V. Grebennikov

    2015-01-01

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related or most similar to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented for each species,...

  6. A small-bolt method for screening tree protectants against bark beetles (coleoptera: curculionidae)

    Treesearch

    B.L. Strom; L.M. Roton

    2009-01-01

    A simple, small-bolt method was developed and refi ned for evaluating and screening treatments being considered as prophylactics against bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Using this method, 4 insecticide products (3 active ingredients) were evaluated against the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, intermittently during a period...

  7. Field Response of Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) to Synthetic Semiochemicals in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Treesearch

    Benjamin Moreno; Jorge Macias; Brian Sullivan; Stephen Clarke

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) is the most serious pestof pines (Pinus spp.) in Mexico. ConspeciÞcs are attracted to trees undergoing colonization by the  aggregation pheromone frontalin, which is synergized by odors of pine oleoresin released from beetle-damaged host tissue. Synthetic racemic frontalin combined with turpentine has been the...

  8. Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona

    Treesearch

    Christopher J. Allender; Karen M. Clancy; Tom E. DeGomez; Joel D. McMillin; Scott A. Woolbright; Paul Keim; David M. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality. A better understanding of the population structure of these...

  9. Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an economically important pest of common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) in the tropics and subtropics. It is difficult to detect the presence of A. obtectus because the larvae are cryptic and spend most of their developmental time...

  10. Intercepted Scolytidae (Coleoptera) at U.S. ports of entry: 1985-2000.

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack

    2001-01-01

    Since 1985, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has maintained the 'Port Information Network' (PIN) database for plant pests intercepted at the U.S. ports of entry. As of August 2001, PIN contained 6825 records of beetles (Coleoptera) in the family Scolytidae that had been intercepted during the years 1985-2000 from...

  11. Evaluation of double-decker traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera:Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrea C. Anulewicz

    2011-01-01

    Improved detection tools are needed for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive forest insect from Asia that has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since its discovery in Michigan in 2002.We evaluated attraction of adult A. planipennis...

  12. A new species and first record of Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) for Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor Jaime; Deloya, Cuauhtémoc

    2015-04-20

    A new Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Gymnetini) species from Venezuela is described and illustrated. The new species is compared with Cotinis barthelemyi (Gory & Percheron) from Colombia. The Neotropical distribution of Cotinis is expanded to Venezuela. A revised key to the species of Cotinis is provided in both English and Spanish.

  13. Semiochemical disruption of the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Peter De Groot; Stephen Burke; David Wakarchuk; Robert A. Haack; Reginald Nott

    2004-01-01

    The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is an exotic pest of pine in North America. We evaluated blends of semiochemical disruptants, which included nonhost volatiles and verbenone, for their ability to disrupt attraction of T. piniperda to traps baited with the attractant α-pinene and to Scots...

  14. A catalog of the Coleoptera of America north of Mexico, family: curculionidae subfamily: Curculioninae

    Treesearch

    Lester P. Gibson

    1985-01-01

    The Coleoptera, or beetles, are represented in the world by about 220,000 described species, of which about 24,000 occur in the United States and Canada. A comprehensive taxonomic catalog of beetles for this area has not been available except the series of world-based "Coleopterorum Catalogus" volumes (1909-present, Junk, Berlin). The Leng "Catalogue of...

  15. A new Oxyurida (Thelastomatidae) from Cyclocephala signaticollis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Camino, Nora B; Reboredo, Guillermo R

    2005-08-01

    Cephalobellus cyclocephalae n. sp. (Oxyurida: Thelastomatidae), a parasite of larvae of Cyclocephala signaticollis (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae), found in Argentina is described and illustrated. It is characterized by the cuticle striated at the anterior end in both sexes, with 15 annules, buccal cavity short and not armed, and the male with 4 pairs of genital papillae, 1 pair of preanal papillae, 3 pairs of postanal papillae.

  16. A new species of Golinca Thomson (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae): first record of the genus for Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valois, M; Silva, F

    2015-02-16

    Golinca trevisani Valois & Silva, new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Trichiini: Incina) from Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondônia, and Amazonas, Brazil is described, representing the first record of the genus Golinca for Brazil. Diagnosis, illustrations of key morphological characters, the first male genitalia description in the genus, and a key for identification of four species of Golinca are provided.

  17. Host selection and feeding preference of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on ash (Fraxinus spp.)

    Treesearch

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    We studied the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A. planipennis is an exotic forest insect pest native to Asia that was discovered in North America in 2002 and is causing widespread mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp...

  18. Detection of Rhynchophorus palmarum (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and identification of associated nematodes in south Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study reports a survey conducted to find the South American palm weevil Rhynchophorus palmarum (L.) and the red palm weevil R. ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), two invasive species of palm trees. The study was performed in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas and near the bor...

  19. Progress in the classical biological control of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Discovered in North America in 2002, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a phloem-feeding beetle from Asia that attacks and kills ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) populations surveyed for natural enemies in North America reveal low prevalence of native larva...

  20. Chemical control of the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, and other Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of Lauraceae in the southeastern U.S. This wood-boring insect vectors a lethal fungus, Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease. The vector-pathogen complex is responsible...

  1. Chemical Control of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of U.S. trees in the family Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and redbay (P. borbonia). It threatens avocado production in Florida by transmitting Raffaelea lauricola, the fungal...

  2. First contact pheromone identified for a longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae

    Treesearch

    Annie E. Spikes; Matthew A. Paschen; Jocelyn G. Miller; Jardel A. Moreira; Paul B. Hamel; Nathan M. Schiff; Matthew D. Ginzel

    2010-01-01

    Little is known of the reproductive behavior of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae. Mallodon dasystomus (Say), the hardwood stump borer, is a widely distributed prionine that is native to the southern U.S. Here, we explored the chemically-mediated mating behavior of M dasystomus, and tested the hypothesis that males recognize...

  3. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) species, flight, and attack on living eastern cottonwood trees

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Derek C. Booth; M. S. Wallace

    2005-01-01

    In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon...

  4. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in the Conservation Reserve Program crop rotation systems in Interior Alaska

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) abundance and diversity were documented on Conservation Research Program (CRP) agricultural lands in Delta Junction, Alaska (64ºN, 145º W). Twenty species were documented based on a total sample of 6,116 specimens collected during 2006 and 2007. Two speci...

  5. Morphology and sexual dimorphism of the weevil Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) also known as Sri Lankan weevil, is becoming a major pest of ornamentals and tropical fruit trees in the southern states of USA, especially in Florida. Recent findings of this species in Florida citrus groves justify research ...

  6. Improved visualization of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) - Part II: Alimentary canal components and measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a pest of stored food products and problematic to every type of poultry production facility. Larvae and adults can ingest and harbor foodborne and poultry pathogens. Determining the efficiency of this insect’s capacity to transmit dise...

  7. Exotic bark- and wood-boring Coleoptera in the United States: recent establishments and interceptions

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack

    2006-01-01

    Summary data are given for the 25 new species of exotic bark- and wood-boring Coleoptera first reported in the continental United States between 1985 and 2005, including 2 Buprestidae (Agrilus planipennis and Agrilus prionurus), 5 Cerambycidae (Anoplophora glabripennis, Callidiellum rufipenne, Phoracantha recurva, Sybra...

  8. High-level phylogeny of the Coleoptera inferred with mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming-Long; Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhong-Long; Liu, Yong-Jian; Shen, Yu-Ying; Shao, Renfu

    2016-11-01

    The Coleoptera (beetles) exhibits tremendous morphological, ecological, and behavioral diversity. To better understand the phylogenetics and evolution of beetles, we sequenced three complete mitogenomes from two families (Cleridae and Meloidae), which share conserved mitogenomic features with other completely sequenced beetles. We assessed the influence of six datasets and three inference methods on topology and nodal support within the Coleoptera. We found that both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood with homogeneous-site models were greatly affected by nucleotide compositional heterogeneity, while the heterogeneous-site mixture model in PhyloBayes could provide better phylogenetic signals for the Coleoptera. The amino acid dataset generated more reliable tree topology at the higher taxonomic levels (i.e. suborders and series), where the inclusion of rRNA genes and the third positions of protein-coding genes improved phylogenetic inference at the superfamily level, especially under a heterogeneous-site model. We recovered the suborder relationships as (Archostemata+Adephaga)+(Myxophaga+Polyphaga). The series relationships within Polyphaga were recovered as (Scirtiformia+(Elateriformia+((Bostrichiformia+Scarabaeiformia+Staphyliniformia)+Cucujiformia))). All superfamilies within Cucujiformia were recovered as monophyletic. We obtained a cucujiform phylogeny of (Cleroidea+(Coccinelloidea+((Lymexyloidea+Tenebrionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+(Chrysomeloidea+Curculionoidea))))). This study showed that although tree topologies were sensitive to data types and inference methods, mitogenomic data could provide useful information for resolving the Coleoptera phylogeny at various taxonomic levels by using suitable datasets and heterogeneous-site models.

  9. A novel semiochemical tool for protecting Pinus contorta from mortality attributed to Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Treesearch

    Chris Fettig; A. S. Munson; M. Reinke; A. Mafra-Neto

    2015-01-01

    Verbenone (4,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-3-en-2-one) is an antiaggregant of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a notable forest insect capable of causing extensive levels of tree mortality in western North America. Several formulations of verbenone are registered...

  10. Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States and Canada using sex attractants

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Robbins; Steven R. Alm; Charles D. Armstrong; Anne L. Averill; Thomas C. Baker; Robert J. Bauernfiend; Frederick P. Baxendale; S. Kris Braman; Rick L. Brandenburg; Daniel B. Cash; Gary J. Couch; Richard S. Cowles; Robert L. Crocker; Zandra D. DeLamar; Timothy G. Dittl; Sheila M. Fitzpatrick; Kathy L. Flanders; Tom Forgatsch; Timothy J. Gibb; Bruce D. Gill; Daniel O. Gilrein; Clyde S. Gorsuch; Abner M. Hammond; Patricia D. Hastings; David W. Held; Paul R. Heller; Rose T. Hiskes; James L. Holliman; William G. Hudson; Michael G. Klein; Vera L. Krischik; David J. Lee; Charles E. Linn; Nancy J. Luce; Kenna E. MacKenzie; Catherine M. Mannion; Sridhar Polavarapu; Daniel A. Potter; Wendell L. Roelofs; Brian M. Rovals; Glenn A. Salsbury; Nathan M. Schiff; David J. Shetlar; Margaret Skinner; Beverly L. Sparks; Jessica A. Sutschek; Timothy P. Sutschek; Stanley R. Swier; Martha M. Sylvia; Niel J. Vickers; Patricia J. Vittum; Richard Weidman; Donald C. Weber; R. Chris Williamson; Michael G. Villani

    2006-01-01

    The sex pheromone of the scarab beetle, Phyllophaga anxia, is a blend of the methyl esters of two amino acids, L-valine and L-isoleucine. A field trapping study was conducted, deploying different blends of the two compounds at 59 locations in the United States and Canada. More than 57,000 males of 61 Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera...

  11. Diversity abundance and seasonality of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: curculionida) in Southern Mississippi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A survey was undertaken in 2010 to assess the makeup of the ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) community at two research sites in South Mississippi. Inexpensive beetle traps were constructed and fitted with ethanol lures, with bi-weekly collections made from March through November. The gr...

  12. How varying pest and trap densities affect Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) capture in pheromone traps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an important insect pest in food processing facilities. Pheromone trapping is frequently used to monitor red flour beetle populations in structures; however, the optimal trap density and the relationship between trap ...

  13. Review of the genus Ceresium Newman, 1842 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A taxonomic review of the genus Ceresium (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) found within the Fiji Islands is presented. A total of 17 species is treated. Full morphological descriptions and comparative images of each species are included, along with a dichotomous key for their identification....

  14. Effect of larval density on food utilization efficiency of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rearing conditions, particularly the crowding of larvae, may have a significant impact on production efficiency of some insects produced commercially, such as Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Although larval densities are known to affect developmental time and growth in T. molitor, n...

  15. Behavioral assays for evaluating host preferences of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2010, the exotic ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) was first discovered in Florida avocado groves. Introduction of its symbiotic Fusarium spp. fungi into galleries in the xylem tissue results in Fusarium-dieback disease. Unlike most ambros...

  16. Characterization of an Aggregation Pheromone in Hylesinus pruinosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    William Shepherd; Brian Sullivan; Bradley Hoosier; JoAnne Barrett; Tessa Bauman

    2010-01-01

    We conducted laboratory and field bioassays to characterize the pheromone system of an ash bark beetle, Hylesinus pruinosus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Solitary females in newly initiated galleries in ash logs produced (+)-exo-brevicomin, whereas male beetles paired with females produced (+)-endo-brevicomin, lesser quantities of...

  17. Role of volatile semiochemicals in the host and mate location behavior of Mallodon dasystomus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    Matthew A. Paschen; Nathan M. Schiff; Matthew D. Ginzel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known of the role semiochemicals play in the mating systems of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the primitive subfamily Prioninae. Mallodon dasystomus (Say), the hardwood stump borer, is a widely distributed prionine native to the southern US. Preferred hosts of M. dasystomus include oak, sweetgum,...

  18. Novel method for determining sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae).

    Treesearch

    William Shepherd; Michael Montgomery; Brian Sullivan; Albert (Bud) Mayfield

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera:Derodontidae) is described. Beetles were briefly chilled and positioned ventral-side-up under a dissecting microscope. Two forceps with blunted ends were used to gently brace the beetle and press on the centre of the abdomen to extrude its terminal segments. Male beetles were...

  19. Efficacy of three insecticides applied to bark to control Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. In 2003 and 2004, we tested the efficacy of different insecticides sprayed on the bark of cut ash logs for killing emerging EAB adults. Logs (means: length = 30 cm; diam. = 16 cm) were...

  20. Review of the genus Ceresium Newman, 1842 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Waqa-Sakiti, Hilda; Winder, Linton; Lingafelter, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A taxonomic review of the genus Ceresium (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) found within the Fiji Islands is presented. A total of 17 species is treated. Full morphological descriptions and comparative images of each species are included, along with a dichotomous key for their identification. PMID:26692805

  1. Biology of the invasive banded elm bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in the western United States

    Treesearch

    Jana C. Lee; Jose F. Negron; Sally J. McElwey; Livy Williams; Jeffrey J. Witcosky; John B. Popp; Steven J. Seybold

    2011-01-01

    The banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), native to Asia, was detected in the United States in 2003, and as of 2011 it is known to occur in 28 states and four Canadian provinces. S. schevyrewi infests the same elm (Ulmus spp.) hosts as the longestablished invasive...

  2. Susceptibility of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae

    Treesearch

    Houping Lui; Leah S. Bauer

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibility of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to selected strains of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin was evaluated through bioassays with direct immersion or foliar exposure under laboratory conditions. Results showed that A. planipennis adults were...

  3. Dilution of Fluon Before Trap Surface Treatment Has No Effect on Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Captures

    Treesearch

    Jeremy D. Allison; Elizabeth E. Graham; Therese M. Poland; Brian L. Strom

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have observed that trap captures of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) can be increased by treating the surface of intercept traps with a lubricant. In addition to being expensive, these treatments can alter the spectral properties of intercept traps when applied neat. These surface treatments, particularly Fluon, are commonly used diluted as...

  4. Use of nutrient self selection as a diet refining tool in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new method to refine existing dietary supplements for improving production of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), was tested. Self selected ratios of 6 dietary ingredients by T. molitor larvae were used to produce a dietary supplement. This supplement was compared...

  5. Impact of Adult Weight, Density, and Age on Reproduction of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of adult weight, age, and density on reproduction of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied. The impact of adult weight on reproduction was determined in two ways: 1) counting the daily progeny of individual adult pairs of known weight and analyzing the data with line...

  6. The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae: Neorthopleurinae), with description of a new species from Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-23

    The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae) is redescribed and classified into the subfamily Neorthopleurinae Opitz, 2009. A phylogenetic tree is supplementally provided for Platytenerus based on twenty morphological and two geographical characters. A new species of the genus, Platytenerus iriomotensis sp. n. is described from Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

  7. Capture of Xylosandrus crassiusculus and other Scolytinae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) in response to visual and volatile cues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In June and July 2011 traps were deployed in Tuskegee National Forest, Macon County, Alabama to test the influence of chemical and visual cues on for the capture of bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). \\using chemical and visual cues. The first experiment investigated t...

  8. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  9. Incorporating a sorghum habitat for enhancing lady beetles (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae) in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are important predators of cotton insect pests. The objective of this 2-yr on-farm study was to examine the ability of a sorghum trap crop with Euschistus spp. pheromone baited capture traps to enhance these predators in cotton in Georgia. Scymnus spp., Cocci...

  10. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Micraspis pusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far. PMID:25425937

  11. Rearing redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), on semi-artifical media

    Treesearch

    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2014-01-01

    Semi-artificial diets consisting of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng,; Laurales: Lauraceae) sawdust and various nutrients were tested for rearing Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in vitro. Comparison of 2 media, modified and standard, adapted from Biedermann et al. (2009) showed that the more...

  12. Hitchhikers with invasive Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.) (Coleoptera:Cerambycidae) in Atlantic Canada

    Treesearch

    Karin Jacobs; Keith A. Seifert; Ken J. Harrison; Georgette Smith; Thomas Kirisits

    2003-01-01

    Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.) (Coleoptera:Cerambycidae) is native to Europe and apart from the Halifax, Nova Scotia area, is unknown elsewhere in North America (Smith & Hurley, 2000). Tetropium fuscum poses no primary threat to Picea abies Karst. in Europe and is regarded there as a secondary insect that usually...

  13. Interactions of Hylastes Species (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) with Leptographium Species Associated with Loblolly Pine Decline

    Treesearch

    Lori G. Eckhardt; Richard A. Goyer; Kier Klepzig; John P. Jones

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Hylastes spp. (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)were evaluated as potential vectors of Leptographium spp. fungi. Bark beetles were trapped from stands of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., exhibiting a range of decline symptoms in central Alabama. Under controlled conditions, field-collected adult...

  14. Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, with description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    Jäch, Manfred A.; Delgado, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hydraena matyoti sp. n. (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) is described from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean. Hydraena mahensis Scott, 1913 is redescribed. The latter is here recorded from La Digue for the first time. A key to the species of the genus Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 of the Seychelles is presented. PMID:27843389

  15. Leptotrachelus dorsalis (F.) (Coleoptera: Carabidae): A candidate biological control agent of the sugarcane borer in Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the registration and wide-spread use of insect growth regulators (e.g. tebufenozide and novaluron) for control of sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in Louisiana, larvae of the ground beetle, Leptotrachelus dorsalis (F.) (Coleoptera: Carabidae) have become appar...

  16. Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Jäch, Manfred A; Delgado, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    Hydraena matyotisp. n. (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) is described from the Seychelles, Indian Ocean. Hydraena mahensis Scott, 1913 is redescribed. The latter is here recorded from La Digue for the first time. A key to the species of the genus Hydraena Kugelann, 1794 of the Seychelles is presented.

  17. Dispersal of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from discrete epicenters in two outlier sites

    Treesearch

    N.W. Siegert; D.G. McCullough; D.W. Williams; I. Fraser; T.M. Poland; S.J. Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem- feeding beetle native to Asia, has become one of the most destructive forest pests in North America. Since it was Þrst identified in 2002 in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, dozens of isolated A. planipennis populations have been...

  18. A comparison of trap type and height for capturing cerambycid beetles (Coleoptera)

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth E. Graham; Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Jocelyn G. Millar

    2012-01-01

    Wood-boring beetles in the family Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) play important roles in many forest ecosystems. However, increasing numbers of invasive cerambycid species are transported to new countries by global commerce and threaten forest health in the United States and worldwide. Our goal was to identify effective detection tools for a broad array of cerambycid...

  19. Factors affecting pheromone production by the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and collection efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several factors which might affect pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were investigated. Included were a comparison of porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), the effect of male age, the effect of time of day, the effect of mal...

  20. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianjun; Nápoles, Jesús Romero; Ji, Yingchao; Jiang, Chunyan; Zhang, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchus affinis Frolich, 1799, Bruchus atomarius L., 1761, Bruchus loti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinus kergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species. PMID:25610333

  1. Biology, ecology, and management of Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ornamental tree nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are two of the most damaging non-native ambrosia beetle pests in ornamental tree nurseries. Adult females tunnel into the stems and branches of host trees to create galleries with bro...

  2. Entomopathogens in conjunction with imidacloprid could be used to manage wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) on spring wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soil-dwelling larvae of click beetles (wireworms) (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are serious pests of several agricultural crops worldwide. Hypnoidus bicolor and Limonius californicus are two major wireworm species damaging to spring wheat, particularly in the Golden Triangle, an important cereal-grow...

  3. Development and evaluation of a trapping system for Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the United States

    Treesearch

    M.E. Nehme; R.T. Trotter; M.A. Keena; C. McFarland; J. Coop; H.M. Hull-Sanders; P. Meng; C.M. De Moraes; M.C. Mescher; K. Hoover

    2014-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), commonly known as the Asian longhorned beetle, is an invasive wood-boring pest that infests a number of hardwood species and causes considerable economic losses in North America, several countries in Europe, and in its native range in Asia. The success of eradication efforts may...

  4. Agrilus auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) seasonal development within Quercus agrifolia (Fagales: Fagaceae) in southern California

    Treesearch

    L.J. Haavik; T.W. Coleman; M.L. Flint; R.C. Venette; S.J. Seybold

    2013-01-01

    We investigated seasonal development of the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and physical conditions of the phloem within a preferred host species, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née. We sampled infested trees on a monthly basis at two sites in southern California throughout...

  5. Variation in enantiospecific attraction of Ips avulsus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to the pheromone ipsdienol in Georgia.

    Treesearch

    Daniel Miller; Jeremy Allison

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, we tested the responses of the small southern pine engraver, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), to multiple-funnel traps baited with (+)-, (-)-, and (+/-)- ipsdienol. Three experiments were conducted in Georgia with all traps co-baited with one of the following lure combinations, respectively: experiment 1, ipsenol; experiment 2, lanierone and...

  6. Field Evaluations of Systemic Insecticides for Control of Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in China

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller; Leah S. Bauer; Ruitong Gao

    2006-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a pest native to China and Korea, was discovered in North America in 1996. Currently, the only reliable strategy available for eradication and control is to cut and chip all infested trees. We evaluated various doses of the systemic insecticides azadirachtin, emamectin benzoate,...

  7. Suitability and accessibility of immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Ivich. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T....

  8. Life cycle, development, and culture of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a wood-boring pest that transmits the fungal pathogen Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease in American Lauraceae. This study documents the gallery formation patterns of X. gla...

  9. Microbial control of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: field applications

    Treesearch

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA, applied as BotaniGard ES, on newly colonised and well-established populations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) were evaluated in the field using foliar and trunk sprays in Michigan in 2004-2005. Results from field trials at a newly colonised white ash...

  10. Developing monitoring techniques for the invasive goldspotted oak borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in California

    Treesearch

    Tom W. Coleman; Yigen Chen; Andrew D. Graves; Stacy M. Hishinuma; Nancy E. Grulke; Mary Louise Flint; Steven J. Seybold

    2014-01-01

    The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive species that has colonized oak woodlands in southern California. To better define its seasonal flight activity, assist with forest and integrated pest management activities, and define the current distribution in California, an effective monitoring...

  11. Pine sawyers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) attracted to a-pinene, monochamol, and ipsenol in North America

    Treesearch

    Dan Miller; J. D. Allison; C. M. Crowe; Matthew Dickinson; A. Eglitis; R. W. Hofstetter; A. S. Munson; Therese M. Poland; L. S. Reid; B. E. Steed; J. D. Sweeney

    2016-01-01

    Detection tools are needed for Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) because they are known to introduce pine wilt disease by vectoring nematodes in Asia, Europe, and North America. In 2012–2014, we examined the effects of the semiochemicals monochamol and ipsenol on the flight responses of the sawyer beetles Monochamus carolinensis (Olivier), Monochamus...

  12. Progress in the classical biological control of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America

    Treesearch

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Roy. Van Driesche

    2015-01-01

    First detected in North America in 2002, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding beetle from Asia, has killed tens of millions of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus; Oleaceae) trees. Although few parasitoids attack EAB in North America, three parasitoid species were found...

  13. Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) associated with rice mills: Fumigation efficacy and population rebound

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is the most important stored-product insect pest infesting rice mills in the U.S. Due to the phasing out of methyl bromide in accordance with the 1987 Montreal Protocol, the efficacy of alternative fumigants in controlli...

  14. Diversity of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attracted to avocado, lychee, and essential oil lures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and native Persea species (redbay, swampbay). As part...

  15. Development of an improved attractive lure for the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Peter de Groot; Stephen Burke; David Wakarchuk; Robert A. Haack; Reginald Nott; Taylor Scarr

    2003-01-01

    1) The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is an exotic pest of pine, Pinus spp., and was first discovered in North America in 1992. 2) Although primary attraction to host volatiles has been clearly demonstrated for T. piniperda, the existence and role of secondary attraction to...

  16. Suitability and Accessibility of Immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Treesearch

    Michael Ulyshen; Jian Duan; Leah Bauer; Ivich Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T. planipennisi involves presenting the wasps with...

  17. Effects of Temperature on Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Adult Survival, Reproduction, and Egg Hatch

    Treesearch

    Melody A. Keena

    2006-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a recently introduced non-native invasive species in North America that has the potential to destroy several tree species in urban and forest habitats. Adult survival, reproduction, and egg hatch of A. glabripennis from two populations (Ravenswood, Chicago, IL, and Bayside, Queens, NY) were evaluated...

  18. Tomicus Piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae): Is Shoot-Feeding Requires For Reproductive Maturation

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack

    2000-01-01

    The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is a univoltine pest of pine in its native range of Europe and Asia. Tomicus piniperda is now widely established in the Great Lakes region and poses a potentially significant threat to other pine-producing areas in North America. An unusual aspect of the life...

  19. Effects of temperature on Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) larvae and pupae

    Treesearch

    M.A. Keena; P.M. Moore

    2010-01-01

    Developmental thresholds, degree-days for development, larval weights, and head capsule widths for each larval instar and the pupal stage of Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) were studied at eight constant temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40ºC) for two source populations (Ravenswood, Chicago, IL [...

  20. Seasonal and spatial dispersal patterns of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: curculionidae) from forest habitats into production nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exotic ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are important pests of tree nurseries. While they are known to migrate in early spring from peripheral forested areas into nurseries, there are few data to show how far ambrosia beetles will fly to infest new host trees, or whether a mass trapping...

  1. Field response of Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) to Synthetic Semiochemicals in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Treesearch

    Benjamin Moreno; Jorge Macias; Brian T. Sullivan; Stephen R. Clarke

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) is the most serious pest of pines (Pinus spp.) in Mexico. Con specifics are attracted to trees undergoing colonization by the aggregation pheromone frontalin, which is synergized by odors of pine oleoresin released from beetle-damaged host tissue. Synthetic racemic frontalin...

  2. Irradiation quarantine treatment for control of Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irradiation is a quarantine treatment option for stored products pests. Dose response tests were conducted to identify a postharvest radiation treatment that would control rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in rice. Rice infested with adult or immature weevils was treate...

  3. Two new species of Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in genera Parandra and Acutandra from South America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of high-elevation Parandrinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are described from Bolivia and Ecuador, South America. Both species are unusual in having piceous coloration over most of the dorsal surface. Acutandra caterinoi Lingafelter & Tishechkin, new species, is described from Pichin...

  4. Effect of abiotic factors on initiation of red flour beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) flight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traps baited with pheromones are used to monitor the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), populations in flour mills to aid in making pest management decisions, but the factors that influence T. castaneum flight aren’t fully understood. We investigated the impa...

  5. Efficacy of systemic insecticides for protection of loblolly pine against southern pine engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Grosman, Donald M; Upton, William W

    2006-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the systemic insecticides dinotefuran, emamectin benzoate, fipronil, and imidacloprid for preventing attacks and brood production of southern pine engraver beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on standing, stressed trees and bolt sections of loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., in eastern Texas. Emamectin benzoate significantly reduced the colonization success of engraver beetles and associated wood borers in both stressed trees and pine bolt sections. Fipronil was nearly as effective as emamectin benzoate in reducing insect colonization of bolts 3 and 5 mo after injection but only moderately effective 1 mo after injection. Fipronil also significantly reduced bark beetle-caused mortality of stressed trees. Imidacloprid and dinotefuran were ineffective in preventing bark beetle and wood borer colonization of bolts or standing, stressed trees. The injected formulation of emamectin benzoate was found to cause long vertical lesions in the sapwood-phloem interface at each injection point.

  6. Laccomimus xikrin sp. nov. and new records of other species of Laccomimus Toledo & Michat, 2015 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Laccophilinae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Braga, Rafael Benzi; Ferreira-Jr, Nelson

    2016-08-18

    The genus Laccomimus Toledo & Michat, 2015 was recently erected for small drop-shape Dytiscidae beetles commonly found in Tropical South America associated with lentic waters. In the present paper a new species, Laccomimus xikrin sp. nov., is described and illustrated. New records from Brazil are presented for Laccomimus alvarengi Toledo & Michat, 2015 from Amazonas state, L. bordoni Toledo & Michat, 2015 from São Paulo state and L. variegatus Toledo & Michat, 2015 from Pará state.

  7. Multistate characters and diet shifts: evolution of Erotylidae (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Leschen, Richard A B; Buckley, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    The dominance of angiosperms has played a direct role in the diversification of insects, especially Coleoptera. The shift to angiosperm feeding from other diets is likely to have increased the rate of speciation in Phytophaga. However, Phytophaga is only one of many hyperdiverse lineages of beetles and studies of host-shift proliferation have been somewhat limited to groups that primitively feed on plants. We have studied the diet-diverse beetle family Erotylidae (Cucujoidea) to determine if diet is correlated with high diversification rates and morphological evolution by first reconstructing ancestral diets and then testing for associations between diet and species number and diet and ovipositor type. A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of morphological data that was previously published in Leschen (2003, Pages 1-108 in Fauna of New Zealand, 47; 53 terminal taxa and 1 outgroup, 120 adult characters and 1 diet character) yielded results that are similar to the parsimony analyses of Leschen (2003). Ancestral state reconstructions based on Bayesian and parsimony inference were largely congruent and both reconstructed microfungal feeding (the diet of the outgroup Biphyllidae) at the root of the Erotylidae tree. Shifts among microfungal, saprophagous, and phytophagous diets were most frequent. The largest numbers of species are contained in lineages that are macrofungal feeders (subfamily Erotylinae) and phytophagous (derived Languriinae), although the Bayesian posterior predictive tests of character state correlation were unable to detect any significant associations. Ovipositor morphology correlated with diet (i.e., acute forms were associated with phytophagy and unspecialized forms were associated with a mixture of diets). Although there is a general trend to increased species number associated with the shift from microfungal feeding to phytophagy (based on character mapping and mainly restricted to shifts in Languriinae), there is a large radiation of taxa feeding on

  8. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei.

  9. The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina and adjacent countries.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Osvaldo Di; Turienzo, Paola

    2016-03-14

    The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina is represented by three species of the genus Taphropiestes Reitter, 1875: T. fusca Reitter, 1875 [Chubut], T. magna Ślipiński & Tomaszewska, 2010 [Río Negro; Chubut], and T. plaumanni Ślipiński & Tomaszewska 2010 [Buenos Aires]. A total of 2565 larvae (multiple instars), 83 pupae, 2028 live adults, and 16 dead adults of T. plaumanni were found in Argentina between 2005 and 2013 in the nests of birds representing the families Columbidae, Emberizidae, Falconidae, Furnariidae, Hirundinidae, Mimidae, Passeridae, Psittacidae, Troglodytidae and Tyrannidae. The adults were most abundant in closed mud nests of Furnarius rufus (Gmelin, 1788) [Furnariidae] and its inquiline birds, but the larvae were most abundant in wood nest boxes. When T. plaumanni was scarcely represented in bird nests from some localities, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797), an exotic darkling beetle [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Tenebrioninae], and one native species, Phobelius crenatus Blanchard, 1842 [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Lagriinae], were most abundant in stick nests of Furnariidae. In contrast, when A. diaperinus and P. crenatus were absent in one locality from the province of Buenos Aires, T. plaumanni was the most abundant beetle. A complete account of data is provided for these collections of T. plaumanni in Argentina. Known distributional data for all Argentinian species of Taphropiestes are plotted on maps with biogeographical provinces indicated.

  10. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    PubMed

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Cheirotonus jansoni (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Shao, L L; Huang, D Y; Sun, X Y; Hao, J S; Cheng, C H; Zhang, W; Yang, Q

    2014-02-20

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Cheirotonus jansoni (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), an endangered insect species from Southeast Asia. This long legged scarab is widely collected and reared for sale, although it is rare and protected in the wild. The circular genome is 17,249 bp long and contains a typical gene complement: 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 putative tRNA genes, and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene order and arrangement are identical to the common type found in most insect mitogenomes. As with all other sequenced coleopteran species, a 5-bp long TAGTA motif was detected in the intergenic space sequence located between trnS(UCN) and nad1. The atypical cox1 start codon is AAC, and the putative initiation codon for the atp8 gene appears to be GTC, instead of the frequently found ATN. By sequence comparison, the 2590-bp long non-coding AT-rich region is the second longest among the coleopterans, with two tandem repeat regions: one is 10 copies of an 88-bp sequence and the other is 2 copies of a 153-bp sequence. Additionally, the A+T content (64%) of the 13 protein-coding genes is the lowest among all sequenced coleopteran species. This newly sequenced genome aids in our understanding of the comparative biology of the mitogenomes of coleopteran species and supplies important data for the conservation of this species.

  12. Phylogeny of ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): are the subfamilies monophyletic?

    PubMed

    Magro, A; Lecompte, E; Magné, F; Hemptinne, J-L; Crouau-Roy, B

    2010-03-01

    The Coccinellidae (ladybirds) is a highly speciose family of the Coleoptera. Ladybirds are well known because of their use as biocontrol agents, and are the subject of many ecological studies. However, little is known about phylogenetic relationships of the Coccinellidae, and a precise evolutionary framework is needed for the family. This paper provides the first phylogenetic reconstruction of the relationships within the Coccinellidae based on analysis of five genes: the 18S and 28S rRNA nuclear genes and the mitochondrial 12S, 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes. The phylogenetic relationships of 67 terminal taxa, representative of all the subfamilies of the Coccinellidae (61 species, 37 genera), and relevant outgroups, were reconstructed using multiple approaches, including Bayesian inference with partitioning strategies. The recovered phylogenies are congruent and show that the Coccinellinae is monophyletic but the Coccidulinae, Epilachninae, Scymninae and Chilocorinae are paraphyletic. The tribe Chilocorini is identified as the sister-group of the Coccinellinae for the first time. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A chromosomal analysis of eleven species of Gyrinidae (Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Robert B.; Holloway, Teresa C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyotypes are presented for 10 species of Gyrinus Geoffroy, 1762: Gyrinus minutus Fabricius, 1798, Gyrinus caspius Ménétriés, 1832, Gyrinus paykulli Ochs, 1927, Gyrinus distinctus Aubé, 1836 var. fairmairei Régimbart, 1883, Gyrinus marinus Gyllenhal, 1808, Gyrinus natator (Linnaeus, 1758), Gyrinus opacus Sahlberg, 1819, Gyrinus substriatus Stephens, 1869, Gyrinus suffriani Scriba, 1855, Gyrinus urinator Illiger, 1807 and for Orectochilus villosus (Müller, 1776) (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae). The 10 Gyrinus species have karyotypes comprising 13 pairs of autosomes plus sex chromosomes which are X0 (♂), XX (♀), with the X chromosomes the longest in the nucleus. Orectochilus villosus has 16 pairs of autosomes plus X0, XX sex chromosomes. The data obtained by Saxod and Tetart (1967) and Tetart and Saxod (1968) for five of the Gyrinus species are compared with our results. Saxod and Tetart considered the X chromosome to be the smallest in the nucleus in all cases, and this is considered to result from confusion arising from uneven condensation of some of the chromosomes. Small differences between the chromosomes of different Gyrinus species have been detected, but not between Greenland and Swedish populations of Gyrinus opacus, nor between typical Gyrinus distinctus from France and Gyrinus distinctus var. fairmairei from Kuwait. PMID:27186347

  14. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) *

    PubMed Central

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xyp and XYp clearly prevailing (79.0%), but with the XO well represented too (19.75%). The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2%) although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6%) and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%). Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74) has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry. PMID:22303104

  15. Bruchid (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) ovicidal phenylbutanoid from Zingiber purpureum.

    PubMed

    Bandara, K A Nimal P; Kumar, Vijaya; Saxena, Ramesh C; Ramdas, Puthenveetil K

    2005-08-01

    The larvicidal activity of the dichloromethane extract of Zingiber purpureum Roscoe (Zingiberaceae) rhizome against the second instar of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is shown to be due to 4-(3',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)buta-1,3-diene. The diene also showed ovicidal activity against the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Most of the eggs laid by bruchids on treated cowpea seeds were transparent, and very few of them contained developing embryos. The few larvae produced from these embryos were unable to penetrate the seed coat and enter the seed. Similar effects were seen when adults were exposed to the compound and then placed on untreated cowpea seeds, suggesting that a new type of maternally mediated ovicidal effect was involved. Coated and impregnated granular formulations of the extract were evaluated for use in the control of bruchid infestation of stored cowpea seeds. Coated granules showed activity similar to that of the crude extract but were found to lose activity rapidly. Impregnated granules were found to be less active than the crude extract.

  16. Pyemotes tritici (Acari: Pyemotidae): a parasitoid of Agrilus auroguttatus and Agrilus coxalis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the southwestern United States of America and southern Mexico

    Treesearch

    Tom W. Coleman; Michael I. Jones; Mark S. Hoddle; Laurel J. Haavik; John C. Moser; Mary L. Flint; Steven J. Seybold

    2015-01-01

    The straw itch mite, Pyemotes tritici Lagrèze-Fossat andMontané (Acari: Pyemotidae), was discovered parasitising the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive exotic species to California, United States of America, and the Mexican goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Coleoptera:...

  17. Emergence of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Scolytinae (Coleoptera) from mountain pine beetle-killed and fire-killed ponderosa pines in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Treesearch

    Sheryl L. Costello; William R. Jacobi; Jose F. Negron

    2013-01-01

    Wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Buprestidae) and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infest ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa P. Lawson and C. Lawson, killed by mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and fire. No data is available comparing wood borer and bark beetle densities or species guilds associated with MPB-killed or fire-...

  18. Dispersal of Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) in different habitats.

    PubMed

    Mahroof, Rizana M; Edde, Peter A; Robertson, Barrett; Puckette, J Andrew; Phillips, Thomas W

    2010-06-01

    The lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), a serious pest of stored cereal grains, is widely distributed and has been collected in different habitats in North America, such as those from agricultural and nonagricultural settings. Our objective was to study the dispersal distances and direction of dispersal by R. dominica after external marking using fluorescent powder, releasing marked beetles, and recapturing adults using pheromone traps in distinctively different ecological habitats, wooded sites and open grasslands, for 2 consecutive yr. The recapture rate of marked beetles ranged from 6 to 26% in both sites and was generally higher in the wooded site than the open field site for both years. There was a significant difference in dispersal distances between wooded and open sites. Mean dispersal distances in the wooded site ranged from 337 to 375 m, whereas in the open site, they varied from 261 to 333 m. Trap captures for both marked and feral beetles were related to the ambient temperature such that increase in trap captures occurred with increasing temperature. Significant differences were observed for directional movement of R. dominica in both sites and indicated that most beetles dispersed in the northwest direction. Correlation analyses showed that the relationship between numbers of marked-released-recaptured beetles significantly decreased with increasing trap distances. Understanding dispersal distances and directions provide insight to flight behavior of R. dominica and to the relationship between ecologically diverse breeding habitats. Knowledge of R. dominica habitat ecology outside of grain storage facilities may be useful in designing suitable management tactics to minimize the onset of infestations in grain storages.

  19. Testing the 'island rule' for a tenebrionid beetle (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Miquel

    2002-05-01

    Insular populations and their closest mainland counterparts commonly display body size differences that are considered to fit the island rule, a theoretical framework to explain both dwarfism and gigantism in isolated animal populations. The island rule is used to explain the pattern of change of body size at the inter-specific level. But the model implicitly makes also a prediction for the body size of isolated populations of a single species. It suggests that, for a hypothetical species covering a wide range of island sizes, there exists a specific island size where this species reaches the largest body size. Body size would be small (in relative terms) in the smallest islets of the species range. It would increase with island size, and reach a maximum at some specific island size. However, additional increases from such a specific island size would instead promote body size reduction, and small (in relative terms) body sizes would be found again on the largest islands. The biogeographical patterns predicted by the island rule have been described and analysed for vertebrates only (mainly mammals), but remain largely untested for insects or other invertebrates. I analyse here the pattern of body size variation between seven isolated insular populations of a flightless beetle, Asida planipennis (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae). This is an endemic species of Mallorca, Menorca and a number of islands and islets in the Balearic archipelago (western Mediterranean). The study covers seven of the 15 known populations (i.e., there are only 15 islands or islets inhabited by the species). The populations studied fit the pattern advanced above and we could, therefore, extrapolate the island rule to a very different kind of organism. However, the small sample size of some of the populations invites some caution at this early stage.

  20. A molecular phylogeny of Alpine subterranean Trechini (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Alpine region harbours one of the most diverse subterranean faunas in the world, with many species showing extreme morphological modifications. The ground beetles of tribe Trechini (Coleoptera, Carabidae) are among the best studied and widespread groups with abundance of troglobionts, but their origin and evolution is largely unknown. Results We sequenced 3.4 Kb of mitochondrial (cox1, rrnL, trnL, nad1) and nuclear (SSU, LSU) genes of 207 specimens of 173 mostly Alpine species, including examples of all subterranean genera but two plus a representation of epigean taxa. We applied Bayesian methods and maximum likelihood to reconstruct the topology and to estimate divergence times using a priori rates obtained for a related ground beetle genus. We found three main clades of late Eocene-early Oligocene origin: (1) the genus Doderotrechus and relatives; (2) the genus Trechus sensu lato, with most anisotopic subterranean genera, including the Pyrenean lineage and taxa from the Dinaric Alps; and (3) the genus Duvalius sensu lato, diversifying during the late Miocene and including all subterranean isotopic taxa. Most of the subterranean genera had an independent origin and were related to epigean taxa of the same geographical area, but there were three large monophyletic clades of exclusively subterranean species: the Pyrenean lineage, a lineage including subterranean taxa from the eastern Alps and the Dinarides, and the genus Anophthalmus from the northeastern Alps. Many lineages have developed similar phenotypes independently, showing extensive morphological convergence or parallelism. Conclusions The Alpine Trechini do not form a homogeneous fauna, in contrast with the Pyrenees, and show a complex scenario of multiple colonisations of the subterranean environment at different geological periods and through different processes. Examples go from populations of an epigean widespread species going underground with little morphological modifications to

  1. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    SciTech Connect

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  2. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Strom, B L; Smith, S L; Brownie, C

    2013-04-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey pine and its primary insect pest. Despite the importance of P. jeffreyi, difficult terrain, environmental concerns, and lack of roads can constrain pest management activities. Semiochemicals are often easier to apply and more environmentally acceptable than other options, but they are lacking in this system. Attractants have been identified, but field bioassays have been limited because of infrequent or short duration outbreaks and a lack of beetles during nonoutbreak periods. Disruptant semiochemicals have not been assessed for D. jeffreyi during outbreak conditions; however, commercially available semiochemicals have been implicated as disruptants for this bark beetle. The objective of this study was to identify the most effective commercially available attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for D. jeffreyi. Our highest observed catch occurred with the blend of 5% 1-heptanol and 95% n-heptane. When this was used to challenge potential disruptant semiochemicals, the combination of S-(-)-verbenone and the green leaf volatile blend (cis-3-Hexenol and 1-Hexanol) reduced trap catch by ≍80%. However, frontalin was most effective, reducing the number of D. jeffreyi caught by >96%. Within each year of the study, the percentage female of D. jeffreyi caught with our attractant decreased from start to end of the experimental period. On average, our first collection in a year (mid-June to early July) was 59% female, whereas our last (mid-August) was 34%. Frontalin was equally or more effective against females (the pioneering sex) than males, providing optimism that semiochemical disruption may be possible for protecting Jeffrey pines from D

  3. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera. Carabidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Ulyshen, Michael D.; Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott

    2012-04-02

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  4. Gold bugs and beyond: a review of iridescence and structural colour mechanisms in beetles (Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Seago, Ainsley E.; Brady, Parrish; Vigneron, Jean-Pol; Schultz, Tom D.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the order Coleoptera are sometimes referred to as ‘living jewels’, in allusion to the strikingly diverse array of iridescence mechanisms and optical effects that have arisen in beetles. A number of novel and sophisticated reflectance mechanisms have been discovered in recent years, including three-dimensional photonic crystals and quasi-ordered coherent scattering arrays. However, the literature on beetle structural coloration is often redundant and lacks synthesis, with little interchange between the entomological and optical research communities. Here, an overview is provided for all iridescence mechanisms observed in Coleoptera. Types of iridescence are illustrated and classified into three mechanistic groups: multilayer reflectors, three-dimensional photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Taxonomic and phylogenetic distributions are provided, along with discussion of the putative functions and evolutionary pathways by which iridescence has repeatedly arisen in beetles. PMID:18957361

  5. Revision of the genus Ptomaphagus Hellwig (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, Cholevinae) from Taiwan Island

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Bin; Nishikawa, Masaaki; Perreau, Michel; Růžička, Jan; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ptomaphagus (s. str.) chenggongi sp. n. and Ptomaphagus (s. str.) tingtingae sp. n. (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, Cholevinae, Ptomaphagini) are described from Taiwan Island. In addition, a new subjective synonym is proposed, Ptomaphagus (s. str.) yasutoshii Nishikawa, 1993 = Ptomaphagus (s. str.) smetanai Perreau, 1996, syn. n. Relevant morphological characters of the examined Ptomaphagus species are illustrated with colour plates, and their known distributions are mapped. PMID:27563271

  6. Wireworms’ Management: An Overview of the Existing Methods, with Particular Regards to Agriotes spp. (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

    PubMed Central

    Barsics, Fanny; Haubruge, Eric; Verheggen, François J.

    2013-01-01

    Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are important soil dwelling pests worldwide causing yield losses in many crops. The progressive restrictions in the matter of efficient synthetic chemicals for health and environmental care brought out the need for alternative management techniques. This paper summarizes the main potential tools that have been studied up to now and that could be applied together in integrated pest management systems and suggests guidelines for future research. PMID:26466799

  7. Carabid (Coleoptera) type collection at National Forest Insect Collection (NFIC), Forest Research Institute, Dehradun (India).

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Singh, Sudhir

    2014-04-10

    Members of family Carabidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) are a dominant group of terrestrial predators. National Forest Insect Collection (NFIC) of Forest Research Institute, Dehradun (India) has a good collection of carabids rich in type material. Here we report the details of the type specimens of 139 species included in 49 genera, 24 tribes and 14 subfamilies. Colour automontaged photographs of each type along with its original labels are also included.

  8. Tiger Beetles' (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cicindelinae) pupal stage: current state of knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roza, André S; Mermudes, José R M

    2017-01-26

    The tiger beetles (Carabidae: Cicindelinae) include about 2,822 species and 120 genera around the world. They are one of the most widely studied families of Coleoptera. However, the knowledge about their immature stages is incipient and usually restricted to the larval stages. Pupal characteristics have been among the most ignored aspects of tiger beetle biology. Here we compile and update the current knowledge of tiger beetle pupae.

  9. New national and state records of Neotropical Staphylinidae (Insecta: Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Asiain, Julieta; Márquez, Juan; Irmler, Urlich

    2015-06-19

    Eighteen new national records of nine species of Osoriinae (Staphylinidae) are added for 10 Neotropical countries. Additionally, 17 species of three subfamilies are first recorded from ten States of México. The distributional patterns of the studied species are commented and the congruence with species of different families of Coleoptera and Odonata previously analyzed is discussed. Finally, we conclude that some of these patterns can be proposed as hypothesis of primary biogeographic homology.

  10. New species and records of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) from Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arce-Pérez, Roberto; Morón, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-28

    Two new species of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from Bolivia are described and illustrated: M. megaphyllus new species (from Comarapa, Santa Cruz and Sehuenca, Cochabamba) and M. yunganus new species (from Mairana and Comarapa, Santa Cruz). In addition, the species Macrodactylus bolivianus Moser, M. gracilis Moser, and M. nobilis Frey are redescribed and illustrated to help facilitate identification of these species. A key to the 10 species of Macrodactylus presently known from Bolivia is provided. 

  11. Walking Responses of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to Its Aggregation Pheromone and Odors of Wheat Infestations.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, B J; Cai, L; Faucher, C; Michie, M; Berna, A; Ren, Y; Anderson, A; Chyb, S; Xu, W

    2017-03-03

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is a worldwide pest of stored grains. Using "Y"-tube olfactometry we studied the response of T. castaneum to odors from simulated wheat infestations containing conspecifics, and infestations containing the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and the granary weevil Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Tribolium castaneum larvae were significantly attracted to odors from all three test species. Tribolium castaneum adults were attracted to grains infested by R. dominica and flour infested by T. castaneum but repelled from grains infested by S. granarius. Further behavioral analysis with pheromones showed that T. castaneum were significantly attracted to their aggregation pheromone, dimethyldecanal (DMD), but not to the R. dominica aggregation pheromone, a mixture of dominicalure 1 and 2. Female T. castaneum adults were attracted to ∼50-fold less DMD than larvae and 100-fold less than male adults, suggesting they are more sensitive to DMD. This study improves our understanding of T. castaneum behaviors to infested grain volatile compounds and pheromones, and may help develop new control methods for grain pest species.

  12. Alien seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Europe.

    PubMed

    Yus-Ramos, Rafael; Ventura, Daniel; Bensusan, Keith; Coello-García, Pedro; György, Zoltán; Stojanova, Anelia

    2014-07-01

    Under the framework of the DAISIE consortium, whose main mission is to make an inventory of the alien invasive species of Europe and its islands, we review the current state of knowledge and provide an up-to-date catalogue and distributional status for alien seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Europe. This work is based on studies of the species detected from the last century to the present, but with greater emphasis on the beginning of the 21st century, during which new biological studies have been carried out and findings made in European countries. The main objective of this paper is to focus on this last fact, which has promoted new views on the existing and potential threat of exotic bruchids in relation to climate change. This must now be regarded as a matter of concern for European agricultural and environmental policies. Only species of exotic origin introduced in European regions outside their native range were considered. Therefore, species of European origin spreading to new countries within Europe are not treated. Also, we provide a new approach to classifying alien seed beetle species according to their ability to become established, distinguishing between the well-established and those that may appear in seed stores but are not capable of invading natural and agricultural ecosystems. We present a taxonomic characterization of the alien bruchids found in Europe, providing an illustrated key based on external morphological characters of adults. The key facilitates the identification of the sixteen most frequently recorded genera, which represent 37 of the 42 species of exotic species recorded in Europe up to the present, whether established, not established or occasional. Finally, we provide a summary of the state of knowledge of the taxonomy and biology of the 20 most worrying species as pests, both established and non-established. This includes, where appropriate, an illustrated key for the identification of species. The study

  13. Biocontrol of larval mosquitoes by Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Goutam; Mandal, Samir K; Ghosh, Arup K; Das, Dipanwita; Banerjee, Siddhartha S; Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2008-01-01

    Background Problems associated with resistant mosquitoes and the effects on non-target species by chemicals, evoke a reason to find alternative methods to control mosquitoes, like the use of natural predators. In this regard, aquatic coleopterans have been explored less compared to other insect predators. In the present study, an evaluation of the role of the larvae of Acilius sulcatus Linnaeus 1758 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) as predator of mosquito immatures was made in the laboratory. Its efficacy under field condition was also determined to emphasize its potential as bio-control agent of mosquitoes. Methods In the laboratory, the predation potential of the larvae of A. sulcatus was assessed using the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae) as prey at varying predator and prey densities and available space. Under field conditions, the effectiveness of the larvae of A. sulcatus was evaluated through augmentative release in ten cemented tanks hosting immatures of different mosquito species at varying density. The dip density changes in the mosquito immatures were used as indicator for the effectiveness of A. sulcatus larvae. Results A single larva of A. sulcatus consumed on an average 34 IV instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus in a 24 h period. It was observed that feeding rate of A. sulcatus did not differ between the light-on (6 a.m. – 6 p.m.), and dark (6 p.m. – 6 a.m.) phases, but decreased with the volume of water i.e., space availability. The prey consumption of the larvae of A. sulcatus differed significantly (P < 0.05) with different prey, predator and volume combinations, revealed through univariate ANOVA. The field study revealed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in larval density of different species of mosquitoes after 30 days from the introduction of A. sulcatus larvae, while with the withdrawal, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in larval density was noted indicating the efficacy of A. sulcatus in regulating mosquito

  14. Evaluation of Standard Loose Plastic Packaging for the Management of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebriondiae)

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Muhammad Waqar; Gulraize; Ali, Usman; Ur Rehman, Fazal; Najeeb, Hafsa; Sohail, Maryam; Irsa, Bakhtawar; Muzaffar, Zubaria; Chaudhry, Muhammad Shafiq

    2016-01-01

    Three standard foodstuff plastic packaging namely polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyvinylchloride (PVC) were evaluated for management of lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Resistance parameters in packaging were recorded as punctures, holes, penetrations, sealing defects, and invasions with two thicknesses and tested for two lengths of time. Damages like punctures, holes and penetrations by both insects were more in PE packaging however R. dominica made more penetrations in PP than in PE. For both insects sealing defects and invasions were predominant in PVC than in others. Thickness did not affect significantly damage types but significantly more holes and penetrations by R. dominica were in less thickness. Punctures and holes by R. dominica were more after less time period but other damages in packaging were more after more time period. However for T. castaneum all sorts of damages were seen more after more time period. Overall categorization between two insects showed R. dominica made more penetrations and T. castaneum made more invasions compared with their counterparts. Pictures were taken under camera fitted microscope to magnify punctures and holes in different packaging and thicknesses. Insect mortality due to phosphine was more in PP and PE packaging and least in PVC packaging and thickness effect was marginal. T. castaneum mortality was significantly more after 48 h than after 24 h. Damages extent in packaging and fumigation results showed PP to be the best of three packaging materials to manage these insects. PMID:27638958

  15. Acoustic Detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) Trees and Offshoots in Saudi Arabian Orchards.

    PubMed

    Mankin, R W; Al-Ayedh, H Y; Aldryhim, Y; Rohde, B

    2016-04-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal tissue-feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect; consequently, infestations may remain hidden until they are widespread in an orchard. Infested trees and propagable offshoots that develop from axillary buds on the trunk frequently are transported inadvertently to previously uninfested areas. Acoustic methods can be used for scouting and early detection of R. ferrugineus, but until now have not been tested on multiple trees and offshoots in commercial date palm orchard environments. For this report, the acoustic detectability of R. ferrugineus was assessed in Saudi Arabian date palm orchards in the presence of commonly occurring wind, bird noise, machinery noise, and nontarget insects. Signal analyses were developed to detect R. ferrugineus and another insect pest, Oryctes elegans Prell (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), frequently co-occurring in the orchards, and discriminate both from background noise. In addition, it was possible to distinguish R. ferrugineus from O. elegans in offshoots by differences in the temporal patterns of their sound impulses. As has been observed often with other insect pests, populations of the two species appeared clumped rather than uniform or random. The results are discussed in relation to development of automated methods that could assist orchard managers in quickly identifying infested trees and offshoots so that R. ferrugineus infestations can be targeted and the likelihood of transferring infested offshoots to uninfested areas can be reduced.

  16. Influence of host age on critical fitness parameters of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a new parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a recently discovered gregarious idiobiont larval ectoparasitoid currently being evaluated for biological control against the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the United St...

  17. Leaf beetles are ant-nest beetles: the curious life of the juvenile stages of case-bearers (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cryptocephalinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although some species of Cryptocephalinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) have been documented with ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) for almost 200 years, information on this association is fragmentary. This contribution synthesizes scattered literature to determine the patterns in ant host use. Some degr...

  18. Monitoring the establishment and flight phenology of parasitoids of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan by using sentinel eggs and larvae

    Treesearch

    Kristopher J. Abell; Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Jian J. Duan; Roy G. Van Driesche

    2016-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an important invasive pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. Two larval parasitoid species, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera:...

  19. Recent Records of Adalia Bipunctata (L.), Coccinella Transversoguttata Richardsoni Brown and, Coccinella Novemnotata Herbst (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from South Dakota and Nebraska

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adalia bipunctata (L.), Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and C. novemnotata Herbst (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were previously common throughout much of North America, but their numbers have declined drastically over the last few decades. This paper reports on recent findings of thes...

  20. Role of Ipsdienol, Ipsenol, and cis-Verbenol in chemical ecology of Ips avulsus, Ips calligraphus, and Ips grandicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    Jeremy D. Allison; Jessica I. McKenney; Daniel R. Miller; Matthew L. Gimmel

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stressed or damaged pine (Pinus sp.) trees in the southeastern United States are often colonized simultaneously by three southern Ips species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): small southern pine engraver, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff); sixspined ips, Ips calligraphus (Germar); and...

  1. Behavioral Responses of Laricobius spp. and Hybrids (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) to Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and Adelgid Host Tree Odors in an Olfactometer

    Treesearch

    Arielle L. Arsenault; Nathan P. Havill; Albert E. Mayfield; Kimberly F. Wallin

    2015-01-01

    The predatory species Laricobius nigrinus (Fender) and Laricobius osakensis (Shiyake and Montgomery) (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) have been released for biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae; Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in eastern North America. L. osakensis is native to Japan, whereas

  2. Influence of temperature on the reproductive and developmental biology of Ontsira mellipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): Implications for biological control of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ontsira mellipes Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a North American parasitoid that develops on the invasive pest, Anoplophora glabripennis (Moltschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) under laboratory conditions, and is currently being considered as a potential new-association biocontrol agent. In ...

  3. Seasonal abundance of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and its natural enemies Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in China

    Treesearch

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Tonghai Zhao; Ruitong Gao; Liwen Song; Qingshu Luan; Ruozhong Jin; Changqi Gao

    2007-01-01

    The seasonal abundance and population dynamics of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and its natural enemies Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) were studied on ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  4. New myrmecomorphous longhorned beetles from Haiti and the Dominican Republic with a key to Anaglyptini and Tillomorphini of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    First records of the tribes Anaglyptini and Tillomorphini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae) are documented for Hispaniola. A new genus of highly myrmecomorphic longhorned beetle (Licracantha, new genus) is described and illustrated based on one species (Licracantha formicaria, new species) a...

  5. Seven New Species of Elaphidiini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) from the Dominican Republic with Taxonomic Notes, New Country Records, and a Key to Elaphidion Audinet-Serville from Hispaniola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seven new species, two new combinations, two new synonyms, and four new country records of Elaphidiini longhorned woodborers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) from the Dominican Republic are presented. Elaphidion compressipenne Fisher is transferred to Ceresium Newman as C. compressipenne (Fisher), new c...

  6. Studies on West Indian Scolytidae (Coleoptera) 4: A review of the Scolytidae of Puerto Rico, U.S.A with descriptions of one new genus, fourteen new species and notes on new synonymy (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    D.E. Bright; J.A. Torres

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive biodiversity study of the Scolytidae (Coleoptera) of Puerto Rico, USA has been underway for several years. Seventy-one species are now recorded from the island. One new genus, Allothenemus, is described with Allothenemus minutus new species, as the type species. An additional 13 new species are described: Chramesus atlanticus, Scolytodes puertoricensis...

  7. Acute toxicity, critical body residues, Michaelis-Menten analysis of bioaccumulation, and ionoregulatory disturbance in response to waterborne nickel in four invertebrates: Chironomus riparius, Lymnaea stagnalis, Lumbriculus variegatus and Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Erin M; Wood, Chris M

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the bioaccumulation and acute toxicity (48 h or 96 h) of Ni in four freshwater invertebrate species in two waters with hardness of 40 (soft water) and 140 mg L(-1) as CaCO(3) (hard water). Sensitivity order (most to least) was Lymnaea stagnalis > Daphnia pulex > Lumbriculus variegatus > Chironomus riparius. In all cases water hardness was protective against acute Ni toxicity with LC(50) values 3-3.5× higher in the hard water vs. soft water. In addition, higher water hardness significantly reduced Ni bioaccumulation in these organisms suggesting that competition by Ca and Mg for uptake at the biotic ligand may contribute to higher metal resistance. CBR50 values (Critical Body Residues) were less dependent on water chemistry (i.e. more consistent) than LC(50) values within and across species by ~2 fold. These data support one of the main advantages of the Tissue Residue Approach (TRA) where tissue concentrations are generally less variable than exposure concentrations with respect to toxicity. Whole body Ni bioaccumulation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in all organisms, with greater hardness tending to decrease B(max) with no consistent effect on K(d). Across species, acute Ni LC(50) values tended to increase with both K(d) and B(max) values - i.e. more sensitive species exhibited higher binding affinity and lower binding capacity for Ni, but there was no correlation with body size. With respect to biotic ligand modeling, log K(NiBL) values derived from Ni bioaccumulation correlated well with log K(NiBL) values derived from toxicity testing. Both whole body Na and Mg levels were disturbed, suggesting that disruption of ionoregulatory homeostasis is a mechanism of acute Ni toxicity. In L. stagnalis, Na depletion was a more sensitive endpoint than mortality, however, the opposite was true for the other organisms. This is the first study to show the relationship between Na and Ni.

  8. Absence asymmetry: the evolution of monorchid beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Will, Kipling W; Liebherr, James K; Maddison, David R; Galián, José

    2005-04-01

    Asymmetrical monorchy, or the complete absence of one testis coupled with the presence of its bilateral counterpart, is reported for 174 species of the carabid beetle tribes Abacetini, Harpalini, and Platynini (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae) based on a survey of over 820 species from throughout the family. This condition was not found in examined individuals of any other carabid beetle tribes, or of other adephagan beetle families. One monorchid taxon within Platynini exhibits symmetrical vasa deferentia at the beginning of the pupal stadium, suggesting that developmental arrest of the underdeveloped vas deferens takes place in pupation. The point at which development of the testis is interrupted is unknown. Complete absence of one organ of a bilateral pair--absence asymmetry--is rarely found in any animal clade and among insects is otherwise only known for testes in the minute-sized beetles of the family Ptiliidae, ovaries in Scarabaeinae dung beetles, and ovaries of some aphids. Based on current phylogenetic hypotheses for Carabidae, testis loss has occurred independently at least three times, and up to five origins are possible, given the variation within Abacetini. Clear phylogenetic evidence for multiple independent origins suggests an adaptive or functional cause for this asymmetry. A previously posited taxon-specific hypothesis wherein herbivory in the tribe Harpalini led to testis loss is rejected. Optimal visceral packing of the beetle abdomen is suggested as a general explanation. Specifically, based on the function of various organ systems, we hypothesize that interaction of internal organs and pressure to optimize organ size and space usage in each system led to the multiple origins and maintenance of the monorchid condition. Testes are the only redundant and symmetrically paired structures not thought to be developmentally linked to other symmetrical structures in the abdomen. Among all possible organs, they are the most likely--although the observed

  9. Landing surface color preferences of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The color preferences for landing surfaces were examined for Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitic wasp introduced for biocontrol of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Lures with the 3-component pheromone blend of male S. agrili were use...

  10. Survival and phenology of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) reared on a newly developed artificial diet free of host material

    Treesearch

    Melody A. Keena; Hannah Nadel; Juli. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The final phase in the development of an artificial diet that contains no ash host material and the phenology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Bupresidae) on that diet are documented. A diet containing powdered ash phloem exists, but host material introduces potential variability and contamination, and the cost and...

  11. Evaluating the use of plastic bags to prevent escape of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from firewood

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Ciaramitaro; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Andrea Diss-Torrance

    2008-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a highly destructive exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus) in North America. Human movement of infested logs, primarily pieces of firewood, is a major pathway for long distance spread of the beetle. Firewood may be confiscated at campgrounds, rest-areas, and...

  12. Acute toxicity of plant essential oils to scarab larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Larvae of scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are important contaminant and root-herbivore pests of ornamental crops. In order to develop alternatives to conventional insecticides, 24 plant essential oils were tested for their acute toxicity against third instar larvae of the Japanese beetle P...

  13. Influence of elevation on bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) community structure and flight periodicity in ponderosa pine forests of Arizona

    Treesearch

    Kelly K. Williams; Joel D. McMillin; Tom E. DeGomez; Karen M. Clancy; Andy Miller

    2008-01-01

    We examined abundance and flight periodicity of five Ips and six Dendroctonus species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) among three different elevation bands in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex. Lawson) forests of northcentral Arizona. Bark beetle populations were monitored at 10 sites in each of three elevation...

  14. Biology and natural enemies of Agrilus fleischeri (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a newly emerging destructive buprestid pest in Northeast China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The jewel beetle Agrilus fleischeri Obenberger (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a newly emerging major pest of poplar trees (Populus spp.) in northeast China and is responsible for the poplar mortality throughout its distribution range. In order to determine how to manage this pest effectively, we stud...

  15. Spatio-temporal analysis of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Circulionidae: Scolytinae) invasion in Eastern U.S. forests

    Treesearch

    F. H. Koch; W. D. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a significant pest of southeastern u.s. coastal forests. Specifically, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia...

  16. Attraction of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and other buprestids to sticky traps of various colors and shapes

    Treesearch

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland

    2013-01-01

    The family Buprestidae (Coleoptera) contains numerous economically significant species, including the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, first discovered in North America in 2002. Effective traps for monitoring spread and population densities of EAB and other buprestids are needed. Studies were conducted in 2008 to test different...

  17. Acoustic detection of Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) and Nasutitermes luzonicus (Isoptera: Termitidae) in palm trees of urban Guam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult and larval Oryctes rhinoceros (L) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) were acoustically detected in live and dead palm trees and logs in recently invaded areas of Guam, along with Nasutitermes (Isoptera: Termitidae), and other small, sound-producing invertebrates and invertebrates. The sou...

  18. A new species of Tomarus Erichson, 1847 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Pentodontini), with a key to the species in Colombia.

    PubMed

    López-García, Margarita M; Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor J; Amat-García, Germán

    2014-10-03

    A new Tomarus Erichson, 1847 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Pentodontini) species is described from western Colombia. The new species is compared with Tomarus laevicollis (Bates, 1888) from Central America. An identification key is also provided to the species occurring in the country. 

  19. Podisus distinctus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) with the pupae of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) immobilized by ventral nerve cord transection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The movement observed in the Tenebrio molitor L., 1758 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) pupae can be a type of defense strategy. This makes it significant to study the development and reproduction of the predatory stinkbugs Asopinae with the immobilized pupae of this prey. The aim was to evaluate the per...

  20. Spatio-temporal analysis of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Circulionidae: Scolytinae) Invasion in Eastern U.S. Forests

    Treesearch

    F.H. Koch; W.D. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a signiÞcant pest of southeastern U.S. coastal forests. SpeciÞcally, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia...

  1. Development and characterization of 11 microsatellite markers in the root-gall-forming weevil, Ceutorhynchus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The host race of Ceutorhynchus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that specifically develops on Lepidium draba (Brassicales: Brassicaceae), an invasive weed in North America, is being considered for use as a biocontrol agent. Because there are other races that attack other plants, it is important...

  2. Acoustic assessment of Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) effects on Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larval activity and mortality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae), the red palm weevil, is an economically important palm tree pest in subtropical regions of the world. Previous studies have shown that R. ferrugineus can be infected and killed by the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana. Howev...

  3. Community composition and structure had no effect on forest susceptibility to invasion by the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Annemarie Smith; Daniel A. Herms; Robert P. Long; Kamal J.K. Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a non-native, wood-boring beetle that has caused widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) in eastern North America. During 2004-2007, we determined whether forest community composition and structure of black (F. nigra...

  4. Evolving management strategies for a recently discovered exotic forest pest: the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera)

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland

    2001-01-01

    Established populations of the Eurasian pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda (L.); Coleoptera: Scolytidae) were first discovered in North America in Ohio in 1992. As of 31 December 2000, T. piniperda was found in 303 counties in 12 US states (Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, West Virginia, and...

  5. Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, USA, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 200...

  6. Effects of pheromone and plant volatile release rates and ratios on trapping Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in China

    Treesearch

    P.S. Meng; R.T. Trotter; M.A. Keena; T.C. Baker; S. Yan; E.G. Schwartzberg; K. Hoover

    2014-01-01

    Native to China and Korea, the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is a polyphagous wood-boring pest for which a trapping system would greatly benefit eradication and management programs in both the introduced and native ranges. Over two field seasons, a total of 160 flight intercept panel traps...

  7. Taxonomic review of the genus Leucopholis Dejean, 1833 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Leucopholini) in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Calcetas, Orlando A; Adorada, Jessamyn R

    2017-02-15

    The genus Leucopholis Dejean, 1833 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Leucopholini) is reviewed for the species from the Philippines. Five species of Leucopholis occur in the Philippines, including one new species. Keys to the genera of Leucopholini and to the species of Leucopholis in the Philippines are provided.

  8. Identification of feeding stimulants for Pacific coast wireworm by use of a filter paper assay (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugars and several plant essential oils were evaluated as feeding stimulants for larvae of Pacific coast wireworm, Limonius canus (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Compounds were evaluated by quantifying biting rates of wireworms on treated filter paper disks, modifying a method used previously in assays w...

  9. Influence of environmental and physical factors on Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) trap captures in a flour mill

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental and physical variables in food processing facilities can influence both the distribution of stored-product pests and the effectiveness of traps at capturing them. Data from a long-term Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) monitoring program was used to evaluate spat...

  10. Records of unsuccessful attack by Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on broadleaf trees of questionable suitability in Ontario

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Discovery of the non-native Anoplophora glabripennis Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Ontario, Canada, in 2003 led to the implementation of an eradication program. The plan consisted of removing all infested trees and all trees within 400 m of an infested tree belonging to a genus consider...

  11. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  12. Optimizing use of girdled ash trees for management of low-density emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) populations

    Treesearch

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert L. Heyd

    2017-01-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of...

  13. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  14. Development of a satellite-based hazard rating system for Dendrctonus frontallis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Stephen Cook; Shane Cherry; Karen Humes; James Guldin; Christopher Williams

    2007-01-01

    The southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is the most damaging forest insect pest of pines (Pinus spp.) throughout the southeastern United States. Hazard rating schemes have been developed for D. frontalis, but for these schemes to be accurate and effective, they...

  15. Description of immature stages of Scymnus (Neopullus) sinuanodulus Yu and Yao (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) with notes on life history

    Treesearch

    Wenhua Lu; Phetsamon Souphanya; Michael E. Montgomery

    2002-01-01

    We describe for the first time immature stages of the Scymnus subgenus Neopullus; namely the egg, larval (4 instars), and pupal stages of Scymnus (Neopullus) sinuanodulus Yu and Yao (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), which is indigenous to China. This lady beetle was imported to...

  16. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    E. Reichert; M.T. Johnson; E. Chacon; R.S. Anderson; T.A. Wheeler

    2010-01-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil...

  17. Efficacy of verbenone for protecting ponderosa pine stands from western pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) attack in California

    Treesearch

    C.J. Fettig; S.R. McKelvey; R.R. Borys; C.P Dabney; S.M. Hamud; L.J. Nelson; S.J. Seybold

    2009-01-01

    The western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a major cause of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws., mortality in much of western North America. Currently, techniques for managing D. brevicomis infestations are limited. Verbenone (4,6,6-...

  18. Olfactometer responses of plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host plant volatiles, synthetic grandisoic acid, and live conspecifics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit, but will also attack other fruits. Males produce the aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid; emitting only the (+)- enantiomer which is attractive to both sexes of the univoltine an...

  19. Verification of a useful character for separating the sexes of the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    T.W. Coleman; S.J. Seybold

    2010-01-01

    The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a new threat to several native oak species in California (CA) (Coleman & Seybold 2008a, b). The beetle larvae feed in and damage the outer xylem, cambium, and phloem of coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née (Fagaceae),...

  20. Previously unrecorded damage to oak, Quercus spp., in southern California by the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Treesearch

    Tom W. Coleman; Steven Seybold

    2008-01-01

    A new and potentially devastating pest of oaks, Quercus spp., has been discovered in southern California. The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), colonizes the sapwood surface and phloem of the main stem and larger branches of at least three species of...

  1. Review of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), life history, mating behaviours, host plant selection, and host resistance

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Yigen Chen; Jennifer Koch; Deepa. Pureswaran

    2015-01-01

    As of summer 2014, the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has become established in 24 states in the United States of America and has killed tens of millions of ash trees since its introduction into Michigan in the 1990s. Considerable research has been conducted on many aspects of EAB life...

  2. Biology and larval morphology of Agrilus subcinctus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with comparisons to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis

    Treesearch

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack; John S. Strazanac; Jonathan P. Lelito

    2009-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic invasive pest of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees that was first discovered in North America in 2002. There has been concern that surveyors could confuse immature stages of EAB with A. subcinctus Gory, an ash borer native to...

  3. Olfactory responses of the hemlock woolly adelgid predator, Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), to natural and synthetic conifer volatiles

    Treesearch

    William P. Shepherd; Brian T. Sullivan; Albert (Bud) Mayfield; Richard C. McDonald

    2016-01-01

    Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) is a specialist predator of the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), native to the Pacific Northwest. It has been introduced into the eastern United States for biological control of exotic hemlock woolly adelgid populations that threaten...

  4. Developmental plasticity in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): Analysis of Instar Variation in Number and Development Time under Different Diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The variation in instar number and the pattern of sequential instar development time of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied under 4 different diet regimes. Addition of dietary supplements consisting of dry potato or a mix of dry potato and dry egg whites significantly reduced...

  5. Self-selection of two diet components by Tennebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae and its impact on fitness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the ability of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to self-select optimal ratios of two dietary components to approach nutritional balance and maximum fitness. Life table analysis was used to determine the fitness of T. molitor developing in diet mixtures comprised of four dif...

  6. Description and phylogeny of a new microsporidium from the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola Muller, 1766 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study describes a new genus and species of microsporidia which is a pathogen of the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola Muller, 1776 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The beetles were collected from Istanbul in Turkey. All developmental stages are uninucleate and in direct contact with the host ...

  7. The historical role of Ips hauseri (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the spruce forest of Ile-Alatausky and Medeo National Parks

    Treesearch

    N. Mukhamadiev; A. Lynch; C. O' Connor; A. Sagitov; N. Ashikbaev; I. Panyushkina

    2014-01-01

    On 17 May and 27 June 2011 severe cyclonic storms damaged several hundred hectares of spruce forest (Picea schrenkiana) in the Tian Shan Mountains. Bark beetle populations increased rapidly in dead and damaged trees, particularly Ips hauseri, I. typographus, I. sexdentatus, and Piiyogenesperfossus (all Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and there is concern about the...

  8. Responses of Ips pini (Say), Pityogenes knechteli Swaine and Associated Beetles (Coleoptera) to Host Monoterpenes in Stands of Lodgepole Pine

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Miller; John H. Borden

    2003-01-01

    We conducted seven experiments in stands of mature lodgepole pine in southern British Columbia to elucidate the role of host volatiles in the semiochemical ecology of the pine engraver, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), with particular reference to the behavioral responses of predators and competing species of bark beetles. Our results demonstrated that the...

  9. Adult survival of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), on diets of whiteflies, honeydew and honey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a predator that is commercially sold for the management of whiteflies. A study was conducted to assay the effect of selected diets on the survival of adult D. catlinae. Treatments of water (as a control), 10% honey, honeydew, and whiteflie...

  10. Microbial control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: Greenhouse and field trials

    Treesearch

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    In 2003-2004, the lethal and sublethal effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults and larvae were evaluated using topical spray and fungal band treatments in the greenhouse and field. B. bassiana strain GHA was moderately effective against...

  11. Effects of cutting date, outdoor storage conditions, and splitting on survival of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in firewood logs

    Treesearch

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2006-01-01

    The emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. We conducted studies in Michigan to evaluate how different tree cutting dates, outdoor storage conditions, and splitting affected A. planipennis survival in firewood logs. In...

  12. A new species of the genus Promacrolaelaps (Acari: Laelapidae) associated with Propomacrus bimucronatus (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Joharchi, Omid; Halliday, Bruce; Beyzavi, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of mite from Iran - Pronacrolaelaps propomacrus sp. nov. (Acari: Laelapidae). The new species was collected in association with the beetle Propomacrus bimucronatus (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Euchirinae) in holes in the trunk of oak trees. The genus Promacrolaelaps is redescribed and distinguished from the related genus Hypoaspis Canestrini sells. strict.

  13. From forest to plantation? Obscure papers reveal alternate host plants for the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most devastating insect pest of coffee throughout the world. The insect is endemic to Africa but can now be found throughout nearly all coffee producing countries. One area of the basic biology of the insec...

  14. Agrilus rubensteini, a new species from the Philippines related to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species from the Philippines closely related to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888 (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is described: Agrilus rubensteini Chamorro & Jendek, new species. This is the first species in the A. cyaneoniger species-group recorded for the Philippines. Agr...

  15. Sanitation options for managing oak wood infested with the invasive goldspotted oak borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Southern California

    Treesearch

    Michael I. Jones; Tom W. Coleman; Andrew D. Graves; Mary Louise. Flint; Steven J. Seybold

    2013-01-01

    Movement of invasive wood-boring insects in wood products presents a threat to forest health and a management challenge for public and private land managers. The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a new pest in San Diego and Riverside Cos., CA, believed to have been introduced on firewood. This beetle...

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of the Toxicity of Systemic Insecticides for Control of Anoplophora glabripennis and Plectrodera scalator (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller; Leah S. Bauer

    2006-01-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is one of the most serious nonnative invasive forest insects discovered in North America in recent years. A. glabripennis is regulated by federal quarantines in the United States and Canada and is the subject of eradication programs that involve locating, cutting,...

  17. Efficacy of two insecticides for protecting loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    Jordon L. Burke; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Jackson P. Audley; Kamal JK. Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two insecticides (carbaryl and bifenthrin) for excluding subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae) from loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Two trap designs (single- and double-pane windows) and two trapping heights (1.5 and 4m) were also evaluated for maximizing beetle catches.

  18. Laboratory and field efficacy of entomopathogenic fungi for the management of the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius (Coleoptera: Brentidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius (F.) (Coleoptera: Brentidae), is one of the most important pests of sweet potatoes in the world. With free trade between the United States and the U. S.-controlled Marianas Islands, C. formicarius has spread along with this commodity. Because of the cryptic ...

  19. Fungal symbionts in three exotic ambrosia beetles, Xylosandrus amputatus, Xyleborinus andrewesi, and Dryoxylon onoharaense (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae: Xyleborini) in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract In nearly every forest habitat, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae, Platypodinae) plant and maintain symbiotic fungus gardens inside dead or dying trees. Some non-native ambrosia beetles aggressively attack live trees and damage tree crops, lumber, and native woody pla...

  20. Nosema scripta N. Sp. (Microsporida: Nosematidae), a Microsporidian Parasite of the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela scripta (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)1

    Treesearch

    Leah S. Bauer; Stuart H. Pankratz

    1993-01-01

    Nosema scripta (Microsporida: Nosematidae), a new species of microsporidian parasite, is described from the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in North America. Studies using light and electron microscopy reveal that this species completes its life cycle in direct contact with the cytoplasm...