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Sample records for asymmetric m-b velocity

  1. Quantum beats in conductance oscillations in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity wells and electrostatic wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Ying-Tao; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-14

    The transport properties in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity well (Fermi velocity inside the well less than that outside the well) and electrostatic well structures are investigated using the transfer matrix method. The results show that quantum beats occur in the oscillations of the conductance for asymmetric double velocity wells. The beating effect can also be found in asymmetric double electrostatic wells, but only if the widths of the two wells are different. The beat frequency for the asymmetric double well is exactly equal to the frequency difference between the oscillation rates in two isolated single wells with the same structures as the individual wells in the double well structure. A qualitative interpretation is proposed based on the fact that the resonant levels depend upon the sizes of the quantum wells. The beating behavior can provide a new way to identify the symmetry of double well structures.

  2. Asymmetric velocity anisotropies in remnants of collisionless mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    Dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations are affected by processes such as mergers, accretion and the gravitational interaction with baryonic matter. Typically the analysis of dark matter haloes is performed in spherical or elliptical bins and the velocity distributions are often assumed to be constant within those bins. However, the velocity anisotropy, which describes differences between the radial and tangential velocity dispersion, has recently been show to have a strong dependence on direction in the triaxial halos formed in cosmological simulations. In this study we derive properties of particles in cones parallel or perpendicular to the collision axis of merger remnants. We find that the velocity anisotropy has a strong dependence on direction. The finding that the direction-dependence of the velocity anisotropy of a halo depends on the merger history, explains the existence of such trends in cosmological simulations. It also explains why a large diversity is seen in the velocity anisotropy profiles in the outer parts of high-resolution simulations of cosmological haloes.

  3. Computational analysis of asymmetric water entry of wedge and ship section at constant velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Md. Mashiur; Ullah, Al Habib; Afroz, Laboni; Shabnam, Sharmin; Sarkar, M. A. Rashid

    2016-07-01

    Water impact problems receive much attention due to their short duration and large unsteady component of hydrodynamic loads. The effect of water entry has several important applications in various aspects of the naval field. Significant attention has been given to various water entry phenomena such as ship slamming, planning hulls, high-speed hydrodynamics of seaplanes, surface-piercing propellers and the interaction of high-speed liquid drops with structural elements. Asymmetric water entry may be caused by various natural phenomena such as weather conditions or strong winds. Since the determination of hydrodynamic impact load plays a vital role in designing safe and effcient vessels, an accurate and reliable prediction method is necessary to investigate asymmetric water entry problems. In this paper, water entry of a two-dimensional wedge and ship section at constant velocity in asymmetric condition will be analysed numerically and the effects of asymmetric impact on the velocity and pressure distribution will be discussed. The finite volume method is employed to solve the dynamic motion of the wedge in two-phase flow. During the water entry, the air and water interface is described implicitly by the volume of fluid (VOF) scheme. The numerical code and method was first validated for symmetric condition by one of the present author is applied for asymmetric wedge and ship section. The free surface, velocity and pressure distribution for asymmetric water entry are investigated and visualized with contour plots at different time steps.

  4. Asymmetric metallicity patterns in the stellar velocity space with RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoja, T.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Monari, G.; Famaey, B.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Grebel, E. K.; Steinmetz, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Zwitter, T.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The chemical abundances of stars encode information on their place and time of origin. Stars formed together in e.g. a cluster, should present chemical homogeneity. Also disk stars influenced by the effects of the bar and the spiral arms might have distinct chemical signatures depending on the type of orbit that they follow, e.g. from the inner versus outer regions of the Milky Way. Aims: We explore the correlations between velocity and metallicity and the possible distinct chemical signatures of the velocity over-densities of the local Galactic neighbourhood. Methods: We use the large spectroscopic survey RAVE and the Geneva Copenhagen Survey. We compare the metallicity distribution of regions in the velocity plane (vR,vφ) with that of their symmetric counterparts (-vR,vφ). We expect similar metallicity distributions if there are no tracers of a sub-population (e.g. a dispersed cluster, accreted stars), if the disk of the Galaxy is axisymmetric, and if the orbital effects of the bar and the spiral arms are weak. Results: We find that the metallicity-velocity space of the solar neighbourhood is highly patterned. A large fraction of the velocity plane shows differences in the metallicity distribution when comparing symmetric vR regions. The typical differences in the median metallicity are of 0.05 dex with statistical significant of at least 95% confidence, and with values up to 0.6 dex. For stars with low azimuthal velocity vφ, the ones moving outwards. These include stars in the Hercules and Hyades moving groups and other velocity branch-like structures. For higher vφ, the stars moving inwards have higher metallicity than those moving outwards. We have also discovered a positive gradient in vφ with respect to metallicity at high metallicities, apart from the two known positive and negative gradients for the thick and thin disks. Conclusions: The most likely interpretation of the metallicity asymmetry is that it is mainly due to the orbital effects of

  5. Reconstruction of velocity profiles in axisymmetric and asymmetric flows using an electromagnetic flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, László E.; Lucas, Gary P.; Meng, Yiqing

    2015-05-01

    An analytical method that was developed formerly for the reconstruction of velocity profiles in asymmetric flows is improved to be applicable for both axisymmetric and asymmetric flows. The method is implemented in Matlab, and predicts the velocity profile from measured electrical potential distributions obtained around the boundary of a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM). Potential distributions are measured in uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields, and the velocity is assumed as a sum of axisymmetric and polynomial components. The procedure requires three steps. First, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a uniform magnetic field. Since the direction of polynomial components of order greater than two in the plane of the pipe cross section is not unique multiple solutions exist, therefore all possible polynomial velocity profiles are determined. Then, the DFT is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a specific non-uniform magnetic field, and used to calculate the exponent in a power-law representation of the axisymmetric component. Finally, the potential distribution in the non-uniform magnetic field is calculated for all of the possible velocity profile solutions using weight values, and the velocity profile with the calculated potential distribution which is closest to the measured one provides the optimum solution. The method is validated by reconstructing two quartic velocity profiles, one of which includes an axisymmetric component. The potential distributions are obtained from simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics where a model of the EMFM is constructed. The reconstructed velocity profiles show satisfactory agreement with the input velocity profiles. The main benefits of the method described in this paper are that it provides a velocity distribution in the circular cross section of a pipe as an analytical function of the spatial coordinates which is suitable for both

  6. Asymmetric orbital distribution near mean motion resonance: Application to planets observed by Kepler and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-05-10

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consistent with the scenario that planets formed separately then migrated toward the MMR. The location of the pileup infers a K value of 1-100 on the order of magnitude for massive planets, where K is the damping rate ratio between orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis during planet migration.

  7. Asymmetric High-Velocity Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-11-01

    Chandra has revealed highly asymmetric supernova ejecta in G1.9+0.3. Iron dominates thermal emission in the radio-bright northern rim, while only intermediate-mass elements are found along the SE-NW axis. The measured X-ray expansion rates decrease radially by about 60% along this axis from 0.84% yr^{-1) to 0.52% yr^{-1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3, and implying that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock. Only the outermost ejecta with very high (>18,000 km s^{-1}) free-expansion velocities have been shocked so far. We discuss G1.9+0.3 in the framework of recent asymmetric 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia explosions from Seitenzahl et al. (2013). Their N3 model provides the best match.

  8. Effect of asymmetric vocal fold stiffness on traveling wave velocity in the canine larynx.

    PubMed

    Sloan, S H; Berke, G S; Gerratt, B R

    1992-10-01

    The vocal fold (VF) traveling wave is essential to normal voice production. The present investigation describes a new method to determine traveling wave velocity (TWV) in the in vivo canine phonatory model. This method synchronizes photoglottographic and electroglottographic waveforms with videostroboscopic images to determine the duration of time the traveling wave moves between two tattoos placed a known distance apart between the upper and lower margins of each VF. Using this method, we compared the TWV of a paralyzed VF with the TWV of the contralateral, electrically stimulated VF during phonation in two canines. In addition, the presumed VF stiffness asymmetry in the simulated acute recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis state was confirmed by measuring Young's modulus of each VF. The results indicated that the TWV of the paralyzed VF averaged 55% of the TWV of the normal, stiffer VF when the glottal gap was small and entrainment occurred. This study demonstrated the feasibility of quantifying traveling wave motion in asymmetric VF stiffness disorders. The potential use of TWV in human beings as a target to optimize the phonosurgical results in asymmetric VF stiffness disorders is discussed.

  9. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Read, Tyson J. G.; Segre, Paolo S.; Middleton, Kevin M.; Altshuler, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left–right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius. PMID:27030042

  10. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Malík, M. Primas, J.; Kopecký, V.; Svoboda, M.

    2014-01-15

    This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect). A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  11. Experimental study of the free surface velocity field in an asymmetrical confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creelle, Stephan; Mignot, Emmanuel; Schindfessel, Laurent; De Mulder, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of open channel confluences is highly complex because of the combination of different processes that interact with each other. To gain further insights in how the velocity uniformization between the upstream channels and the downstream channel is proceeding, experiments are performed in a large scale 90 degree angled concrete confluence flume with a chamfered rectangular cross-section and a width of 0.98m. The dimensions and lay-out of the flume are representative for a prototype scale confluence in e.g. drainage and irrigation systems. In this type of engineered channels with sharp corners the separation zone is very large and thus the velocity difference between the most contracted section and the separation zone is pronounced. With the help of surface particle tracking velocimetry the velocity field is recorded from upstream of the confluence to a significant distance downstream of the confluence. The resulting data allow to analyze the evolution of the incoming flows (with a developed velocity profile) that interact with the stagnation zone and each other, causing a shear layer between the two bulk flows. Close observation of the velocity field near the stagnation zone shows that there are actually two shear layers in the vicinity of the upstream corner. Furthermore, the data reveals that the shear layer observed more downstream between the two incoming flows is actually one of the two shear layers next to the stagnation zone that continues, while the other shear layer ceases to exist. The extensive measurement domain also allows to study the shear layer between the contracted section and the separation zone. The shear layers of the stagnation zone between the incoming flows and the one between the contracted flow and separation zone are localized and parameters such as the maximum gradient, velocity difference and width of the shear layer are calculated. Analysis of these data shows that the shear layer between the incoming flows

  12. Asymmetric Hermite method for the velocity dependence of the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Vlasov-Maxwell equations provide one of the basic kinetic theory descriptions of a plasma; in one dimension and for a single negatively charged species of unit charge and unit mass, and with a neutralizing background of immobile positive charge, where the integrals-{integral}f{alpha} du and - {integral}uf{alpha} du over all velocities u give the charge and current densities. Because of the self-consistent coupling, these equations are nonlinear, and very few exact solutions can be constructed. One challenge in the development of numerical methods for these equations is to produce methods that simultaneously and exactly conserve particles, momentum, and energy in a fully discrete model. I have previously described a pseudospectral method based on Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto collocation which was conservative in the sense that particles, energy, and momentum did not appear or disappear into the grid but could enter and leave the region of phase space being modeled; this is satisfactory for spatial boundaries, where particles can physically enter and exit, but the method had a maximum velocity boundary in phase space that allowed high-energy particles to enter and exit the system, carrying their energy and momentum with them, simply by accelerating or decelerating beyond the maximum speed. In this paper, a method is briefly described based on a nonstandard Hermite expansion in velocity that has no such maximum velocity and that does not suffer the same nonphysical loss of particles.

  13. Updated constraints on velocity and momentum-dependent asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Aaron C.; Scott, Pat; Serenelli, Aldo

    2016-11-04

    We present updated constraints on dark matter models with momentum-dependent or velocity-dependent interactions with nuclei, based on direct detection and solar physics. We improve our previous treatment of energy transport in the solar interior by dark matter scattering, leading to significant changes in fits to many observables. Based on solar physics alone, DM with a spin-independent q{sup 4} coupling provides the best fit to data, and a statistically satisfactory solution to the solar abundance problem. Once direct detection limits are accounted for however, the best solution is spin-dependent v{sup 2} scattering with a reference cross-section of 10{sup −35} cm{sup 2} (at a reference velocity of v{sub 0}=220 km s{sup −1}), and a dark matter mass of about 5 GeV.

  14. Updated constraints on velocity and momentum-dependent asymmetric dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Aaron C.; Scott, Pat; Serenelli, Aldo

    2016-11-01

    We present updated constraints on dark matter models with momentum-dependent or velocity-dependent interactions with nuclei, based on direct detection and solar physics. We improve our previous treatment of energy transport in the solar interior by dark matter scattering, leading to significant changes in fits to many observables. Based on solar physics alone, DM with a spin-independent q4 coupling provides the best fit to data, and a statistically satisfactory solution to the solar abundance problem. Once direct detection limits are accounted for however, the best solution is spin-dependent v2 scattering with a reference cross-section of 10-35 cm2 (at a reference velocity of v0=220 km s-1), and a dark matter mass of about 5 GeV.

  15. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavsen, Richard; Scharff, Robert; Byers, Mark

    2015-05-19

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodology of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results are presented.

  16. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    DOE PAGES

    Aslam, Tariq; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavsen, Richard; ...

    2015-05-19

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodologymore » of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results are presented.« less

  17. Red blood cell phase separation in symmetric and asymmetric microchannel networks: effect of capillary dilation and inflow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavica, Francesco; Homsy, Alexandra; Jeandupeux, Laure; Obrist, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    The non-uniform partitioning or phase separation of red blood cells (RBCs) at a diverging bifurcation of a microvascular network is responsible for RBC heterogeneity within the network. The mechanisms controlling RBC heterogeneity are not yet fully understood and there is a need to improve the basic understanding of the phase separation phenomenon. In this context, in vitro experiments can fill the gap between existing in vivo and in silico models as they provide better controllability than in vivo experiments without mathematical idealizations or simplifications inherent to in silico models. In this study, we fabricated simple models of symmetric/asymmetric microvascular networks; we provided quantitative data on the RBC velocity, line density and flux in the daughter branches. In general our results confirmed the tendency of RBCs to enter the daughter branch with higher flow rate (Zweifach-Fung effect); in some cases even inversion of the Zweifach-Fung effect was observed. We showed for the first time a reduction of the Zweifach-Fung effect with increasing flow rate. Moreover capillary dilation was shown to cause an increase of RBC line density and RBC residence time within the dilated capillary underlining the possible role of pericytes in regulating the oxygen supply.

  18. Red blood cell phase separation in symmetric and asymmetric microchannel networks: effect of capillary dilation and inflow velocity

    PubMed Central

    Clavica, Francesco; Homsy, Alexandra; Jeandupeux, Laure; Obrist, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The non-uniform partitioning or phase separation of red blood cells (RBCs) at a diverging bifurcation of a microvascular network is responsible for RBC heterogeneity within the network. The mechanisms controlling RBC heterogeneity are not yet fully understood and there is a need to improve the basic understanding of the phase separation phenomenon. In this context, in vitro experiments can fill the gap between existing in vivo and in silico models as they provide better controllability than in vivo experiments without mathematical idealizations or simplifications inherent to in silico models. In this study, we fabricated simple models of symmetric/asymmetric microvascular networks; we provided quantitative data on the RBC velocity, line density and flux in the daughter branches. In general our results confirmed the tendency of RBCs to enter the daughter branch with higher flow rate (Zweifach-Fung effect); in some cases even inversion of the Zweifach-Fung effect was observed. We showed for the first time a reduction of the Zweifach-Fung effect with increasing flow rate. Moreover capillary dilation was shown to cause an increase of RBC line density and RBC residence time within the dilated capillary underlining the possible role of pericytes in regulating the oxygen supply. PMID:27857165

  19. Shed Vortex Structure and Phase-Averaged Velocity Statistics in Symmetric/Asymmetric Turbulent Flat Plate Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2017-01-01

    The near wake of a flat plate is investigated via direct numerical simulations (DNS). Many earlier experimental investigations have used thin plates with sharp trailing edges and turbulent boundary layers to create the wake. This results in large theta divided by D (sub TE) values (theta is the boundary layer momentum thickness towards the end of the plate and D (sub TE) is the trailing edge thickness). In the present study the emphasis is on relatively thick plates with circular trailing edges (CTE) resulting in theta divided by D values less than one (D is the plate thickness and the diameter of the CTE), and vigorous vortex shedding. The Reynolds numbers based on the plate length and D are 1.255 x 10 (sup 6) and 10,000, respectively. Two cases are computed; one with turbulent boundary layers on both the upper and lower surfaces of the plate (statistically the same, symmetric wake, Case TT) and, a second with turbulent and laminar boundary layers on the upper and lower surfaces, respectively (asymmetric case, Case TL). The data and understanding obtained is of considerable engineering interest, particularly in turbomachinery where the pressure side of an airfoil can remain laminar or transitional because of a favorable pressure gradient and the suction side is turbulent. Shed-vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics obtained in the two cases are compared here. The upper negative shed vortices in Case TL (turbulent separating boundary layer) are weaker than the lower positive ones (laminar separating boundary layer) at inception (a factor 1.27 weaker in terms of peak phase-averaged spanwise vorticity at first appearance of a peak). The upper vortices weaken rapidly as they travel downstream. A second feature of interest in Case TL is a considerable increase in the peak phase-averaged, streamwise normal intensity (random component) with increasing streamwise distance (x divided by D) that occurs nears the positive vortex cores. This behavior is

  20. Thermal and velocity slip effects on the MHD peristaltic flow with carbon nanotubes in an asymmetric channel: application of radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S.; Khan, Zafar Hayat

    2014-10-01

    Peristaltic flow is used to study the flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes in an asymmetric channel with thermal and velocity slip effects. Two types of carbon nanotubes, namely, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes are utilized to see the analysis with water as base fluids. Empirical correlations are used for the thermo-physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of solid volume fraction of CNTs. The governing equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Exact solutions have been evaluated for velocity, pressure gradient, the solid volume fraction of CNTs and temperature profile. The effects of various flow parameters, i.e. Hatmann number M, the solid volume fraction of the nanoparticles ϕ, Grashof number G, velocity slip parameter β, thermal slip parameter γ and Prandtl number P r are presented graphically for both single- (SWCNT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT).

  1. Performance of an asymmetric short annular diffuser with a nondiverging inner wall using suction. [control of radial profiles of diffuser exit velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of a short highly asymmetric annular diffuser equipped with wall bleed (suction) capability was evaluated at nominal inlet Mach numbers of 0.188, 0.264, and 0.324 with the inlet pressure and temperature at near ambient values. The diffuser had an area ratio of 2.75 and a length- to inlet-height ratio of 1.6. Results show that the radial profiles of diffuser exit velocity could be controlled from a severely hub peaked to a slightly tip biased form by selective use of bleed. At the same time, other performance parameters were also improved. These results indicate the possible application of the diffuser bleed technique to control flow profiles to gas turbine combustors.

  2. Observations of asymmetric velocity fields and gas cooling in the NGC 4636 galaxy group X-ray halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahoranta, Jussi; Finoguenov, Alexis; Pinto, Ciro; Sanders, Jeremy; Kaastra, Jelle; de Plaa, Jelle; Fabian, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Aims: This study aims to probe the thermodynamic properties of the hot intragroup medium (IGM) plasma in the core regions of the NGC 4636 galaxy group by detailed measurements of several emission lines and their relative intensities. Methods: We analyzed deep XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) data in five adjacent spectral regions in the central parts of the NGC 4636 galaxy group. We examined the suppression of the Fe xvii resonance line (15.01 Å) as compared to the forbidden lines of the same ion (17.05 Å and 17.10 Å). The presence and radial dependence of the cooling flow was investigated through spectral modeling. Parallel analysis with deep Chandra Advances CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) data was conducted to gain additional information about the thermodynamical properties of the IGM. Results: The plasma at the group center to the north shows efficient Fe xvii ion resonant scattering, yielding (Iλ17.05 + Iλ17.10) /Iλ15.01 line ratios up to 2.9 ± 0.4, corresponding toabout twice the predicted line ratio. In contrast, no resonant scattering was detected at the south side. The regions featuring resonant scattering coincide with those embodying large amounts of cool (kT ≲ 0.4 keV) gas phases, and the spectral imprints of cooling gas with a total mass deposition rate of ~0.8 M⊙ yr-1 within the examined region of 2.4' × 5.0'. Conclusions: We interpret the results as possible evidence of asymmetric turbulence distribution in the NGC 4636 IGM: turbulence dominates the gas dynamics to the south, while collective gas motions characterize the dynamics to the north. X-ray images show imprints of energetic AGN at both sides, yet we find evidence of turbulence heating at the south and gas cooling at the north of the core. We infer that the observed asymmetry may be the result of the specific observation angle to the source, or arise from the turbulence driven by core sloshing at south side.

  3. Structure of the velocity distribution of sheath-accelerated secondary electrons in an asymmetric RF-dc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrabrov, Alexander V.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-10-01

    Low-pressure capacitively-coupled discharges with additional dc bias applied to a separate electrode are utilized in plasma-assisted etching for semiconductor device manufacturing. Measurements of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) of the flux impinging on the wafer, as well as in the plasma bulk, show a thermal population and additional peaks within a broad range of energies. That range extends from the thermal level up to the value for the ‘ballistic’ peak, corresponding to the bias potential. The non-thermal electron flux has been correlated to alleviating the electron shading effect and providing etch-resistance properties to masking photoresist layers. ‘Middle-energy peak electrons’ at energies of several hundred eV may provide an additional sustaining mechanism for the discharge. These features in the electron velocity (or energy) distribution functions are possibly caused by secondary electrons emitted from the electrodes and interacting with two high-voltage sheaths: a stationary sheath at the dc electrode and an oscillating self-biased sheath at the powered electrode. Since at those energies the mean free path for large-angle scattering (momentum relaxation length) is comparable to, or exceeds the size of the discharge gap, these ‘ballistic’ electrons will not be fully scattered by the background gas as they traverse the inter-electrode space. We have performed test-particle simulations in which the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytical model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF. Those features can be explained by analyzing the kinematics of electron trajectories in the discharge gap. Step-like structures in the EVDF near the powered electrode appear due to accumulation of electrons emitted from the dc electrode within a portion of the RF cycle, and their subsequent release. Trapping occurs when the RF

  4. Measurement of the Mass Difference m(B0) - m(B+)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-05-19

    Using 230 million B{bar B} events recorded with the BABAR detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings PEP-II, they reconstruct approximately 4100 B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 9930 B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +} decays with J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and e{sup +} e{sup -}. From the measured B-momentum distributions in the e{sup +}e{sup -} rest frame, they determine the mass difference m(B{sup 0}) - m(B{sup +}) = (+0.33 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.03) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide is related with coronary flow velocity reserve and diastolic dysfunction in patients with asymmetric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tesic, Milorad; Seferovic, Jelena; Trifunovic, Danijela; Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Giga, Vojislav; Jovanovic, Ivana; Petrovic, Olga; Marinkovic, Jelena; Stankovic, Sanja; Stepanovic, Jelena; Ristic, Arsen; Petrovic, Milan; Mujovic, Nebojsa; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Beleslin, Branko; Vukcevic, Vladan; Stankovic, Goran; Seferovic, Petar

    2017-10-01

    The relations of elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients is uncertain. Therefore we designed the study with the following aims: (1) to analyze plasma concentrations of NT-pro-BNP in various subsets of HCM patients; (2) to reveal the correlations of NT-pro-BNP, myocardial ischemia, and diastolic dysfunction; (3) to assess predictors of the elevated plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP. In 61 patients (mean age 48.9±16.3 years; 26 male) with asymmetric HCM plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP were obtained. Standard transthoracic examination, tissue Doppler echocardiography with measurement of transthoracic coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) in left anterior descending artery (LAD) was done. Mean natural logarithm value of NT-pro-BNP was 7.11±0.95pg/ml [median value 1133 (interquartile range 561-2442)pg/ml]. NT-pro-BNP was significantly higher in patients with higher NYHA class, in obstructive HCM, more severe mitral regurgitation, increased left atrial volume index (LAVI), presence of calcified mitral annulus, elevated left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and in decreased CFVR. Levels of NT-pro-BNP significantly correlated with the ratio of E/e' (r=0.534, p<0.001), LV outflow tract gradient (r=0.503, p=0.024), LAVI (r=0.443, p<0.001), while inversely correlated with CFVR LAD (r=-0.569, p<0.001). When multivariate analysis was done only CFVR LAD and E/e' emerged as independent predictors of NT-pro-BNP. Plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP were significantly higher in HCM patients with more advanced disease. Elevated NT-pro-BNP not only reflects the diastolic impairment of the LV, but it might also be the result of cardiac ischemia in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Harvard M.B.A.: A Golden Passport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Despite increasing competition from Stanford University in California and a number of other graduate business schools, an M.B.A. degree from Harvard is still regarded as the great golden passport to life in the upper class. Discusses the salary and business advantages in having a Harvard M.B.A. and the attitudes of three graduates on what the…

  7. The M.B.A.: A Schizophrenic Graduate Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Shelley M.

    2007-01-01

    The term "M.B.A." is globally recognized as referring to a Masters of Business Administration Program, a degree historically perceived as a graduate's ticket to employment opportunities, generous salaries and the business savvy that garners respect across industries. Recently, however, the value of an M.B.A. has come under fire from many…

  8. Asymmetric Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Crespi, Mattia; Cuffaro, Marco; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Levshin, Anatoli; Panza, Giuliano F.; Riguzzi, Federica

    2010-05-01

    The net rotation, or so-called W-ward drift of the lithosphere, implies a decoupling of the plates relative to the underlying asthenosphere, and a relative "E-ward" mantle flow. This polarized flow can account for a number of asymmetries. When comparing the W-directed versus the E- to NE-directed subduction zones, as a general observation, they have the subduction hinge diverging versus converging relative to the upper plate; low versus high topography and structural elevation respectively; deep versus shallow trenches and foreland basins; shallow versus deep decollement; low versus high basement involvement; high versus low heat flow and gravity anomaly; shallow versus deep asthenosphere; etc. The western limbs of rift zones show S-waves faster in the lithosphere and slower in the asthenosphere with respect to the eastern limb. The asymmetry can be recognized when moving along the "tectonic equator", which describes the fastest flow of plates relative to the mantle, and it undulates relative to the geographic equator. In our reconstructions, the best fit for the tectonic equator has a pole of rotation at latitude -56.4° and longitude 136.7°, with an angular velocity of 1.2036°/Ma. Shear-wave splitting alignments tend to parallel the tectonic flow, apart along the subduction zones where they become orthogonal, as a flow encountering an obstacle. The tectonic equator lies close to the revolution plane of the Moon about the Earth. All these data and interpretations point for an asymmetric Earth, whose nature appears to be related to the rotation and its tidal despinning, combined with the thermal cooling of the planet. However, this model has been questioned on the basis of the high viscosity so far inferred in the asthenosphere. Preliminary modelling shows that the tidal oscillation can generate gravitational wave propagation in the lithosphere, and the wave velocity can increase with the decrease of the asthenospheric viscosity.

  9. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Lee, Junggi; Lee, Junhyun; Park, Jongsun; Park, Kyungsun; Seough, Jungjoon; Hong, Jinhy

    2012-08-20

    The present paper provides a possible explanation for the solar wind electron velocity distribution functions possessing asymmetric energetic tails. By numerically solving the electrostatic weak turbulence equations that involve nonlinear interactions among electrons, Langmuir waves, and ion-sound waves, it is shown that different ratios of ion-to-electron temperatures lead to the generation of varying degrees of asymmetric tails. The present finding may be applicable to observations in the solar wind near 1 AU and in other regions of the heliosphere and interplanetary space.

  10. Asymmetric Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, L. G.

    2001-04-01

    Asymmetric Differentiation is the name I have given to a novel method of looking for the point of no variation of a function defined by an integral (summation). The simplest example is that of the definite integral of F(x,p) from x = a to x = b where p is some parameter. Unlike the usual method of differentiation, this technique dis-continuously breaks the range of integration into two parts and considers p goes to p + Dp for x within [a,c] and p goes to p - Dp for x within [c,b] where a < c < b. What this process reveals about the underlying function depends on the context. For example, for a normalized probability distribution it produces the median. I further illustrate via a circle (compressed/expanded with a fixed area), an ellipse (stretched/tightened perimeter of fixed arc length), and a sphere (compressed/expanded surface of fixed area). The symmetry of these figures portends the result. Several conservative physical problems are solved by considering the variation of the action---a ball thrown off a building in a constant gravitational field, the simple harmonic oscillator, the spherical pendulum, a charged particle in a constant magnetic field, and the two-body problem. Finally, the financial engineering problem for which this method was invented is presented too.

  11. Tectonically Asymmetric Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Crespi, M.; Cuffaro, M.; Panza, G. F.; Riguzzi, F.

    2011-12-01

    The net rotation, or so-called W-ward drift of the lithosphere, implies a decoupling of the plates relative to the underlying asthenosphere, and a relative "E-ward" mantle flow. This polarized flow can account for a number of asymmetries. When comparing the W-directed versus the E- to NE-directed subduction zones, as a general observation, they have the subduction hinge diverging versus converging relative to the upper plate; low versus high topography and structural elevation respectively; deep versus shallow trenches and foreland basins; shallow versus deep decollement; low versus high basement involvement; high versus low heat flow and gravity anomaly; shallow versus deep asthenosphere; etc. The western limbs of rift zones have in average a deeper bathymetry, and show S-waves faster in the lithosphere and slower in the asthenosphere with respect to the eastern limb. These asymmetries can be recognized when moving along the "tectonic equator", which describes the fastest flow of plates relative to the mantle, and it undulates relative to the geographic equator, with an angle of about 30°. Shear-wave splitting alignments tend to parallel the tectonic flow, apart along the subduction zones where they become orthogonal, as a flow encountering an obstacle. The estimates of the net rotation span from 0.2° to 1.2° Ma. However, only a net rotation >1° Ma is required in order to satisfy the aforementioned tectonically asymmetric Earth. In our reconstructions, the best fit for the tectonic equator has a pole of rotation at latitude 56.4° and longitude 136.7°, with an angular velocity of 1.2036°/Ma. This velocity can be obtained only if the source of the so-called volcanic trails or plumes are sourced from the middle of the low-velocity layer, at the top of the asthenosphere, i.e., within the decoupling layer of the plates relative to the underlying mantle. The tectonic equator lies close to the revolution plane of the Moon about the Earth. All these data and

  12. Asymmetric Ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    that oscillate in certain directions. Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflected off a pond. When light scatters through the expanding debris of a supernova, it retains information about the orientation of the scattering layers. If the supernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas shell is not round, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This is what broad-band polarimetry can accomplish. If additional spectral information is available ('spectro-polarimetry'), one can determine whether the asymmetry is in the continuum light or in some spectral lines. In the case of the Type Ia supernovae, the astronomers found that the continuum polarisation is very small so that the overall shape of the explosion is crudely spherical. But the much larger polarization in strongly blue-shifted spectral lines evidences the presence, in the outer regions, of fast moving clumps with peculiar chemical composition. "Our study reveals that explosions of Type Ia supernovae are really three-dimensional phenomena," says Dietrich Baade. "The outer regions of the blast cloud is asymmetric, with different materials found in 'clumps', while the inner regions are smooth." "This study was possible because polarimetry could unfold its full strength thanks to the light-collecting power of the Very Large Telescope and the very precise calibration of the FORS instrument," he adds. The research team first spotted this asymmetry in 2003, as part of the same observational campaign (ESO PR 23/03 and ESO PR Photo 26/05). The new, more extensive results show that the degree of polarisation and, hence, the asphericity, correlates with the intrinsic brightness of the explosion. The brighter the supernova, the smoother, or less clumpy

  13. Asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jason

    2014-06-24

    We review the theoretical framework underlying models of asymmetric dark matter, describe astrophysical constraints which arise from observations of neutron stars, and discuss the prospects for detecting asymmetric dark matter.

  14. Pharmacology of M & B 18,706, a drug which selectively reduces decerebrate rigidity.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, D R; Read, M A; Sumpter, E A

    1974-01-01

    1 (+/-)-10-(3-Dimethylamino-2-methylpropyl)-2-valeroylphenothiazine hydrochloride (M & B 18,706) has been compared with dimethothiazine, chloropromazine, diazepam and baclofen for potency in reducing decerebrate rigidity in the cat and rat and for activity in causing ataxia or sedation.2 When given intravenously M & B 18,706 had seven times the potency of dimethothiazine and one-half the potency of chlorpromazine in reducing the rigidity of the intercollicular decerebrate cat. When administered orally M & B 18,706 and chlorpromazine were equi-potent in reducing rigidity but M & B 18,706 was less effective than chlorpromazine in producing ataxia in this species.3 In the rat, M & B 18,706 had one-quarter the potency of chlorpromazine for reducing decerebrate rigidity but had from 1/20th to 1/200th its potency in tests for sedative or tranquillizing activity.4 M & B 18,706, like dimethothiazine and chlorpromazine, had little effect on the rigidity of ischaemic decerebrate cats and failed to inhibit polysynaptic spinal reflexes.5 M & B 18,706 had intravenous potency comparable to chlorpromazine in reducing the pressor action of noradrenaline in the spinal cat.

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS (FRONT) LOOKING NORTHEAST. - University of South Carolina, Library, South Sumter Street, Columbia, Richland County, SC

  16. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 MAIN READING ROOM, LOOKING EAST. - University of South Carolina, Library, South Sumter Street, Columbia, Richland County, SC

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 FIRST FLOOR ENTRANCE HALL, LOOKING NORTH. - University of South Carolina, Library, South Sumter Street, Columbia, Richland County, SC

  18. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, M.B. Paine, Photographer April, 1934 DETAIL, BALCONY MAIN READING ROOM. - University of South Carolina, Library, South Sumter Street, Columbia, Richland County, SC

  19. Beta-adrenoceptor blocking properties and cardioselectivity of M & B 17,803A.

    PubMed

    Basil, B; Jordan, R; Loveless, A H; Maxwell, D R

    1973-06-01

    1. The beta-adrenoceptor blocking properties of (+/-)-1-(2-acetyl-4-n-butyramidophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-3-isopropylaminopropane hydrochloride (M&B 17,803A) have been compared with those of practolol and propranolol in the guinea-pig, cat and dog.2. Following either intravenous or oral administration in the cat or dog, M&B 17,803A and practolol had similar potency in antagonizing isoprenaline-induced tachycardia and both showed cardioselectivity, but both were less potent than propranolol.3. M&B 17,803A and practolol had approximately one hundredth the intravenous potency of propranolol in increasing the severity of anaphylactic bronchospasm in the conscious sensitized guinea-pig.4. M&B 17,803A possessed less marked intrinsic sympathomimetic activity than practolol but, like propranolol, it had significant local anaesthetic properties and increased the refractory period of rabbit isolated atria.

  20. Asymmetric Black Diholes

    SciTech Connect

    Manko, V. S.; Sanchez-Mondragon, J.; Ruiz, E.

    2009-05-01

    In the present paper we enlarge the list of black dihole spacetimes by introducing the notion of asymmetric black diholes which describe configurations composed of two static charged black holes endowed with unequal masses and equal but opposite charges. The asymmetric dihole solutions are considered both in the Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories.

  1. Tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer within Zemax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steven R.

    2016-08-01

    Techniques are described for tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer system within Zemax, including: how to set up and verify the tolerancing model, performance metrics and tolerance operands used, as well as post- Zemax analysis methods. Use of the tolerancing model for various analyses will be discussed, such as: alignment sensitivity, radial velocity sensitivity, and sensitivity of the optical system to temperature changes. Tolerance results from the Keck Planet Finder project (a precision radial velocity spectrometer of asymmetric white pupil design) will be shown.

  2. ASYMMETRIC ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Kicheol; Ryu, Chang-Mo; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-09-20

    A plausible mechanism responsible for producing asymmetric electron velocity distribution functions in the solar wind is investigated by means of one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. A recent paper suggests that the variation in the ion-to-electron temperature ratio influences the nonlinear wave-particle dynamics such that it results in the formation of asymmetric distributions. The present PIC code simulation largely confirms this finding, but quantitative differences between the weak turbulence formalism and the present PIC simulation are also found, suggesting the limitation of the analytical method. The inter-relationship between the asymmetric electron distribution and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio may be a new useful concept for the observation.

  3. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    García García, Isabel; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John

    2015-09-18

    We study asymmetric dark matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (fraternal) twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged SU(3)^{'}×SU(2)^{'}, a twin Higgs doublet, and only third-generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD^{'} scale Λ_{QCD}^{'}≃0.5-20  GeV, and that t^{'} is heavy. We focus on the light b^{'} quark regime, m_{b^{'}}≲Λ_{QCD}^{'}, where QCD^{'} is characterized by a single scale Λ_{QCD}^{'} with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful dark matter (DM) candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, Δ^{'}∼b^{'}b^{'}b^{'}, with a dynamically determined mass (∼5Λ_{QCD}^{'}) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio Ω_{DM}/Ω_{baryon}≃5. Gauging the U(1)^{'} group leads to twin atoms (Δ^{'}-τ^{'}[over ¯] bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo properties. Direct detection signatures satisfy current bounds, at times modified by dark form factors.

  4. Asymmetric gas separation membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Malon, R. F.; Zampini, A.

    1984-12-04

    Asymmetric gas separation membranes of materials having selective permeation of at least one gas of a gaseous mixture over that of one or more remaining gases of the gaseous mixture, exhibit significantly improved permeation selectivities for the at least one gas when the asymmetric membrane is contacted on one or both surfaces with an effective amount of a Lewis acid. The improved asymmetric gas separation membranes, process for producing the improved membrane, and processes utilizing such membranes for selectively separating at least one gas from a gaseous mixture by permeation are disclosed.

  5. Asymmetric gas separation membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Malon, R. F.; Zampini, A.

    1984-09-18

    Asymmetric gas separation membranes of materials having selective permeation of at least one gas of a gaseous mixture over that of one or more remaining gases of the gaseous mixture, exhibit significantly improved permeation selectivities for the at least one gas when the asymmetric membrane is contacted on one or both surfaces with an effective amount of a Br nsted-Lowry acid. The improved asymmetric gas separation membranes, process for producing the improved membrane, and processes utilizing such membranes for selectively separating at least one gas from a gaseous mixture by permeation are disclosed.

  6. Preliminary Study of m(b) Bias at Selected Soviet Seismic Stations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-21

    8217-R66 395 PRELIMINARY STUDY OF M(B) BIRS AT SELECTED SOVIET 1/1 SEISMIC STRTIONS(U) SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORP ARLINGTON VR A S RYRLL...earthquakes in each source region was not given in the ,.t 1980 paper, but in the earlier work it ranged from 35 events for Asia and the Mediter - ranean to

  7. Sources of Error and the Statistical Formulation of M S: m b Seismic Event Screening Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Patton, H. J.; Taylor, S. R.; Bonner, J. L.; Selby, N. D.

    2014-03-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a global ban on nuclear explosions, is currently in a ratification phase. Under the CTBT, an International Monitoring System (IMS) of seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasonic and radionuclide sensors is operational, and the data from the IMS is analysed by the International Data Centre (IDC). The IDC provides CTBT signatories basic seismic event parameters and a screening analysis indicating whether an event exhibits explosion characteristics (for example, shallow depth). An important component of the screening analysis is a statistical test of the null hypothesis H 0: explosion characteristics using empirical measurements of seismic energy (magnitudes). The established magnitude used for event size is the body-wave magnitude (denoted m b) computed from the initial segment of a seismic waveform. IDC screening analysis is applied to events with m b greater than 3.5. The Rayleigh wave magnitude (denoted M S) is a measure of later arriving surface wave energy. Magnitudes are measurements of seismic energy that include adjustments (physical correction model) for path and distance effects between event and station. Relative to m b, earthquakes generally have a larger M S magnitude than explosions. This article proposes a hypothesis test (screening analysis) using M S and m b that expressly accounts for physical correction model inadequacy in the standard error of the test statistic. With this hypothesis test formulation, the 2009 Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea announced nuclear weapon test fails to reject the null hypothesis H 0: explosion characteristics.

  8. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  9. Asymmetric Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Apolloni, B; Bertoni, A; Campadelli, P; de Falco, D

    1991-01-01

    We study asymmetric stochastic networks from two points of view: combinatorial optimization and learning algorithms based on relative entropy minimization. We show that there are non trivial classes of asymmetric networks which admit a Lyapunov function L under deterministic parallel evolution and prove that the stochastic augmentation of such networks amounts to a stochastic search for global minima of L. The problem of minimizing L for a totally antisymmetric parallel network is shown to be associated to an NP-complete decision problem. The study of entropic learning for general asymmetric networks, performed in the non equilibrium, time dependent formalism, leads to a Hebbian rule based on time averages over the past history of the system. The general algorithm for asymmetric networks is tested on a feed-forward architecture.

  10. Correlation after Asymmetrical Clipping,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    A general formula is derived for the correlation coefficient between clipped waveforms or among detection sequences, for the case where the clipping is asymmetric or the detection probability departs from 50%. The analytic arcsine law for symmetrical clipping is rehearsed and new analytic forms are found for asymmetrical clipping with high positive correlation, numerically low correlation and high negative correlation. Keywords: Sonar; Detection; Probability; Great Britain.

  11. Endohedral and exohedral metalloborospherenes: M@B40 (M=Ca, Sr) and M&B40 (M=Be, Mg).

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2015-01-12

    The recent discovery of the all-boron fullerenes or borospherenes, D(2d) B40(-/0), paves the way for borospherene chemistry. Here we report a density functional theory study on the viability of metalloborospherenes: endohedral M@B40 (M=Ca, Sr) and exohedral M&B40 (M=Be, Mg). Extensive global structural searches indicate that Ca@B40 (1, C(2v), (1)A1) and Sr@B40 (3, D(2d), (1)A1) possess almost perfect endohedral borospherene structures with a metal atom at the center, while Be&B40 (5, C(s), (1)A') and Mg&B40 (7, C(s), (1)A') favor exohedral borospherene geometries with a η(7)-M atom face-capping a heptagon on the waist. Metalloborospherenes provide indirect evidence for the robustness of the borospherene structural motif. The metalloborospherenes are characterized as charge-transfer complexes (M(2+)B40(2-)), where an alkaline earth metal atom donates two electrons to the B40 cage. The high stability of endohedral Ca@B40 (1) and Sr@B40 (3) is due to the match in size between the host cage and the dopant. Bonding analyses indicate that all 122 valence electrons in the systems are delocalized as σ or π bonds, being distributed evenly on the cage surface, akin to the D(2d) B40 borospherene. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Transverse Velocity Shifts in Protostellar Jets: Rotation or Velocity Asymmetries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Cerqueira, Adriano H.; Riera, Angels

    2016-12-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction that have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could originate from rotation in the flow, or from side-to-side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (˜100-200 km s-1), an asymmetry ≳10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three-dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing, and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts (TVSs). Our analysis indicates that side-to-side velocitiy asymmetries could represent an important contribution to TVSs, being the most important contributor for large jet inclination angles (with respect the the plane of the sky), and cannot be neglected when interpreting the observations.

  13. Abnormal phenotypic features of IgM+B cell subsets in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanyun; Feng, Bo; Zhang, Henghui; Rao, Huiying; Wang, Jianghua; Cong, Xu; Wei, Lai

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with B cell abnormality; however the phenotypic profiles of immunoglobulin (Ig)M+B cell subsets in patients with HCV infection remain unclear. In the current study, the effect of HCV infection on IgM+B cell subsets was evaluated. The percentages, as well as the differentiation and activation features of peripheral IgM+B naive subsets [cluster of differentiation (CD)27-IgM+B cells] and IgM+B memory subsets (CD27+IgM+B cells) were assessed using flow cytometry in 27 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and 20 healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of CD27+IgM+B memory subsets detected in patients with CHC was significantly higher than that in HCs (P<0.05). Although the frequency of CD27-IgM+B naive subsets was similar in both groups, there was a significantly higher proportion of CD5+B cells detected in the CD27-IgM+B subsets of patients with CHC compared with HCs (P<0.05). Among CD27-IgM+B subsets, abnormal differentiation was associated with HCV infection, with significantly increased percentages of IgD+B cells and CD38+B cells in patients with CHC compared with HCs (P<0.05). In CD27+IgM+B memory subsets, the abnormality of cell differentiation was associated with a significantly increased percentage of CD38+B cells in patients with CHC compared with HCs (P<0.05). In addition, the percentage of activated CD27+IgM+B subsets in patients with CHC were significantly higher than those observed in HCs (P<0.05). The number of CD27-IgD+IgM+B, CD27-CD38+IgM+B and CD27+CD38+IgM+B cells were negatively correlated with HCV RNA in patients with CHC. These results suggest that HCV infection contributes to abnormalities in the percentage, differentiation and activation of IgM+B cell subsets and may disrupt the immune response mediated by IgM+B cells.

  14. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  15. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  16. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  17. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  18. ON ASYMMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, A.; Evans, N. W.; Belokurov, V.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate that the asymmetric distribution of M31 satellites cannot be produced by tides from the Milky Way as such effects are too weak. However, loosely bound associations and groups of satellites can fall into larger halos and give rise to asymmetries. We compute the survival times for such associations. We prove that the survival time is always shortest in Keplerian potentials, and can be ∼3 times longer in logarithmic potentials. We provide an analytical formula for the dispersal time in terms of the size and velocity dispersion of the infalling structure. We show that, if an association of ∼10 dwarfs fell into the M31 halo, its present aspect would be that of an asymmetric disk of satellites. We also discuss the case of cold substructure in the Andromeda II and Ursa Minor dwarfs.

  19. Electrokinetics induced asymmetric transport in polymeric nanonozzles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengnian; Hu, Xin; Lee, L James

    2008-04-01

    The asymmetric geometry of polymeric nanonozzles provides two different transport directions: a converging direction (from the large opening to the small opening) and a diverging direction (from the small opening to the large opening). Asymmetric transport was observed in such nanochannels for both rigid polystyrene nanoparticles and flexible DNA molecules under a DC electric bias. Small, hard nanoparticles migrate easily in the diverging direction and tend to pack inside the nanochannel in the converging direction. In contrast, large, flexible DNA molecules transport better in the converging direction than in the diverging direction. A high electric field and a high velocity gradient along the tapered region produce different geometric constrictions and vortex-like particle motions for rigid nanoparticles, and also generate various coil-stretching dynamics for DNA molecules. Such nanonozzle arrays are useful in high flux and high sieving efficiency devices for biomolecule delivery or separation, and for loading trace amounts of drugs or genes for controlled drug and gene delivery.

  20. Asymmetric reactions in continuous flow

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Xiao Yin; Laurino, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Summary An overview of asymmetric synthesis in continuous flow and microreactors is presented in this review. Applications of homogeneous and heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis as well as biocatalysis in flow are discussed. PMID:19478913

  1. Synthesis and Trapping of Iminoboranes by M=B/C=N Bond Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Nutz, Marco; Borthakur, Bitupon; Dewhurst, Rian D; Deißenberger, Andrea; Dellermann, Theresa; Schäfer, Marius; Krummenacher, Ivo; Phukan, Ashwini K; Braunschweig, Holger

    2017-06-26

    Although the metathesis of metal-boron double bonds with elemental chalcogenides is an established process, no similar reactivity has been observed with element-nitrogen bonds. Such a reaction would provide a new route to iminoborane compounds (RB≡NR'), which have recently experienced renewed synthetic interest. Herein, we present the first observation of M=B/C=N metathesis reactions, which led to the isolation of a stable iminoborane in addition to further iminoborane cycloaddition products. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  3. Asymmetric hydrogenations (Nobel lecture).

    PubMed

    Knowles, William S

    2002-06-17

    The start of the development of catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation was the concept of replacing the triphenylphosphane ligand of the Wilkinson catalyst with a chiral ligand. With the new catalysts, it should be possible to hydrogenate prochiral olefins. Knowles and his co-workers were convinced that the phosphorus atom played a central role in this selectivity, as only chiral phosphorus ligands such as (R,R)-DIPAMP, whose stereogenic center lies directly on the phosphorus atom, lead to high enantiomeric excesses when used as catalysts in asymmetric hydrogenation reactions. This hypothesis was disproven by the development of ligands with chiral carbon backbones. Although the exact mechanism of action of the phosphane ligands is not incontrovertibly determined to this day, they provide a simple entry to a large number of chiral compounds.

  4. Asymmetric information and economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieden, B. Roy; Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    We present an expression of the economic concept of asymmetric information with which it is possible to derive the dynamical laws of an economy. To illustrate the utility of this approach we show how the assumption of optimal information flow leads to a general class of investment strategies including the well-known Q theory of Tobin. Novel consequences of this formalism include a natural definition of market efficiency and an uncertainty principle relating capital stock and investment flow.

  5. Asymmetric acoustic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaojian; Peng, Shasha; Ye, Yangtao; Dai, Zhongwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2011-02-01

    The unidirectional transmission of acoustic waves is realized by a simple geometrically asymmetric steel grating structure. This exotic phenomenon stems from the one-way diffraction effect induced by the different periods of the slits on the both surfaces of the sample. And the frequency range of unidirectional transmission is simply determined by the structure periods. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical simulation. This remarkable effect is expected potential applications in ultrasonic devices, such as acoustic rectifiers and acoustic diodes.

  6. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  7. Asymmetrical Capacitors for Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, Francis X.; Melcher, Cory; Winet, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetrical Capacitor Thrusters have been proposed as a source of propulsion. For over eighty years, it has been known that a thrust results when a high voltage is placed across an asymmetrical capacitor, when that voltage causes a leakage current to flow. However, there is surprisingly little experimental or theoretical data explaining this effect. This paper reports on the results of tests of several Asymmetrical Capacitor Thrusters (ACTs). The thrust they produce has been measured for various voltages, polarities, and ground configurations and their radiation in the VHF range has been recorded. These tests were performed at atmospheric pressure and at various reduced pressures. A simple model for the thrust was developed. The model assumed the thrust was due to electrostatic forces on the leakage current flowing across the capacitor. It was further assumed that this current involves charged ions which undergo multiple collisions with air. These collisions transfer momentum. All of the measured data was consistent with this model. Many configurations were tested, and the results suggest general design principles for ACTs to be used for a variety of purposes.

  8. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations "interpolate" between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle "flavor" effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. "Flavor-sensitive" DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while "flavor-blind" interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  9. Asymmetric fluorocyclizations of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Wolstenhulme, Jamie R; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: The vicinal fluorofunctionalization of alkenes is an attractive transformation that converts feedstock olefins into valuable cyclic fluorinated molecules for application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, medical, and material sectors. The challenges associated with asymmetric fluorocyclizations induced by F(+) reagents are distinct from other types of halocyclizations. Processes initiated by the addition of an F(+) reagent onto an alkene do not involve the reversible formation of bridged fluoronium ions but generate acyclic β-fluorocationic intermediates. This mechanistic feature implies that fluorocyclizations are not stereospecific. A discontinuity exists between the importance of this class of fluorocyclization and the activation modes currently available to implement successful catalysis. Progress toward fluorocyclization has been achieved by investing in neutral and cationic [NF] reagent development. The body of work on asymmetric fluorination using chiral cationic [NF](+) reagents prepared by fluorine transfer from the dicationic [NF](2+) reagent Selectfluor to quinuclidines, inspired the development of asymmetric F(+)-induced fluorocyclizations catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids; for catalysis, the use of N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide, which is less reactive than Selectfluor, ensures that the achiral F(+) source remains unreactive toward the alkene. These organocatalyzed enantioselective fluorocyclizations can be applied to indoles to install the fluorine on a quaternary benzylic stereogenic carbon center and to afford fluorinated analogues of natural products featuring the hexahydropyrrolo[2,3-b]indole or the tetrahydro-2H-furo[2,3-b]indole skeleton. In an alternative approach, the poor solubility of dicationic Selectfluor bis(tetrafluoroborate) in nonpolar solvent was exploited with anionic phase transfer catalysis as the operating activation mode. Exchange of the tetrafluoroborate ions of Selectfluor with bulky lipophilic chiral anions (e

  10. Use of nonlinear asymmetrical shock absorber to improve comfort on passenger vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M.; Pontes, B. R.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this study the behaviour of two different types of shock absorbers, symmetrical (linear) and asymmetrical (nonlinear) is compared for use on passenger vehicles. The analyses use different standard road inputs and include variation of the severity parameter, the asymmetry ratio and the velocity of the vehicle. Performance indices and acceleration values are used to assess the efficacy of the asymmetrical systems. The comparisons show that the asymmetrical system, with nonlinear characteristics, tends to have a smoother and more progressive performance, both for vertical and angular movements. The half-car front asymmetrical system was introduced, and the simulation results show that the use of the asymmetrical system only at the front of the vehicle can further diminish the angular oscillations. As lower levels of acceleration are essential for improved ride comfort, the use of asymmetrical systems for vibrations and impact absorption can be a more advantageous choice for passenger vehicles.

  11. Mean velocities measured with the double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.

    2004-10-01

    It was recently observed that double-pulse measurements of the mean velocities of a wide asymmetric spectrum are a function of the time lag between the pulses (Uspensky et al., 2004). Here we demonstrate that the observed relationship probably is influenced by the measurement technique in a way that is consistent with theoretical prediction. It is further shown that for small time lags the double pulse velocity is a good approximation to the mean Doppler velo-city.

  12. Skewed exponential pairwise velocities from Gaussian initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkiewicz, R.; Fisher, K. B.; Szapudi, I.

    1998-09-01

    Using an Eulerian perturbative calculation, we show that the distribution of relative pairwise velocities which arises from gravitational instability of Gaussian density fluctuations has asymmetric (skewed) exponential tails. The negative skewness is induced by the negative mean streaming velocity of pairs (the infall prevails over expansion), while the exponential tails arise because the relative pairwise velocity is a number, not volume weighted statistic. The derived probability distribution is compared with N-body simulations and shown to provide a reasonable fit.

  13. Control of asymmetric jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chih-Ming

    1992-06-01

    A passive method of enhancing the rate of entrainment by as much as 500 percent in subsonic open nozzle flows has been obtained by modifying axisymmetric nozzle geometry to a 2:1 aspect-ratio elliptic nozzle. Small aspect-ratio elliptical nozzles have been demonstrated to more efficiently control mixing processes and to exhibit increased rates of spreading, entrainment, and fine-scale mixing than axisymmetric nozzles at subsonic and supersonic conditions in a confined dump combustor and in high-temperature ramjets. Vortex self-induction is the principle mechanism controlling mixing processes in asymmetric jet nozzles.

  14. Asymmetric Gaussian optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A; Porfirev, Alexey P

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a Gaussian optical beam with an embedded off-axis optical vortex. We also experimentally generate such an asymmetric Gaussian optical vortex by using an off-axis spiral phase plate. It is shown that depending on the shift distance the laser beam has the form of a crescent, which is rotated upon propagation. An analytical expression is obtained for the orbital angular momentum of such a beam, which appears to be fractional. When the shift increases, the greater the number of spirality of the phase plate or the "fork" hologram, the slower the momentum decreases. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the theory.

  15. Optimum profiles for asymmetrical longitudinal fins in annular ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, G.

    2000-04-01

    In the present work the geometry of annular ducts with asymmetrical longitudinal fins is optimized in order to enhance the heat transfer under laminar coolant flow conditions. The heat transferred is also maximized for a given amount of material or hydraulic resistance. Polynomial profiles are assigned to the two lateral fin surfaces. Velocity and temperature distributions on the annular duct cross section are determined with the help of a finite-element model. A global heat transfer coefficient and an equivalent Nusselt number are then calculated. Lastly, optimum asymmetrical fins obtained by means of a genetic algorithm are shown for different situations and their performance is compared with those of optimum symmetrical fins.

  16. Colon Cryptogenesis: Asymmetric Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2013-01-01

    The process of crypt formation and the roles of Wnt and cell-cell adhesion signaling in cryptogenesis are not well described; but are important to the understanding of both normal and cancer colon crypt biology. A quantitative 3D-microscopy and image analysis technique is used to study the frequency, morphology and molecular topography associated with crypt formation. Measurements along the colon reveal the details of crypt formation and some key underlying biochemical signals regulating normal colon biology. Our measurements revealed an asymmetrical crypt budding process, contrary to the previously reported symmetrical fission of crypts. 3D immunofluorescence analyses reveals heterogeneity in the subcellular distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin in distinct crypt populations. This heterogeneity was also found in asymmetrical budding crypts. Singular crypt formation (i.e. no multiple new crypts forming from one parent crypt) were observed in crypts isolated from the normal colon mucosa, suggestive of a singular constraint mechanism to prevent aberrant crypt production. The technique presented improves our understanding of cryptogenesis and suggests that excess colon crypt formation occurs when Wnt signaling is perturbed (e.g. by truncation of adenomatous polyposis coli, APC protein) in most colon cancers. PMID:24205248

  17. The Effects of Spall on m(b) and M(s)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-04

    HARDHAT 02-15-62 37 116 5.9 287 .12 .44 CHINCHILLA I 02-19-62 37 116 1.8 150 .17 .51 PLATYPUS 02-24-62 37 116 0-20 58 .07 .15 PAMPAS 03-01-62 37 116 0...16 1.78 335 .12 .51 PLATYPUS 15 .05 .86 32 .04 .51 PAMPAS 15 .20 17.02 ERMINE 15 .03 .43 A- 1 APPENDIX Continued Surface Particle Velocity Data

  18. Asymmetric stereodivergent strategy towards aminocyclitols.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Malhotra, Sushant

    2014-07-01

    A concise asymmetric synthesis of aminocyclitols, such as diastereomeric 2-deoxystreptamine analogues and conduramine A, is described. The Pd-catalyzed asymmetric desymmetrization of meso 1,4-dibenzolate enables the synthesis of highly oxidized cyclohexane architectures. These scaffolds can potentially be used to access new aminoglycoside antibiotics and enantiomerically pure α-glucosidase inhibitors.

  19. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Coker, Eric N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-08-07

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  20. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  1. ac electro-osmotic micropump by asymmetric electrode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie (Jayne)

    2008-01-01

    ac electro-osmosis (ACEO) has emerged recently as a promising strategy for fluid transport at microscale. With an array of planar interdigital electrodes immersed in an electrolyte, different charging mechanisms at electrode/electrolyte interface and electrokinetic surface flows can be induced by nonuniform electrical fields. To implement ACEO micropump, asymmetry in an electrode pair is essential to generate net flow, which has been typically achieved through asymmetric electrode geometries. This work proposes asymmetric electrode polarization processes to break the electrode symmetry. A dc bias is superimposed onto ac potentials, so that the two electrodes in a pair undergo capacitive charging or Faradaic charging separately. Applying such signals, pumping action has been demonstrated with only a few volts of applied voltage and a power consumption in the range of milliwatts. Pumping velocity by asymmetric electrode polarization exhibits an exponential dependency on voltage.

  2. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-09

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  3. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-01

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  4. Air Velocity Mapping of Environmental Test Chambers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    variable that must be measured for the evaluations of the air diffusion performance index (ADPI), or the thermal comfort indices such as predicted mean...altered. The impact of asymmetrical airflow patterns undoubtedly affect human thermal comfort votes. The standardized 6 technique described in this...report could be easily employed prior to or along with specific studies requiring precise air velocity data, and coupled with human thermal comfort surveys

  5. Mechanical, physical, and physiological analysis of symmetrical and asymmetrical combat.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente J; Robles-Pérez, José J

    2013-09-01

    In current theaters of operation, soldiers had to face a different situation as symmetrical (defined battlefield) and asymmetrical combat (non-defined battlefield), especially in urban areas. The mechanical and organic responses of soldiers in these combats are poorly studied in specific literature. This research aimed to analyze physical, mechanical, and physiological parameters during symmetrical and asymmetrical combat simulations. We analyzed 20 soldiers from the Spanish Army and Spanish Forces and Security Corps (34.5 ± 4.2 years; 176.4 ± 8.4 cm; 74.6 ± 8.7 kg; 63.3 ± 8.0 kg muscular mass; 7.6 ± 3.2 kg fat mass) during a symmetric combat (traditional combat simulation) and during an asymmetrical combat (urban combat simulation). Heart rate (HR), speed, sprints, distances, impact, and body load parameters were measured by a GPS system and a HR belt. Results showed many differences between symmetrical and asymmetrical combat. Asymmetrical combat presented higher maximum velocity movement, number of sprints, sprint distance, and average HR. By contrary, symmetric combat presented higher number of impact and body load. This information could be used to improve specific training programs for each type of combat.

  6. Asymmetric Bessel modes.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Soifer, V A

    2014-04-15

    We propose a new, three-parameter family of diffraction-free asymmetric elegant Bessel modes (aB-modes) with an integer and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The aB-modes are described by the nth-order Bessel function of the first kind with complex argument. The asymmetry degree of the nonparaxial aB-mode is shown to depend on a real parameter c≥0: when c=0, the aB-mode is identical to a conventional radially symmetric Bessel mode; with increasing c, the aB-mode starts to acquire a crescent form, getting stretched along the vertical axis and shifted along the horizontal axis for c≫1. On the horizontal axis, the aB-modes have a denumerable number of isolated intensity zeros that generate optical vortices with a unit topological charge of opposite sign on opposite sides of 0. At different values of the parameter c, the intensity zeros change their location on the horizontal axis, thus changing the beam's OAM. An isolated intensity zero on the optical axis generates an optical vortex with topological charge n. The OAM per photon of an aB-mode depends near-linearly on c, being equal to ℏ(n+cI1(2c)/I0(2c)), where ℏ is the Planck constant and In(x) is a modified Bessel function.

  7. Microstructure and texture of asymmetrically rolled aluminium and titanium after deformation and recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wronski, M.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Wronski, S.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-08-01

    Asymmetric rolling is used to modify material properties and to reduce forces and torques applied during deformation. This geometry of deformation is relatively easy to implement on existing industrial rolling mills and it can provide large volumes of a material. The results of the study of microstructure and crystallographic texture in asymmetrically rolled aluminium 6061 and titanium (grade 2) are presented in this work. These characteristics were determined using the EBSD technique and X-ray diffraction. The rolling asymmetry was realized using two identical rolls, driven by independent motors, rotating with different angular velocities. It was found that asymmetric rolling leads to microstructural refinement and texture rotation (around the transverse direction). The impact of asymmetric rolling on microstructural refinement appears also in recrystallized samples of both materials. On the other hand, texture rotation, caused by asymmetric rolling, persists after annealing in titanium but not in aluminium samples.

  8. Concise asymmetric synthesis of (-)-sparteine.

    PubMed

    Hermet, Jean-Paul R; McGrath, Matthew J; O'Brien, Peter; Porter, David W; Gilday, John

    2004-08-21

    A six-step asymmetric synthesis of natural (-)-sparteine from ethyl 7-iodohept-2-enoate is reported, involving a connective Michael addition of an amino ester-derived enolate to an alpha,beta-unsaturated amino ester.

  9. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  10. Study of texture, microstructure and mechanical properties of asymmetrically rolled aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wronski, M.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Wronski, S.; Bacroix, B.; Wróbel, M.; Uniwersał, A.

    2015-04-01

    Asymmetric rolling is a promising forming technique offering numerous possibilities of material properties modification and the improvement of technological process parameters. This geometry of deformation is relatively easy to implement on existing industrial rolling mills. Moreover, it can provide large volume of a material with modified properties. The study of microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties of asymmetrically rolled aluminium is presented in this work. The above characteristics were examined using EBSD technique and X-ray diffraction. The rolling asymmetry was realized using two identical rolls, driven by independent motors, rotating with different angular velocities. It was found that asymmetric rolling leads to microstructure refinement, texture homogenization and decreasing of residual stress.

  11. Asymmetrical internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, P.

    1983-03-08

    An internal combustion engine adapted to be powered by a burnable gaseous fuel includes one cylinder, first and second pistons reciprocally movable in the cylinder substantially in opposite directions, inlet and outlet valves for controlling the flow of the gaseous fuel into the cylinder, and the exhaust of the burnt fuel therefrom, respectively, and a linkage device connected to the pistons for converting the reciprocating movement thereof into a rotary movement. The linkage device includes change-of-rate-of-displacement devices for increasing the rate of velocity in the maximum acceleration range, and for reducing the rate of displacement in the maximum velocity range of one piston with respect to the other piston, first and second piston rods pivotably connected to the first and second pistons, respectively, first and second crankshafts pivotably connected to the first and second piston rods, rotatable about first and second axes disposed substantially parallel to, and displaced by a predetermined angle from one another, respectively, and a gear train coupling the first and second crankshafts to one another. The gear train includes first and second fixedly mounted gearwheels, first and second concentrically mounted gear wheels, and a position-shiftable coupling mechanism for coupling the first gear wheels and the second gear wheels to one another, respectively, and an engaging device for meshing the eccentrically mounted gear wheels with one another.

  12. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly doped DG MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Pradipta; Syamal, Binit; Koley, Kalyan; Dutta, Arka; Sarkar, C. K.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a drain current model for double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (DG MOSFETs) based on a new velocity saturation model that accounts for short-channel velocity saturation effect independently in the front and the back gate controlled channels under asymmetric front and back gate bias and oxide thickness. To determine the front and the back-channel velocity saturation, drain-induced barrier lowering is evaluated by effective gate voltages at the front and back gates obtained from surface potential at the threshold condition after considering symmetric and asymmetric front and back oxide thickness. The model also incorporates surface roughness scattering and ionized impurity scattering to estimate drain current for heavily / lightly doped channel for short-channel asymmetric DG MOSFET and a good agreement has been achieved with TCAD simulations, with a relative error of around 3-7%.

  13. Net electron energy gain induced by superluminal phase velocity and subluminal group velocity of a laser in a plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Hong; Yao, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2017-08-01

    We examine electron dynamics induced by laser-plasma interaction in a two-dimensional plasma channel, taking into action the laser phase velocity as well as the group velocity. The coupled effects of phase velocity, group velocity, and plasma channel on electron dynamics are discussed in detail. The superluminal phase velocity and the corresponding subluminal group velocity of the laser result in rich and complex electron dynamics, which are depicted in the plane of the phase velocity and plasma charge density. For weak superluminosity of the phase velocity, the effects of the phase velocity and the group velocity can be neglected. For moderate superluminosity of the phase velocity, a cross-over region can exist, where the highly energetic electron could be found and the net energy gain is several times greater than the energy gain in vacuum. For strong superluminosity of the phase velocity, the dephasing rate increases and thus limits the electron energy gain from the laser. However, the asymmetric laser pulse, attributed by the superluminal phase velocity and the subluminal group velocity, results in the electron getting adjustable net energy gain from the laser. The electron oscillations are no longer limited by the charge density threshold and the electron can always get net energy from the laser. These electron dynamics can also be modified by adjusting the polarization of the laser.

  14. Magnetic properties of RCo4M (R=Y, Nd and Ho; M=B, Al and Ga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, H.; Konno, K.; Ito, T.; Cheng, S. F.; Sankar, S. G.; Wallace, W. E.

    1991-04-01

    Magnetic and crystallographic measurements have been made for the compounds RCo4M (R=Y, Nd, and Ho; M=B, Al, and Ga) to intercompare the magnetic properties of RCo4B, RCo4M (M=Al and Ga) and RCo5. The compounds RCo4B crystallize in the CeCo4B type structure, while RCo4M (M=Al and Ga) in the CaCu5 type. The following main conclusions have been obtained: (1) the Curie temperature and the averaged Co-moment of RCo4M (R=Y, Nd, and Ho; M=B, Al, and Ga) are lower and smaller than those of RCo5, respectively, and 6i-site Co-moment in RCo4B is smaller than the 2c-site Co-moment by the influence of the neighboring B-layer; (2) magnetocrystalline anisotropy of R-sublattice of RCo4B is stronger than that of RCo5, while that of RCo4Al is remarkably weaker than that of RCo5; (3) the Co-sublattice anisotropy constants of YCo4M (M=B and Al) are 20% or less of that of YCo5; and (4) JR-Co and JCo-Co, which are the exchange parameters of the atomic pairs in NdCo4M (M=B and Al), have been estimated to be JR-Co/k ≂ 7 K and JCo-Co/k ≂ 200 K, where k is the Boltzman constant.

  15. Expansion and differentiation of IgM(+) B cells in the rainbow trout peritoneal cavity in response to different antigens.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; González, Lucia; Granja, Aitor G; Tafalla, Carolina

    2017-05-01

    To date, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection seems to be the most effective vaccination route in aquaculture, as many i.p. administered fish vaccines are capable of conferring strong and long-lasting immune responses. Despite this, how peritoneal leukocytes are regulated upon antigen encounter has only been scarcely studied in fish. Although, in the past, myeloid cells were thought to be the main responders to peritoneal inflammation, a recent study revealed that IgM(+) B cells are one of the main cell types in the teleost peritoneal cavity in response to pathogenic bacteria. Thus, in the current work, we have focused on establishing how IgM(+) B cells are recruited into the peritoneum in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) comparing different antigens: Escherichia coli as a bacterial model, E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). In addition to studying their capacity to dominate the peritoneal cavity, we have established how these IgM(+) B cells are regulated in response to the different antigens, determining their levels of IgM secretion, surface MHC II expression, cell size and phagocytic abilities. Our results reveal that IgM(+) B cells are one of the main cell types amplified in the peritoneum in response to either bacterial or viral antigens and that these immunogenic stimulations provoke a differentiation of some of these cells towards plasmablasts/plasma cells whereas others seem to be implicated in antigen presentation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the immune processes that regulate peritoneal inflammation in teleost fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Trunk rotation monitor using angular velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, A; Uda, S

    1997-04-01

    To monitor the low back risk imposed by asymmetric postures at workplaces, a method using angular velocity sensors was studied. According to a simple model analysis, trunk rotation could be calculated from the angular velocities measured at both the waist and shoulder and from the inclination of each angular velocity sensor. We thus developed a new detector consisting of an angular velocity sensor (ENC-05D, Murata, Japan) for detecting angular velocity and an acceleration sensor (ADXL05, Analog Devices, USA) for measuring inclination. The precision of the angular velocity sensor was high as the correlation coefficient between the output of the sensor and the true value was 0.9996. When the detectors were affixed to a subject and compared with data measured by a Vicon System 370 (Oxford Metrics, UK), the correlation coefficients between the two methods were 0.949 and 0.815 during model tasks of box transfer and box lifting, respectively. In a model of lifting boxes at different rates, the mean and standard deviation increased according to the task speed. This method was shown to be of practical use for monitoring trunk rotation.

  17. Hydroxamic Acids in Asymmetric Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed stereoselective reactions are a central theme in organic chemistry research. In these reactions, the stereoselection is achieved predominantly by introducing chiral ligands at the metal catalyst’s center. For decades, researchers have sought better chiral ligands for asymmetric catalysis and have made great progress. Nevertheless, to achieve optimal stereoselectivity and to catalyze new reactions, new chiral ligands are needed. Due to their high metal affinity, hydroxamic acids play major roles across a broad spectrum of fields from biochemistry to metal extraction. Dr. K. Barry Sharpless first revealed their potential as chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis in 1977: He published the chiral vanadium-hydroxamic-acid-catalyzed, enantioselective epoxidation of allylic alcohols before his discovery of Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation, which uses titanium-tartrate complex as the chiral reagent. However, researchers have reported few highly enantioselective reactions using metal-hydroxamic acid as catalysts since then. This Account summarizes our research on metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation using hydroxamic acids as chiral ligands. We designed and synthesized a series of new hydroxamic acids, most notably the C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) family. V-BHA-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic and homoallylic alcohols achieved higher activity and stereoselectivity than Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation in many cases. Changing the metal species led to a series of unprecedented asymmetric epoxidation reactions, such as (i) single olefins and sulfides with Mo-BHA, (ii) homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols with Zr- and Hf-BHA, and (iii) N-alkenyl sulfonamides and N-sulfonyl imines with Hf-BHA. These reactions produce uniquely functionalized chiral epoxides with good yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:23157425

  18. Does asymmetric correlation affect portfolio optimization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Lukas

    2017-07-01

    The classical portfolio optimization problem does not assume asymmetric behavior of relationship among asset returns. The existence of asymmetric response in correlation on the bad news could be important information in portfolio optimization. The paper applies Dynamic conditional correlation model (DCC) and his asymmetric version (ADCC) to propose asymmetric behavior of conditional correlation. We analyse asymmetric correlation among S&P index, bonds index and spot gold price before mortgage crisis in 2008. We evaluate forecast ability of the models during and after mortgage crisis and demonstrate the impact of asymmetric correlation on the reduction of portfolio variance.

  19. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Supersensing through industrial process tomography’. PMID:27185961

  20. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  1. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement.

  2. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement.

  3. Color Doppler imaging in glaucoma patients with asymmetric optic cups.

    PubMed

    Costa, V P; Sergott, R C; Smith, M; Spaeth, G L; Wilson, R P; Moster, M R; Katz, L J; Schmidt, C M

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the color Doppler imaging (CDI) parameters of the retrobulbar circulation, we performed color Doppler imaging in both eyes of 29 glaucomatous patients with asymmetric cups [asymmetry >0.3 cup/disc ratio (C/D)] and asymmetric visual field loss. We used the QAD-1 Color Doppler unit (Quantum Medical Systems Inc.) with a 7.5-MHz linear-phased transducer to calculate the pulsatility index, and the peak systolic, end diastolic, and average blood-flow velocities in the ophthalmic, central retinal, nasal, and temporal short posterior ciliary arteries of each eye. In a second analysis, we compared the results of a randomly selected eye of age- and sex-matched controls. Paired t tests did not show any significant difference between the blood-flow velocities of the more damaged and less damaged eyes when the entire 29-patient group was considered together. The power was adequate to detect a 1.0 cm/s difference in most of the analyzed vessels. Thirteen of the 29 patients had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and the remaining eyes had pseudoexfoliation and low tension, pigmentary, and chronic angle-closure glaucoma. When compared to age- and sex-matched controls, the less damaged eyes of patients with POAG displayed reduced systolic, diastolic, and mean velocities (p < 0.05) in the ophthalmic artery. In comparison, the more damaged eyes revealed statistically reduced velocities in the ophthalmic artery, temporal short posterior ciliary artery, and in all the parameters for the mean values of the short posterior ciliary arteries (p < 0.05). More advanced optic nerve damage in patients with POAG correlated with more severe reductions of CDI parameters of the retrobulbar circulation of patients with asymmetric disease. Further clinical color Doppler correlations are now mandatory to determine whether these vascular changes are pathogenetically important or epiphenomena.

  4. ASYMMETRIC EJECTA DISTRIBUTION IN SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2013-07-01

    We present the results from deep X-ray observations ({approx}400 ks in total) of SN 1006 with Suzaku. The thermal spectrum from the entire supernova remnant (SNR) exhibits prominent emission lines of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. The observed abundance pattern in the ejecta components is in good agreement with that predicted by a standard model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe). The spatially resolved analysis reveals that the distribution of the O-burning and incomplete Si-burning products (Si, S, and Ar) is asymmetric, while that of the C-burning products (O, Ne, and Mg) is relatively uniform in the SNR interior. The peak position of the former is clearly shifted by 5' ({approx}3.2 pc at the distance of 2.2 kpc) to the southeast (SE) from the SNR's geometric center. Using the SNR age of {approx}1000 yr, we constrain that the velocity asymmetry (in projection) of the ejecta is {approx}3100 km s{sup -1}. The Fe abundance is also significantly higher in the SE region than in the northwest. Given that the non-uniformity is observed only in the heavier elements (Si through Fe), we argue that SN 1006 originates from an asymmetric explosion, as is expected from recent multidimensional simulations of Type Ia SNe, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that inhomogeneous ambient medium had induced the apparent non-uniformity. Possible evidence for the Cr-K-shell line and line broadening in the Fe-K-shell emission is also found.

  5. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions.

  6. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier–Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called “Coanda effect” in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  7. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Mittal, R; Bielamowicz, S

    2011-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called "Coanda effect" in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection.

  8. Induced Motion by Asymmetric Enzymatic Degradation of Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jennifer; Cohen, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Biological hydrogels are continuously turned over through secretion and degradation. This non-equilibrium flux is critical to understanding cellular and molecular transport through biogels such as mucus and the extracellular matrix. Gel-digesting enzymes can drastically change the physical and chemical properties of the hydrogel environment. We report that a spatial gradient in the degradation of two gel/enzyme systems--gelatin/trypsin and hyaluronan/hyaluronidase--leads to directional motion of particles embedded in the gel in the direction of higher enzyme concentration. We study the rate at which the degradation front propagates through the gel and the ensuing velocity of the embedded particles, as functions of enzyme and gel concentrations. We propose that asymmetric degradation leads to asymmetric swelling, which transports particles up the enzyme concentration gradient.

  9. Thomson scattering measurements from asymmetric interpenetrating plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J. S. Moody, J. D.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Divol, L.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.

    2014-11-15

    Imaging Thomson scattering measurements of collective ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion temperature and density from laser produced counter-streaming asymmetric flows. Two foils are heated with 8 laser beams each, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 60 J 2ω probe laser with a 200 ps pulse length. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the multi-ion species, asymmetric flows theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperatures, ion densities, and flow velocities for each plasma flow are determined.

  10. Asymmetric Penning trap coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez, David J.

    2010-07-12

    By using a matrix technique, which allows to identify directly the ladder operators, the coherent states of the asymmetric Penning trap are derived as eigenstates of the appropriate annihilation operators. They are compared with those obtained through the displacement operator method.

  11. Asymmetric Synthesis (by Garry Procter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Brenda

    1998-05-01

    Oxford University Press: New York, 1996. vi + 237 pp. ISBN 0 19 855726 4 (cloth); 85.00. ISBN 0 19 855725 6 (paper); 37.00. This ever-expanding area of organic chemistry is indeed a daunting challenge for a book, both in terms of the breadth of material and the rapid change of events relative to the publishing time line. I feel the author has done an admirable job juggling these two issues. Following an introductory chapter on the principles of asymmetric induction are seven chapters on individual classes of reactions: additions to carbonyl compounds, alpha-substitution using chiral enolates, asymmetric aldol reactions, additions to C-C double bonds, reduction and oxidation, rearrangements, and hydrolysis and esterification. The vast majority of the references are from the mid-80s through the early 90s, including both general and seminal references. In particular, I feel a very solid balance has been achieved between content and clarity. The chapter on "Principles" at the beginning was very well thought out and organized and is a wonderful overview of asymmetric synthesis. This is balanced nicely in subsequent chapters on specific methods where very useful, practical generalizations are presented, such as the "best alpha-hydroxylation" method or the "best alpha-bromination" procedure. The chapters also have nicely integrated examples that show the power of the particular bond construction being examined as it applies to published total syntheses, my favorite being the ones in the chapter on asymmetric aldol reactions.

  12. Catalytic Asymmetric Bromocyclization of Polyenes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Ramesh C; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2017-02-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric bromonium ion-induced polyene cyclization has been achieved by using a chiral BINOL-derived thiophosphoramide catalyst and 1,3-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantoin as an electrophilic bromine source. Bromocyclization products are obtained in high yields, with good enantiomeric ratios and high diastereoselectivity, and are abundantly found as scaffolds in natural products.

  13. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  14. Organocatalyzed asymmetric synthesis of morphans.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Ben; Parra, Claudio; Bonjoch, Josep

    2013-05-17

    A general effective organocatalyzed synthesis of enantioenriched morphans with up to 92% ee was developed. The morphan scaffold was constructed in a one-pot tandem asymmetric organocatalyzed Michael addition followed by a domino Robinson annulation/aza-Michael intramolecular reaction sequence from easily available starting materials.

  15. CO2 capture and separation from N2/CH4 mixtures by Co@B8/Co@B8(-) and M@B9/M@B9(-) (M = Ir, Rh, Ru) clusters: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Ping; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Ren, Cong; Guo, Chao

    2015-01-29

    The discovery of advanced materials with high selectivity and efficiency is essential to realize practical carbon capture and sequestration. Here, we have investigated the interactions of the Co@B8/Co@B8(-) and M@B9/M@B9(-) (M = Ir, Rh, Ru) clusters with CO2, N2, and CH4 gas molecules theoretically. We found that neutral boron clusters have weak interaction with CO2, N2, and CH4 molecules. Similarly, the clusters with their negative charge states have also weak interaction with N2 and CH4 molecules. However, anionic clusters have a strong interaction with CO2, which can be explained by the Lewis acid-base interaction as CO2 (Lewis acid) can gain electron easily from the electron-rich anionic clusters. Moreover, the kinetic stability of the formed complexes after CO2 capture has been validated by ab initio molecular dynamics. In all, the present study demonstrates, for the first time, that the anionic boron wheel ring clusters can be used as potential advanced materials for CO2 capture and separation from flue gas and natural gas mixtures.

  16. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  17. Embedded soliton dynamics in the asymmetric array of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Ivan O.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav

    2017-06-01

    The dc-biased annular array of three-junction asymmetric superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is investigated. The existence of embedded solitons (solitons that exist despite the resonance with the linear waves) is demonstrated both in the unbiased Hamiltonian limit and in the dc-biased and damped case on the current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) of the array. The existence diagram on the parameter plane is constructed. The signatures of the embedded solitons manifest themselves as inaccessible voltage intervals on the CVCs. The upper boundary of these intervals is proportional to the embedded soliton velocity.

  18. Ratchet effect driven by Coulomb friction: the asymmetric Rayleigh piston.

    PubMed

    Sarracino, A; Gnoli, A; Puglisi, A

    2013-04-01

    The effect of Coulomb friction is studied in the framework of collisional ratchets. It turns out that the average drift of these devices can be expressed as the combination of a term related to the lack of equipartition between the probe and the surrounding bath, and a term featuring the average frictional force. We illustrate this general result in the asymmetric Rayleigh piston, showing how Coulomb friction can induce a ratchet effect in a Brownian particle in contact with an equilibrium bath. An explicit analytical expression for the average velocity of the piston is obtained in the rare collision limit. Numerical simulations support the analytical findings.

  19. Asymmetric Separation and Perturbation Sensitivity in an Annular Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffman, Jesse; Morris, Scott; Jemcov, Aleksander; Cameron, Joshua

    2013-11-01

    When an annular diffuser stalls, the separation can take many forms. Experiments show that one type of separation appears to be asymmetric and periodic. This asymmetry appears to be influenced by upstream and downstream components and inlet flow conditions. By understanding the changes effected at the exit of the diffuser by the inlet perturbations, the diffuser performance can be more accurately predicted within a system. This work aims to understand the influence of velocity perturbations at the inlet of the diffuser on the overall duct performance. This is done by application of the Euler equations and a RANS simulation for various circumferential wavenumbers.

  20. Exact phase diagram for an asymmetric avalanche process.

    PubMed

    Priezzhev, V B; Ivashkevich, E V; Povolotsky, A M; Hu, C K

    2001-08-20

    The Bethe ansatz method and an iterative procedure based on detailed balance are used to obtain exact results for an asymmetric avalanche process on a ring. The average velocity of particle flow, v, is derived as a function of the toppling probabilities and the density of particles, rho. As rho increases, the system shows a transition from intermittent to continuous flow, and v diverges at a critical point rho(c) with exponent alpha. The exact phase diagram of the transition is obtained and alpha is found to depend on the toppling rules.

  1. Electron Jet of Asymmetric Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Graham, D. B.; Norgren, C.; Eriksson, E.; Li, W.; Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Pritchett, P. L.; Retino, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present Magnetospheric Multiscale observations of an electron-scale current sheet and electron outflow jet for asymmetric reconnection with guide field at the subsolar magnetopause. The electron jet observed within the reconnection region has an electron Mach number of 0.35 and is associated with electron agyrotropy. The jet is unstable to an electrostatic instability which generates intense waves with E(sub parallel lines) amplitudes reaching up to 300 mV/m and potentials up to 20% of the electron thermal energy. We see evidence of interaction between the waves and the electron beam, leading to quick thermalization of the beam and stabilization of the instability. The wave phase speed is comparable to the ion thermal speed, suggesting that the instability is of Buneman type, and therefore introduces electron-ion drag and leads to braking of the electron flow. Our observations demonstrate that electrostatic turbulence plays an important role in the electron-scale physics of asymmetric reconnection.

  2. Asymmetric Image-Template Registration

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Mert R.; Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Van Leemput, Koen; Vercauteren, Tom; Golland, Polina

    2010-01-01

    A natural requirement in pairwise image registration is that the resulting deformation is independent of the order of the images. This constraint is typically achieved via a symmetric cost function and has been shown to reduce the effects of local optima. Consequently, symmetric registration has been successfully applied to pairwise image registration as well as the spatial alignment of individual images with a template. However, recent work has shown that the relationship between an image and a template is fundamentally asymmetric. In this paper, we develop a method that reconciles the practical advantages of symmetric registration with the asymmetric nature of image-template registration by adding a simple correction factor to the symmetric cost function. We instantiate our model within a log-domain diffeomorphic registration framework. Our experiments show exploiting the asymmetry in image-template registration improves alignment in the image coordinates. PMID:20426033

  3. PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakit, K.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P.

    2009-12-01

    Conventional studies of magnetic reconnection have almost exclusively focussed on symmetric systems, i.e., where both upstream regions have the same magnetic field magnitude and particle density. However, in many physics systems such as the dayside magnetosphere, reconnection is often asymmetric with different upstream conditions on either side. In this study we perform full particle simulations of anti-parallel asymmetric reconnection with a range of different upstream values. The results are consistent with previous Sweet-Parker scaling results and fluid simulations (e.g. Cassak and Shay, 2007,2008), suggesting that kinetic physics does not fundamentally modify the gross properties of the diffusion region. Contrary to fluid simulation studies which did not allow parallel diffusion along magnetic field lines, the downstream density is consistent with previous scaling predictions that assume complete mixing along field lines within the diffusion region.

  4. Superpositions of asymmetrical Bessel beams.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Soifer, V A

    2015-06-01

    We considered nonparaxial asymmetrical Bessel modes of the first and second types, which differ from a conventional symmetrical Bessel mode by a real-valued shift along one Cartesian coordinate and an imaginary shift along another (both shifts are equal in modulus). The first- and second-type Bessel modes differ only in signs of the shift and, therefore, have different orbital angular momentum (OAM) (integer or fractional). Addition and subtraction of complex amplitudes of two identical asymmetrical Bessel modes of the first and second type lead to light beams with the same integer OAM equal to the topological charge n of the original mode, but with different transverse intensity distributions, which depend on the shift magnitude. This proposed method allows controlling of the OAM of the beam with simultaneous changing of its shape, i.e., for matching with the object being trapped.

  5. Asymmetric information and macroeconomic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Aoki, Masanao; Roy Frieden, B.

    2010-09-01

    We show how macroeconomic dynamics can be derived from asymmetric information. As an illustration of the utility of this approach we derive the equilibrium density, non-equilibrium densities and the equation of motion for the response to a demand shock for productivity in a simple economy. Novel consequences of this approach include a natural incorporation of time dependence into macroeconomics and a common information-theoretic basis for economics and other fields seeking to link micro-dynamics and macro-observables.

  6. Defeating the Modern Asymmetric Threat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    prolific use of suicide bombers by the LTTE: one strategic, one operational, one psychological and one religious. Chapter V conducts an analysis of...and responsive government) are the applicable variables in defeating the modern asymmetric threat, even those that employ suicide bombers. I...future. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 171 14. SUBJECT TERMS Sri Lanka, LTTE, Ethnic Conflict, Asymmetry, Suicide Terrorism, Foreign Internal Defense

  7. Organocatalytic asymmetric hydrophosphination of nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Giuseppe; Bosco, Marcella; Carlone, Armando; Locatelli, Manuela; Mazzanti, Andrea; Sambri, Letizia; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2007-02-21

    The use of a bifunctional Cinchona alkaloid catalyst has provided a new organocatalytic strategy for the enantioselective addition of diphenylphosphine to a range of nitroalkenes, affording optically active beta-nitrophosphines (up to 99% ee after crystallization); this organocatalytic approach, providing a direct route to a new class of potentially useful enantiopure P,N-ligands, constitutes a bridge between the two complementary areas of asymmetric catalysis: organo- and metal-catalyzed transformations.

  8. Asymmetric tonsil size in children.

    PubMed

    Harley, Earl H

    2002-07-01

    To assess the clinical implications of asymmetrically enlarged tonsils in children. A prospective controlled study of asymmetric tonsil size in children scheduled for tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy. Data were recorded on tonsil size and position, tonsillar fossa depth, degree of asymmetry, and pathological findings. Control patients were matched for age, sex, race, diagnosis, and surgical procedure. A total of 258 children, aged 2 to 18 years, scheduled for tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy during a 27-month period. A tertiary care academic medical center. Forty-seven children (18.2%) were determined to have asymmetric tonsils. There were 43 matched controls with symmetric tonsils. Three-dimensional quantitative measurements of the resected tonsils revealed little or no actual asymmetry in tonsil size even though preoperative intraoral observations gave the impression that one tonsil was larger than the other. Statistically, tonsillar asymmetry was more apparent than real. When measured by volume, there was asymmetry in both groups. However, there was no statistical difference in the degree of asymmetry between the groups (P =.50). A difference in the depth of the tonsil fossa contributed to the putative asymmetry (P<.001). No malignant neoplasms were identified on microscopic examination in either group. Tonsillar asymmetry in children may often be an illusion secondary to a difference in the depth of the tonsillar fossa. Tonsillar asymmetry in children in the absence of other findings such as ipsilateral cervical adenopathy or other constitutional symptoms may not indicate a malignancy.

  9. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Rebecca L; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Briggs, Dayrl P; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-01-01

    Leidenfrost phenomena on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems utilizing boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant means to direct droplet motion in a variety of recently emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions, namely on impact with Weber numbers 40 at T 325 C. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask, with mean pillar diameters of 100 nm and heights of 200-500 nm. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling, suggesting that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Using high-speed imaging, phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon impact for droplets falling onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. The asymmetric impact and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing that asymmetric wettability upon impact is the mechanism for the droplet directionality.

  10. Eccentricity Samples: Implications on the Potential and the Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, R.; Stojanović, M.; Ninković, S.

    2017-06-01

    Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples.

  11. Analysis of antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of Juniperus excelsa M. B subsp. Polycarpos (K. Koch) Takhtajan essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Moein, M. R.; Ghasemi, Y.; Moein, S.; Nejati, M.

    2010-01-01

    Juniperus excelsa M.B subsp. Polycarpos (K.Koch), collected from south of Iran, was subjected to hydrodistillation using clevenger apparatus to obtain essential oil. The essential was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and studied for antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant activities. The results indicated α-pinene (67.71%) as the major compound and α-cedral (11.5%), δ3-carene (5.19%) and limonene (4.41%) in moderate amounts. Antimicrobial tests were carried out using disk diffusion method, followed by the measurement of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All the Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were susceptible to essential oil. The oil showed radical scavenging and antioxidant effects. PMID:21808554

  12. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors.

  13. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  14. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  15. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  16. Electronic properties of asymmetrically doped twisted graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambly de Laissardière, Guy; Namarvar, Omid Faizy; Mayou, Didier; Magaud, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Rotated graphene bilayers form an exotic class of nanomaterials with fascinating electronic properties governed by the rotation angle θ . For large rotation angles, the electron eigenstates are restricted to one layer and the bilayer behaves like two decoupled graphene layers. At intermediate angles, Dirac cones are preserved but with a lower velocity and van Hove singularities are induced at energies where the two Dirac cones intersect. At very small angles, eigenstates become localized in peculiar moiré zones. We analyze here the effect of an asymmetric doping for a series of commensurate rotated bilayers on the basis of tight-binding calculations of their band dispersions, density of states, participation ratio, and diffusive properties. While a small doping level preserves the θ dependence of the rotated bilayer electronic structure, larger doping induces a further reduction of the band velocity in the same way as a further reduction of the rotation angle.

  17. Cooperativity-Driven Singularities in Cooperative Asymmetric Exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Sidney

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the effect of cooperative interactions on the asymmetric exclusion process. In the simplest case a particle can hop to its vacant right neighbor only if its left neighbor is occupied. We show that an initial density downstep develops into a rarefaction wave that can have a jump discontinuity at the leading edge, while an upstep results in a shock wave. We also investigate a more general model in which the particle velocity can be an increasing function of the density. Within a hydrodynamic theory, initial density upsteps and downsteps can evolve into: (a) shock waves, (b) continuous compression or rarefaction waves, or (c) a mixture of shocks and continuous waves. These unusual phenomena arise because the current versus density relation has an inflection point, so that the group velocity can either be an increasing or a decreasing function of the density on either side of the inflection point.

  18. Pulsatile flow in a compliant stenosed asymmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2016-12-01

    Time-varying velocity field in an asymmetric constricted tube is experimentally studied using a two-dimensional particle image velocimetry system. The geometry resembles a vascular disease which is characterized by arterial narrowing due to plaque deposition. The present study compares the nature of flow patterns in rigid and compliant asymmetric constricted tubes for a range of dimensionless parameters appearing in a human artery. A blood analogue fluid is employed along with a pump that mimics cardioflow conditions. The peak Reynolds number range is Re 300-800, while the Womersley number range considered in experiments is Wo 6-8. These values are based on the peak velocity in a straight rigid tube connected to the model, over a pulsation frequency range of 1.2-2.4 Hz. The medial-plane velocity distribution is used to investigate the nature of flow patterns. Temporal distribution of stream traces and hemodynamic factors including WSS, TAWSS and OSI at important phases of the pulsation cycle are discussed. The flow patterns obtained from PIV are compared to a limited extent against numerical simulation. Results show that the region downstream of the constriction is characterized by a high-velocity jet at the throat, while a recirculation zone, attached to the wall, evolves in time. Compliant models reveal large flow disturbances upstream during the retrograde flow. Wall shear stress values are lower in a compliant model as compared to the rigid. Cross-plane flow structures normal to the main flow direction are visible at select phases of the cycle. Positive values of largest Lyapunov exponent are realized for wall movement and are indicative of chaotic motion transferred from the flow to the wall. These exponents increase with Reynolds number as well as compliance. Period doubling is observed in wall displacement of highly compliant models, indicating possible triggering of hemodynamic events in a real artery that may cause fissure in the plaque deposits.

  19. Asymmetric Schiff bases derived from diaminomaleonitrile and their metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianjie; Shi, Rufei; Zhou, Pei; Qiu, Qiming; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Asymmetric Schiff bases, due to its asymmetric structure, can be used as asymmetric catalyst, antibacterial, and mimic molecules during simulate biological processes, etc. In recent years, research on synthesis and properties of asymmetric Schiff bases have become an increase interest of chemists. This review summarizes asymmetric Schiff bases derived from diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) and DAMN-based asymmetric Schiff bases metal complexes. Applications of DAMN-based asymmetric Schiff bases are also discussed in this review.

  20. Asymmetric Walkway: A Novel Behavioral Assay for Studying Asymmetric Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Tuntevski, Kiril; Ellison, Ryan; Yakovenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral assays are commonly used for the assessment of sensorimotor impairment in the central nervous system (CNS). The most sophisticated methods for quantifying locomotor deficits in rodents is to measure minute disturbances of unconstrained gait overground (e.g., manual BBB score or automated CatWalk). However, cortical inputs are not required for the generation of basic locomotion produced by the spinal central pattern generator (CPG). Thus, unconstrained walking tasks test locomotor deficits due to motor cortical impairment only indirectly. In this study, we propose a novel, precise foot-placement locomotor task that evaluates cortical inputs to the spinal CPG. An instrumented peg-way was used to impose symmetrical and asymmetrical locomotor tasks mimicking lateralized movement deficits. We demonstrate that shifts from equidistant inter-stride lengths of 20% produce changes in the forelimb stance phase characteristics during locomotion with preferred stride length. Furthermore, we propose that the asymmetric walkway allows for measurements of behavioral outcomes produced by cortical control signals. These measures are relevant for the assessment of impairment after cortical damage. PMID:26863182

  1. LG tools for asymmetric wargaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Alex; Yakhnis, Vladimir

    2002-07-01

    Asymmetric operations represent conflict where one of the sides would apply military power to influence the political and civil environment, to facilitate diplomacy, and to interrupt specified illegal activities. This is a special type of conflict where the participants do not initiate full-scale war. Instead, the sides may be engaged in a limited open conflict or one or several sides may covertly engage another side using unconventional or less conventional methods of engagement. They may include peace operations, combating terrorism, counterdrug operations, arms control, support of insurgencies or counterinsurgencies, show of force. An asymmetric conflict can be represented as several concurrent interlinked games of various kinds: military, transportation, economic, political, etc. Thus, various actions of peace violators, terrorists, drug traffickers, etc., can be expressed via moves in different interlinked games. LG tools allow us to fully capture the specificity of asymmetric conflicts employing the major LG concept of hypergame. Hypergame allows modeling concurrent interlinked processes taking place in geographically remote locations at different levels of resolution and time scale. For example, it allows us to model an antiterrorist operation taking place simultaneously in a number of countries around the globe and involving wide range of entities from individuals to combat units to governments. Additionally, LG allows us to model all sides of the conflict at their level of sophistication. Intelligent stakeholders are represented by means of LG generated intelligent strategies. TO generate those strategies, in addition to its own mathematical intelligence, the LG algorithm may incorporate the intelligence of the top-level experts in the respective problem domains. LG models the individual differences between intelligent stakeholders. The LG tools make it possible to incorporate most of the known traits of a stakeholder, i.e., real personalities involved in

  2. Effect of Geometric Azimuthal Asymmetrics of PPM Stack on Electron Beam Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) beam optics model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes an electron beam with initial transverse velocity distribution focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing several azimuthally asymmetric traveling wave tube (TWT) characteristics to be investigated for the first time. These include C-magnets, shunts and magnet misalignment and their effects on electron beam behavior. The development of the model is presented and 3D TWT electron beam characteristics are compared in the absence of and under the influence of the azimuthally asymmetric characteristics described.

  3. Velocity profiles of granules in moving bed filters for flue gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiau, S.S.; Wang, C.Y.; Smid, J.

    1998-04-01

    The velocity fields in three symmetric and two asymmetric louver-walled moving bed systems are studied experimentally. The results indicate that the velocity profiles of filter granules are influenced by the louver geometry. When the louver angle is small, the velocity profile of filter granules is close to plug flow. When the angle of louvers is large, the quasi-stagnant zones exist alone the louver walls. The velocity profiles are less uniform with faster flowing core in the central part of filter bed. The refreshing rate of filter granules can be very low for the asymmetric louvered system. The kinematic model for predicting the granule velocity distribution is also used for analyzing the three symmetric louver geometries.

  4. Velocity profiles of granules in moving bed filters for flue gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiau, S.S.; Smid, J.; Wang, C.Y.; Kuo, J.T.; Chou, C.S.

    1998-07-01

    The velocity fields in three symmetric and two asymmetric louver-walled moving bed systems are studied experimentally. The results indicate that the velocity profiles of filter granules are influenced by the louver geometry. When the louver angle is small, the velocity profile of filter granules is close to plug flow. When the angle of louvers is large, the quasi-stagnant zones exist along the louver walls. The velocity profiles are less uniform with faster flowing core in the central part of filter bed. The refreshing rate of filter granules can be very low for the asymmetric louvered system. The kinematic model for predicting the granule velocity distribution is also used for analyzing the three symmetric louver geometries.

  5. Ice crystal terminal velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and most any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The general equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The specific equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  6. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  7. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  8. Velocity control for improving flow through a bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroki; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2017-04-01

    A bottleneck can largely deteriorate the flow, such as a traffic light or an on-ramp at a road. To alleviate bottleneck situations, one of the important strategies is to control input rate to suit the state of the road. In this study, we propose an effective velocity control of traveling particles, in which the particle velocity depends on the state of a bottleneck. To analyze our method, we modify the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) and introduce a slow-to-start rule, which we refer to as controlled TASEP in the present paper. Flow improvement is verified in numerical simulations and theoretical analyses by using controlled TASEP.

  9. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  10. Scatterometry measurement of asymmetric gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Hwu, Justin J.; Liu, Yongdong; Rabello, Silvio; Liu, Zhuan; Hu, Jiangtao

    2009-12-01

    Scatterometry has been used extensively for the characterization of critical dimensions (CD) and detailed sidewall profiles of periodic structures in microelectronics fabrication processes. So far the majority of applications are for symmetric gratings. In most cases devices are designed to be symmetric although errors could occur during fabrication process and result in undesired asymmetry. The problem with conventional optical scatterometry techniques lies in the lack of capability to distinguish between left and right asymmetries. In this work we investigate the possibility of measuring grating asymmetry using Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MM-SE). A patterned hard disk prepared by nano-imprint technique is used for the study. The relief image on the disk sometimes has asymmetrical sidewall profile, presumably due to the uneven separation of the template from the disk. The undesired tilting resist profile causes difficulties to the downstream processes or even makes them fail. Cross-section SEM reveals that the asymmetrical resist lines are typically tilted towards the outer diameter direction. The simulation and experimental data show that certain Mueller matrix elements are proportional to the direction and amplitude of profile asymmetry, providing a direct indication to the sidewall tilting. The tilting parameter can be extracted using rigorous optical critical dimension (OCD) modeling or calibration method. We demonstrate that this technique has good sensitivity for measuring and distinguishing left and right asymmetry caused by sidewall tilting, and can therefore be used for monitoring processes, such as lithography and etch processing, for which symmetric structures are desired.

  11. Asymmetric liberations in exterior resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauge, C.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general analysis of the planar circular restricted problem of three bodies in the case of exterior mean-motion resonances. Particularly, our aim is to map the phase space of various commensurabilities and determine the singular solutions of the averaged system, comparing them to the well-known case of interior resonances. In some commensurabilities (e.g. 1/2, 1/3) we show the existence of asymmetric librations; that is, librations in which the stationary value of the critical angle theta = (p+q) lambda1-p lambda-q pi is not equal to either zero or pi. The origin, stability and morphogenesis of these solutions are discussed and compared to symmetric librations. However, in some other resonances (e.g. 2/3, 3/4), these fixed points of the mean system seem to be absent. Librations in such cases are restricted to theta = O mod(pi). Asymmetric singular solutions of the plane circular problem are unknown in the case of interior resonances and cannot be reproduced by the reduced Andoyer Hamiltonian known as the Second Fundamental Model for Resonance. However, we show that the extended version of this Hamiltonian function, in which harmonics up to order two are considered, can reproduce fairly well the principal topological characteristics of the phase space and thereby constitutes a simple and useful analytical approximation for these resonances.

  12. Asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a family of asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian (aLG) laser beams. The beams have been derived via a complex-valued shift of conventional LG beams in the Cartesian plane. While propagating in a uniform medium, the first bright ring of the aLG beam becomes less asymmetric and the energy is redistributed toward peripheral diffraction rings. The projection of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) onto the optical axis is calculated. The OAM is shown to grow quadratically with increasing asymmetry parameter of the aLG beam, which equals the ratio of the shift to the waist radius. Conditions for the OAM becoming equal to the topological charge have been derived. For aLG beams with zero radial index, we have deduced an expression to define the intensity maximum coordinates and shown the crescent-shaped intensity pattern to rotate during propagation. Results of the experimental generation and rotation of aLG beams agree well with theoretical predictions.

  13. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  14. Asymmetric deformation of contracting human gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Hodgson, John A; Edgerton, V Reggie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2012-02-01

    Muscle fiber deformation is related to its cellular structure, as well as its architectural arrangement within the musculoskeletal system. While playing an important role in aponeurosis displacement, and efficiency of force transmission to the tendon, such deformation also provides important clues about the underlying mechanical structure of the muscle. We hypothesized that muscle fiber cross section would deform asymmetrically to satisfy the observed constant volume of muscle during a contraction. Velocity-encoded, phase-contrast, and morphological magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure changes in fascicle length, pinnation angle, and aponeurosis separation of the human gastrocnemius muscle during passive and active eccentric ankle joint movements. These parameters were then used to subsequently calculate the in-plane muscle area subtended by the two aponeuroses and fascicles and to calculate the in-plane (dividing area by fascicle length), and through-plane (dividing muscle volume by area) thicknesses. Constant-volume considerations of the whole-muscle geometry require that, as fascicle length increases, the muscle fiber cross-sectional area must decrease in proportion to the length change. Our empirical findings confirm the definition of a constant-volume rule that dictates that changes in the dimension perpendicular to the plane, i.e., through-plane thickness, (-6.0% for passive, -3.3% for eccentric) equate to the reciprocal of the changes in area (6.8% for passive, 3.7% for eccentric) for both exercise paradigms. The asymmetry in fascicle cross-section deformation for both passive and active muscle fibers is established in this study with a ∼22% in-plane and ∼6% through-plane fascicle thickness change. These fiber deformations have functional relevance, not only because they affect the force production of the muscle itself, but also because they affect the characteristics of adjacent muscles by deflecting their line of pull.

  15. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  16. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  17. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  18. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  19. Asymmetric Features for Two Types of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyu

    2017-04-01

    Asymmetric Features for Two Types of ENSO LI Zhiyu, XU Haiming, ZHANG Wenjun College of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 ABSTRACT There are two types of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), namely, the eastern Pacific (EP) ENSO that is characterized by the warmest (coldest) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern equatorial Pacific, and the central Pacific (CP) ENSO whose maximum (minimum) SST anomalies are over the central equatorial Pacific. Asymmetric features of SST anomalies for the EP and CP types of ENSO events and their possible mechanisms were analyzed using a variety of data during the period of 1961-2010. The responses of atmospheric circulation to the two types of ENSO were also discussed. Results showed asymmetric features of SST anomalies in terms of spatial and temporal distributions and intensity. Although the dominant mechanisms differed at both development and decay stages, the oceanic vertical advection played a key role in the asymmetric intensity of the two ENSO events. In addition, both local and remote atmospheric responses showed strong asymmetric signals, which were consistent with the asymmetric distribution of SST anomalies. The asymmetric atmospheric responses in EP-ENSO (CP-ENSO) were similar to those associated with EP-El Niño (CP-La Niña). The intensity of asymmetric responses related to the EP-ENSO was much stronger than that related to the CP-ENSO.

  20. Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Koros, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

  1. Asymmetric visual deficit at high sustained Gz.

    PubMed

    Paul, M A

    1991-06-01

    Occasionally, acceleration research personnel see an individual who experiences consistent asymmetric visual deficits at high sustained Gz (HSG). Recently, one such centrifuge research subject from this laboratory was investigated with transcranial Doppler sonography. The results indicate an abnormal circle of Willis which could explain the asymmetric visual deficit at HSG.

  2. Mechanochemistry assisted asymmetric organocatalysis: A sustainable approach.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Pankaj; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2012-01-01

    Ball-milling and pestle and mortar grinding have emerged as powerful methods for the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations. Recently, the use of these mechanochemical techniques in asymmetric organocatalysis has increased. This review highlights the progress in asymmetric organocatalytic reactions assisted by mechanochemical techniques.

  3. Mechanochemistry assisted asymmetric organocatalysis: A sustainable approach

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ball-milling and pestle and mortar grinding have emerged as powerful methods for the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations. Recently, the use of these mechanochemical techniques in asymmetric organocatalysis has increased. This review highlights the progress in asymmetric organocatalytic reactions assisted by mechanochemical techniques. PMID:23243475

  4. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  5. Pattern collapse solution for asymmetric pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C. J.; Huang, C. H.; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most critical issues associate with decreasing photo-resist feature size is pattern collapse, and more serious pattern collapse can be easily observed especially in asymmetric pitch environment due to unbalanced capillary stress acting on photo-resist pattern during development rinse step. The pattern collapse would kill product yield in the worse condition. This work investigates the approaches of mitigating the asymmetric pattern collapse behavior, such as adjusting photoresist pattern aspect ratio, applying surfactant during development rinse to reduce the solution surface tension, and altering underlying anti-reflection coating and hard-mask combinations to tailor the photo-resist bottom profile as well as decreasing developer permeation into photo-resist interface. Pattern sizing to resist unbalanced capillary force is also explored in the asymmetric pattern region. Two novel layout methods to mitigate asymmetric dummy pattern collapse were demonstrated and both methods were confirmed to have higher immunity against pattern collapse in asymmetric pitch environment.

  6. New asymmetric quantum codes over Fq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuena; Feng, Xiaoyi; Xu, Gen

    2016-07-01

    Two families of new asymmetric quantum codes are constructed in this paper. The first family is the asymmetric quantum codes with length n=qm-1 over Fq, where qge 5 is a prime power. The second one is the asymmetric quantum codes with length n=3m-1. These asymmetric quantum codes are derived from the CSS construction and pairs of nested BCH codes. Moreover, let the defining set T1=T2^{-q}, then the real Z-distance of our asymmetric quantum codes are much larger than δ _max+1, where δ _max is the maximal designed distance of dual-containing narrow-sense BCH code, and the parameters presented here have better than the ones available in the literature.

  7. Designing asymmetric multiferroics with strong magnetoelectric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xuezeng; Xiang, Hongjun; Rondinelli, James; Materials Theory; Design Group Team

    2015-03-01

    Multiferroics offer exciting opportunities for electric-field control of magnetism. Single-phase multiferroics suitable for such applications at room temperature need much more study. Here, we propose the concept of an alternative type of multiferroics, namely, the ``asymmetric multiferroic.'' In asymmetric multiferroics, two locally stable ferroelectric states are not symmetrically equivalent, leading to different magnetic properties between these two states. Furthermore, we predict from first principles that a Fe-Cr-Mo superlattice with the LiNbO3-type structure is such an asymmetric multiferroic. The strong ferrimagnetism, high ferroelectric polarization, and significant dependence of the magnetic transition temperature on polarization make this asymmetric multiferroic an ideal candidate for realizing electric-field control of magnetism at room temperature. Our study suggests that the asymmetric multiferroic may provide an alternative playground for voltage control of magnetism and find its applications in spintronics and quantum computing.

  8. Designing asymmetric multiferroics with strong magnetoelectric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. Z.; Xiang, H. J.

    2014-09-01

    Multiferroics offer exciting opportunities for electric-field control of magnetism. Single-phase multiferroics suitable for such applications at room temperature need much more study. Here, we propose the concept of an alternative type of multiferroics, namely, the "asymmetric multiferroic." In asymmetric multiferroics, two locally stable ferroelectric states are not symmetrically equivalent, leading to different magnetic properties between these two states. Furthermore, we predict from first principles that a Fe-Cr-Mo superlattice with the LiNbO3-type structure is such an asymmetric multiferroic. The strong ferrimagnetism, high ferroelectric polarization, and significant dependence of the magnetic transition temperature on polarization make this asymmetric multiferroic an ideal candidate for realizing electric-field control of magnetism at room temperature. Our study suggests that the asymmetric multiferroic may provide an alternative playground for voltage control of magnetism and find its applications in spintronics and quantum computing.

  9. Imaging Asymmetric T Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Mirren; Russell, Sarah M

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) controls cell fate decisions in model organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans and has recently emerged as a mediator of T cell fate and hematopoiesis. The most appropriate methods for assessing ACD in T cells are still evolving. Here we describe the methods currently applied to monitor and measure ACD of developing and activated T cells. We provide an overview of approaches for capturing cells in the process of cytokinesis in vivo, ex vivo, or during in vitro culture. We provide methods for in vitro fixed immunofluorescent staining and for time-lapse analysis. We provide an overview of the different approaches for quantification of ACD of lymphocytes, discuss the pitfalls and concerns in interpretation of these analyses, and provide detailed methods for the quantification of ACD in our group.

  10. Meson physics in asymmetric matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes dynamic and thermodynamic (at T = 0) properties of mesons in asymmetric matter in the framework of Chiral Perturbation Theory. We consider the effect of nonzero isospin and strangeness chemical potentials on a mesonic system and report on the corresponding phase diagram. We also study meson masses and mixing in the resulting normal phase, pion condensation phase and kaon condensation phase. We find differences with previous papers regarding meson masses and mixing in the condensed phases; the results presented here are supported by theory group analysis and direct calculations. Pressure, density and equation of state of the system at T = 0 and nonzero μI are calculated, finding remarkable agreement with analogue studies performed by lattice calculations.

  11. Superfluidity in asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakian, A.; Alm, T.; Lombardo, U.

    1997-02-01

    The onset of superfluidity in isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within the BCS theory. A neutron-proton superfluid state in the channel {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} comes about from the interplay between thermal excitations and separation {delta}{mu} of the two Fermi surfaces. The superfluid state disappears above the threshold value of the density-asymmetry parameter {alpha}=(n{sub n}{minus}n{sub p})/n{approx_equal}0.35. For large enough shift between the two Fermi surfaces {delta}{mu}=(1)/(2)({mu}{sub n}{minus}{mu}{sub p}) the transition to the normal state becomes a first-order transition and a second gap solution develops. This solution, however, corresponds to a metastable superfluid state which is unstable with respect to the transition to the normal state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Asymmetric catalysis: An enabling science

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.

    2004-01-01

    Chirality of organic molecules plays an enormous role in areas ranging from medicine to material science, yet the synthesis of such entities in one enantiomeric form is one of the most difficult challenges. The advances being made stem from the convergence of a broader understanding of theory and how structure begets function, the developments in the interface between organic and inorganic chemistry and, most notably, the organic chemistry of the transition metals, and the continuing advancements in the tools to help define structure, especially in solution. General themes for designing catalysts to effect asymmetric induction are helping to make this strategy more useful, in general, with the resultant effect of a marked enhancement of synthetic efficiency. PMID:14990801

  13. Research on asymmetric searchable encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zonghua; Wu, Yudong

    2017-05-01

    Cloud server side to ease the user's local storage pressure at the same time, there are hidden data on the hidden dangers, the user often choose to upload the data in the form of cipher text to the cloud server. However, the classic data encryption and decryption algorithms are not provided search function, affecting the user's efficiency. To this end, an asymmetric searchable encryption scheme is proposed. The scheme can be used for any person can generate a trapdoor, cipher text can be free modified, the key pair generated by the user themselves, encrypt the identity, S-shaped virtual and other five loopholes to improve. The analysis results show that the scheme solves the above five vulnerabilities in the original scheme, so that the information semantics of both parties of communication can be guaranteed.

  14. CCR7 is mainly expressed in teleost gills, where it defines an IgD+IgM- B lymphocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Bromage, Erin; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; González Granja, Aitor; Luque, Alfonso; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7, the receptor for both CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, regulates the recruitment and clustering of circulating leukocytes to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Even though teleost fish do not have either of these secondary lymphoid structures, we have recently reported a homolog to CCR7 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of leukocytes bearing extracellular CCR7 in naive adult tissues by flow cytometry, observing that among the different leukocyte populations, the highest numbers of cells with membrane (mem)CCR7 were recorded in the gill (7.5 ± 2% CCR7(+) cells). In comparison, head kidney, spleen, thymus, intestine, and peripheral blood possessed <5% CCR7(+) cells. When CCR7 was studied at early developmental stages, we detected a progressive increase in gene expression and protein CCR7 levels in the gills throughout development. Surprisingly, the majority of the CCR7(+) cells in the gills were not myeloid cells and did not express membrane CD8, IgM, nor IgT, but expressed IgD on the cell surface. In fact, most IgD(+) cells in the gills expressed CCR7. Intriguingly, the IgD(+)CCR7(+) population did not coexpress memIgM. Finally, when trout were bath challenged with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, the number of CCR7(+) cells significantly decreased in the gills while significantly increased in head kidney. These results provide evidence of the presence of a novel memIgD(+)memIgM(-) B lymphocyte subset in trout that expresses memCCR7 and responds to viral infections. Similarities with IgD(+)IgM(-) subsets in mammals are discussed.

  15. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  16. Extremely High Velocity Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minho; Evans, Neal J., II; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    1993-11-01

    Extremely high velocity (EHV) wings, with full widths of 72 to 140 km s-1, are seen on the CO J = 3 → 2 lines toward W3 IRS 5, GL 490, NGC 2071, W28 A2 (G05.89-0.39), GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. Observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 3 → 2 and J = 2 → 1 lines indicate that optical depth generally decreases with increasing velocity separation from the ambient cloud velocity. Maps of the extremely high velocity (|V-V0| ≳ 20 km s-1) and the high-velocity (5 ≲ |V-V0| ≲ 20 km s-1) CO emission components show that the morphology of the two components is similar in W3 IRS 5 and W28 A2 but may be different in GL 2591, S140, and Cepheus A. The results of our survey suggest that EHV wings are common around infrared sources of moderate to high luminosity [500 to (4 × 105) Lsun] in dense regions. Line ratios imply that the EHV gas is usually optically thin and warm. Characteristic velocities range from 20 to 40 km s-1, yielding timescales of 1600-4200 yr. Since most sources in this study are producing some ionizing photons, these short timescales suggest that neutral winds coexist with ionizing photons. We examined two possible sources for the extremely high velocity CO emission: a neutral stellar wind; and swept-up or entrained molecular gas. Neither can be ruled out. If the high-velocity (HV) gas is swept up by a momentum-conserving stellar wind traced by the extremely high velocity CO emission, most of the C in the winds from luminous objects cannot be in CO. If the EHV and HV forces are equal, the fraction of C in a form other than CO increases with source luminosity and with the production rate of ionizing photons. This trend is natural in the stellar wind hypothesis, but models of winds around such luminous objects are needed. We consider other possible chemical states for the carbon in the stellar wind.

  17. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  18. Asymmetric features for two types of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyu; Xu, Haiming; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-12-01

    There are two types of ENSO, namely, the eastern Pacific (EP) ENSO that is characterized by the warmest (coldest) SST anomalies in the eastern equatorial Pacific, and the central Pacific (CP) ENSO whose maximum (minimum) SST anomalies are over the central equatorial Pacific. Asymmetric features of SST anomalies for the EP and CP types of ENSO events and their possible mechanisms were analyzed by using a variety of data during the period 1961-2010. The responses of atmospheric circulation to the two types of ENSO were also discussed. The results showed asymmetric features of SST anomalies in terms of spatial and temporal distributions and intensity. Although the dominant mechanisms differed at both development and decay stages, the oceanic vertical advection played a key role in the asymmetric intensity of the two ENSO events. In addition, both local and remote atmospheric responses showed strong asymmetric signals, which were consistent with the asymmetric distribution of SST anomalies. The asymmetric atmospheric responses in EP-ENSO (CP-ENSO) were similar to those associated with EP-El Ni˜no (CP-La Ni˜na). The intensity of asymmetric responses related to the EP-ENSO was much stronger than that related to the CP-ENSO.

  19. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  20. Asymmetric dark matter in braneworld cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B. E-mail: Ian.Whittingham@jcu.edu.au

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the effect of a braneworld expansion era on the relic density of asymmetric dark matter. We find that the enhanced expansion rate in the early universe predicted by the Randall-Sundrum II (RSII) model leads to earlier particle freeze-out and an enhanced relic density. This effect has been observed previously by Okada and Seto (2004) for symmetric dark matter models and here we extend their results to the case of asymmetric dark matter. We also discuss the enhanced asymmetric annihilation rate in the braneworld scenario and its implications for indirect detection experiments.

  1. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  2. Enantiopure sulfoxides: recent applications in asymmetric synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carreño, M Carmen; Hernández-Torres, Gloria; Ribagorda, María; Urbano, Antonio

    2009-11-07

    Sulfoxides are nowadays recognised as powerful chiral auxiliaries that may participate in a wide range of asymmetric reactions. Their high configurational stability, the existence of several efficient methods allowing the access to both configurations as well as their synthetic versatility are characteristic features offering a tremendous potential to develop new applications. Significant recent advances leading to high asymmetric inductions in carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bond forming reactions, and applications of homochiral sulfoxides to atroposelective synthesis and asymmetric catalysis are discussed. New uses of sulfoxides in the design of chiroptical switches are also shown.

  3. On-chip asymmetric microcavity optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Soheil; Hudnut, Alexa W; Armani, Andrea M

    2016-12-26

    High quality factor (Q) optical resonators have enabled rapid growth in the field of cavity-enhanced, radiation pressure-induced optomechanics. However, because research has focused on axisymmetric devices, the observed regenerative excited mechanical modes are similar. In the present work, a strategy for fabricating high-Q whispering gallery mode microcavities with varying degrees of asymmetry is developed and demonstrated. Due to the combination of high optical Q and asymmetric device design, two previously unobserved modes, the asymmetric cantilever and asymmetric crown mode, are demonstrated with sub-mW thresholds for onset of oscillations. The experimental results are in good agreement with computational modeling predictions.

  4. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Göpfrich, K.; Kartanas, T.; Keyser, U. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  5. Regenerating a symmetry in asymmetric dark matter.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Matthew R; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-06

    Asymmetric dark matter theories generically allow for mass terms that lead to particle-antiparticle mixing. Over the age of the Universe, dark matter can thus oscillate from a purely asymmetric configuration into a symmetric mix of particles and antiparticles, allowing for pair-annihilation processes. Additionally, requiring efficient depletion of the primordial thermal (symmetric) component generically entails large annihilation rates. We show that unless some symmetry completely forbids dark matter particle-antiparticle mixing, asymmetric dark matter is effectively ruled out for a large range of masses, for almost any oscillation time scale shorter than the age of the Universe.

  6. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  7. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  8. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  9. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  10. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1984-02-07

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an interrotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal application

  12. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  13. Transition from Symmetric to Asymmetric Scaling Function before Drop Pinch-Off

    SciTech Connect

    Rothert, Alexander; Richter, Reinhard; Rehberg, Ingo

    2001-08-20

    The drop pinch-off at a nozzle is studied experimentally for a glycerin-water mixture in surrounding air. The neck diameter of the fluid shrinks with constant velocity. After a distinct transition point, the shrink velocity switches to a smaller value. Before that transition point, the shape of the neck can well be described by a symmetric scaling function, as obtained from Stokes-flow theory of drop formation. This function gives way to an asymmetric scaling function in the final stage before pinch-off.

  14. Asymmetric dark matter bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhaofeng; Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun

    2017-02-01

    We propose an interesting framework for asymmetric scalar dark matter (ADM), which has novel collider phenomenology in terms of an unstable ADM bound state (ADMonium) produced via Higgs portals. ADMonium is a natural consequence of the basic features of ADM: the (complex scalar) ADM is charged under a dark local U (1 )d symmetry which is broken at a low scale and provides a light gauge boson X . The dark gauge coupling is strong and then ADM can annihilate away into X -pair effectively. Therefore, the ADM can form a bound state due to its large self-interaction via X mediation. To explore the collider signature of ADMonium, we propose that ADM has a two-Higgs doublet portal. The ADMonium can have a sizable mixing with the heavier Higgs boson, which admits a large cross section of ADMonium production associated with b b ¯. The resulting signature at the LHC depends on the decays of X . In this paper we consider a case of particular interest: p p →b b ¯ +ADMonium followed by ADMonium→2 X →2 e+e- where the electrons are identified as (un)converted photons. It may provide a competitive explanation to heavy di-photon resonance searches at the LHC.

  15. Reflection asymmetric shapes in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Emling, H.; Holzmann, R.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.; Moore, E.F.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Mowbary, A.S.; Hotchkiss, M.A.; Phillips, W.R.; Drigert, M.W.; Ye, D.; Benet, P.; Manchester Univ. . Dept. of Physics; EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID; Notre Dame Univ., IN; Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN )

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data show that there is no even-even nucleus with a reflection asymmetric shape in its ground state. Maximum octupole- octupole correlations occur in nuclei in the mass 224 (N{approximately}134, Z{approximately}88) region. Parity doublets, which are the characteristic signature of octupole deformation, have been observed in several odd mass Ra, Ac and Pa nuclei. Intertwined negative and positive parity levels have been observed in several even-even Ra and Th nuclei above spin {approximately}8{Dirac h}. In both cases, the opposite parity states are connected by fast El transitions. In some medium-mass nuclei intertwined negative and positive parity levels have also been observed above spin {approximately}7{Dirac h}. The nuclei which exhibit octupole deformation in this mass region are {sup 144}Ba, {sup 146}Ba and {sub 146}Ce; {sup 142}Ba, {sup 148}Ce, {sup 150}Ce and {sup 142}Xe do not show these characteristics. No case of parity doublet has been observed in the mass 144 region. 32 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hourglass effects for asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We give the expressions for the geometrical reduction factor of the luminosity and the geometrical beam-beam aggravating factor'' for the general asymmetric case, for tri-gaussian bunches colliding head on. With these formulas we attempt a (limited) analytic understanding of the multiparticle tracking simulations carried out for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B factory when parasitic crossings are ignored. We conclude the following: (a) the geometrical reduction in luminosity is {approximately}6% relative to the zero-bunch-length (nominal) value; (b) only the vertical beam-beam parameter of the LER is significantly altered by the hourglass effect: the geometrical enhancement of the central positron's vertical beam-beam parameter is {approximately}10% relative to the nominal value, and (c) the positrons at the head or tail of the bunch have vertical beam-beam parameters much larger than nominal. We discuss the electromagnetic disruption effect only qualitatively. This effect probably compensates (or overcompensates) the geometrical reduction of the luminosity, and it is possibly detrimental for the beam-beam parameters. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Asymmetric ejection of jets from the symbiotic prototype Z Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopal, A.; Tarasova, T. N.; Pribulla, T.; Vanko, M.; Dubovsky, P. A.; Kudzej, I.

    Z And is considered as a prototype symbiotic star. The binary composes of a late-type, M4.5 III, giant and a white dwarf accreting from the giant's wind on the 758-day orbit. From 2000 September, Z And started a series of outbursts with the main optical maxima in 2000 December, 2006 July and 2009 December. During the 2006 optical maximum, highly-collimated bipolar jets were detected for the first time. They were launched asymmetrically with respect to the reference wavelength of the spectral line. Their presence was transient, they disappeared by the end of 2006. During the following re-brightening, from the beginning of 2008 to its end, faint emission satellite components to the Hα and Hβ were observed again. The red component was enhanced relatively to its blue counterpart. During the recent 2009 major outburst, the mass ejection in the form of jet was indicated almost exclusively on the red side of the Hα line with velocities from +1000 (2009/10/01) to +1800 km s-1 (2010/01/05). During the light maxima, our high-time-resolution photometry revealed irregular waves in the star's brightness throughout a night(˜m 0.06mag),while in between the outbursts,they nearly disappeared. Evolution in the rapid photometric variability and asymmetric ejection of jets could be explained by a disruption of the inner parts of the disk ignited by radiation-induced warping of the disk.

  18. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  19. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  20. Nonlinear Hadley circulation driven by asymmetric differential heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamical state of the stratosphere influenced by radiative heating, with no internal sources or sinks of angular momentum, is examined. It is shown that there exists a nonlinear Hadley regime driven by antisymmetric (or more generally, asymmetric) thermal equilibria typical of the middle atmosphere at the solstices. This regime consists of a single mean meridional cell, equatorial easterlies, and strong winter westerlies. Outside of the circulation region the flow is in thermal equilibrium. The effect of one-sided friction, acting as a drag on midlatitude westerlies only, is to expand the Hadley cell into the winter hemisphere and increase the magnitude of cross-equatorial flow. This result is possible even in the steady state when the advection of angular momentum in the tropics is made small by reducing the gradient of angular momentum in this region instead of the advecting velocity.

  1. Population Mixing in Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection with a Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M.; Chen, L. J.; Liu, Y.-H.; Bessho, N.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate how population mixing leads to structured electron distribution functions in asymmetric guide-field magnetic reconnection based on particle-in-cell simulations. The change of magnetic connectivity patches populations from different inflow regions to form multicomponent distributions in the exhaust, illustrating the direct consequence of the breaking and rejoining of magnetic flux tubes. Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects of electrons accelerated by the perpendicular electric fields result in crescent-type nongyrotropic distributions. A new type of nongyrotropy is found to be caused by the combined effects of the FLR and velocity dispersion of electrons accelerated by the parallel electric field. The patching together of populations and the effects of acceleration and the FLR form the first steps of mixing in the exhaust and separatrix regions.

  2. Asymmetric cryorolling for fabrication of nanostructural aluminum sheets

    PubMed Central

    YU, Hailiang; LU, Cheng; TIEU, Kiet; LIU, Xianghua; SUN, Yong; YU, Qingbo; KONG, Charlie

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructural Al 1050 sheets were produced using a novel method of asymmetric cryorolling under ratios of upper and down rolling velocities (RUDV) of 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4. Sheets were rolled to about 0.17 mm from 1.5 mm. Both the strength and ductility of Al 1050 sheets increase with RUDVs. Tensile strength of Al sheets with the RUDV 1.4 is larger 22.3% of that for RUDV 1.1, which is 196 MPa. The TEM observations show the grain size is 360 nm when the RUDV is 1.1, and 211 nm for RUDV 1.4. PMID:23101028

  3. SiO MASERS IN ASYMMETRIC MIRAS. II. R CANCRI

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Danchi, W. C.; Traub, W. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    This is the second paper in a series of multi-epoch observations of the SiO masers at 7 mm wavelength in several asymptotic giant branch stars from a sample of Mira variable stars showing evidence of asymmetric structure in the infrared. These stars have been observed interferometrically in the infrared by the Infrared Optical Telescope Array and with Very Long Baseline Array measurements of the SiO masers. In this paper, we present the observations of R Cancri (R Cnc). The systemic velocity of R Cnc is estimated to be 15.8 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1}. A comparison is made with the model calculations of Gray et al. which predict some but not all observed features.

  4. The Basic Mechanics of Bipedal Walking Lead to Asymmetric Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Robert D.; Degani, Amir; Dhaher, Yasin; Lynch, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper computationally investigates whether gait asymmetries can be attributed in part to basic bipedal mechanics independent of motor control. Using a symmetrical rigid-body model known as the compass-gait biped, we show that changes in environmental or physiological parameters can facilitate asymmetry in gait kinetics at fast walking speeds. In the environmental case, the asymmetric family of high-speed gaits is in fact more stable than the symmetric family of low-speed gaits. These simulations suggest that lower extremity mechanics might play a direct role in functional and pathological asymmetries reported in human walking, where velocity may be a common variable in the emergence and growth of asymmetry. PMID:22275657

  5. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-15

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  6. A novel asymmetric synthesis of cinacalcet hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Laxminarasimhulu; Dubey, Pramod K

    2012-01-01

    Summary A novel route to asymmetric synthesis of cinacalcet hydrochloride by the application of (R)-tert-butanesulfinamide and regioselective N-alkylation of the naphthyl ethyl sulfinamide intermediate is described. PMID:23019473

  7. GPM Sees Tropical Storm Danny's Asymmetric Rainfall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On Aug. 19, GPM saw Danny's rain structure was still asymmetric as noted by the large rain band (identified by the green arc indicating moderate rain) being located mainly on the eastern side of th...

  8. The centrosome and asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric stem cell division is a mechanism widely employed by the cell to maintain tissue homeostasis, resulting in the production of one stem cell and one differentiating cell. However, asymmetric cell division is not limited to stem cells and is widely observed even in unicellular organisms as well as in cells that make up highly complex tissues. In asymmetric cell division, cells must organize their intracellular components along the axis of asymmetry (sometimes in the context of extracellular architecture). Recent studies have described cell asymmetry in many cell types and in many cases such asymmetry involves the centrosome (or spindle pole body in yeast) as the center of cytoskeleton organization. In this review, I summarize recent discoveries in cellular polarity that lead to an asymmetric outcome, with a focus on centrosome function. PMID:19458491

  9. Tight focusing of an asymmetric Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Stafeev, Sergey S.; Porfirev, Alexey P.

    2015-12-01

    Tight focusing of a linearly polarized asymmetric Bessel beam, which has a topological charge n=3 and a crescent shape, was investigated numerically and experimentally. Using the Debye formulae, it was shown that the aplanatic lens of numerical aperture NA=0.9 forms a crescent in the focal plane. Experimentally, an asymmetric Bessel beam was formed by a spatial light modulator and focused by an immersive lens (NA=1.25). The crescent was also formed in the focal plane.

  10. New models for asymmetric kinks and branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R.; Moreira, D. C.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate new models for scalar fields in flat and curved spacetime. We note that the global reflection symmetry of the potential that identify the scalar field model does not exclude the presence of internal asymmetries that give rise to asymmetric structures. Despite the asymmetry, the new structures are linearly stable and in the braneworld scenario with an extra dimension of infinite extend, they may generate new families of asymmetric thick branes that are robust against small fluctuations in the warped geometry.

  11. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M⊙ generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M⊙ progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M⊙ progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] λ 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  12. Modeling the Asymmetric Wind of Massive LBV Binary MWC 314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.; Groh, J.; Torres Dozinel, K.; Gorlova, N.; Martayan, C.; Raskin, G.; Van Winckel, H.; Prins, S.; Pessemier, W.; Waelkens, C.; Frémat, Y.; Hensberge, H.; Dummortier, L.; Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.; Lehmann, H.

    2012-12-01

    Spectroscopic monitoring with Mercator-HERMES over the past two years reveals that MWC 314 is a massive binary system composed of an early B-type primary LBV star and a less-luminous supergiant companion. We determine an orbital period Porb of 60.85 d from optical S II and Ne I absorption lines observed in this single-lined spectroscopic binary. We find an orbital eccentricity of e = 0.26, and a large amplitude of the radial velocity curve of 80.6 km s-1. The ASAS V light-curve during our spectroscopic monitoring reveals two brightness minima (ΔV = 0.1 mag) over the orbital period due to partial eclipses at an orbital inclination angle of ˜ 70°. We find a clear correlation between the orbital phases and the detailed shapes of optical and near-IR P Cygni-type line profiles of He I, Si II, and double- or triple-peaked stationary cores of prominent Fe II emission lines. A preliminary 3-D radiative transfer model computed with Wind3D shows that the periodic P Cygni line profile variability results from an asymmetric common-envelope wind with enhanced density (or line opacity) in the vicinity of the LBV primary. The variable orientation of the inner LBV wind region due to the orbital motion produces variable P Cygni line profiles (with wind velocities of ˜ 200 km s-1) between orbital phases φ = 0.65 to 0.85, while weak inverse P Cygni profiles are observed half an orbital period later around φ = 0.15 to 0.35. We do not observe optical or near-IR He II, C III, and Si III lines, signaling that the LBV's spectral type is later than B0. Detailed modeling of the asymmetrical wind properties of massive binary MWC 314 provides important new physical information about the most luminous hot (binary) stars such as η Carinae.

  13. Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N. A.; Miralles, M. P.; Ranquist, D. A.; Pope, C. L.; Raymond, J. C.; Lukin, V. S.; McKillop, S.; Shen, C.; Winter, H. D.; Reeves, K. K.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections typically predict the development of an elongated current sheet in the wake behind the rising flux rope. In reality, reconnection in these current sheets will be asymmetric along the inflow, outflow, and out-of-plane directions. We perform resistive MHD simulations to investigate the consequences of asymmetry during solar reconnection. We predict several observational signatures of asymmetric reconnection, including flare loops with a skewed candle flame shape, slow drifting of the current sheet into the strong field upstream region, asymmetric footpoint speeds and hard X-ray emission, and rolling motions within the erupting flux rope. There is net plasma flow across the magnetic field null along both the inflow and outflow directions. We compare simulations to SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT, and STEREO observations of flare loop shapes, current sheet drifting, and rolling motions during prominence eruptions. Simulations of the plasmoid instability with different upstream magnetic fields show that the reconnection rate remains enhanced even during the asymmetric case. The islands preferentially grow into the weak field upstream region. The islands develop net vorticity because the outflow jets impact them obliquely rather than directly. Asymmetric reconnection in the chromosphere occurs when emerging flux interacts with pre-existing overlying flux. We present initial results on asymmetric reconnection in partially ionized chromospheric plasmas. Finally, we discuss how comparisons to observations are necessary to understand the role of three-dimensional effects.

  14. Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N. A.; Miralles, M. P.; Ranquist, D. A.; Pope, C. L.; Raymond, J. C.; Lukin, V. S.; McKillop, S. C.; Shen, C.; Winter, H. D.; Reeves, K. K.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections typically predict the development of an elongated current sheet in the wake behind the rising flux rope. In reality, reconnection in these current sheets will be asymmetric along the inflow, outflow, and out-of-plane directions. We perform resistive MHD simulations to investigate the consequences of asymmetry during solar reconnection. We predict several observational signatures of asymmetric reconnection, including flare loops with a skewed candle flame shape, slow drifting of the current sheet into the strong field upstream region, asymmetric footpoint speeds and hard X-ray emission, and rolling motions within the erupting flux rope. There is net plasma flow across the magnetic field null along both the inflow and outflow directions. We compare simulations to SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT, and STEREO observations of flare loop shapes, current sheet drifting, and rolling motions during prominence eruptions. Simulations of the plasm! oid instability with different upstream magnetic fields show that the reconnection rate remains enhanced even during the asymmetric case. The islands preferentially grow into the weak field upstream region. The islands develop net vorticity because the outflow jets impact them obliquely rather than directly. Asymmetric reconnection in the chromosphere occurs when emerging flux interacts with pre-existing overlying flux. We present initial results on asymmetric reconnection in partially ionized chromospheric plasmas. Finally, we discuss how comparisons to observations are necessary to understand the role of three-dimensional effects.

  15. Asymmetric supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-03-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and Cas A. Asymmetry in the strength of polar jets is a plausible mechanism to produce substantial pulsar "kick" velocities. Jets may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) for the core collapse problem in the context of the non-monotonic behavior expected: increasing centrifugal support will lead to a maximum rotation and magnetic field production as a function of the initial rotation of the iron core. Non-axisymmetric instabilities are predicted for differentially rotating proto-neutron stars with values of the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to binding energy, T/∣ W∣≳0.01. The non-axisymmetric instabilities are likely to drive magnetosonic waves into the surrounding time-dependent density structure. These waves represent a mechanism of the dissipation of the rotational energy of the proto-neutron star, and the outward deposition of this energy may play a role in the supernova explosion process. The phase of deleptonization and contraction of the proto-neutron star lasting several seconds is likely to be an important phase of magnetic non-axisymmetric evolution. In the special circumstance that the proto-neutron star is born sufficiently rapidly rotating that it is subject to bar-mode instabilities on secular timescales, a possible outcome is that the deleptonizing neutron star will evolve along the locus T/∣ W∣˜0.14 releasing a significant fraction of its binding energy as MHD power sufficient to account for a GRB. This power will be provided over an extended time, 10 s, that is strongly reminiscent of the timescale of long GRBs and is also comparable to the

  16. Asymmetric Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Skidanov, R V; Soifer, V A

    2014-09-01

    We propose a three-parameter family of asymmetric Bessel-Gauss (aBG) beams with integer and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The aBG beams are described by the product of a Gaussian function by the nth-order Bessel function of the first kind of complex argument, having finite energy. The aBG beam's asymmetry degree depends on a real parameter c≥0: at c=0, the aBG beam is coincident with a conventional radially symmetric Bessel-Gauss (BG) beam; with increasing c, the aBG beam acquires a semicrescent shape, then becoming elongated along the y axis and shifting along the x axis for c≫1. In the initial plane, the intensity distribution of the aBG beams has a countable number of isolated optical nulls on the x axis, which result in optical vortices with unit topological charge and opposite signs on the different sides of the origin. As the aBG beam propagates, the vortex centers undergo a nonuniform rotation with the entire beam about the optical axis (c≫1), making a π/4 turn at the Rayleigh range and another π/4 turn after traveling the remaining distance. At different values of the c parameter, the optical nulls of the transverse intensity distribution change their position, thus changing the OAM that the beam carries. An isolated optical null on the optical axis generates an optical vortex with topological charge n. A vortex laser beam shaped as a rotating semicrescent has been generated using a spatial light modulator.

  17. Phase space analysis of velocity bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cultrera, L.; di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Pace, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vicario, C.; Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Cianchi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giannessi, L.; Labat, M.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Marrelli, C.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serluca, M.

    2011-09-01

    Peak current represents a key demand for new generation electron beam photoinjectors. Many beam applications, such as free electron laser, inverse Compton scattering, terahertz radiation generation, have efficiencies strongly dependent on the bunch length and current. A method of beam longitudinal compression (called velocity bunching) has been proposed some years ago, based on beam longitudinal phase space rotation in a rf field potential. The control of such rotation can lead to a compression factor in excess of 10, depending on the initial longitudinal emittance. Code simulations have shown the possibility to fully compensate the transverse emittance growth during rf compression, and this regime has been experimentally proven recently at SPARC. The key point is the control of transverse beam plasma oscillations, in order to freeze the emittance at its lowest value at the end of compression. Longitudinal and transverse phase space distortions have been observed during the experiments, leading to asymmetric current profiles and higher final projected emittances. In this paper we discuss in detail the results obtained at SPARC in the regime of velocity bunching, analyzing such nonlinearities and identifying the causes. The beam degradation is discussed, both for slice and projected parameters. Analytical tools are derived to experimentally quantify the effect of such distortions on the projected emittance.

  18. The Comparison of M-B CDI-K Short Form and K-ASQ as Screening Test for Language Development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the usefulness of the communication domain in the Korean version of Ages and Stages Questionnaire (K-ASQ), and short form of the Korean version of MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (M-B CDI-K), as screening tests for language developmental delay. Methods Data was collected between April 2010 and December 2013, from children who visited either the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation or the Developmental Delay Clinic, presenting with language development delay as their chief complaint. All the children took the short form of M-B CDI-K and K-ASQ as screening tests, and received diagnostic language assessments including Sequenced Language Scale for Infants (SELSI) or Preschool Receptive-Expressive Language Scale (PRES). Results A total of 206 children, mean age 29.7 months, were enrolled. The final diagnoses were developmental language disorder, global developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, etc. The M-B CDI-K short form and the communication domain of the K-ASQ had 95.9% and 76.7% sensitivity, and 82.4% and 85.3% specificity, with regards to diagnostic language assessments. The M-B CDI-K short form showed higher negative predictive value and better accuracy than the communication domain of the K-ASQ. Conclusion The screening ability of K-ASQ was not sufficient for children with language development delay, and the M-B CDI-K short form should be implemented for additional screening. PMID:28119842

  19. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  20. Control over band structure and tunneling in bilayer graphene induced by velocity engineering.

    PubMed

    Cheraghchi, Hosein; Adinehvand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-08

    The band structure and transport properties of massive Dirac fermions in bilayer graphene with velocity modulation in space are investigated in the presence of a previously created band gap. It is pointed out that velocity engineering may be considered as a factor to control the band gap of symmetry-broken bilayer graphene. The band gap is direct and independent of velocity value if the velocity modulated in two layers is set up equally. Otherwise, in the case of interlayer asymmetric velocity, not only is the band gap indirect, but also the electron-hole symmetry fails. This band gap is controllable by the ratio of the velocity modulated in the upper layer to the velocity modulated in the lower layer. In more detail, the shift of momentum from the conduction band edge to the valence band edge can be engineered by the gate bias and velocity ratio. A transfer matrix method is also elaborated to calculate the four-band coherent conductance through a velocity barrier possibly subjected to a gate bias. Electronic transport depends on the ratio of velocity modulated inside the barrier to that for surrounding regions. As a result, a quantum version of total internal reflection is observed for thick enough velocity barriers. Moreover, a transport gap originating from the applied gate bias is engineered by modulating the velocities of the carriers in the upper and lower layers.

  1. Energy Velocity Defined by Brillouin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hiroyuki; Hosono, Toshio

    The physical meaning of the energy velocity in lossy Lorentz media is clarified. First, two expressions for the energy velocity, one by Brillouin and another by Diener, are examined. We show that, while Diener's is disqualified, Brillouin's is acceptable as energy velocity. Secondly, we show that the signal velocity defined by Brillouin and Baerwald is exactly identical with the Brillouin's energy velocity. Thirdly, by using triangle-modulated harmonic wave, we show that the superluminal group velocity plays its role as a revelator only after the arrival of the signal traveling at the subluminal energy velocity. In short, nothing moves at the group velocity, and every frequency component of a signal propagates at its own energy velocity.

  2. Asymmetric tandem organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, Thomas J.

    where it is used to predict the short-circuit current (Jsc) generation of the sub-cells, which is not accessible experimentally. Current-matching is then used to predict the Jsc of the complete tandem device. . As a support to the optical modelling, ellipsometry measurements of thin films of ClAlPc are presented. These films of known thickness are analysed to extract the complex refractive index for use in optical modelling calculations. A dependence of the complex refractive index on film thickness and substrate is also noted. Finally, the external quantum efficiency (EQE) technique is considered as applied to solar cells, and an additional method is proposed to characterise current balancing in asymmetric tandem cells under illumination. This technique is verified experimentally by two separate sets of data..

  3. Velocity distribution of neutral species during magnetron sputtering by Fabry-Perot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, N.; Han, J. G.; Oh, S.-G.

    2008-04-07

    The velocity distribution of a metallic neutral species sputtered in a dc magnetron discharge was measured using a planar Fabry-Perot interferometer and a hollow cathode lamp as a reference source. The measurement was performed under different angles of view relative to the target surface. The velocity distribution function in the direction perpendicular to the target becomes asymmetrical as the Ar pressure decreases, whereas it remains nearly symmetrical when the line of sight is parallel to the target surface. The average velocity of the sputtered Ti atoms was measured to be about 2 km/s.

  4. The asymmetric gait toenail unit sign.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Casal, German; Appel, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to resolve a diagnostic problem and report toenail unit changes attributable to shoe friction that resemble onychomycosis, but that are fungus-negative, and identify common skeletal causes in patients with an asymmetric walking gait. X-ray and clinical feet inspections were performed to evaluate skeletal components that change normal foot biodynamics. Forty-nine patients, all dermatophyte-negative, were reviewed. All patients were those seen in our private practice who demonstrated skeletal and toenail unit abnormalities such as onycholysis, nail bed keratosis resembling distal subungual onychomycosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, distal toe skin keratosis, a diagnostic nail plate shape, as well as several skeletal abnormalities. The clinical abnormalities of the asymmetric gait syndrome include onycholysis, nail bed keratosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, and a diagnostic nail plate shape. By the patient's history, the skeletal findings that were present worsened with age and, in many patients, they were familial. Onychomycosis does not lead to an asymmetric gait nail problem, asymmetric gait toenail does not favor dermatophyte infection, and not all nail dystrophies are the result of an asymmetric walking gait.

  5. Asymmetric biocatalysis with microbial enzymes and cells.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Microbial enzymes and cells continue to be important tools and nature's privileged chiral catalysts for performing asymmetric biocatalysis from the analytical small scale to the preparative and large scale in synthesis and degradation. The application of biocatalysts for preparing molecular asymmetry has achieved high efficiency, enantioselectivity and yield and is experiencing today a worldwide renaissance. Recent developments in the discovery, development and production of stable biocatalysts, in the design of new biocatalytic processes and in the product recovery and purification processes have made biocatalytic approaches using microbial cells and enzymes attractive choices for the synthesis of chiral compounds. The methodologies of kinetic resolution and kinetic asymmetric transformation, dynamic kinetic resolution and deracemization, desymmetrization, asymmetric synthesis with or without diastereo control and multi-step asymmetric biocatalysis are finding increasing applications in research. The ever-increasing use of hydrolytic enzymes has been accompanied by new applications of oxidoreductases, transferases and lyases. Isomerases, already used in large-scale processes, and ligases, are emerging as interesting biocatalysts for new synthetic applications. The production of a wide variety of industrial products by asymmetric biocatalysis has even become the preferred method of production. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  7. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  8. Keep-Left Behavior Induced by Asymmetrically Profiled Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. L. N.; Vieira, A. P.; Helbing, D.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    We show, computationally and analytically, that asymmetrically shaped walls can organize the flow of pedestrians driven in opposite directions through a corridor. Precisely, a two-lane ordered state emerges in which people always walk on the left-hand side (or right-hand side), controlled by the system's parameters. This effect depends on features of the channel geometry, such as the asymmetry of the profile and the channel width, as well as on the density and the drift velocity of pedestrians, and the intensity of noise. We investigate in detail the influence of these parameters on the flow and discover a crossover between ordered and disordered states. Our results show that an ordered state only appears within a limited range of drift velocities. Moreover, increasing noise may suppress such flow organization, but the flow is always sustained. This is in contrast with the "freezing by heating" phenomenon according to which pedestrians tend to clog in smooth channels for strong noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1240 (2000)]. Therefore, the ratchetlike effect proposed here acts on the system not only to induce a "keep-left" behavior but also to prevent the freezing by heating clogging phenomenon. Besides pedestrian flow, this new phenomenon has other potential applications in microfluidics systems.

  9. IS FS Tau B DRIVING AN ASYMMETRIC JET?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Fan; Shang, Hsien; Takami, Michihiro; Yan, Chi-Hung; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Walter, Frederick M.; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2012-04-10

    FS Tau B is one of the few T Tauri stars that possess a jet and a counterjet as well as an optically visible cavity wall. We obtained images and spectra of its jet-cavity system in the near-infrared H and K bands using the Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and detected the jet and the counterjet in the [Fe II] 1.644 {mu}m line for the first time. Within 2'' the blueshifted jet is brighter, whereas beyond {approx}5'' the redshifted counterjet dominates the [Fe II] emission. The innermost blueshifted knot is spectrally resolved to have a large line width of {approx}110 km s{sup -1}, while the innermost redshifted knot appears spectrally unresolved. The velocity ratio of the jet to the counterjet is {approx}1.34, which suggests that FS Tau B is driving an asymmetric jet, similar to those found in several T Tauri stars. Combining with optical observations in the literature, we showed that the blueshifted jet has a lower density and higher excitation than the redshifted counterjet. We suggest that the asymmetry in brightness and velocity is the manifestation of a bipolar outflow driving at different mass-loss rates, while maintaining balance of linear momentum. A full explanation of the asymmetry in the FS Tau B system awaits detail modeling and further investigation of the kinematic structure of the wind-associated cavity walls.

  10. Asymmetric Subductions in an Asymmetric Earth: Geodynamics and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; Ficini, E.; Doglioni, C.; Gerya, T.

    2016-12-01

    The driving mechanism of plate tectonics is still controversial. Moreover, mantle kinematics is still poorly constrained due to the limited information available on its composition, thermal state, and physical parameters. The net rotation of the lithosphere, or so-called W-ward drift, however, indicates a decoupling of the plates relative to the underlying asthenosphere at about 100-200 km depth in the Low-Velocity Zone and a relative "E-ward" mantle counterflow. This mantle flow can account for a number of tectonic asymmetries on subduction dynamics such as steep versus shallow slab dip, diverging versus converging subduction hinge, low versus high topography of mountain belts, etc. This asymmetry is generally interpreted to reflect the age-dependent negative buoyancy of the subducting lithosphere. However, slab dip is insensitive to the age of the lithosphere. Here we investigate the role of mantle flow in controlling subduction dynamics using a high-resolution rheologically consistent two-dimensional numerical modeling. Results show the evolution of a subducting oceanic plate beneath a continent: when the subducting plate is dipping in opposite direction with respect to the mantle flow, the slab is sub-vertically deflected by the mantle flow, thus leading the coeval development of a back-arc basin. In contrast, agreement between mantle flow and dipping of the subducting slab relieves shallow dipping subduction zone, which in turn controls the development of a pronounced topography. Moreover, this study confirms that the age of the subducting oceanic lithosphere (i.e. its negative buoyancy) has a second order effect on the dip angle of the slab and, more generally, on subduction dynamics. Our numerical experiments show strong similarities to the observed evolution of subduction zone worldwide and demonstrate that the possibility of a horizontal mantle flow is universally valid.

  11. Evident Enhancement of Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production by Electroless Deposition of M-B (M = Ni, Co) Catalysts on Silicon Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Peili; Wang, Weihan; Han, Hongxian; Sun, Licheng

    2016-11-09

    Modification of p-type Si surface by active and stable earth-abundant electrocatalysts is an effective strategy to improve the sluggish kinetics for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at p-Si/electrolyte interface and to develop highly efficient and low-cost photocathodes for hydrogen production from water. To this end, Si nanowire (Si-NW) array has been loaded with highly efficient electrocatalysts, M-B (M = Ni, Co), by facile and quick electroless plating to build M-B catalyst-modified Si nanowire-array-textured photocathodes for water reduction to H2. Compared with the bare Si-NW array, composite Si-NWs/M-B arrays display evidently enhanced photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance. The onset potential (Vphon) of cathodic photocurrent is positively shifted by 530-540 mV to 0.44-0.45 V vs RHE, and the short-circuit current density (Jsc) is up to 19.5 mA cm(-2) in neutral buffer solution under simulated 1 sun illumination. Impressively, the half-cell photopower conversion efficiencies (ηhc) of the optimized Si-NWs/Co-B (2.53%) and Si-NWs/Ni-B (2.45%) are comparable to that of Si-NWs/Pt (2.46%). In terms of the large Jsc, Vphon, and ηhc values, as well as the high Faradaic efficiency, Si-NWs/M-B electrodes are among the top performing Si photocathodes which are modified with HER electrocatalysts but have no buried solid/solid junction.

  12. Loss of pre-B and IgM(+) B cells in the bone marrow after exposure to a mixture of herbicides.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Patricia; Barnett, John; Schafer, Rosana

    2003-12-26

    This study determined alterations to bone marrow B-cell populations after in vivo exposure to a mixture containing the herbicides 3,4-dichloropropionanilide (propanil) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and compared them to the effects of exposure to the individual herbicides. Propanil and 2,4-D are postemergent herbicides that are sold commercially as a mixture. The individual herbicides or the mixture containing propanil and 2,4-D were administered intraperitoneally to C57Bl/6 female mice at doses from 50 to 200 mg herbicide/kg body weight. The mixtures were given in a 1:1 ratio. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to quantitate bone marrow B-cell populations at 1, 2, 7, and 14d posttreatment. Mixture treatment decreased pre-B and immunoglobulin (Ig) M(+) B-cell populations at all doses by 2 d postexposure. The cell populations were still decreased at 7d posttreatment. In contrast, exposure to the individual herbicides only caused decreases in the pre-B and IgM(+) B-cell populations 7d after exposure to the high doses. Previous studies have demonstrated that corticosterone levels are increased by exposure to propanil. Therefore, the glucocorticoid hormone, corticosterone, was investigated as a possible mediator of cell loss in the bone marrow. Treatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU 486, however, did not prevent cell loss in the bone marrow of mice exposed to the mixture of propanil and 2,4-D. This study demonstrates that pre-B and IgM(+) B-cell populations are decreased after exposure to propanil, 2,4-D, or the mixture containing propanil and 2,4-D. Exposure to the mixture had greater toxic effects than the individual herbicides on bone marrow pre-B and IgM(+) B-cell populations, emphasizing the need to study mixture interactions.

  13. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  14. Asymmetric effects on Earth's polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid

    2013-06-01

    Differential equations ruling the Earth's polar motion are slightly asymmetric with respect to the pole coordinates. This is not only associated with the lack of axial symmetry around the Earth figure axis (triaxiality) but also with the longitude dependency of the pole tide (the main contribution). We propose a consistent handling of both asymmetric contributions, formulating a unique equation in the complex equatorial plane, of which we derive a general solution. Difference with respect to the usual symmetric solution is discussed and found significant in light of the present accuracy of the observed pole coordinates. For the same geophysical excitation, the prograde Chandler wobble is accompanied by a retrograde component up to 2 milliarcseconds (mas), transforming it in a slight elliptic motion. The asymmetric contribution is relatively larger in the geodetic excitation function, for Chandler wobble excitation mixes prograde and retrograde components of comparable level (1 mas).

  15. Asymmetric catalysis based on tropos ligands.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Kohsuke; Mikami, Koichi

    2012-11-21

    All enantiopure atropisomeric (atropos) ligands essentially require enantiomeric resolution or synthetic transformation from a chiral pool. In sharp contrast, the use of tropos (chirally flexible) ligands, which are highly modular, versatile, and easy to synthesize without enantiomeric resolution, has recently been the topic of much interest in asymmetric catalysis. Racemic catalysts bearing tropos ligands can be applied to asymmetric catalysis through enantiomeric discrimination by the addition of a chiral source, which preferentially transforms one catalyst enantiomer into a highly activated catalyst enantiomer. Additionally, racemic catalysts bearing tropos ligands can also be utilized as atropos enantiopure catalysts obtained via the control of chirality by a chiral source followed by the memory of chirality. In this feature article, our results on the asymmetric catalysis via the combination of various central metals and tropos ligands are summarized.

  16. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  17. Asymmetric Switch Costs as Sequential Difficulty Effects

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Anderson, John R.

    2010-01-01

    When switching between tasks of unequal difficulty, there is often a larger switch cost for the easy task than for the difficult task. The authors propose a new account of these asymmetric switch costs based on sequential difficulty effects. They argue that the asymmetry arises from impaired performance after a difficult trial regardless of whether the task switches or repeats. Empirical support for this idea is provided in two experiments on arithmetic task switching in which asymmetries are observed for secondary difficulty manipulations, even in the context of arithmetic task repetitions. The authors discuss how their sequential difficulty account might explain asymmetric restart costs in addition to asymmetric switch costs and how sequential difficulty effects might be explained by resource depletion involving executive control or working memory. PMID:20401811

  18. Asymmetric soft-error resistant memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Perlman, Marvin (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A memory system is provided, of the type that includes an error-correcting circuit that detects and corrects, that more efficiently utilizes the capacity of a memory formed of groups of binary cells whose states can be inadvertently switched by ionizing radiation. Each memory cell has an asymmetric geometry, so that ionizing radiation causes a significantly greater probability of errors in one state than in the opposite state (e.g., an erroneous switch from '1' to '0' is far more likely than a switch from '0' to'1'. An asymmetric error correcting coding circuit can be used with the asymmetric memory cells, which requires fewer bits than an efficient symmetric error correcting code.

  19. Characteristics of a Liquid Spray Issued from Asymmetric and Tabbed Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Todd; Acharya, Sumanta

    1999-11-01

    Several studies have shown that gaseous jets issued from asymmetric and tabbed nozzles produce increases in jet spreading and mass entrainment. The mixing enhancements are caused by the interaction of counter-rotating longitudinal vortex pairs in tabbed nozzles, and due to axis-switching in asymmetric nozzles. However, these studies have been confined to gaseous jets only. It is the goal of this work to determine if these mechanisms will produce similar mixing enhancements for a liquid spray issued from asymmetric and tabbed nozzles. Such mixing enhancements in a gas turbine spray combustor application are likely to result in a more uniform temperature distribution and lower emissions. In the present work, the liquid spray from a Parker Hannifin Research Simplex Atomizer (RSA) Nozzle is to be studied for different nozzle configurations. The conventional “holder” piece of the RSA nozzle has a circular orifice and is used as a baseline in the current experiments. Two additional holder pieces have been modified with rectangular and elliptical shaped orifices. In addition to the two asymmetric nozzles, an axisymmetric nozzle fitted with four delta tabs is also studied. The jets issued from the different nozzles are characterized using a TSI 3-D Phase Doppler Particle Anemometry (PDPA) system. Velocity and size measurements of the particles in the spray are made at different radial and downstream locations. These measurements are used to quantify the mixing enhancements achieved and the mechanisms associated with these enhancements.

  20. Neutron Velocity Selector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico

    This Patent presents a detailed description of the construction and operation of a velocity selector for neutrons with velocities up to 6000÷7000 m/s. This apparatus employs a rotating shutter designed in such a way that neutrons are passed during a portion of each rotation of the shutter, the shutter blocking all neutron radiation at other times. The selector is built up with alternate laminations of a material with high neutron capture cross section (such as, for example, cadmium, boron or gadolinium), and parallel laminations of a material with low capture probability (such as, for example, aluminium, magnesium or beryllium). This is required in order to provide a path through the shutter to the neutrons, which then pass into a ionization chamber. The timing mechanism, adopted to activate or deactivate the neutron detection, and measuring means at given times following each opening or closing of the shutter, is electronic (not mechanic), controlled by a photocell unit. The reference published article for the main topic of the present Patent is [Fermi (1947)].

  1. Top Driven Asymmetric Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The role of the decoupling in the low-velocity zone is crucial for understanding the mechanisms governing plate tectonics and mantle convection. Mantle convection models fail to integrate plate kinematics and thermodynamics of the mantle. We computed the volume of the plates lost along subduction zones, which is about 306 km3/yr (±15). Mass balance predicts that slabs are compensated by broad passive upwellings beneath oceans, mainly at oceanic ridges and backarc basins. These may correspond to the broad low wavespeed regions found in the upper mantle by tomography. However, W-directed slabs enter the mantle more than 3 times faster (232 km3/yr ±15) than the opposite E- or NE-directed subduction zones (74 km3/yr ±15). This is consistent with the westward drift of the outer shell relative to the underlying mantle, which accounts for the steep dip of W-directed slabs, and the asymmetry between the flanks of oceanic ridges, and the directions of ridge migration. The larger recycling volumes along W-directed subduction zones implies i) asymmetry of the cooling of the underlying mantle and ii) it constrains the "easterly" directed component of the upwelling replacement mantle. In this model, mantle convection is tuned by polarized decoupling of the advecting and shearing upper boundary layer. Return mantle flow can be envisaged as a result of passive volume balance rather than as a thermal buoyancy driven upwelling.

  2. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate.

  3. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Gobade, N. G.; Koland, Marina; Harish, K. H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  4. FAIMS operation for realistic gas flow profile and asymmetric waveforms including electronic noise and ripple.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2005-09-01

    The use of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has rapidly grown with the advent of commercial FAIMS systems coupled to mass spectrometry. However, many fundamental aspects of FAIMS remain obscure, hindering its technological improvement and expansion of analytical utility. Recently, we developed a comprehensive numerical simulation approach to FAIMS that can handle any device geometry and operating conditions. The formalism was originally set up in one dimension for a uniform gas flow and limited to ideal asymmetric voltage waveforms. Here we extend the model to account for a realistic gas flow velocity distribution in the analytical gap, axial ion diffusion, and waveform imperfections (e.g., noise and ripple). The nonuniformity of the gas flow velocity profile has only a minor effect, slightly improving resolution. Waveform perturbations are significant even at very low levels, in some cases approximately 0.01% of the nominal voltage. These perturbations always improve resolution and decrease sensitivity, a trade-off controllable by variation of noise or ripple amplitude. This trade-off is physically inferior to that obtained by adjusting the gap width and/or asymmetric waveform frequency. However, the disadvantage is negligible when the perturbation period is much shorter than the residence time in FAIMS, and ripple adjustment appears to offer a practical method for modifying FAIMS resolution.

  5. Asymmetric gear rectifies random robot motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zhang, H. P.

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally study the dynamics of centimetric robots and their interactions with rotary gears through inelastic collisions. Under the impacts of self-propelled robots, a gear with symmetric teeth diffuses with no preferred direction of motion. An asymmetric gear, however, rectifies random motion of nearby robots which, in return, exert a torque on the gear and drive it into unidirectional motion. Rectification efficiency increases with the degree of gear asymmetry. Our work demonstrates that asymmetric environments can be used to rectify and extract energy from random motion of macroscopic self-propelled particles.

  6. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  7. The Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Cheyenne S.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric aldol reactions are a powerful method for the construction of carbon-carbon bonds in an enantioselective fashion. Historically this reaction has been performed in a stoichiometric fashion to control the various aspects of chemo-, diastereo-, regio- and enantioselectivity, however, a more atom economical approach would unite high selectivity with the use of only a catalytic amount of a chiral promoter. This critical review documents the development of direct catalytic asymmetric aldol methodologies, including organocatalytic and metal-based strategies. New methods have improved the reactivity, selectivity and substrate scope of the direct aldol reaction and enabled the synthesis of complex molecular targets PMID:20419212

  8. Asymmetric Synthesis of Akt Kinase Inhibitor Ipatasertib.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Savage, Scott; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Yajima, Herbert; Remarchuk, Travis; Reents, Reinhard; Wirz, Beat; Iding, Hans; Bachmann, Stephan; Fantasia, Serena M; Scalone, Michelangelo; Hell, André; Hidber, Pirmin; Gosselin, Francis

    2017-09-15

    A highly efficient asymmetric synthesis of the Akt kinase inhibitor ipatasertib (1) is reported. The bicyclic pyrimidine 2 starting material was prepared via a nitrilase biocatalytic resolution, halogen-metal exchange/anionic cyclization, and a highly diastereoselective biocatalytic ketone reduction as key steps. The route also features a halide activated, Ru-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of a vinylogous carbamic acid to produce α-aryl-β-amino acid 3 in high yield and enantioselectivity. The API was assembled in a convergent manner through a late-stage amidation/deprotection/monohydrochloride salt formation sequence.

  9. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  10. Deep inelastic scattering on asymmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Boros, C.; Tsushima, K.; Bissey, F.; Afnan, I. R.; Thomas, A. W.

    2000-11-01

    We study deep inelastic scattering on isospin asymmetric nuclei. In particular, the difference of the nuclear structure functions and the Gottfried sum rule for the lightest mirror nuclei, 3He and 3H, are investigated. It is found that such systems can provide significant information on charge symmetry breaking and flavor asymmetry in the nuclear medium. Furthermore, we propose a new method to extract the neutron structure function from radioactive isotopes far from the line of stability. We also discuss the flavor asymmetry in the Drell-Yan process with isospin asymmetric nuclei.

  11. Total absorption in asymmetric hyperbolic media

    PubMed Central

    Nefedov, Igor S.; Valagiannopoulos, Constantinos A.; Hashemi, Seed M.; Nefedov, Evgeny I.

    2013-01-01

    Finite-thickness slabs of hyperbolic media with tilted optical axes exhibit asymmetry properties for waves propagating upward and downward with respect to slab interfaces. Under certain conditions, asymmetric hyperbolic media acquire extreme permittivity parameters and the difference between upward and downward propagating waves becomes very large. Furthermore, both waves can be perfectly matched with the free space; such a feature makes possible the development of optically ultra thin perfect absorbers. The proposed approach is unified and allows the use of different -negative materials. Of particular interest is the asymmetric hyperbolic medium, made of silicon nanowires, since it can be directly applicable to solar cell systems. PMID:24036519

  12. Asymmetric catalysis with short-chain peptides.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Bartosz; Wennemers, Helma

    2014-10-01

    Within this review article we describe recent developments in asymmetric catalysis with peptides. Numerous peptides have been established in the past two decades that catalyze a wide variety of transformations with high stereoselectivities and yields, as well as broad substrate scope. We highlight here catalytically active peptides, which have addressed challenges that had thus far remained elusive in asymmetric catalysis: enantioselective synthesis of atropoisomers and quaternary stereogenic centers, regioselective transformations of polyfunctional substrates, chemoselective transformations, catalysis in-flow and reactions in aqueous environments.

  13. Combined trellis coding with asymmetric modulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Simon, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    The use of asymmetric signal constellations combined with optimized trellis coding to improve the performance of coded systems without increasing the average or peak power, or changing the bandwidth constraints of a system is discussed. The trellis code, asymmetric signal set, and Viterbi decoder of the system model are examined. The procedures for assigning signals to state transitions of the trellis code are described; the performance of the trellis coding system is evaluated. Examples of AM, QAM, and MPSK modulations with short memory trellis codes are presented.

  14. The asymmetrically stepped, orifice compensated hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, J. K.; Hibbs, R. I.; San Andres, L.

    1992-07-01

    An improved hydrostatic bedaring configuration consisting of a conventional orifice compensated, continuous, hydrostatic bearing augmented on one side by a ring with a smaller radial clearance is presented. Results for the leakage and rotordynamic coeffcients of this asymmetrically stepped hydrostatic bearing are calculated using a numerical solution of the film-average Navier-Stokes equations. Results of a parametric study on the effects of ring geometry and recess position on hydrostatic bearing performance are presented. The results show that the presence of the asymmetric step enhances the rotordynamic performance of an orifice compensated hydrostatic bearing.

  15. Asymmetric interface temperature during vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, A.; Castillo, M.; Steinberg, T.; Brutin, D.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and detachment of single vapor bubbles at the interface microscale. Shear flow is used to investigate pool and convective boiling situations using visible and infrared visualizations. We determine a threshold Reynolds number for the onset of asymmetric interfacial temperatures. Below this threshold, bubble growth is geometrically and thermally symmetric, while above, bubbles no longer grow thermally symmetrically. This is explained by the dominance of convective heat transfer removal over viscous effects at the bubble interface. We experimentally demonstrate asymmetric interfacial temperature profiles that should be taken into account for future bubble growth modeling.

  16. Asymmetric interface temperature during vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Antoine; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Ted; Brutin, David; AMU Collaboration; QUT Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and detachment of single vapor bubbles at the interface microscale. Shear flow is used to investigate pool and convective boiling situations using visible and infrared visualizations. We determine a threshold Reynolds number for the onset of asymmetric interfacial temperatures. Below this threshold, bubble growth is geometrically and thermally symmetric, while above, bubbles no longer grow thermally symmetrically. This is explained by the dominance of convective heat transfer removal over viscous effects at the bubble interface. We experimentally demonstrate asymmetric interfacial temperature profiles that should be taken into account for future bubble growth modeling.

  17. Integrated asymmetric vertical coupler pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyat, Isa; Kocabas, Askin; Akcag, Imran; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-08-01

    Design and analysis of a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon-on-insulator asymmetric integrated vertical coupler is presented. The coupler is composed of a single mode low index waveguide and a thin silicon slab. Wavelength selective optical modulation of asymmetric vertical coupler is examined in detail. Its potential for sensing applications is highlighted as an integrated optical pressure sensor which can be realized by standard silicon micro-fabrication. Sensitivity of transmission of such couplers on refractive index change of silicon slab ensures that they are good candidates for applications requiring high sensitivities.

  18. Asymmetric catalysis with chiral ferrocene ligands.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Xin; Tu, Tao; You, Shu-Li; Deng, Wei-Ping; Hou, Xue-Long

    2003-09-01

    Chiral ferrocene ligands have been widely used in asymmetric catalysis. The advantages of using ferrocene as a scaffold for chiral ligands are described, particularly those regarding planar chirality, rigid bulkiness, and ease of derivatization. The role of planar chirality in 1,2- and 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene systems is discussed. By using a bulky ferrocene fragment, novel ferrocene ligands were designed, and high enantioselectivity and regioselectivity were achieved in the allylic substitution reaction of monosubstituted allyl substrates. Using the tunable electronic properties of a diphosphine-oxazoline ferrocenyl ligand, the regioselectivity of the intermolecular asymmetric Heck reaction was also examined.

  19. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions.

  20. Asymmetric multiscale behavior in PM2.5 time series: Based on asymmetric MS-DFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Ni, Zhiwei; Ni, Liping

    2016-11-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 mm or less (PM2.5) is one of the most serious air pollution, considered most harmful for people by World Health Organisation. In this paper, we utilized the asymmetric multiscale detrended fluctuation analysis (A-MSDFA) method to explore the existence of asymmetric correlation properties for PM2.5 daily average concentration in two USA cities (Fresno and Los Angeles) and two Chinese cities (Hong Kong and Shanghai), and to assess the properties of these asymmetric correlations. The results show the existences of asymmetric correlations, and the degree of asymmetric for two USA cities is stronger than that of two Chinese cities. Further, most of the local exponent β(n) are smaller than 0.5, which indicates the existence of anti-persistent long-range correlation for PM2.5 time series in four cities. In addition, we reanalyze the asymmetric correlation by the A-MSDFA method with secant rolling windows of different sizes, which can investigate dynamic changes in the multiscale correlation for PM2.5 time series with changing window size. Whatever window sizes, the correlations are asymmetric and display smaller asymmetries at small scales and larger asymmetries at large scales. Moreover, the asymmetries become increasingly weaker with the increase of window sizes.

  1. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions.

  2. Rectification of asymmetric surface vibrations with dry friction: An exactly solvable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baule, A.; Sollich, P.

    2013-03-01

    We consider a stochastic model for the directed motion of a solid object due to the rectification of asymmetric surface vibrations with Poissonian shot-noise statistics. The friction between the object and the surface is given by a piecewise-linear friction force. This models the combined effect of dynamic friction and singular dry friction. We derive an exact solution of the stationary Kolmogorov-Feller (KF) equation in the case of two-sided exponentially distributed amplitudes. The stationary density of the velocity exhibits singular features such as a discontinuity and a delta-peak singularity at zero velocity, and also contains contributions from nonintegrable solutions of the KF equation. The mean velocity in our model generally varies nonmonotonically as the strength of the dry friction is increased, indicating that transport improves for increased dissipation.

  3. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  4. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  5. Universal nodal Fermi velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.; Yoshida, T.; Lanzara, A.; Bogdanov, P.V.; Kellar, S.A.; Shen, K.M.; Yang, W.L.; Ronning, F.; Sasagawa, T.; Kakeshita, T.; Noda, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lin, C.T.; Zhou, F.; Xiong, J.W.; Ti, W.X.; Zhao, Z.X.; Fujimori, A.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2003-05-27

    The physical properties of cuprate superconductors vary dramatically as a function of doping, evolving from antiferromagnetic insulator to superconductors, and to normal metal upon doping. They also vary among different families of compounds, most prominent being the superconducting transition temperature (Tc), which ranges from 38 K for optimally-doped (La2-xSrx)CuO4 (x=0.15) to 135 K for Hg2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10. Such dramatic changes with doping and material family have been observed in transport properties, optical response, magnetic excitation spectra, the superconducting condensation energy and superfluid density. All these seem to imply that the underlying microscopic quantities of cup rates are generally non-universal. This paper presents a striking exception by providing experimental evidence that the nodal Fermi velocity, a quantity that governs the low-energy quasiparticle dynamics along the (0,0)-(p,p) direction where the d-wave superconducting gap is zero in cuprate superconductors , is actually universal. This conclusion is based on extensive measurements from a wide range of doping, and from five families of hole-doped cuprates whose maximum Tc varies by a factor of three or more. The invariance of the nodal Fermi velocity all the way to the Mott insulator boundary clearly signals the breakdown of the conventional Fermi liquid theory where the metal-insulator transition is realized by the divergence of the effective mass near the insulator boundary. A possible way to understand this behavior is the nanoscale phase separation where doped holes tend to create a preferred local environment so that the behavior of the individual hole is more or less the same for low energy dynamics

  6. Some physical consequences of a random walk in velocity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzenberg, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    A simple conceptual model of stochastic behavior based on a random walk process in velocity space is examined. For objects moving at non-relativistic velocities, this leads under asymmetric directional probabilities to acceleration processes that resemble the behavior of objects subject to Newton's second law. For three dimensional space, inverse square law acceleration emerges for sufficiently separated objects. In modeling classical behavior, such non-relativistic random walks would appear to be limited to objects of sufficiently large mass. Objects with smaller mass exhibit more rapid diffusion and less localization, and a relativistic random walk would seem to be required for objects having masses smaller than a threshold mass value. Results suggest that the threshold mass value must be similar in magnitude to the Planck mass, which leads to behavior somewhat comparable to that characterizing an intrinsic quantum classical transition in the microgram mass range.

  7. Asymmetric and axisymmetric dynamics of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persing, J.; Montgomery, M. T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Smith, R. K.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of idealized numerical experiments to examine the difference between tropical cyclone evolution in three-dimensional (3-D) and axisymmetric (AX) model configurations. We focus on the prototype problem for intensification, which considers the evolution of an initially unsaturated AX vortex in gradient-wind balance on an f-plane. Consistent with findings of previous work, the mature intensity in the 3-D model is reduced relative to that in the AX model. In contrast with previous interpretations invoking barotropic instability and related horizontal mixing processes as a mechanism detrimental to the spin-up process, the results indicate that 3-D eddy processes associated with vortical plume structures can assist the intensification process by contributing to a radial contraction of the maximum tangential velocity and to a vertical extension of tangential winds through the depth of the troposphere. These plumes contribute significantly also to the azimuthally-averaged heating rate and the corresponding azimuthal-mean overturning circulation. The comparisons show that the resolved 3-D eddy momentum fluxes above the boundary layer exhibit counter-gradient characteristics and are generally not represented properly by the subgrid-scale parameterizations in the AX configuration. The resolved eddy fluxes act to support the contraction and intensification of the maximum tangential winds. The comparisons indicate fundamental differences between convective organization in the 3-D and AX configurations for meteorologically relevant forecast time scales. While the radial and vertical gradients of the system-scale angular rotation provide a hostile environment for deep convection in the 3-D model, with a corresponding tendency to strain the convective elements in the tangential direction, deep convection in the AX model does not suffer this tendency. Also, since during the 3-D intensification process the convection has not yet organized into annular rings

  8. Asymmetric and axisymmetric dynamics of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persing, J.; Montgomery, M. T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Smith, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of idealized numerical experiments to examine the difference between tropical cyclone evolution in three-dimensional (3-D) and axisymmetric (AX) model configurations. We focus on the prototype problem for intensification, which considers the evolution of an initially unsaturated AX vortex in gradient-wind balance on an f plane. Consistent with findings of previous work, the mature intensity in the 3-D model is reduced relative to that in the AX model. In contrast with previous interpretations invoking barotropic instability and related horizontal mixing processes as a mechanism detrimental to the spin-up process, the results indicate that 3-D eddy processes associated with vortical plume structures can assist the intensification process by contributing to a radial contraction of the maximum tangential velocity and to a vertical extension of tangential winds through the depth of the troposphere. These plumes contribute significantly also to the azimuthally averaged heating rate and the corresponding azimuthal-mean overturning circulation. The comparisons show that the resolved 3-D eddy momentum fluxes above the boundary layer exhibit counter-gradient characteristics during a key spin-up period, and more generally are not solely diffusive. The effects of these eddies are thus not properly represented by the subgrid-scale parameterizations in the AX configuration. The resolved eddy fluxes act to support the contraction and intensification of the maximum tangential winds. The comparisons indicate fundamental differences between convective organization in the 3-D and AX configurations for meteorologically relevant forecast timescales. While the radial and vertical gradients of the system-scale angular rotation provide a hostile environment for deep convection in the 3-D model, with a corresponding tendency to strain the convective elements in the tangential direction, deep convection in the AX model does not suffer this tendency. Also, since

  9. Visual control of walking velocity.

    PubMed

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  10. Wave propagation in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction across an asymmetric gap.

    PubMed

    Ichino, Takatoshi; Fujio, Kenji; Matsushita, Mariko; Nakata, Satoshi

    2009-03-19

    The photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction was investigated at an asymmetrically illuminated gap, which was drawn using computer software and then projected on a filter paper soaked with BZ solution using a liquid-crystal projector. The probability of the chemical wave passing through the gap with asymmetric illumination was different from that through its mirror image. The location at which the wave disappeared and the time delay of the chemical wave passing through the gap changed depending on the velocity of chemical wave propagation. The experimental results were qualitatively reproduced by a theoretical calculation based on the three-variable Oregonator model that included photosensitivity. These results suggest that the photosensitive BZ reaction may be useful for studying spatiotemporal development that depends on the geometry of excitable fields.

  11. Model of the optical Stark effect in semiconductor quantum wells: Evidence for asymmetric dressed exciton bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang-Tao; Su, Fu-Hai; Wang, Hai

    2009-09-01

    The influence of intense coherent ω and 2ω laser beams on the electric properties of quantum wells is investigated. In the optical quantum-interference process, an asymmetric dressed band structure can be achieved in k space. By adjusting the relative phase and the polarization direction of the ω and 2ω laser beams, the light-induced shift and group velocity variation in electrons and spins can be tuned. The transport effects of asymmetric dressed carriers are studied. We find that if the pseudospin Hall conductance (p-SHC) is dominated by the optically induced band mixing, the p-SHC is nearly invariable with the relative phase of the laser beams. But if the p-SHC is caused by the disorder scattering effect, it is sensitive to the relative phase of the laser beams.

  12. Oscillatory electroosmotic flow in a parallel-plate microchannel under asymmetric zeta potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, M.; Arcos, J.; Méndez, F.; Bautista, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we conduct a theoretical analysis of the start-up of an oscillatory electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a parallel-plate microchannel under asymmetric zeta potentials. It is found that the transient evolution of the flow field is controlled by the parameters {R}ω , {R}\\zeta , and \\bar{κ }, which represent the dimensionless frequency, the ratio of the zeta potentials of the microchannel walls, and the electrokinetic parameter, which is defined as the ratio of the microchannel height to the Debye length. The analysis is performed for both low and high zeta potentials; in the former case, an analytical solution is derived, whereas in the latter, a numerical solution is obtained. These solutions provide the fundamental characteristics of the oscillatory EOFs for which, with suitable adjustment of the zeta potential and the dimensionless frequency, the velocity profiles of the fluid flow exhibit symmetric or asymmetric shapes.

  13. Dynamic control of coherent pulses via Fano-type interference in asymmetric double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinhui; Gao Jinyue; Xu Jihua; Silvestri, L.; La Rocca, G. C.; Bassani, F.; Artoni, M.

    2006-05-15

    We study the temporal and spatial dynamics of two light pulses, a probe and a switch, propagating through an asymmetric double quantum well where tunneling-induced quantum interference may be observed. When such an interference takes place, in the absence of the switch, the quantum well is transparent to the probe which propagates over sufficiently long distances at very small group velocities. In the presence of a relatively strong switch, however, the probe pulse is absorbed due to the quenching of tunneling-induced quantum interference. The probe may be made to vanish even when switch and probe are somewhat delayed with respect to one another. Conversely, our asymmetric double quantum well may be rendered either opaque or transparent to the switch pulse. Such a probe-switch 'reciprocity' can be used to devise a versatile all-optical quantum interference-based solid-state switch for optical communication devices.

  14. Large eddy simulation of high frequency oscillating flow in an asymmetric branching airway model.

    PubMed

    Nagels, Martin A; Cater, John E

    2009-11-01

    The implementation of artificial ventilation schemes is necessary when respiration fails. One approach involves the application of high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) to the respiratory system. Oscillatory airflow in the upper bronchial tree can be characterized by Reynolds numbers as high as 10(4), hence, the flow presents turbulent features. In this study, transitional and turbulent flow within an asymmetric bifurcating model of the upper airway during HFOV are studied using large eddy simulation (LES) methods. The flow, characterized by a peak Reynolds number of 8132, is analysed using a validated LES model of a three-dimensional branching geometry. The pressures, velocities, and vorticity within the flow are presented and compared with prior models for branching flow systems. The results demonstrate how pendelluft occurs at asymmetric branches within the respiratory system. These results may be useful in optimising treatments using HFOV methods.

  15. Stochastic Differential Games with Asymmetric Information

    SciTech Connect

    Cardaliaguet, Pierre Rainer, Catherine

    2009-02-15

    We investigate a two-player zero-sum stochastic differential game in which the players have an asymmetric information on the random payoff. We prove that the game has a value and characterize this value in terms of dual viscosity solutions of some second order Hamilton-Jacobi equation.

  16. Asymmetric synthesis of tertiary thiols and thioethers

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Summary Enantiomerically pure tertiary thiols provide a major synthetic challenge, and despite the importance of chiral sulfur-containing compounds in biological and medicinal chemistry, surprisingly few effective methods are suitable for the asymmetric synthesis of tertiary thiols. This review details the most practical of the methods available. PMID:21647256

  17. Magnetically Retrievable Catalysts for Asymmetric Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles with chiral scaffolds for asymmetric catalytic applications is an elegant way of providing a special pseudo homogenous phase which could be separated using an external magnet. In this review, we summarize the use of magnetic nanopart...

  18. Attentional Control and Asymmetric Associative Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Keith A.; Heap, Shelly J.; Neely, James H.; Thomas, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Participants completed a battery of 3 attentional control (AC) tasks (OSPAN, antisaccade, and Stroop, as in Hutchison, 2007) and performed a lexical decision task with symmetrically associated (e.g., "sister-brother") and asymmetrically related primes and targets presented in both the forward (e.g., "atom-bomb") and backward…

  19. A Concise Asymmetric Total Synthesis of (+)-Brevisamide

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Aaron T.; Martinez, Steven R.; Zakarian, Armen

    2012-01-01

    A new protecting-group-free synthesis of the marine monocyclic ether (+)-brevisamide is reported. The enantioselective synthesis utilizes a key asymmetric Henry reaction and an Achmatowicz rearrangement for the formation of the tetrahydropyran ring. A penultimate Stille cross-coupling allows for an efficient installation of the conjugated (E,E)-diene side chain ultimately delivering (+)-brevisamide. PMID:21678904

  20. Attentional Control and Asymmetric Associative Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Keith A.; Heap, Shelly J.; Neely, James H.; Thomas, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Participants completed a battery of 3 attentional control (AC) tasks (OSPAN, antisaccade, and Stroop, as in Hutchison, 2007) and performed a lexical decision task with symmetrically associated (e.g., "sister-brother") and asymmetrically related primes and targets presented in both the forward (e.g., "atom-bomb") and backward…

  1. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  2. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right–left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use. PMID:25368178

  3. Mach bands change asymmetrically during solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Ross, John; Diamond, Mark R; Badcock, David R

    2003-01-01

    Observations made during two partial eclipses of the Sun show that the Mach bands on shadows cast by the Sun disappear and reappear asymmetrically as an eclipse progresses. These changes can be explained as due to changes in the shape of the penumbras of shadows as the visible portion of the Sun forms crescents of different orientation.

  4. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-11-18

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right-left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use.

  5. Asymmetric conditional volatility in international stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Nuno B.; Menezes, Rui; Mendes, Diana A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies show that a negative shock in stock prices will generate more volatility than a positive shock of similar magnitude. The aim of this paper is to appraise the hypothesis under which the conditional mean and the conditional variance of stock returns are asymmetric functions of past information. We compare the results for the Portuguese Stock Market Index PSI 20 with six other Stock Market Indices, namely the SP 500, FTSE 100, DAX 30, CAC 40, ASE 20, and IBEX 35. In order to assess asymmetric volatility we use autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity specifications known as TARCH and EGARCH. We also test for asymmetry after controlling for the effect of macroeconomic factors on stock market returns using TAR and M-TAR specifications within a VAR framework. Our results show that the conditional variance is an asymmetric function of past innovations raising proportionately more during market declines, a phenomenon known as the leverage effect. However, when we control for the effect of changes in macroeconomic variables, we find no significant evidence of asymmetric behaviour of the stock market returns. There are some signs that the Portuguese Stock Market tends to show somewhat less market efficiency than other markets since the effect of the shocks appear to take a longer time to dissipate.

  6. Magnetically Retrievable Catalysts for Asymmetric Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles with chiral scaffolds for asymmetric catalytic applications is an elegant way of providing a special pseudo homogenous phase which could be separated using an external magnet. In this review, we summarize the use of magnetic nanopart...

  7. Three dimensional force balance of asymmetric droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Kun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    An equilibrium contact angle of a droplet is determined by a horizontal force balance among vapor, liquid, and solid, which is known as Young's law. Conventional wetting law is valid only for axis-symmetric droplets, whereas real droplets are often asymmetric. Here we show that three-dimensional geometry must be considered for a force balance for asymmetric droplets. By visualizing asymmetric droplets placed on a free-standing membrane in air with X-ray microscopy, we are able to identify that force balances in one side and in other side control pinning behaviors during evaporation of droplets. We find that X-ray microscopy is powerful for realizing the three-dimensional force balance, which would be essential in interpretation and manipulation of wetting, spreading, and drying dynamics for asymmetric droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  8. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric division in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Chen; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to symmetric division in mitosis, mammalian oocyte maturation is characterized by asymmetric cell division that produces a large egg and a small polar body. The asymmetry results from oocyte polarization, which includes spindle positioning, migration, and cortical reorganization, and this process is critical for fertilization and the retention of maternal components for early embryo development. Although actin dynamics are involved in this process, the molecular mechanism underlying this remained unclear until the use of confocal microscopy and live cell imaging became widespread in recent years. Information obtained through a PubMed database search of all articles published in English between 2000 and 2012 that included the phrases "oocyte, actin, spindle migration," "oocyte, actin, polar body," or "oocyte, actin, asymmetric division" was reviewed. The actin nucleation factor actin-related protein 2/3 complex and its nucleation-promoting factors, formins and Spire, and regulators such as small GTPases, partitioning-defective/protein kinase C, Fyn, microRNAs, cis-Golgi apparatus components, myosin/myosin light-chain kinase, spindle stability regulators, and spindle assembly checkpoint regulators, play critical roles in asymmetric cell division in oocytes. This review summarizes recent findings on these actin-related regulators in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division and outlines a complete signaling pathway.

  9. Integrated Optical Asymmetric Coupler Pressure Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyat, Isa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    Analysis of a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) asymmetric vertical coupler is presented. The integrated optical component is a coupler composed of a single mode (SM) low index waveguide and a thin silicon slab. High sensitivities of about 0.14 rad.kPa-1 should be achieved.

  10. Settling dynamics of asymmetric rigid fibers

    Treesearch

    E.J. Tozzi; C Tim Scott; David Vahey; D.J. Klingenberg

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional motion of asymmetric rigid fibers settling under gravity in a quiescent fluid was experimentally measured using a pair of cameras located on a movable platform. The particle motion typically consisted of an initial transient after which the particle approached a steady rate of rotation about an axis parallel to the acceleration of gravity, with...

  11. Asymmetric demand for energy: A cointegration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Thomas Frank

    1997-12-01

    This paper uses time series data in a study of the demand for energy. One goal is to compare the results from the traditional autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) model to the error correction model (ECM) using cointegration. The second goal is to determine if the demand elasticity is asymmetric with respect to increasing and decreasing prices. This paper discusses three topics that are important to the use of time series data. The first topic is the presence and consequences unit roots which are common in time series data. The second topic is the identification of cointegrated variables and the third topic is a development of the ECM. This results in a model that can be used in either a single equation or multivariate system context and it will estimate both long run and short run elasticities. Asymmetry theory and its implications are studied along with an investigation into competing methods of creating the asymmetric variables. Simulations provided evidence that the use of dummy variables results in biased estimates and that the cumulative difference method of Wolffram/Houck gives valid estimates. The results of the empirical part of the paper show that the short run estimates of the ADL model are like those of the error correction model, but the cointegration method's long run estimates are better since they are known to be consistent and asymptotically unbiased. Tests for asymmetry do not support the theory of asymmetric long run price elasticities; however there is evidence to support the presence of asymmetric demand in the short run.

  12. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  13. Asymmetric division of Drosophila male germline stem cell shows asymmetric histone distribution.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuong; Lim, Cindy; Xie, Jing; Chen, Xin

    2012-11-02

    Stem cells can self-renew and generate differentiating daughter cells. It is not known whether these cells maintain their epigenetic information during asymmetric division. Using a dual-color method to differentially label "old" versus "new" histones in Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs), we show that preexisting canonical H3, but not variant H3.3, histones are selectively segregated to the GSC, whereas newly synthesized histones incorporated during DNA replication are enriched in the differentiating daughter cell. The asymmetric histone distribution occurs in GSCs but not in symmetrically dividing progenitor cells. Furthermore, if GSCs are genetically manipulated to divide symmetrically, this asymmetric mode is lost. This work suggests that stem cells retain preexisting canonical histones during asymmetric cell divisions, probably as a mechanism to maintain their unique molecular properties.

  14. Charge asymmetric cosmic rays as a probe of flavor violating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco E-mail: sannino@cp3-origins.net

    2011-09-01

    The recently introduced cosmic sum rules combine the data from PAMELA and Fermi-LAT cosmic ray experiments in a way that permits to neatly investigate whether the experimentally observed lepton excesses violate charge symmetry. One can in a simple way determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays. Here we attribute a potential charge asymmetry to the dark sector. In particular we provide models of asymmetric dark matter able to produce charge asymmetric cosmic rays. We consider spin zero, spin one and spin one-half decaying dark matter candidates. We show that lepton flavor violation and asymmetric dark matter are both required to have a charge asymmetry in the cosmic ray lepton excesses. Therefore, an experimental evidence of charge asymmetry in the cosmic ray lepton excesses implies that dark matter is asymmetric.

  15. Development of a laser-Doppler system for measurement of velocity fields in PVT crystal growth systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, O. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Lin, J. T.; Kim, G. T.; Singh, N. B.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system capable of measuring velocities as low as 10 exp -5 m/s is presented, and a calibration system for determining the accuracy of the LDV system at these velocities is described. The results obtained in mercurous chloride crystal grown in cylindrical ampoules at 300 C, using physical vapor transport (PVT) methods, are presented. It is concluded that the overall flow pattern observed is a unicellular, asymmetric pattern between Rayleigh number of 125 and 250.

  16. Plant asymmetric cell division, vive la différence!

    PubMed

    Menke, Frank L H; Scheres, Ben

    2009-06-26

    Although little is known about how asymmetric cell division in plants is regulated, recent discoveries provide a starting point for exploring the mechanisms underlying this process. These studies reveal parallels with asymmetric division in yeast and animals, but also point to regulated cell expansion as a new mechanism of asymmetric division in plants.

  17. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  18. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  19. Different IgM(+) B cell subpopulations residing within the peritoneal cavity of vaccinated rainbow trout are differently regulated by BAFF.

    PubMed

    Granja, Aitor G; Tafalla, Carolina

    2017-10-05

    In teleost fish, IgM(+) B cells are one of the main responders against inflammatory stimuli in the peritoneal cavity, as IgM(+) B cells dominate the peritoneum after intraperitoneal stimulation, also increasing the levels of secreted IgM. BAFF, a cytokine known to play a major role in B cell biology, has been shown to be up-regulated along with its receptors in the peritoneum of rainbow trout upon antigenic exposure, however, the regulatory mechanisms underneath this response remain unclear. In this study, we have identified two different IgM(+) B cell types residing in the peritoneal cavity of previously vaccinated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): IgD(+)IgM(hi)MHCII(hi) cells, resembling naïve B cells, and IgD(-)IgM(lo)MHCII(lo) cells, resembling antibody-secreting cells. Based on their membrane IgM levels, these cell types were named IgM(hi) and IgM(lo) B cells, respectively. As each of these B cell populations showed a distinct expression pattern for the different BAFF receptors, we studied the effect of BAFF individually on each cell subset. Recombinant BAFF promoted the survival of IgM(lo) but not IgM(hi) B cells in vitro, resulting in increased levels of IgM-secreting cells. In contrast, BAFF increased the levels of membrane MHC II only on IgM(hi) B cells, suggesting different functions on these B cell subsets. Moreover, we also showed that peritoneal IgM(hi) B cells expressed BAFF at levels comparable to those seen on myeloid cells. These results point to BAFF as a main regulator of B cell homeostasis in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting that this cytokine can trigger different signals on different peritoneal B cell subsets in a specific manner. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  1. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  2. Peculiar cosmological velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    In the first section a gauge-invariant, variations formalism for investigating vector perturbations is set up, suitable for showing that there is no natural way that the usual scalar inflation field could give rise to vorticities. In the last two sections, a vector field A{sub {mu}} is coupled to the Einstein equations with a linearly perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric, constructed to generate first order vector perturbations. A working classical chaotic vector inflation is demonstrated and then quantum fluctuations of the field are used to constrain the cosmological perturbations. In particular, the vector momentum flux, T{sub 0i}, is tracked to the epoch where a radiation-dominated matter exists. Matching conditions using observational constraints of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) gives rise to a peculiar cosmological velocity of the order of 10{sup {minus}100}c. Amplification of this number, e.g., by breaking the conformal invariance of the field, could be used to generate cosmic magnetic fields using a dynamo mechanism.

  3. The asymmetric distribution of phytoplankton in anticyclonic eddies in the western South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fenfen; Tang, Shilin; Huang, Rui Xin; Yin, Kedong

    2017-02-01

    An anticyclonic eddy's periphery is characterized by large horizontal density gradients, strain and vertical velocity. In this paper we document the asymmetric distribution of phytoplankton around the periphery of anticyclonic eddies in the western South China Sea based on 432 eddies detected from satellite data. The high level of phytoplankton occurs consistently at the northwestern periphery of eddies, with a maximum positive chlorophyll anomaly greater than 0.01 mg m-3. The asymmetric distribution of phytoplankton primarily tags the non-uniform surface velocity field varying from 0.15 m s-1 to 0.3 m s-1 along the eddy's periphery. The coastal boundary and off-coast jet may be the primary cause of the non-uniform flow. Associated with the non-uniform flow speed, the combined effects of the velocity convergence and steepened northwestern part of the eddies act to sharpen the density fronts and tend to result in an ageostrophic secondary circulation at the northwestern edge of the eddy. The upward component of the ageostrophic secondary circulation can enhance the nutrient flux into the euphotic layer, thereby increasing phytoplankton productivity. Anticyclonic eddy-induced ageostrophic secondary circulation appears to be an important mechanism for increasing phytoplankton productivity in the oligotrophic waters of the South China Sea.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  5. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-15

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  6. Similarity of the Velocity Profile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    su x (with 0 constantb = ) is the empirically derived velocity scale developed by Zagarola and Smits [5] for turbulent boundary layer flow...Zagarola and Smits and others have shown that the velocity scaling factor given by Eq. 5 with sδ as the boundary layer thickness can collapse certain...and Smits , it is important to point out that the fact that the similarity length scale factor and the similarity velocity scale factor must follow

  7. Velocity correlations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gramann, Mirt

    1994-01-01

    We determine the velocity correlation function, pairwise peculiar velocity difference, and rms pairwise peculiar velocity dispersion of rich clusters of galaxies, as a function of pair separation, for three cosmological models: Omega = 1 and Omega = 0.3 cold dark matter (CDM), and Omega = 0.3 primeval baryonic isocurvature (PBI) models (all flat and Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized). We find that close cluster pairs, with separation r is less than or equal to 10/h Mpc, exhibit strong attractive peculiar velocities in all models; the cluster pairwise velocities depend sensitively on the model. The mean pairwise attractive velocity of clusters on 5/h Mpc scale ranges from approximately 1700 km/s for Omega = 1 CDM to approximately 1000 km/s for PBI to approximately 700 km/s for Omega = 0.3 CDM. The small-scale pairwise velocities depend also on cluster mass: richer, more massive clusters exhibit stronger attractive velocities than less massive clusters. On large scales, from approximately 20 to 200/h Mpc, the cluster peculiar velocities are increasingly dominated by bulk and random motions; they are independent of cluster mass. The cluster velocity correlation function is negative on small scales for Omega = 1 and Omega = 0.3 CDM, indicating strong pairwise motion relative to bulk motion on small scales; PBI exhibits relatively larger bulk motions. The cluster velocity correlation function is positive on very large scales, from r approximately 10/h Mpc to r approximately 200/h Mpc, for all models. These positive correlations, which decrease monotonically with scale, indicate significant bulk motions of clusters up to approximately 200/h Mpc. The strong dependence of the cluster velocity functions on models, especially at small separations, makes them useful tools in constraining cosmological models when compared with observations.

  8. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  9. Ballistic Mass And Velocity Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, Steven J.; Hecht, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Proposed device for measuring distribution of masses and velocities of ions in plasma or ion beam of general type denoted variously as mass, velocity, and energy analyzers. Yields indications of charge-to-mass ratios and velocities; from these quantities, one computes masses and energies if one also either measures charges of ions by other means or else makes realistic assumption that each ion carries small number (usually 1) of fundamental units of electric charge. In comparison with older devices of this type, device smaller, and operates faster, yielding simultaneous indications of both charge-to-mass ratios and velocities.

  10. Asymmetric total synthesis of Apocynaceae hydrocarbazole alkaloids (+)-deethylibophyllidine and (+)-limaspermidine.

    PubMed

    Du, Ji-Yuan; Zeng, Chao; Han, Xiao-Jie; Qu, Hu; Zhao, Xian-He; An, Xian-Tao; Fan, Chun-An

    2015-04-01

    An unprecedented asymmetric catalytic tandem aminolysis/aza-Michael addition reaction of spirocyclic para-dienoneimides has been designed and developed through organocatalytic enantioselective desymmetrization. A unified strategy based on this key tandem methodology has been divergently explored for the asymmetric total synthesis of two natural Apocynaceae alkaloids, (+)-deethylibophyllidine and (+)-limaspermidine. The present studies not only enrich the tandem reaction design concerning the asymmetric catalytic assembly of a chiral all-carbon quaternary stereocenter contained in the densely functionalized hydrocarbazole synthons but also manifest the potential for the application of the asymmetric catalysis based on the para-dienone chemistry in asymmetric synthesis of natural products.

  11. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  12. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  13. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells promote generation of protective germinal center-derived IgM+ B cell memory against Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Hisaki, Emiliano; Chai, Qian; Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Regen, Tommy; Waisman, Ari; Isibasi, Armando; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2014-06-01

    Abs play a significant role in protection against the intracellular bacterium Salmonella Typhi. In this article, we investigated how long-term protective IgM responses can be elicited by a S. Typhi outer-membrane protein C- and F-based subunit vaccine (porins). We found that repeated Ag exposure promoted a CD4(+) T cell-dependent germinal center reaction that generated mutated IgM-producing B cells and was accompanied by a strong expansion of IFN-γ-secreting T follicular helper cells. Genetic ablation of individual cytokine receptors revealed that both IFN-γ and IL-17 are required for optimal germinal center reactions and production of porin-specific memory IgM(+) B cells. However, more profound reduction of porin-specific IgM B cell responses in the absence of IFN-γR signaling indicated that this cytokine plays a dominant role. Importantly, mutated IgM mAbs against porins exhibited bactericidal capacity and efficiently augmented S. Typhi clearance. In conclusion, repeated vaccination with S. Typhi porins programs type I T follicular helper cell responses that contribute to the diversification of B cell memory and promote the generation of protective IgM Abs.

  14. Velocity ratio and its application to predicting velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2003-01-01

    The velocity ratio of water-saturated sediment derived from the Biot-Gassmann theory depends mainly on the Biot coefficient?a property of dry rock?for consolidated sediments with porosity less than the critical porosity. With this theory, the shear moduli of dry sediments are the same as the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments. Because the velocity ratio depends on the Biot coefficient explicitly, Biot-Gassmann theory accurately predicts velocity ratios with respect to differential pressure for a given porosity. However, because the velocity ratio is weakly related to porosity, it is not appropriate to investigate the velocity ratio with respect to porosity (f). A new formulation based on the assumption that the velocity ratio is a function of (1?f)n yields a velocity ratio that depends on porosity, but not on the Biot coefficient explicitly. Unlike the Biot-Gassmann theory, the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments depend not only on the Biot coefficient but also on the pore fluid. This nonclassical behavior of the shear modulus of water-saturated sediment is speculated to be an effect of interaction between fluid and the solid matrix, resulting in softening or hardening of the rock frame and an effect of velocity dispersion owing to local fluid flow. The exponent n controls the degree of softening/hardening of the formation. Based on laboratory data measured near 1 MHz, this theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and consolidation. However, the velocity dispersion and anisotropy are not included in the formulation.

  15. Chiral poly-rare earth metal complexes in asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2006-04-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is a powerful component of modern synthetic organic chemistry. To further broaden the scope and utility of asymmetric catalysis, new basic concepts for the design of asymmetric catalysts are crucial. Because most chemical reactions involve bond-formation between two substrates or moieties, high enantioselectivity and catalyst activity should be realized if an asymmetric catalyst can activate two reacting substrates simultaneously at defined positions. Thus, we proposed the concept of bifunctional asymmetric catalysis, which led us to the design of new asymmetric catalysts containing two functionalities (e.g. a Lewis acid and a Brønsted base or a Lewis acid and a Lewis base). These catalysts demonstrated broad reaction applicability with excellent substrate generality. Using our catalytic asymmetric reactions as keys steps, efficient total syntheses of pharmaceuticals and their biologically active lead natural products were achieved.

  16. Chiral poly-rare earth metal complexes in asymmetric catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2006-01-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is a powerful component of modern synthetic organic chemistry. To further broaden the scope and utility of asymmetric catalysis, new basic concepts for the design of asymmetric catalysts are crucial. Because most chemical reactions involve bond-formation between two substrates or moieties, high enantioselectivity and catalyst activity should be realized if an asymmetric catalyst can activate two reacting substrates simultaneously at defined positions. Thus, we proposed the concept of bifunctional asymmetric catalysis, which led us to the design of new asymmetric catalysts containing two functionalities (e.g. a Lewis acid and a Brønsted base or a Lewis acid and a Lewis base). These catalysts demonstrated broad reaction applicability with excellent substrate generality. Using our catalytic asymmetric reactions as keys steps, efficient total syntheses of pharmaceuticals and their biologically active lead natural products were achieved. PMID:25792774

  17. Spin-asymmetric Josephson plasma oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreula, J. M.; Valtolina, G.; Törmä, P.

    2017-01-01

    The spin-asymmetric Josephson effect is a proposed quantum-coherent tunneling phenomenon where Cooper-paired fermionic spin-1/2 particles, which are subjected to spin-dependent potentials across a Josephson junction, undergo frequency-synchronized alternating-current Josephson oscillations with spin-dependent amplitudes. Here, in line with present-day techniques in ultracold Fermi gas setups, we consider the regime of small Josephson oscillations and show that the Josephson plasma oscillation amplitude becomes spin dependent in the presence of spin-dependent potentials, while the Josephson plasma frequency is the same for both spin components. Detecting these spin-dependent Josephson plasma oscillations provides a possible means to establish the yet-unobserved spin-asymmetric Josephson effect with ultracold Fermi gases using existing experimental tools.

  18. ASYMMETRIC DIFFUSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2013-04-20

    Stochasticity of magnetic field lines is important for particle transport properties. Magnetic field lines separate faster than diffusively in turbulent plasma, which is called superdiffusion. We discovered that this superdiffusion is pronouncedly asymmetric, so that the separation of field lines along the magnetic field direction is different from the separation in the opposite direction. While the symmetry of the flow is broken by the so-called imbalance or cross-helicity, the difference between forward and backward diffusion is not directly due to imbalance, but a non-trivial consequence of both imbalance and non-reversibility of turbulence. The asymmetric diffusion perpendicular to the mean magnetic field entails a variety of new physical phenomena, such as the production of parallel particle streaming in the presence of perpendicular particle gradients. Such streaming and associated instabilities could be significant for particle transport in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  19. Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2017-02-01

    We systematically study the possibilities for asymmetric dark matter in the context of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models of grand unification. Dark matter stability in SO(10) is guaranteed by a remnant Z2 symmetry which is preserved when the intermediate scale gauge subgroup of SO(10) is broken by a {126} dimensional representation. The asymmetry in the dark matter states is directly generated through the out-of-equilibrium decay of particles around the intermediate scale, or transferred from the baryon/lepton asymmetry generated in the Standard Model sector by leptogenesis. We systematically classify possible asymmetric dark matter candidates in terms of their quantum numbers, and derive the conditions for each case that the observed dark matter density is (mostly) explained by the asymmetry of dark matter particles.

  20. Effects of asymmetric sitting on spinal balance.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hee Soon; Oh, Jong Chi; Won, Sung Yoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of two common asymmetric sitting positions on spinal balance. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven healthy subjects in their twenties were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Asymmetric positions of resting the chin on a hand and crossing the legs were performed by each group for 1 hour. After 1 hour, the subjects lay in the supine position again and spinal imbalance was measured using a device. [Results] After 1 hour of resting with the chin on a hand, sagittal imbalance, coronal imbalance, pelvic obliquity and lordosis angle presented spinal imbalance worsening of 1 hour of crossing legs, sagittal imbalance, pelvic torsion showed in mainly learned spinal imbalance living. [Conclusion] Good posture could be an innate ability, however it through habits. So this study is meaningful from the perspective of the importance of good posture.

  1. Bilateral asymmetric supernumerary heads of biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song Eun; Jung, Chaeyong; Ahn, Kyu Youn

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the biceps brachii have been described by various authors, but the occurrence of bilateral asymmetric supernumerary heads is rare and has not been reported. We found three accessory heads of the biceps brachii muscle on right arm and an anomalous third head of biceps brachii on left arm. The third, fourth, and fifth heads of right arm originated from the body of humerus at the insertion site of coracobrachialis and inserted into the distal part of biceps brachii short head in order. The third head of left arm originated from humerus at the insertion site of coracobrachialis and combined with the distal part of biceps brachii and continued to the proximal part of common biceps tendon. Understanding the existence of bilateral asymmetric supernumerary heads of biceps brachii may influence preoperative diagnosis and surgery on the upper limbs. PMID:22025976

  2. Asymmetric relationship between driving and safety skills.

    PubMed

    Sümer, Nebi; Ozkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo

    2006-07-01

    We hypothesized that the combination of self reported high ratings of driving skills and low ratings of safety skills creates a serious risk for road accident involvement. This study was aimed at investigating the asymmetric interplay between driving and safety skills among Turkish drivers (N=785) using the Driving Skills Inventory [Lajunen, T., Summala, H., 1995. Driver experience, personality, and skill and safety motive dimensions in drivers' self-assessments. Pers. Indiv. Differ. 19, 307-318]. The assumed asymmetric interactions were tested on a number of outcome variables representing risky driving using moderated regression analyses. The results revealed that driving skills moderated the effects of safety skills on six out of the eight outcome variables including the number of accidents, tickets, overtaking tendencies, speed on motorways, and aggressive driving style. Results suggested that high levels of safety skills buffer the negative effect of overconfidence resulting from exaggerated ratings of self-reported driving skills.

  3. Asymmetric twins in rhombohedral boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takeshi Guan, Pengfei; Madhav Reddy, K.; Hirata, Akihiko; Guo, Junjie; Chen, Mingwei

    2014-01-13

    Superhard materials consisting of light elements have recently received considerable attention because of their ultrahigh specific strength for a wide range of applications as structural and functional materials. However, the failure mechanisms of these materials subjected to high stresses and dynamic loading remain to be poorly known. We report asymmetric twins in a complex compound, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), characterized by spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The atomic structure of boron-rich icosahedra at rhombohedral vertices and cross-linked carbon-rich atomic chains can be clearly visualized, which reveals unusual asymmetric twins with detectable strains along the twin interfaces. This study offers atomic insights into the structure of twins in a complex material and has important implications in understanding the planar defect-related failure of superhard materials under high stresses and shock loading.

  4. Cosmological signatures of time-asymmetric gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortês, Marina; Liddle, Andrew R.; Smolin, Lee

    2016-12-01

    We develop the model proposed by Cortês, Gomes and Smolin [1] to predict cosmological signatures of time-asymmetric extensions of general relativity. Within this class of models the equation of motion of chiral fermions is modified by a torsion term. This term leads to a dispersion law for neutrinos that associates a new time-varying energy with each particle. We find a new neutrino contribution to the Friedmann equation resulting from the torsion term in the Ashtekar connection. In this paper we explore the phenomenology of this term and observational consequences for cosmological evolution. We show that constraints on the critical energy density will ordinarily render this term unobservably small, a maximum of order 10-25 of the neutrino energy density today. However, if the time-asymmetric dark energy is tuned to cancel the cosmological constant, the torsion effect may be a dark matter candidate.

  5. Asymmetric wave propagation in nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Lepri, Stefano; Casati, Giulio

    2011-04-22

    A mechanism for asymmetric (nonreciprocal) wave transmission is presented. As a reference system, we consider a layered nonlinear, nonmirror-symmetric model described by the one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatially varying coefficients embedded in an otherwise linear lattice. We construct a class of exact extended solutions such that waves with the same frequency and incident amplitude impinging from left and right directions have very different transmission coefficients. This effect arises already for the simplest case of two nonlinear layers and is associated with the shift of nonlinear resonances. Increasing the number of layers considerably increases the complexity of the family of solutions. Finally, numerical simulations of asymmetric wave packet transmission are presented which beautifully display the rectifying effect.

  6. On Asymmetric Classifier Training for Detector Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Timothy Felix

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the Asymmetric AdaBoost algorithm introduced by Viola and Jones for cascaded face detection. The Viola and Jones face detector uses cascaded classifiers to successively filter, or reject, non-faces. In this approach most non-faces are easily rejected by the earlier classifiers in the cascade, thus reducing the overall number of computations. This requires earlier cascade classifiers to very seldomly reject true instances of faces. To reflect this training goal, Viola and Jones introduce a weighting parameter for AdaBoost iterations and show it enforces a desirable bound. During their implementation, a modification to the proposed weighting was introduced, while enforcing the same bound. The goal of this paper is to examine their asymmetric weighting by putting AdaBoost in the form of Additive Regression as was done by Friedman, Hastie, and Tibshirani. The author believes this helps to explain the approach and adds another connection between AdaBoost and Additive Regression.

  7. Tokamak current driven by poloidally asymmetric fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Fueloep, T.; Lisak, M.

    2006-10-15

    It is shown that poloidally asymmetric particle transport or fueling in a tokamak generally produces an electric current parallel to the magnetic field, in particular if the transport or fueling is up-down asymmetric. For instance, a current arises in the edge region if most particle transport across the last closed flux surface occurs in the midplane while most refueling comes from recycling near the X-point. This current is negative relative to the bulk plasma current (and thus stabilizing to peeling modes) if the ion drift is toward the X-point, and changes direction if the magnetic field is reversed. However, this current appears to be smaller than the pedestal bootstrap current under typical conditions.

  8. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  9. The Asymmetric Exclusion Process and Brownian Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Enaud, C.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2004-04-01

    We consider the totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) in one dimension in its maximal current phase. We show, by an exact calculation, that the non-Gaussian part of the fluctuations of density can be described in terms of the statistical properties of a Brownian excursion. Numerical simulations indicate that the description in terms of a Brownian excursion remains valid for more general one dimensional driven systems in their maximal current phase.

  10. Asymmetric Redox-Annulation of Cyclic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic amines such as 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline undergo regiodivergent annulation reactions with 4-nitrobutyraldehydes. These redox-neutral transformations enable the asymmetric synthesis of highly substituted polycyclic ring systems in just two steps from commercial materials. The utility of this process is illustrated in a rapid synthesis of (−)-protoemetinol. Computational studies provide mechanistic insights and implicate the elimination of acetic acid from an ammonium nitronate intermediate as the rate-determining step. PMID:26348653

  11. Asymmetric-cut monochromator with adjustable asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    A variable incident angle, asymmetric cut, double crystal monochromator was tested for use on beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). For both undulator and wiggler beams the monochromator can expand area of footprint of beam on surface of the crystals to 50 times the area of incident beam; this will reduce the slope errors by a factor of 2500. The asymmetric cut allows one to increase the acceptance angle for incident radiation and obtain a better match to the opening angle of the incident beam. This can increase intensity of the diffracted beam by a factor of 2 to 5 and can make the beam more monochromatic, as well. The monochromator consists of two matched, asymmetric cut (18 degrees), silicon crystals mounted so that they can be rotated about three independent axes. Rotation around the first axis controls the Bragg angle. The second rotation axis is perpendicular to the diffraction planes and controls the increase of the area of the footprint of the beam on the crystal surface. Rotation around the third axis controls the angle between the surface of the crystal and the wider, horizontal axis for the beam and can make the footprint a rectangle with a minimum. length for this area. The asymmetric cut is 18 degrees for the matched pair of crystals, which allows one to expand the footprint area by a factor of 50 for Bragg angles up to 19.15 degrees (6 keV for Si[111] planes). This monochromator, with proper cooling, will be useful for analyzing the high intensity x-ray beams produced by both undulators and wigglers at the APS.

  12. De Novo Asymmetric Synthesis of (+)-Monanchorin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuzhi; O'Doherty, George A

    2015-11-06

    A de novo asymmetric total synthesis of the guanidine alkaloid natural product (+)-monanchorin has been achieved in nine steps from the commodity chemicals furan and caproic acid. The asymmetry of the route was introduced by a Noyori reduction of an acylfuran. In addition, this route relies upon an Achmatowicz rearrangement, a diastereoselective palladium catalyzed glycosylation, reductive amination, and an acid catalyzed bicyclic guanidine mixed acetal formation.

  13. Asymmetric flow events in a VEER 1000

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Shier, W.; Guppy, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the simulation of asymmetric loss of flow events in Russian designed VVER-1000 reactors using the RETRAN-02 Mod4 computer code. VVER-1000 reactors have significant differences from United States pressurized water reactors including multi-level emergency response systems and plant operation at reduced power levels with one or more main circulation pumps inoperable. The results of these simulations are compared to similar analyses done by the designers for the Rovno plant.

  14. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Phosphine Boronates.

    PubMed

    Hornillos, Valentín; Vila, Carlos; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-06-26

    The first catalytic enantioselective synthesis of ambiphilic phosphine boronate esters is presented. The asymmetric boration of α,β-unsaturated phosphine oxides catalyzed by a copper bisphosphine complex affords optically active organoboronate esters that bear a vicinal phosphine oxide group in good yields and high enantiomeric excess. The synthetic utility of the products is demonstrated through stereospecific transformations into multifunctional optically active compounds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Bidirectional and Asymmetric Quantum Controlled Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Zha, Xin-Wei; Duan, Ya-Jun

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new protocol of bidirectional and asymmetric quantum controlled teleportation, using a maximally seven-qubit entangled state as the quantum channel. That is to say Alice wants to transmit an arbitrary single qubit state (an arbitrary two-qubit state) to Bob and Bob wants to transmit an arbitrary two-qubit state (an arbitrary single state) to Alice via the control of the supervisor Charlie.

  16. High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; McKee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the Galactic Halo. Our method accounts for the photoelectric heating from small grains and PAHs, and includes a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus gas density n) are presented for gas with a range of dust/gas ratios (D/G) and a range of metallicities (Z). Variations in D/G affect mainly the photoelectric heating rate, while variations in Z affect both the photoelectric heating and gas cooling. Curves are shown for D/G = 1 (local value) to D/G less than approx. equal to 0.005 and for Z=1 (local value) to Z= 0.005. We find that a two phase medium (CNM + WNM) can be in pressure equilibrium with a hot (T approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 6) K) halo within a range of permitted pressures, P(sup min) to P(sup max). We take halo parameters consistent with observed properties of the soft X-ray background. In general, both P(sup min) and P(sup max) decrease with lower D/G due to a drop in photoelectric heating from grains, while. P(sup min) and P(sup max) increase with lower Z due to a drop in gas coolants. We demonstrate that successful two phase models can be constructed with pressure in the range 10(exp 3) less than approximately equal to P/k less than approximately equal to 10(exp 4) K cm(exp -3) consistent with the thermal pressure in the Galactic disk. In addition, using the observed relation between CNM density and distance in HVCs, (n = 75/fDkpc cm(exp -3); Wakker & Schwarz 1991, AA, 250, 484) we show that our pressure curves constrain the allowed range of HVC heights to be between 0.3 - 16 kpc.

  17. High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; McKee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the Galactic Halo. Our method accounts for the photoelectric heating from small grains and PAHs, and includes a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus gas density n) are presented for gas with a range of dust/gas ratios (D/G) and a range of metallicities (Z). Variations in D/G affect mainly the photoelectric heating rate, while variations in Z affect both the photoelectric heating and gas cooling. Curves are shown for D/G = 1 (local value) to D/G less than approx. equal to 0.005 and for Z=1 (local value) to Z= 0.005. We find that a two phase medium (CNM + WNM) can be in pressure equilibrium with a hot (T approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 6) K) halo within a range of permitted pressures, P(sup min) to P(sup max). We take halo parameters consistent with observed properties of the soft X-ray background. In general, both P(sup min) and P(sup max) decrease with lower D/G due to a drop in photoelectric heating from grains, while. P(sup min) and P(sup max) increase with lower Z due to a drop in gas coolants. We demonstrate that successful two phase models can be constructed with pressure in the range 10(exp 3) less than approximately equal to P/k less than approximately equal to 10(exp 4) K cm(exp -3) consistent with the thermal pressure in the Galactic disk. In addition, using the observed relation between CNM density and distance in HVCs, (n = 75/fDkpc cm(exp -3); Wakker & Schwarz 1991, AA, 250, 484) we show that our pressure curves constrain the allowed range of HVC heights to be between 0.3 - 16 kpc.

  18. Effects of Impact Damage in Midplane Asymmetric Sandwich Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael (Technical Monitor); Webb, M. Mensah; Veezie, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Several structural sandwich composites arc in service on military and commercial aerospace vehicles, however, these components have been limited to secondary structures partly because the impact damage and damage tolerance of these composites have not been extensively characterized. To improve durability, safety, and life cycle performance of PMCs while reducing maintenance costs, combined analysis, and test methods that provide a means of predicting critical engineering properties after impact damage of the structure, must be developed. A key enabling technology here is the establishment of the correlation between the impact test results conducted in the laboratory and the mechanics-based phenomenological solutions. This research was undertaken to investigate the compression and flexural properties following low velocity impact of a nomex/phenolic honeycomb core, fiberglass/epoxy facesheet, midplane asymmetric sandwich composite. One facesheet (thin side) was composed of two plies of the fiberglass/epoxy (0/90), while the other facesheet (thick side) was composed of four plies (0/90/0/90) of fiberglass/epoxy. Due to the differences in facesheet thickness, impact damage was separately induced on the thick side as well as the thin side. The compression and flexural strength properties for each damage arrangement were compared using different levels of impact energy ranging from 0 to 452 Joules. In all cases, higher impact energy resulted in decreased compression and flexural strength. Impact on the thin side showed slightly more retention of compression strength at low impact levels, whereas higher residual compressive strength was observed from impact on the thick side at higher impact levels. Different facesheet thicknesses or midplane asymmetry, played an important role in the flexural strength, however, low velocity impact on the both the thick and thin fiberglass/epoxy facesheet side showed an almost linear loss of flexural strength to saturation.

  19. Compositionally-distinct ultra-low velocity zones on Earth's core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingming; McNamara, Allen K; Garnero, Edward J; Yu, Shule

    2017-08-02

    The Earth's lowermost mantle large low velocity provinces are accompanied by small-scale ultralow velocity zones in localized regions on the core-mantle boundary. Large low velocity provinces are hypothesized to be caused by large-scale compositional heterogeneity (i.e., thermochemical piles). The origin of ultralow velocity zones, however, remains elusive. Here we perform three-dimensional geodynamical calculations to show that the current locations and shapes of ultralow velocity zones are related to their cause. We find that the hottest lowermost mantle regions are commonly located well within the interiors of thermochemical piles. In contrast, accumulations of ultradense compositionally distinct material occur as discontinuous patches along the margins of thermochemical piles and have asymmetrical cross-sectional shape. Furthermore, the lateral morphology of these patches provides insight into mantle flow directions and long-term stability. The global distribution and large variations of morphology of ultralow velocity zones validate a compositionally distinct origin for most ultralow velocity zones.Ultralow velocity zones are detected on the core-mantle boundary, but their origin is enigmatic. Here, the authors find that the global distribution and large variations of morphology of ultralow velocity zones are consistent with most having a compositionally-distinct origin.

  20. Asymmetric shape transitions of epitaxial quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chaozhen; Spencer, Brian J.

    2016-06-01

    We construct a two-dimensional continuum model to describe the energetics of shape transitions in fully faceted epitaxial quantum dots (strained islands) via minimization of elastic energy and surface energy at fixed volume. The elastic energy of the island is based on a third-order approximation, enabling us to consider shape transitions between pyramids, domes, multifaceted domes and asymmetric intermediate states. The energetics of the shape transitions are determined by numerically calculating the facet lengths that minimize the energy of a given island type of prescribed island volume. By comparing the energy of different island types with the same volume and analysing the energy surface as a function of the island shape parameters, we determine the bifurcation diagram of equilibrium solutions and their stability, as well as the lowest barrier transition pathway for the island shape as a function of increasing volume. The main result is that the shape transition from pyramid to dome to multifaceted dome occurs through sequential nucleation of facets and involves asymmetric metastable transition shapes. We also explicitly determine the effect of corner energy (facet edge energy) on shape transitions and interpret the results in terms of the relative stability of asymmetric island shapes as observed in experiment.

  1. Asymmetric wettability of nanostructures directs leidenfrost droplets.

    PubMed

    Agapov, Rebecca L; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Briggs, Dayrl P; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-01-28

    Leidenfrost phenomena on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems utilizing boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant means to direct droplet motion in a variety of recently emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions, namely on impact with Weber numbers ≥40 at T ≥ 325 °C. The directionality for these droplets is opposite to the direction previously exhibited by macro- and microscale Leidenfrost ratchets where movement against the tilt of the ratchet was observed. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask, with mean pillar diameters of 100 nm and heights of 200-500 nm. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling, suggesting that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of the widely accepted mechanism of asymmetric vapor flow. Using high-speed imaging, phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon impact for droplets falling onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. The asymmetric impact and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, linking asymmetric surface wettability to preferential directionality of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets on nanostructured surfaces.

  2. Asymmetric threat data mining and knowledge discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Pagels, Michael A.; Palk, Justin

    2001-03-01

    Asymmetric threats differ from the conventional force-on- force military encounters that the Defense Department has historically been trained to engage. Terrorism by its nature is now an operational activity that is neither easily detected or countered as its very existence depends on small covert attacks exploiting the element of surprise. But terrorism does have defined forms, motivations, tactics and organizational structure. Exploiting a terrorism taxonomy provides the opportunity to discover and assess knowledge of terrorist operations. This paper describes the Asymmetric Threat Terrorist Assessment, Countering, and Knowledge (ATTACK) system. ATTACK has been developed to (a) data mine open source intelligence (OSINT) information from web-based newspaper sources, video news web casts, and actual terrorist web sites, (b) evaluate this information against a terrorism taxonomy, (c) exploit country/region specific social, economic, political, and religious knowledge, and (d) discover and predict potential terrorist activities and association links. Details of the asymmetric threat structure and the ATTACK system architecture are presented with results of an actual terrorist data mining and knowledge discovery test case shown.

  3. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    DOE PAGES

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb latticemore » gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.« less

  4. Flatfish: an asymmetric perspective on metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    The most asymmetrically shaped and behaviorally lateralized of all the vertebrates, the flatfishes are an endless source of fascination to all fortunate enough to study them. Although all vertebrates undergo left-right asymmetric internal organ placement during embryogenesis, flatfish are unusual in that they experience an additional period of postembryonic asymmetric remodeling during metamorphosis, and thus deviate from a bilaterally symmetrical body plan more than other vertebrates. As with amphibian metamorphosis, all the developmental programs of flatfish metamorphosis are ultimately under the control of thyroid hormone. At least one gene pathway involved in embryonic organ lateralization (nodal-lefty-pitx2) is re-expressed in the larval stage during flatfish metamorphosis. Aspects of modern flatfish ontogeny, such as the gradual translocation of one eye to the opposite side of the head and the appearance of key neurocranial elements during metamorphosis, seem to elegantly recapitulate flatfish phylogeny. This chapter highlights the current state of knowledge of the developmental biology of flatfish metamorphosis with emphases on the genetic, morphological, behavioral, and evolutionary origins of flatfish asymmetry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hadron scattering in an asymmetric box*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China Lattice QCD Collaboration; Li, Xin; Chen, Ying; Meng, Guo-Zhan; Feng, Xu; Gong, Ming; He, Song; Li, Gang; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Ma, Jian-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2007-06-01

    We propose to study hadron-hadron scattering using lattice QCD in an asymmetric box which allows one to access more non-degenerate low-momentum modes for a given volume. The conventional Lüscher's formula applicable in a symmetric box is modified accordingly. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, pion-pion elastic scattering phase shifts in the I = 2, J = 0 channel are calculated within quenched approximation using improved gauge and Wilson fermion actions on anisotropic lattices in an asymmetric box. After the chiral and continuum extrapolation, we find that our quenched results for the scattering phase shifts in this channel are consistent with the experimental data when the three-momentum of the pion is below 300MeV. Agreement is also found when compared with previous theoretical results from lattice and other means. Moreover, with the usage of asymmetric volume, we are able to compute the scattering phases in the low-momentum range (pion three momentum less than about 350MeV in the center of mass frame) for over a dozen values of the pion three-momenta, much more than using the conventional symmetric box with comparable volume.

  6. Symmetry of asymmetric quantum Rabi models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Masato

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper is a better understanding for the eigenstates of the asymmetric quantum Rabi model by Lie algebra representations of sl2 . We define a second order element of the universal enveloping algebra U(sl_2) of sl_2({R}) , which, through the action of a certain infinite dimensional representation of sl_2({R}) , provides a picture of the asymmetric quantum Rabi model equivalent to the one drawn by confluent Heun ordinary differential equations. Using this description, we prove the existence of level crossings in the spectral graph of the asymmetric quantum Rabi model when the symmetry-breaking parameter ɛ is equal to \\frac12 , and conjecture a formula that ensures likewise the presence of level crossings for general ε \\in \\frac12{Z} . This result on level crossings was demonstrated numerically by Li and Batchelor in 2015, investigating an earlier empirical observation by Braak (2011). The first analysis of the degenerate spectrum was given for the symmetric quantum Rabi model by Kuś in 1985. In our picture, we find a certain reciprocity (or {Z}2 -symmetry) for ε \\in \\frac12{Z} if the spectrum is described by representations of sl2 . We further discuss briefly the non-degenerate part of the exceptional spectrum from the viewpoint of infinite dimensional representations of sl_2({R}) having lowest weight vectors.

  7. [Bilateral Asymmetric Traumatic Dislocation of Hip Joints].

    PubMed

    Paša, L; Veselý, R; Kelbl, M

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of bilateral asymmetric traumatic dislocation of hip joints, where the left joint was treated conservatively after the reduction, while the right joint, with an acetabular fragment interposition, was treated surgically - by arthroscopically assisted reduction and fixation of an osteochondral fragment of posterior wall of the acetabulum. The female patient healed with no complications, showing an excellent clinical outcome with no signs of instability or limited mobility of hip joints, and also with no signs of para-articular calcification or necrosis of the hip at 1 year after the injury and treatment. Bilateral asymmetric dislocation of hip joint is a rare injury with the total incidence of 150 cases as reported by the literature. Recently, its incidence is higher due to the increased traffic and the associated accident rate. A precise and prompt reduction of the injured hip joint is always necessary, if possible under general anesthesia. Also, it is always necessary to carry out a complete examination of the patient since this type of injury is always caused by a strong force and is often accompanied by injuries of other parts of the body. Key words: bilateral asymmetric dislocation of hip joints, hip arthroscopy, acetabular fracture.

  8. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  9. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  10. Multi-Velocity Component LDV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laser doppler velocimeter uses frequency shifting of a laser beam to provide signal information for each velocity component. A composite electrical signal generated by a light detector is digitized and a processor produces a discrete Fourier transform based on the digitized electrical signal. The transform includes two peak frequencies corresponding to the two velocity components.

  11. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Mao; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is an old issue in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). What is the so-called contravariant velocity or contravariant velocity component? In the article, we review the basics of tensor analysis and give the contravariant velocity component a rigorous explanation. For a given coordinate system, there exist two uniquely determined sets of base vector systems - one is the covariant and another is the contravariant base vector system. The two base vector systems are reciprocal. The so-called contravariant velocity component is really the contravariant component of a velocity vector for a time-independent coordinate system, or the contravariant component of a relative velocity between fluid and coordinates, for a time-dependent coordinate system. The contravariant velocity components are not physical quantities of the velocity vector. Their magnitudes, dimensions, and associated directions are controlled by their corresponding covariant base vectors. Several 2-D (two-dimensional) linear examples and 2-D mass-conservation equation are used to illustrate the details of expressing a vector with respect to the covariant and contravariant base vector systems, respectively.

  12. Asymmetrical lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs may promote asymmetrical hip joint development.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, Mark A; Steffen, Frank; Hässig, Michael; Morgan, Joseph P

    2017-03-20

    This study examines the relationship between the morphology of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LTV) and asymmetrical development of the hip joints in dogs. A total of 4000 dogs which had been consecutively scored for canine hip dysplasia were checked for the presence of a LTV. A LTV was noted in 138 dogs and classified depending on the morphology of the transverse processes and the degree of contact with the ilium. In dogs with an asymmetrical LTV, the hip joint was significantly more predisposed to subluxation and malformation on the side of the intermediate or sacral-like transverse process (p <0.01), on the side of the elevated pelvis (p <0.01), or when an asymmetrical LTV resulted in pelvic rotation on its long axis (p <0.01), whereas hip joint conformation was less affected on the side featuring a free transverse process (p <0.01). The results support our hypothesis that an asymmetrical LTV favours pelvic rotation over its long axis, resulting in inadequate femoral head coverage by the acetabulum on one side. Inadequate coverage of the femoral head favours subluxation, malformation of the hip joint, and secondary osteoarthritis. Asymmetrical hip conformation may therefore be the sequela of a LTV and mask or aggravate genetically induced canine hip dysplasia.

  13. Asymmetric distribution of histones during Drosophila male germline stem cell asymmetric divisions.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuong; Feng, Lijuan; Chen, Xin

    2013-05-01

    It has long been known that epigenetic changes are inheritable. However, except for DNA methylation, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Many types of stem cells undergo asymmetric cell divisions to generate self-renewed stem cells and daughter cells committed for differentiation. Still, whether and how stem cells retain their epigenetic memory remain questions to be elucidated. During the asymmetric division of Drosophila male germline stem cell (GSC), our recent studies revealed that the preexisting histone 3 (H3) are selectively segregated to the GSC, whereas newly synthesized H3 deposited during DNA replication are enriched in the differentiating daughter cell. We propose a two-step model to explain this asymmetric histone distribution. First, prior to mitosis, preexisting histones and newly synthesized histones are differentially distributed at two sets of sister chromatids. Next, during mitosis, the set of sister chromatids that mainly consist of preexisting histones are segregated to GSCs, while the other set of sister chromatids enriched with newly synthesized histones are partitioned to the daughter cell committed for differentiation. In this review, we apply current knowledge about epigenetic inheritance and asymmetric cell division to inform our discussion of potential molecular mechanisms and the cellular basis underlying this asymmetric histone distribution pattern. We will also discuss whether this phenomenon contributes to the maintenance of stem cell identity and resetting chromatin structure in the other daughter cell for differentiation.

  14. Turbulent free convection between vertical isothermal plates with asymmetrical heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, V. I.; Ekaid, A. L.

    2013-06-01

    Results of numerical investigation of the flow and heat transfer at turbulent free convection between the vertical parallel isothermal plates with different temperatures are presented. The temperature factor R T varied within -2 ÷ 1. The Rayleigh number changed within Ra = 107 ÷ 109, and the ratio of geometrical sizes of plates and distances between them was constant A = L/ w = 10. Numerical studies were performed via the solution to the two-dimensional Navier—Stokes equations and energy equation in Boussinesq approximation. The considered boundary-value problem has the unknown conditions at the inlet and outlet between the plates. To describe turbulence, the modified low-Reynolds k-ɛ model was used. The effect of the temperature factor on the flow structure at the channel inlet and outlet was analyzed. Data on distributions of velocities and temperatures between the plates, local and integral heat transfer allow deeper understanding of the mechanism of transfer processes between the parallel plates with asymmetrical heating.

  15. Intrinsic momentum transport in up-down asymmetric tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin; Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Dorland, William; Hammett, Gregory W.; Rodrigues, Paulo; Loureiro, Nuno F.

    2014-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that breaking the up-down symmetry of tokamak flux surfaces removes a constraint that limits intrinsic momentum transport, and hence toroidal rotation, to be small. We show, through MHD analysis, that ellipticity is most effective at introducing up-down asymmetry throughout the plasma. We detail an extension to GS2, a local δf gyrokinetic code that self-consistently calculates momentum transport, to permit up-down asymmetric configurations. Tokamaks with tilted elliptical poloidal cross-sections were simulated to determine nonlinear momentum transport. The results, which are consistent with the experiment in magnitude, suggest that a toroidal velocity gradient, (∂uζi/∂ρ)/vthi, of 5% of the temperature gradient, (∂Ti/∂ρ)/Ti, is sustainable. Here vthi is the ion thermal speed, uζi is the ion toroidal mean flow, ρ is the minor radial coordinate normalized to the tokamak minor radius, and Ti is the ion temperature. Though other known core intrinsic momentum transport mechanisms scale poorly to larger machines, these results indicate that up-down asymmetry may be a feasible method to generate the current experimentally measured rotation levels in reactor-sized devices.

  16. Generic phase coexistence in the totally asymmetric kinetic Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, Claude; Luck, Jean-Marc

    2017-07-01

    The physical analysis of generic phase coexistence in the North-East-Center Toom model was originally given by Bennett and Grinstein. The gist of their argument relies on the dynamics of interfaces and droplets. We revisit the same question for a specific totally asymmetric kinetic Ising model on the square lattice. This nonequilibrium model possesses the remarkable property that its stationary-state measure in the absence of a magnetic field coincides with that of the usual ferromagnetic Ising model. We use both analytical arguments and numerical simulations in order to make progress in the quantitative understanding of the phenomenon of generic phase coexistence. At zero temperature a mapping onto the TASEP allows an exact determination of the time-dependent shape of the ballistic interface sweeping a large square minority droplet of up or down spins. At finite temperature, measuring the mean lifetime of such a droplet allows an accurate measurement of its shrinking velocity v, which depends on temperature T and magnetic field h. In the absence of a magnetic field, v vanishes with an exponent Δ_v≈2.5+/-0.2 as the critical temperature T c is approached. At fixed temperature in the ordered phase, v vanishes at the phase-boundary fields +/- h_b(T) which mark the limits of the coexistence region. The latter fields vanish with an exponent Δ_h≈3.2+/-0.3 as T c is approached.

  17. Transport of pulmonary secretions by asymmetric high frequency oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenauer, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Asymmetric high frequency oscillation (AHFO) was investigated as a mechanism for augmenting the clearance of excess pulmonary secretions from the airways of the lungs. In vitro and in vivo models were developed to test its ability to predictably transport pulmonary secretions. The augmentation of mucus transport by 10 Hz AHFO was investigated in the canine trachea. Ventilation of eight dogs (2 studies each) was performed with three AHFO power settings in random order and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) before or after the AHFO trials. Prior to each trial, 35-45 ..mu..l of canine muscus mixed with a radiotagged colloid (/sup 99/Tc/sup m/) was instilled in the distal trachea. As the radiotagged mixture traveled up the trachea, tracheal muscus velocities (TMV) were recorded on six channels with a multidetector probe. CMV mean TMVs before and after AHFO were not significantly different. The mean TMV of 6.3 +/- 2.6 mm/min at 30% power AHFO was faster than the CMV mean TVM of 4.1 +/- 2.1 mm/min (p <0.05).

  18. Switching by Domain-Wall Automotion in Asymmetric Ferromagnetic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Richter, Kornel; Bisig, Andre; Reeve, Robert M.; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Krone, Andrea; Kronast, Florian; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    Spintronic applications based on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion, such as magnetic data storage, sensors, and logic devices, require approaches to reliably manipulate the magnetization in nanowires. In this paper, we report the direct dynamic experimental visualization of reliable switching from the onion to the vortex state by DW automotion at zero field in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using a uniaxial field pulse. Employing time-resolved x-ray microscopy, we demonstrate that depending on the detailed spin structure of the DWs and the size and geometry of the rings, the automotive propagation can be tailored during the DW relaxation from the higher-energy onion state to the energetically favored vortex state, where both DWs annihilate. Our measurements show DW automotion with an average velocity of about 60 m /s , which is a significant speed for spintronic devices. Such motion is mostly governed by local forces resulting from the geometry variations in the device. A closer study of the annihilation process via micromagnetic simulations reveals that a new vortex is nucleated in between the two initial walls. We demonstrate that the annihilation of DWs through automotion in our scheme always occurs with the detailed topological nature of the walls influencing only the DW dynamics on a local scale. The simulations show good quantitative agreement with our experimental results. These findings shed light on a robust and reliable switching process of the onion state in ferromagnetic rings, which paves the way for further optimization of these devices.

  19. Zero Temperature Phase Diagram of an Asymmetric Spin Ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capriotti, Luca; Becca, Federico; Parola, Alberto; Sorella, Sandro

    2003-03-01

    Asymmetric spin-half ladders (ASL) have recently attracted much theoretical interest due to possible experimental realizations in delafossite cuprates such as YCuO_2.5 [1] and the unusual physical effects that the asymmetry in the leg exchanges could introduce both in the ground-state correlations and in the properties of the excitation spectrum. Using conformal field theory and Lanczos exact diagonalizations, we demonstrate that for small frustration these systems are in a Luttinger spin-fluid phase, with gapless excitations, and a finite spin-wave velocity. In the regime of strong frustration, instead, the ground state is spontaneously dimerized and the bond alternation reduces the triplet gap, leading to a slight enhancement of the critical point separating the Luttinger phase from the gapped one. An accurate determination of the phase boundary, is obtained numerically from the study of the excitation spectrum. Our study completely clarifies the much debated zero-temperature phase diagram of the ASL model. [2] [1] G. Van Tendeloo, O. Garlea, C. Darie, C. Bougerol-Chaillout, and P. Bordet, J. Solid State Chem. 156, 428 (2001). [2] L. Capriotti, F. Becca, S. Sorella, and A. Parola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 149701 (2002); to be published.

  20. Animating streamlines with repeated asymmetric patterns for steady flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuo; Liu, Zhanping; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Animation provides intuitive cueing for revealing essential spatial-temporal features of data in scientific visualization. This paper explores the design of Repeated Asymmetric Patterns (RAPs) in animating evenly-spaced color-mapped streamlines for dense accurate visualization of complex steady flows. We present a smooth cyclic variable-speed RAP animation model that performs velocity (magnitude) integral luminance transition on streamlines. This model is extended with inter-streamline synchronization in luminance varying along the tangential direction to emulate orthogonal advancing waves from a geometry-based flow representation, and then with evenly-spaced hue differing in the orthogonal direction to construct tangential flow streaks. To weave these two mutually dual sets of patterns, we propose an energy-decreasing strategy that adopts an iterative yet efficient procedure for determining the luminance phase and hue of each streamline in HSL color space. We also employ adaptive luminance interleaving in the direction perpendicular to the flow to increase the contrast between streamlines.

  1. The effects of variable practice on locomotor adaptation to a novel asymmetric gait.

    PubMed

    Hinkel-Lipsker, Jacob W; Hahn, Michael E

    2017-06-24

    Very little is known about the effects of specific practice on motor learning of predictive balance control during novel bipedal gait. This information could provide an insight into how the direction and magnitude of predictive errors during acquisition of a novel gait task influence transfer of balance control, as well as yield a practice protocol for the restoration of balance for those with locomotor impairments. This study examined the effect of a variable practice paradigm on transfer of a novel asymmetric gait pattern in able-bodied individuals. Using a split-belt treadmill, one limb was driven at a constant velocity (constant limb) and the other underwent specific changes in velocity (variable limb) during practice according to one of three prescribed practice paradigms: serial, where the variable limb velocity increased linearly; random blocked, where variable limb underwent random belt velocity changes every 20 strides; and random practice, where the variable limb underwent random step-to-step changes in velocity. Random practice showed the highest balance control variability during acquisition compared to serial and random blocked practice which demonstrated the best transfer of balance control on one transfer test. Both random and random blocked practices showed significantly less balance control variability during a second transfer test compared to serial practice. These results indicate that random blocked practice may be best for generalizability of balance control while learning a novel gait, perhaps, indicating that individuals who underwent this practice paradigm were able to find the most optimal balance control solution during practice.

  2. Traffic bottleneck characteristics caused by the reduction of lanes in an optimal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiling; Wang, Rui; Sun, Xiaosi; Cui, Xiaochao

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the lane reduction bottleneck is investigated using the optimal velocity model, in which two kinds of vehicles (fast and slow) are introduced. The asymmetric lane changing rules in the slowdown section and the lane squeezing behaviors at the bottleneck are taken into account. Under the periodic boundary condition, the numerical simulations are performed. The traffic states change with increasing density. And an interesting phenomenon of ratio inversion appears. When the current saturates, the headway and velocity discontinuously vary with the position. In addition, traffic patterns and the phase transition points depend greatly on the speed limit and the length of the slowdown section.

  3. Strong Asymmetric Limit of the Quasi-Potential of the Boundary Driven Weakly Asymmetric Exclusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Lorenzo; Gabrielli, Davide; Landim, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    We consider the weakly asymmetric exclusion process on a bounded interval with particles reservoirs at the endpoints. The hydrodynamic limit for the empirical density, obtained in the diffusive scaling, is given by the viscous Burgers equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In the case in which the bulk asymmetry is in the same direction as the drift due to the boundary reservoirs, we prove that the quasi-potential can be expressed in terms of the solution to a one-dimensional boundary value problem which has been introduced by Enaud and Derrida [16]. We consider the strong asymmetric limit of the quasi-potential and recover the functional derived by Derrida, Lebowitz, and Speer [15] for the asymmetric exclusion process.

  4. Numerical solution of the asymmetric water impact of a wedge in three degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazizade-Ahsaee, H.; Nikseresht, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Impact problems associated with water entry have important applications in various aspects of naval architecture and ocean engineering. Estimation of hydrodynamic impact forces especially during the first instances after the impact is very important and is of interest. Since the estimation of hydrodynamic impact load plays an important role in safe design and also in evaluation of structural weight and costs, it is better to use a reliable and accurate prediction method instead of a simple estimation resulted by analyzing methods. In landing of flying boats, some phenomena such as weather conditions and strong winds can cause asymmetric instead of symmetric descent. In this paper, a numerical simulation of the asymmetric impact of a wedge, as the step of a flying boat, considering dynamic equations in two-phase flow is taken into account. The dynamic motion of the wedge in two-phase flow is solved based on finite volume method with volume of fluid (VOF) scheme considering dynamic equations. Then the effects of different angles of impact and water depth on the velocity change and slamming forces in an asymmetric impact are investigated. The comparison between the simulation results and experimental data verifies the accuracy of the method applied in the present study.

  5. Asymmetric valley-resolved beam splitting and incident modes in slanted graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, S. H.; Chu, C. S.

    2016-01-18

    Electron injection into a graphene sheet through a slanted armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) is investigated. An incident mode, or subband, in the AGNR is valley-unpolarized. Our attention is on the valley-resolved nature of the injected electron beams and its connection to the incident mode. It is known for a normal injection that an incident mode will split symmetrically into two valley-resolved beams of equal intensity. We show, in contrast, that slanted injections result in asymmetric valley-resolved beam splitting. The most asymmetric beam splitting cases, when one of the valley-resolved beams has basically disappeared, are found and the condition derived. This is shown not due to trigonal warping because it holds even in the low incident energy regime, as long as collimation allows. These most asymmetric beam splitting cases occur at energies within an energy interval near and include the subband edge of an incident mode. The physical picture is best illustrated by a projection of the slanted AGNR subband states onto that of the 2D graphene sheet. It follows that the disappearing of a valley-resolved beam coincides with the situation that the group velocities of the projected states in the corresponding valley are in backward directions.

  6. Bending and growth of entrained air filament under converging and asymmetric rotational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parmod; Das, Arup K.; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2017-02-01

    Here we have proposed the increase of the entrainment rate by extruding an air filament under the action of convergent but asymmetric rotational field. By varying the source speed and the diameter of rotational fields, we showed the bending of an air filament towards the higher strength direction of the asymmetric inertia. Interfacial profiles like bubble ejection from the air filament and non-collapsible entrainment with air accumulation in a stagnant zone are obtained in finite volume based numerical simulations, on gradual increase of average rotational fields. Physical understanding of bent interface profile reveals the presence of multiple stages in filament growth depending upon the inertia of surrounding medium. Accumulation of air in the stagnant zone is found to be more prominent in case of rotational speed based asymmetry in contrast to its counterpart having diametric asymmetry of imposing sources. Relative comparison between these two methods of producing asymmetric field showed faster growth of filament upon varying the source diameter, while keeping the speed same. In case of extreme retardation and enhancement of rotational asymmetry, film pinch off and formation of bubble train have been reported. The shape of ejected bubbles is governed by the inertia of the surrounding medium, and bubbles have taken elliptical shapes with their major axis aligned parallel to the adjacent velocity field.

  7. Lane-changing behavior and its effect on energy dissipation using full velocity difference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Ding, Jian-Xun; Shi, Qin; Kühne, Reinhart D.

    2016-07-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane with lane-specific velocity limits. Most previous researches are derived from single-lane car-following theory which in the past years has been extensively investigated and applied. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane car-following model (full velocity difference model) to simulate the three-lane-changing behavior on an urban roadway which consists of three lanes. To meet incentive and security requirements, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed, taking safety distance and velocity difference into consideration and setting lane-specific speed restriction for each lane. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behavior on distribution of cars, velocity, headway, fundamental diagram of traffic and energy dissipation. Simulation results have demonstrated asymmetric lane-changing “attraction” on changeable lane-specific speed-limited roadway, which leads to dramatically increasing energy dissipation.

  8. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yisikandeer, Abudusaimaitijiang; Zhu, Chunhua; Wang, Zhaojun; Lü, Guoliang

    2016-09-01

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30-100 km s -1. The runaway stars observed in the galaxy are possibly CC-RASs. Due to differences in stellar chemical components and structures, TN-RASs are divided into hydrogen-rich TN-RASs and helium-rich TN-RASs. The velocities of the former are about 100-500 km s -1, while the velocities of the latter are mainly between 600 and 1100 km s -1. The hypervelocity stars observed in the galaxy may originate from thermonuclear supernova explosions. Our results possibly cover the US 708 which is a compact helium star and travels with a velocity of 1157 ±53 km s-1 in our galaxy.

  9. Effect of Ambient Wind Velocity on the Shaping of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.; Chevalier, R. A.; Blondin, J.

    1995-05-01

    We have modelled planetary nebulae (PNe) using a 2-wind interacting-stellar-winds (ISW) model. If the two interacting winds have constant properties, the velocity of the PN shell tends towards a constant with time and the shape becomes self-similar. Additionally, if the velocity of the fast wind is much higher than the expansion velocity of the shell, the interior of the hot shocked bubble becomes isobaric. We have computed the shapes of PNe in the self-similar stage with both semi-analytic methods and numerical hydrodynamic simulations. An asymmetric density profile was assumed for the slow wind. We include the effects of the ambient wind velocity. Though the ambient velocity is often comparable to the expansion velocity of the PN, it has not received much attention since the work of Kahn & West (1985). The morphological appearance depends on the density contrast, steepness of the density profile with polar angle and velocity of the ambient medium; classification of PNe purely on the basis of the first two factors may be misleading. In particular the ambient wind velocity determines whether the PN will show a bulge or a cusp at the equator. Moderate values of the density contrast result in a cusp at the equator. Higher density contrast coupled with a low velocity for the external medium gives rise to extremely bipolar nebulae. For large density contrasts and a significant value of the slow wind velocity, the surface density maximicrons of the shell shifts away from the equator, giving rise to peanut-shaped structures with pronounced equatorial bulges. Our work shows that bipolar nebulae result when the expansion velocity of the PN is much larger than that of the external wind. An asymmetry in the external wind velocity can also lead to a bipolar shape if the equatorial velocity is sufficiently low. Our simulations indicate that all PNe may not reach the isobaric, self-similar shape. A ratio of interior sound speed to shell velocity ga 10 is found to yield nebulae

  10. Benzene analogues of (quasi-)planar M@B{sub n}H{sub n} compounds (M = V{sup −}, Cr, Mn{sup +}): A theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lifen; Xu, Chang; Jin, Baokang; Cheng, Longjiu

    2013-11-07

    The stability of M@B{sub n}H{sub n} (M = V{sup −}, Cr, Mn{sup +}; n = 5–8) is investigated by density functional theory. For n = 6–8, the isomers possess (quasi-)planar local minima showed by geometry optimization at TPSSh/6-311+G{sup **} level. All the optimized structures are thermodynamics stable according to the large HOMO-LUMO gap, binding energy, vertical ionization potential, and vertical electron affinity analysis. The peripheral and central atomic radius fit each other best at n = 7 confirmed by the variation of the binding energy values. The availability of d atom orbitals in M for participation in the π-delocalized bonding with the peripheral ring leads to the aromaticity of the (quasi-)planar structures and makes them the benzene analogues. This work establishes firmly the metal-doped borane rings as a new type of aromatic molecule.

  11. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  12. Slip velocity and velocity inversion in a cylindrical Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrak

    2009-03-01

    Velocity inversion in a nanoscale cylindrical Couette flow is investigated with the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. With general slip boundary conditions in the NS equation, the flow can be classified into five distinct profiles. The condition of velocity inversion is explored in the whole space of four dimensionless variables of beta , slip velocity ratio u('), radius ratio a('), and angular velocity ratio omega('). MD computer simulations are performed to estimate the constitutive coefficient of the slip velocities at the walls. The flow is generated by a rotating inner wall and a stationary outer wall in conformity with the theoretical result. By varying an attraction parameter in the Lennard-Jones potential, the slip velocities can be easily controlled. The theoretical predictions are compared with the simulation results. We find that in the intermediate range of the attraction parameter the two results are quite comparable to some extent, but at both extreme values of the attraction parameter, they are quite different.

  13. Horns as particle velocity amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Donskoy, Dimitri M; Cray, Benjamin A

    2011-11-01

    Preliminary measurements and numerical predictions reveal that simple, and relatively small, horns generate remarkable amplification of acoustic particle velocity. For example, below 2 kHz, a 2.5 cm conical horn has a uniform velocity amplification ratio (throat-to-mouth) factor of approximately 3, or, in terms of a decibel level, 9.5 dB. It is shown that the velocity amplification factor depends on the horn's mouth-to-throat ratio as well as, though to a lesser degree, the horn's flare rate. A double horn configuration provides limited additional gain, approximately an increase of up to 25%.

  14. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  15. Dendritic Growth Velocities in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Winsa, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    We measured dendritic tip velocities in pure succinonitrile (SCN) in microgravity. using a sequence of telemetered binary images sent to Earth from the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Growth velocities were measured as a function of the supercooling over the range 0.05-1.5 K. Microgravity observations show that buoyancy-induced convection alters the growth kinetics of SCN dendrites at supercooling as high as 1.3 K. Also, the dendrite velocity data measured under microgravity agree well with the Ivantsov paraboloidal diffusion solution when coupled to a scaling constant of sigma(sup *) = 0.0157.

  16. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-02

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  17. Robust, automatic GPS station velocities and velocity time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.; Hammond, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Automation in GPS coordinate time series analysis makes results more objective and reproducible, but not necessarily as robust as the human eye to detect problems. Moreover, it is not a realistic option to manually scan our current load of >20,000 time series per day. This motivates us to find an automatic way to estimate station velocities that is robust to outliers, discontinuities, seasonality, and noise characteristics (e.g., heteroscedasticity). Here we present a non-parametric method based on the Theil-Sen estimator, defined as the median of velocities vij=(xj-xi)/(tj-ti) computed between all pairs (i, j). Theil-Sen estimators produce statistically identical solutions to ordinary least squares for normally distributed data, but they can tolerate up to 29% of data being problematic. To mitigate seasonality, our proposed estimator only uses pairs approximately separated by an integer number of years (N-δt)<(tj-ti )<(N+δt), where δt is chosen to be small enough to capture seasonality, yet large enough to reduce random error. We fix N=1 to maximally protect against discontinuities. In addition to estimating an overall velocity, we also use these pairs to estimate velocity time series. To test our methods, we process real data sets that have already been used with velocities published in the NA12 reference frame. Accuracy can be tested by the scatter of horizontal velocities in the North American plate interior, which is known to be stable to ~0.3 mm/yr. This presents new opportunities for time series interpretation. For example, the pattern of velocity variations at the interannual scale can help separate tectonic from hydrological processes. Without any step detection, velocity estimates prove to be robust for stations affected by the Mw7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, and velocity time series show a clear change after the earthquake, without any of the usual parametric constraints, such as relaxation of postseismic velocities to their preseismic values.

  18. Synthesis of asymmetric tetracarboxylic acids and corresponding dianhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to processes for preparing asymmetrical biphenyl tetracarboxylic acids and the corresponding asymmetrical dianhydrides, namely 2,3,3',4'-biphenyl dianhydride (a-BPDA), 2,3,3',4'-benzophenone dianhydride (a-BTDA) and 3,4'-methylenediphthalic anhydride (-MDPA). By cross-coupling reactions of reactive metal substituted o-xylenes or by cross-coupling o-xylene derivatives in the presence of catalysts, this invention specifically produces asymmetrical biphenyl intermediates that are subsequently oxidized or hydrolyzed and oxidized to provide asymmetric biphenyl tetracarboxylic acids in comparatively high yields. These asymmetrical biphenyl tetracarboxylic acids are subsequently converted to the corresponding asymmetrical dianhydrides without contamination by symmetrical biphenyl dianhydrides.

  19. Exact Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria for asymmetric current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanson, O.; Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Liu, Y.-H.; Hodgson, J. D. B.

    2017-09-01

    The NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission has made in situ diffusion region and kinetic-scale resolution measurements of asymmetric magnetic reconnection for the first time, in the Earth's magnetopause. The principal theoretical tool currently used to model collisionless asymmetric reconnection is particle-in-cell simulations. Many particle-in-cell simulations of asymmetric collisionless reconnection start from an asymmetric Harris-type magnetic field but with distribution functions that are not exact equilibrium solutions of the Vlasov equation. We present new and exact equilibrium solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell system that are self-consistent with one-dimensional asymmetric current sheets, with an asymmetric Harris-type magnetic field profile, plus a constant nonzero guide field. The distribution functions can be represented as a combination of four shifted Maxwellian distribution functions. This equilibrium describes a magnetic field configuration with more freedom than the previously known exact solution and has different bulk flow properties.

  20. Asymmetric Synthesis of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-Mefloquine Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Ettore J; Coltart, Don M

    2016-10-21

    The asymmetric (er > 99:1) total synthesis of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine hydrochloride from a common intermediate is described. The Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation is the key asymmetric transformation used in the synthesis of this intermediate. It is carried out on an olefin that is accessed in three steps from commercially available materials, making the overall synthetic sequence very concise. The common diol intermediate derived from the Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation is converted into either a trans- or cis-epoxide, and these are subsequently converted to (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis of derivatives of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine is used to lay to rest a 40 year argument regarding the absolute stereochemistry of the mefloquines. A formal asymmetric (er > 99:1) synthesis of (+)-anti-mefloquine hydrochloride is also presented that uses a Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation as a key step.

  1. Asymmetric-Structure Analysis of Carbon and Energy Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Cao, Guangxi

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the asymmetric structure between the carbon and energy markets from two aspects of different trends (up or down) and volatility-transmission direction using asymmetric detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) cross-correlation coefficient test, multifractal asymmetric DCCA (MF-ADCCA) method, asymmetric volatility-constrained correlation metric and time rate of information-flow approach. We sampled 1283 observations from January 2008 to December 2012 among pairs of carbon and energy markets for analysis. Empirical results show that the (1) asymmetric characteristic from the cross-correlation between carbon and returns in the energy markets is significant, (2) asymmetric cross-correlation between carbon and energy market price returns is persistent and multifractral and (3) volatility of the base assets of energy market returns is more influential to the base asset of the carbon market than that of the energy market.

  2. Terminal gas velocity during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Laura W; Ott, Douglas E

    2002-08-01

    To assess the effect of port size in relation to laparoscopic gas flow and to determine the terminal velocity of gas flow during insufflation. Analysis and mathematical modeling of gas flow characteristics. University biomedical engineering department. Analytic calculations including Bernoulli's equation to describe gas volumetric flow and velocity as it exits laparoscopic intraabdominal entrance sites. Mathematical modeling showed that terminal velocity of gas entering the abdomen through needles or trocars reaches a practical limit depending on size and configuration of the gas exit site, amount of turbulence, length of delivery port, and gas flow. Flow rate was evaluated for circles of 2, 5, and 10 mm and annular slots of 0.1- to 0.01-mm thickness. Resistance to gas flow increases and gas exiting terminal velocity increases as the effective area of the gas exit site decreases. Depending on the configuration of variable parameters, gas flow can reach 30 m/second.

  3. Improved tractography using asymmetric fibre orientation distributions.

    PubMed

    Bastiani, Matteo; Cottaar, Michiel; Dikranian, Krikor; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Zhang, Hui; Alexander, Daniel C; Behrens, Timothy E; Jbabdi, Saad; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N

    2017-09-01

    Diffusion MRI allows us to make inferences on the structural organisation of the brain by mapping water diffusion to white matter microstructure. However, such a mapping is generally ill-defined; for instance, diffusion measurements are antipodally symmetric (diffusion along x and -x are equal), whereas the distribution of fibre orientations within a voxel is generally not symmetric. Therefore, different sub-voxel patterns such as crossing, fanning, or sharp bending, cannot be distinguished by fitting a voxel-wise model to the signal. However, asymmetric fibre patterns can potentially be distinguished once spatial information from neighbouring voxels is taken into account. We propose a neighbourhood-constrained spherical deconvolution approach that is capable of inferring asymmetric fibre orientation distributions (A-fods). Importantly, we further design and implement a tractography algorithm that utilises the estimated A-fods, since the commonly used streamline tractography paradigm cannot directly take advantage of the new information. We assess performance using ultra-high resolution histology data where we can compare true orientation distributions against sub-voxel fibre patterns estimated from down-sampled data. Finally, we explore the benefits of A-fods-based tractography using in vivo data by evaluating agreement of tractography predictions with connectivity estimates made using different in-vivo modalities. The proposed approach can reliably estimate complex fibre patterns such as sharp bending and fanning, which voxel-wise approaches cannot estimate. Moreover, histology-based and in-vivo results show that the new framework allows more accurate tractography and reconstruction of maps quantifying (symmetric and asymmetric) fibre complexity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  5. Transient Asymmetric Flow and Bubble Transport Inside a Slab Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-04-01

    A one third scale water model experiment was conducted to observe the asymmetric flow and vortexing flow inside a slab continuous-casting mold. Dye-injection experiment was used to show the evolution of the transient flow pattern in the liquid pool without and with gas injection. The spread of the dye was not symmetric about the central plane. The flow pattern inside the mold was not stationary. The black sesames were injected into water to visualize the vortexing flow pattern on the top surface. The changes of shape and location of single vortex and two vortices with time had been observed during experiments. Plant ultrasonic testing (UT) of slabs was used to analyze the slab defects distribution, which indicated that the defects are intermittent and asymmetric. A mathematical model has been developed to analyze the time-dependent flow using the realistic geometries, which includes the submerged entry nozzle (SEN), actual mold, and part of the secondary cooling zone. The transient turbulent flow of molten steel inside the mold has been simulated using the large eddy simulation computational approach. Simulation results agree acceptably well with the water model experimentally observed and plant UT results. The oscillating motions of jet and the turbulence naturally promote the asymmetric flow even without the effects of slide gate nozzle or the existence of clogs inside the SEN. The periodic behavior of transient fluid flow in the mold is identified and characterized. The vortexing flow is resulted from asymmetric flow in the liquid pool. The vortices are located at the low-velocity side adjacent to the SEN, and the positions and sizes are different. Finally, the model is applied to investigate the influence of bubble size and casting speed on the time-dependent bubble distribution and removal fraction from the top surface inside the mold.

  6. Natal kicks of stellar mass black holes by asymmetric mass ejection in fallback supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Integrating trajectories of low-mass X-ray binaries containing black holes within the Galactic potential, Repetto, Davies & Sigurdsson recently showed that the large distances of some systems above the Galactic plane can only be explained if black holes receive appreciable natal kicks. Surprisingly, they found that the distribution of black hole kick velocities (rather than that of the momenta) should be similar to that of neutron stars. Here I argue that this result can be understood if neutron star and black hole kicks are a consequence of large-scale asymmetries created in the supernova ejecta by the explosion mechanism. The corresponding anisotropic gravitational attraction of the asymmetrically expelled matter does not only accelerate new-born neutron stars by the `gravitational tug-boat mechanism', but can also lead to delayed black hole formation by asymmetric fallback of the slowest parts of the initial ejecta on to the transiently existing neutron star, in course of which the momentum of the black hole can grow with the fallback mass. Black hole kick velocities will therefore not be reduced by the ratio of neutron star to black hole mass as would be expected for kicks caused by anisotropic neutrino emission of the nascent neutron star.

  7. Velocity profiles of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1983-01-01

    The type 2 radio burst was identified as a shock propagating through solar corona. Radio emission from shocks travelling through the interplanetary (IP) medium was observed. Using the drift rates of IP type II bursts the velocity characteristics of eleven shocks were investigated. It is indicated that shocks in the IP medium undergo acceleration before decelerating and that the slower shocks take longer to attain their maximum velocity.

  8. Asymmetric chemical reactions by polarized quantum beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Jun-Ichi; Kobayashi, Kensei

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bio-organic compounds (L-amino acid and D-sugar dominant) is nominated as "Cosmic Scenario"; a chiral impulse from asymmetric excitation sources in space triggered asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such space materials as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life. 1) Effective asymmetric excitation sources in space are proposed as polarized quantum beams, such as circularly polarized light and spin polarized electrons. Circularly polarized light is emitted as synchrotron radiation from tightly captured electrons by intense magnetic field around neutron stars. In this case, either left-or right-handed polarized light can be observed depending on the direction of observation. On the other hand, spin polarized electrons is emitted as beta-ray in beta decay from radioactive nuclei or neutron fireballs in supernova explosion. 2) The spin of beta-ray electrons is longitudinally polarized due to parity non-conservation in the weak interaction. The helicity (the the projection of the spin onto the direction of kinetic momentum) of beta-ray electrons is universally negative (left-handed). For the purpose of verifying the asymmetric structure emergence in bio-organic compounds by polarized quantum beams, we are now carrying out laboratory simulations using circularly polarized light from synchrotron radiation facility or spin polarized electron beam from beta-ray radiation source. 3,4) The target samples are solid film or aqueous solution of racemic amino acids. 1) K.Kobayashi, K.Kaneko, J.Takahashi, Y.Takano, in Astrobiology: from simple molecules to primitive life; Ed. V.Basiuk; American Scientific Publisher: Valencia, 2008. 2) G.A.Gusev, T.Saito, V.A.Tsarev, A.V.Uryson, Origins Life Evol. Biosphere. 37, 259 (2007). 3) J.Takahashi, H.Shinojima, M.Seyama, Y.Ueno, T.Kaneko, K.Kobayashi, H.Mita, M.Adachi, M.Hosaka, M.Katoh, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 10, 3044

  9. Asymmetrical singularities in real-world signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Kyoko; Amaral, Luís A.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-12-01

    We generalize the wavelet transform modulus maxima approach in order to analyze positive and negative changes separately and show different singularity spectra depending on the direction of changes in (i) human heartbeat interval data during sympathetic blockade, (ii) time series of daytime human physical activity of healthy individuals (but not of patients with debilitating fatigue), and (iii) daily stock price records of the Nikkei 225 in the period 1990 2002—but not of the S&P 500. We conclude that the analysis of asymmetrical singularities provides deeper insights into the underlying complexity of real-world signals that can greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms determining the systems’ dynamics.

  10. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Aschenauer, C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Ottavio, T. D.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C. J.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J. S.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nayak, S.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  11. de Sitter and double asymmetric brane worlds

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rommel; Rodriguez, R. Omar; Torrealba, Rafael

    2005-12-15

    Asymmetric brane worlds with dS expansion and static double kink topology are obtained from a recently proposed method and their properties are analyzed. These domain walls interpolate between two spacetimes with different cosmological constants. In the dynamic case, the vacua correspond to dS and AdS geometry, unlike the static case where they correspond to AdS background. We show that it is possible to confine gravity on such branes. In particular, the double-brane world hosts two different walls, so that the gravity is localized on one of them.

  12. Enhancing molecule fluorescence with asymmetrical plasmonic antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guowei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Tianyue; Shen, Hongming; Perriat, Pascal; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Gu, Ying; He, Yingbo; Wang, Yuwei; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-06-01

    We propose and justify by the finite-difference time-domain method an efficient strategy to enhance the spontaneous emission of a fluorophore with a multi-resonance plasmonic antenna. The custom-designed asymmetrical antenna consists of two plasmonic nanoparticles with different sizes and is able to couple efficiently to free space light through multiple localized surface plasmon resonances. This design simultaneously permits a large near-field excitation near the antenna as well as a high quantum efficiency, which results in an unusual and significant enhancement of the fluorescence of a single emitter. Such an asymmetrical antenna presents intrinsic advantages over single particle or dimer based antennas made using two identical nanostructures. This promising concept can be exploited in the large domain of light-matter interaction processes involving multiple frequencies.We propose and justify by the finite-difference time-domain method an efficient strategy to enhance the spontaneous emission of a fluorophore with a multi-resonance plasmonic antenna. The custom-designed asymmetrical antenna consists of two plasmonic nanoparticles with different sizes and is able to couple efficiently to free space light through multiple localized surface plasmon resonances. This design simultaneously permits a large near-field excitation near the antenna as well as a high quantum efficiency, which results in an unusual and significant enhancement of the fluorescence of a single emitter. Such an asymmetrical antenna presents intrinsic advantages over single particle or dimer based antennas made using two identical nanostructures. This promising concept can be exploited in the large domain of light-matter interaction processes involving multiple frequencies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The performance of plasmonic enhanced one-photon fluorescence within the nanogap of symmetrical optical antennas, i.e. Rods-L45-L45 and Rods-L60-L60 are formed by end to

  13. Asymmetric Total Synthesis of Ieodomycin B

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuangjie; Zhang, Jianting; Zhang, Zhibin; Xu, Tianxiang; Huang, Shuangping; Wang, Xiaoji

    2017-01-01

    Ieodomycin B, which shows in vitro antimicrobial activity, was isolated from a marine Bacillus species. A novel asymmetric total synthetic approach to ieodomycin B using commercially available geraniol was achieved. The approach involves the generation of 1,3-trans-dihydroxyl at C-3 and C-5 positions via a Crimmins-modified Evans aldol reaction and a chelation-controlled Mukaiyama aldol reaction of a p-methoxybenzyl-protected aldehyde, as well as the generation of a lactone ring in a deprotection–lactonization one-pot reaction. PMID:28106760

  14. Photoresponse of silicon with asymmetric area contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, M. Golam; Sundararajan, Jency P.; Verma, Amit; Nekovei, Reza; Khader, Mahmoud M.; Darling, R. B.; Patil, Sunil R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on high performance metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photosensors based on asymmetric metal pad areas. The reported devices require a single-step metal deposition, and exhibit large photo response even under zero-bias. Moreover the devices offer fast and stable light switching behavior. Device fabrication and electrical characterization results are presented that are further analyzed with TCAD modeling and simulation. Device simulations show that contact asymmetry along with surface recombination and barrier lowering plays an important role in the MSM I-V characteristics.

  15. Highly Concentrated Catalytic Asymmetric Allylation of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Alfred J.; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80–99%) with high enantioselectivities (79–95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84–87%). PMID:17249767

  16. Highly concentrated catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Alfred J; Kim, Jeung Gon; Walsh, Patrick J

    2007-02-01

    [reaction: see text] We report the catalytic asymmetric allylation of ketones under highly concentrated reaction conditions with a catalyst generated from titanium tetraisopropoxide and BINOL (1:2 ratio) in the presence of isopropanol. This catalyst promotes the addition of tetraallylstannane to a variety of ketones to produce tertiary homoallylic alcohols in excellent yield (80-99%) with high enantioselectivities (79-95%). The resulting homoallylic alcohols can also be epoxidized in situ using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to afford cyclic epoxy alcohols in high yield (84-87%).

  17. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in graded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Lu, Kuan; Gao, Nansha; Songhua, Cao

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the dynamic effective material parameters and vibration performance of a graded beam. The structure of the beam was composed of several unit cells with different fill factors. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of each unit cell were calculated using the finite element method (FEM). The dynamic effective material parameters in each unit cell of the graded beam were determined by the dispersion relations and energy band structures. Longitudinal wave propagation was investigated using a numerical method and FEM. The results show that the graded beam allows asymmetric acoustic transmission over a wide range of frequencies.

  18. Modelling pressure rolling of asymmetric rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, V.; Ratiu, S. A.; Kiss, I.; Cioata, V. G.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a comparative analysis between experimental results and modelling in order to interpret the value of the contact pressure on the asymmetric longitudinal rolling. It is also intended action and the different behaviour of upper cylinder compared to the lower cylinder action in situations when both are driven, or only one operates. In the modelling will be presented on the basis of boundary conditions imposed rolling pressure variation in the degree of reduction and also re size arc length of contact. Determining a curve is also important to determine the locus of points which characterize symmetry conditions partial rolling process between unequal diameters cylinders.

  19. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric oxidation of sulfides.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Graham E; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Anita R

    2012-04-06

    Copper-catalyzed asymmetric sulfoxidation of aryl benzyl and aryl alkyl sulfides, using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, has been investigated. A relationship between the steric effects of the sulfide substituents and the enantioselectivity of the oxidation has been observed, with up to 93% ee for 2-naphthylmethyl phenyl sulfoxide, in modest yield in this instance (up to 30%). The influence of variation of solvent and ligand structure was examined, and the optimized conditions were then used to oxidize a number of aryl alkyl and aryl benzyl sulfides, producing sulfoxides in excellent yields in most cases (up to 92%), and good enantiopurities in certain cases (up to 84% ee).

  20. Dynamics of adaptive agents with asymmetric information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMartino, Andrea; Galla, Tobias

    2005-08-01

    We apply path integral techniques to study the dynamics of agent-based models with asymmetric information structures. In particular, we devise a batch version of a model proposed originally by Berg et al (2001 Quantitative Finance 1 203), and convert the coupled multi-agent processes into an effective-agent problem from which the dynamical order parameters in ergodic regimes can be derived self-consistently together with the corresponding phase structure. Our dynamical study complements and extends the available static theory. Results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  1. Acquired and isolated asymmetrical palatal palsy.

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J C; Cuisset, J M; Nuyts, J P; Vallée, L

    1998-12-01

    Benign acquired and isolated asymmetrical palatal palsy is a rare condition in childhood. We report on three cases. Typical features include: sudden onset, abnormality of the palatal components of speech (rhinolalia), nasal escape of fluids from the ipsilateral nostril. It is supposed to be caused by viral infection, but attempts at viral isolation were unsuccessful. Complete spontaneous recovery is usual, taking a few weeks. Our paper seems to be the first report of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in this condition. It did not disclose any abnormalities in the 2 cases in which it was performed.

  2. Confocal unstable optical resonator with asymmetrical magnification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, P.

    1981-12-01

    The appropriate combination of spherical and cylindrical mirrors allows one to arrange an unstable laser cavity with asymmetrical magnification and to generate collimated output as well. By introducing two additional cylindrical mirrors into the cavity the aberration problems of tilted mirror systems are avoided. On the other hand, this modification is a low-cost alternative to cavities with diamond-turned mirrors with ellipsoidal surface curvature. In the geometrical-optics limit there exists a unique combination of mirror radii of curvature for a given ratio of magnification at fixed distances between the mirrors.

  3. Confocal unstable optical resonator with asymmetrical magnification.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, P

    1981-12-01

    The appropriate combination of spherical and cylindrical mirrors allows one to arrange an unstable laser cavity with asymmetrical magnification and to generate collimated output as well. By introducing two additional cylindrical mirrors into the cavity the aberration problems of tilted mirror systems are avoided. On the other hand, this modification is a low-cost alternative to cavities with diamond-turned mirrors with ellipsoidal surface curvature. In the geometrical-optics limit there exists a unique combination of mirror radii of curvature for a given ratio of magnification at fixed distances between the mirrors.

  4. Plasma current resonance in asymmetric toroidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Catto, Peter J.

    2015-09-15

    The well-known singularity in the magnetic differential equation for plasma current in an asymmetric toroidal confinement system is resolved by including in the pressure tensor corrections stemming from finite Larmor radius. The result provides an estimate of the amplitude of spikes in the parallel current that occur on rational magnetic surfaces. Resolution of the singularity is shown to depend on both the ambipolarity condition—the requirement of zero surface-averaged radial current—and the form of the magnetic differential equation near the rational surface.

  5. Asymmetric joint multifractal analysis in Chinese stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuwen; Zheng, Tingting

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the asymmetric joint multifractal analysis method based on statistical physics is proposed to explore the asymmetric correlation between daily returns and trading volumes in Chinese stock markets. The result shows asymmetric multifractal correlations exist between return and trading volume in Chinese stock markets. Moreover, when the stock indexes are upward, the fluctuations of returns are always weaker than when they are downward, whether the trading volumes are more or less.

  6. Recent Advances in Asymmetric Organocatalyzed Conjugate Additions to Nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Diego A; Baeza, Alejandro; Chinchilla, Rafael; Gómez, Cecilia; Guillena, Gabriela; Pastor, Isidro M; Ramón, Diego J

    2017-05-29

    The asymmetric conjugate addition of carbon and heteroatom nucleophiles to nitroalkenes is a very interesting tool for the construction of highly functionalized synthetic building blocks. Thanks to the rapid development of asymmetric organocatalysis, significant progress has been made during the last years in achieving efficiently this process, concerning chiral organocatalysts, substrates and reaction conditions. This review surveys the advances in asymmetric organocatalytic conjugate addition reactions to α,β-unsaturated nitroalkenes developed between 2013 and early 2017.

  7. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimerz J.; Gwynne, Peter; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) SN Ia that exploded approximately 1900 CE, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, much brighter in the north, but bilaterally symmetric in X-rays. We present the results of X-ray expansion measurements that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. We confirm the mean expansion rate (2011-2015) of 0.58% per yr, but large spatial variations are present. Using the nonparametric 'Demons' method, we measure the velocity field throughout the entire SNR, finding that motions vary by a factor of 5, from 0.''09 to 0.''44 per yr. The slowest shocks are at the outer boundary of the bright northern radio rim, with velocities v(sub s) as low as 3600 km per sec (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than v(sub s) = 12,000-13,000 km per sec along the X-ray-bright major axis. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. This asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. Based on Chandra observations spanning 8.3 yr, we measure its increase at 1.3% +/- 0.8% per yr. The SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium ejected by the SN progenitor prior to its explosion.

  8. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimerz J.; Gwynne, Peter; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) SN Ia that exploded approximately 1900 CE, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, much brighter in the north, but bilaterally symmetric in X-rays. We present the results of X-ray expansion measurements that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. We confirm the mean expansion rate (2011-2015) of 0.58% per yr, but large spatial variations are present. Using the nonparametric 'Demons' method, we measure the velocity field throughout the entire SNR, finding that motions vary by a factor of 5, from 0.''09 to 0.''44 per yr. The slowest shocks are at the outer boundary of the bright northern radio rim, with velocities v(sub s) as low as 3600 km per sec (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than v(sub s) = 12,000-13,000 km per sec along the X-ray-bright major axis. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. This asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. Based on Chandra observations spanning 8.3 yr, we measure its increase at 1.3% +/- 0.8% per yr. The SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium ejected by the SN progenitor prior to its explosion.

  9. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gwynne, Peter; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) SN Ia that exploded ˜1900 CE, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, much brighter in the north, but bilaterally symmetric in X-rays. We present the results of X-ray expansion measurements that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. We confirm the mean expansion rate (2011-2015) of 0.58% yr-1, but large spatial variations are present. Using the nonparametric “Demons” method, we measure the velocity field throughout the entire SNR, finding that motions vary by a factor of 5, from 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 09 to 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 44 yr-1. The slowest shocks are at the outer boundary of the bright northern radio rim, with velocities v s as low as 3600 km s-1 (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than v s = 12,000-13,000 km s-1 along the X-ray-bright major axis. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. This asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. Based on Chandra observations spanning 8.3 yr, we measure its increase at 1.3 % +/- 0.8 % yr-1. The SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium ejected by the SN progenitor prior to its explosion.

  10. On optimal velocity during cycling.

    PubMed

    Maroński, R

    1994-02-01

    This paper focuses on the solution of two problems related to cycling. One is to determine the velocity as a function of distance which minimizes the cyclist's energy expenditure in covering a given distance in a set time. The other is to determine the velocity as a function of the distance which minimizes time for fixed energy expenditure. To solve these problems, an equation of motion for the cyclist riding over arbitrary terrain is written using Newton's second law. This equation is used to evaluate either energy expenditure or time, and the minimization problems are solved using an optimal control formulation in conjunction with the method of Miele [Optimization Techniques with Applications to Aerospace Systems, pp. 69-98 (1962) Academic Press, New York]. Solutions to both optimal control problems are the same. The solutions are illustrated through two examples. In one example where the relative wind velocity is zero, the optimal cruising velocity is constant regardless of terrain. In the second, where the relative wind velocity fluctuates, the optimal cruising velocity varies.

  11. Asymmetric multifractal scaling behavior in the Chinese stock market: Based on asymmetric MF-DFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guangxi; Cao, Jie; Xu, Longbing

    2013-02-01

    We utilized asymmetric multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis in this study to examine the asymmetric multifractal scaling behavior of Chinese stock markets with uptrends or downtrends. Results show that the multifractality degree of Chinese stock markets with uptrends is stronger than that of Chinese stock markets with downtrends. Correlation asymmetries are more evident in large fluctuations than in small fluctuations. By discussing the source of asymmetric multifractality, we find that multifractality is related to long-range correlations when the market is going up, whereas it is related to fat-tailed distribution when the market is going down. The main source of asymmetric scaling behavior in the Shanghai stock market are long-range correlations, whereas that in the Shenzhen stock market is fat-tailed distribution. An analysis of the time-varying feature of scaling asymmetries shows that the evolution trends of these scaling asymmetries are similar in the two Chinese stock markets. Major financial and economical events may enhance scaling asymmetries.

  12. Asymmetrical Sample Training Produces Asymmetrical Retention Functions in Feature-Present/Feature-Absent Matching in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Douglas S.; Blatz, Craig W.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons were trained in a matching task in which samples involved presentation of a white line on a green background (feature-present) or on an otherwise dark key (feature-absent). After asymmetrical training in which one group was initially trained with the feature-present sample and another was initially trained with the feature-absent sample,…

  13. Asymmetrical Capacitors for Propulsion and the ISR Asymmetrical Capacitator Thruster, Experimental Results and Improved Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, Francis; Winet, Ed; Ice, Bob; Melcher, Cory; Pesavento, Phil; Holmes, Alan; Butler, Carey; Cole, John; Campbell, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The outline of this viewgraph presentation on asymmetrical capacitor thruster development includes: 1) Test apparatus; 2) Devices tested; 3) Circuits used; 4) Data collected (Time averaged, Time resolved); 5) Patterns observed; 6) Force calculation; 7) Electrostatic modeling; 8) Understand it all.

  14. Charging-induced asymmetric spin distribution in an asymmetric (9,0) carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Roeterdink, Wim G; Jiang, Wanrun; Dai, Xing; Gao, Yang; Wang, Bo; Lei, Yanyu; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-11-21

    Asymmetry in the electronic structure of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials is important for designing molecular devices for functions such as directional transport and magnetic switching. In this paper, we use density functional theory to achieve an asymmetric spin distribution in a typical (9,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) by capping the CNT with a fullerene hemisphere at one end and saturating the dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms at the other end. The asymmetric structure facilitates obvious asymmetry in the spin distribution along the tube axis direction, with the maximum difference between the ends reaching 1.6 e Å(-1). More interestingly, the heterogeneity of the spin distribution can be controlled by charging the system. Increasing or decreasing the charge by 2e can reduce the maximum difference in the linear spin density along the tube axis to approximately 0.68 e Å(-1) without changing the proportion of the total electron distribution. Further analyses of the electron density difference and the density of states reveal the loss and gain of charge and the participation of atomic orbitals at both ends. Our study characterizes the asymmetric spin distribution in a typical asymmetric carbon system and its correlation with charge at the atomic level. The results provide a strategy for controlling the spin distribution for functional molecular devices through a simple charge adjustment.

  15. Study of Optimum Insulating Design Method of Asymmetrical Structure GCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, Shuichi; Yoshioka, Yoshio

    An asymmetrical structure GCB that employed resister closing method equips an interrupter and a closing resister contact in one shield, and so the shield diameter becomes large. In this study, we investigated the optimum tank diameter and major radius of shield electrode of asymmetrical structure GCB by three-dimensional electric field calculation. We also investigated these optimum structures of symmetrical structure GCB and compared the result with that of the asymmetrical structure GCB. In conclusion, the tank diameter of asymmetrical structure GCB becomes larger than the tank diameter of symmetrical structure GCB by 24%.

  16. Asymmetric cell divisions: a view from plant development.

    PubMed

    Abrash, Emily B; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2009-06-01

    All complex multicellular organisms must solve the problem of generating diverse and appropriately patterned cell types. Asymmetric division, in which a single mother cell gives rise to daughters with distinct identities, is instrumental in the generation of cellular diversity and higher-level patterns. In animal systems, there exists considerable evidence for conserved mechanisms of polarization and asymmetric division. Here, we consider asymmetric cell divisions in plants, highlighting the unique aspects of plant cell biology and organismal development that constrain the process, but also emphasizing conceptual and mechanistic similarities with animal asymmetric divisions.

  17. Symmetry Breaking in Asymmetric Autocatalysis of Pyrimidyl Alkanol

    SciTech Connect

    Soai, Kenso; Kawasaki, Tsuneomi

    2008-03-05

    Asymmetric autocatalysis is a reaction in which chiral product acts as a chiral catalyst for its own production. Pyrimidyl alkanol was found to act as asymmetric autocatalysts with significant amplification of enantiopurity in the enantioselective addition of diisopropylzinc to pyrimidine-5-carbaldehyde. Symmetry breaking is observed in the reaction between the aldehyde and diisopropylzinc without adding chiral substance. Enantioenriched pyrimidyl alkanol was obtained with stochastic distribution of R and S-enantiomers. This is a unique example of spontaneous absolute asymmetric synthesis. Asymmetric autocatalysis is also described using chiral initiators such as circularly polarized light, quartz, chiral crystal of achiral cytosine.

  18. Opening of the central Atlantic Ocean: Implications for geometric rifting and asymmetric initial seafloor spreading after continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biari, Y.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Sahabi, M.; Funck, T.; Benabdellouahed, M.; Schnabel, M.; Reichert, C.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Bronner, A.; Austin, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    Study of the deep structure of conjugate passive continental margins combined with detailed plate kinematic reconstructions can provide constraints on the mechanisms of rifting and formation of initial oceanic crust. In this study the central Atlantic conjugate margins are compared based on compilation of wide-angle seismic profiles from NW Africa Nova Scotian and U.S. passive margins. The patterns of volcanism, crustal thickness, geometry, and seismic velocities in the transition zone suggest symmetric rifting followed by asymmetric oceanic crustal accretion. Conjugate profiles in the southern central Atlantic image differences in the continental crustal thickness. While profiles on the eastern U.S. margin are characterized by thick layers of magmatic underplating, no such underplate was imaged along the African continental margin. In the north, two wide-angle seismic profiles acquired in exactly conjugate positions show that the crustal geometry of the unthinned continental crust and the necking zone are nearly symmetric. A region including seismic velocities too high to be explained by either continental or oceanic crust is imaged along the Canadian side, corresponding on the African side to an oceanic crust with slightly elevated velocities. These might result from asymmetric spreading creating seafloor by faulting the existing lithosphere on the Canadian side and the emplacement of magmatic oceanic crust including pockets of serpentinite on the Moroccan margin. After isochron M25, a large-scale plate reorganization might then have led to an increase in spreading velocity and the production of thin magmatic crust on both sides.

  19. [Asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles].

    PubMed

    Arzul, L; Corre, P; Khonsari, R H; Mercier, J-M; Piot, B

    2012-06-01

    Hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles most commonly affects the masseter. Less common cases of isolated or associated temporalis hypertrophy are also reported. Parafunctional habits, and more precisely bruxism, can favor the onset of the hypertrophy. This condition is generally idiopathic and can require both medical and/or surgical management. A 29-year-old patient was referred to our department for an asymmetric swelling of the masticatory muscles. Physical examination revealed a bilateral hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles, predominantly affecting the right temporalis and the left masseter. Major bruxism was assessed by premature dental wearing. The additional examinations confirmed the isolated muscle hypertrophy. Benign asymmetric hypertrophy of the masticatory muscles promoted by bruxism was diagnosed. Treatment with injections of type A botulinum toxin was conducted in association with a splint and relaxation. Its effectiveness has been observed at six months. Few cases of unilateral or bilateral temporalis hypertrophy have been reported, added to the more common isolated masseter muscles hypertrophy. The diagnosis requires to rule out secondary hypertrophies and tumors using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The condition is thought to be favoured by parafunctional habits such as bruxism. The conservative treatment consists in reducing the volume of the masticatory muscles using intramuscular injections of type A botulinum toxin. Other potential conservative treatments are wearing splints and muscle relaxant drugs. Surgical procedures aiming to reduce the muscle volume and/or the bone volume (mandibular gonioplasty) can be proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolutionary stability in the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Zhou; Wang, Rui-Wu; Li, Yao-Tang

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that in public goods games, contributors are either strong or weak players and each individual has an equal probability of exhibiting cooperation. It is difficult to explain why the public good is produced by strong individuals in some cooperation systems, and by weak individuals in others. Viewing the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma game as an evolutionary game, we find that whether the strong or the weak players produce the public good depends on the initial condition (i.e., phenotype or initial strategy of individuals). These different evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) associated with different initial conditions, can be interpreted as the production modes of public goods of different cooperation systems. A further analysis revealed that the strong player adopts a pure strategy but mixed strategies for the weak players to produce the public good, and that the probability of volunteering by weak players decreases with increasing group size or decreasing cost-benefit ratio. Our model shows that the defection probability of a "strong" player is greater than the "weak" players in the model of Diekmann (1993). This contradicts Selten's (1980) model that public goods can only be produced by a strong player, is not an evolutionarily stable strategy, and will therefore disappear over evolutionary time. Our public good model with ESS has thus extended previous interpretations that the public good can only be produced by strong players in an asymmetric game.

  1. Patellofemoral pain and asymmetrical hip rotation.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T; Threlkeld-Watkins, Julie

    2005-11-01

    Patellofemoral joint problems are the most common overuse injury of the lower extremity, and altered femoral or hip rotation may play a role in patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation of and intervention for a patient with asymmetrical hip rotation and patellofemoral pain. The patient was a 15-year-old girl with an 8-month history of anterior right knee pain, without known trauma or injury. Prior to intervention, her score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was 24%. Right hip medial (internal) rotation was less than left hip medial rotation, and manual muscle testing showed weakness of the right hip internal rotator and abductor muscles. The intervention was aimed at increasing right hip medial rotation, improving right hip muscle strength (eg, the muscle force exerted by a muscle or a group of muscles to overcome a resistance), and eliminating anterior right knee pain. After 6 visits (14 days), passive left and right hip medial rotations were symmetrical, and her right hip internal rotator and abductor muscle grades were Good plus. Her WOMAC score was 0%. The patient had right patellofemoral pain and an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hip rotation, with diminished hip medial rotation and excessive hip lateral (external) rotation on the right side. The patient's outcomes suggest that femoral or hip joint asymmetry may be related to patellofemoral joint pain.

  2. Survey of Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Erik; Cao, Yuchen; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Due to spontaneous symmetry breaking it is possible for a nucleus to have a deformed shape in its ground state. It is theorized that atoms whose nuclei have reflection-asymmetric or pear-like deformations could have non-zero electric dipole moments (EDMs). Such a trait would be evidence of CP-violation, a feature that goes beyond the Standard Model of Physics. It is the purpose of this project to predict which nuclei exhibit a reflection-asymmetric deformation and which of those would be the best candidates for an EDM measuring experiment. Using nuclear Density Functional Theory along with the new computer code AxialHFB and massively parallel computing we calculated ground state nuclear properties for thousands of even-even nuclei across the nuclear chart: from light to superheavy and from stable to short-lived systems. Six different Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) were used to assess systematic errors in our calculations. These results are to be added to the website Massexplorer (http://massexplorer.frib.msu.edu/) which contains results from earlier mass table calculations and information on single quasiparticle energies.

  3. Survey of Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Erik; Birge, Noah; Erler, Jochen; Nazarewicz, Witek; Perhac, Alex; Schunck, Nicolas; Stoitsov, Mario; Nuclei Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Due to spontaneous symmetry breaking it is possible for a nucleus to have a deformed shape in its ground state. It is theorized that atoms whose nuclei have reflection-asymmetric or pear-like deformations could have non-zero electric dipole moments (EDMs). Such a trait would be evidence of CP-violation, a feature that goes beyond the Standard Model of Physics. It is the purpose of this project to predict which nuclei exhibit a reflection-asymmetric deformation and which of those would be the best candidates for an EDM measuring experiment. Using nuclear Density Functional Theory along with the new computer code AxialHFB and massively parallel computing we calculated ground state nuclear properties for thousands of even-even nuclei across the nuclear chart: from light to superheavy and from stable to short-lived systems. Six different Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) were used to assess systematic errors in our calculations. Overall, 140 even-even nuclei (near and among the lantanides and actinides and in the superheavy region near N = 184) were predicted by all 6 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation. The case of 112Xe also proved curious as it was predicted by 5 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation despite its proximity to the two-proton drip line. Deceased.

  4. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction.

    PubMed

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-06-04

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel 'ribs' inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations.

  5. Evolution of asymmetrically displaced footpoints during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohma, Anders; Østgaard, Nikolai; Reistad, Jone Peter; Tenfjord, Paul; Laundal, Karl M.; Snekvik, Kristian

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that a transverse (y) component in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) induces a By component in the closed magnetosphere through asymmetric loading and/or redistribution of magnetic flux. Simultaneous images of the aurora in the two hemispheres have revealed that conjugate auroral features are displaced longitudinally during such conditions, indicating that the field-lines are displaced from their symmetric configuration. Although the direction and magnitude of this displacement show correlations with IMF clock angle and dipole tilt, events show large temporal and spatial variability of this displacement. For instance, it is not clear how substorms affect the displacement. In a previous case study, it has been demonstrated that displaced auroral forms, associated with the present IMF orientation, returned to a more symmetric configuration during the expansion phase of two substorms. Using IMAGE and Polar, we have identified several events where conjugate images during substorm are available. We identify asymmetric auroral features during these events and investigate their time development during the substorm phases.

  6. Analysis and design of asymmetrical reluctance machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harianto, Cahya A.

    Over the past few decades the induction machine has been chosen for many applications due to its structural simplicity and low manufacturing cost. However, modest torque density and control challenges have motivated researchers to find alternative machines. The permanent magnet synchronous machine has been viewed as one of the alternatives because it features higher torque density for a given loss than the induction machine. However, the assembly and permanent magnet material cost, along with safety under fault conditions, have been concerns for this class of machine. An alternative machine type, namely the asymmetrical reluctance machine, is proposed in this work. Since the proposed machine is of the reluctance machine type, it possesses desirable feature, such as near absence of rotor losses, low assembly cost, low no-load rotational losses, modest torque ripple, and rather benign fault conditions. Through theoretical analysis performed herein, it is shown that this machine has a higher torque density for a given loss than typical reluctance machines, although not as high as the permanent magnet machines. Thus, the asymmetrical reluctance machine is a viable and advantageous machine alternative where the use of permanent magnet machines are undesirable.

  7. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction

    PubMed Central

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel ‘ribs’ inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations. PMID:26040634

  8. Instability of asymmetric continuous shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinath, R.; Sarkar, Abhijit; Sekhar, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the governing equation of asymmetric continuous shaft in inertial frame of reference is studied. In particular, determination of the parameter ranges for the stability or instability of the shaft response is the focus of the present work. The governing equations are a fourth-order coupled partial differential equations containing time dependent coefficients. The equations are non-dimensionalized in terms of two parameters related to the average moment of inertia and the difference of moments of inertia about the principal axes. Using the latter as the asymptotic parameter and employing modal superposition, a formal methodology based on perturbation methods is developed to ascertain the stability and instability characteristics. The methodology is applicable to shafts subjected to some of the classical boundary conditions viz. simply supported, cantilever, and fixed-fixed. Similar stability curves are obtained for each mode for these different boundary conditions. The novel non-dimensionalization scheme chosen leads to the stability boundaries as well as the loci of varying speeds to be in the form of straight lines. The intersection of these lines determine the stable and unstable speed ranges of different asymmetric shafts. The results are generalized for different material and geometric properties of the shaft.

  9. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  10. Asymmetric Vesicle Instability in Extensional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Andrew; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Previous researchers have chronicled the breakup of drops in an extensional flow as they stretch into a dumbbell shape with a long thin neck. Motivated by recent experimental observations, we study an apparently similar problem with vesicles, which are deformable but incompressible membranes that conserve area and volume. First, we simulate vesicles in an unbounded uniaxial extensional flow which are given general radial perturbations from an initially stable symmetric equilibrium state. For sufficiently low reduced volume (< 0.74 at matched inner/outer viscosity) there exists a capillary number at which an asymmetric perturbation mode will grow, resulting in the formation of an asymmetric dumbbell shape with a thin connecting cylindrical bridge analogous to the shapes associated with drop breakup. Our simulations help elucidate a mechanism for this instability based on a competition between internal pressure differentials in the vesicle resulting from the membrane bending force and ambient flow. We compare and contrast this transition to the ``standard'' drop breakup transition. Funded by NSF GRFP and Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  11. An asymmetric B factory based on PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    In this report we describe a design for a high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory to be built in the PEP tunnel on the SLAC site. This proposal, a collaborative effort SLAC, LBL, and LLNL, is the culmination of more than two years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, and electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of the B Factory. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two B Factory storage rings.

  12. Dynamics of Contracting Asymmetric Viscoelastic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher; Thete, Sumeet; Appathurai, Santosh; Bhat, Pradeep; Basaran, Osman; Harris, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In ink-jet printing and atomization, slender filaments are routinely formed. Such filaments either contract to form a single drop or breakup into multiple drops, e.g. by end pinching. Beginning with papers by Schulkes (1996) and Notz & Basaran (2004), past studies have focused exclusively on the contraction dynamics of Newtonian filaments. Also in these studies, initial filament shapes are taken to be long cylinders terminated by two identical spherical caps (symmetric filaments). In emerging applications, e.g. ink-jet printing of complex fluids, the filaments are viscoelastic (VE) fluids. Moreover, older experiments by Notz et al. (2001) and more recent ones by Castrejón-Pita et al. (2012) show that initial filament shapes resemble long, tapered cylinders terminated by hemispherical caps of unequal radii (asymmetric filaments). Therefore, we analyze the contraction dynamics of both asymmetric and symmetric filaments of VE fluids using the Giesekus model. Rather than solving the full set of equations governing the problem, we take advantage of filament slenderness and solve a much simpler set of 1D equations (Eggers, 1997). We then use a finite element method with Streamline Upwind/Petrov Galerkin (SUPG) formulation (Brooks & Hughes, 1982) to solve the reduced equations.

  13. Evolutionary Stability in the Asymmetric Volunteer's Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao-Tang

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that in public goods games, contributors are either strong or weak players and each individual has an equal probability of exhibiting cooperation. It is difficult to explain why the public good is produced by strong individuals in some cooperation systems, and by weak individuals in others. Viewing the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma game as an evolutionary game, we find that whether the strong or the weak players produce the public good depends on the initial condition (i.e., phenotype or initial strategy of individuals). These different evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) associated with different initial conditions, can be interpreted as the production modes of public goods of different cooperation systems. A further analysis revealed that the strong player adopts a pure strategy but mixed strategies for the weak players to produce the public good, and that the probability of volunteering by weak players decreases with increasing group size or decreasing cost-benefit ratio. Our model shows that the defection probability of a “strong” player is greater than the “weak” players in the model of Diekmann (1993). This contradicts Selten's (1980) model that public goods can only be produced by a strong player, is not an evolutionarily stable strategy, and will therefore disappear over evolutionary time. Our public good model with ESS has thus extended previous interpretations that the public good can only be produced by strong players in an asymmetric game. PMID:25111781

  14. Asymmetric disassembly and robustness in declining networks

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms that enable declining networks to avert structural collapse and performance degradation are not well understood. This knowledge gap reflects a shortage of data on declining networks and an emphasis on models of network growth. Analyzing >700,000 transactions between firms in the New York garment industry over 19 years, we tracked this network's decline and measured how its topology and global performance evolved. We find that favoring asymmetric (disassortative) links is key to preserving the topology and functionality of the declining network. Based on our findings, we tested a model of network decline that combines an asymmetric disassembly process for contraction with a preferential attachment process for regrowth. Our simulation results indicate that the model can explain robustness under decline even if the total population of nodes contracts by more than an order of magnitude, in line with our observations for the empirical network. These findings suggest that disassembly mechanisms are not simply assembly mechanisms in reverse and that our model is relevant to understanding the process of decline and collapse in a broad range of biological, technological, and financial networks. PMID:18936489

  15. Asymmetric disassembly and robustness in declining networks.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2008-10-28

    Mechanisms that enable declining networks to avert structural collapse and performance degradation are not well understood. This knowledge gap reflects a shortage of data on declining networks and an emphasis on models of network growth. Analyzing >700,000 transactions between firms in the New York garment industry over 19 years, we tracked this network's decline and measured how its topology and global performance evolved. We find that favoring asymmetric (disassortative) links is key to preserving the topology and functionality of the declining network. Based on our findings, we tested a model of network decline that combines an asymmetric disassembly process for contraction with a preferential attachment process for regrowth. Our simulation results indicate that the model can explain robustness under decline even if the total population of nodes contracts by more than an order of magnitude, in line with our observations for the empirical network. These findings suggest that disassembly mechanisms are not simply assembly mechanisms in reverse and that our model is relevant to understanding the process of decline and collapse in a broad range of biological, technological, and financial networks.

  16. Limit laws for the asymmetric inclusion process.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Eliazar, Iddo; Yechiali, Uri

    2012-12-01

    The Asymmetric Inclusion Process (ASIP) is a unidirectional lattice-gas flow model which was recently introduced as an exactly solvable 'Bosonic' counterpart of the 'Fermionic' asymmetric exclusion process. An iterative algorithm that allows the computation of the probability generating function (PGF) of the ASIP's steady state exists but practical considerations limit its applicability to small ASIP lattices. Large lattices, on the other hand, have been studied primarily via Monte Carlo simulations and were shown to display a wide spectrum of intriguing statistical phenomena. In this paper we bypass the need for direct computation of the PGF and explore the ASIP's asymptotic statistical behavior. We consider three different limiting regimes: heavy-traffic regime, large-system regime, and balanced-system regime. In each of these regimes we obtain-analytically and in closed form-stochastic limit laws for five key ASIP observables: traversal time, overall load, busy period, first occupied site, and draining time. The results obtained yield a detailed limit-laws perspective of the ASIP, numerical simulations demonstrate the applicability of these laws as useful approximations.

  17. Asymmetric dimethylarginine level in hyperglycemic gestation.

    PubMed

    Sertkaya, Ayse Cikim; Kafkasli, Ayse; Turkcuoglu, Ilgin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations and its relation with insulin sensitivity/resistance indices in pregnant women with different degrees of carbohydrate intolerance. This study included a two step approach; 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) followed by 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was used for diagnosis of carbohydrate intolerance within 24-28th weeks of gestation. Pregnant women with positive GCT but negative OGTT (AGCT group, n=30) and gestational diabetics (GDM group, n=58) were compared to healthy pregnant controls (n=50). Plasma ADMA concentration and its relationship with glucose and insulin levels and insulin sensitivity/resistance indices (HOMA-IR, QUICKI, ISIOGTT) were evaluated. Both AGCT and GDM groups were found to have similarly higher plasma ADMA levels than control subjects (3.60±1.21; 4.00±1.70; 2.65±0.82 μmol/l, respectively, P=0.001). ADMA was significantly but slightly correlated with insulin sensitivity/resistance indices and moderately correlated with 2-h insulin level. The 2-h insulin value of the OGTT was the independent influencing constant for ADMA (R=0.57, P=0.0001). In conclusion, plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine level was higher in cases with abnormal glucose challenge test but normal OGTT as well as in gestational diabetics, compared to pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance. The elevated ADMA level in pregnant women with carbohydrate intolerance may possibly be due to elevated insulin level.

  18. Asymmetric Cell Divisions in the Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Poulson, Nicholas D.; Lechler, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Generation of three-dimensional tissue with distinct cell types is required for the development of all organs. On its own, mitotic spindle orientation allows tissues to change in length or shape. In combination with intrinsic or extrinsic cues this can also be coupled to the generation of diverse cell fates - a process known as asymmetric cell division (ACD). Understanding ACD’s has been greatly aided by studies in invertebrate model systems, where genetics and live imaging have provided the basis for much of what we know. ACD’s also drive the development and differentiation of the epidermis in mammals. While similar to the invertebrate models, the epidermis is distinct in balancing symmetric and asymmetric divisions to yield a tissue of the correct surface area and thickness. Here we review the roles of spindle orientation in driving both morphogenesis and cell fate decisions. We highlight the epidermis as a unique model system to study not only basic mechanisms of ACD, but also to study their regulation during development. PMID:22449491

  19. Prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationship.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, Faraj; Roy, Rino; Al-Jame, Badreia

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of occlusal asymmetries in the molar and canine regions in a large population-based sample of adolescent Kuwaitis. Using a stratified cluster sampling method, 1299 Kuwaiti adolescents (674 boys mean age 13.3 years and 625 girls mean age 13.2 years), representing approximately 6.7 per cent of that age stratum in the population, were examined clinically for sagittal molar and canine relationships, with a view to recording half and full-step asymmetries. In this sample, 1244 subjects were examined clinically, while for the remaining 55, pre-treatment study models were assessed. All subjects were in the early permanent dentition stage. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to determine the proportion of different molar and canine asymmetries. Antero-posterior asymmetries were found to be a distinctive and common feature of the dental arches, with half-step outweighing full-step asymmetries both in the anterior and posterior regions. The total prevalence of an asymmetric molar or canine relationship was 29.7 and 41.4 per cent, respectively, with more than 95 per cent falling in the mild category. Patient gender did not influence the prevalence or magnitude of asymmetry. The results showed a clinically significant prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationships, which were mainly in the category of half-step asymmetry. Class II half and full-step asymmetries were more prevalent than Class III asymmetries in the molar and canine regions.

  20. Asymmetric negotiation in structured language games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2008-02-01

    We propose an asymmetric negotiation strategy to investigate the influence of high-degree agents on the agreement dynamics in a structured language game, the naming game. We introduce a model parameter, which governs the frequency of high-degree agents acting as speakers in communication. It is found that there exists an optimal value of the parameter that induces the fastest convergence to a global consensus on naming an object for both scale-free and small-world naming games. This phenomenon indicates that, although a strong influence of high-degree agents favors consensus achievement, very strong influences inhibit the convergence process, making it even slower than in the absence of influence of high-degree agents. Investigation of the total memory used by agents implies that there is some trade-off between the convergence speed and the required total memory. Other quantities, including the evolution of the number of different names and the relationship between agents’ memories and their degrees, are also studied. The results are helpful for better understanding of the dynamics of the naming game with asymmetric negotiation strategy.

  1. Particle identification at an asymmetric B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, P.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Oddone, P.; Ratcliff, B.; Roe, N.; Va'vra, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

    1991-09-01

    Particle identification systems are an important component of any detector at a high-luminosity, asymmetric B Factory. In particular, excellent hadron identification is required to probe CP violation in B{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates. The particle identification systems discussed below also provide help in separating leptons from hadrons at low momenta. We begin this chapter with a discussion of the physics motivation for providing particle identification, the inherent limitations due to interactions and decays in flight, and the requirements for hermiticity and angular coverage. A special feature of an asymmetric B Factory is the resulting asymmetry in the momentum distribution as a function of polar angle; this will also be quantified and discussed. In the next section the three primary candidates, time-of-flight (TOF), energy loss (dE/dx), and Cerenkov counters, both ring-imaging and threshold, will be briefly described and evaluated. Following this, one of the candidates, a long-drift Cerenkov ring-imaging device, is described in detail to provide a reference design. Design considerations for a fast RICH are then described. A detailed discussion of aerogel threshold counter designs and associated R D conclude the chapter. 56 refs., 64 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Coil-Type Asymmetric Supercapacitor Electrical Cables.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zenan; Moore, Julian; Calderon, Jean; Zhai, Lei; Thomas, Jayan

    2015-10-21

    Cable-shaped supercapacitors (SCs) have recently aroused significant attention due to their attractive properties such as small size, lightweight, and bendability. Current cable-shaped SCs have symmetric device configuration. However, if an asymmetric design is used in cable-shaped supercapacitors, they would become more attractive due to broader cell operation voltages, which results in higher energy densities. Here, a novel coil-type asymmetric supercapacitor electrical cable (CASEC) is reported with enhanced cell operation voltage and extraordinary mechanical-electrochemical stability. The CASECs show excellent charge-discharge profiles, extraordinary rate capability (95.4%), high energy density (0.85 mWh cm(-3)), remarkable flexibility and bendability, and superior bending cycle stability (≈93.0% after 4000 cycles at different bending states). In addition, the CASECs not only exhibit the capability to store energy but also to transmit electricity simultaneously and independently. The integrated electrical conduction and storage capability of CASECS offer many potential applications in solar energy storage and electronic gadgets. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Modeling Normal Shock Velocity Curvature Relation for Heterogeneous Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sunhee; Crochet, Michael; Pemberton, Steve

    2015-06-01

    The normal shock velocity and curvature, Dn(κ) , relation on a detonation shock surface has been an important functional quantity to measure to understand the shock strength exerted against the material interface between a main explosive charge and the case of an explosive munition. The Dn(κ) relation is considered an intrinsic property of an explosive, and can be experimentally deduced by rate stick tests at various charge diameters. However, experimental measurements of the Dn(κ) relation for heterogeneous explosives such as PBXN-111 are challenging due to the non-smoothness and asymmetry usually observed in the experimental streak records of explosion fronts. Out of the many possibilities, the asymmetric character may be attributed to the heterogeneity of the explosives, a hypothesis which begs two questions: (1) is there any simple hydrodynamic model that can explain such an asymmetric shock evolution, and (2) what statistics can be derived for the asymmetry using simulations with defined structural heterogeneity in the unreacted explosive? Saenz, Taylor and Stewart studied constitutive models for derivation of the Dn(κ) relation on porous `homogeneous' explosives and carried out simulations in a spherical coordinate frame. In this paper, we extend their model to account for `heterogeneity' and present shock evolutions in heterogeneous explosives using 2-D hydrodynamic simulations with some statistical examination. (96TW-2015-0004)

  4. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) evaluation of flow modification in aneurysm phantoms using asymmetric stents.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Hoi, Y; Meng, H; Rudin, S

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetric stents are promising new devices for endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular aneurysms. For in vitro experiment a patch made of stainless steel mesh is directly attached onto a standard stent and deployed so that the patch is placed over the aneurysm orifice. Thus we modify substantially the flow into the aneurysm and decrease the shear stress on the aneurysm walls. We used mesh-patches having different permeabilities and evaluated the flow using Particle Image Velocimetry. PIV provides instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a cross-section of flow containing reflective micro-particles. A pulsed-laser light sheet illuminates the flow in the target area and images are acquired using a CCD camera. By registering the position of the particles in two successive images the fluid velocity vectors components are calculated. From the 2D velocity field a best polynomial fit is made to obtain a smooth function of each velocity with respect to the coordinates. Using the fit, we derived the values of quantities of interest in the plane of acquisition such as: tangent shear stress, vorticity and inflow. We used four meshes of different permeabilities. We found out that by using lower permeability meshes we create better conditions for the embolization of the aneurysm.

  5. Single-drop impingement onto a wavy liquid film and description of the asymmetrical cavity dynamics.

    PubMed

    van Hinsberg, Nils Paul; Charbonneau-Grandmaison, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to an experimental investigation of the cavity formed upon a single-drop impingement onto a traveling solitary surface wave on a deep pool of the same liquid. The dynamics of the cavity throughout its complete expansion and receding phase are analyzed using high-speed shadowgraphy and compared to the outcomes of drop impingements onto steady liquid surface films having equal thickness. The effects of the surface wave velocity, amplitude and phase, drop impingement velocity, and liquid viscosity on the cavity's diameter and depth evolution are accurately characterized at various time instants. The wave velocity induces a distinct and in time increasing inclination of the cavity in the wave propagation direction. In particular for strong waves an asymmetrical distribution of the radial expansion and retraction velocity along the cavity's circumference is observed. A linear dependency between the absolute Weber number and the typical length and time scales associated with the cavity's maximum depth and maximum diameter is reported.

  6. Single-drop impingement onto a wavy liquid film and description of the asymmetrical cavity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Nils Paul; Charbonneau-Grandmaison, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to an experimental investigation of the cavity formed upon a single-drop impingement onto a traveling solitary surface wave on a deep pool of the same liquid. The dynamics of the cavity throughout its complete expansion and receding phase are analyzed using high-speed shadowgraphy and compared to the outcomes of drop impingements onto steady liquid surface films having equal thickness. The effects of the surface wave velocity, amplitude and phase, drop impingement velocity, and liquid viscosity on the cavity's diameter and depth evolution are accurately characterized at various time instants. The wave velocity induces a distinct and in time increasing inclination of the cavity in the wave propagation direction. In particular for strong waves an asymmetrical distribution of the radial expansion and retraction velocity along the cavity's circumference is observed. A linear dependency between the absolute Weber number and the typical length and time scales associated with the cavity's maximum depth and maximum diameter is reported.

  7. Stochastic optimal velocity model and its long-lived metastability.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic cellular automaton model of traffic flow extending two exactly solvable stochastic models, i.e., the asymmetric simple exclusion process and the zero range process. Moreover, it is regarded as a stochastic extension of the optimal velocity model. In the fundamental diagram (flux-density diagram), our model exhibits several regions of density where more than one stable state coexists at the same density in spite of the stochastic nature of its dynamical rule. Moreover, we observe that two long-lived metastable states appear for a transitional period, and that the dynamical phase transition from a metastable state to another metastable/stable state occurs sharply and spontaneously.

  8. Analytical study of flow and heat transfer in an annular porous medium subject to asymmetrical heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huijin; Zhao, Changying; Vafai, Kambiz

    2017-08-01

    Fully developed forced convective heat transfer in an annulus filled with a porous medium subject to asymmetrical heating is investigated analytically with different models in this work. The classic Darcy and Brinkman models were employed for the fluid flow, while the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and the local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) models were employed to describe the heat transfer process in porous media. An analytical model based on fin theory was also employed for analyzing this problem. Exact solutions with Darcy-LTNE, Darcy-LTE, Brinkman-LTNE, Brinkman-LTE, and the fin models were obtained. Among these solutions, the Brinkman-LTNE solution can be treated as the benchmark, as it is a complete model, which covers the effect of viscous force near the solid wall and the temperature difference between the solid and fluid phases. The basic parameters that affect the velocity and temperature fields were analyzed in depth. The velocity and temperature profiles with these different models were also presented. The effects of some critical parameters on thermal performance of asymmetrically heated annulus fitted with a porous medium were discussed. The cited different analytical models were compared in detail with each other. The critical heat flux (HF) ratios for the inner and outer walls were presented in terms of a Nu- ξ curve for the five models. These solutions were developed for an asymmetrically heated annular channel filled with a porous medium, which can predict the thermal performance within a wide range of radii and HF ratios.

  9. Velocity difference statistics in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunghwan; Swinney, Harry L

    2005-08-01

    We unify two approaches that have been taken to explain the non-Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDFs) obtained in measurements of longitudinal velocity differences in turbulence, and we apply our approach to Couette-Taylor turbulence data. The first approach we consider was developed by Castaing and co-workers, who obtained the non-Gaussian velocity difference PDF from a superposition of Gaussian distributions for subsystems that have a particular energy dissipation rate at a fixed length scale [Castaing, Physica D 46, 177 (1990)]. Another approach was proposed by Beck and Cohen, who showed that the observed PDFs can be obtained from a superposition of Gaussian velocity difference PDFs in subsystems conditioned on the value of an intensive variable (inverse "effective temperature") in each subsystem [Beck and Cohen, Physica A 322, 267 (2003)]. The intensive variable was defined for subsystems assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, but no method was proposed for determining the size of a subsystem. We show that the Castaing and Beck-Cohen methods are related, and we present a way to determine subsystem size in the Beck-Cohen method. The application of our approach to Couette-Taylor turbulence (Reynolds number 540,000) yields a log-normal distribution of the intensive parameter, and the resultant velocity difference PDF agrees well the observed non-Gaussian velocity difference PDFs.

  10. Calibration method helps in seismic velocity interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, C.E.; Davenport, H.A.; Wilhelm, R.

    1997-11-03

    Acoustic velocities derived from seismic reflection data, when properly calibrated to subsurface measurements, help interpreters make pure velocity predictions. A method of calibrating seismic to measured velocities has improved interpretation of subsurface features in the Gulf of Mexico. In this method, the interpreter in essence creates a kind of gauge. Properly calibrated, the gauge enables the interpreter to match predicted velocities to velocities measured at wells. Slow-velocity zones are of special interest because they sometimes appear near hydrocarbon accumulations. Changes in velocity vary in strength with location; the structural picture is hidden unless the variations are accounted for by mapping in depth instead of time. Preliminary observations suggest that the presence of hydrocarbons alters the lithology in the neighborhood of the trap; this hydrocarbon effect may be reflected in the rock velocity. The effect indicates a direct use of seismic velocity in exploration. This article uses the terms seismic velocity and seismic stacking velocity interchangeably. It uses ground velocity, checkshot average velocity, and well velocity interchangeably. Interval velocities are derived from seismic stacking velocities or well average velocities; they refer to velocities of subsurface intervals or zones. Interval travel time (ITT) is the reciprocal of interval velocity in microseconds per foot.

  11. Tangential Velocity Measurement Using Interferometric MTI Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY, ARMIN W.; MILESHOSKY, BRIAN P.; BICKEL, DOUGLAS L.

    2002-11-01

    An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity vector of a target.

  12. Double aromaticity in transition metal centered double-ring boron clusters M@B2n (M = Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn; n = 6, 7, 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang; Cheng, Longjiu; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that double-ring boron clusters have got the special double aromaticity with delocalized π orbitals in two directions (tangential and radial), which are potential ligands centered by a transition metal. In this article, the transition metal centered double-ring boron clusters M@B2n (M = Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn; n = 6, 7, 8) are theoretically investigated by density functional theory calculations. These endohedral compounds have also got double aromaticity in both tangential and radial directions. Interestingly, the tangential delocalized π orbitals of boron ligands following the Huckle's (4n + 2) rule do not interact with the central metal, while the radial π orbitals of boron ligands are bonded with the central mental to form spd-π endohedral bonding. The spd-π endohedral bonding follows the 18e-principle in Ni@B14 and Fe@B16. However, due to the flat shape of the compounds, 14e (Cr@B14) and 16e (Ni@B12) can also be electronically very stable where the energy levels of the spd-π orbitals delocalized in z-direction rise up. This intriguing bonding model makes sense in further study of the boron chemistry.

  13. Structural phase stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of alkali metal hydrides AMH4 (A=Li, Na; M=B, AL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-01-01

    The structural stability of Alkali metal hydrides AMH4 (A=Li, Na; M=B, Al) is analyzed among the various crystal structures, namely hexagonal (P63mc), tetragonal (P42/nmc), tetragonal (P-421c), tetragonal (I41/a), orthorhombic (Pnma) and monoclinic (P21/c). It is observed that, orthorhombic (Pnma) phase is the most stable structure for LiBH4, monoclinic (P21/c) for LiAlH4, tetragonal (P42/nmc) for NaBH4 and tetragonal (I41/a) for NaAlH4 at normal pressure. Pressure induced structural phase transitions are observed in LiBH4, LiAlH4, NaBH4 and NaAlH4 at the pressures of 4 GPa, 36.1 GPa, 26.5 GPa and 46 GPa respectively. The electronic structure reveals that these metal hydrides are wide band gap insulators. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these metal hydrides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  14. The hydrology of inland valleys in the sub-humid zone of West Africa: rainfall-runoff processes in the M'bé experimental watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiyandima, Mutsa C.; van de Giesen, Nick; Diatta, Sitapha; Windmeijer, Pieter N.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2003-04-01

    Inland valleys with wet lowlands are an important water source for farming communities in the sub-humid zone of West Africa. An inland valley and surrounding contributing watershed area located in the sub-humid zone near M'bé in central Côte d'Ivoire was instrumented to study surface runoff and base flow mechanisms. Four flumes at different distances down the main stream and more than 100 piezometers were installed. Measurements were taken during two rainfall seasons in 1998 and 1999. Under initial wet conditions, a typical single-peak hydrograph was observed. Under low antecedent moisture conditions, however, runoff was characterized by a double-peaked hydrograph. The first peak, which occurred during the storm, was caused by rain falling on the saturated valley bottom. The second peak was delayed by minutes to hours from the first peak and consisted of rain flowing via the subsurface of the hydromorphic zone that surrounds the valley bottom. The duration of the delay was a function of the water table depth in the hydromorphic zone before the storm. The volume of the second peak constituted the largest portion of the stream flow.

  15. Iron-, Cobalt-, and Nickel-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation and Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Yu, Shen-Luan; Shen, Wei-Yi; Gao, Jing-Xing

    2015-09-15

    Chiral alcohols are important building blocks in the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries. The enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by transition metal complexes, especially asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) and asymmetric hydrogenation (AH), is one of the most efficient and practical methods for producing chiral alcohols. In both academic laboratories and industrial operations, catalysts based on noble metals such as ruthenium, rhodium, and iridium dominated the asymmetric reduction of ketones. However, the limited availability, high price, and toxicity of these critical metals demand their replacement with abundant, nonprecious, and biocommon metals. In this respect, the reactions catalyzed by first-row transition metals, which are more abundant and benign, have attracted more and more attention. As one of the most abundant metals on earth, iron is inexpensive, environmentally benign, and of low toxicity, and as such it is a fascinating alternative to the precious metals for catalysis and sustainable chemical manufacturing. However, iron catalysts have been undeveloped compared to other transition metals. Compared with the examples of iron-catalyzed asymmetric reduction, cobalt- and nickel-catalyzed ATH and AH of ketones are even seldom reported. In early 2004, we reported the first ATH of ketones with catalysts generated in situ from iron cluster complex and chiral PNNP ligand. Since then, we have devoted ourselves to the development of ATH and AH of ketones with iron, cobalt, and nickel catalysts containing novel chiral aminophosphine ligands. In our study, the iron catalyst containing chiral aminophosphine ligands, which are expected to control the stereochemistry at the metal atom, restrict the number of possible diastereoisomers, and effectively transfer chiral information, are successful catalysts for enantioselective reduction of ketones. Among these novel chiral aminophosphine ligands, 22-membered macrocycle P2N4

  16. Signal velocity in oscillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantos, C. E.; Veerman, J. J. P.; Hammond, D. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a system of coupled oscillators on the circle, which arises from a simple model for behavior of large numbers of autonomous vehicles where the acceleration of each vehicle depends on the relative positions and velocities between itself and a set of local neighbors. After describing necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability, we derive expressions for the phase velocity of propagation of disturbances in velocity through this system. We show that the high frequencies exhibit damping, which implies existence of well-defined signal velocitiesc+ > 0 and c- < 0 such that low frequency disturbances travel through the flock as f+(x - c+t) in the direction of increasing agent numbers and f-(x - c-t) in the other.

  17. Geostatistical Modeling of Pore Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Devary, J.L.; Doctor, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    A significant part of evaluating a geologic formation as a nuclear waste repository involves the modeling of contaminant transport in the surrounding media in the event the repository is breached. The commonly used contaminant transport models are deterministic. However, the spatial variability of hydrologic field parameters introduces uncertainties into contaminant transport predictions. This paper discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to the modeling of spatially varying hydrologic field parameters required as input to contaminant transport analyses. Kriging estimation techniques were applied to Hanford Reservation field data to calculate hydraulic conductivity and the ground-water potential gradients. These quantities were statistically combined to estimate the groundwater pore velocity and to characterize the pore velocity estimation error. Combining geostatistical modeling techniques with product error propagation techniques results in an effective stochastic characterization of groundwater pore velocity, a hydrologic parameter required for contaminant transport analyses.

  18. Cosmic string induced peculiar velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dalen, Anthony; Schramm, David N.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers the scenario of a flat universe with a network of heavy cosmic strings as the primordial fluctuation spectrum. The joint probability of finding streaming velocities of at least 600 km/s on large scales and local peculiar velocities of less than 800 km/s is calculated. It is shown how the effects of loops breaking up and being born with a spectrum of sizes can be estimated. It is found that to obtain large-scale streaming velocities of at least 600 km/s, it is necessary that either a large value for beta G mu exist or the effect of loop fissioning and production details be considerable.

  19. Photonic integration using asymmetric twin-waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenkov, Pavel V.

    A novel approach to fabrication of monolithic photonic integrated circuits based on the asymmetric twin- waveguide (ATG) structure is proposed and demonstrated. In contrast to the conventional integration methods relying on semiconductor regrowth, the ATG approach requires only one epitaxy step, while the integrated devices are defined by post-growth patterning. The ATG structure contains two evanescently coupled waveguide layers separated by a cladding layer. The upper layer provides optical gain for the active devices such as lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers. The transparent lower layer is used to make waveguides and optical interconnects on the chip. Thus the ATG represents a versatile integration platform for cost- effective fabrication of photonic integrated circuits, similar in some respects to the electronic CMOS platform. Light propagation and coupling in the ATG structure are analyzed using the beam propagation method to optimize the layer design. It is shown that the asymmetric refractive index profile eliminates undesirable optical coupling between the waveguide layers. At the interfaces between the active and passive devices, lateral tapers are used to induce vertical coupling of light with a coupling loss of typically <1 dB. Therefore various integrated devices can be separately optimized to achieve performance close to that of the conventional discrete components. The design of taper couplers is described in detail, and their performance is experimentally verified. Using the ATG approach, several integrated devices were fabricated in the InGaAsP/InP material system for λ = 1.55 μm wavelength operation. Lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers with integrated waveguides were characterized to test the integration approach. Single-frequency, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers achieved output power of 11 mW with a 40 dB side-mode suppression ratio. A DBR laser with integrated electroabsorption modulator had a 24 dB extinction ratio

  20. Alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric reactions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Yamashita, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-18

    The group 2 alkaline earth metals calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) are among the most common elements on Earth, abundant in both the sea and the Earth's crust. Although they are familiar in our daily lives, their application to organic synthesis has, so far, been limited. Some particularly useful properties of these elements include (i) low electronegativity, (ii) a stable oxidation state of +2, meaning that they can potentially form two covalent bonds with anions, and (iii) the ability to occupy a variety of coordination sites due to their large ionic radius. Furthermore, the alkaline earth metals, found between the group 1 and group 3 elements, show mild but significant Lewis acidity, which can be harnessed to control coordinative molecules via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Taken together, these characteristics make the metals Ca, Sr, and Ba very promising components of highly functionalized acid-base catalysts. In this Account, we describe the development of chiral alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Recently prepared chiral alkaline earth metal complexes have shown high diastereo- and enantioselectivities in fundamental and important chemical transformations. We chose chiral bisoxazoline (Box) derivatives bearing a methylene tether as a ligand for chiral modification. These molecules are very useful because they can covalently coordinate to alkaline earth metals in a bidentate fashion through deprotonation of the tether portion. It was found that chiral calcium-Box complexes could successfully promote catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Both the calcium-Box complexes and chiral strontium-bis-sulfonamide and chiral barium-BINOLate complexes could catalyze asymmetric 1,4-addition reactions with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, we designed a calcium-neutral coordinative ligand complex as a new type of chiral alkaline

  1. Asymmetric perfectly matched layer for the absorption of waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-02-10

    The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) has become a standard for comparison in the techniques that have been developed to close the system of Maxwell equations (more generally wave equations) when simulating an open system. The original Berenger PML formulation relies on a split version of Maxwell equations with numerical electric and magnetic conductivities. They present here an extension of this formulation which introduces counterparts of the electric and magnetic conductivities affecting the term which is spatially differentiated in the equations. they phase velocity along each direction is also multiplied by an additional coefficient. They show that, under certain constraints on the additional numerical coefficients, this ''medium'' does not generate any reflection at any angle and any frequency and is then a Perfectly Matched Layer. Technically it is a super-set of Berenger's PML to which it reduces for a specific set of parameters and like it, it is anisotropic. However, unlike the PML, it introduces some asymmetry in the absorption rate and is therefore labeled an APML for Asymmetric Perfectly Matched Layer. They present here the numerical considerations that have led them to introduce such a medium as well as its theory. Several finite-different numerical implementations are derived (in one, two and three dimensions) and the performance of the APML is contrasted with that of the PML in one and two dimensions. Using plane wave analysis, they show that the APML implementations lead to higher absorption rates than the considered PML implementations. Although they have considered in this paper the finite-different discretization of Maxwell-like equations only, the APML system of equations may be used with other discretization schemes, such as finite-elements, and may be applied to other equations, for applications beyond electromagnetics.

  2. Effect of asymmetric auxin application on Helianthus hypocotyl curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migliaccio, F.; Rayle, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid was applied asymmetrically to the hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings. After 5 hours on a clinostat, auxin gradients as small as 1 to 1.3 produced substantial (more than 60 degrees) hypocotyl curvature. This result suggests the asymmetric growth underlying hypocotyl gravitropism can be explained by lateral auxin redistribution.

  3. Current Large Deviations for Asymmetric Exclusion Processes with Open Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.

    2006-04-01

    We study the large deviation functional of the current for the Weakly Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process in contact with two reservoirs. We compare this functional in the large drift limit to the one of the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, in particular to the Jensen-Varadhan functional. Conjectures for generalizing the Jensen-Varadhan functional to open systems are also stated.

  4. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  5. Ultrathin-skinned asymmetric membranes by immiscible solvents treatment

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.

    1989-11-28

    Improved semipermeable asymmetric fluid separation membranes useful in gas, vapor and liquid separations are disclosed. The membranes are prepared by substantially filling the pores of asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membranes having a finely porous layer on one side thereof with a water immiscible organic liquid, followed by contacting the finely porous layer with water.

  6. New optimal asymmetric quantum codes from constacyclic codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanghui; Chen, Bocong; Li, Liangchen

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we construct two classes of asymmetric quantum codes by using constacyclic codes. The first class is the asymmetric quantum codes with parameters [[q2 + 1, q2 + 1 - 2(t + k + 1), (2k + 2)/(2t + 2)

  7. Effects of Noise on Asymmetric Bidirectional Controlled Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yi-you; Sang, Ming-huang

    2016-11-01

    We present a scheme for asymmetric bidirectional controlled teleportation via a six-qubit cluster state in noisy environments, which includes the phase-damping and amplitude-damping channels. We analytically derive the fidelities of the asymmetric bidirectional controlled teleportation process in these two noise channels. We show that the fidelities only depend on the initial state and the noisy rate.

  8. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  9. Information Fusion and Visualisation in Anti Asymmetric Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Information Fusion and Visualisation in Anti Asymmetric Warfare Felix Opitz, Thilo Trapp, Kaeye Dästner, Thomas Kausch Defence and Communications...Anti Asymmetric Warfare Felix Opitz, Thilo Trapp, Kaeye Dästner, Thomas Kausch IST-063/RWS-010 Workshop on Visualising Network Information Seite 2

  10. Mouse blastomeres acquire ability to divide asymmetrically before compaction

    PubMed Central

    Kłoś, Piotr; Maleszewski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    The mouse preimplantation embryo generates the precursors of trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) during the 8- to 16-cell stage transition, when the apico-basal polarized blastomeres undergo divisions that give rise to cells with different fate. Asymmetric segregation of polar domain at 8–16 cell division generate two cell types, polar cells which adopt an outer position and develop in TE and apolar cells which are allocated to inner position as the precursors of ICM. It is still not know when the blastomeres of 8-cell stage start to be determined to undergo asymmetric division. Here, we analyze the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric divisions of blastomeres isolated from 8-cell stage embryo before and after compaction. Using p-Ezrin as the polarity marker we found that size of blastomeres in 2/16 pairs cannot be used as a criterion for distinguishing symmetric and asymmetric divisions. Our results showed that at early 8-cell stage, before any visible signs of cortical polarity, a subset of blastomeres had been already predestined to divide asymmetrically. We also showed that almost all of 8-cell stage blastomeres isolated from compacted embryo divide asymmetrically, whereas in intact embryos, the frequency of asymmetric divisions is significantly lower. Therefore we conclude that in intact embryo the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric division is regulated by cell-cell interactions. PMID:28362853

  11. Asymmetric Type F Botulism with Cranial Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Jessica A.; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C. Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N.; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients. PMID:22257488

  12. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  13. Asymmetric crying face in a newborn with isotretinoin embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarici, Dilek; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Kurtoglu, Selim; Uzum, Kazim; Kiraz, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    We report a newborn with asymmetric crying face and other anomalies whose mother had taken isotretinoin during the first month of pregnancy. We hypothesize that asymmetric crying face is a finding of retinoic acid embryopathy and results from the intrauterine effects of retinoic acid on the development of the depressor anguli oris muscle or the mandibular branch of the facial nerve.

  14. Asymmetric turbulent boundary layers along long thin circular cylinders at low-Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen A.

    2015-09-01

    Notable deviations of the asymmetric turbulent boundary layer (TBL) statistics from their axisymmetric counterpart along long thin circular cylinders are vitally important to the naval and oceanographic jurisdictions. Although the available experimental evidence backs their concern, the realm of parametric variability (both geometric and kinematic) is extremely limited to draw solid conclusions. We know that only small misalignments which quantify less than one degree of incidence between the freestream and the straight cylinder axis can substantially alter the boundary layer thicknesses, mean axial velocity, and Reynolds stresses. But the statistical database is plainly inadequate to justify modifying the design tools that were founded solely for axisymmetric flow conditions. Herein, we begin rectifying this drawback by numerical means. The investigation centers on low turbulent Reynolds numbers (500 ≤ Rea ≤ 2500) and small angles-of-incidence (0° < α < 9°) to validate and complement the lions-share of the present database (Rea = aUo/ν, where a, Uo, and ν are the cylinder radius, freestream velocity, and kinematic viscosity, respectively). In particular, we numerically resolved the statistical responses of the TBL, mean axial velocity, Reynolds stresses, and skin friction under angles-of-incidence up to the earliest signs of Strouhal-type shedding. Clearly, the first prominent response was the thinning and thickening of the TBL along the respective windward and leeward sides to only a minor misalignment. Tilting the straight cylinder to slightly higher yaw angles transformed the TBL to a transitional boundary layer along the windward side for all simulated Reynolds numbers. For yaw angles α > 2°, all turbulent statistics of the asymmetric boundary layer were measurably dissimilar to those of the axisymmetric state.

  15. Turbulent flow separation in three-dimensional asymmetric diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyapaul, Elbert

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent three-dimensional flow separation is more complicated than 2-D. The physics of the flow is not well understood. Turbulent flow separation is nearly independent of the Reynolds number, and separation in 3-D occurs at singular points and along convergence lines emanating from these points. Most of the engineering turbulence research is driven by the need to gain knowledge of the flow field that can be used to improve modeling predictions. This work is motivated by the need for a detailed study of 3-D separation in asymmetric diffusers, to understand the separation phenomena using eddy-resolving simulation methods, assess the predictability of existing RANS turbulence models and propose modeling improvements. The Cherry diffuser has been used as a benchmark. All existing linear eddy-viscosity RANS models k--o SST,k--epsilon and v2- f fail in predicting such flows, predicting separation on the wrong side. The geometry has a doubly-sloped wall, with the other two walls orthogonal to each other and aligned with the diffuser inlet giving the diffuser an asymmetry. The top and side flare angles are different and this gives rise to different pressure gradient in each transverse direction. Eddyresolving simulations using the Scale adaptive simulation (SAS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method have been used to predict separation in benchmark diffuser and validated. A series of diffusers with the same configuration have been generated, each having the same streamwise pressure gradient and parametrized only by the inlet aspect ratio. The RANS models were put to test and the flow physics explored using SAS-generated flow field. The RANS model indicate a transition in separation surface from top sloped wall to the side sloped wall at an inlet aspect ratio much lower than observed in LES results. This over-sensitivity of RANS models to transverse pressure gradients is due to lack of anisotropy in the linear Reynolds stress formulation. The complexity of the flow

  16. Asymmetric selection and the evolution of extraordinary defences.

    PubMed

    Urban, Mark C; Bürger, Reinhard; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists typically predict future evolutionary responses to natural selection by analysing evolution on an adaptive landscape. Much theory assumes symmetric fitness surfaces even though many stabilizing selection gradients deviate from symmetry. Here we revisit Lande's adaptive landscape and introduce novel analytical theory that includes asymmetric selection. Asymmetric selection and the resulting skewed trait distributions bias equilibrium mean phenotypes away from fitness peaks, usually toward the flatter shoulder of the individual fitness surface. We apply this theory to explain a longstanding paradox in biology and medicine: the evolution of excessive defences against enemies. These so-called extraordinary defences can evolve in response to asymmetrical selection when marginal risks of insufficient defence exceed marginal costs of excessive defence. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks between population abundances and asymmetric selection further exaggerate these defences. Recognizing the effect of asymmetrical selection on evolutionary trajectories will improve the accuracy of predictions and suggest novel explanations for apparent sub-optimality.

  17. Field evaluation of an asymmetric directional microphone fitting.

    PubMed

    Cord, Mary T; Walden, Brian E; Surr, Rauna K; Dittberner, Andrew B

    2007-03-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests that an asymmetric microphone fitting (omnidirectional processing in one ear and directional processing in the other) can provide a directional advantage in background noise that is as great, or nearly as great, as that provided by binaural directional processing (Bentler et al, 2004). The present study investigated whether the potential benefit of an asymmetric fitting observed in the laboratory extends to real-life listening. Specifically, ease of listening was compared across a variety of real-life listening situations for asymmetric microphone fittings and bilateral omnidirectional processing. These ratings were compared to determine whether the asymmetric fitting provided an advantage in listening situations in which directional microphone processing is generally preferred and/or a disadvantage in listening situations in which omnidirectional microphone processing is generally preferred. Results suggest that an asymmetric fitting may be a viable option for patients who cannot or do not switch microphone modes.

  18. Metal-Catalyzed Asymmetric Michael Addition in Natural Product Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chunngai; Pu, Fan; Xu, Jing

    2016-12-19

    Asymmetric catalysis for chiral compound synthesis is a rapidly growing field in modern organic chemistry. Asymmetric catalytic processes have been indispensable for the synthesis of enantioselective materials to meet demands from various fields. Michael addition has been used extensively for the construction of C-C bonds under mild conditions. With the discovery and development of organo- and metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions, the synthesis of enantioselective and/or diastereoselective Michael adducts has become possible and increasingly prevalent in the literature. In particular, metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael addition has been employed as a key reaction in natural product synthesis for the construction of contiguous quaternary stereogenic center(s), which is still a difficult task in organic synthesis. Previously reported applications of metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions in natural product synthesis are presented here and discussed in depth.

  19. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission through an acoustic prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ailing; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xi, Yanhui

    2017-08-01

    Narrow bandwidth and complex structure are the main shortcomings of the existing asymmetric acoustic transmission devices. In this letter, a simple broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device is proposed by using an acoustic prism filled with xenon gas. The sound pressure field distributions, the transmission spectra, and the prism angle effect are numerically investigated by using finite element method. The proposed device can always realize asymmetric acoustic transmission for the wave frequency larger than 480 Hz because the wave paths are not influenced by the wave frequencies. The asymmetric acoustic transmission is attributed to normal refraction and total reflection occur at different interfaces. Besides, relatively high transmission efficiency is realized due to the similar impedance between the acoustic prism and background. And the transmitted wave direction can be controlled freely by changing the prism angle. Our design provides a simple method to obtain broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device and has potentials in many applications, such as noise control and medical ultrasound.

  20. Asymmetric division coordinates collective cell migration in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Guilherme; Harrington, Kyle I; Lovegrove, Holly E; Page, Donna J; Chakravartula, Shilpa; Bentley, Katie; Herbert, Shane P

    2016-12-01

    The asymmetric division of stem or progenitor cells generates daughters with distinct fates and regulates cell diversity during tissue morphogenesis. However, roles for asymmetric division in other more dynamic morphogenetic processes, such as cell migration, have not previously been described. Here we combine zebrafish in vivo experimental and computational approaches to reveal that heterogeneity introduced by asymmetric division generates multicellular polarity that drives coordinated collective cell migration in angiogenesis. We find that asymmetric positioning of the mitotic spindle during endothelial tip cell division generates daughters of distinct size with discrete 'tip' or 'stalk' thresholds of pro-migratory Vegfr signalling. Consequently, post-mitotic Vegfr asymmetry drives Dll4/Notch-independent self-organization of daughters into leading tip or trailing stalk cells, and disruption of asymmetry randomizes daughter tip/stalk selection. Thus, asymmetric division seamlessly integrates cell proliferation with collective migration, and, as such, may facilitate growth of other collectively migrating tissues during development, regeneration and cancer invasion.

  1. Asymmetric NMR lineshapes and precision magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Brian

    1996-04-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetic field of asymmetric distribution the observed NMR precession frequency of a liquid will vary with time. We show that the initial frequency corresponds to the mean of the absorption spectrum whereas the final precession frequency corresponds to the peak of the spectrum. Precision magnetometry requires knowledge of the mean so that reliable extrapolation to the zero-time value of the frequency is required. We demonstrate that, as with the narrowing of NMR lines, the effect of atomic motion is to cause the precession frequency to relax in an exponential manner. The importance of these results is discussed in the comparison of proton magnetic resonance in water and NMR in gaseous 0957-0233/7/4/028/img1 for precision magnetometry.

  2. Optical Nonreciprocity in Asymmetric Optomechanical Couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheqi; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yi; Xu, Xinbiao; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-03-01

    We propose an all-optical integrated nonreciprocal device on the optomechanical platform with a large nonreciprocal bandwidth and low operating power. The device is based on an asymmetric silicon coupler consisting of two branches. One of them is a conventional strip waveguide fixed on the substrate, and the other is a freestanding nanostring suspended above a groove in the substrate. When light is launched into the coupler, the optical gradient force between the freestanding nanostring and the underlying substrate leads to the deflection of the nanostring, and finally results in destruction of the initial phase-matching condition between the two branches. The suspended branch would achieve distinct deflections when light is incident from different ports. The simulation results show a nonreciprocal bandwidth of 13.1 nm with operating power of 390 μW. With the advantages of simple structure, low power consumption and large operating bandwidth, our work provides a promising solution for on-chip passive nonreciprocal device.

  3. Polyimides Derived from Novel Asymmetric Benzophenone Dianhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the composition and processes for preparing thermoset polyimides derived from an asymmetric dianhydride, namely 2,3,3',4'-benzophenone dianhydride (a-BTDA) with at least one diamine, and a monofunctional terminal endcaps. The monofunctional terminating groups include 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride ester-acid derivatives, phenylethyl trimellitic anhydride (PETA) and its ester derivatives as well as 3-phenylethynylaniline. The process of polyimide composite comprises impregnating monomer reactants of dianhydride or its ester-acid derivatives, diamine and with monofunctional reactive endcaps into glass, carbon, quartz or synthetic fibers and fabrics, and then stack up into laminates and subsequently heated to between 150-375.degree. C. either at atmosphere or under pressure to promote the curing and crosslinking of the reactive endcaps to form a network of thermoset polyimides.

  4. Asymmetric capillary bridges between contacting spheres.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Timothy P; Bird, James C

    2015-09-15

    When a drop of liquid wets two identical solid spheres, the liquid forms a capillary bridge between the spheres to minimize surface energy. In the absence of external forces, these bridges are typically assumed to be axisymmetric, and the shape that minimizes surface energy can be calculated analytically. However under certain conditions, the bridge is axisymmetrically unstable, and migrates to a non-axisymmetric configuration. The goal of this paper is to characterize these non-axisymmetric capillary bridges. Specifically, we numerically calculate the shape of the capillary bridge between two contacting spheres that minimizes the total surface energy for a given volume and contact angle and compare to experiments. When the bridge is asymmetric, finite element calculations demonstrate that the shape of the bridge is spherical. In general, the bridge shape depends on both volume and contact angle, yet we find the degree of asymmetry is controlled by a single parameter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Towards Tartaric-Acid-Derived Asymmetric Organocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Gratzer, Katharina; Gururaja, Guddeangadi N; Waser, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Tartaric acid is one of the most prominent naturally occurring chiral compounds. Whereas its application in the production of chiral ligands for metal-catalysed reactions has been exhaustively investigated, its potential to provide new organocatalysts has been less extensively explored. Nevertheless, some impressive results, such as the use of TADDOLs as chiral H-bonding catalysts or of tartrate-derived asymmetric quaternary ammonium salt catalysts, have been reported over the last decade. The goal of this article is to provide a representative overview of the potential and the limitations of tartaric acid or TADDOLs in the creation of new organocatalysts and to highlight some of the most spectacular applications of these catalysts, as well as to summarize case studies in which other classes of chiral backbones were better suited. PMID:24194674

  6. Asymmetric quantum dialogue in noisy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Anindita; Shukla, Chitra; Thapliyal, Kishore; Pathak, Anirban; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-02-01

    A notion of asymmetric quantum dialogue (AQD) is introduced. Conventional protocols of quantum dialogue are essentially symmetric as the users (Alice and Bob) can encode the same amount of classical information. In contrast, the proposed scheme for AQD provides different amount of communication powers to Alice and Bob. The proposed scheme offers an architecture, where the entangled state to be used and the encoding scheme to be shared between Alice and Bob depend on the amount of classical information they want to exchange with each other. The general structure for the AQD scheme has been obtained using a group theoretic structure of the operators introduced in Shukla et al. (Phys Lett A 377:518, 2013). The effect of different types of noises (e.g., amplitude damping and phase damping noise) on the proposed scheme is investigated, and it is shown that the proposed scheme for AQD is robust and it uses an optimized amount of quantum resources.

  7. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, A. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Grint, A. N.; Harkness, L. J.; Jones, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Slee, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Simpson, J.

    2008-11-11

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4{pi} ball of germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA)[1] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA)[2] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array) asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  8. Hydrazones as Singular Reagents in Asymmetric Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Matador, Esteban; Monge, David; Lassaletta, José M; Fernández, Rosario

    2016-09-12

    This Minireview summarizes strategies and developments regarding the use of hydrazones as reagents in asymmetric organocatalysis, their distinct roles in nucleophile-electrophile, cycloaddition, and cyclization reactions. The key structural elements governing the reactivity of these reagents in a preferred pathway will be discussed, as well as their different interactions with organocatalysts, leading to diverse activation modes. Along these studies, the synthetic equivalence of N-monoalkyl, N,N-dialkyl, and N-acyl hydrazones with several synthons is also highlighted. Emphasis is also put on the mechanistic studies performed to understand the observed reactivities. Finally, the functional group transformations performed from the available products has also been analyzed, highlighting the synthetic value of these methodologies, which served to access numerous families of valuable multifunctional compounds and nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

  9. Spectral measurements of asymmetrically irradiated capsule backlighters

    DOE PAGES

    Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-09

    Capsule backlighters provide a quasi-continuum x-ray spectrum over a wide range of photon energies. Ideally one irradiates the capsule backlighter symmetrically, however, in complex experimental geometries, this is not always possible. In recent experiments we irradiated capsule backlighters asymmetrically and measured the x-ray spectrum from multiple directions. We will present time-integrated spectra over the photon energy range of ~2-13 keV and time-resolved spectra over the photon energy range of ~2-3 keV. Lastly, we will compare the spectra from different lines of sight to determine if the laser asymmetry results in an angular dependence in the x-ray emission.

  10. Control of Asymmetric Magnetic Perturbations in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Schaffer, Michael J.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Boozer, Allen H.

    2007-10-03

    The sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to very small deviations from the axisymmetry of the magnetic field |δ→(over)Β/→(over)Β|≈ 10–4 is well known. What was not understood until very recently is the importance of the perturbation to the plasma equilibrium in assessing the effects of externally produced asymmetries in the magnetic field, even far from a stability limit. DIII-D and NSTX experiments find that when the deleterious effects of asymmetries are mitigated, the external asymmetric field was often made stronger and with an increased interaction with the magnetic field of the unperturbed equilibrium fields. This paper explains these counter intuitive results. The explanation using ideal perturbed equilibria has important implications for the control of field errors in all toroidal plasmas.

  11. Optically addressed asymmetric Fabry-Perot modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Maserjian, J.

    1991-01-01

    A low power, high contrast optically addressed modulator, operating with normal incidence, has been fabricated. Optically controlled reflection modulation is achieved through optically induced absorption modulation in a periodically delta-doped InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well structure inserted in an integrated asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator. A contrast ratio over 60:1 was measured using a spectrally matched low power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser to generate the write (control) signal. The insertion loss for the normally off modulator is 4.6 dB at the highest write signal power (30 mW) used. The device lends itself to the fabrication of arrays for optically addressed spatial light modulation.

  12. Asymmetric Ferromagnet-Superconductor-Ferromagnet Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cadden-Zimansky, P.; Bazaliy, Ya.B.; Litvak, L.M.; Jiang, J.S.; Pearson, J.; Gu, J.Y.; You, Chun-Yeol; Beasley, M.R.; Bader, S.D.

    2011-11-04

    In layered ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagnet F{sub 1} /S/F{sub 2} structures, the critical temperature T{sub c} of the superconductors depends on the magnetic orientation of the ferromagnetic layers F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} relative to each other. So far, the experimentally observed magnitude of change in T{sub c} for structures utilizing weak ferromagnets has been 2 orders of magnitude smaller than is expected from calculations. We theoretically show that such a discrepancy can result from the asymmetry of F/S boundaries, and we test this possibility by performing experiments on structures where F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} are independently varied. Our experimental results indicate that asymmetric boundaries are not the source of the discrepancy. If boundary asymmetry is causing the suppressed magnitude of T{sub c} changes, it may only be possible to detect in structures with thinner ferromagnetic layers.

  13. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  14. Control of asymmetric magnetic perturbations in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Schaffer, Michael J; Menard, Jonathan E; Boozer, Allen H

    2007-11-09

    The sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to very small deviations from the axisymmetry of the magnetic field |deltaB/B| approximately 10{-4} is well known. What was not understood until very recently is the importance of the perturbation to the plasma equilibrium in assessing the effects of externally produced asymmetries in the magnetic field, even far from a stability limit. DIII-D and NSTX experiments find that when the deleterious effects of asymmetries are mitigated, the external asymmetric field was often made stronger and had an increased interaction with the magnetic field of the unperturbed equilibrium. This Letter explains these counterintuitive results. The explanation using ideal perturbed equilibria has important implications for the control of field errors in all toroidal plasmas.

  15. The Asymmetric Dust Environment of IK Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.; Tatebe, K.; Hale, D. D. S.; Townes, C. H.; Monnier, J. D.; Ireland, M.; Tuthill, P. G.; Cohen, R.; Barry, R. K.; Rajagopal, J.; Danchi, W. C.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-infrared observations of IK Tau have been made at 11.15 μm with the three-telescope Infrared Spatial Interferometer on Mount Wilson and also using individual segments of the Keck telescope for multiple-aperture interferometry on the Keck telescope at 10.7 μm. Both experiments provided closure phase and show temporal variations and asymmetries in the surrounding dust, with a difference of about 15% in intensity between two sides of the star. Asymmetries have been previously observed in the distribution of SiO masers closely surrounding the star. Comparison with earlier interferometric measurements shows substantial reduction in dust surrounding the star over the last decade. Several asymmetric dust models are investigated and simple images constructed.

  16. Spectral measurements of asymmetrically irradiated capsule backlighters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Capsule backlighters provide a quasi-continuum x-ray spectrum over a wide range of photon energies [J. F. Hansen et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 013504 (2008)]. Ideally one irradiates the capsule backlighter symmetrically, however, in complex experimental geometries, this is not always possible. In recent experiments we irradiated capsule backlighters asymmetrically and measured the x-ray spectrum from multiple directions. We will present time-integrated spectra over the photon energy range of 2-13 keV and time-resolved spectra over the photon energy range of 2-3 keV. We will compare the spectra from different lines of sight to determine if the laser asymmetry results in an angular dependence in the x-ray emission.

  17. Vortex Ring State and Asymmetric Thrust Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Gregory; Savas, Omer; Caradonna, Francis

    2008-11-01

    When the helical vortices of a rotor are not convected away, the vortices may form a ring-like structure about the rotor disk. This vortex ring state (VRS) is most common during rapid descent and leads to thrust oscillations coupled to the formation and subsequent breakdown of the ring. Experimental observations at and near VRS were made using strobed particle image velocimetry on a three-blade rotor in a towing tank. Simultaneous strain gage readings allowed direct measurement of the rotor's thrust history in this state. Operating conditions near the cusp of VRS were investigated to offer insight into the initial evolution of this undesirable state. In addition, asymmetries in the periodic thrust histories during non-axial descent are analyzed in conjunction with corresponding vorticity evolutions. Salient features of the vortex wake structure during highly asymmetric thrust oscillations are discussed in contrast to VRS cases with nearly symmetric thrust oscillations.

  18. Asymmetric Heat Conduction in Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bambi

    2008-12-01

    Heat conduction is an old yet important problem. Since Fourier introduced the law bearing his name two hundred years ago, a first-principle derivation of this law from statistical mechanics is still lacking. Worse still, the validity of this law in low dimensions, and the necessary and sufficient conditions for its validity are still far from clear. In this talk I'll give a review of recent works done on this subject. I'll also report our latest work on asymmetric heat conduction in nonlinear systems. The study of heat condution is not only of theoretical interest but also of practical interest. The study of electric conduction has led to the invention of such important electric devices such as electric diodes and transistors. The study of heat conduction may also lead to the invention of thermal diodes and transistors in the future. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  19. Universality in freezing of an asymmetric drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Md Farhad; Waghmare, Prashant R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the evidence of universality in conical tip formation during the freezing of arbitrary-shaped sessile droplets. The focus is to demonstrate the relationship between this universality and the liquid drop shape. We observe that, in the case of asymmetric drops, this universal shape is achieved when the tip reconfigures by changing its location, which subsequently alters the frozen drop shape. The proposed "two-triangle" model quantifies the change in the tip configuration as a function of the asymmetry of the drop that shows a good agreement with the experimental evidence. Finally, based on the experimental and theoretical exercise, we propose the scaling dependence between the variations in the tip configuration and the asymmetry of the drop.

  20. Cylindrical Asymmetrical Capacitor Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An asymmetrical capacitor system is provided which creates a thrust force. The system is adapted for use in space applications and includes a capacitor device provided with a first conductive element and a second conductive element axially spaced from the first conductive element and of smaller axial extent. A shroud supplied with gas surrounds the capacitor device. The second conductive element can be a wire ring or mesh mounted on dielectric support posts affixed to a dielectric member which separates the conductive elements or a wire or mesh annulus surrounding a barrel-shaped dielectric member on which the h t element is also mounted. A high voltage source is connected across the conductive elements and applies a high voltage to the conductive elements of sufficient value to create a thrust force on the system inducing movement thereof.