Science.gov

Sample records for asymmetric rotor model

  1. Quasimodes instability analysis of uncertain asymmetric rotor system based on 3D solid element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanfei; Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Weimeng

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainties are considered in the equation of motion of an asymmetric rotor system. Based on Hill's determinant method, quasimodes stability analysis with uncertain parameters is used to get stochastic boundaries of unstable regions. Firstly, A 3D finite element rotor model was built in rotating frame with four parameterized coefficients, which is assumed as random parameters representing the uncertainties existing in the rotor system. Then the influences of uncertain coefficients on the distribution of the unstable region boundaries are analyzed. The results show that uncertain parameters have various influences on the size, boundary and number of unstable regions. At last, the statistic results of the minimum and maximum spin speeds of unstable regions were got by Monte Carlo simulation. The used method is suitable for real engineering rotor system, because arbitrary configuration of rotors can be modeled by 3D finite element.

  2. Reflection-asymmetric rotor model of odd Aapprox. 219--229 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leander, G.A.; Chen, Y.S.

    1988-06-01

    The low-energy spectroscopy of odd-A nuclei in the mass region Aapprox.219--229 is modeled by coupling states of a deformed shell model including octupole deformation to a reflection-asymmetric rotor core. Theory and experiment are compared for the nuclei in which data are available: /sup 219,221,223,225/Rn, /sup 221,223,225,227/Fr, /sup 219,221,223,225,227/Ra, /sup 219,223,225,227,229/Ac /sup 221,223,225,227,229/Th, and /sup 229/Pa. Overall agreement requires an octupole deformation ..beta../sub 3/approx.0.1. The results throughout the region are synthesized to evaluate the model.

  3. The effect of transverse crack upon parametric instability of a rotor-bearing system with an asymmetric disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that either the asymmetric disk or transverse crack brings parametric inertia (or stiffness) excitation to the rotor-bearing system. When both of them appear in a rotor system, the parametric instability behaviors have not gained sufficient attentions. Thus, the effect of transverse crack upon parametric instability of a rotor-bearing system with an asymmetric disk is studied. First, the finite element equations of motion are established for the asymmetric rotor system. Both the open and breathing transverse cracks are taken into account in the model. Then, the discrete state transition matrix (DSTM) method is introduced for numerically acquiring the instability regions. Based upon these, some computations for a practical asymmetric rotor system with open or breathing transverse crack are conducted, respectively. Variations of the primary and combination instability regions induced by the asymmetric disk with the crack depth are observed, and the effect of the orientation angle between the crack and asymmetric disk on various instability regions are discussed in detail. It is shown that for the asymmetric angle around 0, the existence of transverse (either open or breathing) crack has attenuation effect upon the instability regions. Under certain crack depth, the instability regions could be vanished by the transverse crack. When the asymmetric angle is around π/2, increasing the crack depth would enhance the instability regions.

  4. Methods and apparatus for reduction of asymmetric rotor loads in wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-10

    A method for reducing load and providing yaw alignment in a wind turbine includes measuring displacements or moments resulting from asymmetric loads on the wind turbine. These measured displacements or moments are used to determine a pitch for each rotor blade to reduce or counter asymmetric rotor loading and a favorable yaw orientation to reduce pitch activity. Yaw alignment of the wind turbine is adjusted in accordance with the favorable yaw orientation and the pitch of each rotor blade is adjusted in accordance with the determined pitch to reduce or counter asymmetric rotor loading.

  5. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  6. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  7. Macroscopic balance model for wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for multi-port wave rotors is described. The wave processes that effect energy exchange within the rotor passage are modeled using one-dimensional gas dynamics. Macroscopic mass and energy balances relate volume-averaged thermodynamic properties in the rotor passage control volume to the mass, momentum, and energy fluxes at the ports. Loss models account for entropy production in boundary layers and in separating flows caused by blade-blockage, incidence, and gradual opening and closing of rotor passages. The mathematical model provides a basis for predicting design-point wave rotor performance, port timing, and machine size. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with CFD calculations and three-port wave rotor experimental data. A four-port wave rotor design example is provided to demonstrate model applicability. The modeling approach is amenable to wave rotor optimization studies and rapid assessment of the trade-offs associated with integrating wave rotors into gas turbine engine systems.

  8. Acoustic test of a model rotor and tail rotor: Results for the isolated rotors and combined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.; Elliott, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data from a model scale main rotor and tail rotor experiment in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel are presented for the main rotor and trail rotor in isolation and for the two rotors operating together. Results for the isolated main rotor show the importance of the rotor flapping conditions on mid-frequency noise content. High levels of main rotor retreating side blade-vortex interaction noise are shown to radiate downstream of the model. The isolated tail rotor noise results show the dominance of harmonic noise in the thrusting direction. The occurrence of tail rotor broadband noise is seen by the broadening of the tail rotor harmonics and is attributed to fuselage wake turbulence. The combined main and tail rotor data are presented to show the dominance of each rotor's different noise sources at different directivity locations.

  9. Theoretical models of helicopter rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkings, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    For low speed rotors, it is shown that unsteady load models are only partially successful in predicting experimental levels. A theoretical model is presented which leads to the concept of unsteady thickness noise. This gives better agreement with test results. For high speed rotors, it is argued that present models are incomplete and that other mechanisms are at work. Some possibilities are briefly discussed.

  10. Rotor systems research aircraft simulation mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.; Moore, F. L.; Howlett, J. J.; Pollock, K. S.; Browne, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model developed for evaluating and verifying advanced rotor concepts is discussed. The model was used during in both open loop and real time man-in-the-loop simulation during the rotor systems research aircraft design. Future applications include: pilot training, preflight of test programs, and the evaluation of promising concepts before their implementation on the flight vehicle.

  11. A novel PM motor with hybrid PM excitation and asymmetric rotor structure for high torque performance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaohong; Liu, Guohai; Du, Xinxin; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel permanent magnet (PM) motor for high torque performance, in which hybrid PM material and asymmetric rotor design are applied. The hybrid PM material is adopted to reduce the consumption of rare-earth PM because ferrite PM is assisted to enhance the torque production. Meanwhile, the rotor structure is designed to be asymmetric by shifting the surface-insert PM (SPM), which is used to improve the torque performance, including average torque and torque ripple. Moreover, the reasons for improvement of the torque performance are explained by evaluation and analysis of the performances of the proposed motor. Compared with SPM motor and V-type motor, the merit of high utilization ratio of rare-earth PM is also confirmed, showing that the proposed motor can offer higher torque density and lower torque ripple simultaneously with less consumption of rare-earth PM. PMID:28382228

  12. Rotordynamic analysis of asymmetric turbofan rotor due to fan blade-loss event with contact-impact rub loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sunil K.

    2013-04-01

    Loss of a blade from a running turbofan rotor introduces not only huge imbalance into the dynamical system rather it makes the entire rotor asymmetric as well. In a nonsymmetric rotor, the various terms of mass, gyroscopic and stiffness matrices also become time-dependent. In this paper, all the dynamical equations include the effect of the rotary inertia and gyroscopic moments as a result of both shaft bending as well as staggered blades flexing in-and-out of the plane of the disk. The governing equations also account for internal material damping in the shaft and the external damping in the support bearing system. In addition to the unbalance load at the disk location, the shaft may also be subjected to a torque and axial forces. Here, the fan blades are modeled as pre-twisted thin shallow shells. They have coupled flexural-torsional motion in the lateral out-of-plane direction as well as extensional degrees-of-freedom in the longitudinal spanwise direction of the blade airfoil. The effect of blade tip rub forces being transmitted to the shaft are analyzed in terms of the dynamic stability of the rotor, especially during windmilling.

  13. Effect of rotor wake on aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/6 scale model of the rotor systems research aircraft. [in the Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the effect of the main-rotor wake on the aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor systems research aircraft. A 1/6-scale model with a 4-blade articulated rotor was used to determine the effect of the rotor wake for the compound configuration. Data were obtained over a range of angles of attack, angles of sideslip, auxiliary engine thrusts, rotor collective pitch angles, and rotor tip-path plane angles for several main-rotor advance ratios. Separate results are presented for the forces and moments on the airframe, the wing, and the tail. An analysis of the test data indicates significant changes in the aerodynamic characteristics. The rotor wake increases the longitudinal static stability, the effective dihedral, and the lateral static stability of the airframe. The rotor induces a downwash on the wing. This downwash decreases the wing lift and increases the drag. The asymmetrical rotor wake induces a differential lift across the wing and a subsequent rolling moment. These rotor induced effects on the wing become smaller with increasing forward speed.

  14. Simple theoretical models for composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valisetty, R. R.; Rehfield, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of theoretical rotor blade structural models for designs based upon composite construction is discussed. Care was exercised to include a member of nonclassical effects that previous experience indicated would be potentially important to account for. A model, representative of the size of a main rotor blade, is analyzed in order to assess the importance of various influences. The findings of this model study suggest that for the slenderness and closed cell construction considered, the refinements are of little importance and a classical type theory is adequate. The potential of elastic tailoring is dramatically demonstrated, so the generality of arbitrary ply layup in the cell wall is needed to exploit this opportunity.

  15. Modeling Aerodynamically Generated Sound of Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound of rotors over the past decade. Although the modeling effort has focused on helicopter main rotors, the theory is generally valid for a wide range of rotor configurations. The Ffowcs Williams Hawkings (FW-H) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. The monopole and dipole source terms of the FW-H equation account for the thickness and loading noise, respectively. Bladevortex-interaction noise and broadband noise are important types of loading noise, hence much research has been directed toward the accurate modeling of these noise mechanisms. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H equation has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparisons of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems. Finally, significant progress has been made incorporating the rotor noise models into full vehicle noise prediction tools.

  16. HARP model rotor test at the DNW. [Hughes Advanced Rotor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Seth; Jordan, David; Smith, Charles; Ekins, James; Silverthorn, Lou

    1989-01-01

    Data from a test of a dynamically scaled model of the Hughes Advanced Rotor Program (HARP) bearingless model main rotor and 369K tail rotor are reported. The history of the HARP program and its goals are reviewed, and the main and tail rotor models are described. The test facilities and instrumentation are described, and wind tunnel test data are presented on hover, forward flight performance, and blade-vortex interaction. Performance data, acoustic data, and dynamic data from near field/far field and shear layer studies are presented.

  17. Important Scaling Parameters for Testing Model-Scale Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the effects of aerodynamic and aeroelastic scaling parameters on model scale helicopter rotors has been conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The effect of varying Reynolds number, blade Lock number, and structural elasticity on rotor performance has been studied and the performance results are discussed herein for two different rotor blade sets at two rotor advance ratios. One set of rotor blades were rigid and the other set of blades were dynamically scaled to be representative of a main rotor design for a utility class helicopter. The investigation was con-densities permits the acquisition of data for several Reynolds and Lock number combinations.

  18. Development of a rotor wake-vortex model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Certain empirical rotor wake and turbulence relationships were developed using existing low speed rotor wave data. A tip vortex model was developed by replacing the annulus wall with a row of image vortices. An axisymmetric turbulence spectrum model, developed in the context of rotor inflow turbulence, was adapted to predicting the turbulence spectrum of the stator gust upwash.

  19. Full Scale Rotor Aeroacoustic Predictions and the Link to Model Scale Rotor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Aeroacoustic Prediction System (NAPS) is used to establish a link between model-scale and full-scale rotor predictions and is partially validated against measured wind tunnel and flight aeroacoustic data. The prediction approach of NAPS couples a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with acoustic source noise and propagation codes. The comprehensive analysis selected for this study is CAMRAD-II, which provides the performance/trim/wake solution for a given rotor or flight condition. The post-trim capabilities of CAMRAD-II are used to compute high-resolution sectional airloads for the acoustic tone noise analysis, WOPMOD. The tone noise is propagated to observers on the ground with the propagation code, RNM (Rotor Noise Model). Aeroacoustic predictions are made with NAPS for an isolated rotor and compared to results of the second Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART-II) program, which tested a 40% dynamically and Mach-scaled BO-105 main rotor at the DNW. The NAPS is validated with comparisons for three rotor conditions: a baseline condition and two Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) conditions. To establish a link between model and full-scale rotor predictions, a full-scale BO-105 main rotor input deck for NAPS is created from the 40% scale rotor input deck. The full-scale isolated rotor predictions are then compared to the model predictions. The comparisons include aerodynamic loading, acoustic levels, and acoustic pressure time histories for each of the three conditions. With this link established, full-scale predictions are made for a range of descent flight conditions and compared with measured trends from the recent Rotorcraft Operational Noise Abatement Procedures (RONAP) flight test conducted by DLR and ONERA. Additionally, the effectiveness of two HHC conditions from the HART-II program is demonstrated for the full-scale rotor in flight.

  20. A Model Rotor in Axial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Huang, S. S.; Abrego, A. I.

    2001-01-01

    A model rotor was mounted horizontally in the settling chamber of a wind tunnel to obtain performance and wake structure data under low climb conditions. The immediate wake of the rotor was carefully surveyed using 3-component particle image velocimetry to define the velocity and vortical content of the flow, and used in a subsequent study to validate a theory for the separate determination of induced and profile drag. Measurements were obtained for two collective pitch angles intended to render a predominately induced drag state and another with a marked increase in profile drag. A majority of the azimuthally directed vorticity in the wake was found to be concentrated in the tip vortices. However, adjacent layers of inboard vorticity with opposite sense were clearly present. At low collective, the close proximity of the tip vortex from the previous blade caused the wake from the most recent blade passage to be distorted. The deficit velocity component that was directed along the azimuth of the rotor blade was never more that 15 percent of the rotor tip speed, and except for the region of the tip vortex, appeared to have totally disappeared form the wake left by the previous blade.

  1. Test results from a dynamic model dynaflex rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebanck, C. F.; Goodman, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A one-fifth scale dynamic model of the Sikorsky Dynaflex rotor was tested in hover and in forward flight conditions in a wind tunnel. The Dynaflex rotor features an advanced composite structure which flexes to provide a constant speed universal joint action. Testing concentrated on confirming that the stability and dynamic response of the rotor were satisfactory. Lift conditions of up to .11 Ct/sigma and advance ratios as high as .46 were reached. Vibratory loads were compared to those of articulated rotors. The Dynaflex rotor concept appears to be a practical concept from the standpoint of dynamic response and stability.

  2. Thermodynamic calculations for molecules with asymmetric internal rotors. II. Application to the 1,2-dihaloethanes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bryan M; Fadri, Maria M; Raman, Sumathy

    2008-02-01

    The thermodynamic properties of three halocarbon molecules relevant in atmospheric and public health applications are presented from ab initio calculations. Our technique makes use of a reaction path-like Hamiltonian to couple all the vibrational modes to a large-amplitude torsion for 1,2-difluoroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,2-dibromoethane, each of which possesses a heavy asymmetric rotor. Optimized ab initio energies and Hessians were calculated at the CCSD(T) and MP2 levels of theory, respectively. In addition, to investigate the contribution of electronically excited states to thermodynamic properties, several excited singlet and triplet states for each of the halocarbons were computed at the CASSCF/MRCI level. Using the resulting potentials and projected frequencies, the couplings of all the vibrational modes to the large-amplitude torsion are calculated using the new STAR-P 2.4.0 software platform that automatically parallelizes our codes with distributed memory via a familiar MATLAB interface. Utilizing the efficient parallelization scheme of STAR-P, we obtain thermodynamic properties for each of the halocarbons, with temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 1000 K. We propose that the free energies, entropies, and heat capacities obtained from our methods be used to supplement theoretical and experimental values found in current thermodynamic tables.

  3. Asymmetric Top Rotors in Superfluid Para-Hydrogen Nano-Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Li, Hui; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    We present the first simulation study of bosonic clusters doped with an asymmetric top molecule. A variation of the path-integral Monte Carlo method is developed to study a para-water (pH_2O) impurity in para-hydrogen (pH_2) clusters. The growth pattern of the doped clusters is similar in nature to that of the pure clusters. The pH_2O molecule appears to rotate freely in the cluster due to its large rotational constants and the lack of adiabatic following. The presence of pH_2O substantially quenches the superfluid response of pH_2 with respect to the space fixed frame. We also study the behaviour of a sulphur dioxide (32S16O_2) dopant in the pH_2 clusters. For such a heavy rotor, the adiabatic following of the pH_2 molecules is established and the superfluid renormalization of the rotational constants is observed. The rotational structure of the SO_2-p(H_2)_N clusters' ro-vibrational spectra is predicted. The connection between the superfluid response respect to the external boundary rotation and the dopant rotation is discussed.

  4. Coupled transport in rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, S.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.; Politi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Steady nonequilibrium states are investigated in a one-dimensional setup in the presence of two thermodynamic currents. Two paradigmatic nonlinear oscillators models are investigated: an XY chain and the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Their distinctive feature is that the relevant variable is an angle in both cases. We point out the importance of clearly distinguishing between energy and heat flux. In fact, even in the presence of a vanishing Seebeck coefficient, a coupling between (angular) momentum and energy arises, mediated by the unavoidable presence of a coherent energy flux. Such a contribution is the result of the ‘advection’ induced by the position-dependent angular velocity. As a result, in the XY model, the knowledge of the two diagonal elements of the Onsager matrix suffices to reconstruct its transport properties. The analysis of the nonequilibrium steady states finally allows to strengthen the connection between the two models.

  5. Icing research tunnel test of a model helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas L.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in which an OH-58 tail rotor assembly was operated in a horizontal plane to simulate the action of a typical main rotor. Ice was accreted on the blades in a variety of rotor and tunnel operating conditions and documentation of the resulting shapes was performed. Rotor torque and vibration are presented as functions of time for several representative test runs, and the effects of various parametric variations on the blade ice shapes are shown. This OH-58 test was the first of its kind in the United States and will encourage additional model rotor icing tunnel testing. Although not a scaled representative of any actual full-scale main rotor system, this rig has produced torque and vibration data which will be useful in assessing the quality of existing rotor icing analyses.

  6. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study: Wind tunnel tests of a full scale hingeless prop/rotor designed for the Boeing Model 222 tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, J. P.; Alexander, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    The rotor system designed for the Boeing Model 222 tilt rotor aircraft is a soft-in-plane hingeless rotor design, 26 feet in diameter. This rotor has completed two test programs in the NASA Ames 40' X 80' wind tunnel. The first test was a windmilling rotor test on two dynamic wing test stands. The rotor was tested up to an advance ratio equivalence of 400 knots. The second test used the NASA powered propeller test rig and data were obtained in hover, transition and low speed cruise flight. Test data were obtained in the areas of wing-rotor dynamics, rotor loads, stability and control, feedback controls, and performance to meet the test objectives. These data are presented.

  7. Effect of Rotor Diameter on the Thermal Stresses of a Turbine Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávalos, J. O.; García, J. C.; Urquiza, G.; Castro-Gómez, L. L.; Rodríguez, J. A.; De Santiago, O.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stresses in a simplified steam turbine rotor model during a cold startup are analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA). In order to validate the numerical model, an experimental array is developed in which a hollow cylinder is heated with hot air in the external surface. At the thick wall of the cylinder, temperature distribution is measured in real time, while at the same time an algorithm computes thermal stresses. Additional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations are made to obtain magnitudes of velocity and pressure in order to compute convective heat transfer coefficient. The experimental results show good agreement with the FEA computations. To evaluate the effect of rotor diameter size, FEA computations with variation in external and internal diameters are performed. Results show that thermal stresses are proportional to rotor diameter size. Also, zones of higher stress concentration are found in the external and internal surfaces of the rotor.

  8. Establishment of a rotor model basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Radial-dimension computations in the RSRA's blade-element model are modified for both the acquisition of extensive baseline data and for real-time simulation use. The baseline data, which are for the evaluation of model changes, use very small increments and are of high quality. The modifications to the real-time simulation model are for accuracy improvement, especially when a minimal number of blade segments is required for real-time synchronization. An accurate technique for handling tip loss in discrete blade models is developed. The mathematical consistency and convergence properties of summation algorithms for blade forces and moments are examined and generalized integration coefficients are applied to equal-annuli midpoint spacing. Rotor conditions identified as 'constrained' and 'balanced' are used and the propagation of error is analyzed.

  9. Results of a sub-scale model rotor icing test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemming, Robert J.; Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

    1991-01-01

    A heavily instrumented sub-scale model of a helicopter main rotor was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in September and November 1989. The four-bladed main rotor had a diameter of 1.83 m (6.00 ft) and the 0.124 m (4.9 in) chord rotor blades were specially fabricated for this experiment. The instrumented rotor was mounted on a Sikorsky Aircraft Powered Force Model, which enclosed a rotor balance and other measurement systems. The model rotor was exposed to a range of icing conditions that included variations in temperature, liquid water content, and median droplet diameter, and was operated over ranges of advance ratio, shaft angle, tip Mach number (rotor speed) and weight coefficient to determine the effect of these parameters on ice accretion. In addition to strain gage and balance data, the test was documented with still, video, and high speed photography, ice profile tracings, and ice molds. The sensitivity of the model rotor to the test parameters, is given, and the result to theoretical predictions are compared. Test data quality was excellent, and ice accretion prediction methods and rotor performance prediction methods (using published icing lift and drag relationships) reproduced the performance trends observed in the test. Adjustments to the correlation coefficients to improve the level of correlation are suggested.

  10. Two-Dimensional Computational Model for Wave Rotor Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional (theta,z) Navier-Stokes solver for multi-port wave rotor flow simulation is described. The finite-volume form of the unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time on multi-block grids that represent the stationary inlet and outlet ports and the moving rotor passages of the wave rotor. Computed results are compared with three-port wave rotor experimental data. The model is applied to predict the performance of a planned four-port wave rotor experiment. Two-dimensional flow features that reduce machine performance and influence rotor blade and duct wall thermal loads are identified. The performance impact of rounding the inlet port wall, to inhibit separation during passage gradual opening, is assessed.

  11. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  12. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  13. Two-dimensional CFD modeling of wave rotor flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver developed for detailed study of wave rotor flow dynamics is described. The CFD model is helping characterize important loss mechanisms within the wave rotor. The wave rotor stationary ports and the moving rotor passages are resolved on multiple computational grid blocks. The finite-volume form of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with laminar viscosity are integrated in time using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Roe's approximate Riemann solution scheme or the computationally less expensive advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) flux-splitting scheme is used to effect upwind-differencing of the inviscid flux terms, using cell interface primitive variables set by MUSCL-type interpolation. The diffusion terms are central-differenced. The solver is validated using a steady shock/laminar boundary layer interaction problem and an unsteady, inviscid wave rotor passage gradual opening problem. A model inlet port/passage charging problem is simulated and key features of the unsteady wave rotor flow field are identified. Lastly, the medium pressure inlet port and high pressure outlet port portion of the NASA Lewis Research Center experimental divider cycle is simulated and computed results are compared with experimental measurements. The model accurately predicts the wave timing within the rotor passages and the distribution of flow variables in the stationary inlet port region.

  14. Wind tunnel test on a 1/4.622 Froude scale, hingeless rotor, tilt rotor model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, J. P.; Alexander, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Wing tunnel test data on a 1/4.622 Froude scale, hingeless rotor, tilt rotor mode are reported for all potential flight conditions through hover and a wide envelope of transitions. A mathematical model was used to describe the rotor system in real time simulation by means of regression analyses. Details of the model, test program and data system are provided together with four data files for hover and transition.

  15. Low-frequency broadband noise generated by a model rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aravamudan, K. S.; Harris, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Low-frequency broadband noise generated by model rotors is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The influence of free-stream turbulence in the low-frequency broadband noise radiation from model rotors has been experimentally investigated. The turbulence was generated in the M.I.T. anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of bipolar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the low-frequency broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of helicopter performance parameters. The location of the peak intensity was observed to be strongly dependent on the rotor-tip velocity and on the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence. The size scale of turbulence had negligible effect on the intensity of low-frequency broadband noise. The experimental data show good agreement with an ad hoc model based on unsteady aerodynamics.

  16. Reference Model 2: %22Rev 0%22 Rotor Design.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew F.; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Griffith, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    The preliminary design for a three-bladed cross-flow rotor for a reference marine hydrokinetic turbine is presented. A rotor performance design code is described, along with modifications to the code to allow prediction of blade support strut drag as well as interference between two counter-rotating rotors. The rotor is designed to operate in a reference site corresponding to a riverine environment. Basic rotor performance and rigid-body loads calculations are performed to size the rotor elements and select the operating speed range. The preliminary design is verified with a simple finite element model that provides estimates of bending stresses during operation. A concept for joining the blades and support struts is developed and analyzed with a separate finite element analysis. Rotor mass, production costs, and annual energy capture are estimated in order to allow calculations of system cost-of-energy. Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd

  17. Linear Time Invariant Models for Integrated Flight and Rotor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcer, Fahri Ersel

    2011-12-01

    Recent developments on individual blade control (IBC) and physics based reduced order models of various on-blade control (OBC) actuation concepts are opening up opportunities to explore innovative rotor control strategies for improved rotor aerodynamic performance, reduced vibration and BVI noise, and improved rotor stability, etc. Further, recent developments in computationally efficient algorithms for the extraction of Linear Time Invariant (LTI) models are providing a convenient framework for exploring integrated flight and rotor control, while accounting for the important couplings that exist between body and low frequency rotor response and high frequency rotor response. Formulation of linear time invariant (LTI) models of a nonlinear system about a periodic equilibrium using the harmonic domain representation of LTI model states has been studied in the literature. This thesis presents an alternative method and a computationally efficient scheme for implementation of the developed method for extraction of linear time invariant (LTI) models from a helicopter nonlinear model in forward flight. The fidelity of the extracted LTI models is evaluated using response comparisons between the extracted LTI models and the nonlinear model in both time and frequency domains. Moreover, the fidelity of stability properties is studied through the eigenvalue and eigenvector comparisons between LTI and LTP models by making use of the Floquet Transition Matrix. For time domain evaluations, individual blade control (IBC) and On-Blade Control (OBC) inputs that have been tried in the literature for vibration and noise control studies are used. For frequency domain evaluations, frequency sweep inputs are used to obtain frequency responses of fixed system hub loads to a single blade IBC input. The evaluation results demonstrate the fidelity of the extracted LTI models, and thus, establish the validity of the LTI model extraction process for use in integrated flight and rotor control

  18. Extension and validation of an unsteady wake model for rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, AY; Yoo, Kyung M.; Peters, David A.

    1992-01-01

    A new three-dimensional, finite-state induced-flow model is extended to treat nonlinearities associated with the mass flow induced through the rotor plane. This new theory is then applied to the correlation of a recent set of unsteady, hover laser Doppler velocimetry inflow measurements conducted in the Aeroelastic Rotor Test Chamber at Georgia Institute of Technology. Although the model is intended primarily as a representation of unsteady aerodynamics for aeroelasticity applications, the results show that it has an excellent capability in predicting the inflow distribution in hover except near the root and tip. In addition, the computed unsteady spanwise lift distribution of a rotor is compared with that from an unsteady vortex lattice method for pitch oscillations at various frequencies. The new model is shown to be capable of prediction of unsteady loads typical of aeroelastic response.

  19. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  20. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-07-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  1. Rotor Broadband Noise Prediction with Comparison to Model Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Burley, Casey L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports an analysis and prediction development of rotor broadband noise. The two primary components of this noise are Blade-Wake Interaction (BWI) noise, due to the blades' interaction with the turbulent wakes of the preceding blades, and "Self" noise, due to the development and shedding of turbulence within the blades' boundary layers. Emphasized in this report is the new code development for Self noise. The analysis and validation employs data from the HART program, a model BO-105 rotor wind tunnel test conducted in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). The BWI noise predictions are based on measured pressure response coherence functions using cross-spectral methods. The Self noise predictions are based on previously reported semiempirical modeling of Self noise obtained from isolated airfoil sections and the use of CAMRAD.Modl to define rotor performance and local blade segment flow conditions. Both BWI and Self noise from individual blade segments are Doppler shifted and summed at the observer positions. Prediction comparisons with measurements show good agreement for a range of rotor operating conditions from climb to steep descent. The broadband noise predictions, along with those of harmonic and impulsive Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise predictions, demonstrate a significant advance in predictive capability for main rotor noise.

  2. A mathematical model for the doubly fed wound rotor generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of a doubly-fed wound rotor machine used as a constant frequency generator is presented. The purpose of this analysis is to derive a consistent set of circuit equations which produce constant stator frequency and constant stator voltage. Starting with instantaneous circuit equations, the necessary rotor voltages and currents are derived. The model, thus obtained, is assumed to be valid, since the resulting relationships between mechanical power and active volt-amperes agrees with the results of others. In addition, the model allows for a new interpretation of the power flow in the doubly-fed generator.

  3. Twin-Rotor Patrol Airship Flying Model Design Rationale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ’ADORES(f d•llffewent from Contriollin# Ofifer) IS, SECURITY CL.ASS. (at this ve .0d6 ) Unclassified TDiCL.A-SsIPrlCA1ION...experimental data on the controllability of tilt-rotor airships operating near neutral buoyancy, a 32-foot long 1/10 scale flying model is bein...foot long 1/10 scale flying model is being developed using two cuntrarotating tilt-rotors representing those on the NASA/Bell XV-15 research aircraft

  4. Asymmetric dark matter models in SO(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2017-02-01

    We systematically study the possibilities for asymmetric dark matter in the context of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models of grand unification. Dark matter stability in SO(10) is guaranteed by a remnant Z2 symmetry which is preserved when the intermediate scale gauge subgroup of SO(10) is broken by a {126} dimensional representation. The asymmetry in the dark matter states is directly generated through the out-of-equilibrium decay of particles around the intermediate scale, or transferred from the baryon/lepton asymmetry generated in the Standard Model sector by leptogenesis. We systematically classify possible asymmetric dark matter candidates in terms of their quantum numbers, and derive the conditions for each case that the observed dark matter density is (mostly) explained by the asymmetry of dark matter particles.

  5. Modeling and simulation of coaxial helicopter rotor aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gecgel, Murat

    A framework is developed for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of a series of helicopter rotor flowfields in hover and in forward flight. The methodology is based on the unsteady solutions of the three-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations recast in a rotating frame of reference. The simulations are carried out by solving the developed mathematical model on hybrid meshes that aim to optimally exploit the benefits of both the structured and the unstructured grids around complex configurations. The computer code is prepared for parallel processing with distributed memory utilization in order to significantly reduce the computational time and the memory requirements. The developed model and the simulation methodology are validated for single-rotor-in-hover flowfields by comparing the present results with the published experimental data. The predictive merit of different turbulence models for complex helicopter aerodynamics are tested extensively. All but the kappa-o and LES results demonstrate acceptable agreement with the experimental data. It was deemed best to use the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for the subsequent rotor flowfield computations. First, the flowfield around a single rotor in forward flight is simulated. These time---accurate computations help to analyze an adverse effect of increasing the forward flight speed. A dissymmetry of the lift on the advancing and the retreating blades is observed for six different advance ratios. Since the coaxial rotor is proposed to mitigate the dissymmetry, it is selected as the next logical step of the present investigation. The time---accurate simulations are successfully obtained for the flowfields generated by first a hovering then a forward-flying coaxial rotor. The results for the coaxial rotor in forward flight verify the aerodynamic balance proposed by the previously published advancing blade concept. The final set of analyses aims to investigate if the gap between the

  6. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  7. A numerical model for dynamic wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict the dynamic (and steady state) performance of a wave rotor, given the geometry and time dependent boundary conditions. The one-dimensional, perfect gas, CFD based code tracks the gasdynamics in each of the wave rotor passages as they rotate past the various ducts. The model can operate both on and off-design, allowing dynamic behavior to be studied throughout the operating range of the wave rotor. The model accounts for several major loss mechanisms including finite passage opening time, fluid friction, heat transfer to and from the passage walls, and leakage to and from the passage ends. In addition, it can calculate the amount of work transferred to and from the fluid when the flow in the ducts is not aligned with the passages such as occurs in off-design operation. Since it is one-dimensional, the model runs reasonably fast on a typical workstation. This paper will describe the model and present the results of some transient calculations for a conceptual four port wave rotor designed as a topping cycle for a small gas turbine engine.

  8. Flow Measurements of an Isolated Model Tilt Rotor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    Murashige , A., Kobiki, N., Tsuchihashi, A., Nakamura, H., Inagaki, K., Yamakawa, E., “ATIC Aeroacoustic Model Rotor Test at DNW,” AHS International...Meeting on Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Disaster Relief, Gifu, Japan, April 1998. 25. Murashige , A., Tsuchihashi, A., Tsujiuchi, T., Yamakawa, E

  9. Using a collision model to design safer wind turbine rotors for birds

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-11-01

    A mathematical model for collisions between birds and propeller-type turbine rotors identifies the variables that can be manipulated to reduce the probability that birds will collide with the rotor. This study defines a safety index--the clearance power density--that allows rotors of different sizes and designs to be compared in terms of the amount of wind energy converted to electrical energy per bird collision. The collision model accounts for variations in wind speed during the year and shows that for model rotors with simple, one-dimensional blades, the safety index increases in proportion to rotor diameter, and variable speed rotors have higher safety indexes than constant speed rotors. The safety index can also be increased by enlarging the region near the center of the rotor hub where the blades move slowly enough for birds to avoid them. Painting the blades to make them more visible might have this effect. Model rotors with practical designs can have safety indexes an order of magnitude higher than those for model rotors typical of the constant speeds rotors in common use today. This finding suggests that redesigned rotors could have collision rates with birds perhaps an order of magnitude lower than today`s rotors, with no reduction in the production of wind power. The empirical data that exist for collisions between raptors, such as hawks and eagles, and rotors are consistent with the model: the numbers of raptor carcasses found beneath large variable speed rotors, relative to the numbers found under small constant speed rotors, are in the proportions predicted by the collision model rather than in proportion to the areas swept by the rotor blades. However, uncontrolled variables associated with these data prevent a stronger claim of support for the model.

  10. V/STOL tilt rotor study. Volume 5: A mathematical model for real time flight simulation of the Bell model 301 tilt rotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harendra, P. B.; Joglekar, M. J.; Gaffey, T. M.; Marr, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for real-time flight simulation of a tilt rotor research aircraft was developed. The mathematical model was used to support the aircraft design, pilot training, and proof-of-concept aspects of the development program. The structure of the mathematical model is indicated by a block diagram. The mathematical model differs from that for a conventional fixed wing aircraft principally in the added requirement to represent the dynamics and aerodynamics of the rotors, the interaction of the rotor wake with the airframe, and the rotor control and drive systems. The constraints imposed on the mathematical model are defined.

  11. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study mathematical model for a real time simulation of a tilt rotor aircraft (Boeing Vertol Model 222), volume 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenstein, H.; Mcveigh, M. A.; Mollenkof, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for a real time simulation of a tilt rotor aircraft was developed. The mathematical model is used for evaluating aircraft performance and handling qualities. The model is based on an eleven degree of freedom total force representation. The rotor is treated as a point source of forces and moments with appropriate response time lags and actuator dynamics. The aerodynamics of the wing, tail, rotors, landing gear, and fuselage are included.

  12. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidea, A. G.; Yding Brogaard, R.; Andersen, N. A.; Ravn, O.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model of a multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of Single Input Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model and controllers were tested experimentally on a quadcopter. Using the combined model and controllers, simple system simulation and control is possible, by replacing the physical values for the individual systems.

  13. An investigation of rotor harmonic noise by the use of small scale wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Schaffer, E. G.

    1982-01-01

    Noise measurements of small scale helicopter rotor models were compared with noise measurements of full scale helicopters to determine what information about the full scale helicopters could be derived from noise measurements of small scale helicopter models. Comparisons were made of the discrete frequency (rotational) noise for 4 pairs of tests. Areas covered were tip speed effects, isolated rotor, tandem rotor, and main rotor/tail rotor interaction. Results show good comparison of noise trends with configuration and test condition changes, and good comparison of absolute noise measurements with the corrections used except for the isolated rotor case. Noise measurements of the isolated rotor show a great deal of scatter reflecting the fact that the rotor in hover is basically unstable.

  14. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter-rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of rotor wake on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. Force, moment, and pressure data were obtained on three fuselage models at various combinations of windspeed, sideslip angle, and pitch angle. The data show that the influence of rotor wake on the helicopter fuselage yawing moment imposes a significant additional thrust requirement on the tail rotor of a single-rotor helicopter at high sideslip angles.

  15. A mathematical model of bird collisions with wind turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-11-01

    When a bird flies through the disk swept out by the blades of a wind turbine rotor, the probability of collision depends on the motions and dimensions of the bird and the blades. The collision model in this paper predicts the probability for birds that glide upwind, downwind, an across the wind past simple one-dimensional blades represented by straight lines, and upwind and downwind past more realistic three-dimensional blades with chord and twist. Probabilities vary over the surface of the disk, and in most cases, the tip of the blade is less likely to collide with a bird than parts of the blade nearer the hub. The mean probability may be found by integration over the disk area. The collision model identifies the rotor characteristics that could be altered to make turbines safer for birds.

  16. Centrifuge Rotor Models: A Comparison of the Euler-Lagrange and the Bond Graph Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granda, Jose J.; Ramakrishnan, Jayant; Nguyen, Louis H.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on centrifuge rotor models with a comparison using Euler-Lagrange and bond graph methods is shown. The topics include: 1) Objectives; 2) MOdeling Approach Comparisons; 3) Model Structures; and 4) Application.

  17. Analytical model of rotor wake aerodynamics in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saberi, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The model and the computer program developed provides the velocity, location, and circulation of the tip vortices of a two-blade helicopter in and out of the ground effect. Comparison of the theoretical results with some experimental measurements for the location of the wake indicate that there is excellent accuracy in the vicinity of the rotor and fair amount of accuracy far from it. Having the location of the wake at all times enables us to compute the history of the velocity and the location of any point in the flow. The main goal of out study, induced velocity at the rotor, can also be calculated in addition to stream lines and streak lines. Since the wake location close to the rotor is known more accurately than at other places, the calculated induced velocity over the disc should be a good estimate of the real induced velocity, with the exception of the blade location, because each blade was replaced only by a vortex line. Because no experimental measurements of the wake close to the ground were available to us, quantitative evaluation of the theoretical wake was not possible. But qualitatively we have been able to show excellent agreement. Comparison of flow visualization with out results has indicated the location of the ground vortex is estimated excellently. Also the flow field in hover is well represented.

  18. Preliminary Study of a Model Rotor in Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Tung, C.; Sharpe, D. L.; Huang, S.; Hendley, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    Within a program designed to develop experimental techniques for measuring the trajectory and structure of vortices trailing from the tips of rotor blades, the present preliminary study focuses on a method for quantifying the trajectory of the trailing vortex during descent flight conditions. This study also presents rotor loads and blade surface pressures for a range of tip-path plane angles and Mach numbers. Blade pressures near the leading edge and along the outer radius are compared with data obtained on the same model rotor, but in open jet facilities. A triangulation procedure based on two directable laser-light sheets, each containing an embedded reference, proved effective in defining the spatial coordinates of the trailing vortex. When interrogating a cross section of the flow that contains several trailing vortices, the greatest clarity was found to result when the flow is uniformly seeded. Surface pressure responses during blade-vortex interactions appeared equally sensitive near the leading edge and along the outer portion of the blade, but diminished rapidly as the distance along the blade chord increased. The pressure response was virtually independent of whether the tip-path plane angle was obtained through shaft tilt or cyclic pitch. Although the shape and frequency of the pressure perturbations on the advancing blade during blade-vortex interaction are similar to those obtained in open-jet facilities, the angle of the tip-path plane may need to be lower than the range covered in this study.

  19. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  20. Acoustic predictions using measured pressures from a model rotor in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visintainer, Joseph A.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Liu, Sandy R.

    1991-01-01

    A contemporary design, 4-bladed United Technologies model rotor with pressure-instrumented blades was tested in the Duits-Nederslandse Windtunnel. Simultaneous acoustic and pressure measurements were made for a wide range of operating conditions. Microphones were optimally positioned at a number of locations in the flow forward of the rotor to measure rotor thickness noise, high-speed impulsive noise (both in the rotor plane), and blade-vortex interaction noise (forward and 25 deg below the rotor plane). The blade surface pressure data are used as aerodynamic input to WOPWOP, which is a state-of-the-art rotor noise prediction program that predicts rotor thickness and loading noise. The predicted results using WOPWOP are compared to the measured noise levels for cases where either thickness noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, or high-speed impulsive noise is the dominant noise mechanism. The comparisons show regions of good agreement, as well as areas where further improvement is necessary.

  1. An Incidence Loss Model for Wave Rotors with Axially Aligned Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1998-01-01

    A simple mathematical model is described to account for the losses incurred when the flow in the duct (port) of a wave rotor is not aligned with the passages. The model, specifically for wave rotors with axially aligned passages, describes a loss mechanism which is sensitive to incident flow angle and Mach number. Implementation of the model in a one-dimensional CFD based wave rotor simulation is presented. Comparisons with limited experimental results are consistent with the model. Sensitivity studies are presented which highlight the significance of the incidence loss relative to other loss mechanisms in the wave rotor.

  2. Flap motion of helicopter rotors with novel, dynamic stall model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Liu, Jie; Liu, Chun; Chen, Lei; Su, Xichao; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear flapping equation for large inflow angles and flap angles is established by analyzing the aerodynamics of helicopter blade elements. In order to obtain a generalized flap equation, the Snel stall model was first applied to determine the lift coefficient of the helicopter rotor. A simulation experiment for specific airfoils was then conducted to verify the effectiveness of the Snel stall model as it applies to helicopters. Results show that the model requires no extraneous parameters compared to the traditional stall model and is highly accurate and practically applicable. Based on the model, the relationship between the flapping angle and the angle of attack was analyzed, as well as the advance ratio under the dynamic stall state.

  3. Wind-tunnel acoustic results of two rotor models with several tip designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Connor, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    A three-phase research program has been undertaken to study the acoustic signals due to the aerodynamic interaction of rotorcraft main rotors and tail rotors. During the first phase, two different rotor models with several interchangeable tips were tested in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel on the U.S. Army rotor model system. An extensive acoustic data base was acquired, with special emphasis on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The details of the experimental procedure, acoustic data acquisition, and reduction are documented. The overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of the high-twist rotor systems is relatively insensitive to flight speed but generally increases with rotor tip-path-plane angle. The OASPL of the high-twist rotors is dominated by acoustic energy in the low-frequency harmonics. The OASPL of the low-twist rotor systems shows more dependence on flight speed than the high-twist rotors, in addition to being quite sensitive to tip-path-plane angle. An integrated band-limited sound pressure level, limited by 500 to 3000 Hz, is a useful metric to quantify the occurrence of BVI noise. The OASPL of the low-twist rotors is strongly influenced by the band-limited sound levels, indicating that the blade-vortex impulsive noise is a dominant noise source for this rotor design. The midfrequency acoustic levels for both rotors show a very strong dependence on rotor tip-path-plane angle. The tip-path-plane angle at which the maximum midfrequency sound level occurs consistently decreases with increasing flight speed. The maximum midfrequency sound level measured at a given location is constant regardless of the flight speed.

  4. Stability Analysis of a Spinning and Precessing Viscoelastic Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Nandi, A.; Neogy, S.

    2013-10-01

    The present work deals with stability analysis of a spinning and precessing gyroscopic systems, where the spin axis and precession axis intersect at right angle. The nutation speed is zero, the spin and precession speeds are considered to be uniform and the precession axis is located at one end of the shaft. The properties of the shaft material correspond to a four element type linear viscoelastic model. The shaft disk system is assumed to be axially and torsionally stiff. For analysis, a simple rotor has been considered with the rigid disk placed on a massless viscoelastic shaft at specified locations from one end of the shaft. The governing parametric equations for such a rotor are derived in the simultaneously spinning and precessing frame. A stability analysis is performed considering both two- and four-degree of freedom models. The stability borderlines are computed considering spin and precession speeds as parameters. It is shown that though viscoelastic material may appear attractive for its large material damping, for gyroscopic systems it may lead to unstable vibrations.

  5. Acoustic characteristics of 1/20-scale model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.; Kohlhepp, Fred W.; Leighton, Kenneth P.

    1986-01-01

    A wind tunnel test to study the effects of geometric scale on acoustics and to investigate the applicability of very small scale models for the study of acoustic characteristics of helicopter rotors was conducted in the United Technologies Research Center Acoustic Research Tunnel. The results show that the Reynolds number effects significantly alter the Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) Noise characteristics by enhancing the lower frequency content and suppressing the higher frequency content. In the time domain this is observed as an inverted thickness noise impulse rather than the typical positive-negative impulse of BVI noise. At higher advance ratio conditions, in the absence of BVI, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends with Mach number follow those of larger scale models. However, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends appear to indicate stall at higher thrust and advance ratio conditions.

  6. Rigid rotor as a toy model for Hodge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Malik, R. P.

    2010-07-01

    We apply the superfield approach to the toy model of a rigid rotor and show the existence of the nilpotent and absolutely anticommuting Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) and anti-BRST symmetry transformations, under which, the kinetic term and the action remain invariant. Furthermore, we also derive the off-shell nilpotent and absolutely anticommuting (anti-) co-BRST symmetry transformations, under which, the gauge-fixing term and the Lagrangian remain invariant. The anticommutator of the above nilpotent symmetry transformations leads to the derivation of a bosonic symmetry transformation, under which, the ghost terms and the action remain invariant. Together, the above transformations (and their corresponding generators) respect an algebra that turns out to be a physical realization of the algebra obeyed by the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry. Thus, our present model is a toy model for the Hodge theory.

  7. V/STOL tilt rotor study. Volume 6: Hover, low speed and conversion tests of a tilt rotor aeroelastic model (Model 300)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, R. L.; Sambell, K. W.; Neal, G. T.

    1973-01-01

    Stability and control tests of a scale model of a tilt rotor research aircraft were conducted. The characteristics of the model for hover, low speed, and conversion flight were analyzed. Hover tests were conducted in a rotor whirl cage. Helicopter and conversion tests were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel. Data obtained from the tests are presented as tables and graphs. Diagrams and illustrations of the test equipment are provided.

  8. Reduction of high-speed impulsive noise by blade planform modification of a model helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. A.; Hoad, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The reduction of high speed impulsive noise for the UH-1H helicopter was investigated by using an advanced main rotor system. The advanced rotor system had a tapered blade planform compared with the rectangular planform of the standard rotor system. Models of both the advanced main rotor system and the UH-1H standard main rotor system were tested at 1/4 scale in the 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel. In plane acoustic measurements of the high speed impulsive noise demonstrated that the advanced rotor system on the UH-1H helicopter reduced the high speed impulsive noise by up to 20 dB, with a reduction in overall sound pressure level of up to 5 dB.

  9. Symmetry in the Generalized Rotor Model for Extremely Floppy Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Protonated methane CH_5^+ is unique: It is an extremely fluxional molecule. All attempts to assign quantum numbers to the high-resolution transitions obtained over the last 20 years have failed because molecular rotation and vibration cannot be separated in the conventional way. The first step towards a theoretical description is to include internal rotational degrees of freedom into the overall ones, which can be used to formulate a fundamentally new zero order approximation for the (now) generalized rotational states and energies. Predictions from this simple five-dimensional rotor model compare very favorably with the combination differences of protonated methane found in recent low temperature experiments. This talk will focus on symmetry aspects and implications of permutation symmetry for the generalized rotational states. Furthermore, refinements of the theory will be discussed, ranging from the generalization to even higher-dimensional rotors to explicit symmetry breaking and corresponding energy splittings. The latter includes the link to well-known theories of internal rotation dynamics and will show the general validity of the presented theory. Schmiedt, H., et al.; J. Chem. Phys. 143 (15), 154302 (2015) Wodraszka, R. et al.; J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 4229-4232 (2015) Asvany, O. et al.; Science, 347, (6228), 1346-1349 (2015)

  10. Model rotor high-speed impulsive noise - Parametric variations and full-scale comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a 1/7-scale model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor test in the German-Dutch anechoic wind tunnel are discussed, with emphasis given on exploring the important scaling parameters of helicopter-rotor high-speed impulsive noise. Nondimensional parameters are derived from the governing equations and employed to compare the model rotor measurements with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. The peak acoustic pressure, impulsive noise directivity, and acoustic waveform of the model are found to scale well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Parametric variations of the model-rotor acoustic measurements, such as the change of the high-speed impulsive noise level over a range of advancing-tip Mach numbers at constant advance ratio or constant velocity, are presented. It is concluded that model-scale rotors can be used to explore potential acoustic design innovations on full-scale helicopters.

  11. Vibration model of rolling element bearings in a rotor-bearing system for fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Feiyun; Chen, Jin; Dong, Guangming; Pecht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Rolling element bearing faults are among the main causes of breakdown in rotating machines. In this paper, a rolling bearing fault model is proposed based on the dynamic load analysis of a rotor-bearing system. The rotor impact factor is taken into consideration in the rolling bearing fault signal model. The defect load on the surface of the bearing is divided into two parts, the alternate load and the determinate load. The vibration response of the proposed fault signal model is investigated and the fault signal calculating equation is derived through dynamic and kinematic analysis. Outer race and inner race fault simulations are realized in the paper. The simulation process includes consideration of several parameters, such as the gravity of the rotor-bearing system, the imbalance of the rotor, and the location of the defect on the surface. The simulation results show that different amplitude contributions of the alternate load and determinate load will cause different envelope spectrum expressions. The rotating frequency sidebands will occur in the envelope spectrum in addition to the fault characteristic frequency. This appearance of sidebands will increase the difficulty of fault recognition in intelligent fault diagnosis. The experiments given in the paper have successfully verified the proposed signal model simulation results. The test rig design of the rotor bearing system simulated several operating conditions: (1) rotor bearing only; (2) rotor bearing with loader added; (3) rotor bearing with loader and rotor disk; and (4) bearing fault simulation without rotor influence. The results of the experiments have verified that the proposed rolling bearing signal model is important to the rolling bearing fault diagnosis of rotor-bearing systems.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of bearingless rotors - Model development and experimental correlation of modes, response, trim and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jambunathan, V.; Murthy, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    A generic mathematical model that is capable of accurately modeling the multiple load path bearingless rotor blade is developed. A comprehensive, finite element based solution for the natural vibration of the rotor blade is developed. An iterative scheme based on harmonic balance is used to evaluate the nonlinear response of the rotor to control inputs and a Newton-Raphson procedure is employed to evaluate the trim of rotorcraft. Linearized perturbation model of the nonlinear system are presented. The model is validated by comparing with existing whirl tower, wind tunnel and flight test results of BMR/BO-105 helicopter. Frequencies of two bearingless rotor blades compare well with results from experiments. Nonlinear response and trim results are presented for the bearingless BMR/BO-105 rotor. Aeroelastic stability in forward flight, evaluated using floquet theory agrees with test data in general.

  13. Aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/6-scale powered model of the rotor systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Freeman, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effects of the main-rotor wake on the aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor systems research aircraft (RSRA). For the investigation, a 1/6-scale model with a four-blade articulated main rotor was used. Tests were conducted with and without the main rotor. Both the helicopter and the compound helicopter were tested. The latter configuration included the auxiliary thrust engines and the variable-incidence wing. Data were obtained over ranges of angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and main-rotor collective pitch angle at several main-rotor advance ratios. Results are presented for the total loads on the airframe as well as the loads on the rotor, the wing, and the tail. The results indicated that without the effect of the rotor wake, the RSRA had static longitudinal and directional stability and positive effective dihedral. With the effect of the main rotor and its wake, the RSRA exhibited longitudinal instability but retained static directional stability and positive effective dihedral.

  14. Computation of rotor aerodynamic loads with a constant vorticity contour free wake model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method is presented which facilitates the study of isolated rotors with an improved approach to wake simulation. Vortex filaments are simulated along contours of constant sheet strength for the sheet of vorticity resulting from each rotor blade. Curved vortex elements comprise the filaments which can be distorted by the local velocity field. Called the Constant Vorticity Contour wake model, the approach permits the simulation of the blades' wakes corresponding to the full span of the rotor blade. The discretization of the wake of the rotor blade produces spacing and structure that are consistent with the spatial and temporal variations in the loading. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the blade is also included which introduces a finite-element structural model of the blade and consideration of the force and moment trim analysis. Results of the present version of the simulation, called RotorCRAFT, are found to correlate well with H-34 flight-test data.

  15. Experimental study of performance degradation of a model helicopter main rotor with simulated ice shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkan, K. D.; Cross, E. J., Jr.; Cornell, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study utilizing a remote controlled model helicopter has been conducted to measure the performance degradation due to simulated ice accretion on the leading edge of the main rotor for hover and forward flight. The 53.375 inch diameter main rotor incorporates a NACA 0012 airfoil with a generic ice shape corresponding to a specified natural ice condition. Thrust coefficients and torque coefficients about the main rotor were measured as a function of velocity, main rotor RPM, angle-of-incidence of the fuselage, collective pitch angle, and extent of spanwise ice accretion. An experimental airfoil data bank has been determined using a two-dimensional twenty-one inch NACA 0012 airfoil with scaled ice accretion shapes identical to that used on the model helicopter main rotor. The corresponding experimental data are discussed with emphasis on Reynolds number effects and ice accretion scale model testing.

  16. Modelling Aerodynamically Generated Sound: Recent Advances in Rotor Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound for rotors over the past decade. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H ) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparison of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems.

  17. An experimental investigation of the helicopter rotor blade element airloads on a model rotor in the blade stall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. K., Jr.; Tompkins, J. E.; Bobo, C. J.; Child, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program was conducted on an eight foot diameter model rotor system to determine blade element airloads characteristics in the unstalled and stalled flight regimes. The fully articulated model rotor system utilized three blades with a Vertol 23010-1.58 airfoil section, the blades being 1/7.5 scale models of the Ch-47C rotor blades. Instrumentation was incorporated at the blade 75% radial station to measure pressure and skin friction distributions, surface streamline directions and local angle of attack. The test program was conducted in three phases; non-rotating, hover and forward flight at advance ratios of 0.15, 0.35 and 0.60. Test data were analyzed with respect to providing insight to the mechanisms affecting blade stall, particularly retreating blade stall during forward flight conditions. From such data, an assessment was made as to the applicability of current theoretical analyses used for the prediction of blade element airloads in the stall regime.

  18. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Three cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model of a hingeless rotor and fuselage in hover. The first case examined the stability of a configuration with 0 degree blade pitch so that coupling between dynamic modes was minimized. The second case was identical to the first except the blade pitch was set to 9 degrees which provides flap-lag coupling of the rotor modes. The third case had 9 degrees of blade pitch and also included negative pitch-lag coupling, and therefore was the most highly coupled configuration. Analytical calculations were made by Bell Helicopter Textron, Boeing Vertol, Hughes Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory, and NASA Ames Research Center and compared to some or all of the experimental cases. Overall, the correlation ranged from very poor-to-poor to good.

  19. Analysis of the wind tunnel test of a tilt rotor power force model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, R. L.; Ford, D. G.; Ferguson, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Two series of wind tunnel tests were made to determine performance, stability and control, and rotor wake interaction on the airframe, using a one-tenth scale powered force model of a tilt rotor aircraft. Testing covered hover (IGE/OCE), helicopter, conversion, and airplane flight configurations. Forces and moments were recorded for the model from predetermined trim attitudes. Control positions were adjusted to trim flight (one-g lift, pitching moment and drag zero) within the uncorrected test data balance accuracy. Pitch and yaw sweeps were made about the trim attitudes with the control held at the trimmed settings to determine the static stability characteristics. Tail on, tail off, rotors on, and rotors off configurations were testes to determine the rotor wake effects on the empennage. Results are presented and discussed.

  20. Torque generation through the random movement of an asymmetric rotor: A potential rotational mechanism of the γ subunit of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y. C.; Hsiao, Yi-Feng; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; To, Kiwing

    2016-02-01

    The rotation of the γ subunit of F1-ATPase is stochastic, processive, unidirectional, reversible through an external torque, and stepwise with a slow rotation. We propose a mechanism that can explain these properties of the rotary molecular motor, and that can determine the direction of rotation. The asymmetric structures of the γ subunit, both at the tip of the shaft (C and N termini) and at the part (ɛ subunit) protruding from the α3β3 subunits, are critical. The torque required for stochastic rotation is generated from the impulsive reactive force due to the random collisions between the γ subunit and the quasihexagonal α3β3 subunits. The rotation is the result of the random motion of the confined asymmetric γ subunit. The steps originate from the chemical reactions of the γ subunit and physical interaction between the γ subunit and the flexible protrusions of the α3β3 subunits. An external torque as well as a configurational modification in the γ subunit (the central rotor) can reverse the rotational direction. We demonstrate the applicability of the mechanism to a macroscopic simulation system, which has the essential ingredients of the F1-ATPase structure, by reproducing the dynamic properties of the rotation.

  1. Takeoff/approach noise for a model counterrotation propeller with a forward-swept upstream rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hall, David G.; Podboy, Gary G.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model of a counterrotating propeller with forward-swept blades in the forward rotor and aft-swept blades in the aft rotor (designated F39/A31) has been tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. This paper presents aeroacoustic results at a takeoff/approach condition of Mach 0.20. Laser Doppler Velocimeter results taken in a plane between the two rotors are also included to quantify the interaction flow field. The intention of the forward-swept design is to reduce the magnitude of the forward rotor tip vortex and/or wakes which impinge on the aft rotor, thus lowering the interaction tone levels.

  2. Vibratory Loads Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Structurally Tailored Model Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Idol, Robert F.; Mirick, Paul H.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to investigate the use of a Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) rotor structural tailoring concept, known as rotor nodalization, in conjunction with advanced blade aerodynamics as well as to evaluate rotor blade aerodynamic design methodologies. A 1/5-size, four-bladed bearingless hub, three sets of Mach-scaled model rotor blades were tested in forward flight from transition up to an advance ratio of 0.35. The data presented pertain only to the evaluation of the structural tailoring concept and consist of fixed-system and rotating system vibratory loads. These data will be useful for evaluating the effects of tailoring blade structural properties on fixed-system vibratory loads, as well as validating analyses used in the design of advanced rotor systems.

  3. Distributed model for electromechanical interaction in rotordynamics of cage rotor electrical machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiho, Antti; Holopainen, Timo P.; Klinge, Paul; Arkkio, Antero

    2007-05-01

    In this work the effects of the electromechanical interaction on rotordynamics and vibration characteristics of cage rotor electrical machines were considered. An eccentric rotor motion distorts the electromagnetic field in the air-gap between the stator and rotor inducing a total force, the unbalanced magnetic pull, exerted on the rotor. In this paper a low-order parametric model for the unbalanced magnetic pull is coupled with a three-dimensional finite element structural model of the electrical machine. The main contribution of the work is to present a computationally efficient electromechanical model for vibration analysis of cage rotor machines. In this model, the interaction between the mechanical and electromagnetic systems is distributed over the air gap of the machine. This enables the inclusion of rotor and stator deflections into the analysis and, thus, yields more realistic prediction for the effects of electromechanical interaction. The model was tested by implementing it for two electrical machines with nominal speeds close to one of the rotor bending critical speeds. Rated machine data was used in order to predict the effects of the electromechanical interaction on vibration characteristics of the example machines.

  4. Effects of Different Rub Models on Simulated Rotor Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    disks were overhung thermal mismatch, rotor imbalance, high "g" maneuver and the third was centered with respect to the bearing loads, aerodynamic...system Aas assumed to be balanced prior to It is known that rotor rubs can have an important blade loss and operating at 160 Hz (9550 rpm). The blade...that can drive a rotor 130 -Mmn (5-mil) mass eccentricity in only one of the to whiI in a direction opposite to the direction of overhung disks. Each

  5. Dynamic approximate entropy electroanatomic maps detect rotors in a simulated atrial fibrillation model.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Juan P; Orozco-Duque, Andrés; Tobón, Catalina; Kremen, Vaclav; Novak, Daniel; Saiz, Javier; Oesterlein, Tobias; Schmitt, Clauss; Luik, Armin; Bustamante, John

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that rotors could be drivers that maintain atrial fibrillation. Complex fractionated atrial electrograms have been located in rotor tip areas. However, the concept of electrogram fractionation, defined using time intervals, is still controversial as a tool for locating target sites for ablation. We hypothesize that the fractionation phenomenon is better described using non-linear dynamic measures, such as approximate entropy, and that this tool could be used for locating the rotor tip. The aim of this work has been to determine the relationship between approximate entropy and fractionated electrograms, and to develop a new tool for rotor mapping based on fractionation levels. Two episodes of chronic atrial fibrillation were simulated in a 3D human atrial model, in which rotors were observed. Dynamic approximate entropy maps were calculated using unipolar electrogram signals generated over the whole surface of the 3D atrial model. In addition, we optimized the approximate entropy calculation using two real multi-center databases of fractionated electrogram signals, labeled in 4 levels of fractionation. We found that the values of approximate entropy and the levels of fractionation are positively correlated. This allows the dynamic approximate entropy maps to localize the tips from stable and meandering rotors. Furthermore, we assessed the optimized approximate entropy using bipolar electrograms generated over a vicinity enclosing a rotor, achieving rotor detection. Our results suggest that high approximate entropy values are able to detect a high level of fractionation and to locate rotor tips in simulated atrial fibrillation episodes. We suggest that dynamic approximate entropy maps could become a tool for atrial fibrillation rotor mapping.

  6. Aerodynamic and acoustic test of a United Technologies model scale rotor at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Liu, Sandy R.; Jordan, Dave E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.; Lorber, Peter F.; Pollack, Michael J.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1990-01-01

    The UTC model scale rotors, the DNW wind tunnel, the AFDD rotary wing test stand, the UTRC and AFDD aerodynamic and acoustic data acquisition systems, and the scope of test matrices are discussed and an introduction to the test results is provided. It is pointed out that a comprehensive aero/acoustic database of several configurations of the UTC scaled model rotor has been created. The data is expected to improve understanding of rotor aerodynamics, acoustics, and dynamics, and lead to enhanced analytical methodology and design capabilities for the next generation of rotorcraft.

  7. Model updating of rotor systems by using Nonlinear least square optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. K.; Dewangan, P.; Sarangi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Mathematical models of structure or machineries are always different from the existing physical system, because the approach of numerical predictions to the behavior of a physical system is limited by the assumptions used in the development of the mathematical model. Model updating is, therefore necessary so that updated model should replicate the physical system. This work focuses on the model updating of rotor systems at various speeds as well as at different modes of vibration. Support bearing characteristics severely influence the dynamics of rotor systems like turbines, compressors, pumps, electrical machines, machine tool spindles etc. Therefore bearing parameters (stiffness and damping) are considered to be updating parameters. A finite element model of rotor systems is developed using Timoshenko beam element. Unbalance response in time domain and frequency response function have been calculated by numerical techniques, and compared with the experimental data to update the FE-model of rotor systems. An algorithm, based on unbalance response in time domain is proposed for updating the rotor systems at different running speeds of rotor. An attempt has been made to define Unbalance response assurance criterion (URAC) to check the degree of correlation between updated FE model and physical model.

  8. CFD modeling and analysis of rotor wake in hover interacting with a ground plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Tarandeep Singh

    The action of the rotor wake on loose sediment on the ground is primarily responsible for inducing the rotorcraft brownout phenomenon. Therefore, any simulation of brownout must be capable of accurately predicting the velocity field induced by the rotor when it is operating in ground effect. This work attempts to use a compressible, structured, overset Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based solver to simulate hovering rotors in ground effect (IGE) to demonstrate the capability of the code to provide accurate tip vortex flow field predictions, and provide a good understanding of the ground-wake interactions. The computations are performed for a micro-scale rotor (0.086m radius, aspect ratio of 4.387 operating at a tip Mach number of 0.08 and Reynolds number of 32,500) and a sub-scale rotor (0.408m radius, aspect ratio of 9.132 operating at a tip Mach number of 0.24 and Reynolds number of 250,000) in order to compare to experimental measurements. The micro-scale rotor has a rectangular tip shape and is simulated three rotor heights: 1.5R, 1.0R and 0.5R above ground (R = Rotor radius). The sub-scale rotor is simulated at one particular rotor height (i.e. 1R) but with four different tip shapes: rectangular, swept, BERP-like and slotted tip. Various mesh placement strategies are devised to efficiently capture the path of the tip vortices for both regimes. The micro-scale rotor simulations are performed using the Spalart Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model. The examination of the IGE tip vortex flow field suggests high degree of instabilities close to the ground. In addition, the induced velocities arising from the proximity of the rotor tip vortices causes flow separation at the ground. The sub-scale rotor simulations show a smeared out flow field even at early wake ages due to excessive turbulence levels. The distance function in the S-A turbulence model is modified using the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) approach and a correction to length scaling is

  9. On determining the acoustic properties of main helicopter rotor models on an open test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Zaitsev, M. Yu.; Ostrikov, N. N.; Denisov, S. L.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Anikin, V. A.; Gromov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on developing a technique to determine the acoustic properties of models of main helicopter rotors on an open test bench. The method of maximum length sequences is used to choose the optimum arrangement of microphones for an open test bench that would minimize the influence of parasitic echo. The results of processing the data of an acoustic experiment with a model rotor are detailed.

  10. Matrix product states and the non-Abelian rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsted, Ashley

    2016-04-01

    We use uniform matrix product states to study the (1 +1 )D O (2 ) and O (4 ) rotor models, which are equivalent to the Kogut-Susskind formulation of matter-free non-Abelian lattice gauge theory on a "Hawaiian earring" graph for U (1 ) and S U (2 ), respectively. Applying tangent space methods to obtain ground states and determine the mass gap and the β function, we find excellent agreement with known results, locating the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition for O (2 ) and successfully entering the asymptotic weak-coupling regime for O (4 ). To obtain a finite local Hilbert space, we truncate in the space of generalized Fourier modes of the gauge group, comparing the effects of different cutoff values. We find that higher modes become important in the crossover and weak-coupling regimes of the non-Abelian theory, where entanglement also suddenly increases. This could have important consequences for tensor network state studies of Yang-Mills on higher-dimensional graphs.

  11. Dynamics of multilayer, multidisc viscoelastic rotor - An operator based higher order classical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, H.; Chandraker, S.; Dutt, J. K.; Roy, T.

    2016-05-01

    Inherent material damping plays a very significant role on dynamic behaviour of rotors. The material damping in a spinning rotor produces a tangential force along the whirl direction and its magnitude being proportional to spin speed. After certain value of spin speed, decided by the characteristic of the system, the tangential force becomes strong enough to throw the rotor centre out of the whirl orbit by inflating it progressively. This leads to destabilization of the system and corresponding speed is known as stability limit of spin speed. Stability limit of spin speed for Jeffcott rotor, by using viscous form of material damping model is straight forward and has been reported by several researchers, however the same analysis for viscoelastic material characteristics is not reported much. This analysis is very relevant for industrial requirements to replace bulky and heavy metal rotor by light but strong rotors. This is achieved either by reinforcing fibre or multi layering arrangements. Both of which are represented by viscoelastic constitutive behaviour. This paper gives mathematical derivation of equations of motion for multi-disc, multi-layered rotor-shaft-system. Both lumped mass and discretized approach (finite element) are presented here mathematically and numerical simulation results are compared. The lumped mass approach gives a concise yet acceptable accuracy of the results.

  12. Evaluation of a load cell model for dynamic calibration of the rotor systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, R. W.; Bahrami, H.; Wellman, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft uses load cells to isolate the rotor/transmission system from the fuselage. An analytical model of the relationship between applied rotor loads and the resulting load cell measurements is derived by applying a force-and-moment balance to the isolated rotor/transmission system. The model is then used to estimate the applied loads from measured load cell data, as obtained from a ground-based shake test. Using nominal design values for the parameters, the estimation errors, for the case of lateral forcing, were shown to be on the order of the sensor measurement noise in all but the roll axis. An unmodeled external load appears to be the source of the error in this axis.

  13. Noise of a model helicopter rotor due to ingestion of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of a model helicoper rotor due to ingestion of turbulence was conducted. Experiments were performed with a 0.76 m dia, articulated model rotor for a range of inflow turbulence and rotor operating conditions. Inflow turbulence levels varied from approximately 2 to 19 percent and tip Mach number was varied from 0.3 to 0.52. Test conditions included ingestion of a atmospheric turbulence in outdoor hover as well as ingestion of grid generated isotropic turbulence in the wind tunnel airstream. In wind tunnel testing, both forward flight and vertical ascent (climb) were simulated. Far field noise spectra and directivity were measured in addition to incident turbulence intensities, length scales, and spectra. Results indicate that ingestion of atmospheric turbulence is the dominant helicopter rotor hover noise mechanism at the moderate to high frequencies which determine perceived noise level.

  14. On the nonlinear problem of the three-axis reorientation of a three-rotor gyrostat in the game noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotnikov, V. I.; Martyshenko, Yu. G.

    2013-09-01

    The nonlinear game problem of the three-axis reorientation of an asymmetric solid body with three flywheels (rotors) has been solved. Acceptable levels of uncontrollable noise depending on given constraints of control moments have been estimated.

  15. Effect of advanced rotorcraft airfoil sections on the hover performance of a small-scale rotor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Althoff, Susan L.

    1988-01-01

    A hover test was conducted on a small scale rotor model for two sets of tapered rotor blades. The baseline rotor blade set used a NACA 0012 airfoil section, whereas the second rotor blade set had advanced rotorcraft airfoils distributed along the radius. The experiment was conducted for a range of thrust coefficients and tip speeds, and the data were compared to the predictions of three analytical methods. The data show the advantage of the advanced airfoils at the higher rotor thrust levels; two of the analyses predicted the correct data trends.

  16. Elastoplastic viscous model of rotor-stator impact interaction without separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. N.; Shokhin, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact interaction without separation between a flexible rotor and a rigid stator is analyzed in the framework of the plane model based on the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinates and the Hertz, Rivin, and Gerstner relations. It is shown that there are critical values of the system parameters at which the so-called asynchronous rolling of the rotor on the stator arises.

  17. A synchronous strobed laser light sheet for helicopter model rotor flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.; Franke, John M.

    1990-01-01

    A synchronous, strobed laser light sheet has been developed for use in flow visualization of a helicopter rotor model. The light sheet strobe circuit included selectable blade position, strobe duration, and multiple pulses per revolution for rotors having 2 to 9 blades. The flow was seeded with propylene glycol. Between runs, a calibration grid board was placed in the plane of the laser sheet and recorded with the video camera at the position used to record the flow field. A slip-sync mode permitted slow motion visualization of the flow field over complete rotations of the rotor. The system was used to make two-dimensional flow field cuts of a four-bladed rotor operating at advance ratio of 0.37 at wind tunnel speeds up to 79.25 meters per second (260 feet per second).

  18. Calculation of the Aerodynamic Behavior of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of measured and calculated aerodynamic behavior of a tiltrotor model are presented. The test of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) with a single, 1/4-scale V- 22 rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) provides an extensive set of aeroacoustic, performance, and structural loads data. The calculations were performed using the rotorcraft comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. Presented are comparisons of measured and calculated performance and airloads for helicopter mode operation, as well as calculated induced and profile power. An aerodynamic and wake model and calculation procedure that reflects the unique geometry and phenomena of tiltrotors has been developed. There are major differences between this model and the corresponding aerodynamic and wake model that has been established for helicopter rotors. In general, good correlation between measured and calculated performance and airloads behavior has been shown. Two aspects of the analysis that clearly need improvement are the stall delay model and the trailed vortex formation model.

  19. Takeoff/approach noise for a model counterrotation propeller with a forward-swept upstream rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hall, David G.; Podboy, Gary G.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model of a counterrotating propeller with forward-swept blades in the forward rotor and aft-swept blades in the aft rotor (designated F39/A31) has been tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. This paper presents aeroacoustic results at a takeoff/approach condition of Mach 0.20. Laser Doppler velocimeter results taken in a plane between the two rotors are also included to quantify the interaction flow field. The intention of the forward-swept design is to reduce the magnitude of the forward rotor tip vortex and/or wakes which impinge on the aft rotor, thus lowering the interaction tone levels. A reference model propeller (designated F31/A31), having aft-swept blades in both rotors, was also tested. Aeroelastic performance of the F39/A31 propeller was disappointing. The forward rotor tip region tended to untwist toward higher effective blade angles under load. The forward rotor also exhibited steady state blade flutter at speeds and loadings well below the design condition. The noise results, based on sideline acoustic data, show that the interaction tone levels were up to 8 dB higher with the forward-swept design compared to those for the reference propeller at similar operating conditions, with these tone level differences extending down to lower propeller speeds where flutter did not occur. These acoustic results are for a poorly-performing forward-swept propeller. It is quite possible that a properly-designed forward-swept propeller would exhibit substantial interaction tone level reductions.

  20. A flight-dynamic helicopter mathematical model with a single flap-lag-torsion main rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model of a helicopter system with a single main rotor that includes rigid, hinge-restrained rotor blades with flap, lag, and torsion degrees of freedom is described. The model allows several hinge sequences and two offsets in the hinges. Quasi-steady Greenberg theory is used to calculate the blade-section aerodynamic forces, and inflow effects are accounted for by using three-state nonlinear dynamic inflow model. The motion of the rigid fuselage is defined by six degrees of freedom, and an optional rotor rpm degree of freedom is available. Empennage surfaces and the tail rotor are modeled, and the effect of main-rotor downwash on these elements is included. Model trim linearization, and time-integration operations are described and can be applied to a subset of the model in the rotating or nonrotating coordinate frame. A preliminary validation of the model is made by comparing its results with those of other analytical and experimental studies. This publication presents the results of research compiled in November 1989.

  1. A mathematical simulation model of a 1985-era tilt-rotor passenger aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcveigh, M. A.; Widdison, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model for use in real-time piloted simulation of a 1985-era tilt rotor passenger aircraft is presented. The model comprises the basic six degrees-of-freedom equations of motion, and a large angle of attack representation of the airframe and rotor aerodynamics, together with equations and functions used to model turbine engine performance, aircraft control system and stability augmentation system. A complete derivation of the primary equations is given together with a description of the modeling techniques used. Data for the model is included in an appendix.

  2. Thermal Modeling of Disc Brake Rotor in Frictional Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Belhocine; Ghazaly, Nouby Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Safety aspect in automotive engineering has been considered as a number one priority in development of new vehicle. Each single system has been studied and developed in order to meet safety requirement. Instead of having air bag, good suspension systems, good handling and safe cornering, there is one most critical system in the vehicle which is brake systems. The objective of this work is to investigate and analyze the temperature distribution of rotor disc during braking operation using ANSYS Multiphysics. The work uses the finite element analysis techniques to predict the temperature distribution on the full and ventilated brake disc and to identify the critical temperature of the rotor. The analysis also gives us, the heat flux distribution for the two discs.

  3. Development of an Open Rotor Cycle Model in NPSS Using a Multi-Design Point Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project and Subsonic Fixed Wing Project are focused on developing concepts and technologies which may enable dramatic reductions to the environmental impact of future generation subsonic aircraft (Refs. 1 and 2). The open rotor concept (also referred to as the Unducted Fan or advanced turboprop) may allow the achievement of this objective by reducing engine emissions and fuel consumption. To evaluate its potential impact, an open rotor cycle modeling capability is needed. This paper presents the initial development of an open rotor cycle model in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) computer program which can then be used to evaluate the potential benefit of this engine. The development of this open rotor model necessitated addressing two modeling needs within NPSS. First, a method for evaluating the performance of counter-rotating propellers was needed. Therefore, a new counter-rotating propeller NPSS component was created. This component uses propeller performance maps developed from historic counter-rotating propeller experiments to determine the thrust delivered and power required. Second, several methods for modeling a counter-rotating power turbine within NPSS were explored. These techniques used several combinations of turbine components within NPSS to provide the necessary power to the propellers. Ultimately, a single turbine component with a conventional turbine map was selected. Using these modeling enhancements, an open rotor cycle model was developed in NPSS using a multi-design point approach. The multi-design point (MDP) approach improves the engine cycle analysis process by making it easier to properly size the engine to meet a variety of thrust targets throughout the flight envelope. A number of design points are considered including an aerodynamic design point, sea-level static, takeoff and top of climb. The development of this MDP model was also enabled by the selection of a simple power

  4. Asymmetric dark matter models and the LHC diphoton excess

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2016-05-31

    The existence of dark matter (DM) and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are persistent indications that the SM is incomplete. More recently, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have observed an excess of diphoton events with invariant mass of about 750 GeV. One interpretation of this excess is decays of a new spin-0 particle with a sizable diphoton partial width, e.g. induced by new heavy weakly charged particles. These are also key ingredients in models cogenerating asymmetric DM and baryons via sphaleron interactions and an initial particle asymmetry. We explore what consequences the new scalar may have for models of asymmetric DM that attempt to account for the similarity of the dark and visible matter abundances.

  5. Exact results for the one dimensional asymmetric exclusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Evans, M. R.; Hakim, V.; Pasquier, V.

    1993-11-01

    The asymmetric exclusion model describes a system of particles hopping in a preferred direction with hard core repulsion. These particles can be thought of as charged particles in a field, as steps of an interface, as cars in a queue. Several exact results concerning the steady state of this system have been obtained recently. The solution consists of representing the weights of the configurations in the steady state as products of non-commuting matrices.

  6. A Linear City Model with Asymmetric Consumer Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Ofer H.

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes a linear-city model where the consumer distribution can be asymmetric, which is important because in real markets this distribution is often asymmetric. The model yields equilibrium price differences, even though the firms’ costs are equal and their locations are symmetric (at the two endpoints of the city). The equilibrium price difference is proportional to the transportation cost parameter and does not depend on the good's cost. The firms' markups are also proportional to the transportation cost. The two firms’ prices will be equal in equilibrium if and only if half of the consumers are located to the left of the city’s midpoint, even if other characteristics of the consumer distribution are highly asymmetric. An extension analyzes what happens when the firms have different costs and how the two sources of asymmetry – the consumer distribution and the cost per unit – interact together. The model can be useful as a tool for further development by other researchers interested in applying this simple yet flexible framework for the analysis of various topics. PMID:26034984

  7. A theoretical model of asymmetric wave ripples.

    PubMed

    Blondeaux, P; Foti, E; Vittori, G

    2015-01-28

    The time development of ripples under sea waves is investigated by means of the weakly nonlinear stability analysis of a flat sandy bottom subjected to the viscous oscillatory flow that is present in the boundary layer at the bottom of propagating sea waves. Second-order effects in the wave steepness are considered, to take into account the presence of the steady drift generated by the surface waves. Hence, the work of Vittori & Blondeaux (1990 J. Fluid Mech. 218, 19-39 (doi:10.1017/S002211209000091X)) is extended by considering steeper waves and/or less deep waters. As shown by the linear analysis of Blondeaux et al. (2000 Eur. J. Mech. B 19, 285-301 (doi:10.1016/S0997-7546(90)00106-I)), because of the presence of a steady velocity component in the direction of wave propagation, ripples migrate at a constant rate that depends on sediment and wave characteristics. The weakly nonlinear analysis shows that the ripple profile is no longer symmetric with respect to ripple crests and troughs and the symmetry index is computed as a function of the parameters of the problem. In particular, a relationship is determined between the symmetry index and the strength of the steady drift. A fair agreement between model results and laboratory data is obtained, albeit further data and analyses are necessary to determine the behaviour of vortex ripples and to be conclusive.

  8. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  9. Simplified rotor load models and fatigue damage estimates for offshore wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Muskulus, M

    2015-02-28

    The aim of rotor load models is to characterize and generate the thrust loads acting on an offshore wind turbine. Ideally, the rotor simulation can be replaced by time series from a model with a few parameters and state variables only. Such models are used extensively in control system design and, as a potentially new application area, structural optimization of support structures. Different rotor load models are here evaluated for a jacket support structure in terms of fatigue lifetimes of relevant structural variables. All models were found to be lacking in accuracy, with differences of more than 20% in fatigue load estimates. The most accurate models were the use of an effective thrust coefficient determined from a regression analysis of dynamic thrust loads, and a novel stochastic model in state-space form. The stochastic model explicitly models the quasi-periodic components obtained from rotational sampling of turbulent fluctuations. Its state variables follow a mean-reverting Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Although promising, more work is needed on how to determine the parameters of the stochastic model and before accurate lifetime predictions can be obtained without comprehensive rotor simulations.

  10. Interference resistance of pentamaran ship model with asymmetric outrigger configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuar; Ibadurrahman; Waskito, Kurniawan T.; Karim, S.; Ichsan, M.

    2017-03-01

    An experimental investigation is performed to assess the relation of interference performance on the total resistance of a pentamaran model advancing in calm water. For this motivation, the total drag of the ship is performed for several values of asymmetric outrigger configuration and hull separation, altering the Froude number in the range 0.3-0.9. Our results indicate that remarkable changes in resistance require notable changes in transverse distance values (hull separation) when wave interference may occur. In addition, there is no single configuration that consistently outperforms the other configurations across the entire speed range and the optimum interference factor -0.2 appears at a Froude number of 0.45 in S/L=0.33 with the outrigger outer position: asymmetric outboard for A3 configuration.

  11. Interference resistance of pentamaran ship model with asymmetric outrigger configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuar; Ibadurrahman; Waskito, Kurniawan T.; Karim, S.; Ichsan, M.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation is performed to assess the relation of interference performance on the total resistance of a pentamaran model advancing in calm water. For this motivation, the total drag of the ship is performed for several values of asymmetric outrigger configuration and hull separation, altering the Froude number in the range 0.3-0.9. Our results indicate that remarkable changes in resistance require notable changes in transverse distance values (hull separation) when wave interference may occur. In addition, there is no single configuration that consistently outperforms the other configurations across the entire speed range and the optimum interference factor -0.2 appears at a Froude number of 0.45 in S/L=0.33 with the outrigger outer position: asymmetric outboard for A3 configuration.

  12. Helicopter main-rotor noise: Determination of source contributions using scaled model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1988-08-01

    Acoustic data from a test of a 40 percent model MBB BO-105 helicopter main rotor are scaled to equivalent full-scale flyover cases. The test was conducted in the anechoic open test section of the German-Dutch Windtunnel (DNW). The measured data are in the form of acoustic pressure time histories and spectra from two out-of-flow microphones underneath and foward of the model. These are scaled to correspond to measurements made at locations 150 m below the flight path of a full-scale rotor. For the scaled data, a detailed analysis is given for the identification in the data of the noise contributions from different rotor noise sources. Key results include a component breakdown of the noise contributions, in terms of noise criteria calculations of a weighted sound pressure level (dBA) and perceived noise level (PNL), as functions of rotor advance ratio and descent angle. It is shown for the scaled rotor that, during descent, impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is the dominant contributor to the noise. In level flight and mild climb, broadband blade-turbulent wake interaction (BWI) noise is dominant due to the absence of BVI activity. At high climb angles, BWI is reduced and self-noise from blade boundary-layer turbulence becomes the most prominent.

  13. Helicopter main-rotor noise: Determination of source contributions using scaled model data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic data from a test of a 40 percent model MBB BO-105 helicopter main rotor are scaled to equivalent full-scale flyover cases. The test was conducted in the anechoic open test section of the German-Dutch Windtunnel (DNW). The measured data are in the form of acoustic pressure time histories and spectra from two out-of-flow microphones underneath and foward of the model. These are scaled to correspond to measurements made at locations 150 m below the flight path of a full-scale rotor. For the scaled data, a detailed analysis is given for the identification in the data of the noise contributions from different rotor noise sources. Key results include a component breakdown of the noise contributions, in terms of noise criteria calculations of a weighted sound pressure level (dBA) and perceived noise level (PNL), as functions of rotor advance ratio and descent angle. It is shown for the scaled rotor that, during descent, impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is the dominant contributor to the noise. In level flight and mild climb, broadband blade-turbulent wake interaction (BWI) noise is dominant due to the absence of BVI activity. At high climb angles, BWI is reduced and self-noise from blade boundary-layer turbulence becomes the most prominent.

  14. A comparison of model helicopter rotor Primary and Secondary blade/vortex interaction blade slap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, J. E., Jr.; Leighton, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the relative importance of blade/vortex interactions which occur on the retreating side of a model helicopter rotor disk is described. Some of the salient characteristics of this phenomenon are presented and discussed. It is shown that the resulting Secondary blade slap may be of equal or greater intensity than the advancing side (Primary) blade slap. Instrumented model helicopter rotor data is presented which reveals the nature of the retreating blade/vortex interaction. The importance of Secondary blade slap as it applies to predictive techniques or approaches is discussed. When Secondary blade slap occurs it acts to enlarge the window of operating conditions for which blade slap exists.

  15. Wind tunnel investigation of helicopter rotor wake effects on three helicopter fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Mineck, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of rotor downwash on helicopter fuselage aerodynamic characteristics were investigated. A rotor model for generating the downwash was mounted close to each of three fuselage models. The main report presents the force and moment data in both graphical and tabular form and the pressure data in graphical form. This supplement presents the pressure data in tabular form. Each run or parameter sweep is identified by a unique run number. The data points in each run are identified by a point number. The pressure data can be matched to the force data by matching the run and point number.

  16. Rotating Shake Test and Modal Analysis of a Model Helicopter Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Mirick, Paul H.; Langston, Chester W.

    1997-01-01

    Rotating blade frequencies for a model generic helicopter rotor blade mounted on an articulated hub were experimentally determined. Testing was conducted using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) testbed in the Helicopter Hover Facility (HBF) at Langley Research Center. The measured data were compared to pretest analytical predictions of the rotating blade frequencies made using the MSC/NASTRAN finite-element computer code. The MSC/NASTRAN solution sequences used to analyze the model were modified to account for differential stiffening effects caused by the centrifugal force acting on the blade and rotating system dynamic effects. The correlation of the MSC/NASTRAN-derived frequencies with the experimental data is, in general, very good although discrepancies in the blade torsional frequency trends and magnitudes were observed. The procedures necessary to perform a rotating system modal analysis of a helicopter rotor blade with MSC/NASTRAN are outlined, and complete sample data deck listings are provided.

  17. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system including auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1993-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotor-dynamic model and assess the dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing rotor system which includes the effects of auxiliary bearings. Of particular interest is the effects of introducing sideloading into such a system during failure of the magnetic bearing. A model is developed from an experimental test facility and a number of simulation studies are performed. These results are presented and discussed.

  18. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  19. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  20. The asymmetric quantum Rabi model in the polaron picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoxin; Ying, Zu-Jian; An, Jun-Hong; Luo, Hong-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qin

    2017-02-01

    The concept of the polaron in condensed matter physics has been extended to the Rabi model, where polarons resulting from the coupling between a two-level system and single-mode photons represent two oppositely displaced oscillators. Interestingly, tunneling between these two displaced oscillators can induce an anti-polaron, which has not been systematically explored in the literature, especially in the presence of an asymmetric term. In this paper, we present a systematic analysis of the competition between the polaron and anti-polaron under the interplay of the coupling strength and the asymmetric term. While intuitively the anti-polaron should be secondary owing to its higher potential energy, we find that, under certain conditions, the minor anti-polaron may gain a reversal in the weight over the major polaron. If the asymmetric amplitude ɛ is smaller than the harmonic frequency ω, such an overweighted anti-polaron can occur beyond a critical value of the coupling strength g; if ɛ is larger, the anti-polaron can even be always overweighted at any g. We propose that the explicit occurrence of the overweighted anti-polaron can be monitored by a displacement transition from negative to positive values. This displacement is an experimentally accessible observable, which can be measured by quantum optical methods, such as balanced Homodyne detection.

  1. Loads and Performance Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Generic Model Helicopter Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to acquire data for use in assessing the ability of current and future comprehensive analyses to predict helicopter rotating-system and fixed-system vibratory loads. The investigation was conducted with a generic model helicopter rotor system using blades with rectangular planform, no built-in twist, uniform radial distribution of mass and stiffnesses, and a NACA 0012 airfoil section. Rotor performance data, as well as mean and vibratory components of blade bending and torsion moments, fixed-system forces and moments, and pitch link loads were obtained at advance ratios up to 0.35 for various combinations of rotor shaft angle-of-attack and collective pitch. The data are presented without analysis.

  2. Wake Geometry Measurements and Analytical Calculations on a Small-Scale Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Berry, John D.; Zori, Laith A. J.; Elliott, Joe W.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to quantify the rotor wake behind a scale model helicopter rotor in forward level flight at one thrust level. The rotor system in this test consisted of a four-bladed fully articulated hub with blades of rectangular planform and an NACA 0012 airfoil section. A laser light sheet, seeded with propylene glycol smoke, was used to visualize the vortex geometry in the flow in planes parallel and perpendicular to the free-stream flow. Quantitative measurements of wake geometric proper- ties, such as vortex location, vertical skew angle, and vortex particle void radius, were obtained as well as convective velocities for blade tip vortices. Comparisons were made between experimental data and four computational method predictions of experimental tip vortex locations, vortex vertical skew angles, and wake geometries. The results of these comparisons highlight difficulties of accurate wake geometry predictions.

  3. The Role of Flow Diagnostic Techniques in Fan and Open Rotor Noise Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2016-01-01

    A principal source of turbomachinery noise is the interaction of the rotating and stationary blade rows with the perturbations in the airstream through the engine. As such, a lot of research has been devoted to the study of the turbomachinery noise generation mechanisms. This is particularly true of fan and open rotors, both of which are the major contributors to the overall noise output of modern aircraft engines. Much of the research in fan and open rotor noise has been focused on developing theoretical models for predicting their noise characteristics. These models, which run the gamut from the semi-empirical to fully computational ones, are, in one form or another, informed by the description of the unsteady flow-field in which the propulsors (i.e., the fan and open rotors) operate. Not surprisingly, the fidelity of the theoretical models is dependent, to a large extent, on capturing the nuances of the unsteady flowfield that have a direct role in the noise generation process. As such, flow diagnostic techniques have proven to be indispensible in identifying the shortcoming of theoretical models and in helping to improve them. This presentation will provide a few examples of the role of flow diagnostic techniques in assessing the fidelity and robustness of the fan and open rotor noise prediction models.

  4. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage. PMID:26180839

  5. Housing flexibility effects on rotor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. B.; Wolfe, E. A.; Beatty, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary rotordynamic evaluations are performed with a housing stiffness assumption that is typically determined only after the hardware is built. In addressing rotor stability, a rigid housing assumption was shown to predict an instability at a lower spin speed than a comparable flexible housing analysis. This rigid housing assumption therefore provides a conservative estimate of the stability threshold speed. A flexible housing appears to act as an energy absorber and dissipated some of the destabilizing force. The fact that a flexible housing is usually asymmetric and considerably heavier than the rotor was related to this apparent increase in rotor stability. Rigid housing analysis is proposed as a valuable screening criteria and may save time and money in construction of elaborate housing finite element models for linear stability analyses.

  6. Stress analysis of 27% scale model of AH-64 main rotor hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Stress analysis of an AH-64 27% scale model rotor hub was performed. Component loads and stresses were calculated based upon blade root loads and motions. The static and fatigue analysis indicates positive margins of safety in all components checked. Using the format developed here, the hub can be stress checked for future application.

  7. A study of the rotor wake of a small-scale rotor model in forward flight using laser light sheet flow visualization with comparisons to analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Elliott, Joe W.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the 14 by 22 ft subsonic tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center to quantify the rotor wake behind a scale model helicopter rotor in forward flight (mu = 0.15 and 0.23) at one thrust level (C sub T = 0.0064). The rotor system used in the present test consisted of a four-bladed, fully articulated hub and utilized blades of rectangular planform with a NACA-0012 airfoil section. A laser light sheet, seeded with propylene glycol smoke, was used to visualize the flow in planes parallel and perpendicular to the freestream flow. Quantitative measurements of vortex location, vertical skew angle, and vortex particle void radius were obtained for vortices in the flow; convective velocities were obtained for blade tip vortices. Comparisons were made between the experimental results and the wake geometry generated by computational predictions. The results of these comparisons show that the interaction between wake vortex structures is an important consideration for correctly predicting the wake geometry.

  8. Asymmetric adaptive modeling of central tarsal bones in racing greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Muir, P; Nicoll, R G; Roush, J K

    2000-08-01

    Fatigue fracture of the cuboidal bones of the foot, especially the navicular tarsal bone, is common in athletes and dancers. The racing greyhound is a naturally occurring animal model of this injury because both microcracking and complete fracture occur in the right central (navicular) tarsal bone (CTB). The right limb is on the outside when racing in a counter-clockwise direction on circular tracks, and is subjected to asymmetric cyclic compressive loading. We wished to study in more detail adaptive modeling in the right CTB in racing greyhounds. We hypothesized that cyclic asymmetric loading of a cuboidal bone induced by racing on a circular track would induce site-specific bone adaptation. We also hypothesized that such an adaptive response would be attenuated in greyhounds that were retired from racing and no longer subjected to cyclic asymmetric loading. Central tarsal bones from racing greyhounds (racing group, n = 6) and retired greyhounds being used for breeding (nonracing group, n = 4) were examined using quantitative computed tomography (CT). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined in a 3-mm diameter region-of-interest (ROI) in six contiguous 1-mm-thick sagittal CT slices of each CTB. Bones were subsequently examined histomorphometrically and percentage bone area (B.Ar./T.Ar., %) was determined in 10 ROI from dorsal to plantar in a transverse plane, mid-way between the proximal and distal articular surfaces. The BMD of the right CTB was greater than the left in all greyhounds (p < 0. 001). In comparing ipsilateral limbs between groups, BMD of the racing group was greater than the nonracing group for each side (p < 0.005). In sagittal plane histologic sections, bone in the dorsal region of the right CTB had undergone adaptive modeling, through thickening and compaction of trabeculae. B.Ar./T.Ar., % in the right CTB of the racing group was greater than in the contralateral CTB (p < 0.001), and the ipsilateral CTB of the nonracing group (p < 0.001). In the

  9. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study. Volume 10: Performance and stability test of A 1-14.622 Froude scaled Boeing Vertol Model 222 tilt rotor aircraft (Phase 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, F. J.; Eason, W.; Alexander, H. R.; Mutter, H.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel test data obtained from a 1/4.622 Froude scale Boeing Model 222 with a full span, two prop, tilt rotor, powered model in the Boeing V/STOL wind tunnel are reported. Data were taken in transition and cruise flight conditions and include performance, stability and control and blade loads information. The effects of the rotors, tail surfaces and airframe on the performance and stability are isolated as are the effects of the airframe on the rotors.

  10. Dynamic modelling and analysis of a magnetically suspended flexible rotor. M.S. Thesis, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, Duncan C.

    1991-01-01

    A 12-state lumped-element model is presented for a flexible rotor supported by two attractive force electromagnetic journal bearings. The rotor is modeled as a rigid disk with radial mass unbalance mounted on a flexible, massless shaft with internal damping (Jeffcott rotor). The disk is offset axially from the midspan of the shaft. Bearing dynamics in each radial direction are modeled as a parallel combination of a negative (unstable) spring and a linear current-to-force actuator. The model includes translation and rotation of the rigid mass and the first and second bending models of the flexible shaft, and it simultaneously includes internal shaft damping, gyroscopic effects, and the unstable nature of the attractive force magnetic bearings. The model is used to analyze the dependence of the system transmission zeros and open-loop poles on system parameters. The dominant open-loop poles occur in stable/unstable pairs with bandwidth dependent on the ratios of bearing (unstable) stiffnesses to rotor mass and damping dependent on the shaft spin rate. The zeros occur in complex conjugate pairs with bandwidth dependent on the ratios of shaft stiffness to rotor mass and damping dependent on the shaft spin rate. Some of the transmission zeros are non-minimum phase when the spin rate exceeds the shaft critical speed. The transmission zeros and open-loop poles impact the design of magnetic bearing control systems. The minimum loop cross-over frequency of the closed-loop system is the speed of the unstable open-loop poles. For the supercritical shaft spin rates, the presence of non-minimum phase zeros limits the distribution rejection achievable at frequencies near or above the shaft critical speed. Since non-minimum phase transmission zeros can only be changed by changing the system inputs and/or outputs, closed-loop performance is limited for supercritical spin rates unless additional force or torque actuators are added.

  11. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    SciTech Connect

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  12. Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

  13. Application of a High-Fidelity Icing Analysis Method to a Model-Scale Rotor in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert; Orr, Stanley; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    An icing analysis process involving the loose coupling of OVERFLOW-RCAS for rotor performance prediction and with LEWICE3D for thermal analysis and ice accretion is applied to a model-scale rotor for validation. The process offers high-fidelity rotor analysis for the noniced and iced rotor performance evaluation that accounts for the interaction of nonlinear aerodynamics with blade elastic deformations. Ice accumulation prediction also involves loosely coupled data exchanges between OVERFLOW and LEWICE3D to produce accurate ice shapes. Validation of the process uses data collected in the 1993 icing test involving Sikorsky's Powered Force Model. Non-iced and iced rotor performance predictions are compared to experimental measurements as are predicted ice shapes.

  14. Mutual information in a dilute, asymmetric neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Elliot

    We study the computational properties of a neural network consisting of binary neurons with dilute asymmetric synaptic connections. This simple model allows us to simulate large networks which can reflect more of the architecture and dynamics of real neural networks. Our main goal is to determine the dynamical behavior that maximizes the network's ability to perform computations. To this end, we apply information theory, measuring the average mutual information between pairs of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Communication of information between neurons is an essential requirement for collective computation. Previous workers have demonstrated that neural networks with asymmetric connections undergo a transition from ordered to chaotic behavior as certain network parameters, such as the connectivity, are changed. We find that the average mutual information has a peak near the order-chaos transition, implying that the network can most efficiently communicate information between cells in this region. The mutual information peak becomes increasingly pronounced when the basic model is extended to incorporate more biologically realistic features, such as a variable threshold and nonlinear summation of inputs. We find that the peak in mutual information near the phase transition is a robust feature of the system for a wide range of assumptions about post-synaptic integration.

  15. Modeling and Control for an Asymmetric Hydraulic Active Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Won, Sangchul

    In this paper we present a model for an automotive active suspension system which includes the dynamics of an asymmetric hydraulic actuator. In this model the force exerted by a single-rod cylinder is regarded as an internal state, and the sum of the oil flow rates through the orifice of a servo valve as the control input. We obtain a linear time-invariant (LTI) state state equation and propose a force-tracking-free one-step control method which can accept various linear control techniques. An optimal state-feedback control is applied as an example. Quarter car test rig experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in modeling and control.

  16. An asymmetric inhibition model of hemispheric differences in emotional processing

    PubMed Central

    Grimshaw, Gina M.; Carmel, David

    2014-01-01

    Two relatively independent lines of research have addressed the role of the prefrontal cortex in emotional processing. The first examines hemispheric asymmetries in frontal function; the second focuses on prefrontal interactions between cognition and emotion. We briefly review each perspective and highlight inconsistencies between them. We go on to describe an alternative model that integrates approaches by focusing on hemispheric asymmetry in inhibitory executive control processes. The asymmetric inhibition model proposes that right-lateralized executive control inhibits processing of positive or approach-related distractors, and left-lateralized control inhibits negative or withdrawal-related distractors. These complementary processes allow us to maintain and achieve current goals in the face of emotional distraction. We conclude with a research agenda that uses the model to generate novel experiments that will advance our understanding of both hemispheric asymmetries and cognition-emotion interactions. PMID:24904502

  17. Ice accretion modeling for wind turbine rotor blades

    SciTech Connect

    Chocron, D.; Brahimi, T.; Paraschivoiu, I.; Bombardier, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    The increasing application of wind energy in northern climates implies operation of wind turbines under severe atmospheric icing conditions. Such conditions are well known in the Scandinavian countries, Canada and most of Eastern European countries. An extensive study to develop a procedure for the prediction of ice accretion on wind turbines rotor blades appears to be essential for the safe and economic operation of wind turbines in these cold regions. The objective of the present paper is to develop a computer code capable of simulating the shape and amount of ice which may accumulate on horizontal axis wind turbine blades when operating in icing conditions. The resulting code is capable to predict and simulate the formation of ice in rime and glaze conditions, calculate the flow field and particle trajectories and to perform thermodynamic analysis. It also gives the possibility of studying the effect of different parameters that influence ice formation such as temperature, liquid water content, droplet diameter and accretion time. The analysis has been conducted on different typical airfoils as well as on NASA/DOE Mod-0 wind turbine. Results showed that ice accretion on wind turbines may reduce the power output by more than 20%.

  18. Some issues on modeling atmospheric turbulence experienced by helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Mark; Gaonkar, G. H.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence velocities seen by nonrotating aircraft components and rotating blades can be substantially different. The differences are due to the spatial motion of the rotor blades, which move fore and aft through the gust waves. Body-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the actual atmospheric turbulence experienced by a point fixed on a nonrotating aircraft component such as the aircraft's center of gravity or the rotor hub, while blade-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the atmospheric turbulence experienced by an element of the rotating rotor blade. An example is presented, which, though overly simplified, shows important differences between blade- and body-fixed rotorcraft atmospheric turbulence models. All of the information necessary to develop the dynamic equations describing the atmospheric turbulence velocity field experienced by an aircraft is contained in the atmospheric turbulence velocity correlation matrix. It is for this reason that a generalized formulation of the correlation matrix describing atmospheric turbulence that a rotating blade encounters is developed. From this correlation matrix, earlier treated cases restricted to a rotor flying straight and level directly into the mean wind can be recovered as special cases.

  19. Noise Benefits of Rotor Trailing Edge Blowing for a Model Turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Fite, E. Brian; Podboy, Gary G.

    2007-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects associated with rotor Trailing-Edge-Blowing (TEB) for a modern, 1.294 stage pressure ratio turbofan model. The TEB rotor (Fan9) was designed to be aerodynamically similar to the previously tested Fan1, and used the same stator and nacelle hardware. Fan9 was designed with trailing edge blowing slots using an external air supply directed through the rotor hub. The TEB flow was heated to approximate the average fan exit temperature at each fan test speed. Rotor root blockage inserts were used to block TEB to all but the outer 40 and 20% span in addition to full-span blowing. A configuration with full-span TEB on alternate rotor blades was also tested. Far field acoustic data were taken at takeoff/approach conditions at 0.10 tunnel Mach. Far-field acoustic results showed that full-span blowing near 2.0% of the total flow could reduce the overall sound power level by about 2 dB. This noise reduction was observed in both the rotor-stator interaction tones and for the spectral broadband noise levels. Blowing only the outer span region was not very effective for lowering noise, and actually increased the far field noise level in some instances. Full-span blowing of alternate blades at 1.0% of the overall flow rate (equivalent to full-span blowing of all blades at 2.0% flow) showed a more modest noise decrease relative to full-span blowing of all blades. Detailed hot film measurements of the TEB rotor wake at 2.0% flow showed that TEB was not every effective for filling in the wake defect at approach fan speed toward the tip region, but did result in overfilling the wake toward the hub. Downstream turbulence measurements supported this finding, and support the observed reduction in spectral broadband noise.

  20. Development of a comprehensive analysis for rotorcraft. I - Rotor model and wake analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics is described. Particular emphasis is given to describing the reasons behind the choices and decisions involved in constructing the model. The analysis is designed to calculate rotor performance, loads and noise; helicopter vibration and gust response; flight dynamics and handling qualities; and system aeroelastic stability. It is intended for use in the design, testing and evaluation of a wide class of rotors and rotorcraft, and to be the basis for further development of rotary wing theories. The general characteristics of the geometric, structural, inertial, and aerodynamic models used for the rotorcraft components are described, including the assumptions introduced by the chosen models and the resulting capabilities and limitations. Finally, some examples from recent applications of the analysis are given.

  1. Modeling and control of a flexible rotor system with AMB-based sustentation.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, I; Jugo, J; Etxebarria, V

    2008-01-01

    In this work the modeling and basic control design process of a rotary flexible spindle hovered by Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) whose good capabilities for machine-tool industry extensively treated in the literature is presented. The modeling takes into account the three main behavioral characteristics of such magnetically-levitated rotor: the rigid dynamics, the flexible dynamics and the rotating unbalanced motion. Besides, the gyroscopic coupling is also studied proving that in this case, its effects are not significant and can be neglected. Using this model, a stabilizing controller based on symmetry properties is successfully designed for the system and a complete experimental analysis of its performance is carried out. Also, the predictions of the model are compared with the actual measured experimental results on a laboratory set-up based on the MBC500 Rotor Dynamics. Afterwards, a brief study about some nonlinear behavior observed in the system and its effect over the system stability at the critical speed is included.

  2. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Counter-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  3. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Contra-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  4. Estimation of rotor effective wind speeds using autoregressive models on Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giyanani, A.; Bierbooms, W. A. A. M.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Lidars have become increasingly useful for providing accurate wind speed measurements in front of the wind turbine. The wind field measured at distant meteorological masts changes its structure or was too distorted before it reaches the turbine. Thus, one cannot simply apply Taylor's frozen turbulence for representing this distant flow field at the rotor. Wind turbine controllers can optimize the energy output and reduce the loads significantly, if the wind speed estimates were known in advance with high accuracy and low uncertainty. The current method to derive wind speed estimations from aerodynamic torque, pitch angle and tip speed ratio after the wind field flows past the turbine and have their limitations, e.g. in predicting gusts. Therefore, an estimation model coupled with the measuring capability of nacelle based Lidars was necessary for detecting extreme events and for estimating accurate wind speeds at the rotor disc. Nacelle-mounted Lidars measure the oncoming wind field from utpo 400m(5D) in front of the turbine and appropriate models could be used for deriving the rotor effective wind speed from these measurements. This article proposes an auto-regressive model combined with a method to include the blockage factor in order to estimate the wind speeds accurately using Lidar measurements. An Armax model was used to determine the transfer function that models the physical evolution of wind towards the wind turbine, incorporating the effect of surface roughness, wind shear and wind variability at the site. The model could incorporate local as well as global effects and was able to predict the rotor effective wind speeds with adequate accuracy for wind turbine control actions. A high correlation of 0.86 was achieved as the Armax modelled signal was compared to a reference signal. The model could also be extended to estimate the damage potential during high wind speeds, gusts or abrupt change in wind directions, allowing the controller to act appropriately

  5. Pulsatile flow in a compliant stenosed asymmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2016-12-01

    Time-varying velocity field in an asymmetric constricted tube is experimentally studied using a two-dimensional particle image velocimetry system. The geometry resembles a vascular disease which is characterized by arterial narrowing due to plaque deposition. The present study compares the nature of flow patterns in rigid and compliant asymmetric constricted tubes for a range of dimensionless parameters appearing in a human artery. A blood analogue fluid is employed along with a pump that mimics cardioflow conditions. The peak Reynolds number range is Re 300-800, while the Womersley number range considered in experiments is Wo 6-8. These values are based on the peak velocity in a straight rigid tube connected to the model, over a pulsation frequency range of 1.2-2.4 Hz. The medial-plane velocity distribution is used to investigate the nature of flow patterns. Temporal distribution of stream traces and hemodynamic factors including WSS, TAWSS and OSI at important phases of the pulsation cycle are discussed. The flow patterns obtained from PIV are compared to a limited extent against numerical simulation. Results show that the region downstream of the constriction is characterized by a high-velocity jet at the throat, while a recirculation zone, attached to the wall, evolves in time. Compliant models reveal large flow disturbances upstream during the retrograde flow. Wall shear stress values are lower in a compliant model as compared to the rigid. Cross-plane flow structures normal to the main flow direction are visible at select phases of the cycle. Positive values of largest Lyapunov exponent are realized for wall movement and are indicative of chaotic motion transferred from the flow to the wall. These exponents increase with Reynolds number as well as compliance. Period doubling is observed in wall displacement of highly compliant models, indicating possible triggering of hemodynamic events in a real artery that may cause fissure in the plaque deposits.

  6. Rotor Wake Development During the First Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.

    2003-01-01

    The wake behind a two-bladed model rotor in light climb was measured using particle image velocimetry, with particular emphasis on the development of the trailing vortex during the first revolution of the rotor. The distribution of vorticity was distinguished from the slightly elliptical swirl pattern. Peculiar dynamics within the void region may explain why the peak vorticity appeared to shift away from the center as the vortex aged, suggesting the onset of instability. The swirl and axial velocities (which reached 44 and 12 percent of the rotor-tip speed, respectively) were found to be asymmetric relative to the vortex center. In particular, the axial flow was composed of two concentrated zones moving in opposite directions. The radial distribution of the circulation rapidly increased in magnitude until reaching a point just beyond the core radius, after which the rate of growth decreased significantly. The core-radius circulation increased slightly with wake age, but the large-radius circulation appeared to remain relatively constant. The radial distributions of swirl velocity and vorticity exhibit self-similar behaviors, especially within the core. The diameter of the vortex core was initially about 10 percent of the rotor-blade chord, but more than doubled its size after one revolution of the rotor. According to vortex models that approximate the measured data, the core-radius circulation was about 79 percent of the large-radius circulation, and the large-radius circulation was about 67 percent of the maximum bound circulation on the rotor blade. On average, about 53 percent of the maximum bound circulation resides within the vortex core during the first revolution of the rotor.

  7. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1995-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotordynamic model which describes the dynamic behavior of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings including auxiliary bearings. The model is based upon an experimental test facility. Some simulation studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model. In particular, the effects of introducing sideloading from the magnetic bearing when one coil fails is studied.

  8. Unsteady separation experiments on 2-D airfoils, 3-D wings, and model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1992-01-01

    Information on unsteady separation and dynamic stall is being obtained from two experimental programs that have been underway at United Technologies Research Center since 1984. The first program is designed to obtain detailed surface pressure and boundary layer condition information during high amplitude pitching oscillations of a large (17.3 in. chord) model wing in a wind tunnel. The second program involves the construction and testing of a pressure-instrumented model helicopter rotor. This presentation describes some of the results of these experiments, and in particular compares the detailed dynamic stall inception information obtained from the oscillating wing with the unsteady separation and reverse flow results measured on the retreating blade side of the model rotor during wind tunnel testing.

  9. Rotordynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of an Active Magnetic Bearing Rotor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1996-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotordynamic model which describes the dynamic behavior of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings including auxiliary bearings. The model is based upon an experimental test facility. Some simulation studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model. In particular, the effects of introducing sideloading from the magnetic bearing when one coil fails is studied. These results are presented and discussed.

  10. Measurement and Modelling of Multicopter UAS Rotor Blades in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowicki, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Multicopters are becoming one of the more common and popular type of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) which have both civilian and military applications. One example being the concept of drone deliveries proposed by the distribution company Amazon [1]. The electrical propulsion is considered to have both faster and easier deliveries and also environmental benefits compared to other vehicles that still use fossil fuel. Other examples include surveillance and just simple entertainment. The reason behind their success is often said to be due to their small size, relatively low cost, simple structure and finally simple usage. With an increase in the UAS market comes challenges in terms of security, as both people and other aircrafts could be harmed if not used correctly. Therefore further studies and regulations are needed to ensure that future use of drones, especially in the civilian and public sectors, are safe and efficient. Thorough research has been done on full scale, man or cargo transporting, helicopters so that most parts of flight and performance are fairly well understood. Yet not much of it have been verified for small multicopters. Until today many studies and research projects have been done on the control systems, navigation and aerodynamics of multicopters. Many of the methods used today for building multicopters involve a process of trial an error of what will work well together, and once that is accomplished some structural analysis of the multicopter bodies might be done to verify that the product will be strong enough and have a decent aerodynamic performance. However, not much has been done on the research of the rotor blades, especially in terms of structural stress analyses and ways to ensure that the commonly used parts are indeed safe and follow safety measures. Some producers claim that their propellers indeed have been tested, but again that usually tends towards simple fluid dynamic analyses and even simpler stress analyses. There is no real

  11. A model for asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect in multilayered bimagnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buznikov, N. A.; Antonov, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetoimpedance in three-layered bimagnetic film structure is studied theoretically. The structure consists of the soft and hard magnetic films separated by highly conductive non-magnetic layer. A model to describe the magnetoimpedance effect in the film structure based on a simultaneous solution of linearized Maxwell equations and Landau-Lifshitz equation is proposed. It is shown that magnetostatic coupling between the magnetic layers results in the asymmetry in the field dependence of the film impedance. The magnetostatic coupling is described in terms of an effective bias field appearing in the soft magnetic layer. The calculated field and frequency dependences of the film impedance are shown to be in a qualitative agreement with previous results of experimental studies of the asymmetric magnetoimpedance in NiFe/Cu/Co film structures. The results obtained may be useful for development of weak magnetic-field sensors.

  12. Flight dynamics and control modelling of damaged asymmetric aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunwa, T. T.; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    This research investigates the use of a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller to assist commercial Boeing 747-200 aircraft regains its stability in the event of damage. Damages cause an aircraft to become asymmetric and in the case of damage to a fraction (33%) of its left wing or complete loss of its vertical stabilizer, the loss of stability may lead to a fatal crash. In this study, aircraft models for the two damage scenarios previously mentioned are constructed using stability derivatives. LQR controller is used as a direct adaptive control design technique for the observable and controllable system. Dynamic stability analysis is conducted in the time domain for all systems in this study.

  13. Compressible cell gas models for asymmetric fluid criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Orkoulas, Gerassimos

    2017-03-01

    We thoroughly describe a class of models recently presented by Fisher and coworkers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040601 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040601. The crucial feature of such models, termed compressible cell gases (CCGs), is that the individual cell volumes of a lattice gas are allowed to fluctuate. They are studied via the seldom-used (μ , p , T ) ensemble, which leads to their exact mapping onto the Ising model. Remarkably, CCGs obey complete scaling, a formulation for the thermodynamic behavior of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point that accommodates features inherent to the asymmetric nature of this phase transition like the Yang-Yang (YY) and singular coexistence-curve diameter anomalies. The CCG0 models generated when volumes vary freely reveal local free volume fluctuations as the origin of these phenomena. Local energy-volume coupling is found to be another relevant microscopic factor. Furthermore, the CCG class is greatly extended by using the decoration transformation, with an interesting example being the Sastry-Debenedetti-Sciortino-Stanley model for hydrogen bonding in low-temperature water. The magnitude of anomalies is characterized by a single parameter, the YY ratio, which for the models so far considered here ranges from -∞ to 1/2 .

  14. Simulation and experimental validation of the dynamical model of a dual-rotor vibrotactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, Á.; Szabó, Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a novel design for small vibrotactors called the Dual Excenter is presented, which makes it possible to produce vibrations with independently adjustable frequency and amplitude. This feature has been realized using two coaxially aligned eccentric rotors, which are driven by DC motors independently. The prototype of the device has been built, where mechanical components are integrated on a frame with two optical sensors for the measurement of angular velocity and phase angle. The system is equipped with a digital controller. Simulations confirm the results of analytical investigations and they allow us to model the sampling method of the signals of the angular velocity and the phase angle between the rotors. Furthermore, we model the discrete behavior of the controller, which is a PI controller for the angular velocities and a PID controller for the phase angle. Finally, simulation results are compared to experimental ones, which show that the Dual Excenter concept is feasible.

  15. Experimental and analytical studies of a model helicopter rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1981-01-01

    A benchmark test to aid the development of various rotor performance codes was conducted. Simultaneous blade pressure measurements and tip vortex surveys were made for a wide range of tip Mach numbers including the transonic flow regime. The measured tip vortex strength and geometry permit effective blade loading predictions when used as input to a prescribed wake lifting surface code. It is also shown that with proper inflow and boundary layer modeling, the supercritical flow regime can be accurately predicted.

  16. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover under simulated vacuum conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Two cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model rotor that used tantalum rods instead of blades to simulate vacuum conditions. The first case involved body roll freedom only while the second case included body pitch and roll degrees of freedom together. Analyses from Hughes Helicopters and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the data and the correlations ranged from poor to good.

  17. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Rotor Source Noise Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new physics-based method called Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) is used to demonstrate the change in rotor harmonic noise of a helicopter operating at different ambient conditions. FRAME is based upon a non-dimensional representation of the governing acoustic and performance equations of a single rotor helicopter. Measured external noise is used together with parameter identification techniques to develop a model of helicopter external noise that is a hybrid between theory and experiment. The FRAME method is used to evaluate the main rotor harmonic noise of a Bell 206B3 helicopter operating at different altitudes. The variation with altitude of Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, known to be a strong function of the helicopter s advance ratio, is dependent upon which definition of airspeed is flown by the pilot. If normal flight procedures are followed and indicated airspeed (IAS) is held constant, the true airspeed (TAS) of the helicopter increases with altitude. This causes an increase in advance ratio and a decrease in the speed of sound which results in large changes to BVI noise levels. Results also show that thickness noise on this helicopter becomes more intense at high altitudes where advancing tip Mach number increases because the speed of sound is decreasing and advance ratio increasing for the same indicated airspeed. These results suggest that existing measurement-based empirically derived helicopter rotor noise source models may give incorrect noise estimates when they are used at conditions where data were not measured and may need to be corrected for mission land-use planning purposes.

  18. Geared rotor dynamic methodologies for advancing prognostic modeling capabilities in rotary-wing transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, David Blake

    The overarching objective in this research is the development of a robust, rotor dynamic, physics based model of a helicopter drive train as a foundation for the prognostic modeling for rotary-wing transmissions. Rotorcrafts rely on the integrity of their drive trains for their airworthiness. Drive trains rely on gear technology for their integrity and function. Gears alter the vibration characteristics of a mechanical system and significantly contribute to noise, component fatigue, and personal discomfort prevalent in rotorcraft. This research effort develops methodologies for generating a rotor dynamic model of a rotary-wing transmission based on first principles, through (i) development of a three-dimensional gear-mesh stiffness model for helical and spur gears and integration of this model in a finite element rotor dynamic model, (ii) linear and nonlinear analyses of a geared system for comparison and validation of the gear-mesh model, (iii) development of a modal synthesis technique for potentially providing model reduction and faster analysis capabilities for geared systems, and (iv) extension of the gear-mesh model to bevel and epicyclic configurations. In addition to model construction and validation, faults indigenous to geared systems are presented and discussed. Two faults are selected for analysis and seeded into the transmission model. Diagnostic vibration parameters are presented and used as damage indicators in the analysis. The fault models produce results consistent with damage experienced during experimental testing. The results of this research demonstrate the robustness of the physics-based approach in simulating multiple normal and abnormal conditions. The advantages of this physics-based approach, when combined with contemporary probabilistic and time-series techniques, provide a useful method for improving health monitoring technologies in mechanical systems.

  19. Surface pressure measurements at two tips of a model helicopter rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. B.; Mcmahon, H. M.; Shenoy, K. R.; Hammer, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Surface pressures were measured near the tip of a hovering single-bladed model helicopter rotor with two tip shapes. The rotor had a constant-chord, untwisted blade with a square, flat tip which could be modified to a body-of-revolution tip. Pressure measurements were made on the blade surface along the chordwise direction at six radial stations outboard of the 94 percent blade radius. Data for each blade tip configuration were taken at blade collective pitch angles of 0, 6.18 and 11.4 degrees at a Reynolds number of 736,000 and a Mach number of 0.25 both based on tip speed. Chordwise pressure distributions and constant surface pressure contours are presented and discussed.

  20. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of asymmetric optothermal microactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuying; Chun, Qin; You, Qingyang; Wang, Yingda; Zhang, Haijun

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the dynamic modelling and experimental study of an asymmetric optothermal microactuator (OTMA). According to the principle of thermal flux, a theoretical model for instantaneous temperature distribution of an expansion arm is established and the expression of expansion increment is derived. Dynamic expansion properties of the arm under laser pulse irradiation are theoretically analyzed indicating that both of the maximum expansion and expansion amplitude decrease with the pulse frequency increasing. Experiments have been further carried out on an OTMA fabricated by using an excimer laser micromachining system. It is shown that the OTMA deflects periodically with the same frequency of laser pulse irradiation. Experimental results also prove that both OTMA's maximum deflection and deflection amplitude (related to maximum expansion and expansion amplitude of the arm) decrease as frequency increases, matching with the theoretical model quite well. Even though the OTMA's deflection decrease at higher frequency, it is still capable of generating 8.2 μm maximum deflection and 4.2 μm deflection amplitude under 17 Hz/2 mW laser pulse irradiation. This work improves the potential applications of optothermal microactuators in micro-opto-electro-mechanical system (MOEMS) and micro/nano-technology fields.

  1. A Control System for the Wind Tunnel Model of a Reverse-Blowing Circulation Control Rotor (RB-CCR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    for possible application, e.g., (1) sleeve valves , (2) cam driver poppet valves , (3) on-off (bang-bang) type valves , (4) cam nozzle valves , and (5...Identify by block number) Circulation Control Rotors Control System for High Speed Circulation Control Rotor Model Pneumatic Valving System, Dual Receiver...Continued on reverse side) 20. A STRACT (Continue on reverse side if neceesary iand IdjntIty by block number) A pneumatic valving system has been

  2. Statistics of a neuron model driven by asymmetric colored noise.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hansen, Finn; Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Irregular firing of neurons can be modeled as a stochastic process. Here we study the perfect integrate-and-fire neuron driven by dichotomous noise, a Markovian process that jumps between two states (i.e., possesses a non-Gaussian statistics) and exhibits nonvanishing temporal correlations (i.e., represents a colored noise). Specifically, we consider asymmetric dichotomous noise with two different transition rates. Using a first-passage-time formulation, we derive exact expressions for the probability density and the serial correlation coefficient of the interspike interval (time interval between two subsequent neural action potentials) and the power spectrum of the spike train. Furthermore, we extend the model by including additional Gaussian white noise, and we give approximations for the interspike interval (ISI) statistics in this case. Numerical simulations are used to validate the exact analytical results for pure dichotomous noise, and to test the approximations of the ISI statistics when Gaussian white noise is included. The results may help to understand how correlations and asymmetry of noise and signals in nerve cells shape neuronal firing statistics.

  3. Measured Boundary Layer Transition and Rotor Hover Performance at Model Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Martin, Preston B.

    2017-01-01

    An experiment involving a Mach-scaled, 11:08 f t: diameter rotor was performed in hover during the summer of 2016 at NASA Langley Research Center. The experiment investigated the hover performance as a function of the laminar to turbulent transition state of the boundary layer, including both natural and fixed transition cases. The boundary layer transition locations were measured on both the upper and lower aerodynamic surfaces simultaneously. The measurements were enabled by recent advances in infrared sensor sensitivity and stability. The infrared thermography measurement technique was enhanced by a paintable blade surface heater, as well as a new high-sensitivity long wave infrared camera. The measured transition locations showed extensive amounts, x=c>0:90, of laminar flow on the lower surface at moderate to high thrust (CT=s > 0:068) for the full blade radius. The upper surface showed large amounts, x=c > 0:50, of laminar flow at the blade tip for low thrust (CT=s < 0:045). The objective of this paper is to provide an experimental data set for comparisons to newly developed and implemented rotor boundary layer transition models in CFD and rotor design tools. The data is expected to be used as part of the AIAA Rotorcraft SimulationWorking Group

  4. Metallic Rotor Sizing and Performance Model for Flywheel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Camille J.; Kraft, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing flywheel system requirements and designs for terrestrial and spacecraft applications. Several generations of flywheels have been designed and tested at GRC using in-house expertise in motors, magnetic bearings, controls, materials and power electronics. The maturation of a flywheel system from the concept phase to the preliminary design phase is accompanied by maturation of the Integrated Systems Performance model, where estimating relationships are replaced by physics based analytical techniques. The modeling can incorporate results from engineering model testing and emerging detail from the design process.

  5. Multi-DOF rotor model based measurement of stiffness and damping for active magnetic bearing using multi-frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng; Chen, Liangliang; Qiao, Xiaoli

    2015-08-01

    To represent the support characteristic of active magnetic bearings (AMB), the commonly used parameters are the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping, which inherit the parameters of the stiffness and the damping from traditional mechanical bearings. First, by analyzing the diversity and the similarity between traditional mechanical bearing and AMB, the prior condition for applying the parametric representation of equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping to AMB is illuminated. Then, a method for measuring the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system is proposed with multi-frequency excitation. One of its outstanding features is that the proposed method is based on the multi-degree of freedom (DOF) rotor model, not the single- DOF model, because the single DOF model cannot be suitably applied to the multi-DOF AMB-rotor systems. Otherwise, in order to decrease the identification error, the multi-frequency excitation can achieve the lowest peak value by means of appropriate selection for the relative phasing of each component, so that the possibility of the rotor displacement exceeding clearances of AMB and the magnetic force reaching saturation is minimized. Finally, the experiments, which are carried out on an AMB-rotor test rig with a vertical shaft, indicate that the proposed method can efficiently reduce the peak value for the superimposed multi-frequency excitation and correctly identify the equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system.

  6. Modelling crystal growth: Convection in an asymmetrically heated ampoule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz; Pulicani, J. P.; Krukowski, S.; Ouazzani, Jalil

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to develop and implement a numerical method capable of solving the nonlinear partial differential equations governing heat, mass, and momentum transfer in a 3-D cylindrical geometry in order to examine the character of convection in an asymmetrically heated cylindrical ampoule. The details of the numerical method, including verification tests involving comparison with results obtained from other methods, are presented. The results of the study of 3-D convection in an asymmetrically heated cylinder are described.

  7. Parameterized reduced order modeling of misaligned stacked disks rotor assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganine, Vladislav; Laxalde, Denis; Michalska, Hannah; Pierre, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Light and flexible rotating parts of modern turbine engines operating at supercritical speeds necessitate application of more accurate but rather computationally expensive 3D FE modeling techniques. Stacked disks misalignment due to manufacturing variability in the geometry of individual components constitutes a particularly important aspect to be included in the analysis because of its impact on system dynamics. A new parametric model order reduction algorithm is presented to achieve this goal at affordable computational costs. It is shown that the disks misalignment leads to significant changes in nominal system properties that manifest themselves as additional blocks coupling neighboring spatial harmonics in Fourier space. Consequently, the misalignment effects can no longer be accurately modeled as equivalent forces applied to a nominal unperturbed system. The fact that the mode shapes become heavily distorted by extra harmonic content renders the nominal modal projection-based methods inaccurate and thus numerically ineffective in the context of repeated analysis of multiple misalignment realizations. The significant numerical bottleneck is removed by employing an orthogonal projection onto the subspace spanned by first few Fourier harmonic basis vectors. The projected highly sparse systems are shown to accurately approximate the specific misalignment effects, to be inexpensive to solve using direct sparse methods and easy to parameterize with a small set of measurable eccentricity and tilt angle parameters. Selected numerical examples on an industrial scale model are presented to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm implementation.

  8. Quantum rotor description of the Mott-insulator transition in the Bose-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, T. P.; Kopec, T. K.

    2007-09-01

    We present an approach to the Bose-Hubbard model using the U(1) quantum rotor description. The effective action formalism allows us to formulate a problem in the phase only action and obtain analytical formulas for the critical lines. We show that the nontrivial U(1) phase field configurations have an impact on the phase diagrams. The topological character of the quantum field is governed by terms of the integer charges--winding numbers. The comparison of presented results to recently obtained quantum Monte Carlo numerical calculations suggests that the competition between quantum effects in strongly interacting boson systems is correctly captured by our model.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of rotor system supported by angular contact ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Han, Qinkai; Zhou, Daning

    2017-02-01

    In current bearing dynamic models, the displacement coordinate relations are usually utilized to approximately obtain the contact deformations between the rolling element and raceways, and then the nonlinear restoring forces of the rolling bearing could be calculated accordingly. Although the calculation efficiency is relatively higher, the accuracy is lower as the contact deformations should be solved through iterative analysis. Thus, an improved nonlinear dynamic model is presented in this paper. Considering the preload condition, surface waviness, Hertz contact and elastohydrodynamic lubrication, load distribution analysis is solved iteratively to more accurately obtain the contact deformations and angles between the rolling balls and raceways. The bearing restoring forces are then obtained through iteratively solving the load distribution equations at every time step. Dynamic tests upon a typical rotor system supported by two angular contact ball bearings are conducted to verify the model. Through comparisons, the differences between the nonlinear dynamic model and current models are also pointed out. The effects of axial preload, rotor eccentricity and inner/outer waviness amplitudes on the dynamic response are discussed in detail.

  10. Nearfield Unsteady Pressures at Cruise Mach Numbers for a Model Scale Counter-Rotation Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David B.

    2012-01-01

    An open rotor experiment was conducted at cruise Mach numbers and the unsteady pressure in the nearfield was measured. The system included extensive performance measurements, which can help provide insight into the noise generating mechanisms in the absence of flow measurements. A set of data acquired at a constant blade pitch angle but various rotor speeds was examined. The tone levels generated by the front and rear rotor were found to be nearly equal when the thrust was evenly balanced between rotors.

  11. Rotor Dynamic Inflow Derivatives and Time Constants from Various Inflow Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    DEGREES Angle of the (3,1) is$ Element of COMPLEX LINV(3,1) Inverted Complex L(K) Matrix for a Sweep (Corrected P sk ,’ Pressure) HA S E A NC L E -So...66. Banerjee , D., Crews, S . T., Hohenemser, K. H., and Yin, S . K., "State and Parameter Identification Applied to Rotor Model Dynamic Test Results...34, Journal of the American Helicopter Society, April 1977. 67. Banerjee , D., Crews, S . T., and Hohenemser, K. H., "Parameter Identification Applied to

  12. Vortex Wake Geometry of a Model Tilt Rotor in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, G. K.; Johnson, W.; Wadcock, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The vortex wake trajectory from one rotor of a 0.25-scale V-22 tiltrotor model was measured for four test conditions in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Vortex wake images were acquired using a laser light sheet and video camera. Wake trajectories were constructed by extracting vortex positions from the video images. Wake trajectories were also calculated using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. Measured and calculated wake geometries exhibit similar trends when advance ratio is varied at fixed thrust or when thrust is varied at fixed advance ratio.

  13. Lifetime Measurements of ^170Hf and a test of the Confined Beta Soft Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Heinz, A.; Terry, J. R.; Qian, J.; Winkler, R.; Casperson, R.; Williams, E.; Berant, Z.; L"Uttke, R.; Shoraka, B.; Henning, G.

    2009-10-01

    Significant deviations from rigid rotor model energy level predictions have been known to occur in rare earth nuclei. Recently, it was shown these deviations may be caused by centrifugal stretching effects within the nucleus [1]. New geometrical models have been proposed that account for centrifugal stretching, such as the confined beta soft model (CBS). We present the results from a high precision lifetime experiment performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at WNSL, Yale University. The ground state band of ^170Hf was measured through the J=12^+ level using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift method. Excited states were populated in the ^124Sn(^50Ti,γ)^170Hf fusion evaporation reaction. Using the lifetimes, the B(E2) values and the quadrupole deformation parameter are determined. Centrifugal stretching is observed as an increased deviation in energy at higher spins in 170Hf. These results are compared to theoretical predictions from the CBS rotor model. Supported by grant DE-FG02-91ER40609.[4pt] [1] Costin et al, Phys.Rev. C 79, 024307 (2009)

  14. Application of the cohesive zone model for the evaluation of stiffness losses in a rotor with a transverse breathing crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toni Liong, Rugerri; Proppe, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    The breathing mechanism of a transversely cracked rotor and its influence on a rotor system that appears due to shaft weight and inertia forces is studied. A method is proposed for the evaluation of the stiffness losses in the cross-section that contains the crack. This method is based on a cohesive zone model (CZM) instead of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The CZM is developed for mode-I plane strain conditions and accounts explicitly for triaxiality of the stress state by using constitutive relations. The breathing crack is modelled by a parabolic shape. As long as the relative crack depth is small, a crack closure straight line model may be used, while the crack closure parabolic line should be used in the case of a deep crack. The CZM is also implemented in a one-dimensional continuum rotor model by means of finite element (FE) discretisation in order to predict and to analyse the dynamic behavior of a cracked rotor. The proposed method provides a useful tool for the analysis of rotor systems containing cracks.

  15. Helicopter model rotor-blade vortex interaction impulsive noise: Scalability and parametric variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic data taken in the anechoic Deutsch-Niederlaendischer Windkanal (DNW) have documented the blade vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise radiated from a 1/7-scale model main rotor of the AH-1 series helicopter. Averaged model scale data were compared with averaged full scale, inflight acoustic data under similar nondimensional test conditions. At low advance ratios (mu = 0.164 to 0.194), the data scale remarkable well in level and waveform shape, and also duplicate the directivity pattern of BVI impulsive noise. At moderate advance ratios (mu = 0.224 to 0.270), the scaling deteriorates, suggesting that the model scale rotor is not adequately simulating the full scale BVI noise; presently, no proved explanation of this discrepancy exists. Carefully performed parametric variations over a complete matrix of testing conditions have shown that all of the four governing nondimensional parameters - tip Mach number at hover, advance ratio, local inflow ratio, and thrust coefficient - are highly sensitive to BVI noise radiation.

  16. Triaxial rotor model description of E2 properties in {sup 186,188,190,192}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, J. M.; Zaballa, R.; Oros-Peusquens, A. M.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.

    2008-07-15

    The triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and electric quadrupole tensors is applied to the description of the extensive set of E2 matrix elements available for {sup 186,188,190,192}Os. Most large and medium transition E2 matrix elements can be reproduced to within {approx}10%, and most diagonal elements to within {approx}30%. Most small transition matrix elements can be reproduced to within {approx}30%, and they support the interference effect exhibited by the model between the inertia and E2 tensors: this is a new feature of quantum rotor models. The diagonal E2 matrix elements at higher spins in the K=2 band are extremely sensitive to admixtures of higher K values: the low experimental values in {sup 190,192}Os indicate significant admixtures of K=4 components. Attention is given to the K{sup {pi}}=4{sup +} bands in these nuclei and the controversial issue of whether they are of quadrupole or hexadecapole nature.

  17. Steady and Periodic Pressure Measurements on a Generic Helicopter Fuselage Model in the Presence of a Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of a generic helicopter fuselage model with an independently mounted rotor has been conducted to obtain steady and periodic pressure data on the helicopter body. The model was tested at four advance ratios and three thrust coefficients. The periodic unsteady pressure coefficients are marked by four peaks associated with the passage of the four rotor blades. Blade passage effects are largest on the nose and tail boom of the model. The magnitude of the pulse increases with rotor thrust coefficient. Tabular listings of the unsteady pressure data are included to permit independent analysis. A CD-rom containing the steady and unsteady pressure data presented in the report is available from the authors.

  18. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  19. Aerodynamic Performance of a 0.27-Scale Model of an AH-64 Helicopter with Baseline and Alternate Rotor Blade Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Performance of a 27 percent scale model rotor designed for the AH-64 helicopter (alternate rotor) was measured in hover and forward flight and compared against and AH-64 baseline rotor model. Thrust, rotor tip Mach number, advance ratio, and ground proximity were varied. In hover, at a nominal thrust coefficient of 0.0064, the power savings was about 6.4 percent for the alternate rotor compared to the baseline. The corresponding thrust increase at this condition was approx. 4.5 percent which represents an equivalent full scale increase in lift capability of about 660 lbs. Comparable results were noted in forward flight except for the high thrust, high speed cases investigated where the baseline rotor was slightly superior. Reduced performance at the higher thrusts and speeds was likely due to Reynolds number effects and blade elasticity differences.

  20. A piloted comparison of elastic and rigid blade-element rotor models using parallel processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary; Du Val, Ronald W.; Green, John A.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted comparison of rigid and aeroelastic blade-element rotor models was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility (CSRDF) at Ames Research Center. FLIGHTLAB, a new simulation development and analysis tool, was used to implement these models in real time using parallel processing technology. Pilot comments and quantitative analysis performed both on-line and off-line confirmed that elastic degrees of freedom significantly affect perceived handling qualities. Trim comparisons show improved correlation with flight test data when elastic modes are modeled. The results demonstrate the efficiency with which the mathematical modeling sophistication of existing simulation facilities can be upgraded using parallel processing, and the importance of these upgrades to simulation fidelity.

  1. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  2. A validated model for the prediction of rotor bar failure in squirrel-cage motors using instantaneous angular speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasi, Ahmed Y. Ben; Gu, Fengshou; Li, Yuhua; Ball, Andrew D.

    2006-10-01

    Instantaneous angular speed (IAS)-based condition monitoring is an area in which significant progress has been achieved over the recent years. This condition monitoring technique is less known compared to the existing conventional methods. This paper presents model-predicted simulation and experimental results of broken rotor bar faults in a three-phase induction motor using IAS variations. The simulation was performed under normal, and a broken rotor bar fault. The present paper evaluates through simulating and measuring the IAS of an induction motor at broken rotor bar faults in both time and frequency domains. Experimental results show a good agreement with the model-predicted simulation results. Three vital key features were extracted from the angular speed variations. One feature is the modulating contour of pole pass frequency periods in time domain. The other two features are in frequency domain. The primary feature is the presence of the pole pass frequency component at the low-frequency region of the IAS spectrum. The secondary feature which are the multiple of pole pass frequency sideband components around the rotor speed frequency component. Experimental results confirm the validity of the simulation results for the proposed method. The IAS has demonstrated more sensitivity than current signature analysis in detecting the fault. This research also shows the power of angular speed features as a useful tool to detect broken rotor bar deteriorations using any economical transducer such as low-resolution rotary shaft encoders; which may well be already installed for process control purposes.

  3. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  4. A quasi-three-dimensional model for intra-stator transport of rotor wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, W. F.; Epstein, A. H.

    The time-resolved flowfield in a high thru-flow compressor stage has been studied using a higher frequency response angle probe and a newly developed time-resolved total temperature and pressure probe. The investigation revealed the presence of large gapwise nonuniformity (20C) in stagnation temperature at the stator exit. A quasi-three-dimensional wake transport model, modified from that developed by Kerrebrock and Mikolajczak, was used to investigate the transport of the wake fluid within the stator passage. The present model accounts for three-dimensional effect by including the radial velocity in the wake. In addition, the relative flow angle is not assumed to be uniform across the wake and the inviscid core. The model compares favorably with measurements taken at the stator exit plane. The loss associated with the recirculation of the rotor wake within the stator passage is also calculated.

  5. Modeling XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics by frequency and time-domain identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Kaletka, Juergen

    1987-01-01

    Models of the open-loop hover dynamics of the XV-15 Tilt-Rotor Aircraft are extracted from flight data using two approaches: frequency domain and time-domain identification. Both approaches are reviewed and the identification results are presented and compared in detail. The extracted models are compared favorably, with the differences associated mostly with the inherent weighing of each technique. Step responses are used to show that the predictive capability of the models from both techniques is excellent. Based on the results of this study, the relative strengths and weaknesses of the frequency and time-domain techniques are summarized and a proposal for a coordinated parameter identification approach is presented.

  6. Modeling XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics by frequency and time-domain identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Kaletka, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    Models of the open-loop hover dynamics of the XV-15 Tilt-Rotor Aircraft are extracted from flight data using two approaches: frequency-domain and time-domain identification. Both approaches are reviewed and the identification results are presented and compared in detail. The extracted models compare favorable, with the differences associated mostly with the inherent weighting of each technique. Step responses are used to show that the predictive capability of the models from both techniques is excellent. Based on the results of this study, the relative strengths and weaknesses of the frequency- and time-domain techniques are summarized, and a proposal for a coordinated parameter identification approach is presented.

  7. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  8. A review of ice accretion data from a model rotor icing test and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was conducted by the Helicopter Icing Consortium (HIC) in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in which a 1/6 scale fuselage model of a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter with a generic rotor was subjected to a wide range of icing conditions. The HIC consists of members from NASA, Bell Helicopter, Boeing Helicopter, McDonnell Douglas Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, and Texas A&M University. Data was taken in the form of rotor torque, internal force balance measurements, blade strain gage loading, and two dimensional ice shape tracings. A review of the ice shape data is performed with special attention given to repeatability and correctness of trends in terms of radial variation, rotational speed, icing time, temperature, liquid water content, and volumetric median droplet size. Moreover, an indepth comparison between the experimental data and the analysis of NASA's ice accretion code LEWICE is given. Finally, conclusions are shown as to the quality of the ice accretion data and the predictability of the data base as a whole. Recommendations are also given for improving data taking technique as well as potential future work.

  9. A review of ice accretion data from a model rotor icing test and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was conducted by the Helicopter Icing Consortium (HIC) in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in which a 1/6 scale fuselage model of a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter with a generic rotor was subjected to a wide range of icing conditions. The HIC consists of members from NASA, Bell Helicopter, Boeing Helicopter, McDonnell Douglas Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, and Texas A&M University. Data was taken in the form of rotor torque, internal force balance measurements, blade strain gage loading, and two dimensional ice shape tracings. A review of the ice shape data is performed with special attention given to repeatability and correctness of trends in terms of radial variation, rotational speed, icing time, temperature, liquid water content, and volumetric median droplet size. Moreover, an indepth comparison between the experimental data and the analysis of NASA's ice accretion code LEWICE is given. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the quality of the ice accretion data and the predictability of the data base as a whole. Recommendations are also given for improving data taking technique as well as potential future work.

  10. Unsteady Velocity Measurements Taken Behind a Model Helicopter Rotor Hub in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Drag caused by separated flow behind the hub of a helicopter has an adverse effect on aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. To determine the effect of separated flow on a configuration used extensively for helicopter aerodynamic investigations, an experiment was conducted using a laser velocimeter to measure velocities in the wake of a model helicopter hub operating at Mach-scaled conditions in forward flight. Velocity measurements were taken using a laser velocimeter with components in the vertical and downstream directions. Measurements were taken at 13 stations downstream from the rotor hub. At each station, measurements were taken in both a horizontal and vertical row of locations. These measurements were analyzed for harmonic content based on the rotor period of revolution. After accounting for these periodic velocities, the remaining unsteady velocities were treated as turbulence. Turbulence intensity distributions are presented. Average turbulent intensities ranged from approximately 2 percent of free stream to over 15 percent of free stream at specific locations and azimuths. The maximum average value of turbulence was located near the rear-facing region of the fuselage.

  11. Modeling of asymmetric pulsed phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Yan; Wang Huijuan; Wang Xiaofei

    2012-01-15

    Asymmetric current pulses in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges are investigated by a self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the glow mode and Townsend mode can coexist in the asymmetric discharge even though the gas gap is rather large. The reason for this phenomenon is that the residual space charge plays the role of anode and reduces the gap width, resulting in the formation of a Townsend discharge.

  12. Advancing-side directivity and retreating-side interactions of model rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Schultz, K.-J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from a 40 percent scale model of the four-bladed BO-105 helicopter main rotor, tested in a large aerodynamic wind tunnel. Rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise data in the low-speed flight range were acquired using a traversing in-flow microphone array. Acoustic results presented are used to assess the acoustic far field of BVI noise, to map the directivity and temporal characteristics of BVI impulsive noise, and to show the existence of retreating-side BVI signals. The characterics of the acoustic radiation patterns, which can often be strongly focused, are found to be very dependent on rotor operating condition. The acoustic signals exhibit multiple blade-vortex interactions per blade with broad impulsive content at lower speeds, while at higher speeds, they exhibit fewer interactions per blade, with much sharper, higher amplitude acoustic signals. Moderate-amplitude BVI acoustic signals measured under the aft retreating quadrant of the rotor are shown to originate from the retreating side of the rotor.

  13. Tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffen, Charles David

    1992-01-01

    The methodology, results, and conclusions of a study of tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics and aerodynamics are presented. Flow visualization and hot wire velocity measurement were performed on a 1/12-scale model of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Aircraft in hover. The wing and fuselage below the rotor cause a complex recirculating flow. Results indicate the physical dimensions and details of the flow including the relative unsteadiness and turbulence characteristics of the flow. Discrete frequency harmonic thickness and the loading noise mechanism were predicted using WOPWOP for the standard metal blades and the Advanced Technology Blades. The recirculating flow created by the wing below the rotor is a primary sound mechanism for a hovering tilt rotor. The effects of dynamic blade response should be included for fountain flow conditions which produce impulsive blade loading. Broadband noise mechanisms were studied using Amiet's method with azimuthally varying turbulence characteristics derived from the measurements. The recirculating fountain flow with high turbulence levels in the recirculating zone is the dominant source of broadband noise for a hovering rotor. It is shown that tilt rotor hover aeroacoustic noise mechanisms are now understood. Noise predictions can be made based on reasonably accurate aerodynamic models developed here.

  14. Comparison of calculated and measured pressures on straight and swept-tip model rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.; Chang, I. C.; Caughey, D. A.; Phillipe, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Using the quasi-steady, full potential code, ROT22, pressures were calculated on straight and swept tip model helicopter rotor blades at advance ratios of 0.40 and 0.45, and into the transonic tip speed range. The calculated pressures were compared with values measured in the tip regions of the model blades. Good agreement was found over a wide range of azimuth angles when the shocks on the blade were not too strong. However, strong shocks persisted longer than predicted by ROT22 when the blade was in the second quadrant. Since the unsteady flow effects present at high advance ratios primarily affect shock waves, the underprediction of shock strengths is attributed to the simplifying, quasi-steady, assumption made in ROT22.

  15. Research investigation of helicopter main rotor/tail rotor interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Kohlhepp, F.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were obtained in a Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study the aeroacoustic interaction of 1/5th scale main rotor, tail rotor, and fuselage models. An extensive aeroacoustic data base was acquired for main rotor, tail rotor, fuselage aerodynamic interaction for moderate forward speed flight conditions. The details of the rotor models, experimental design and procedure, aerodynamic and acoustic data acquisition and reduction are presented. The model was initially operated in trim for selected fuselage angle of attack, main rotor tip-path-plane angle, and main rotor thrust combinations. The effects of repositioning the tail rotor in the main rotor wake and the corresponding tail rotor countertorque requirements were determined. Each rotor was subsequently tested in isolation at the thrust and angle of attack combinations for trim. The acoustic data indicated that the noise was primarily dominated by the main rotor, especially for moderate speed main rotor blade-vortex interaction conditions. The tail rotor noise increased when the main rotor was removed indicating that tail rotor inflow was improved with the main rotor present.

  16. International Space Station Centrifuge Rotor Models A Comparison of the Euler-Lagrange and the Bond Graph Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Louis H.; Ramakrishnan, Jayant; Granda, Jose J.

    2006-01-01

    The assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) require extensive testing and engineering analysis to verify that the Space Station system of systems would work together without any adverse interactions. Since the dynamic behavior of an entire Space Station cannot be tested on earth, math models of the Space Station structures and mechanical systems have to be built and integrated in computer simulations and analysis tools to analyze and predict what will happen in space. The ISS Centrifuge Rotor (CR) is one of many mechanical systems that need to be modeled and analyzed to verify the ISS integrated system performance on-orbit. This study investigates using Bond Graph modeling techniques as quick and simplified ways to generate models of the ISS Centrifuge Rotor. This paper outlines the steps used to generate simple and more complex models of the CR using Bond Graph Computer Aided Modeling Program with Graphical Input (CAMP-G). Comparisons of the Bond Graph CR models with those derived from Euler-Lagrange equations in MATLAB and those developed using multibody dynamic simulation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the Bond Graph modeling approach for aeronautics and space applications.

  17. Exact solution of the asymmetric exclusion model with particles of arbitrary size.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, F C; Bariev, R Z

    1999-07-01

    A generalization of the simple exclusion asymmetric model is introduced. In this model an arbitrary mixture of molecules with distinct sizes s=0,1,2, ..., in units of lattice space, diffuses asymmetrically on the lattice. A related surface growth model is also presented. Variations of the distribution of the molecules sizes may change the excluded volume almost continuously. We solve the model exactly through the Bethe ansatz and the dynamical critical exponent z is calculated from the finite-size corrections of the mass gap of the related quantum chain. Our results show that for an arbitrary distribution of molecules, the dynamical critical behavior is on the Kardar-Parizi-Zhang universality.

  18. A guide to the use of the pressure disk rotor model as implemented in INS3D-UP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffin, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    This is a guide for the use of the pressure disk rotor model that has been placed in the incompressible Navier-Stokes code INS3D-UP. The pressure disk rotor model approximates a helicopter rotor or propeller in a time averaged manner and is intended to simulate the effect of a rotor in forward flight on the fuselage or the effect of a propeller on other aerodynamic components. The model uses a modified actuator disk that allows the pressure jump across the disk to vary with radius and azimuth. The cyclic and collective blade pitch angles needed to achieve a specified thrust coefficient and zero moment about the hub are predicted. The method has been validated with experimentally measured mean induced inflow velocities as well as surface pressures on a generic fuselage. Overset grids, sometimes referred to as Chimera grids, are used to simplify the grid generation process. The pressure disk model is applied to a cylindrical grid which is embedded in the grid or grids used for the rest of the configuration. This document will outline the development of the method, and present input and results for a sample case.

  19. Modeling the Overalternating Bias with an Asymmetric Entropy Measure

    PubMed Central

    Gronchi, Giorgio; Raglianti, Marco; Noventa, Stefano; Lazzeri, Alessandro; Guazzini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Psychological research has found that human perception of randomness is biased. In particular, people consistently show the overalternating bias: they rate binary sequences of symbols (such as Heads and Tails in coin flipping) with an excess of alternation as more random than prescribed by the normative criteria of Shannon's entropy. Within data mining for medical applications, Marcellin proposed an asymmetric measure of entropy that can be ideal to account for such bias and to quantify subjective randomness. We fitted Marcellin's entropy and Renyi's entropy (a generalized form of uncertainty measure comprising many different kinds of entropies) to experimental data found in the literature with the Differential Evolution algorithm. We observed a better fit for Marcellin's entropy compared to Renyi's entropy. The fitted asymmetric entropy measure also showed good predictive properties when applied to different datasets of randomness-related tasks. We concluded that Marcellin's entropy can be a parsimonious and effective measure of subjective randomness that can be useful in psychological research about randomness perception. PMID:27458418

  20. An experimental investigation of vortex stability, tip shapes, compressibility, and noise for hovering model rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tangler, J. L.; Wohlfeld, R. M.; Miley, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Schlieren methods of flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry for velocity measurements were used to investigate the wakes generated by hovering model propellers and rotors. The research program was directed toward investigating (1) the stability of the tip vortex, (2) the effects produced by various tip shapes on performance and tip vortex characteristics, and (3) the shock formation and noise characteristics associated with various tip shapes. A free-wake analysis was also conducted for comparison with the vortex stability experimental results. Schlieren photographs showing wake asymmetry, interaction, and instability are presented along with a discussion of the effects produced by the number of blades, collective pitch, and tip speed. Two hot-wire anemometer techniques, used to measure the maximum circumferential velocity in the tip vortex, are discussed.

  1. Rotor reference frame models of a multiloop 2-phase motor drive in brushless DC and microstepping modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes non-linear models of a 2-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor drive in brushless DC and microstepping modes. The models account for everything from the main power bus up to and including the mechanical load and velocity feedback loop. In particular, the models include the power electronics for each phase complete with their internal feedback loops. Classical state space averaged power electronics models are transformed to the rotor reference frame along with the usual electromechanical variables. Since SPICE linearizes the rotor reference frame model about shaft velocity, instead of shaft angle, frequency domain methods apply. The frequency domain analysis detects unstable interactions between torque angle and deliberate feedback within the drives. Time domain simulations using stator reference frame models confirm the results. All models are SPICE-compatible but were developed on Cadence`s Analog Workbench.

  2. A comprehensive dynamic model to investigate the stability problems of the rotor-bearing system due to multiple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuening; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive dynamic model is proposed to analyze the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing system. Three types of excitation including the bearing waviness, the unbalanced force and the finite number of balls (varying compliance effect) are considered. Based on the extended Jones-Harris model with five degrees of freedom, the load distribution and then the stiffness of the angular contact ball bearing are obtained theoretically. After introducing the three types of excitation into the model, the bearing stiffness matrix becomes time-varying and many parametric frequencies are found due to the multiple excitations. Then, the stability problems of the parametrically excited rotor-bearing system are investigated utilizing the discrete state transition matrix method (DSTM). The simple instability regions arising from the translational and the angular motions are analyzed respectively. The effects of the amplitude and the initial phase angle of the bearing waviness, the rotor eccentricity, the bearing preload and the damping of the rotating system on the instability regions are discussed thoroughly. It is shown that the waviness amplitudes have significant influences on the instability regions, while the initial phase angles of the waviness almost have no effect on the instability regions. The rotor eccentricity just affects the widths of the instability regions. The increasing of the bearing preload only shifts the positions of the instability regions. Damping could reduce the instability regions but it could not diminish the regions completely.

  3. A new nonlinear dynamic model of the rotor-bearing system considering preload and varying contact angle of the bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuening; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2015-05-01

    A great deal of research work has been done on the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing system. However, the important effects of load and variation of contact angle on the bearing performance have not been focused on sufficiently. In this paper, a five-degree-of-freedom load distribution model is set up considering the bearing preload and the loads due to the rotor imbalance. Utilizing this model, the variation of the bearing contact angle is investigated thoroughly. The comparisons of the obtained contact angle against the results from literature validate that the proposed load distribution model is effective. With this model, the static ball deformations are obtained considering variation of the contact angle. Through resolving the dynamic displacements of the rotor, the dynamic ball deformations could also be obtained. Then the total restoring forces and moments of the bearings could be formulated. By introducing these nonlinear forces and moments into the rotating system, a new dynamic model considering the preload and the variation of contact angle is set up. The present analyses indicate that the bearing contact angle will be changed remarkably with the effect of bearing load. The deflection vibration of the rotor-bearing system will be underestimated without considering the varying contact angle. With the effect of varying contact angle, the ball passage frequency and its combinations with the shaft rotating frequency become more noticeable. The main resonance regions for the rotor-bearing system shift to the lower speed ranges when the variation of contact angle is taken into account.

  4. Rotor-to-stator Partial Rubbing and Its Effects on Rotor Dynamic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from experimental and analytical studies on rotor to stationary element partial rubbings at several locations and their effects on rotor dynamic responses are presented. The mathematical model of a rubbing rotor is given. The computer program provides numerical results which agree with experimentally obtained rotor responses.

  5. Sensitivity of Hingeless Rotor Blade Flap-lag Stability in Hover to Analytical Modelling Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Prediction of flap-lag stability using a single bending mode for each degree-of-freedom is examined in the case in which the bending modes are assumed to be the same in the flap and lag directions and are independent of pitch angle and stiffness distribution. It is shown that this model gives results analogous to those obtained by Ormiston employing a rigid blade model with the blade and hub stiffness represented by springs in the limiting cases of the elastic coupling parameter R = 0 and 1. For intermediate values of R the results are shown to be quite different. The mode shape assumptions are shown to result in what is referred to as the parallel spring model in contrast to Ormiston's model which is referred to as a series spring model. The similarities and differences between these two models are developed in some details. The differences between these two models are examined for various typical rotor blade characteristics. Other aspects of the sensitivity of this problem are also considered.

  6. Comprehensive Modeling and Analysis of Rotorcraft Variable Speed Propulsion System With Coupled Engine/Transmission/Rotor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSmidt, Hans A.; Smith, Edward C.; Bill, Robert C.; Wang, Kon-Well

    2013-01-01

    This project develops comprehensive modeling and simulation tools for analysis of variable rotor speed helicopter propulsion system dynamics. The Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed in this research is used to investigate coupled rotor/engine/fuel control/gearbox/shaft/clutch/flight control system dynamic interactions for several variable rotor speed mission scenarios. In this investigation, a prototypical two-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is proposed and designed to achieve 50 percent rotor speed variation. The comprehensive modeling tool developed in this study is utilized to analyze the two-speed shift response of both a conventional single rotor helicopter and a tiltrotor drive system. In the tiltrotor system, both a Parallel Shift Control (PSC) strategy and a Sequential Shift Control (SSC) strategy for constant and variable forward speed mission profiles are analyzed. Under the PSC strategy, selecting clutch shift-rate results in a design tradeoff between transient engine surge margins and clutch frictional power dissipation. In the case of SSC, clutch power dissipation is drastically reduced in exchange for the necessity to disengage one engine at a time which requires a multi-DCT drive system topology. In addition to comprehensive simulations, several sections are dedicated to detailed analysis of driveline subsystem components under variable speed operation. In particular an aeroelastic simulation of a stiff in-plane rotor using nonlinear quasi-steady blade element theory was conducted to investigate variable speed rotor dynamics. It was found that 2/rev and 4/rev flap and lag vibrations were significant during resonance crossings with 4/rev lagwise loads being directly transferred into drive-system torque disturbances. To capture the clutch engagement dynamics, a nonlinear stick-slip clutch torque model is developed. Also, a transient gas-turbine engine model based on first principles mean

  7. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  8. Effects of asymmetrical damping on a 2 DOF quarter-car model under harmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M.; Wahi, P.; Fernandes, J. C. M.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this work is to study the dynamical behavior of vehicle suspension systems employing asymmetrical viscous damping, with a focus on improving passenger comfort. Previous studies have shown that the use of asymmetrical dampers in these types of systems can be advantageous with regard to comfort of the passengers. The modeling and the behavior of a quarter-car model with asymmetrical viscous damping under harmonic excitation is presented. The response is obtained with an analytical approximation via the method of Harmonic Balance. The choice of the asymmetry ratio diminishes the effects that the uneven road causes on the displacement and acceleration of the sprung mass. Although current systems usually adopt larger damping during the expansion phase, it is shown in this work that, for lower frequencies, smaller damping in this phase results in better comfort.

  9. Simulating asymmetric colloidal mixture with adhesive hard sphere model.

    PubMed

    Jamnik, A

    2008-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulation and Percus-Yevick (PY) theory are used to investigate the structural properties of a two-component system of the Baxter adhesive fluids with the size asymmetry of the particles of both components mimicking an asymmetric binary colloidal mixture. The radial distribution functions for all possible species pairs, g(11)(r), g(22)(r), and g(12)(r), exhibit discontinuities at the interparticle distances corresponding to certain combinations of n and m values (n and m being integers) in the sum nsigma(1)+msigma(2) (sigma(1) and sigma(2) being the hard-core diameters of individual components) as a consequence of the impulse character of 1-1, 2-2, and 1-2 attractive interactions. In contrast to the PY theory, which predicts the delta function peaks in the shape of g(ij)(r) only at the distances which are the multiple of the molecular sizes corresponding to different linear structures of successively connected particles, the simulation results reveal additional peaks at intermediate distances originating from the formation of rigid clusters of various geometries.

  10. A numerical strategy for finite element modeling of frictionless asymmetric vocal fold collision.

    PubMed

    Granados, Alba; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Brunskog, Jonas; Visseq, Vincent; Erleben, Kenny

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of voice pathologies may require vocal fold models that include relevant features such as vocal fold asymmetric collision. The present study numerically addresses the problem of frictionless asymmetric collision in a self-sustained three-dimensional continuum model of the vocal folds. Theoretical background and numerical analysis of the finite-element position-based contact model are presented, along with validation. A novel contact detection mechanism capable to detect collision in asymmetric oscillations is developed. The effect of inexact contact constraint enforcement on vocal fold dynamics is examined by different variational methods for inequality constrained minimization problems, namely, the Lagrange multiplier method and the penalty method. In contrast to the penalty solution, which is related to classical spring-like contact forces, numerical examples show that the parameter-independent Lagrange multiplier solution is more robust and accurate in the estimation of dynamical and mechanical features at vocal fold contact. Furthermore, special attention is paid to the temporal integration schemes in relation to the contact problem, the results suggesting an advantage of highly diffusive schemes. Finally, vocal fold contact enforcement is shown to affect asymmetric oscillations. The present model may be adapted to existing vocal fold models, which may contribute to a better understanding of the effect of the nonlinear contact phenomenon on phonation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Petal-type Chiral NADH Model: Design, Synthesis and its Asymmetric Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Cui-Bing; Wang, Nai-Xing; Wang, Yan-Jing; Xing, Yalan; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Xing-Wang

    2015-01-01

    A new type of NADH model compound has been synthesized by an efficient and convenient method. This model compound exhibits high reactivity and enantioselectivity in asymmetric reduction reactions. The results show that chiral NADH model S could be effectively combined with Mg2+ to form ternary complexes. This novel C3 symmetrical NADH model is capable of fluorescence emission at 460 nm when excited at 377 nm. PMID:26648413

  12. Classical and quantum localization and delocalization in the Fermi accelerator, kicked rotor and two-sided kicked rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, M.

    1996-06-01

    The phenomena of dynamical localization, both classical and quantum, are studied in the Fermi accelerator model. The model consists of two vertical oscillating walls and a ball bouncing between them. The classical localization boundary is calculated in the case of ``sinusoidal velocity transfer'' [A. J. Lichtenberg and M. A. Lieberman, Regular and Stochastic Motion (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1983)] on the basis of the analysis of resonances. In the case of the ``sawtooth'' wall velocity we show that the quantum localization is determined by the analytical properties of the canonical transformations to the action and angle coordinates of the unperturbed Hamiltonian, while the existence of the classical localization is determined by the number of continuous derivatives of the distance between the walls with respect to time.

  13. Asymmetric magnetic reconnection with out-of-plane shear flows in a two dimensional hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xian-Qu; Liu, Yue

    2015-05-15

    Effects of out-of-plane shear flows on asymmetric magnetic reconnect are investigated in a two-dimensional (2D) hybrid model with an initial Harris sheet equilibrium. It is found that the out-of-plane flow with an in-plane shear can significantly change the asymmetric reconnection process as well as the related geometry. The magnetic flux, out-of-plane magnetic field, in-plane flow vorticity, plasma density, and the reconnection rate are discussed in detail. The results are in comparison with the cases without the shear flows to further understand the effect.

  14. Exact diffusion constant for the one-dimensional partially asymmetric exclusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Mallick, K.

    1997-02-01

    We calculate exactly the diffusion constant associated with the fluctuations of the current for the partial asymmetric exclusion model on a ring with an arbitrary number of particles and holes. We also give the diffusion constant of a tagged particle on that ring. Our approach extends, using the deformed harmonic oscillator algebra, a result already known for the fully asymmetric case. In the limit of weak asymmetry, we extract from our exact expression the crossover between the Edwards - Wilkinson and the Kardar - Parisi - Zhang equations in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  15. Effects of aerodynamic interaction between main and tail rotors on helicopter hover performance and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menger, R. P.; Wood, T. L.; Brieger, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A model test was conducted to determine the effects of aerodynamic interaction between main rotor, tail rotor, and vertical fin on helicopter performance and noise in hover out of ground effect. The experimental data were obtained from hover tests performed with a .151 scale Model 222 main rotor, tail rotor and vertical fin. Of primary interest was the effect of location of the tail rotor with respect to the main rotor. Penalties on main rotor power due to interaction with the tail rotor ranged up to 3% depending upon tail rotor location and orientation. Penalties on tail rotor power due to fin blockage alone ranged up to 10% for pusher tail rotors and up to 50% for tractor tail rotors. The main rotor wake had only a second order effect on these tail rotor/fin interactions. Design charts are presented showing the penalties on main rotor power as a function of the relative location of the tail rotor.

  16. Improving atomic force microscopy imaging by a direct inverse asymmetric PI hysteresis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Yu, Peng; Wang, Feifei; Chan, Ho-Yin; Zhou, Lei; Dong, Zaili; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Wen Jung

    2015-02-03

    A modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) model, referred to as a direct inverse asymmetric PI (DIAPI) model in this paper, was implemented to reduce the displacement error between a predicted model and the actual trajectory of a piezoelectric actuator which is commonly found in AFM systems. Due to the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator, the standard symmetric PI model cannot precisely describe the asymmetric motion of the actuator. In order to improve the accuracy of AFM scans, two series of slope parameters were introduced in the PI model to describe both the voltage-increase-loop (trace) and voltage-decrease-loop (retrace). A feedforward controller based on the DIAPI model was implemented to compensate hysteresis. Performance of the DIAPI model and the feedforward controller were validated by scanning micro-lenses and standard silicon grating using a custom-built AFM.

  17. A mathematical model for the doubly-fed wound rotor generator, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of a doubly-fed wound rotor generator is presented. The constraints of constant stator voltage and frequency to the circuit equations were applied and expressions for the currents and voltages in the machine obtained. The derived variables are redefined as direct and quadrature components. In addition, the apparent (complex) power for both the rotor and the stator are derived in terms of these redefined components.

  18. A mathematical model for the doubly-fed wound rotor generator. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of a doubly-fed wound rotor generator is presented. The constraints of constant stator voltage and frequency to the circuit equations were applied and expressions for the currents and voltages in the machine obtained. The derived variables are redefined as direct and quadrature components. In addition, the apparent (complex) power for both the rotor and the stator are derived in terms of these redefined components.

  19. Experimental investigation of the vibration characteristics of a model of an asymmetric multielement space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, U. J.

    1977-01-01

    Vibration investigations of a model of the asymmetric multielement space shuttle were made. The influence on overall motions of local deformation in the vicinity of element interfaces, high modal density, low structural damping, and high responsiveness in the crew cabin are included in the findings. Mode frequencies generally increase with decreasing propellant masses and staging of elements.

  20. Comparison of Asymmetric and Ice-cream Cone Models for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, H.; Moon, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are major cause of the geomagnetic storms. To minimize the projection effect by coronagraph observation, several cone models have been suggested: an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model etc. These models allow us to determine the three dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone. In this study, we compare these parameters obtained from different models using 48 well-observed HCMEs from 2001 to 2002. And we obtain the root mean square error (RMS error) between measured projection speeds and calculated projection speeds for both cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with each other (R = 0.86), and the correlation coefficient of angular width is 0.6. The correlation coefficient of the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone is 0.31, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be due to the fact that the source locations of the asymmetric cone model are distributed near the center, while those of the ice-cream cone model are located in a wide range. The average RMS error of the asymmetric cone model (85.6km/s) is slightly smaller than that of the ice-cream cone model (87.8km/s).

  1. A general model for metabolic scaling in self-similar asymmetric networks

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Van M.; Enquist, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    How a particular attribute of an organism changes or scales with its body size is known as an allometry. Biological allometries, such as metabolic scaling, have been hypothesized to result from selection to maximize how vascular networks fill space yet minimize internal transport distances and resistances. The West, Brown, Enquist (WBE) model argues that these two principles (space-filling and energy minimization) are (i) general principles underlying the evolution of the diversity of biological networks across plants and animals and (ii) can be used to predict how the resulting geometry of biological networks then governs their allometric scaling. Perhaps the most central biological allometry is how metabolic rate scales with body size. A core assumption of the WBE model is that networks are symmetric with respect to their geometric properties. That is, any two given branches within the same generation in the network are assumed to have identical lengths and radii. However, biological networks are rarely if ever symmetric. An open question is: Does incorporating asymmetric branching change or influence the predictions of the WBE model? We derive a general network model that relaxes the symmetric assumption and define two classes of asymmetrically bifurcating networks. We show that asymmetric branching can be incorporated into the WBE model. This asymmetric version of the WBE model results in several theoretical predictions for the structure, physiology, and metabolism of organisms, specifically in the case for the cardiovascular system. We show how network asymmetry can now be incorporated in the many allometric scaling relationships via total network volume. Most importantly, we show that the 3/4 metabolic scaling exponent from Kleiber’s Law can still be attained within many asymmetric networks. PMID:28319153

  2. A general model for metabolic scaling in self-similar asymmetric networks.

    PubMed

    Brummer, Alexander Byers; Savage, Van M; Enquist, Brian J

    2017-03-01

    How a particular attribute of an organism changes or scales with its body size is known as an allometry. Biological allometries, such as metabolic scaling, have been hypothesized to result from selection to maximize how vascular networks fill space yet minimize internal transport distances and resistances. The West, Brown, Enquist (WBE) model argues that these two principles (space-filling and energy minimization) are (i) general principles underlying the evolution of the diversity of biological networks across plants and animals and (ii) can be used to predict how the resulting geometry of biological networks then governs their allometric scaling. Perhaps the most central biological allometry is how metabolic rate scales with body size. A core assumption of the WBE model is that networks are symmetric with respect to their geometric properties. That is, any two given branches within the same generation in the network are assumed to have identical lengths and radii. However, biological networks are rarely if ever symmetric. An open question is: Does incorporating asymmetric branching change or influence the predictions of the WBE model? We derive a general network model that relaxes the symmetric assumption and define two classes of asymmetrically bifurcating networks. We show that asymmetric branching can be incorporated into the WBE model. This asymmetric version of the WBE model results in several theoretical predictions for the structure, physiology, and metabolism of organisms, specifically in the case for the cardiovascular system. We show how network asymmetry can now be incorporated in the many allometric scaling relationships via total network volume. Most importantly, we show that the 3/4 metabolic scaling exponent from Kleiber's Law can still be attained within many asymmetric networks.

  3. Tunneling of electrons via rotor-stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreska, Irina; Ohanesjan, Vladimir; Pejov, Ljupčo; Kocarev, Ljupčo

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor-stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons' formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green's Function Formalism.

  4. Vortex Wake Geometry of a Model Tilt Rotor in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadcock, Alan J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A full-span 0.25-scale V-22 tiltrotor was tested in the NASA Ames 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel in November 2000. The main objective of the test was to acquire a comprehensive database to validate tiltrotor analyses. Figure 1 shows the model installed in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Rotor and vehicle performance measurements were taken in addition to wing pressures, acoustics, and flow visualization. A dual acoustic traverse system was installed to measure blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise levels and directivity. Test conditions included hover and forward flight in helicopter mode. Angle-of-attack and thrust sweeps for three tunnel speeds were acquired before model problems caused the premature conclusion of the test. The test will resume in the Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel in late 2001. This paper will focus on the wake geometry measurements that were acquired during the test. The wake geometry measurements were a small subset of a larger matrix of planned measurements designed to study the development and structure of the dual vortex system generated during BVI conditions. The present paper will provide wake geometry data for four test conditions. In addition, the data will be compared with previously acquired wake measurements from an isolated tiltrotor

  5. Coupled escape probability for an asymmetric spherical case: Modeling optically thick comets

    SciTech Connect

    Gersch, Alan M.; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2014-05-20

    We have adapted Coupled Escape Probability, a new exact method of solving radiative transfer problems, for use in asymmetrical spherical situations. Our model is intended specifically for use in modeling optically thick cometary comae, although not limited to such use. This method enables the accurate modeling of comets' spectra even in the potentially optically thick regions nearest the nucleus, such as those seen in Deep Impact observations of 9P/Tempel 1 and EPOXI observations of 103P/Hartley 2.

  6. Asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jason

    2014-06-24

    We review the theoretical framework underlying models of asymmetric dark matter, describe astrophysical constraints which arise from observations of neutron stars, and discuss the prospects for detecting asymmetric dark matter.

  7. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  8. On the dynamic model and motion planning for a spherical rolling robot actuated by orthogonal internal rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinin, Mikhail; Morinaga, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Motoji

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the dynamics of a spherical rolling robot actuated by internal rotors that are placed on orthogonal axes. The driving principle for such a robot exploits nonholonomic constraints to propel the rolling carrier. A full mathematical model as well as its reduced version are derived, and the inverse dynamics are addressed. It is shown that if the rotors are mounted on three orthogonal axes, any feasible kinematic trajectory of the rolling robot is dynamically realizable. For the case of only two rotors the conditions of controllability and dynamic realizability are established. It is shown that in moving the robot by tracing straight lines and circles in the contact plane the dynamically realizable trajectories are not represented by the circles on the sphere, which is a feature of the kinematic model of pure rolling. The implication of this fact to motion planning is explored under a case study. It is shown there that in maneuvering the robot by tracing circles on the sphere the dynamically realizable trajectories are essentially different from those resulted from kinematic models. The dynamic motion planning problem is then formulated in the optimal control settings, and properties of the optimal trajectories are illustrated under simulation.

  9. The triaxial particle plus rotor model and wobbling mode: A semiclassical view

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rajiv; Malik, S. S.; Jain, A. K.; Jain, S. R.

    2010-11-24

    A systematic analysis of the triaxial particle rotor model with single-j shell configuration is carried out to explain the prominent features of observed wobbling excitations in odd A nuclei. The equations of motion for the angular momentum vectors I-vector and j-vector generate two types of equilibrium (i.e., (i) the axes aligned and (ii) the planar) states. The planar equilibrium states involve mainly the orientation degree of freedom {gamma} and their Jacobian matrix J gives purely imaginary eigenvalues in conjugate pairs. Also, our dynamical results show a substantial projection of angular momentum vectors on all the three principal axes, which implies that the resultant angular momentum lies outside the planes of three axes. Both these signatures confirm the spontaneous breakdown of time reversal (T) plus rotation by 180 deg. (R{sub {pi}}) i.e., R{sub {pi}T} symmetry and as a result nearly two identical bands consisting of even and odd spins emerge. We have tested our dynamical formalism for the wobbling mode observed in {sup 163}Lu.

  10. A preliminary investigation of finite-element modeling for composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    The results from an initial phase of an in-house study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of elastic couplings are presented. Large degree of freedom shell finite element models of an extension twist coupled composite tube were developed and analyzed using MSC/NASTRAN. An analysis employing a simplified beam finite element representation of the specimen with the equivalent engineering stiffness was additionally performed. Results from the shell finite element normal modes and frequency analysis were compared to those obtained experimentally, showing an agreement within 13 percent. There was appreciable degradation in the frequency prediction for the torsional mode, which is elastically coupled. This was due to the absence of off-diagonal coupling terms in the formulation of the equivalent engineering stiffness. Parametric studies of frequency variation due to small changes in ply orientation angle and ply thickness were also performed. Results showed linear frequency variations less than 2 percent per 1 degree variation in the ply orientation angle, and 1 percent per 0.0001 inch variation in the ply thickness.

  11. Rotor/Wing Interactions in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Derby, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hover predictions of tiltrotor aircraft are hampered by the lack of accurate and computationally efficient models for rotor/wing interactional aerodynamics. This paper summarizes the development of an approximate, potential flow solution for the rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This analysis is based on actuator disk and vortex theory and the method of images. The analysis is applicable for out-of-ground-effect predictions. The analysis is particularly suited for aircraft preliminary design studies. Flow field predictions from this simple analytical model are validated against experimental data from previous studies. The paper concludes with an analytical assessment of the influence of rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This assessment examines the effect of rotor-to-wing offset distance, wing sweep, wing span, and flaperon incidence angle on tiltrotor inflow and performance.

  12. Evaluation of an asymmetric anterior glottic web in an excised canine larynx model.

    PubMed

    Pulvermacher, Allyson C; Xue, Chao; Leggon, Robert; Mills, Randal; Jiang, Jack J

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of the study is to model asymmetry within anterior glottic webs in excised larynges using sutures and apply aerodynamic and acoustic analyses. Anterior glottic webs (AGW) were modeled in eight excised larynges using sutures secured at the level of the glottis to mimic the scar tissue of the web. Each of the eight larynges were tested under three different pressure increments for each of the three models of AGW: symmetric, vertically asymmetric, and laterally asymmetric. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and flow (PTF) differed significantly across AGW conditions (p = 0.006 and p = 0.005, respectively). Additionally, vocal efficiency was significantly different among conditions (p = 0.005) as well as significantly lower in the asymmetric groups (p = 0.015 and p = 0.007). Perturbation measures were not significantly different across conditions. Correlation dimension (D2) was significantly different at PTP, 1.25 × PTP, and 1.5 × PTP (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, and p < 0.001, respectively) as well as significantly higher in the asymmetric groups at each pressure increment. The increased PTP, PTF, and D2 values as well as decreased vocal efficiency among the asymmetric conditions indicates a significant decrease in vocal function, and thus represents that asymmetries could be a contributing factor to the pathological symptoms associated with glottic webs.

  13. An asymmetric approach to modeling ion channels using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Siksik, M; Krishnamurthy, V

    2009-01-01

    Biological ion channels are water filled pores in the cell membrane. They regulate the flow of ions in and out of the cell. Modeling the dynamics of these channels and relating their structure to functionality is crucial in understanding the mechanisms by which they conduct. This paper proposes a novel Finite Element Method (FEM) based simulation framework for modeling of ion channels that does not assume channel symmetry. This is the first framework that allows the use of multiple dielectric constants inside such channels without assuming geometrical symmetry thus providing a more realistic model of the channel. Due to the run-time complexity of the problem, lookup tables must be constructed in memory to store pre-calculated electric potential information. The large number of elements involved in FEM and channel resolution requirements can potentially result in very large lookup tables leading to a performance "bottleneck". This paper answers the following question: Does the accuracy introduced by using an asymmetric model outweigh the inaccuracy caused by having to reduce the size and resolution of electric-field look-up tables? This paper compares the memory footprint of an ion channel simulator that assumes a symmetric channel model versus an asymmetric model. We show that currently available personal computers are sufficient for attaining reasonable levels of accuracy for both. Our results show diminishing returns in accuracy with tables sized greater than 8.5 GB for the asymmetric model.

  14. Asymmetric Lipid Membranes: Towards More Realistic Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Drew; Geier, Barbara; Pabst, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies. PMID:25955841

  15. Quantum Molecular Interaction Field Models of Substrate Enantioselection in Asymmetric Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Marisa C.; Ianni, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Computational models correlating substrate structure to enantioselection with asymmetric catalysts using the QMQSAR program are described. In addition to rapidly providing predictions that could be used to facilitate the screening of catalysts for novel substrates, the QMQSAR program identifies the portions of the substrate that most directly influence the enantioselectivity. The lack underlying relationship between all the substrates in one case, requires two quantitative structure selectivity relationships (QSSR) models to describe all of the experimental results. PMID:20676382

  16. AN ASYMMETRICAL SYNCHROTRON MODEL FOR KNOTS IN THE 3C 273 JET

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Po; Chen, Y. J.; Wang, Chun-Cheng

    2015-06-20

    To interpret the emission of knots in the 3C 273 jet from radio to X-rays, we propose a synchrotron model in which, owing to the shock compression effect, the injection spectra from a shock into the upstream and downstream emission regions are asymmetric. Our model could well explain the spectral energy distributions of knots in the 3C 273 jet, and predictions regarding the knots’ spectra could be tested by future observations.

  17. Investigation of rotor blade element airloads for a teetering rotor in the blade stall regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L. U.; Fukushima, T.

    1974-01-01

    A model of a teetering rotor was tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Blade element airloads measured on an articulated model rotor were compared with the teetering rotor and showed that the teetering rotor is subjected to less extensive flow separation. Retreating blade stall was studied. Results show that stall, under the influence of unsteady aerodynamic effects, consists of four separate stall events, each associated with a vortex shed from the leading edge and sweeping over the upper surface of the rotor blade. Current rotor performance prediction methodology was evaluated through computer simulation.

  18. Behavior of Bilayer Leaflets in Asymmetric Model Membranes: Atomistic Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Jianhui; Nickels, Jonathan; Katsaras, John; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2016-04-27

    Spatial organization within lipid bilayers is an important feature for a range of biological processes. Leaflet compositional asymmetry and lateral lipid organization are just two of the ways in which membrane structure appears to be more complex than initially postulated by the fluid mosaic model. This raises the question of how the phase behavior in one bilayer leaflet may affect the apposing leaflet and how one begins to construct asymmetric model systems to investigate these interleaflet interactions. In this paper, we report on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (a total of 4.1 μs) of symmetric and asymmetric bilayer systems composed of liquid-ordered (Lo) or liquid-disordered (Ld) leaflets, based on the nanodomain-forming POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system. We begin by analyzing an asymmetric bilayer with leaflets derived from simulations of symmetric Lo and Ld bilayers. In this system, we observe that the properties of the Lo and Ld leaflets are similar to those of the Lo and Ld leaflets in corresponding symmetric systems. However, it is not obvious that mixing the equilibrium structures of their symmetric counterparts is the most appropriate way to construct asymmetric bilayers nor that these structures will manifest interleaflet couplings that lead to domain registry/antiregistry. We therefore constructed and simulated four additional asymmetric bilayer systems by systematically adding or removing lipids in the Ld leaflet to mimic potential density fluctuations. We find that the number of lipids in the Ld leaflet affects its own properties, as well as those of the apposing Lo leaflet. Collectively, the simulations reveal the presence of weak acyl chain interdigitation across bilayer leaflets, suggesting that interdigitation alone does not contribute significantly to the interleaflet coupling in nonphase-separated bilayers of this chemical composition. Finally, however, the properties of both leaflets appear to be sensitive to changes in in-plane lipid

  19. Influence of an asymmetric ring on the modeling of an orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, Naveen; Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Structural models are examined for the influence of a ring with an asymmetrical cross section on the linear elastic response of an orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shell subjected to internal pressure. The first structural model employs classical theory for the shell and stiffeners. The second model employs transverse shear deformation theories for the shell and stringer and classical theory for the ring. Closed-end pressure vessel effects are included. Interacting line load intensities are computed in the stiffener-to-skin joints for an example problem having the dimensions of the fuselage of a large transport aircraft. Classical structural theory is found to exaggerate the asymmetric response compared to the transverse shear deformation theory.

  20. Large eddy simulation of high frequency oscillating flow in an asymmetric branching airway model.

    PubMed

    Nagels, Martin A; Cater, John E

    2009-11-01

    The implementation of artificial ventilation schemes is necessary when respiration fails. One approach involves the application of high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) to the respiratory system. Oscillatory airflow in the upper bronchial tree can be characterized by Reynolds numbers as high as 10(4), hence, the flow presents turbulent features. In this study, transitional and turbulent flow within an asymmetric bifurcating model of the upper airway during HFOV are studied using large eddy simulation (LES) methods. The flow, characterized by a peak Reynolds number of 8132, is analysed using a validated LES model of a three-dimensional branching geometry. The pressures, velocities, and vorticity within the flow are presented and compared with prior models for branching flow systems. The results demonstrate how pendelluft occurs at asymmetric branches within the respiratory system. These results may be useful in optimising treatments using HFOV methods.

  1. Acoustic Shielding for a Model Scale Counter-rotation Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David B.; Edmane, Envia

    2012-01-01

    The noise shielding benefit of installing an open rotor above a simplified wing or tail is explored experimentally. The test results provide both a benchmark data set for validating shielding prediction tools and an opportunity for a system level evaluation of the noise reduction potential of propulsion noise shielding by an airframe component. A short barrier near the open rotor was found to provide up to 8.5 dB of attenuation at some directivity angles, with tonal sound particularly well shielded. Predictions from two simple shielding theories were found to overestimate the shielding benefit.

  2. A comparison of theory and experiment for aeroelastic stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of aeroelastic stability are compared with experimental, isolated, hingeless-rotor data. The six cases selected represent a torsionally soft rotor having either a stiff or soft pitch-control system in combination with zero precone and droop, 5 degree precone, or -5 degree droop. Analyses from Bell Helicopter Textron, Boeing Vertol, Hughes Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the experimental data. The correlation ranged from poor to fair.

  3. Molecular Rotors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Zack Murray No Faith Jordan No Charles Hagerdorn No Elizabeth Baker, No Mathew Myers No Leah A. Edelman No William T. Gathright No Bill Bockrath No...ligand could impact the construction of rotor arrays. Consequently, VASP calculations were performed in collaboration with Dr. Jeffrey Reimers of

  4. TH-C-BRD-02: Analytical Modeling and Dose Calculation Method for Asymmetric Proton Pencil Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gelover, E; Wang, D; Hill, P; Flynn, R; Hyer, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A dynamic collimation system (DCS), which consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades driven by linear motors has been proposed to decrease the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy. The DCS reduces lateral penumbra by intercepting the proton pencil beam near the lateral boundary of the target in the beam's eye view. The resultant trimmed pencil beams are asymmetric and laterally shifted, and therefore existing pencil beam dose calculation algorithms are not capable of trimmed beam dose calculations. This work develops a method to model and compute dose from trimmed pencil beams when using the DCS. Methods: MCNPX simulations were used to determine the dose distributions expected from various trimmer configurations using the DCS. Using these data, the lateral distribution for individual beamlets was modeled with a 2D asymmetric Gaussian function. The integral depth dose (IDD) of each configuration was also modeled by combining the IDD of an untrimmed pencil beam with a linear correction factor. The convolution of these two terms, along with the Highland approximation to account for lateral growth of the beam along the depth direction, allows a trimmed pencil beam dose distribution to be analytically generated. The algorithm was validated by computing dose for a single energy layer 5×5 cm{sup 2} treatment field, defined by the trimmers, using both the proposed method and MCNPX beamlets. Results: The Gaussian modeled asymmetric lateral profiles along the principal axes match the MCNPX data very well (R{sup 2}≥0.95 at the depth of the Bragg peak). For the 5×5 cm{sup 2} treatment plan created with both the modeled and MCNPX pencil beams, the passing rate of the 3D gamma test was 98% using a standard threshold of 3%/3 mm. Conclusion: An analytical method capable of accurately computing asymmetric pencil beam dose when using the DCS has been developed.

  5. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

    1998-07-07

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

  6. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  7. Partial SUSY breaking for asymmetric Gepner models and non-geometric flux vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Fuchs, Michael; Plauschinn, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Using the method of simple current extensions, asymmetric Gepner models of Type IIB with N = 1 space-time supersymmetry are constructed. The combinatorics of the massless vector fields suggests that these classical Minkowski string vacua provide fully backreacted solutions corresponding to N = 1 minima of N = 2 gauged supergravity. The latter contain abelian gaugings along the axionic isometries in the hypermultiplet moduli space, and can be considered as Type IIB flux compactifications on Calabi-Yau manifolds equipped with (non-)geometric fluxes. For a particular class of asymmetric Gepner models, we are able to explicitly specify the underlying CICYs and to check necessary conditions for a GSUGRA interpretation. If this conjecture is correct, there exists a large class of exactly solvable non-geometric flux compactifications on CY threefolds.

  8. Flight Acoustic Testing and Data Acquisition For the Rotor Noise Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.; Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the Acoustics Week flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  9. Research on modeling of the agile satellite using a single gimbal magnetically suspended CMG and the disturbance feedforward compensation for rotors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peiling; Yan, Ning

    2012-12-12

    The magnetically suspended Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) has the advantages of long-life, micro-vibration and being non-lubricating, and is the ideal actuator for agile maneuver satellite attitude control. However, the stability of the rotor in magnetic bearing and the precision of the output torque of a magnetically suspended CMG are affected by the rapid maneuvers of satellites. In this paper, a dynamic model of the agile satellite including a magnetically suspended single gimbal control moment gyroscope is built and the equivalent disturbance torque effected on the rotor is obtained. The feedforward compensation control method is used to depress the disturbance on the rotor. Simulation results are given to show that the rotor displacement is obviously reduced.

  10. Research on Modeling of the Agile Satellite Using a Single Gimbal Magnetically Suspended CMG and the Disturbance Feedforward Compensation for Rotors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peiling; Yan, Ning

    2012-01-01

    The magnetically suspended Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) has the advantages of long-life, micro-vibration and being non-lubricating, and is the ideal actuator for agile maneuver satellite attitude control. However, the stability of the rotor in magnetic bearing and the precision of the output torque of a magnetically suspended CMG are affected by the rapid maneuvers of satellites. In this paper, a dynamic model of the agile satellite including a magnetically suspended single gimbal control moment gyroscope is built and the equivalent disturbance torque effected on the rotor is obtained. The feedforward compensation control method is used to depress the disturbance on the rotor. Simulation results are given to show that the rotor displacement is obviously reduced. PMID:23235442

  11. The asymmetric Hubbard model with a confining potential: The partial filling case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    We investigate the one-dimensional asymmetric Hubbard model with a confining potential, which may describe the ground state of two species of fermionic atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We use White's density matrix renormalization group and the global electronic density considered is n=0.8. The fermion density profiles and their variance were computed. We observe coexistence of insulating and metallic regions in the system. The effective confinement region is different for each kind of fermionic atom.

  12. A Hybrid Kinetic Model of Asymmetric Thin Current Sheets with Sheared Flows in a Collisionless Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-27

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDREss. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYVY) 12. REPORT TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 27-12...Current Sheets ........................................ 5 3 . Asymmetric Current Sheet Model ............................................. 6 3.1...Chen,l Robert A. Santoro, 2, t, Adam Szabo, 3 , and Davin E. Larson4 1 Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 2 NRC

  13. Modeling asymmetric cavity collapse with plasma equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, Brett; Hawker, Nicholas; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-05-01

    We explore the effect that equation of state (EOS) thermodynamics has on shock-driven cavity-collapse processes. We account for full, multidimensional, unsteady hydrodynamics and incorporate a range of relevant EOSs (polytropic, QEOS-type, and SESAME). In doing so, we show that simplified analytic EOSs, like ideal gas, capture certain critical parameters of the collapse such as velocity of the main transverse jet and pressure at jet strike, while also providing a good representation of overall trends. However, more sophisticated EOSs yield different and more relevant estimates of temperature and density, especially for higher incident shock strengths. We model incident shocks ranging from 0.1 to 1000 GPa, the latter being of interest in investigating the warm dense matter regime for which experimental and theoretical EOS data are difficult to obtain. At certain shock strengths, there is a factor of two difference in predicted density between QEOS-type and SESAME EOS, indicating cavity collapse as an experimental method for exploring EOS in this range.

  14. Modeling asymmetric cavity collapse with plasma equations of state.

    PubMed

    Tully, Brett; Hawker, Nicholas; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-05-01

    We explore the effect that equation of state (EOS) thermodynamics has on shock-driven cavity-collapse processes. We account for full, multidimensional, unsteady hydrodynamics and incorporate a range of relevant EOSs (polytropic, QEOS-type, and SESAME). In doing so, we show that simplified analytic EOSs, like ideal gas, capture certain critical parameters of the collapse such as velocity of the main transverse jet and pressure at jet strike, while also providing a good representation of overall trends. However, more sophisticated EOSs yield different and more relevant estimates of temperature and density, especially for higher incident shock strengths. We model incident shocks ranging from 0.1 to 1000 GPa, the latter being of interest in investigating the warm dense matter regime for which experimental and theoretical EOS data are difficult to obtain. At certain shock strengths, there is a factor of two difference in predicted density between QEOS-type and SESAME EOS, indicating cavity collapse as an experimental method for exploring EOS in this range.

  15. The asymmetric effect of coal price on the China's macro economy using NARDL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, J. C.; Yang, M. C.

    2016-08-01

    The present work endeavors to explore the asymmetric effect of coal price on the China's macro economy by applying nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag (NARDL) model for the period of January 2005 to June 2015. The obtained results indicate that the coal price has a strong asymmetric effect on China's macro economy in the long-run. Namely one percent increase in coal price leads to 0.6194 percent of the China's macro economy increase; and while the coal price is reduces by 1 percent, the China's macro economy will decrease by 0.008 percent. These data indicate that when coal price rises, the effect on China's macro economy is far greater than the price decline. In the short-run, coal price fluctuation has a positive effect on the China's macro economy.

  16. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2015-10-21

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  17. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R. E-mail: n.bell@unimelb.edu.au E-mail: raymondv@unimelb.edu.au

    2015-10-01

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  18. Modelling of asymmetrical interconnect T-tree laminated on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, Blaise

    2015-11-01

    A fast and accurate behavioral modelling of asymmetrical microstrip tree printed on plastic substrate is investigated. The methodology for extracting the asymmetrical tree transfer responses based on the ABCD-matrix analysis is presented. The elements of the interconnect T-tree are constituted by transmission lines (TLs) defined by their characteristic impedance and physical length. The distributed tree network can be assumed as a single input multiple output (SIMO) topology. By considering the circuit equivalent between the electrical path from the tree input and output, the single input single output (SISO) simplified circuit can be established. In order to determine the frequency response of the interconnect tree system, the elementary TLs constituting the tree branches are modelled with their equivalent frequency dependent RLCG network. The novelty of the present paper is the application of the model to the microstrip structure printed on the plastic substrate by analyzing the influence of the metallization conductivity. As proof of concept (POC), a single input and three output distributed interconnect T-tree having branches presented physical lengths from 3 cm to 20 cm was designed. The POC was printed on the Cu metal deposited plastic Kapton substrate. Then, the frequency dependent per unit length resistance, inductance, capacitance and conductance of the elementary branches of the T-tree from DC to 10 GHz were extracted. By implementing the behavioral model of the circuit, the frequency- and time-domain responses of the proposed asymmetrical T-tree are computed. Then, the analyses of the asymmetrical T-tree responses in function of the thin film conductivity of the microstrip interconnect lines were discussed. In addition, time domain analysis enabling to predict the influence of the deposited metallic ink conductivity on the signal integrity is realized by considering a mixed signal corresponding to the digital data "010110000" having 0.5 Gbps rate

  19. Hot streaks and phantom cooling in a turbine rotor passage. II - Combined effects and analytical modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, Richard J.; Dring, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental documentation and analytical correlations demonstrating the effects of hot streak accumulation and phantom cooling on turbine rotor airfoil surface temperature are presented. Results are shown which quantify the impact of a nonuniform temperature profile at the entrance of a turbine due to combustor-generated hot and cold streaks, and cooling air discharged from the trailing edge of the upstream stator. Experimental results are shown for a range of controlling variables to identify where streak accumulation and phantom cooling were most likely to be strongest. These variables include streak-to-free stream density ratio, streak injection location, and coolant-to-free stream density and velocity ratios. Experimental results are shown for the combined effects of hot streak and stator coolant on the adiabatic recovery temperature of the rotor.

  20. Dynamic response characteristics of a circulation control rotor model pneumatic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, C. B.; Reader, K. R.; Dutta, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical and experimental simulation of unsteady airflow through the control valve and slotted air duct of a circulation control rotor is described. The numerical analysis involves the solution of the quasi-one-dimensional compressible fluid-dynamic equations in the blade air duct together with the coupled isentropic flow equations for flow into the blade through the valve and out of the blade through the Coanda slot. Numerical solutions are compared with basic experimental results obtained for a mockup of a circulation control rotor and its pneumatic valving system. The pneumodynamic phenomena that were observed are discussed with particular emphasis on the characteristic system time lags associated with the response of the flow variables to transient and periodic control valve inputs.

  1. The results of a wind tunnel investigation of a model rotor with a free tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroub, Robert H.; Young, Larry A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a wind-tunnel test of the free tip rotor are presented. The free tip extended over the outer 10% of the rotor blade and included a simple, passive controller mechanism. Wind-tunnel test hardware is described. The free-tip assembly, which includes the controller, functioned flawlessly throughout the test. The tip pitched freely and responded to airflow perturbation in a sharp, quick, and stable manner. Tip pitch-angle responses are presented for an advance ratio range of 0.1 to 0.397 and for a thrust coefficient range of 0.038 to 0.092. The free tip reduced power requirements, loads going into the control system, and some flatwise blade-bending moments. Chordwise loads were not reduced by the free tip.

  2. A method for modeling laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation

    PubMed Central

    Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Hill, Patrick M.; Flynn, Ryan T.; Gao, Mingcheng; Laub, Steve; Pankuch, Mark; Hyer, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a method to model the 3D dose distribution of laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation. The model enables rapid beamlet calculation for spot scanning (SS) delivery using a novel penumbra-reducing dynamic collimation system (DCS) with two pairs of trimmers oriented perpendicular to each other. Methods: Trimmed beamlet dose distributions in water were simulated with MCNPX and the collimating effects noted in the simulations were validated by experimental measurement. The simulated beamlets were modeled analytically using integral depth dose curves along with an asymmetric Gaussian function to represent fluence in the beam’s eye view (BEV). The BEV parameters consisted of Gaussian standard deviations (sigmas) along each primary axis (σx1,σx2,σy1,σy2) together with the spatial location of the maximum dose (μx,μy). Percent depth dose variation with trimmer position was accounted for with a depth-dependent correction function. Beamlet growth with depth was accounted for by combining the in-air divergence with Hong’s fit of the Highland approximation along each axis in the BEV. Results: The beamlet model showed excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation data used as a benchmark. The overall passing rate for a 3D gamma test with 3%/3 mm passing criteria was 96.1% between the analytical model and Monte Carlo data in an example treatment plan. Conclusions: The analytical model is capable of accurately representing individual asymmetric beamlets resulting from use of the DCS. This method enables integration of the DCS into a treatment planning system to perform dose computation in patient datasets. The method could be generalized for use with any SS collimation system in which blades, leaves, or trimmers are used to laterally sharpen beamlets. PMID:25735287

  3. Computer considerations for real time simulation of a generalized rotor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, R. M.; Fogarty, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scaled equations were developed to meet requirements for real time computer simulation of the rotor system research aircraft. These equations form the basis for consideration of both digital and hybrid mechanization for real time simulation. For all digital simulation estimates of the required speed in terms of equivalent operations per second are developed based on the complexity of the equations and the required intergration frame rates. For both conventional hybrid simulation and hybrid simulation using time-shared analog elements the amount of required equipment is estimated along with a consideration of the dynamic errors. Conventional hybrid mechanization using analog simulation of those rotor equations which involve rotor-spin frequencies (this consititutes the bulk of the equations) requires too much analog equipment. Hybrid simulation using time-sharing techniques for the analog elements appears possible with a reasonable amount of analog equipment. All-digital simulation with affordable general-purpose computers is not possible because of speed limitations, but specially configured digital computers do have the required speed and consitute the recommended approach.

  4. Alternating carrier models of asymmetric glucose transport violate the energy conservation laws.

    PubMed

    Naftalin, Richard J

    2008-11-01

    Alternating access transporters with high-affinity externally facing sites and low-affinity internal sites relate substrate transit directly to the unliganded asymmetric "carrier" (Ci) distribution. When both bathing solutions contain equimolar concentrations of ligand, zero net flow of the substrate-carrier complex requires a higher proportion of unliganded low-affinity inside sites (proportional, variant 1/KD(in)) and slower unliganded "free" carrier transit from inside to outside than in the reverse direction. However, asymmetric rates of unliganded carrier movement, kij, imply that an energy source, DeltaGcarrier = RT ln (koi/kio) = RT ln (Cin/Cout) = RT ln (KD(in)/KD(out)), where R is the universal gas constant (8.314 Joules/M/K degrees), and T is the temperature, assumed here to be 300 K degrees , sustains the asymmetry. Without this invalid assumption, the constraints of carrier path cyclicity, combined with asymmetric ligand affinities and equimolarity at equilibrium, are irreconcilable, and any passive asymmetric uniporter or cotransporter model system, e.g., Na-glucose cotransporters, espousing this fundamental error is untenable. With glucose transport via GLUT1, the higher maximal rate and Km of net ligand exit compared to net ligand entry is only properly simulated if ligand transit occurs by serial dissociation-association reactions between external high-affinity and internal low-affinity immobile sites. Faster intersite transit rates occur from lower-affinity sites than from higher-affinity sites and require no other energy source to maintain equilibrium. Similar constraints must apply to cotransport.

  5. Two-Dimensional Wang-Landau Sampling of AN Asymmetric Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Ho; Wang, Fugao; Landau, D. P.

    We study the critical endpoint behavior of an asymmetric Ising model with two- and three-body interactions on a triangular lattice, in the presence of an external field. We use a two-dimensional Wang-Landau sampling method to determine the density of states for this model. An accurate density of states allowed us to map out the phase diagram accurately and observe a clear divergence of the curvature of the spectator phase boundary and of the derivative of the magnetization coexistence diameter near the critical endpoint, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions.

  6. Electron Scale Signatures of Asymmetric Collisionless Reconnection Obtained from Particle-in-Cel Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aunai, N.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Lavraud, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling collisionless magnetic reconnection at electron scales are still poorly understood and the canonical symmetric 2D antiparallel reconnection configuration is quite limited in front of the great diversity of upstream plasma and field configurations reconnection can encounter. Therefore, efficient comparison between numerical simulations and in situ observations requires to look at features as generic as possible and to understand what can limit their generality. In this context, we will discuss the signatures of electron nongyrotropy, the impact of non kinetic equilibrium as an initial condition of asymmetric reconnection models, and of the orientation of the reconnection plane with respect to the upstream field in 2D models.

  7. Characterizing white matter tissue in large strain via asymmetric indentation and inverse finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Lee, Chung-Hao; Sun, Lining; Ji, Songbai; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanical properties of white matter is important to understand and model brain development and injury. With embedded aligned axonal fibers, white matter is typically modeled as a transversely isotropic material. However, most studies characterize the white matter tissue using models with a single anisotropic invariant or in a small-strain regime. In this study, we combined a single experimental procedure - asymmetric indentation - with inverse finite element (FE) modeling to estimate the nearly incompressible transversely isotropic material parameters of white matter. A minimal form comprising three parameters was employed to simulate indentation responses in the large-strain regime. The parameters were estimated using a global optimization procedure based on a genetic algorithm (GA). Experimental data from two indentation configurations of porcine white matter, parallel and perpendicular to the axonal fiber direction, were utilized to estimate model parameters. Results in this study confirmed a strong mechanical anisotropy of white matter in large strain. Further, our results suggested that both indentation configurations are needed to estimate the parameters with sufficient accuracy, and that the indenter-sample friction is important. Finally, we also showed that the estimated parameters were consistent with those previously obtained via a trial-and-error forward FE method in the small-strain regime. These findings are useful in modeling and parameterization of white matter, especially under large deformation, and demonstrate the potential of the proposed asymmetric indentation technique to characterize other soft biological tissues with transversely isotropic properties.

  8. Behavior of Bilayer Leaflets in Asymmetric Model Membranes: Atomistic Simulation Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Jianhui; Nickels, Jonathan; Katsaras, John; ...

    2016-04-27

    Spatial organization within lipid bilayers is an important feature for a range of biological processes. Leaflet compositional asymmetry and lateral lipid organization are just two of the ways in which membrane structure appears to be more complex than initially postulated by the fluid mosaic model. This raises the question of how the phase behavior in one bilayer leaflet may affect the apposing leaflet and how one begins to construct asymmetric model systems to investigate these interleaflet interactions. In this paper, we report on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (a total of 4.1 μs) of symmetric and asymmetric bilayer systems composed ofmore » liquid-ordered (Lo) or liquid-disordered (Ld) leaflets, based on the nanodomain-forming POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system. We begin by analyzing an asymmetric bilayer with leaflets derived from simulations of symmetric Lo and Ld bilayers. In this system, we observe that the properties of the Lo and Ld leaflets are similar to those of the Lo and Ld leaflets in corresponding symmetric systems. However, it is not obvious that mixing the equilibrium structures of their symmetric counterparts is the most appropriate way to construct asymmetric bilayers nor that these structures will manifest interleaflet couplings that lead to domain registry/antiregistry. We therefore constructed and simulated four additional asymmetric bilayer systems by systematically adding or removing lipids in the Ld leaflet to mimic potential density fluctuations. We find that the number of lipids in the Ld leaflet affects its own properties, as well as those of the apposing Lo leaflet. Collectively, the simulations reveal the presence of weak acyl chain interdigitation across bilayer leaflets, suggesting that interdigitation alone does not contribute significantly to the interleaflet coupling in nonphase-separated bilayers of this chemical composition. Finally, however, the properties of both leaflets appear to be sensitive to changes in in

  9. Understanding the apparent stator-rotor connections in the rotary ATPase family using coarse-grained computer modeling.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Robin A; Papachristos, Konstantinos; Read, Daniel J; Harlen, Oliver G; Harrison, Michael; Paci, Emanuele; Muench, Stephen P; Harris, Sarah A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in structural biology, such as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have allowed for a number of sophisticated protein complexes to be characterized. However, often only a static snapshot of a protein complex is visualized despite the fact that conformational change is frequently inherent to biological function, as is the case for molecular motors. Computer simulations provide valuable insights into the different conformations available to a particular system that are not accessible using conventional structural techniques. For larger proteins and protein complexes, where a fully atomistic description would be computationally prohibitive, coarse-grained simulation techniques such as Elastic Network Modeling (ENM) are often employed, whereby each atom or group of atoms is linked by a set of springs whose properties can be customized according to the system of interest. Here we compare ENM with a recently proposed continuum model known as Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis (FFEA), which represents the biomolecule as a viscoelastic solid subject to thermal fluctuations. These two complementary computational techniques are used to answer a critical question in the rotary ATPase family; implicit within these motors is the need for a rotor axle and proton pump to rotate freely of the motor domain and stator structures. However, current single particle cryo-EM reconstructions have shown an apparent connection between the stators and rotor axle or pump region, hindering rotation. Both modeling approaches show a possible role for this connection and how it would significantly constrain the mobility of the rotary ATPase family.

  10. Comments on Frequency Swept Rotating Input Perturbation Techniques and Identification of the Fluid Force Models in Rotor/bearing/seal Systems and Fluid Handling Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    Perturbation techniques used for identification of rotating system dynamic characteristics are described. A comparison between two periodic frequency-swept perturbation methods applied in identification of fluid forces of rotating machines is presented. The description of the fluid force model identified by inputting circular periodic frequency-swept force is given. This model is based on the existence and strength of the circumferential flow, most often generated by the shaft rotation. The application of the fluid force model in rotor dynamic analysis is presented. It is shown that the rotor stability is an entire rotating system property. Some areas for further research are discussed.

  11. Advances in tilt rotor noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Coffen, C. D.; Ringler, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    The two most serious tilt rotor external noise problems, hover noise and blade-vortex interaction noise, are studied. The results of flow visualization and inflow velocity measurements document a complex, recirculating highly unsteady and turbulent flow due to the rotor-wing-body interactions characteristic of tilt rotors. The wing under the rotor is found to obstruct the inflow, causing a deficit in the inflow velocities over the inboard region of the rotor. Discrete frequency harmonic thickness and loading noise mechanisms in hover are examined by first modeling tilt rotor hover aerodynamics and then applying various noise prediction methods using the WOPWOP code. The analysis indicates that the partial ground plane created by the wing below the rotor results in a primary sound source for hover.

  12. Fuselage upwash effects on RSRA rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J.; Dadone, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of RSRA fuselage configurations on rotor performance and loads have been quantified analytically by means of currently available potential flow and rotor analysis. Four configurations of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) were considered in this study. They were: (1) fuselage alone (conventional helicopter); (2) fuselage with auxiliary propulsion; (3) fuselage with wings (auxiliary lift); and (4) fuselage with both auxiliary lift propulsion. The rotor system investigated was identical to a CH-47D front rotor except that it had four instead of three blades. Two scaled-down versions of the same rotor were also analyzed to determine the effect of rotor scale on the fuselage upwash effects. The flight conditions considered for the upwash study are discussed. The potential flow models for the RSRA configuration, with and without the wings and the auxiliary propulsion system, are presented. The results of fuselage/wing/propulsion system upwash on performance and loads are also presented.

  13. Influence of Asymmetric Stiffness on the Structural and Aerodynamic Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, B.A.; Thomson, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of asymmetric vocal fold stiffness on voice production was evaluated using life-sized, self-oscillating vocal fold models with an idealized geometry based on the human vocal folds. The models were fabricated using flexible, materially-linear silicone compounds with Young’s modulus values comparable to that of vocal fold tissue. The models included a two-layer design to simulate the vocal fold layered structure. The respective Young’s moduli of elasticity of the “left” and “right” vocal fold models were varied to create asymmetric conditions. High-speed videokymography was used to measure maximum vocal fold excursion, vibration frequency, and left-right phase shift, all of which were significantly influenced by asymmetry. Onset pressure, a measure of vocal effort, increased with asymmetry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis showed significantly greater skewing of the glottal jet in the direction of the stiffer vocal fold model. Potential applications to various clinical conditions are mentioned, and suggestions for future related studies are presented. PMID:19664777

  14. Comparisons of elastic and rigid blade-element rotor models using parallel processing technology for piloted simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary; Duval, Ronald W.; Green, John A.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1991-01-01

    A piloted comparison of rigid and aeroelastic blade-element rotor models was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility (CSRDF) at Ames Research Center. A simulation development and analysis tool, FLIGHTLAB, was used to implement these models in real time using parallel processing technology. Pilot comments and quantitative analysis performed both on-line and off-line confirmed that elastic degrees of freedom significantly affect perceived handling qualities. Trim comparisons show improved correlation with flight test data when elastic modes are modeled. The results demonstrate the efficiency with which the mathematical modeling sophistication of existing simulation facilities can be upgraded using parallel processing, and the importance of these upgrades to simulation fidelity.

  15. Comparison of elastic and rigid blade-element rotor models using parallel processing technology for piloted simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gary; Du Val, Ronald W.; Green, John A.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1991-01-01

    A piloted comparison of rigid and aeroelastic blade-element rotor models was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility (CSRDF) at Ames Research Center. A simulation development and analysis tool, FLIGHTLAB, was used to implement these models in real time using parallel processing technology. Pilot comments and qualitative analysis performed both on-line and off-line confirmed that elastic degrees of freedom significantly affect perceived handling qualities. Trim comparisons show improved correlation with flight test data when elastic modes are modeled. The results demonstrate the efficiency with which the mathematical modeling sophistication of existing simulation facilities can be upgraded using parallel processing, and the importance of these upgrades to simulation fidelity.

  16. Reduced-order modeling for rotating rotor-bearing systems with cracked impellers using three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Li, Bing; He, Zhengjia

    2015-10-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method is presented in this paper for dynamics analysis of rotating impeller-shaft-bearing assembly with cracked impellers. Based on three-dimensional finite element model, the complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate an efficient reduced-order model (ROM) for studying the effects of crack on the global vibration of the rotating assembly. First, a modeling framework for impeller-shaft-bearing systems in rotating frame is presented. Rotational effects, including Coriolis matrix and centrifugal softening, have been taken into account. Then, the governing equation of motion of the damped gyroscopic system is reduced by the complex CMS method. Finally, the obtained ROM is employed to study the effects of crack on assembly's vibration. During the steady-state response analysis, external excitations on the impeller due to rotor-stator interactions have been taken into account, which was however neglected in previous investigations on rotordynamics. Numerical results show that the lower-order eigenvalues and the unbalance response of the assembly are not sensitive to the local crack on impeller. Nevertheless, the flexible coupling between impeller and shaft becomes more complex when the air flow-induced excitations are considered. Under EO1 traveling wave excitations, a crack leads to slight changes in the assembly's response. In contrast, the effect of crack becomes significant when the assembly is excited by EO2 and higher EO excitations. Moreover, the nonlinear crack breathing effects affect the assembly's response obviously. Finally, a potential technique for detecting the crack on impeller during operation is discussed.

  17. Omics and modelling approaches for understanding regulation of asymmetric cell divisions in arabidopsis and other angiosperm plants

    PubMed Central

    Kajala, Kaisa; Ramakrishna, Priya; Fisher, Adam; C. Bergmann, Dominique; De Smet, Ive; Sozzani, Rosangela; Weijers, Dolf; Brady, Siobhan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymmetric cell divisions are formative divisions that generate daughter cells of distinct identity. These divisions are coordinated by either extrinsic (‘niche-controlled’) or intrinsic regulatory mechanisms and are fundamentally important in plant development. Scope This review describes how asymmetric cell divisions are regulated during development and in different cell types in both the root and the shoot of plants. It further highlights ways in which omics and modelling approaches have been used to elucidate these regulatory mechanisms. For example, the regulation of embryonic asymmetric divisions is described, including the first divisions of the zygote, formative vascular divisions and divisions that give rise to the root stem cell niche. Asymmetric divisions of the root cortex endodermis initial, pericycle cells that give rise to the lateral root primordium, procambium, cambium and stomatal cells are also discussed. Finally, a perspective is provided regarding the role of other hormones or regulatory molecules in asymmetric divisions, the presence of segregated determinants and the usefulness of modelling approaches in understanding network dynamics within these very special cells. Conclusions Asymmetric cell divisions define plant development. High-throughput genomic and modelling approaches can elucidate their regulation, which in turn could enable the engineering of plant traits such as stomatal density, lateral root development and wood formation. PMID:24825294

  18. Principal pitch of frequency-modulated tones with asymmetrical modulation waveform: a comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Etchemendy, Pablo E; Eguia, Manuel C; Mesz, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    In this work, the overall perceived pitch (principal pitch) of pure tones modulated in frequency with an asymmetric waveform is studied. The dependence of the principal pitch on the degree of asymmetric modulation was obtained from a psychophysical experiment. The modulation waveform consisted of a flat portion of constant frequency and two linear segments forming a peak. Consistent with previous results, significant pitch shifts with respect to the time-averaged geometric mean were observed. The direction of the shifts was always toward the flat portion of the modulation. The results from the psychophysical experiment, along with those obtained from previously reported studies, were compared with the predictions of six models of pitch perception proposed in the literature. Even though no single model was able to predict accurately the perceived pitch for all experiments, there were two models that give robust predictions that are within the range of acceptable tuning of modulated tones for almost all the cases. Both models point to the existence of an underlying "stability sensitive" mechanism for the computation of pitch that gives more weight to the portion of the stimuli where the frequency is changing more slowly.

  19. Phase separation and pairing regimes in the one-dimensional asymmetric Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiero, L.; Casadei, M.; Dalmonte, M.; Ercolessi, E.; Ortolani, F.

    2010-06-01

    We address some open questions regarding the phase diagram of the one-dimensional Hubbard model with asymmetric hopping coefficients and balanced species. In the attractive regime we present a numerical study of the passage from on-site pairing dominant correlations at small asymmetries to charge-density waves in the region with markedly different hopping coefficients. In the repulsive regime we exploit two analytical treatments in the strong- and weak-coupling regimes in order to locate the onset of phase separation at small and large asymmetries, respectively.

  20. Asymmetric impact of rainfall on India's food grain production: evidence from quantile autoregressive distributed lag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debdatta; Mitra, Subrata Kumar

    2016-10-01

    This study used a quantile autoregressive distributed lag (QARDL) model to capture asymmetric impact of rainfall on food production in India. It was found that the coefficient corresponding to the rainfall in the QARDL increased till the 75th quantile and started decreasing thereafter, though it remained in the positive territory. Another interesting finding is that at the 90th quantile and above the coefficients of rainfall though remained positive was not statistically significant and therefore, the benefit of high rainfall on crop production was not conclusive. However, the impact of other determinants, such as fertilizer and pesticide consumption, is quite uniform over the whole range of the distribution of food grain production.

  1. Global characterization of a nematic liquid crystal display LCX038ARA using the retarder-rotor model in the modulation amplitude regime-coupled without applied voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas Cely, C. J.; Acevedo, C. H.; Torres Moreno, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This work shows experimental and theoretical results of the characterization of a nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator Sony model LCX038ARA for the parameters angle of molecular rotation, the birefringence and angle of the molecular axis, using the retarder-rotor model without electric field applied in the amplitude regime-coupled.

  2. Inertial dynamics of a general purpose rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The inertial dynamics of a fully articulated stiff rotor blade are derived with emphasis on equations that facilitate an organized programming approach for simulation applications. The model for the derivation includes hinge offset and six degrees of freedom for the rotor shaft. Results are compared with the flapping and lead-lag equations currently used in the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft simulation model and differences are analyzed.

  3. Self-organized criticality in asymmetric exclusion model with noise for freeway traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1995-02-01

    The one-dimensional asymmetric simple-exclusion model with open boundaries for parallel update is extended to take into account temporary stopping of particles. The model presents the traffic flow on a highway with temporary deceleration of cars. Introducing temporary stopping into the asymmetric simple-exclusion model drives the system asymptotically into a steady state exhibiting a self-organized criticality. In the self-organized critical state, start-stop waves (or traffic jams) appear with various sizes (or lifetimes). The typical interval < s>between consecutive jams scales as < s> ≃ Lv with v = 0.51 ± 0.05 where L is the system size. It is shown that the cumulative jam-interval distribution Ns( L) satisfies the finite-size scaling form ( Ns( L) ≃ L- vf( s/ Lv). Also, the typical lifetime ≃ Lv‧ with v‧ = 0.52 ± 0.05. The cumulative distribution Nm( L) of lifetimes satisfies the finite-size scaling form Nm( L)≃ L-1g( m/ Lv‧).

  4. Measurements of the Early Development of Trailing Vorticity from a Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.; Heineck, James T.

    2002-01-01

    The wake behind a two-bladed model rotor in light climb was measured using particle image velocimetry, with particular emphasis on the development of the trailing vortex during the first revolution of the rotor. The distribution of vorticity was distinguished from the slightly elliptical swirl pattern. Peculiar dynamics within the "void" region may explain why the peak vorticity appeared to shift away from the center as the vortex aged, suggesting the onset of instability. The swirl and axial velocities (which reached 44% and 12% of the rotor tip speed, respectively) were found to be asymmetric relative to the vortex center. In particular, the axial flow was composed of two concentrated zones moving in opposite directions. The radial distribution of the circulation rapidly increased in magnitude until reaching a point just beyond the core radius, after which the rate of growth decreased significantly. The core-radius circulation increased slightly with wake age, but the large-radius circulation appeared to remain relatively constant. The radial distributions of swirl velocity and vorticity exhibit self-similar behaviors, especially within the core. The diameter of the vortex core was initially about 10% of the rotor-blade chord, but more than doubled its size after one revolution of the rotor.

  5. Anisotropy-resolving models for predicting separation in 3--D asymmetric diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyapaul, Elbert; Durbin, Paul

    2011-11-01

    All linear eddy-viscosity models are qualitatively incorrect in predicting separation in 3-D asymmetric diffusers. The failure to predict normal stress and shear stress anisotropy at high production-dissipation ratios is the cause. The Explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (Wallin and Johansson, 2000) predicts the mean flow field in the diffuser accurately, but not the wall pressure and Reynolds stresses. Recalibrating the coefficients of the rapid part of pressure-strain model improves the wall pressure prediction. Including the convective, diffusive, streamline curvature effects on anisotropy has not been beneficial. The model has been tested using a family of diffusers having the same nominal streamwise pressure gradient, LES data is used as a reference. Professor

  6. The strain energy release approach for modeling cracks in rotors: A state of the art review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Chris A.

    2008-05-01

    The strain energy release rate (SERR) theory, combined with Linear Fracture Mechanics and Rotordynamics theories, has been widely used over the last three decades in order to calculate the compliance that causes a transverse surface crack in a rotating shaft. In this paper, the basic theory of this approach is presented, along with some extensions and limitations of its usage. The SERR theory is applied to a rotating crack and gives good results. The linear or nonlinear cracked rotor behavior depends on the mechanism of opening and closure of the crack during the shaft rotation. A brief history of the SERR theory is presented. In the 1970s, this theory met with rotordynamics as a result of research conducted on the causes of rotor failures in power industries. The main goal of this research was to give the engineer an early warning about the cracked situation of the rotor—in other words, to make the identification of the crack possible. Different methods of crack identification are presented here as well as those for multi-crack identification.

  7. Kicked-Harper model versus on-resonance double-kicked rotor model: from spectral difference to topological equivalence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Ho, Derek Y H; Lawton, Wayne; Wang, Jiao; Gong, Jiangbin

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have established that, in addition to the well-known kicked-Harper model (KHM), an on-resonance double-kicked rotor (ORDKR) model also has Hofstadter's butterfly Floquet spectrum, with strong resemblance to the standard Hofstadter spectrum that is a paradigm in studies of the integer quantum Hall effect. Earlier it was shown that the quasienergy spectra of these two dynamical models (i) can exactly overlap with each other if an effective Planck constant takes irrational multiples of 2π and (ii) will be different if the same parameter takes rational multiples of 2π. This work makes detailed comparisons between these two models, with an effective Planck constant given by 2πM/N, where M and N are coprime and odd integers. It is found that the ORDKR spectrum (with two periodic kicking sequences having the same kick strength) has one flat band and N-1 nonflat bands with the largest bandwidth decaying in a power law as ~K(N+2), where K is a kick strength parameter. The existence of a flat band is strictly proven and the power-law scaling, numerically checked for a number of cases, is also analytically proven for a three-band case. By contrast, the KHM does not have any flat band and its bandwidths scale linearly with K. This is shown to result in dramatic differences in dynamical behavior, such as transient (but extremely long) dynamical localization in ORDKR, which is absent in the KHM. Finally, we show that despite these differences, there exist simple extensions of the KHM and ORDKR model (upon introducing an additional periodic phase parameter) such that the resulting extended KHM and ORDKR model are actually topologically equivalent, i.e., they yield exactly the same Floquet-band Chern numbers and display topological phase transitions at the same kick strengths. A theoretical derivation of this topological equivalence is provided. These results are also of interest to our current understanding of quantum-classical correspondence considering that

  8. Kicked-Harper model versus on-resonance double-kicked rotor model: From spectral difference to topological equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Ho, Derek Y. H.; Lawton, Wayne; Wang, Jiao; Gong, Jiangbin

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have established that, in addition to the well-known kicked-Harper model (KHM), an on-resonance double-kicked rotor (ORDKR) model also has Hofstadter's butterfly Floquet spectrum, with strong resemblance to the standard Hofstadter spectrum that is a paradigm in studies of the integer quantum Hall effect. Earlier it was shown that the quasienergy spectra of these two dynamical models (i) can exactly overlap with each other if an effective Planck constant takes irrational multiples of 2π and (ii) will be different if the same parameter takes rational multiples of 2π. This work makes detailed comparisons between these two models, with an effective Planck constant given by 2πM/N, where M and N are coprime and odd integers. It is found that the ORDKR spectrum (with two periodic kicking sequences having the same kick strength) has one flat band and N-1 nonflat bands with the largest bandwidth decaying in a power law as ˜KN+2, where K is a kick strength parameter. The existence of a flat band is strictly proven and the power-law scaling, numerically checked for a number of cases, is also analytically proven for a three-band case. By contrast, the KHM does not have any flat band and its bandwidths scale linearly with K. This is shown to result in dramatic differences in dynamical behavior, such as transient (but extremely long) dynamical localization in ORDKR, which is absent in the KHM. Finally, we show that despite these differences, there exist simple extensions of the KHM and ORDKR model (upon introducing an additional periodic phase parameter) such that the resulting extended KHM and ORDKR model are actually topologically equivalent, i.e., they yield exactly the same Floquet-band Chern numbers and display topological phase transitions at the same kick strengths. A theoretical derivation of this topological equivalence is provided. These results are also of interest to our current understanding of quantum-classical correspondence considering that the

  9. Agent-Based Model with Asymmetric Trading and Herding for Complex Financial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Tan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Background For complex financial systems, the negative and positive return-volatility correlations, i.e., the so-called leverage and anti-leverage effects, are particularly important for the understanding of the price dynamics. However, the microscopic origination of the leverage and anti-leverage effects is still not understood, and how to produce these effects in agent-based modeling remains open. On the other hand, in constructing microscopic models, it is a promising conception to determine model parameters from empirical data rather than from statistical fitting of the results. Methods To study the microscopic origination of the return-volatility correlation in financial systems, we take into account the individual and collective behaviors of investors in real markets, and construct an agent-based model. The agents are linked with each other and trade in groups, and particularly, two novel microscopic mechanisms, i.e., investors’ asymmetric trading and herding in bull and bear markets, are introduced. Further, we propose effective methods to determine the key parameters in our model from historical market data. Results With the model parameters determined for six representative stock-market indices in the world, respectively, we obtain the corresponding leverage or anti-leverage effect from the simulation, and the effect is in agreement with the empirical one on amplitude and duration. At the same time, our model produces other features of the real markets, such as the fat-tail distribution of returns and the long-term correlation of volatilities. Conclusions We reveal that for the leverage and anti-leverage effects, both the investors’ asymmetric trading and herding are essential generation mechanisms. Among the six markets, however, the investors’ trading is approximately symmetric for the five markets which exhibit the leverage effect, thus contributing very little. These two microscopic mechanisms and the methods for the determination of the key

  10. Development of Virtual Blade Model for Modelling Helicopter Rotor Downwash in OpenFOAM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    lateral flapping angles (deg) i induced angle-of-attack (deg) UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-TR-2931 UNCLASSIFIED e blade effective angle-of-attack (deg...The VBM also accounts for the blade flapping and coning. Furthermore, the blade collective pitch , cyclic pitch , and twist angles are mathematically...bladeModel> CALCULATE LOCAL INFLOW ANGLE CALCULATE FLAPPING BLADE TRIMMING LOOP: Perturb blade cyclic and collective pitch angles Calculation in

  11. Study of the Standard k-ɛ Model for Tip Leakage Flow in an Axial Compressor Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanfei; Liu, Yangwei; Zhong, Luyang; Hou, Jiexuan; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-12-01

    The standard k-ɛ model (SKE) and the Reynolds stress model (RSM) are employed to predict the tip leakage flow (TLF) in a low-speed large-scale axial compressor rotor. Then, a new research method is adopted to "freeze" the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of the flow field derived from the RSM, and obtain the turbulent viscosity using the Boussinesq hypothesis. The Reynolds stresses and mean flow field computed on the basis of the frozen viscosity are compared with the results of the SKE and the RSM. The flow field in the tip region based on the frozen viscosity is more similar to the results of the RSM than those of the SKE, although certain differences can be observed. This finding indicates that the non-equilibrium turbulence transport nature plays an important role in predicting the TLF, as well as the turbulence anisotropy.

  12. Aeroelastic modeling of rotor blades with spanwise variable elastic axis offset: Classic issues revisited and new formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a systematic methodology assessment program directed to the aeroelastic stability of hingeless helicopter rotor blades, improved basic aeroelastic reformulations and new formulations relating to structural sweep were achieved. Correlational results are presented showing the substantially improved performance of the G400 aeroelastic analysis incorporating these new formulations. The formulations pertain partly to sundry solutions to classic problem areas, relating to dynamic inflow with vortex-ring state operation and basic blade kinematics, but mostly to improved physical modeling of elastic axis offset (structural sweep) in the presence of nonlinear structural twist. Specific issues addressed are an alternate modeling of the delta EI torsional excitation due to compound bending using a force integration approach, and the detailed kinematic representation of an elastically deflected point mass of a beam with both structural sweep and nonlinear twist.

  13. A parametric study of blade vortex interaction noise for two, three, and four-bladed model rotors at moderate tip speeds Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, K. P.; Harris, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation of blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) has been conducted. This investigation consisted of an examination of BVI blade slap for two, three, and four-bladed model rotors at tip Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.50. Blade slap contours have been obtained for each configuration tested. Differences in blade slap contours, peak sound pressure level, and directivity for each configuration tested are noted. Additional fundamental differences, such as multiple interaction BVI, are observed and occur for only specific rotor blade configurations. The effect of increasing the Mach number on the BVI blade slap for various rotor blade combinations has been quantified. A peak blade slap Mach number scaling law is proposed. Comparison of measured BVI blade slap with theory is made.

  14. Analysis of rotor vibratory loads using higher harmonic pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bliss, Donald B.; Boschitsch, Alexander H.; Wachspress, Daniel A.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of isolated rotors in forward flight have indicated that higher harmonic pitch control can reduce rotor noise. These tests also show that such pitch inputs can generate substantial vibratory loads. The modification is summarized of the RotorCRAFT (Computation of Rotor Aerodynamics in Forward flighT) analysis of isolated rotors to study the vibratory loading generated by high frequency pitch inputs. The original RotorCRAFT code was developed for use in the computation of such loading, and uses a highly refined rotor wake model to facilitate this task. The extended version of RotorCRAFT incorporates a variety of new features including: arbitrary periodic root pitch control; computation of blade stresses and hub loads; improved modeling of near wake unsteady effects; and preliminary implementation of a coupled prediction of rotor airloads and noise. Correlation studies are carried out with existing blade stress and vibratory hub load data to assess the performance of the extended code.

  15. Communication: Modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.

    2014-10-07

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley “bracelet” and “rod” test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, “Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes,” J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405–2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  16. Hydrodynamics and Platoon Formation for a Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Model with Particlewise Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppäläinen, Timo; Krug, Joachim

    1999-05-01

    We consider a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion model with quenched random jump rates associated with the particles, and an equivalent interface growth process on the square lattice. We obtain rigorous limit theorems for the shape of the interface, the motion of a tagged particle, and the macroscopic density profile on the hydrodynamic scale. The theorems are valid under almost every realization of the disordered rates. Under suitable conditions on the distribution of jump rates the model displays a disorder-dominated low-density phase where spatial inhomogeneities develop below the hydrodynamic resolution. The macroscopic signature of the phase transition is a density discontinuity at the front of the rarefaction wave moving out of an initial step-function profile. Numerical simulations of the density fluctuations ahead of the front suggest slow convergence to the predictions of a deterministic particle model on the real line, which contains only random velocities but no temporal noise.

  17. Communication: Modeling charge-sign asymmetric solvation free energies with nonlinear boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.

    2014-10-01

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory after replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for: (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley "bracelet" and "rod" test problems [D. L. Mobley, A. E. Barber II, C. J. Fennell, and K. A. Dill, "Charge asymmetries in hydration of polar solutes," J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 2405-2414 (2008)]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  18. An asymmetric dimer in a periodic potential: a minimal model for friction of graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hens, Remco; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the friction and motion of a model of a dimer with asymmetric interactions with a substrate potential. Starting from the consideration that a rigid dimer with spacing equal to half of the period of the potential has exactly zero static friction like the infinite incommensurate Frenkel Kontorova model, we show how stick-slip behaviour and friction arise as a function of asymmetry. We argue that this model can yield a simple yet insightful description of the frictional behaviour of graphene flakes on graphite and of superlubricity. The results can also be of interest for diatomic molecules on surfaces. Supplementary material in the form of three mp4 files available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70273-5

  19. Rectification of asymmetric surface vibrations with dry friction: An exactly solvable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baule, A.; Sollich, P.

    2013-03-01

    We consider a stochastic model for the directed motion of a solid object due to the rectification of asymmetric surface vibrations with Poissonian shot-noise statistics. The friction between the object and the surface is given by a piecewise-linear friction force. This models the combined effect of dynamic friction and singular dry friction. We derive an exact solution of the stationary Kolmogorov-Feller (KF) equation in the case of two-sided exponentially distributed amplitudes. The stationary density of the velocity exhibits singular features such as a discontinuity and a delta-peak singularity at zero velocity, and also contains contributions from nonintegrable solutions of the KF equation. The mean velocity in our model generally varies nonmonotonically as the strength of the dry friction is increased, indicating that transport improves for increased dissipation.

  20. Meta-Boolean models of asymmetric division patterns in the C. elegans intestinal lineage

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Sofia; Forchheimer, Robert; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2013-01-01

    The intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans is derived from 20 cells that are organized into nine intestinal rings. During embryogenesis, three of the rings rotate approximately 90 degrees in a process known as intestinal twist. The underlying mechanisms for this morphological event are not fully known, but it has been demonstrated that both left-right and anterior-posterior asymmetry is required for intestinal twist to occur. We have recently presented a rule-based meta-Boolean tree model intended to describe complex lineages. In this report we apply this model to the E lineage of C. elegans, specifically targeting the asymmetric anterior-posterior division patterns within the lineage. The resulting model indicates that cells with the same factor concentration are located next to each other in the intestine regardless of lineage origin. In addition, the shift in factor concentrations coincides with the boundary for intestinal twist. When modeling lit-1 mutant data according to the same principle, the factor distributions in each cell are altered, yet the concurrence between the shift in concentration and intestinal twist remains. This pattern suggests that intestinal twist is controlled by a threshold mechanism. In the current paper we present the factor concentrations for all possible combinations of symmetric and asymmetric divisions in the E lineage and relate these to the potential threshold by studying existing data for wild-type and mutant embryos. Finally, we discuss how the resulting models can serve as a basis for experimental design in order to reveal the underlying mechanisms of intestinal twist. PMID:24058861

  1. The one-dimensional asymmetric Hubbard model at partial band filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2007-09-01

    We study the one-dimensional asymmetric Hubbard model (AHM) through the White's density matrix renormalization group technique at the density n=0.8. The AHM describes a correlated system where the hopping of electrons depend on their spin. The spin structure factor and the charge structure factor of heavy electrons were calculated as a function of the hopping and the repulsive on-site interaction. We found that the ground state displays phase separation for strong coupling, and a non-universal critical hopping separates the states of density wave and the phase separation. This outcome generalizes the result found one in the Falicov-Kimball model, which is a particular case of the AHM.

  2. The asymmetric simple exclusion process: an integrable model for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinelli, Olivier; Mallick, Kirone

    2006-10-01

    The asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) plays the role of a paradigm in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We review exact results for the ASEP obtained by the Bethe ansatz and put emphasis on the algebraic properties of this model. The Bethe equations for the eigenvalues of the Markov matrix of the ASEP are derived from the algebraic Bethe ansatz. Using these equations we explain how to calculate the spectral gap of the model and how global spectral properties such as the existence of multiplets can be predicted. An extension of the Bethe ansatz leads to an analytic expression for the large deviation function of the current in the ASEP that satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen relation. Finally, we describe some variants of the ASEP that are also solvable by the Bethe ansatz.

  3. Prediction of the Aero-Acoustic Performance of Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2014-01-01

    The rising cost of jet fuel has renewed interest in contrarotating open rotor propulsion systems. Contemporary design methods offer the potential to maintain the inherently high aerodynamic efficiency of open rotors while greatly reducing their noise output, something that was not feasible in the 1980's designs. The primary source mechanisms of open rotor noise generation are thought to be the front rotor wake and tip vortex interacting with the aft rotor. In this paper, advanced measurement techniques and high-fidelity prediction tools are used to gain insight into the relative importance of the contributions to the open rotor noise signature of the front rotor wake and rotor tip vortex. The measurements include three-dimensional particle image velocimetry of the intra-rotor flowfield and the acoustic field of a model-scale open rotor. The predictions provide the unsteady flowfield and the associated acoustic field. The results suggest that while the front rotor tip vortex can have a significant influence on the blade passing tone noise produced by the aft rotor, the front rotor wake plays the decisive role in the generation of the interaction noise produced as a result of the unsteady aerodynamic interaction of the two rotors. At operating conditions typical of takeoff and landing operations, the interaction noise level is easily on par with that generated by the individual rotors, and in some cases is even higher. This suggests that a comprehensive approach to reducing open rotor noise should include techniques for mitigating the wake of the front rotor as well as eliminating the interaction of the front rotor tip vortex with the aft rotor blade tip.

  4. Dense Root Removal by Asymmetric Delamination in Sierra Nevada, California: Insights from Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valera, J.; Negredo, A. M.; Billen, M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence for an event of removal of lithospheric mantle in southern -and possibly central- Sierra Nevada (SN) mountains, California (Zandt et al., Nature, 431, 2004). A sequential history of foundering of the ultramafic root of the Sierra Nevada batholith, with a pronounced asymmetric flow, is proposed to explain a number of geophysical and geological observations, including a fast seismic velocity in the mantle located to the west of the SN crest, a gap in the Moho, recent subsidence and tilting of the Sierra Nevada, and a change in mineralogy of the xenolith population recorded at the surface. In the present study we focus on the quantitative evaluation of this conceptual model. We apply new thermo- mechanical algorithms, developed in MATLAB code, suitable to study the temporal evolution of laterally migrating lithospheric delamination. The motion equation, formulated in terms of the stream function, and the coupled thermal equation are solved applying finite difference techniques. Our physical modeling is shown to properly reproduce the first order features of the conceptual model for lithospheric delamination in the Sierra Nevada. We investigate the evolution of a dense ultramafic root, which brings about a Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability. Following our preliminary results, the presence of a fluid-weakened lithosphere, located just east of Sierra Nevada, is required to reproduce the asymmetric development of this instability, as previously proposed by Zandt et al. (2004). This weak rheology zone, which is modeled by means of a reduced viscosity, is shown to enable the ascent of asthenospheric material and westward propagation of delamination. Our predictions are also consistent with the previous inference of the V-shaped cone of crust being dragged down into the downwelling mantle (i.e., the Moho gap). Present results highlight that viscous drag is also likely responsible for present-day surface subsidence.

  5. Parametric tip effects for conformable rotor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A research study was initiated to systematically determine the impact of selected blade tip geometric parameters on aeroelasticity conformable rotor performance and loads characteristics. The model articulated rotors included baseline and torsionally soft blades with interchangeable tips. Seven blade tip designs were evaluated on the baseline rotor and three tip designs were tested on the torsionally soft blades. The designs incorporated a systematic variation in three geometric parameters: sweep, taper, and anhedral. The rotors were evaluated in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at several advance ratios, lift and propulsive force values, and tip Mach numbers. Based on the test results, tip parameter variations generated significant rotor performance and loads difference for both baseline and torsionally soft blades. Azimuthal variation of elastic twist generated by the tip parameters strongly correlated with rotor performance and loads, but the magnitude of advancing blade elastic twist did not correlate.

  6. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  7. An extended hindered-rotor model with incorporation of Coriolis and vibrational-rotational coupling for calculating partition functions and derived quantities.

    PubMed

    Vansteenkiste, P; Van Neck, D; Van Speybroeck, V; Waroquier, M

    2006-01-28

    Large-amplitude motions, particularly internal rotations, are known to affect substantially thermodynamic functions and rate constants of reactions in which flexible molecules are involved. Up to now all methods for computing the partition functions of these motions rely on the Pitzer approximation of more than 50 years ago, in which the large-amplitude motion is treated in complete independence of the other (vibrational) degrees of freedom. In this paper an extended hindered-rotor model (EHR) is developed in which the vibrational modes, treated harmonically, are correctly separated from the large-amplitude motion and in which relaxation effects (the changes in the kinetic-energy matrix and potential curvature) are taken into account as one moves along the large-amplitude path. The model also relies on a specific coordinate system in which the Coriolis terms vanish at all times in the Hamiltonian. In this way an increased level of consistency between the various internal modes is achieved, as compared with the more usual hindered-rotor (HR) description. The method is illustrated by calculating the entropies and heat capacities on 1,3-butadiene and 1-butene (with, respectively, one and two internal rotors) and the rate constant for the addition reaction of a vinyl radical to ethene. We also discuss various variants of the one-dimensional hindered-rotor scheme existing in the literature and its relation with the EHR model. It is argued why in most cases the HR approach is already quite successful.

  8. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Lin; Rang, Camilla Ulla; Proenca, Audrey Menegaz; Chao, Jasper Ubirajara

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington's genetic assimilation

  9. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  10. Asymmetric Dispersal Can Maintain Larval Polymorphism: A Model Motivated by Streblospio benedicti

    PubMed Central

    Zakas, Christina; Hall, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphism in traits affecting dispersal occurs in a diverse variety of taxa. Typically, the maintenance of a dispersal polymorphism is attributed to environmental heterogeneity where parental bet-hedging can be favored. There are, however, examples of dispersal polymorphisms that occur across similar environments. For example, the estuarine polychaete Streblospio benedicti has a highly heritable offspring dimorphism that affects larval dispersal potential. We use analytical models of dispersal to determine the conditions necessary for a stable dispersal polymorphism to exist. We show that in asexual haploids, sexual haploids, and in sexual diploids in the absence of overdominance, asymmetric dispersal is required in order to maintain a dispersal polymorphism when patches do not vary in intrinsic quality. Our study adds an additional factor, dispersal asymmetry, to the short list of mechanisms that can maintain polymorphism in nature. The region of the parameter space in which polymorphism is possible is limited, suggesting why dispersal polymorphisms within species are rare. PMID:22576818

  11. Charge Renormalization and Charge Oscillation in Asymmetric Primitive Model of Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingnan; Liang, Yihao; Lu, Bing-Sui; Xing, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Debye charging method is generalized to study the linear response properties of the asymmetric primitive model for electrolytes. Analytic results are obtained for the effective charge distributions of constituent ions inside the electrolyte, from which all static linear response properties of the system follow. It is found that, as the ion density increases, both the screening length and the dielectric constant receive substantial renormalization due to ionic correlations. Furthermore, the valence of larger ion is substantially renormalized upward by ionic correlations, while those of smaller ions remain approximately the same. For sufficiently high density, the system exhibits charge oscillations. The threshold ion density for charge oscillation is much lower than the corresponding values for symmetric electrolytes. Our results agree well with large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, and find good agreement in general, except for the case of small ion sizes (d = 4 Å) near the charge oscillation threshold.

  12. Gravity perception and asymmetric growth in plants - A model derived from the grass pulvinus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayanandan, P.; Franklin, C. I.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that gravitropic responses in plants involve asymmetric growth. On the basis of the geometry of growth response in grass leaf sheath pulvinus, a general model is proposed for gravitropism in multicellular plant organs. The negative gravitropic response of a pulvinus is a result of cell elongation involving all but the uppermost region of a horizontally placed organ. Whereas the uppermost region does not grow, the lowermost region elongates maximally. The regions between elongate to intermediate extents. An expression is given relating the angle of curvature of the organ to the diameter and initial and final lengths of the organ. It is shown that the response of the individual cells can be expressed as inherent sensitivity to gravitational stimulus according to a particular equation.

  13. Exact diffusion constant of a one-dimensional asymmetric exclusion model with open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Evans, M. R.; Mallick, K.

    1995-06-01

    For the 1D fully asymmetric exclusion model with open boundary conditions, we calculate exactly the fluctuations of the current of particles. The method used is an extension of a matrix technique developed recently to describe the equatime steady-state properties for open boundary conditions and the diffusion constant for particles on a ring. We show how the fluctuations of the current are related to non-equal-time correlations. In the thermodynamic limit, our results agree with recent results of Ferrari and Fontes obtained by working directly in the infinite system. We also show that the fluctuations of the current become singular when the system undergoes a phase transition with discontinuities along the first-order transition line.

  14. Observations and modeling of the effects of waves and rotors on submeso and turbulence variability within the stable boundary layer over central Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez Mullins, Astrid

    Terrain-induced gravity waves and rotor circulations have been hypothesized to enhance the generation of submeso motions (i.e., nonstationary shear events with spatial and temporal scales greater than the turbulence scale and smaller than the meso-gamma scale) and to modulate low-level intermittency in the stable boundary layer (SBL). Intermittent turbulence, generated by submeso motions and/or the waves, can affect the atmospheric transport and dispersion of pollutants and hazardous materials. Thus, the study of these motions and the mechanisms through which they impact the weakly to very stable SBL is crucial for improving air quality modeling and hazard predictions. In this thesis, the effects of waves and rotor circulations on submeso and turbulence variability within the SBL is investigated over the moderate terrain of central Pennsylvania using special observations from a network deployed at Rock Springs, PA and high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model forecasts. The investigation of waves and rotors over central PA is important because 1) the moderate topography of this region is common to most of the eastern US and thus the knowledge acquired from this study can be of significance to a large population, 2) there have been little evidence of complex wave structures and rotors reported for this region, and 3) little is known about the waves and rotors generated by smaller and more moderate topographies. Six case studies exhibiting an array of wave and rotor structures are analyzed. Observational evidence of the presence of complex wave structures, resembling nonstationary trapped gravity waves and downslope windstorms, and complex rotor circulations, resembling trapped and jump-type rotors, is presented. These motions and the mechanisms through which they modulate the SBL are further investigated using high-resolution WRF forecasts. First, the efficacy of the 0.444-km horizontal grid spacing WRF model to reproduce submeso and meso

  15. A new model of water-lubricated rubber bearings for vibration analysis of flexible multistage rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibing; Yang, Bingen

    2015-08-01

    Flexible multistage rotating systems that are supported or guided by long water-lubricated rubber bearings (WLRBs) have a variety of engineering applications. Vibration analysis of this type of machinery for performance and duality requires accurate modeling of WLRBs and related rotor-bearing assemblies. This work presents a new model of WLRBs, with attention given to the determination of bearing dynamic coefficients. Due to its large length-to-diameter ratio, a WLRB cannot be described by conventional pointwise bearing models with good fidelity. The bearing model proposed in this paper considers spatially distributed bearing forces. For the first time in the literature, the current study addresses the issue of mixed lubrication in the operation of WLRBs, which involves interactions of shaft vibration, elastic deformation of rubber material and fluid film pressure, and validates the WLRB model in experiments. Additionally, with the new bearing model, vibration analysis of WLRB-supported flexible multistage rotating systems is performed through use of a distributed transfer function method, which delivers accurate and closed-form analytical solutions of steady-state responses without discretization.

  16. Asymmetric impacting on the Moon and its dependence on debiased NEA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Malhotra, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recent lunar crater counting studies have revealed an asymmetric distribution of rayed craters on the lunar surface. The asymmetry is related to the synchronous rotation of the Moon, and there is a higher density of rayed craters on the leading hemisphere compared with the trailing hemisphere. Here we report the progress in our study to test the hypotheses that (i) the population of near-Earth asteroids is the source of the impactors that have made the rayed craters, and (ii) that impacts by this projectile population account quantitatively for the observed asymmetry. We carried out numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of a large number of test particles representing near-Earth asteroids in order to determine directly their impact flux on the Moon. In a previous study, we reported results based on the debiased NEA model of Bottke et al.(2002), where we found that the theoretical model yields a smaller asymmetry than is observed on the Moon. A possible reason for the discrepancy is that the population of NEAs having low relative velocity with respect to the Earth-Moon system is underestimated in the debiased NEA model. In the present work, we report results based on a second debiased NEA model (Morbidelli, 2006), and we compare these with our previous study. Our results provide possible constraints on the dynamical characteristics of the near-Earth asteroid population and may help to improve theoretical models of this population.

  17. Comparison between hybrid and fully kinetic models of asymmetric magnetic reconnection: Coplanar and guide field configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah; Zenitani, Seiji; Smets, Roch

    2013-02-15

    Magnetic reconnection occurring in collisionless environments is a multi-scale process involving both ion and electron kinetic processes. Because of their small mass, the electron scales are difficult to resolve in numerical and satellite data, it is therefore critical to know whether the overall evolution of the reconnection process is influenced by the kinetic nature of the electrons, or is unchanged when assuming a simpler, fluid, electron model. This paper investigates this issue in the general context of an asymmetric current sheet, where both the magnetic field amplitude and the density vary through the discontinuity. A comparison is made between fully kinetic and hybrid kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection in coplanar and guide field systems. The models share the initial condition but differ in their electron modeling. It is found that the overall evolution of the system, including the reconnection rate, is very similar between both models. The best agreement is found in the guide field system, which confines particle better than the coplanar one, where the locality of the moments is violated by the electron bounce motion. It is also shown that, contrary to the common understanding, reconnection is much faster in the guide field system than in the coplanar one. Both models show this tendency, indicating that the phenomenon is driven by ion kinetic effects and not electron ones.

  18. A simulation study of an asymmetric exclusion model with open boundaries and random rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengrine, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Krug, J.; Loulidi, M.; Mhirech, F.

    1999-04-01

    Using numerical simulations, we study the asymmetric exclusion model with open boundaries, particlewise disorder and parallel dynamics. At each time step, particles are injected at the left boundary with probability 0305-4470/32/13/005/img9, removed on the right with probability 0305-4470/32/13/005/img10, and jump in the bulk with probability 0305-4470/32/13/005/img11, where 0305-4470/32/13/005/img12 is a random rate associated with each injected particle 0305-4470/32/13/005/img13. The parameter 0305-4470/32/13/005/img14 interpolates between fully parallel 0305-4470/32/13/005/img15 and random sequential 0305-4470/32/13/005/img16 dynamics. The phase diagram in the 0305-4470/32/13/005/img17-plane displays high-density, low-density and maximum-current phases, with the first-order transition line between high- and low-density phases shifted away from the line 0305-4470/32/13/005/img18. Within the low-density phase a platoon phase transition occurs, many features of which can be explained using exact results for asymmetric exclusion with particlewise disorder on the ring. In a certain region of parameter space the disorder induces a cusp in the current-density relation at maximum flow. Our simulations indicate that this does not affect the topology of the phase diagram, nor the familiar 0305-4470/32/13/005/img19-decay of the density profile in the maximum-current phase.

  19. A theoretical model of cytokinesis implicates feedback between membrane curvature and cytoskeletal organization in asymmetric cytokinetic furrowing

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Jonas F.; Zhang, Li; Phi, Tan-Trao; Lacroix, Benjamin; Maddox, Paul S.; Liu, Jian; Maddox, Amy Shaub

    2016-01-01

    During cytokinesis, the cell undergoes a dramatic shape change as it divides into two daughter cells. Cell shape changes in cytokinesis are driven by a cortical ring rich in actin filaments and nonmuscle myosin II. The ring closes via actomyosin contraction coupled with actin depolymerization. Of interest, ring closure and hence the furrow ingression are nonconcentric (asymmetric) within the division plane across Metazoa. This nonconcentricity can occur and persist even without preexisting asymmetric cues, such as spindle placement or cellular adhesions. Cell-autonomous asymmetry is not explained by current models. We combined quantitative high-resolution live-cell microscopy with theoretical modeling to explore the mechanistic basis for asymmetric cytokinesis in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, with the goal of uncovering basic principles of ring closure. Our theoretical model suggests that feedback among membrane curvature, cytoskeletal alignment, and contractility is responsible for asymmetric cytokinetic furrowing. It also accurately predicts experimental perturbations of conserved ring proteins. The model further suggests that curvature-mediated filament alignment speeds up furrow closure while promoting energy efficiency. Collectively our work underscores the importance of membrane–cytoskeletal anchoring and suggests conserved molecular mechanisms for this activity. PMID:26912796

  20. Prediction and reduction of rotor broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.; Aravamudan, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Prediction techniques which can be or have been applied to subsonic rotors, and methods for designing helicopter rotors for reduced broadband noise generation are summarized. It is shown how detailed physical models of the noise source can be used to identify approaches to noise control.

  1. Tip Vortex and Wake Characteristics of a Counterrotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary noise sources for Open Rotor systems is the interaction of the forward rotor tip vortex and blade wake with the aft rotor. NASA has collaborated with General Electric on the testing of a new generation of low noise, counterrotating Open Rotor systems. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired in the intra-rotor gap of the Historical Baseline blade set. The velocity measurements are of sufficient resolution to characterize the tip vortex size and trajectory as well as the rotor wake decay and turbulence character. The tip clearance vortex trajectory is compared to results from previously developed models. Forward rotor wake velocity profiles are shown. Results are presented in a form as to assist numerical modeling of Open Rotor system aerodynamics and acoustics.

  2. Quark-lattice Nuclear Model Applications -- Neutron Absorption, Radioactive Decay, and Asymmetric Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Montgomery, Jerry R.

    2010-10-01

    The new quark-lattice model of the nucleus has been extended through heavy nuclei. Three specific issues illustrate the power of the model: (1) large thermal neutron absorption cross sections, (2) radioactive decay of K-40, and (3) asymmetric fission. Large neutron absorption cross sections occur when there are openings in the lattice into which neutrons can naturally fit. Examples are He-3, Li-6, and B-10. B-10 results in neutron-activated fission. The decay of K-40 into either Ar-40 or Ca-40 illustrates the role spin plays in determining nuclear structure. K-40 has net spin 4 whereas Ar-40 and Ca-40 both have spin 0. Zome models are used to show these structures. The fission of heavy nuclei occurs, in the lattice model, as the core of the structure separates from the loosely-packed ends. The ends are repacked into a smaller nucleus, which forms the lighter of the two daughter fragments. This explains why the lighter fragment mass increases with total mass whereas the heavier fragment mass remains relatively constant.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of an asymmetric Monte Carlo beam model of a Siemens Primus accelerator.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Eric C; Sawkey, Daren L; Faddegon, Bruce A

    2012-03-08

    The assumption of cylindrical symmetry in radiotherapy accelerator models can pose a challenge for precise Monte Carlo modeling. This assumption makes it difficult to account for measured asymmetries in clinical dose distributions. We have performed a sensitivity study examining the effect of varying symmetric and asymmetric beam and geometric parameters of a Monte Carlo model for a Siemens PRIMUS accelerator. The accelerator and dose output were simulated using modified versions of BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc that allow lateral offsets of accelerator components and lateral and angular offsets for the incident electron beam. Dose distributions were studied for 40 × 40 cm² fields. The resulting dose distributions were analyzed for changes in flatness, symmetry, and off-axis ratio (OAR). The electron beam parameters having the greatest effect on the resulting dose distributions were found to be electron energy and angle of incidence, as high as 5% for a 0.25° deflection. Electron spot size and lateral offset of the electron beam were found to have a smaller impact. Variations in photon target thickness were found to have a small effect. Small lateral offsets of the flattening filter caused significant variation to the OAR. In general, the greatest sensitivity to accelerator parameters could be observed for higher energies and off-axis ratios closer to the central axis. Lateral and angular offsets of beam and accelerator components have strong effects on dose distributions, and should be included in any high-accuracy beam model.

  4. Point vortex modelling of the wake dynamics behind asymmetric vortex generator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, D.; Ferreira, C.; Ragni, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a simple inviscid point vortex model to study the dynamics of asymmetric vortex rows, as might appear behind misaligned vortex generator vanes. Starting from the existing solution of the infinite vortex cascade, a numerical model of four base-vortices is chosen to represent two primary counter-rotating vortex pairs and their mirror plane images, introducing the vortex strength ratio as a free parameter. The resulting system of equations is also defined in terms of the vortex row separation and the qualitative features of the ensuing motion are mapped. A translating and orbiting regime are identified for different cascade separations. The latter occurs for all unequal strength vortex pairs. Thus, the motion is further classified by studying the cyclic behaviour of the orbiting regime and it is shown that for small mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting length and time scales are sufficiently large as to appear, in the near wake, as translational (non-orbiting). However, for larger mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting motion approaches the order of the starting height of the vortex. Comparisons between experimental data and the potential flow model show qualitative agreement whilst viscous effects account for the major discrepancies. Despite this, the model captures the orbital mode observed in the measurements and provides an impetus for considering the impact of these complex interactions on vortex generator designs.

  5. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup. PMID:22778638

  6. On cup anemometer rotor aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup.

  7. Halbach Magnetic Rotor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center has a wealth of experience in Halbach array technology through the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The goals of the program include improving aircraft efficiency, reliability, and safety. The concept of a Halbach magnetically levitated electric aircraft motor will help reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels, increase efficiency and reliability, reduce maintenance and decrease operating noise levels. Experimental hardware systems were developed in the GRC Engineering Development Division to validate the basic principles described herein and the theoretical work that was performed. A number of Halbach Magnetic rotors have been developed and tested under this program. A separate test hardware setup was developed to characterize each of the rotors. A second hardware setup was developed to test the levitation characteristics of the rotors. Each system focused around a unique Halbach array rotor. Each rotor required original design and fabrication techniques. A 4 in. diameter rotor was developed to test the radial levitation effects for use as a magnetic bearing. To show scalability from the 4 in. rotor, a 1 in. rotor was developed to also test radial levitation effects. The next rotor to be developed was 20 in. in diameter again to show scalability from the 4 in. rotor. An axial rotor was developed to determine the force that could be generated to position the rotor axially while it is rotating. With both radial and axial magnetic bearings, the rotor would be completely suspended magnetically. The purpose of this report is to document the development of a series of Halbach magnetic rotors to be used in testing. The design, fabrication and assembly of the rotors will be discussed as well as the hardware developed to test the rotors.

  8. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  9. A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against Asymmetric Homeland Threat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against Asymmetric Homeland Threat Ronald L. Cypert Scientific...units, along with coordination at the state and federal agency level, a dynamic process modeling capability was chosen to chart the myriad...COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against

  10. Hydrodynamic Effects on Modeling and Control of a High Temperature Active Magnetic Bearing Pump with a Canned Rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M; Kisner, Roger A; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Embedding instrumentation and control Embedding instrumentation and control (I\\&C) at the component level in nuclear power plants can improve component performance, lifetime, and resilience by optimizing operation, reducing the constraints on physical design, and providing on-board prognostics and diagnostics. However, the extreme environments that many nuclear power plant components operate in makes embedding instrumentation and control at the component level difficult. Successfully utilizing embedded I\\&C requires developing a deep understanding of the system's dynamics and using that knowledge to overcome material and physical limitations imposed by the environment. In this paper, we will develop a coupled dynamic model of a high temperature (700 $^\\circ$C) canned rotor pump that incorporates rotordynamics, hydrodynamics, and active magnetic bearing dynamics. Then we will compare two control design methods, one that uses a simplified decoupled model of the system and another that utilizes the full coupled system model. It will be seen that utilizing all the available knowledge of the system dynamics in the controller design yield an order of magnitude improvement in the magnitude of the magnetic bearing response to disturbances at the same level of control effort, a large reduction in the settling time of the system, and a smoother control action.

  11. Cage-rotor induction motor inter-turn short circuit fault detection with and without saturation effect by MEC model.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Peyman

    2016-09-01

    The inter-turn short fault for the Cage-Rotor-Induction-Machine (CRIM) is studied in this paper and its local saturation is taken into account. However, in order to observe the exact behavior of machine, the Magnetic-Equivalent-Circuit (MEC) and nonlinear B-H curve are proposed to provide an insight into the machine model and saturation effect respectively. The electrical machines are generally operated near to their saturation zone due to some design necessities. Hence, when the machine is exposed to a fault such as short circuit or eccentricities, it is operated within its saturation zone and thus, time and space harmonics are integrated and as a result, current and torque harmonics are generated which the phenomenon cannot be explored when saturation is dismissed. Nonetheless, inter-turn short circuit may lead to local saturation and this occurrence is studied in this paper using MEC model. In order to achieve the mentioned objectives, two and also four-pole machines are modeled as two samples and the machines performances are analyzed in healthy and faulty cases with and without saturation effect. A novel strategy is proposed to precisely detect inter-turn short circuit fault according to the stator׳s lines current signatures and the accuracy of the proposed method is verified by experimental results.

  12. Preliminary simulation of an advanced, hingless rotor XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcveigh, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the tilt-rotor concept was verified through investigation of the performance, stability and handling qualities of the XV-15 tilt rotor. The rotors were replaced by advanced-technology fiberglass/composite hingless rotors of larger diameter, combined with an advanced integrated fly-by-wire control system. A parametric simulation model of the HRXV-15 was developed, model was used to define acceptable preliminary ranges of primary and secondary control schedules as functions of the flight parameters, to evaluate performance, flying qualities and structural loads, and to have a Boeing-Vertol pilot conduct a simulated flight test evaluation of the aircraft.

  13. Open Rotor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale E.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The ERA project executed a comprehensive test program for Open Rotor aerodynamic and acoustic performance. System studies used the data to estimate the fuel burn savings and acoustic margin for an aircraft system with open rotor propulsion. The acoustic measurements were used to produce an auralization that compares the legacy blades to the current generation of open rotor designs.

  14. An investigation of jet trajectory in flow through scaled vocal fold models with asymmetric glottal passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2006-11-01

    Pulsatile two-dimensional flow through asymmetric static divergent models of the human vocal folds is investigated. Included glottal divergence angles are varied between 10° and 30°, with asymmetry angles between the vocal fold pairs ranging from 5° to 15°. The model glottal configurations represent asymmetries that arise during a phonatory cycle due to voice disorders. The flow is scaled to physiological values of Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers. Data are acquired in the anterior posterior mid-plane of the vocal fold models using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) acquired at ten discrete locations in a phonatory cycle. Glottal jet stability arising from the vocal fold asymmetries is investigated and compared to previously reported work for symmetric vocal fold passages. Jet stability is enhanced with an increase in the included divergence angle, and the glottal asymmetry. Concurrently, the bi-modal jet trajectory and flow unsteadiness diminishes. Consistent with previous findings, the flow attachment due to the Coanda effect occurs when the acceleration of the forcing function is zero.

  15. A Rough Set Bounded Spatially Constrained Asymmetric Gaussian Mixture Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zexuan; Huang, Yubo; Sun, Quansen; Cao, Guo; Zheng, Yuhui

    2017-01-01

    Accurate image segmentation is an important issue in image processing, where Gaussian mixture models play an important part and have been proven effective. However, most Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based methods suffer from one or more limitations, such as limited noise robustness, over-smoothness for segmentations, and lack of flexibility to fit data. In order to address these issues, in this paper, we propose a rough set bounded asymmetric Gaussian mixture model with spatial constraint for image segmentation. First, based on our previous work where each cluster is characterized by three automatically determined rough-fuzzy regions, we partition the target image into three rough regions with two adaptively computed thresholds. Second, a new bounded indicator function is proposed to determine the bounded support regions of the observed data. The bounded indicator and posterior probability of a pixel that belongs to each sub-region is estimated with respect to the rough region where the pixel lies. Third, to further reduce over-smoothness for segmentations, two novel prior factors are proposed that incorporate the spatial information among neighborhood pixels, which are constructed based on the prior and posterior probabilities of the within- and between-clusters, and considers the spatial direction. We compare our algorithm to state-of-the-art segmentation approaches in both synthetic and real images to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:28045950

  16. Two-dimensional analytical model for asymmetric dual-gate tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui Fang; Dai, Yue Hua; Gui Guan, Bang; Zhang, Yong Feng

    2017-01-01

    An analytical model for asymmetric dual-gate (ADG) tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) combining a TFET with a junctionless field-effect transistor (JL FET) is presented and investigated extensively for the first time in this paper, with the aim of addressing the challenges of conventional DG TFETs. The drain current is composed of the tunneling current of TFET and the drift-diffusion current of JL FET, which leads to high drain current. The model also predicts the impacts of the lengths of the source and intrinsic regions on the potential and drain current. The results show that ADG TFET can generate optimum results (in terms of on-state current I on and on-to-off current ratio I on/I off) compared with the conventional DG TFET, higher I on of 129 µA/µm and a larger I on/I off of 2.1 × 1010 are obtained when the optimized lengths of the source and intrinsic regions are almost 14 nm. Very good agreements for both the potential and the drain current are observed between the model calculations and the simulated results.

  17. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With Slotted Airfoils at the Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, Kevin W.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    2001-01-01

    Data for rotors using unconventional airfoils are of interest to permit an evaluation of this technology's capability to meet the U.S. Army's need for increased helicopter mission effectiveness and improved safety and survivability. Thus, an experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to evaluate the effect of using slotted airfoils in the rotor blade tip region (85 to 100 percent radius) on rotor aerodynamic performance and loads. Four rotor configurations were tested in forward flight at advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.45 and in hover in-ground effect. The hover tip Mach number was 0.627, which is representative of a design point of 4000-ft geometric altitude and a temperature of 95 F. The baseline rotor configuration had a conventional single-element airfoil in the tip region. A second rotor configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -6 deg slat, a third configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -10 slat, and a fourth configuration had an aft-slotted airfoil with a 3 deg flap (trailing edge down). The results of this investigation indicate that the -6 deg slat configuration offers some performance and loads benefits over the other three configurations.

  18. Whirl and whip: Rotor/bearing stability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical model of a symmetric rotor supported by one rigid and one fluid lubricated bearing is proposed. The rotor model is represented by generalized (modal) parameters of its first bending mode. The rotational character of the bearing fluid force is taken into account. The model yields synchronous vibrations due to rotor unbalance as a particular solution of the equations of motion, rotor/bearing system natural frequencies and corresponding self-excited vibrations known as oil whirl and oil whip. The stability analysis yields rotative speed threshold of stability. The model also gives the evaluation of stability of the rotor synchronous vibrations. In the first balance resonance speed region two more thresholds of stability are yielded. The width of this stability region is directly related to the amount of rotor unbalance. The results of the analysis based on this model stand with very good agreement with field observations of rotor dynamic behavior and the experimental results.

  19. Helicopter rotor induced velocities theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Hoad, Danny R.; Elliott, Joe W.; Althoff, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been performed to assess methods used for rotor inflow modeling. A key element of this assessment has been the recent acquisition of high quality experimental measurements of inflow velocities taken in the proximity of a lifting rotor in forward flight. Widely used rotor performance predictive methods are based on blade element strip theory coupled with an inflow model. The inflow prediction models assessed in this paper include the uniform inflow based on momentum, a skewed disk model, and two methods based on a vortex wake structure.

  20. Complete Budding and Asymmetric Division of Primitive Model Cells To Produce Daughter Vesicles with Different Interior and Membrane Compositions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is common in biology and plays critical roles in differentiation and development. Unicellular organisms are often used as model systems for understanding the origins and consequences of asymmetry during cell division. Although basic as compared to mammalian cells, these are already quite complex. We report complete budding and asymmetric fission of very simple nonliving model cells to produce daughter vesicles that are chemically distinct in both interior and membrane compositions. Our model cells are based on giant lipid vesicles (GVs, 10–30 μm) encapsulating a polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) as a crowded and compartmentalized cytoplasm mimic. Ternary lipid compositions were used to provide coexisting micrometer-scale liquid disordered (Ld) and liquid ordered (Lo) domains in the membranes. ATPS-containing vesicles formed buds when sucrose was added externally to provide increased osmotic pressure, such that they became not only morphologically asymmetric but also asymmetric in both their interior and their membrane compositions. Further increases in osmolality drove formation of two chemically distinct daughter vesicles, which were in some cases connected by a lipid nanotube (complete budding), and in others were not (fission). In all cases, separation occurred at the aqueous–aqueous phase boundary, such that one daughter vesicle contained the PEG-rich aqueous phase and the other contained the dextran-rich aqueous phase. PEGylated lipids localized in the Lo domain resulted in this membrane domain preferentially coating the PEG-rich bud prior to division, and subsequently the PEG-rich daughter vesicle. Varying the mole ratio of lipids resulted in excess surface area of Lo or Ld membrane domains such that, upon division, this excess portion was inherited by one of the daughter vesicles. In some cases, a second “generation” of aqueous phase separation and budding could be induced in these daughter

  1. A robust macroscopic model for normal-shear coupling, asymmetric and anisotropic behaviors of polycrystalline SMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, M.; Damanpack, A. R.; Liao, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this article is to develop a robust macroscopic bi-axial model to capture self-accommodation, martensitic transformation/orientation/reorientation, normal-shear deformation coupling and asymmetric/anisotropic strain generation in polycrystalline shape memory alloys. By considering the volume fraction of martensite and its preferred direction as scalar and directional internal variables, constitutive relations are derived to describe basic mechanisms of accommodation, transformation and orientation/reorientation of martensite variants. A new definition is introduced for maximum recoverable strain, which allows the model to capture the effects of tension-compression asymmetry and transformation anisotropy. Furthermore, the coupling effects between normal and shear deformation modes are considered by merging inelastic strain components together. By introducing a calibration approach, material and kinetic parameters of the model are recast in terms of common quantities that characterize a uniaxial phase kinetic diagram. The solution algorithm of the model is presented based on an elastic-predictor inelastic-corrector return mapping process. In order to explore and demonstrate capabilities of the proposed model, theoretical predictions are first compared with existing experimental results on uniaxial tension, compression, torsion and combined tension-torsion tests. Afterwards, experimental results of uniaxial tension, compression, pure bending and buckling tests on {{NiTi}} rods and tubes are replicated by implementing a finite element method along with the Newton-Raphson and Riks techniques to trace non-linear equilibrium path. A good qualitative and quantitative correlation is observed between numerical and experimental results, which verifies the accuracy of the model and the solution procedure.

  2. Analytical Model of an Asymmetric Sunspot with a Steady Plasma Flow in its Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, A. A.; Kirichek, E. A.

    2016-08-01

    A new exact analytical solution to the stationary problem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is derived for an unipolar asymmetric sunspot immersed in a realistic solar atmosphere. The radial and vertical profiles of pressure, plasma density, and temperature in the visible layers of the sunspot are calculated. The reduction in plasma density in the magnetic funnel of the sunspot, corresponding to the Wilson depression, is also obtained. The magnetic structure of the sunspot is given analytically in a realistic way: a part of the magnetic flux of the sunspot approaches the surrounding photosphere at the outer edge of the penumbra. The magnetic field of the sunspot is not assumed to be axially symmetric. For the first time, the angular dependence of the physical variables in this model allows us to simulate not only a deviation from the circular shape of the sunspot, but also a fine filamentary structure of the sunspot penumbra. The Alfvén Mach number (the ratio of the plasma speed to the Alfvén speed) is zero at the center of the sunspot and rises slowly toward the periphery of the sunspot; this corresponds to the structure of the Evershed flow in the penumbra. The Evershed flow in our model is mainly concentrated in dark penumbral filaments, as is observed.

  3. Transition state models for probing stereoinduction in Evans chiral auxiliary-based asymmetric aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Shinisha, C B; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2010-09-08

    The use of chiral auxiliaries is one of the most fundamental protocols employed in asymmetric synthesis. In the present study, stereoselectivity-determining factors in a chiral auxiliary-based asymmetric aldol reaction promoted by TiCl(4) are investigated by using density functional theory methods. The aldol reaction between chiral titanium enolate [derived from Evans propionyl oxazolidinone (1a) and its variants oxazolidinethione (1b) and thiazolidinethione (1c)] and benzaldehyde is examined by using transition-state modeling. Different stereochemical possibilities for the addition of titanium enolates to aldehyde are compared. On the basis of the coordination of the carbonyl/thiocarbonyl group of the chiral auxiliary with titanium, both pathways involving nonchelated and chelated transition states (TSs) are considered. The computed relative energies of the stereoselectivity-determining C-C bond formation TSs in the nonchelated pathway, for both 1a and 1c, indicate a preference toward Evans syn aldol product. The presence of a ring carbonyl or thiocarbonyl group in the chiral auxiliary renders the formation of neutral TiCl(3)-enolate, which otherwise is energetically less favored as compared to the anionic TiCl(4)-enolate. Hence, under suitable conditions, the reaction between titanium enolate and aldehyde is expected to be viable through chelated TSs leading to the selective formation of non-Evans syn aldol product. Experimentally known high stereoselectivity toward Evans syn aldol product is effectively rationalized by using the larger energy differences between the corresponding diastereomeric TSs. In both chelated and nonchelated pathways, the attack by the less hindered face of the enolate on aldehyde through a chair-like TS with an equatorial disposition of the aldehydic substituent is identified as the preferred mode. The steric hindrance offered by the isopropyl group and the possible chelation are identified as the key reasons behind the interesting

  4. Vortex Ring State and Asymmetric Thrust Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Gregory; Savas, Omer; Caradonna, Francis

    2008-11-01

    When the helical vortices of a rotor are not convected away, the vortices may form a ring-like structure about the rotor disk. This vortex ring state (VRS) is most common during rapid descent and leads to thrust oscillations coupled to the formation and subsequent breakdown of the ring. Experimental observations at and near VRS were made using strobed particle image velocimetry on a three-blade rotor in a towing tank. Simultaneous strain gage readings allowed direct measurement of the rotor's thrust history in this state. Operating conditions near the cusp of VRS were investigated to offer insight into the initial evolution of this undesirable state. In addition, asymmetries in the periodic thrust histories during non-axial descent are analyzed in conjunction with corresponding vorticity evolutions. Salient features of the vortex wake structure during highly asymmetric thrust oscillations are discussed in contrast to VRS cases with nearly symmetric thrust oscillations.

  5. Computational Analysis of Multi-Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics of multi-rotor flows has been studied for a quadcopter representing a generic quad tilt-rotor aircraft in hover. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of the separation distances between rotors, and also fuselage and wings on the performance and efficiency of multirotor systems. Three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a spatially 5th order accurate scheme, dual-time stepping, and the Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence model. The results show that the separation distances as well as the wings have significant effects on the vertical forces of quadroror systems in hover. Understanding interactions in multi-rotor flows would help improve the design of next generation multi-rotor drones.

  6. An asymmetric jet-launching model for the protoplanetary nebula CRL 618

    SciTech Connect

    Velázquez, Pablo F.; Raga, Alejandro C.; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.; Riera, Angels

    2014-10-20

    We propose an asymmetrical jet-ejection mechanism in order to model the mirror symmetry observed in the lobe distribution of some protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs), such as the pPN CRL 618. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet launched from an orbiting source were carried out, including an alternation in the ejections of the two outflow lobes, depending on which side of the precessing accretion disk is hit by the accretion column from a Roche lobe-filling binary companion. Both synthetic optical emission maps and position-velocity diagrams were obtained from the numerical results with the purpose of carrying out a direct comparison with observations. Depending on the observer's point of view, multipolar morphologies are obtained that exhibit a mirror symmetry at large distances from the central source. The obtained lobe sizes and their spatial distributions are in good agreement with the observed morphology of the pPN CRL 618. We also obtain that the kinematic ages of the fingers are similar to those obtained in the observations.

  7. Can hydro-economic river basin models simulate water shadow prices under asymmetric access?

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Britz, W

    2012-01-01

    Hydro-economic river basin models (HERBM) based on mathematical programming are conventionally formulated as explicit 'aggregate optimization' problems with a single, aggregate objective function. Often unintended, this format implicitly assumes that decisions on water allocation are made via central planning or functioning markets such as to maximize social welfare. In the absence of perfect water markets, however, individually optimal decisions by water users will differ from the social optimum. Classical aggregate HERBMs cannot simulate that situation and thus might be unable to describe existing institutions governing access to water and might produce biased results for alternative ones. We propose a new solution format for HERBMs, based on the format of the mixed complementarity problem (MCP), where modified shadow price relations express spatial externalities resulting from asymmetric access to water use. This new problem format, as opposed to commonly used linear (LP) or non-linear programming (NLP) approaches, enables the simultaneous simulation of numerous 'independent optimization' decisions by multiple water users while maintaining physical interdependences based on water use and flow in the river basin. We show that the alternative problem format allows the formulation HERBMs that yield more realistic results when comparing different water management institutions.

  8. Results and limits in the 1-D analytical modeling for the asymmetric DG SOI MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobianu, O.; Glesner, M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents the results and the limits of 1-D analytical modeling of electrostatic potential in the low-doped p type silicon body of the asymmetric n-channel DG SOI MOSFET, where the contribution to the asymmetry comes only from p- and n-type doping of polysilicon used as the gate electrodes. Solving Poisson's equation with boundary conditions based on the continuity of normal electrical displacement at interfaces and the presence of a minimum electrostatic potential by using the Matlab code we have obtained a minimum potential with a slow variation in the central zone of silicon with the value pinned around 0.46 V, where the applied VGS voltage varies from 0.45 V to 0.95 V. The paper states clearly the validity domain of the analytical solution and the important effect of the localization of the minimum electrostatic potential value on the potential variation at interfaces as a function of the applied VGS voltage.

  9. Ion pairing and phase behaviour of an asymmetric restricted primitive model of ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongduo; Li, Bin; Nordholm, Sture; Woodward, Clifford E.; Forsman, Jan

    2016-12-01

    An asymmetric restricted primitive model (ARPM) of electrolytes is proposed as a simple three parameter (charge q, diameter d, and charge displacement b) model of ionic liquids and solutions. Charge displacement allows electrostatic and steric interactions to operate between different centres, so that orientational correlations arise in ion-ion interactions. In this way the ionic system may have partly the character of a simple ionic fluid/solid and of a polar fluid formed from ion pairs. The present exploration of the system focuses on the ion pair formation mechanism, the relative concentration of paired and free ions and the consequences for the cohesive energy, and the tendency to form fluid or solid phase. In contrast to studies of similar (though not identical) models in the past, we focus on behaviours at room temperature. By MC and MD simulations of such systems composed of monovalent ions of hard-sphere (or essentially hard-sphere) diameter equal to 5 Å and a charge displacement ranging from 0 to 2 Å from the hard-sphere origin, we find that ion pairing dominates for b larger than 1 Å. When b exceeds about 1.5 Å, the system is essentially a liquid of dipolar ion pairs with a small presence of free ions. We also investigate dielectric behaviours of corresponding liquids, composed of purely dipolar species. Many basic features of ionic liquids appear to be remarkably consistent with those of our ARPM at ambient conditions, when b is around 1 Å. However, the rate of self-diffusion and, to a lesser extent, conductivity is overestimated, presumably due to the simple spherical shape of our ions in the ARPM. The relative simplicity of our ARPM in relation to the rich variety of new mechanisms and properties it introduces, and to the numerical simplicity of its exploration by theory or simulation, makes it an essential step on the way towards representation of the full complexity of ionic liquids.

  10. Low density instabilities in asymmetric nuclear matter within the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model with the {delta} meson

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Alexandre M.; Providencia, Constanca; Panda, Prafulla K.

    2009-04-15

    In the present work we include the isovector-scalar {delta} meson in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model and study the properties of asymmetric nuclear within QMC without and with the {delta} meson. Recent constraints set by isospin diffusion on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density are used to adjust the model parameters. The thermodynamical spinodal surfaces are obtained and the instability region at subsaturation densities within QMC and QMC{delta} models are compared with mean-field relativistic models. The distillation effect in the QMC model is discussed.

  11. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-01-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  12. Free Wake Techniques for Rotor Aerodynamic Analylis. Volume 2: Vortex Sheet Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanuwidjaja, A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of computations are presented using vortex sheets to model the wake and test the sensitivity of the solutions to various assumptions used in the development of the models. The complete codings are included.

  13. Generalized huygens-fresnel diffraction integral for misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems and decentered anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guilin; Lü, Baida

    2002-03-01

    The generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral for misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems is derived by using the canonical operator method, which enables us to study propagation properties of anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (AGSM) beams through misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems. It is shown that under the action of misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems AGSM beams do not preserve the closed property. Therefore generalized partially coherent anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams called decentered anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (DAGSM) beams are introduced, and AGSM beams can be regarded as a special case of DAGSM beams.

  14. Asymmetric airflow and vibration induced by the Coanda effect in a symmetric model of the vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chao; Zhang, Yu; Hottinger, Daniel G; Jiang, Jack J

    2007-10-01

    A model constructed from Navier-Stokes equations and a two-mass vocal fold description is proposed in this study. The composite model not only has the capability to describe the aerodynamics in a vibratory glottis but also can be used to study the vocal fold vibration under the driving of the complex airflow in the glottis. Numerical simulations show that this model can predict self-oscillations of the coupled glottal aerodynamics and vocal fold system. The Coanda effect could occur in the vibratory glottis even though the vocal folds have left-right symmetric prephonatory shape and tissue properties. The Coanda effect causes the asymmetric flow in the glottis and the difference in the driving force on the left and right vocal folds. The different pressures applied to the left and right vocal folds induce their displacement asymmetry. By using various lung pressures (0.6-2.0 kPa) to drive the composite model, it was found that the asymmetry of the vocal fold displacement is increased from 1.87% to 11.2%. These simulation results provide numerical evidence for the presence of asymmetric flow in the vibratory glottis; moreover, they indicate that glottal aerodynamics is an important factor in inducing the asymmetric vibration of the vocal folds.

  15. Modelling and attenuation feasibility of the aeroelastic response of active helicopter rotor systems during the engagement/disengagement phase of maritime operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouli, F.

    An aeroelastic phenomenon, known as blade sailing, encountered during maritime operation of helicopters is identified as being a factor that limits the tactical flexibility of helicopter operation in some sea conditions. The hazards associated with this phenomenon and its complexity, owing to the number of factors contributing to its occurrence, led previous investigators to conclude that advanced and validated simulation tools are best suited to investigate it. A research gap is identified in terms of scaled experimental investigation of this phenomenon and practical engineering solutions to alleviate its negative impact on maritime helicopter operation. The feasibility of a proposed strategy to alleviate it required addressing a gap in modelling thin-walled composite active beams/rotor blades. The modelling is performed by extending a mathematically-consistent and asymptotic reduction strategy of the 3-D elastic problem to account for embedded active materials. The derived active cross-sectional theory is validated using 2-D finite element results for closed and open cross-sections. The geometrically-exact intrinsic formulation of active maritime rotor systems is demonstrated to yield compact and symbolic governing equations. The intrinsic feature is shown to allow a classical and proven solution scheme to be successfully applied to obtain time history solutions. A Froude-scaled experimental rotor was designed, built, and tested in a scaled ship airwake environment and representative ship motion. Based on experimental and simulations data, conclusions are drawn regarding the influence of the maritime operation environment and the rotor operation parameters on the blade sailing phenomenon. The experimental data is also used to successfully validate the developed simulation tools. The feasibility of an open-loop control strategy based on the integral active twist concept to counter blade sailing is established in a Mach-scaled maritime operation environment

  16. Initial results of a model rotor higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel experiment on BVI impulsive noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Lehmann, G.; van der Wall, B.

    1989-09-01

    Initial acoustic results are presented from a higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel pilot experiment on helicopter rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise reduction, making use of the DFVLR 40-percent-scaled BO-105 research rotor in the DNW 6m by 8m closed test section. Considerable noise reduction (of several decibels) has been measured for particular HHC control settings, however, at the cost of increased vibration levels and vice versa. The apparently adverse results for noise and vibration reduction by HHC are explained. At optimum pitch control settings for BVI noise reduction, rotor simulation results demonstrate that blade loading at the outer tip region is decreased, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are increased, resulting altogether in reduced BVI noise generation. At optimum pitch control settings for vibration reduction adverse effects on blade loading, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are found.

  17. On the flow field around a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeles, G.; Athanassiadis, N.

    A model of a two-bucket Savonius rotor windmill was constructed and tested in a wind tunnel. The flow field around the rotor was examined visually and also quantitatively with the use of a hot wire. The flow visualization revealed an upstream influence on the flow field up to 3 rotor diameters away and a strong downwash downstream. Hot wire measurements showed a large velocity deficit behind the rotor and a quick velocity recovery downstream due to strong mixing; the latter was associated with high levels of turbulence. Energy spectra revealed that all turbulence was concentrated in a single harmonic corresponding to twice the rotational speed of the rotor.

  18. The prediction of transonic loading on advancing helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, R. C.; Tung, C.

    1986-01-01

    Two different schemes are presented for including the effect of rotor wakes on the finie-difference prediction of rotor loads. The first formulation includes wake effects by means of a blade-surface inflow specification. This approach is sufficiently simple to permit coupling of a full-potential finite-difference rotor code to a comprehensive integral model for the rotor wake and blade motion. The coupling involves a transfer of appropriate loads and inflow data between the two computer codes. Results are compared with experimental data for two advancing rotor cases. The second rotor-wake modeling scheme is a split potential formulation for computing unsteady blade-vortex interactions. Discrete vortex fields are introduced into a three-dimensional, conservative, full-potential rotor code. Computer predictions are compared with two experimental blade-vortex interaction cases.

  19. The prediction of transonic loading advancing helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, R.; Tung, C.

    1986-01-01

    Two different schemes are presented for including the effect of rotor wakes on the finite-difference prediction of rotor loads. The first formulation includes wake effects by means of a blade-surface inflow specification. This approach is sufficiently simple to permit coupling of a full-potential finite-difference rotor code to a comprehensive integral model for the rotor wake and blade motion. The coupling involves a transfer of appropriate loads and inflow data between the two computer codes. Results are compared with experimental data for two advancing rotor cases. The second rotor wake modeling scheme in this paper is a split potential formulation for computing unsteady blade-vortex interactions. Discrete vortex fields are introduced into a three-dimensional, conservative, full-potential rotor code. Computer predictions are compared with two experimental blade-vortex interaction cases.

  20. Carbon cycle instability as a cause of the late Pleistocene ice age oscillations - Modeling the asymmetric response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamical model of the Pleistocene ice ages is presented, which incorporates many of the qualitative ideas advanced recently regarding the possible role of ocean circulation, chemistry, temperature, and productivity in regulating long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide variations. This model involves one additional term (and free parameter) beyond that included in a previous model (Saltzman and Sutera, 1987), providing the capacity for an asymmetric response. It is shown that many of the main features exhibited by the delta(O-18)-derived ice record and the Vostok core/delta(C-13)-derived carbon dioxide record in the late Pleistocene can be deduced as a free oscillatory solution of the model.

  1. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in asymmetric and deformed nuclear collisions in the wounded quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, O. S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Kumar, Ashwini; Singh, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    The charged particle multiplicity (n_{ch}) and pseudorapidity density (dn_{ch}/dη) are key observables to characterize the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. The dependence of these observables on collision energy and the collision geometry are a key tool to understand the underlying particle production mechanism. Recently much interest has been focused on asymmetric and deformed nuclei collisions since these collisions can provide a deeper understanding about the nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the phenomenological perspective, a unified model which describes the experimental data coming from various kinds of collision experiments is much needed to provide physical insights on the production mechanism. In this paper, we have calculated the charged hadron multiplicities for nucleon-nucleus, such as proton-lead ( p-Pb) and asymmetric nuclei collisions like deutron-gold ( d-Au), and copper-gold (Cu-Au) within a new version of the wounded quark model (WQM) and we have shown their variation with respect to centrality. Further we have used a suitable density function within our WQM to calculate pseudorapidity density of charged hadrons at midrapidity in the collisions of deformed uranium nuclei. We found that our model with suitable density functions describes the experimental data for symmetric, asymmetric and deformed nuclei collisions simultaneously over a wide range of the collision energy.

  2. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features.

  3. Rotor control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Maciolek, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helicopter rotor control system (13) including a stop azimuth controller (32) for establishing the value of a deceleration command (15') to a deceleration controller (23), a transition azimuth predictor (41) and a position reference generator (55), which are effective during the last revolution of said rotor (14) to establish a correction indication (38) to adjust the deceleration command (15') to ensure that one of the rotor blades (27) stops at a predetermined angular position.

  4. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 2: Run log and tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model Rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The existence of mutual interference between hovering main rotor and a tail rotor was acknowledged in the test. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. This volume contains the test run log and tabulated data.

  5. Chain Pooling modeling selection as developed for the statistical analysis of a rotor burst protection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holms, A. G.

    1977-01-01

    As many as three iterated statistical model deletion procedures were considered for an experiment. Population model coefficients were chosen to simulate a saturated 2 to the 4th power experiment having an unfavorable distribution of parameter values. Using random number studies, three model selection strategies were developed, namely, (1) a strategy to be used in anticipation of large coefficients of variation, approximately 65 percent, (2) a strategy to be sued in anticipation of small coefficients of variation, 4 percent or less, and (3) a security regret strategy to be used in the absence of such prior knowledge.

  6. Calculation of symmetric and asymmetric vortex seperation on cones and tangent ogives based on discrete vortex models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, S.; Lan, C. Edward

    1988-01-01

    An inviscid discrete vortex model, with newly derived expressions for the tangential velocity imposed at the separation points, is used to investigate the symmetric and asymmetric vortex separation on cones and tangent ogives. The circumferential locations of separation are taken from experimental data. Based on a slender body theory, the resulting simultaneous nonlinear algebraic equations in a cross-flow plane are solved with Broyden's modified Newton-Raphson method. Total force coefficients are obtained through momentum principle with new expressions for nonconical flow. It is shown through the method of function deflation that multiple solutions exist at large enough angles of attack, even with symmetric separation points. These additional solutions are asymmetric in vortex separation and produce side force coefficients which agree well with data for cones and tangent ogives.

  7. A line-broadening analysis model for the microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline materials from asymmetric x-ray diffraction peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantoja-Cortés, Juan; Sánchez-Bajo, Florentino; Ortiz, Angel L.

    2012-05-01

    Nanograin sizes and crystal lattice microstrains in nanocrystalline materials are typically evaluated from the broadening of their x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks under the assumption of symmetrical diffraction profiles. Since this assumption is not entirely satisfactory, we formulate a line-broadening analysis model of a single peak that considers explicitly the XRD peak asymmetry. The model is a generalization of the variance method in which the shape of the XRD peaks is idealized through asymmetrical split pseudo-Voigt functions. The model is validated on two nanocrystalline powders.

  8. A line-broadening analysis model for the microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline materials from asymmetric x-ray diffraction peaks.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Cortés, Juan; Sánchez-Bajo, Florentino; Ortiz, Angel L

    2012-05-30

    Nanograin sizes and crystal lattice microstrains in nanocrystalline materials are typically evaluated from the broadening of their x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks under the assumption of symmetrical diffraction profiles. Since this assumption is not entirely satisfactory, we formulate a line-broadening analysis model of a single peak that considers explicitly the XRD peak asymmetry. The model is a generalization of the variance method in which the shape of the XRD peaks is idealized through asymmetrical split pseudo-Voigt functions. The model is validated on two nanocrystalline powders.

  9. User's guide for a personal computer model of turbulence at a wind turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. R.; Powell, D. C.; Gower, G. L.

    1989-08-01

    This document is primarily: (1) a user's guide for the personal computer (PC) version of the code for the PNL computational model of the rotationally sampled wind speed (RODASIM11), and (2) a brief guide to the growing literature on the subject of rotationally sampled turbulence, from which the model is derived. The model generates values of turbulence experienced by single points fixed in the rotating frame of reference of an arbitrary wind turbine blade. The character of the turbulence depends on the specification of mean wind speed, the variance of turbulence, the crosswind and along-wind integral scales of turbulence, mean wind shear, and the hub height, radius, and angular speed of rotation of any point at which wind fluctuation is to be calculated.

  10. User's guide for a personal computer model of turbulence at a wind turbine rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, J.R.; Powell, D.C.; Gower, G.L.

    1989-08-01

    This document is primarily (1) a user's guide for the personal computer (PC) version of the code for the PNL computational model of the rotationally sampled wind speed (RODASIM11) and (2) a brief guide to the growing literature on the subject of rotationally sampled turbulence, from which the model is derived. The model generates values of turbulence experienced by single points fixed in the rotating frame of reference of an arbitrary wind turbine blade. The character of the turbulence depends on the specification of mean wind speed, the variance of turbulence, the crosswind and along-wind integral scales of turbulence, mean wind shear, and the hub height, radius, and angular speed of rotation of any point at which wind fluctuation is to be calculated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A new peak detection algorithm for MALDI mass spectrometry data based on a modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a ubiquitous analytical tool in biological research and is used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of bio-molecules. Peak detection is the essential first step in MS data analysis. Precise estimation of peak parameters such as peak summit location and peak area are critical to identify underlying bio-molecules and to estimate their abundances accurately. We propose a new method to detect and quantify peaks in mass spectra. It uses dual-tree complex wavelet transformation along with Stein's unbiased risk estimator for spectra smoothing. Then, a new method, based on the modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt (mAPV) model and hierarchical particle swarm optimization, is used for peak parameter estimation. Results Using simulated data, we demonstrated the benefit of using the mAPV model over Gaussian, Lorentz and Bi-Gaussian functions for MS peak modelling. The proposed mAPV model achieved the best fitting accuracy for asymmetric peaks, with lower percentage errors in peak summit location estimation, which were 0.17% to 4.46% less than that of the other models. It also outperformed the other models in peak area estimation, delivering lower percentage errors, which were about 0.7% less than its closest competitor - the Bi-Gaussian model. In addition, using data generated from a MALDI-TOF computer model, we showed that the proposed overall algorithm outperformed the existing methods mainly in terms of sensitivity. It achieved a sensitivity of 85%, compared to 77% and 71% of the two benchmark algorithms, continuous wavelet transformation based method and Cromwell respectively. Conclusions The proposed algorithm is particularly useful for peak detection and parameter estimation in MS data with overlapping peak distributions and asymmetric peaks. The algorithm is implemented using MATLAB and the source code is freely available at http://mapv.sourceforge.net. PMID:26680279

  12. Direct integration of transient rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An implicit method was developed for integrating the equations of motion for a lumped mass model of a rotor dynamics system. As an aside, a closed form solution to the short bearing theory was also developed for a damper with arbitrary motion. The major conclusions are that the method is numerically stable and that the computation time is proportional to the number of elements in the rotor dynamics model rather than to the cube of the number. This computer code allowed the simulation of a complex rotor bearing system experiencing nonlinear transient motion and displayed the vast amount of results in an easily understood motion picture format - a 10 minute, 16 millimeter, color, sound motion picture supplement. An example problem with 19 mass elements in the rotor dynamics model took 0.7 second of central processing unit time per time step on an IBM 360-67 computer in a time sharing mode.

  13. Hydraulic Actuator System for Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz; Althaus, Josef

    1991-01-01

    In the last ten years, several different types of actuators were developed and fabricated for active control of rotors. A special hydraulic actuator system capable of generating high forces to rotating shafts via conventional bearings is addressed. The actively controlled hydraulic force actuator features an electrohydraulic servo valve which can produce amplitudes and forces at high frequencies necessary for influencing rotor vibrations. The mathematical description will be given in detail. The experimental results verify the theoretical model. Simulations already indicate the usefulness of this compact device for application to a real rotor system.

  14. Internal Friction And Instabilities Of Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of effects of internal friction on dynamics of rotors prompted by concern over instabilities in rotors of turbomachines. Theoretical and experimental studies described. Theoretical involved development of nonlinear mathematical models of internal friction in three joints found in turbomachinery - axial splines, Curvic(TM) splines, and interference fits between smooth cylindrical surfaces. Experimental included traction tests to determine the coefficients of friction of rotor alloys at various temperatures, bending-mode-vibration tests of shafts equipped with various joints and rotordynamic tests of shafts with axial-spline and interference-fit joints.

  15. Phase behavior and critical properties of size-asymmetric, primitive-model electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yuan; Prausnitz, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The theory of J. Jiang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7977 (2002)] for size-symmetric electrolytes is extended to size-asymmetric electrolytes. When compared to molecular-simulation results, this extension gives the correct trend of critical properties with size asymmetry.

  16. Asymmetric Epoxidation: A Twinned Laboratory and Molecular Modeling Experiment for Upper-Level Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hii, King Kuok; Rzepa, Henry S.; Smith, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of a student experiment involving the preparation and use of a catalyst for the asymmetric epoxidation of an alkene with computational simulations of various properties of the resulting epoxide is set out in the form of a software toolbox from which students select appropriate components. At the core of these are the computational…

  17. Experimental study of main rotor/tail rotor/airframe interactions in hover. Volume 1: Text and figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Saccullo, A.; Sheehy, T. W.

    1983-01-01

    To assist in identifying and quantifying the relevant parameters associated with the complex topic of main rotor/fuselage/tail rotor interference, a model scale hover test was conducted in the Model Rotor Hover Facility. The test was conducted using the basic model test rig, fuselage skins to represent a UH-60A BLACK HAWK helicopter, 4 sets of rotor blades of varying geometry (i.e., twist, airfoils and solidity) and a model tail rotor that could be relocated to give changes in rotor clearance (axially, laterally, and vertically), can't angle and operating model (pusher or tractor). The description of the models and the tests, data analysis and summary (including plots) are included. The customary system of units gas used for principal measurements and calculations. Expressions in both SI units and customary units are used with the SI units stated first and the customary units afterwords, in parenthesis.

  18. Computations and turbulent flow modeling in support of helicopter rotor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Efforts continue to investigate the applicability of the Deiwert's time dependent numerical airfoil calculation code to the simulation of two dimensional airfoil flows with large amounts of separation present. A modified logarithmic region mixing length term produced substantial differences in the calculated flow fields for the large separation of the M=0.4, high angle of attack cases. Reasons are given for interest in applying that model to previously investigated cases of the 64A010 airfoil section at Mach number 0.8 for angles of attack of 4 deg and 6.2 deg. The effects of these turbulence models at alterations and the time dependent behavior from impulsively started conditions are discussed.

  19. Applying Dynamic Wake Models to Induced Power Calculations for an Optimum Rotor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    largest value of n PI induced power Ps shaft power m nP associated Legendre function of the first kind m nP normalized associated Legendre...found by computing the shaft power and then subtracting the work done on the vehicle PI = PS – TV – HU...the four -harmonic flow. 2.6 Effect of Lift Tilt Makinen (Ref. 10) showed that the inflow model can indeed include the effect of tilt on

  20. A review of research in rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1988-01-01

    The research accomplished in the area of rotor loads over the last 13 to 14 years is reviewed. The start of the period examined is defined by the 1973 AGARD Milan conference and the 1974 hypothetical rotor comparison. The major emphasis of the review is research performed by the U.S. Army and NASA at their laboratories and/or by the industry under government contract. For the purpose of this review, two main topics are addressed: rotor loads prediction and means of rotor loads reduction. A limited discussion of research in gust loads and maneuver loads is included. In the area of rotor loads predictions, the major problem areas are reviewed including dynamic stall, wake induced flows, blade tip effects, fuselage induced effects, blade structural modeling, hub impedance, and solution methods. It is concluded that the capability to predict rotor loads has not significantly improved in this time frame. Future progress will require more extensive correlation of measurements and predictions to better understand the causes of the problems, and a recognition that differences between theory and measurement have multiple sources, yet must be treated as a whole. There is a need for high-quality data to support future research in rotor loads, but the resulting data base must not be seen as an end in itself. It will be useful only if it is integrated into firm long-range plans for the use of the data.

  1. Asymmetric Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Crespi, Mattia; Cuffaro, Marco; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Levshin, Anatoli; Panza, Giuliano F.; Riguzzi, Federica

    2010-05-01

    The net rotation, or so-called W-ward drift of the lithosphere, implies a decoupling of the plates relative to the underlying asthenosphere, and a relative "E-ward" mantle flow. This polarized flow can account for a number of asymmetries. When comparing the W-directed versus the E- to NE-directed subduction zones, as a general observation, they have the subduction hinge diverging versus converging relative to the upper plate; low versus high topography and structural elevation respectively; deep versus shallow trenches and foreland basins; shallow versus deep decollement; low versus high basement involvement; high versus low heat flow and gravity anomaly; shallow versus deep asthenosphere; etc. The western limbs of rift zones show S-waves faster in the lithosphere and slower in the asthenosphere with respect to the eastern limb. The asymmetry can be recognized when moving along the "tectonic equator", which describes the fastest flow of plates relative to the mantle, and it undulates relative to the geographic equator. In our reconstructions, the best fit for the tectonic equator has a pole of rotation at latitude -56.4° and longitude 136.7°, with an angular velocity of 1.2036°/Ma. Shear-wave splitting alignments tend to parallel the tectonic flow, apart along the subduction zones where they become orthogonal, as a flow encountering an obstacle. The tectonic equator lies close to the revolution plane of the Moon about the Earth. All these data and interpretations point for an asymmetric Earth, whose nature appears to be related to the rotation and its tidal despinning, combined with the thermal cooling of the planet. However, this model has been questioned on the basis of the high viscosity so far inferred in the asthenosphere. Preliminary modelling shows that the tidal oscillation can generate gravitational wave propagation in the lithosphere, and the wave velocity can increase with the decrease of the asthenospheric viscosity.

  2. Computational Study of Flow Interactions in Coaxial Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    account for multiple real-world constraints up front in design nor possible to know what performance is possible with a given design. Since unmanned vehicles are sized and optimized for the particular mission, a modern low-fidelity conceptual design and sizing tool that has been used for the design of large helicopters can be used for design of small coaxial rotorcraft. However, unlike most helicopters with single main rotor, the interactions between the upper and lower rotors emerge as an important factor to consider in design because an increase in performance of a multi-rotor system is not proportional to the number of rotors. Interference losses and differences in thrusts between the upper and lower rotors were investigated by theoretical methods as well as a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In this work, hybrid turbulence models are used to investigate the physics of interactions between coaxial rotors and a fuselage that are not well understood. Present study covers not only small-scale drones but also large-scale coaxial rotors for heavy-lifting missions. Considering the recently proposed FAA drone rules that require the flight only in visual line-of-sight, a large multirotor might be used as an airborne carrier for launch and recovery of unmanned aircraft systems with a human operator onboard. For applications to civil operations, their aerodynamic performance and noise levels need to be assessed. Noise is one of the largest limiting factors to rotorcraft operations in urban area. Since the high-frequency noise of multi-rotors may increase the annoyance, noise may turn out to be a key issue that must be addressed for market acceptability. One of the objectives of the present work is to study the effects of inter-rotor spacing and collectives on the performance, efficiency, and acoustics of coaxial rotor systems.

  3. Helicopter Rotor Wake Geometry and Its Influence in Forward Flight. Volume 1. Generalized Wake Geometry and Wake Effect on Rotor Airloads and Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    performance. A first level generalized wake model was developed for a helicopter rotor operating in steady level forward flight based on theoretically...predicted wake geometries. The generalized wake model consists of wake geometry equations in which tip vortex distortions are generalized as displacements...of predicted rotor airloads and related rotor performanceand blade bending moments to various rotor inflow and wake geometry models are demonstrated

  4. A bi-hemispheric neuronal network model of the cerebellum with spontaneous climbing fiber firing produces asymmetrical motor learning during robot control

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    To acquire and maintain precise movement controls over a lifespan, changes in the physical and physiological characteristics of muscles must be compensated for adaptively. The cerebellum plays a crucial role in such adaptation. Changes in muscle characteristics are not always symmetrical. For example, it is unlikely that muscles that bend and straighten a joint will change to the same degree. Thus, different (i.e., asymmetrical) adaptation is required for bending and straightening motions. To date, little is known about the role of the cerebellum in asymmetrical adaptation. Here, we investigate the cerebellar mechanisms required for asymmetrical adaptation using a bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network model (biCNN). The bi-hemispheric structure is inspired by the observation that lesioning one hemisphere reduces motor performance asymmetrically. The biCNN model was constructed to run in real-time and used to control an unstable two-wheeled balancing robot. The load of the robot and its environment were modified to create asymmetrical perturbations. Plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the biCNN model was driven by error signal in the climbing fiber (cf) input. This cf input was configured to increase and decrease its firing rate from its spontaneous firing rate (approximately 1 Hz) with sensory errors in the preferred and non-preferred direction of each hemisphere, as demonstrated in the monkey cerebellum. Our results showed that asymmetrical conditions were successfully handled by the biCNN model, in contrast to a single hemisphere model or a classical non-adaptive proportional and derivative controller. Further, the spontaneous activity of the cf, while relatively small, was critical for balancing the contribution of each cerebellar hemisphere to the overall motor command sent to the robot. Eliminating the spontaneous activity compromised the asymmetrical learning capabilities of the biCNN model. Thus, we conclude that a bi

  5. A bi-hemispheric neuronal network model of the cerebellum with spontaneous climbing fiber firing produces asymmetrical motor learning during robot control.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    To acquire and maintain precise movement controls over a lifespan, changes in the physical and physiological characteristics of muscles must be compensated for adaptively. The cerebellum plays a crucial role in such adaptation. Changes in muscle characteristics are not always symmetrical. For example, it is unlikely that muscles that bend and straighten a joint will change to the same degree. Thus, different (i.e., asymmetrical) adaptation is required for bending and straightening motions. To date, little is known about the role of the cerebellum in asymmetrical adaptation. Here, we investigate the cerebellar mechanisms required for asymmetrical adaptation using a bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network model (biCNN). The bi-hemispheric structure is inspired by the observation that lesioning one hemisphere reduces motor performance asymmetrically. The biCNN model was constructed to run in real-time and used to control an unstable two-wheeled balancing robot. The load of the robot and its environment were modified to create asymmetrical perturbations. Plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the biCNN model was driven by error signal in the climbing fiber (cf) input. This cf input was configured to increase and decrease its firing rate from its spontaneous firing rate (approximately 1 Hz) with sensory errors in the preferred and non-preferred direction of each hemisphere, as demonstrated in the monkey cerebellum. Our results showed that asymmetrical conditions were successfully handled by the biCNN model, in contrast to a single hemisphere model or a classical non-adaptive proportional and derivative controller. Further, the spontaneous activity of the cf, while relatively small, was critical for balancing the contribution of each cerebellar hemisphere to the overall motor command sent to the robot. Eliminating the spontaneous activity compromised the asymmetrical learning capabilities of the biCNN model. Thus, we conclude that a bi

  6. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  7. Estimation of dynamic rotor loads for the rotor systems research aircraft: Methodology development and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, R. W.; Bahrami, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft uses load cells to isolate the rotor/transmission systm from the fuselage. A mathematical model relating applied rotor loads and inertial loads of the rotor/transmission system to the load cell response is required to allow the load cells to be used to estimate rotor loads from flight data. Such a model is derived analytically by applying a force and moment balance to the isolated rotor/transmission system. The model is tested by comparing its estimated values of applied rotor loads with measured values obtained from a ground based shake test. Discrepancies in the comparison are used to isolate sources of unmodeled external loads. Once the structure of the mathematical model has been validated by comparison with experimental data, the parameters must be identified. Since the parameters may vary with flight condition it is desirable to identify the parameters directly from the flight data. A Maximum Likelihood identification algorithm is derived for this purpose and tested using a computer simulation of load cell data. The identification is found to converge within 10 samples. The rapid convergence facilitates tracking of time varying parameters of the load cell model in flight.

  8. Modelling the asymmetric wind of the luminous blue variable binary MWC 314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.; Groh, J. H.; Martayan, C.; Frémat, Y.; Torres Dozinel, K.; Raskin, G.; Van Winckel, H.; Prins, S.; Pessemier, W.; Waelkens, C.; Hensberge, H.; Dumortier, L.; Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.; Lehmann, H.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic analysis of MWC 314, a luminous blue variable (LBV) candidate with an extended bipolar nebula. The detailed spectroscopic variability is investigated to determine if MWC 314 is a massive binary system with a supersonically accelerating wind or a low-mass B[e] star. We compare the spectrum and spectral energy distribution to other LBVs (such as P Cyg) and find very similar physical wind properties, indicating strong kinship. Methods: We combined long-term high-resolution optical spectroscopic monitoring and V-band photometric observations to determine the orbital elements and stellar parameters and to investigate the spectral variability with the orbital phases. We developed an advanced model of the large-scale wind-velocity and wind-density structure with 3-D radiative transfer calculations that fit the orbitally modulated P Cyg profile of He i λ5876, showing outflow velocities above 1000 km s-1. Results: We find that MWC 314 is a massive semi-detached binary system of ≃1.22 AU, observed at an inclination angle of i = 72.8° with an orbital period of 60.8 d and e = 0.23. The primary star is a low-vsini LBV candidate of m1 = 39.6 M⊙ and R1 = 86.8 R⊙. The detailed radiative transfer fits show that the geometry of wind density is asymmetric around the primary star with increased wind density by a factor of 3.3, which leads the orbit of the primary. The variable orientation causes the orbital modulation that is observed in absorption portions of P Cyg wind lines. Wind accretion in the system produces a circumbinary disc. Conclusions: MWC 314 is in a crucial evolutionary phase of close binary systems, when the massive primary star has its H envelope being stripped and is losing mass to a circumbinary disc. MWC 314 is a key system for studying the evolutionary consequences of these effects. Table 1, Figs. 1-4, 9, 10, 14-16, 18-20, 23 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Vub/Vcb suppression from an asymmetric variation of the Fritzsch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, A.; Margolis, B.; Robinson, J. A.

    1989-04-01

    We examine the possibility that the Fritzsch prediction <||Vub/Vcb||~=~1/2~0.6, which at first seemed to be too small to agree with the ARGUS limit (>~0.07), might in fact be too large, given the nonobservation of charmless B decays by the CLEO Collaboration. We discuss an up-down asymmetric Fritzsch variant, characterized by ||Vub/Vcb||=(mdm2s/m3b)1/2/||Vcb||~ 0.2.

  10. Effects of planform geometry on hover performance of a 2-meter-diameter model of a four-bladed rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, A. E., III; Althoff, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    Hover tests were conducted on three small scale rotors to evaluate the effects of blade planform taper on rotor hover performance. Tests were conducted on a rectangular swept-tip configuration, on a configuration with a 3 to 1 taper over the outboard 20 percent of the span, and on a configuration with a 5 to 1 taper over the outboard 20 percent of the blade span. The investigation covered a range of thrust coefficients from 0 to 0.0075 and a range of tip speeds from 300 to 600 ft/sec. The tests showed that both tapered configurations had better hover performance than the swept-tip rectangular configuration and that the 3 to 1 taper configuration was better than the 5 to 1 taper configuration. The test results were compared with predictions made with a prescribed wake analysis, a momentum analysis, and a simplified free wake analysis.

  11. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 1. Text and figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. The test showed that overall the tail rotor effects on the advanced tip configurations tested are not substantially different from the effects on conventional tips.

  12. Exploratory flow visualization investigation of mast-mounted sights in presence of a rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1995-01-01

    A flow visualization investigation with a laser light sheet system was conducted on a 27-percent-scale AH-64 attack helicopter model fitted with two mast-mounted sights in the langley 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel. The investigation was conducted to identify aerodynamic phenomena that may have contributed to adverse vibration encountered during full-scale flight of the AH-64D apache/longbow helicopter with an asymmetric mast-mounted sight. Symmetric and asymmetric mast-mounted sights oriented at several skew angles were tested at simulated forward and rearward flight speeds of 30 and 45 knots. A laser light sheet system was used to visualize the flow in planes parallel to and perpendicular to the free-stream flow. Analysis of these flow visualization data identified frequencies of flow patterns in the wake shed from the sight, the streamline angle at the sight, and the location where the shed wake crossed the rotor plane. Differences in wake structure were observed between the sight configurations and various skew angles. Analysis of lateral light sheet plane data implied significant vortex structure in the wake of the asymmetric mast-mounted sight in the configuration that produced maximum in-flight vibration. The data showed no significant vortex structure in the wake of the asymmetric and symmetric configurations that produced no increase in in-flight adverse vibration.

  13. Effect of AFT Rotor on the Inter-Rotor Flow of an Open Rotor Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaboch, Paul E.; Stephens, David B.; Van Zante, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the aft rotor on the inter-rotor flow field of an open rotor propulsion rig were examined. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) dataset that was acquired phase locked to the front rotor position has been phase averaged based on the relative phase angle between the forward and aft rotors. The aft rotor phase was determined by feature tracking in raw PIV images through an image processing algorithm. The effect of the aft rotor potential field on the inter-rotor flow were analyzed and shown to be in good agreement with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. It was shown that the aft rotor had no substantial effect on the position of the forward rotor tip vortex but did have a small effect on the circulation strength of the vortex when the rotors were highly loaded.

  14. Rotor-Fuselage Interaction: Analysis and Validation with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Bettschart, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    The problem of rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction has to be considered in industry applications from various aspects. First, in order to increase helicopter speed and reduce operational costs, rotorcraft tend to be more and more compact, with a main rotor closer to the fuselage surface. This creates significant perturbations both on the main rotor and on the fuselage, including steady and unsteady effects due to blade and wake passage and perturbed inflow at the rotor disk. Furthermore,the main rotor wake affects the tail boom, empennage and anti-torque system. This has important consequences for helicopter control and vibrations at low speeds and also on tail rotor acoustics (main rotor wake-tail rotor interactions). This report describes the US Army-France MOD cooperative work on this problem from both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Using experimental 3D velocity field and fuselage surface pressure measurements, three codes that model the interactions of a helicopter rotor with a fuselage are compared. These comparisons demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of current models for the combined rotor-fuselage analysis.

  15. Transonic aeroelasticity analysis for rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the unsteady transonic rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. The blade structural dynamic equations based on beam theory were formulated by FEM and were solved in the time domain, instead of the frequency domain. For different combinations of precone, droop, and pitch, the correlations are very good in the first three flapping modes and the first twisting mode. However, the predicted frequencies are too high for the first lagging mode at high rotational speeds. This new structure code has been coupled into a transonic rotor flow code, TFAR2, to demonstrate the capability of treating elastic blades in transonic rotor flow calculations. The flow fields for a model-scale rotor in both hover and forward flight are calculated. Results show that the blade elasticity significantly affects the flow characteristics in forward flight.

  16. Potential acoustic benefits of circulation control rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Cheeseman, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    The fundamental aeroacoustic mechanisms responsible for noise generation on a rotating blade are theoretically examined. Their contribution to the overall rotor sound pressure level is predicted. Results from a theory for airfoil trailing edge noise are presented. Modifications and extensions to other source theories are described where it is necessary to account for unique aspects of circulation control (CC) aerodynamics. The circulation control rotor (CCR), as embodied on an X-wing vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, is used as an example for computational purposes, although many of the theoretical results presented are generally applicable to other CC applications (such as low speed rotors, propellers, compressors, and fixed wing aircraft). Using the analytical models, it is shown that the utilization CC aerodynamics theoretically makes possible unprecedented advances in rotor noise reduction. For the X-wing VTOL these reductions appear to be feasible without incurring significant attendant performance and weight penalties.

  17. Estimation of lumbar spinal loading and trunk muscle forces during asymmetric lifting tasks: application of whole-body musculoskeletal modelling in OpenSim.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Zhang, Yanxin

    2016-06-03

    Large spinal compressive force combined with axial torsional shear force during asymmetric lifting tasks is highly associated with lower back injury (LBI). The aim of this study was to estimate lumbar spinal loading and muscle forces during symmetric lifting (SL) and asymmetric lifting (AL) tasks using a whole-body musculoskeletal modelling approach. Thirteen healthy males lifted loads of 7 and 12 kg under two lifting conditions (SL and AL). Kinematic data and ground reaction force data were collected and then processed by a whole-body musculoskeletal model. The results show AL produced a significantly higher peak lateral shear force as well as greater peak force of psoas major, quadratus lumborum, multifidus, iliocostalis lumborum pars lumborum, longissimus thoracis pars lumborum and external oblique than SL. The greater lateral shear forces combined with higher muscle force and asymmetrical muscle contractions may have the biomechanical mechanism responsible for the increased risk of LBI during AL. Practitioner Summary: Estimating lumbar spinal loading and muscle forces during free-dynamic asymmetric lifting tasks with a whole-body musculoskeletal modelling in OpenSim is the core value of this research. The results show that certain muscle groups are fundamentally responsible for asymmetric movement, thereby producing high lumbar spinal loading and muscle forces, which may increase risks of LBI during asymmetric lifting tasks.

  18. Critical endpoint behavior in an asymmetric Ising model: application of Wang-Landau sampling to calculate the density of states.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shan-Ho; Wang, Fugao; Landau, D P

    2007-06-01

    Using the Wang-Landau sampling method with a two-dimensional random walk we determine the density of states for an asymmetric Ising model with two- and three-body interactions on a triangular lattice, in the presence of an external field. With an accurate density of states we were able to map out the phase diagram accurately and perform quantitative finite-size analyses at, and away from, the critical endpoint. We observe a clear divergence of the curvature of the spectator phase boundary and of the magnetization coexistence diameter derivative at the critical endpoint, and the exponents for both divergences agree well with previous theoretical predictions.

  19. Critical endpoint behavior in an asymmetric Ising model: Application of Wang-Landau sampling to calculate the density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Ho; Wang, Fugao; Landau, D. P.

    2007-06-01

    Using the Wang-Landau sampling method with a two-dimensional random walk we determine the density of states for an asymmetric Ising model with two- and three-body interactions on a triangular lattice, in the presence of an external field. With an accurate density of states we were able to map out the phase diagram accurately and perform quantitative finite-size analyses at, and away from, the critical endpoint. We observe a clear divergence of the curvature of the spectator phase boundary and of the magnetization coexistence diameter derivative at the critical endpoint, and the exponents for both divergences agree well with previous theoretical predictions.

  20. Bistable devices for morphing rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Terrence

    This dissertation presents two bistable concepts for morphing rotor blades. These concepts are simple and are composed of bistable devices that act as coupling structures between an actuator and the rotor blade. Bistable or "snap-through" mechanisms have two stable equilibrium states and are a novel way to achieve large actuation output stroke at relatively modest effort for gross rotor morphing applications. This is because in addition to the large actuation stroke associated with the snap-through (relative to conventional actuator/ amplification systems) coming at relatively low actuation effort, no locking is required in either equilibrium state (since they are both stable). The first concept that is presented in this dissertation is a that is composed of a bistable twisting device that twists the tip of helicopter rotor blades. This work examines the performance of the presented bistable twisting device for rotor morphing, specifically, blade tip twist under an aerodynamic lift load. The device is analyzed using finite element analysis to predict its load carrying capability and bistable behavior. The second concept that is presented is a concept that is composed of a bistable arch for rotor blade chord extension. The bistable arch is coupled to a thin flat plate that is supported by rollers. Increasing the chord of the rotor blade is expected to generate more lift-load and improve helicopter performance. In this work, a methodology is presented to design the bistable arches for chord morphing using the finite element analysis and pseudo-rigid body model method. This work also examines the effect of different arches, arch hinge size and shape, inertial loads and rigidity on arch performance. Finally, this work shows results from an experiment that was conducted to validate the developed numerical model and demonstrates how the arch can be actuated using a Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wire to extend the chord of a helicopter rotor blade.

  1. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  2. Psychoacoustic Testing of Modulated Blade Spacing for Main Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan; Booth, Earl R., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Psychoacoustic testing of simulated helicopter main rotor noise is described, and the subjective results are presented. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the potential acoustic benefits of main rotors with modulated (uneven) blade spacing. Sound simulations were prepared for six main rotor configurations. A baseline 4-blade main rotor with regular blade spacing was based on the Bell Model 427 helicopter. A 5-blade main rotor with regular spacing was designed to approximate the performance of the 427, but at reduced tipspeed. Four modulated rotors - one with "optimum" spacing and three alternate configurations - were derived from the 5 bladed regular spacing rotor. The sounds were played to 2 subjects at a time, with care being taken in the speaker selection and placement to ensure that the sounds were identical for each subject. A total of 40 subjects participated. For each rotor configuration, the listeners were asked to evaluate the sounds in terms of noisiness. The test results indicate little to no "annoyance" benefit for the modulated blade spacing. In general, the subjects preferred the sound of the 5-blade regular spaced rotor over any of the modulated ones. A conclusion is that modulated blade spacing is not a promising design feature to reduce the annoyance for helicopter main rotors.

  3. Modeling of complex antibody elution behavior under high protein load densities in ion exchange chromatography using an asymmetric activity coefficient.

    PubMed

    Huuk, Thiemo C; Hahn, Tobias; Doninger, Katharina; Griesbach, Jan; Hepbildikler, Stefan; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    A main requirement for the implementation of model-based process development in industry is the capability of the model to predict high protein load densities. The frequently used steric mass action isotherm assumes a thermodynamically ideal system and, hence constant activity coefficients. In this manuscript, an industrial antibody purification problem under high load conditions is considered where this assumption does not hold. The high protein load densities, as commonly applied in industrial downstream processing, may lead to complex elution peak shapes. Using Mollerup's generalized ion-exchange isotherm (GIEX), the observed elution peak shapes could be modeled. To this end, the GIEX isotherm introduced two additional parameters to approximate the asymmetric activity coefficient. The effects of these two parameters on the curvature of the adsorption isotherm and the resulting chromatogram are investigated. It could be shown that they can be determined by inverse peak fitting and conform with the mechanistic demands of model-based process development.

  4. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  5. Reducing rotor weight

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  6. Open Rotor Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    An open rotor, also known as a high-speed propeller, is tested in a wind tunnel. The propeller moves much more quickly than a standard propeller, and the blades of the propeller are shaped differen...

  7. Rational design of catalysts for asymmetric diamination reaction using transition state modeling.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-05-07

    The stereoselective synthesis of 1,2-diamines has remained a formidable challenge. A recent palladium-catalyzed asymmetric diamination of conjugated double bonds using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone appears promising. The axially chiral binol phosphoramidite ligands are successful in offering high enantioselectivity. The density functional theory investigations revealed that the energies of the stereocontrolling transition states for the C-N bond formation depend on a number of weak non-covalent interactions such as C-H···π, C-H···O and anagostic interactions. We envisaged that the modulation in these interactions in the transition states, through subtle changes in chiral phosphoramidite substituents, could be exploited toward steering the stereoselectivity. The effect of systematic modifications on both 3,3' positions of the binol as well as on the amido nitrogen on the stereochemical outcome is predicted. It is identified that high enantioselectivity requires a balance between the nature of the substituents on binol and amido groups. The reduced size of the amido substituents demands increased bulk on the binol whereas lowering the size on the binol demands increased bulk on the amido for higher stereoselectivity. The substituent at the α-position of the amido group is found to be vital and appears to be a hot spot for modifications. These insights derived from studies on the stereocontrolling transition states could help improve the catalytic efficacies in palladium-catalyzed asymmetric diamination reactions.

  8. Stochastic and empirical models of the absolute asymmetric synthesis by the Soai-autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Barabás, Béla; Zucchi, Claudia; Maioli, Marco; Micskei, Károly; Pályi, Gyula

    2015-02-01

    Absolute asymmetric synthesis (AAS) is the preparation of pure (or excess of one) enantiomer of a chiral compound from achiral precursor(s) by a chemical reaction, without enantiopure chiral additive and/or without applied asymmetric physical field. Only one well-characterized example of AAS is known today: the Soai-autocatalysis. In an attempt at clarification of the mechanism of this particular reaction we have undertaken empirical and stochastic analysis of several parallel AAS experiments. Our results show that the initial steps of the reaction might be controlled by simple normal distribution ("coin tossing") formalism. Advanced stages of the reaction, however, appear to be of a more complicated nature. Symmetric beta distribution formalism could not be brought into correspondence with the experimental observations. A bimodal beta distribution algorithm provided suitable agreement with the experimental data. The parameters of this bimodal beta function were determined by a Pólya-urn experiment (simulated by computer). Interestingly, parameters of the resulting bimodal beta function give a golden section ratio. These results show, that in this highly interesting autocatalysis two or even perhaps three catalytic cycles are cooperating. An attempt at constructing a "designed" Soai-type reaction system has also been made.

  9. Experimental and modeling analysis of asymmetrical on-off oscillation in coupled non-identical inverted bottle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ji; Shangguan, Zhichun; Li, Haihong; Wu, Ye; Liu, Weiqing; Xiao, Jinghua; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Upside-down bottles containing water which are common in our daily life exhibit rich vibration dynamics. Rich dynamic regimes are observed in bottle oscillators by directly measuring the pressure difference between inside and outside of a bottle with the aid of pressure sensors. We observe experimentally that an asymmetrical oscillation process between the outflow of water and the inflow of air is formed in a single bottle oscillator and, in addition, a kind of 2:1 frequency synchronization occurs in a coupled system of two non-identical bottle oscillators. The peak values of the oscillation of pressure differences between inside and outside of the bottle decease as the height of the liquid surface steps down, while the oscillation period increases gradually. The theoretical model of the oscillator is amended to understand the regimes in the experiment by introducing time-dependent parameters related to the asymmetrical oscillation processes. Our numerical results based on the model fit well with the experimental ones.

  10. Investigation of fine-structure dips in fission-fragment mass distribution: An asymmetric two centre shell model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2017-04-01

    The fission fragment mass distribution followed by neutron emission is studied for the 208Pb (18O , f) reaction using the asymmetric two centre shell model. The measured mass distribution spectrum reveals new kind of systematics on shell structure and leads to an improved understanding of structure effects in nuclear fission. A detailed investigation of shell effects both in potential and cranking mass parameter has been carried out for explaining the observed fine structure dips (i.e., less probable distributions) corresponding to shell closure (Z = 50 and/or N = 82) of fission fragments and their complementary partners. The available energy states for the decay process are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation and found that first-five eigenstates are sufficient in reproducing the observed mass distribution spectrum. An outcome of the asymmetric two centre shell model also completely favours the observed claim that ;the total number of emitted neutrons between correlated pairs of fission fragments should not exceed 6;. A complete observed spectrum is obtained by adding the mass distribution yields of all 6-neutron emission channels. This suggests a possible importance of extending these calculations to get new insight into an understanding of the dynamical behaviour of fragment formation in the fission process.

  11. Asymmetric tunneling model of forward leakage current in GaN/InGaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi, Ting; Tao, Tao; Liu, Bin E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Li, Yi; Zhuang, Zhe; Zhang, Guogang; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Rong E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-08-15

    Through investigating the temperature dependent current-voltage (T-I-V) properties of GaN based blue and green LEDs in this study, we propose an asymmetric tunneling model to understand the leakage current below turn-on voltage (V < 3.2 V): At the forward bias within 1.5 V ∼ 2.1 V (region 1), the leakage current is main attributed to electrons tunneling from the conduction band of n-type GaN layer to the valence band of p-type GaN layer via defect states in space-charge region (SCR); While, at the forward bias within 2 V ∼ 2.4 V (region 2), heavy holes tunneling gradually becomes dominant at low temperature (T < 200K) as long as they can overcome the energy barrier height. The tunneling barrier for heavy holes is estimated to be lower than that for electrons, indicating the heavy holes might only tunnel to the defect states. This asymmetric tunneling model shows a novel carrier transport process, which provides better understanding of the leakage characteristics and is vital for future device improvements.

  12. Transition State Models for Understanding the Origin of Chiral Induction in Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-05-17

    In asymmetric catalysis, a chiral catalyst bearing chiral center(s) is employed to impart chirality to developing stereogenic center(s). A rich and diverse set of chiral catalysts is now available in the repertoire of synthetic organic chemistry. The most recent trends point to the emergence of axially chiral catalysts based on binaphthyl motifs, in particular, BINOL-derived phosphoric acids and phosphoramidites. More fascinating ideas took shape in the form of cooperative multicatalysis wherein organo- and transition-metal catalysts are made to work in concert. At the heart of all such manifestations of asymmetric catalysis, classical or contemporary, is the stereodetermining transition state, which holds a perennial control over the stereochemical outcome of the catalytic process. Delving one step deeper, one would find that the origin of the stereoselectivity is delicately dependent on the relative stabilization of one transition state, responsible for the formation of the predominant stereoisomer, over the other transition state for the minor stereoisomer. The most frequently used working hypothesis to rationalize the experimentally observed stereoselectivity places an undue emphasis on steric factors and tends to regard the same as the origin of facial discrimination between the prochiral faces of the reacting partners. In light of the increasing number of asymmetric catalysts that rely on hydrogen bonding as well as other weak non-covalent interactions, it is important to take cognizance of the involvement of such interactions in the sterocontrolling transition states. Modern density functional theories offer a pragmatic and effective way to capture non-covalent interactions in transition states. Aided by the availability of such improved computational tools, it is quite timely that the molecular origin of stereoselectivity is subjected to more intelligible analysis. In this Account, we describe interesting molecular insights into the stereocontrolling

  13. PT -breaking threshold in spatially asymmetric Aubry-André and Harper models: Hidden symmetry and topological states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, Andrew K.; Lee, Tony E.; Joglekar, Yogesh N.

    2016-06-01

    Aubry-André-Harper lattice models, characterized by a reflection-asymmetric sinusoidally varying nearest-neighbor tunneling profile, are well known for their topological properties. We consider the fate of such models in the presence of balanced gain and loss potentials ±i γ located at reflection-symmetric sites. We predict that these models have a finite PT -breaking threshold only for specific locations of the gain-loss potential and uncover a hidden symmetry that is instrumental to the finite threshold strength. We also show that the topological edge states remain robust in the PT -symmetry-broken phase. Our predictions substantially broaden the possible experimental realizations of a PT -symmetric system.

  14. A stochastic spatial model of HIV dynamics with an asymmetric battle between the virus and the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai; Shuai, J. W.

    2010-04-01

    A stochastic spatial model based on the Monte Carlo approach is developed to study the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We aim to propose a more detailed and realistic simulation frame by incorporating many important features of HIV dynamics, which include infections, replications and mutations of viruses, antigen recognitions, activations and proliferations of lymphocytes, and diffusions, encounters and interactions of virions and lymphocytes. Our model successfully reproduces the three-phase pattern observed in HIV infection, and the simulation results for the time distribution from infection to AIDS onset are also in good agreement with the clinical data. The interactions of viruses and the immune system in all the three phases are investigated. We assess the relative importance of various immune system components in the acute phase. The dynamics of how the two important factors, namely the viral diversity and the asymmetric battle between HIV and the immune system, result in AIDS are investigated in detail with the model.

  15. Wind-tunnel Tests of a Cyclogiro Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Windler, Ray

    1935-01-01

    During an extensive study of all types of rotating wings, the NACA examined the cyclogiro rotor and made an aerodynamic analysis of that system (reference 1). The examination disclosed that such a machine had sufficient promise to justify an experimental investigation; a model with a diameter and span of 8 feet was therefore constructed and tested in the 20-foot wind tunnel during 1934. The experimental work included tests of the effect of the motion upon the rotor forces during the static-lift and forward-flight conditions at several rotor speeds and the determination of the relations between the forces generated by the rotor and the power required by it.

  16. Analysis and correlation with theory of rotor lift-limit test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, M.

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program to define the cruise performance and determine any limitations to lift and propulsive force of a conventional helicopter rotor is described. A 2.96 foot radius model rotor was used. The maximum lift and propulsive force obtainable from an articulated rotor for advance ratios of 0.4 to 0.67, and the blade load growth as the lift approaches the limit are determined. Cruise rotor performance for advance ratios of 0.4 to 0.67 and the sensitivity of the rotor forces and moments to rotor control inputs as the lift limit is approached are established.

  17. Equation of state in the pion condensation phase in asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Hiroki; Harada, Masayasu

    2014-12-01

    We study the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model by introducing a baryonic charge in the infrared boundary. We first show that, in the normal hadron phase, the predicted values of the symmetry energy and its slope parameter are comparable with the empirical values. We find that the phase transition from the normal phase to the pion condensation phase is delayed compared with the pure mesonic matter: the critical chemical potential is larger than the pion mass which is obtained for the pure mesonic matter. We also show that, in the pion condensation phase, the pion contribution to the isospin number density increases with the chemical potential, while the baryonic contribution is almost constant. Furthermore, the value of chiral condensation implies that the enhancement of the chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the asymmetric nuclear matter as in the pure mesonic matter. We also give a discussion on how to understand the delay in terms of the four-dimensional chiral Lagrangian including the rho and omega mesons based on the hidden local symmetry.

  18. Asymmetric glottal jet deflection: differences of two- and three-dimensional models.

    PubMed

    Mattheus, Willy; Brücker, Christoph

    2011-12-01

    Flow is studied through a channel with an oscillating orifice mimicking the motion of the glottal-gap during phonation. Simulations with prescribed flow and wall-motion are carried out for different orifice geometries, a 2D slit-like and a 3D lens-like one. Although the jet emerges from a symmetric orifice a significant deflection occurs in case of the slit-like geometry, contrary to the 3D lens-like one. The results demonstrate the dependency of jet entrainment and vortex dynamics on the orifice geometry and the interpretation of asymmetric jet deflection with regard to the relevance of the Coanda effect in the process of human phonation.

  19. Asymmetric adsorption by quartz - A model for the prebiotic origin of optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. M.; Kavasmaneck, P. R.; Martin, F. S.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    One mechanism previously proposed for the abiotic accumulation of molecules of one chirality in nature is asymmetric adsorption on the chiral surfaces of optically active quartz crystals. Earlier literature in this field is reviewed, with the conclusion that previous investigations of this phenomenon, using optical rotation criteria, have afforded ambiguous results. We now have studied the adsorption of radioactive D- and L-alanine on powdered d- and l-quartz, using change in radioactivity level as a criterion for both gross and differential adsorption, d-Quartz preferentially adsorbed D-alanine from anhydrous dimethyl-formamide solution, and l-quartz L-alanine. The differential adsorption varied between 1.0 and 1.8%. The implications of these observations are discussed from the viewpoint of early chemical evolution and the origin of optically active organic compounds in nature.

  20. Field Balancing and Harmonic Vibration Suppression in Rigid AMB-Rotor Systems with Rotor Imbalances and Sensor Runout.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao

    2015-08-31

    Harmonic vibrations of high-speed rotors in momentum exchange devices are primary disturbances for attitude control of spacecraft. Active magnetic bearings (AMBs), offering the ability to control the AMB-rotor dynamic behaviors, are preferred in high-precision and micro-vibration applications, such as high-solution Earth observation satellites. However, undesirable harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations also occur in the AMB-rotor system owing to the mixed rotor imbalances and sensor runout. To compensate the rotor imbalances and to suppress the harmonic vibrations, two control methods are presented. Firstly, a four degrees-of-freedom AMB-rotor model with the static imbalance, dynamic imbalance, and the sensor runout are described. Next, a synchronous current reduction approach with a variable-phase notch feedback is proposed, so that the rotor imbalances can be identified on-line through the analysis of the synchronous displacement relationships of the geometric, inertial, and rotational axes of the rotor. Then, the identified rotor imbalances, which can be represented at two prescribed balancing planes of the rotor, are compensated by discrete add-on weights whose masses are calculated in the vector form. Finally, a repetitive control algorithm is utilized to suppress the residual harmonic vibrations. The proposed field balancing and harmonic vibration suppression strategies are verified by simulations and experiments performed on a control moment gyro test rig with a rigid AMB-rotor system. Compared with existing methods, the proposed strategies do not require trial weights or an accurate model of the AMB-rotor system. Moreover, the harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations can be well-attenuated simultaneously.

  1. Field Balancing and Harmonic Vibration Suppression in Rigid AMB-Rotor Systems with Rotor Imbalances and Sensor Runout

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic vibrations of high-speed rotors in momentum exchange devices are primary disturbances for attitude control of spacecraft. Active magnetic bearings (AMBs), offering the ability to control the AMB-rotor dynamic behaviors, are preferred in high-precision and micro-vibration applications, such as high-solution Earth observation satellites. However, undesirable harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations also occur in the AMB-rotor system owing to the mixed rotor imbalances and sensor runout. To compensate the rotor imbalances and to suppress the harmonic vibrations, two control methods are presented. Firstly, a four degrees-of-freedom AMB-rotor model with the static imbalance, dynamic imbalance, and the sensor runout are described. Next, a synchronous current reduction approach with a variable-phase notch feedback is proposed, so that the rotor imbalances can be identified on-line through the analysis of the synchronous displacement relationships of the geometric, inertial, and rotational axes of the rotor. Then, the identified rotor imbalances, which can be represented at two prescribed balancing planes of the rotor, are compensated by discrete add-on weights whose masses are calculated in the vector form. Finally, a repetitive control algorithm is utilized to suppress the residual harmonic vibrations. The proposed field balancing and harmonic vibration suppression strategies are verified by simulations and experiments performed on a control moment gyro test rig with a rigid AMB-rotor system. Compared with existing methods, the proposed strategies do not require trial weights or an accurate model of the AMB-rotor system. Moreover, the harmonic displacements, currents, and vibrations can be well-attenuated simultaneously. PMID:26334281

  2. Landscape-scale evaluation of asymmetric interactions between Brown Trout and Brook Trout using two-species occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Tyler; Jefferson T. Deweber,; Jason Detar,; John A. Sweka,

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the distribution of native stream fishes is fundamental to the management and conservation of many species. Modeling species distributions often consists of quantifying relationships between species occurrence and abundance data at known locations with environmental data at those locations. However, it is well documented that native stream fish distributions can be altered as a result of asymmetric interactions between dominant exotic and subordinate native species. For example, the naturalized exotic Brown Trout Salmo trutta has been identified as a threat to native Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis in the eastern United States. To evaluate large-scale patterns of co-occurrence and to quantify the potential effects of Brown Trout presence on Brook Trout occupancy, we used data from 624 stream sites to fit two-species occupancy models. These models assumed that asymmetric interactions occurred between the two species. In addition, we examined natural and anthropogenic landscape characteristics we hypothesized would be important predictors of occurrence of both species. Estimated occupancy for Brook Trout, from a co-occurrence model with no landscape covariates, at sites with Brown Trout present was substantially lower than sites where Brown Trout were absent. We also observed opposing patterns for Brook and Brown Trout occurrence in relation to percentage forest, impervious surface, and agriculture within the network catchment. Our results are consistent with other studies and suggest that alterations to the landscape, and specifically the transition from a forested catchment to one that contains impervious surface or agriculture, reduces the occurrence probability of wild Brook Trout. Our results, however, also suggest that the presence of Brown Trout results in lower occurrence probability of Brook Trout over a range of anthropogenic landscape characteristics, compared with streams where Brown Trout were absent.

  3. Performance and loads data from a hover test of a 0.658-scale V-22 rotor and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, Fort F.; Signor, David B.; Young, Larry A.; Betzina, Mark D.

    1987-01-01

    A hover test of a 0.658-scale model of a V-22 rotor and wing was conducted at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility at Ames Research Center. The primary objectives of the test were to obtain accurate measurements of the hover performance of the rotor system, and to measure the aerodynamic interactions between the rotor and wing. Data were acquired for rotor tip Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.73. This report presents data on rotor performance, rotor-wake downwash velocities, rotor system loads, wing forces and moments, and wing surface pressures.

  4. Initial Investigation of the Acoustics of a Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model with Historical Baseline Blades in a Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A counter-rotating open rotor scale model was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This model used a historical baseline blade set with which modern blade designs will be compared against on an acoustic and aerodynamic performance basis. Different blade pitch angles simulating approach and takeoff conditions were tested, along with angle-of-attack configurations. A configuration was also tested in order to determine the acoustic effects of a pylon. The shaft speed was varied for each configuration in order to get data over a range of operability. The freestream Mach number was also varied for some configurations. Sideline acoustic data were taken for each of these test configurations.

  5. Flap-lag-torsional dynamic modelling of rotor blades in hover and in forward flight, including the effect of cubic nonlinearities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespodasilva, M. R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The differential equations of motion, and boundary conditions, describing the flap-lead/lag-torsional motion of a flexible rotor blade with a precone angle and a variable pitch angle, which incorporates a pretwist, are derived via Hamilton's principle. The meaning of inextensionality is discussed. The equations are reduced to a set of three integro partial differential equations by elimination of the extension variable. The generalized aerodynamic forces are modelled using Greenberg's extension of Theodorsen's strip theory. The equations of motion are systematically expanded into polynomial nonlinearities with the objective of retaining all terms up to third degree. The blade is modeled as a long, slender, of isotropic Hookean materials. Offsets from the blade's elastic axis through its shear center and the axes for the mass, area and aerodynamic centers, radial nonuniformaties of the blade's stiffnesses and cross section properties are considered and the effect of warp of the cross section is included in the formulation.

  6. Frozen Rotor and Sliding Mesh Models Applied to the 3D Simulation of the Francis-99 Tokke Turbine with Code_Saturne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonello, N.; Eude, Y.; de Laage de Meux, B.; Ferrand, M.

    2017-01-01

    The steady-state operation of the Francis-99, Tokke turbine [1-3] has been simulated numerically at different loads using the open source, CAD and CFD software, SALOME [4] Code_Saturne [5]. The full 3D mesh of the Tokke turbine provided for the Second Francis-99 Workshop has been adapted and modified to work with the solver. Results are compared for the frozen-rotor and the unsteady, conservative sliding mesh approach over three operating points, showing that good agreement with the experimental data is obtained with both models without having to tune the CFD models for each operating point. Approaches to the simulation of transient operation are also presented with results of work in progress.

  7. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  8. Asymmetric kinetic equilibria: Generalization of the BAS model for rotating magnetic profile and non-zero electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorville, Nicolas; Belmont, Gérard; Aunai, Nicolas; Dargent, Jérémy; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Finding kinetic equilibria for non-collisional/collisionless tangential current layers is a key issue as well for their theoretical modeling as for our understanding of the processes that disturb them, such as tearing or Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities. The famous Harris equilibrium [E. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento Ser. 10 23, 115-121 (1962)] assumes drifting Maxwellian distributions for ions and electrons, with constant temperatures and flow velocities; these assumptions lead to symmetric layers surrounded by vacuum. This strongly particular kind of layer is not suited for the general case: asymmetric boundaries between two media with different plasmas and different magnetic fields. The standard method for constructing more general kinetic equilibria consists in using Jeans theorem, which says that any function depending only on the Hamiltonian constants of motion is a solution to the steady Vlasov equation [P. J. Channell, Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 19, 1541 (1976); M. Roth et al., Space Sci. Rev. 76, 251-317 (1996); and F. Mottez, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1541-1545 (2003)]. The inverse implication is however not true: when using the motion invariants as variables instead of the velocity components, the general stationary particle distributions keep on depending explicitly of the position, in addition to the implicit dependence introduced by these invariants. The standard approach therefore strongly restricts the class of solutions to the problem and probably does not select the most physically reasonable. The BAS (Belmont-Aunai-Smets) model [G. Belmont et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 022108 (2012)] used for the first time the concept of particle accessibility to find new solutions: considering the case of a coplanar-antiparallel magnetic field configuration without electric field, asymmetric solutions could be found while the standard method can only lead to symmetric ones. These solutions were validated in a hybrid simulation [N. Aunai et al., Phys. Plasmas (1994-present) 20

  9. Asymmetric kinetic equilibria: Generalization of the BAS model for rotating magnetic profile and non-zero electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Dorville, Nicolas Belmont, Gérard; Aunai, Nicolas; Dargent, Jérémy; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-09-15

    Finding kinetic equilibria for non-collisional/collisionless tangential current layers is a key issue as well for their theoretical modeling as for our understanding of the processes that disturb them, such as tearing or Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities. The famous Harris equilibrium [E. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento Ser. 10 23, 115–121 (1962)] assumes drifting Maxwellian distributions for ions and electrons, with constant temperatures and flow velocities; these assumptions lead to symmetric layers surrounded by vacuum. This strongly particular kind of layer is not suited for the general case: asymmetric boundaries between two media with different plasmas and different magnetic fields. The standard method for constructing more general kinetic equilibria consists in using Jeans theorem, which says that any function depending only on the Hamiltonian constants of motion is a solution to the steady Vlasov equation [P. J. Channell, Phys. Fluids (1958–1988) 19, 1541 (1976); M. Roth et al., Space Sci. Rev. 76, 251–317 (1996); and F. Mottez, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1541–1545 (2003)]. The inverse implication is however not true: when using the motion invariants as variables instead of the velocity components, the general stationary particle distributions keep on depending explicitly of the position, in addition to the implicit dependence introduced by these invariants. The standard approach therefore strongly restricts the class of solutions to the problem and probably does not select the most physically reasonable. The BAS (Belmont-Aunai-Smets) model [G. Belmont et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 022108 (2012)] used for the first time the concept of particle accessibility to find new solutions: considering the case of a coplanar-antiparallel magnetic field configuration without electric field, asymmetric solutions could be found while the standard method can only lead to symmetric ones. These solutions were validated in a hybrid simulation [N. Aunai et al., Phys. Plasmas (1994-present

  10. RWF rotor-wake-fuselage code software reference guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.

    1991-01-01

    The RWF (Rotor-Wake-Fuselage) code was developed from first principles to compute the aerodynamics associated with the complex flow field of helicopter configurations. The code is sized for a single, multi-bladed main rotor and any configuration of non-lifting fuselage. The mathematical model for the RWF code is based on the integration of the momentum equations and Green's theorem. The unknowns in the problem are the strengths of prescribed singularity distributions on the boundaries of the flow. For the body (fuselage) a surface of constant strength source panels is used. For the rotor blades and rotor wake a surface of constant strength doublet panels is used. The mean camber line of the rotor airfoil is partitioned into surface panels. The no-flow boundary condition at the panel centroids is modified at each azimuthal step to account for rotor blade cyclic pitch variation. The geometry of the rotor wake is computers at each time step of the solution. The code produces rotor and fuselage surface pressures, as well as the complex geometry of the evolving rotor wake.

  11. Response studies of rotors and rotor blades with application to aeroelastic tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Various tools for the aeroelastic stability and response analysis of rotor blades in hover and forward flight were developed and incorporated in a comprehensive package capable of performing aeroelastic tailoring of rotor blades in forward flight. The results indicate that substantial vibration reductions, of order 15-40%, in the vibratory hub shears can be achieved by relatively small modifications of the initial design. Furthermore the optimized blade can be up to 20% lighter than the original design. Accomplishments are reported for the following tasks: (1) finite element modeling of rotary-wing aeroelastic problems in hover and forward flight; (2) development of numerical methods for calculating the aeroelastic response and stability of rotor blades in forward fight; (3) formulation of the helicopter air resonance problem in hover with active controls; and (4) optimum design of rotor blades for vibration reduction in forward flight.

  12. Structural Health and Prognostics Management for Offshore Wind Turbines: Sensitivity Analysis of Rotor Fault and Blade Damage with O&M Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Myrent, Noah J.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2014-07-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling and simulation approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Sensitivity analyses were carried out for the detection strategies of rotor imbalance and shear web disbond developed in prior work by evaluating the robustness of key measurement parameters in the presence of varying wind speeds, horizontal shear, and turbulence. Detection strategies were refined for these fault mechanisms and probabilities of detection were calculated. For all three fault mechanisms, the probability of detection was 96% or higher for the optimized wind speed ranges of the laminar, 30% horizontal shear, and 60% horizontal shear wind profiles. The revised cost model provided insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs as they relate to the characteristics of the SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability

  13. Far-Field Acoustic Power Level and Performance Analyses of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Scaled Takeoff, Nominal Takeoff, and Approach Conditions: Technical Report I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Far-field acoustic power level and performance analyses of open rotor model F31/A31 have been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated scaled takeoff, nominal takeoff, and approach flight conditions. The nonproprietary parts of the data obtained from experiments in 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (9?15 LSWT) tests were provided by NASA Glenn Research Center to perform the analyses. The tone and broadband noise components have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, angle of attack, thrust, and input shaft power have been presented and discussed. The effect of an upstream pylon on the noise levels of the model has been addressed. Empirical equations relating model's acoustic power level, thrust, and input shaft power have been developed. The far-field acoustic efficiency of the model is also determined for various simulated flight conditions. It is intended that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  14. Design, analysis and testing of small, affordable HAWT rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, Mihai V.; Niculescu, Mihai L.; Cojocaru, Marius G.; Barsan, Dorin

    2012-09-01

    The paper presents affordable technologies dedicated to design, CAD modelling and manufacturing of the small-medium HAWT rotors. Three numerical tools are developed: blade/rotor design, blade modelling for industry CATIA(CATScript) and blade modelling for small scale developers. Numerical analysis of the rotors is accomplished for both performance and noise level estimation using XFLOW (LES) and an in-house code (URANS). Results are presented for a 5KW rotor at the design point only, since computations are expensive. Developement examples are included as two rotors are designed, manufactured and tested for 1.5 and 5KW. A third one, rated for 20KW is under developement. Basic testing results are also included.

  15. Tilt rotor aircraft aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Smith, Charles A.; Maisel, Martin D.; Brieger, John T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper studies the state of knowledge and the needed improvement in noise methodology and measurements for tilt rotor aircraft. Similarities and differences between tilt rotor aeroacoustic conditions and helicopter and propeller experience are identified. A discussion of the possible principal noise mechanisms throughout the flight envelope shows a need for further experimental and analytical investigations to develop an adequate understanding of the important sources and influencing factors. Existing experimental data from flight tests suggest terminal area noise reduction by operating within certain portions of the conversion flight envelope. Prediction methods are found to provide approximate indications only for low frequency harmonic and broadband noise for several of the tilt rotor's operating conditions. The acoustic effects of the hover case 'fountain' flow are pronounced and need further research. Impulsive noise and high frequency harmonic noise remain problems, as on helicopters, pending major improvements in wake, unsteady aerodynamics, and acoustics methodology.

  16. Evolution of Rotor Wake in Swirling Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Haldidi, Basman; Atassi, Hafiz; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary

    2000-01-01

    A theory is presented for modeling the evolution of rotor wakes as a function of axial distance in swirling mean flows. The theory, which extends an earlier work to include arbitrary radial distributions of mean swirl, indicates that swirl can significantly alter the wake structure of the rotor especially at large downstream distances (i.e., for moderate to large rotor-stator spacings). Using measured wakes of a representative scale model fan stage to define the mean swirl and initial wake perturbations, the theory is used to predict the subsequent evolution of the wakes. The results indicate the sensitivity of the wake evolution to the initial profile and the need to have complete and consistent initial definition of both velocity and pressure perturbations.

  17. UEDGE modeling of a small-s FRC reactor's asymmetric scrape-off-layer (SOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreivy, Nicholas; Raja, Amir; Evans, Eugene; Izacard, Olivier; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is being considered for use as a terrestrial power plant and as a direct-fusion-drive rocket engine for future space missions in the solar system. To produce thrust for a rocket or extract energy for electricity production, an asymmetric SOL has been proposed in which coolant/propellant gas is injected into a gas box at one end of the SOL. Plasma formed in the gas box flows along the SOL and its electrons are heated as they pass near the FRC core. The heated plasma is then ejected out a magnetic nozzle at the opposite end. We have used a 2D fluid code, UEDGE, to conduct numerical simulations of this FRC's SOL. We have examined the effects of power input (1-10 MW) and gas flow (10-200 kA-equiv) on the rocket's thrust (1-100 N) and specific impulse (ca. 1.5e5 s) as well as on the power flow. One important result is that the high plasma flow out of the gas box and the cold plasma within it reduce the power flow into the gas box well below 50% of the input power. Plasma dynamics of the gas box region have been investigated to assess the degree of detachment that can be obtained for given performance requirements. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Fault model in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea based on the asymmetric topography profile of the oceanic ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Y.; Abe, S.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern margin of the Japan sea is one of the major convergent zone in East Asia. In a past few decades several M7-8 earthquakes (1964 Niigata, 1983 Japan Sea, 1994 SW-off Hokkaido, and 2007 off Mid-Niigata) occurred in this zone. They were often followed by large tsunami, which indicated a vertical seafloor movement by faulting. As a result of such crustal movement since 3Ma, many oceanic ridges with asymmetric topography profile have been formed along the coast. Recent seismic reflection surveys displayed the existence of active faults at the base of the ridges. However the fault parameters such as dip angle, width, top depth are still unknown. We introduce a method to estimate the unknown parameters paying attention to the asymmetric profiles as following 3 steps: (1) Calculation of surface deformation pattern for various combinations of fault parameters based on the dislocation theory. The calculated profiles of the surface pattern are stored to a deformation database. (2) Extraction of the ridge profile from observed seafloor topography. (3) Retrieval of the best fitting model to the observed profile from the deformation database. As a result of investigation using SEABEAM data, highly correlated surface deformation pattern were found for most oceanic ridges in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. The region between the Okushiri Island and the Oga Peninsula is dominated by east-dipping faults with a high angle, whereas the regions on either side to the north and south tend to be dominated by west-dipping faults with a low angle (20 to 50 degrees). We will propose a fault model, which can be referred in a seismic and tsunami hazard assessment.

  19. Rotor balancing apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, Frank (Inventor); Lyman, Joseph (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Rotor balancing apparatus and a system comprising balance probes for measuring unbalance at the ends of a magnetically suspended rotor are disclosed. Each balance probe comprises a photocell which is located in relationship to the magnetically suspended rotor such that unbalance of the rotor changes the amount of light recorded by each photocell. The signal from each photocell is electrically amplified and displayed by a suitable device, such as an oscilloscope.

  20. High-spin states in 79Kr populated by the 78Se(α, 3n) reaction and interpreted in terms of a quasiparticle-plus-rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, M.; Filevich, A.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Szybisz, L.; Thieberger, P.

    1982-10-01

    Nuclear states of 79Kr were studied through the 78Se(α, 3n) reaction at an energy of 45 MeV. Excitation functions, γ-ray angular distributions, and γ-γ coincidences were performed. Three bands based on the g.s. (12-), 147.1 keV (52-), and 129.7 keV (72+) states were identified. Leading order analysis and quasiparticle-plus-rotor model calculations were performed. A good overall agreement was found between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 78Se(α, 3n), E=30-55 MeV; measured σ(E, Eγ, θ), Eγ, Iγ, γ-γ coin. 79Kr deduced levels J. Enriched targets.

  1. Asymmetric Ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    that oscillate in certain directions. Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflected off a pond. When light scatters through the expanding debris of a supernova, it retains information about the orientation of the scattering layers. If the supernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas shell is not round, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This is what broad-band polarimetry can accomplish. If additional spectral information is available ('spectro-polarimetry'), one can determine whether the asymmetry is in the continuum light or in some spectral lines. In the case of the Type Ia supernovae, the astronomers found that the continuum polarisation is very small so that the overall shape of the explosion is crudely spherical. But the much larger polarization in strongly blue-shifted spectral lines evidences the presence, in the outer regions, of fast moving clumps with peculiar chemical composition. "Our study reveals that explosions of Type Ia supernovae are really three-dimensional phenomena," says Dietrich Baade. "The outer regions of the blast cloud is asymmetric, with different materials found in 'clumps', while the inner regions are smooth." "This study was possible because polarimetry could unfold its full strength thanks to the light-collecting power of the Very Large Telescope and the very precise calibration of the FORS instrument," he adds. The research team first spotted this asymmetry in 2003, as part of the same observational campaign (ESO PR 23/03 and ESO PR Photo 26/05). The new, more extensive results show that the degree of polarisation and, hence, the asphericity, correlates with the intrinsic brightness of the explosion. The brighter the supernova, the smoother, or less clumpy

  2. Computational analysis of high resolution unsteady airloads for rotor aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Lam, C.-M. Gordon; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    The study of helicopter aerodynamic loading for acoustics applications requires the application of efficient yet accurate simulations of the velocity field induced by the rotor's vortex wake. This report summarizes work to date on the development of such an analysis, which builds on the Constant Vorticity Contour (CVC) free wake model, previously implemented for the study of vibratory loading in the RotorCRAFT computer code. The present effort has focused on implementation of an airload reconstruction approach that computes high resolution airload solutions of rotor/rotor-wake interactions required for acoustics computations. Supplementary efforts on the development of improved vortex core modeling, unsteady aerodynamic effects, higher spatial resolution of rotor loading, and fast vortex wake implementations have substantially enhanced the capabilities of the resulting software, denoted RotorCRAFT/AA (AeroAcoustics). Results of validation calculations using recently acquired model rotor data show that by employing airload reconstruction it is possible to apply the CVC wake analysis with temporal and spatial resolution suitable for acoustics applications while reducing the computation time required by one to two orders of magnitude relative to that required by direct calculations. Promising correlation with this body of airload and noise data has been obtained for a variety of rotor configurations and operating conditions.

  3. Three-Dimensional Temperature Field Simulation for the Rotor of an Asynchronous Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yanwu; Fan, Chunli; Yang, Li; Sun, Fengrui

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional heat transfer model is built according to the rotor structure of an asynchronous motor, and three-dimensional temperature fields of the rotor under different working conditions, such as the unloaded, rated loaded and that with broken rotor bars, are studied based on the finite element numerical method and experiments. The…

  4. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  5. Role of the particle’s stepping cycle in an asymmetric exclusion process: a model of mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Ciandrini, L.; Stansfield, I.; Romano, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA translation is often studied by means of statistical-mechanical models based on the Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process (ASEP), which considers hopping particles (the ribosomes) on a lattice (the polynucleotide chain). In this work we extend this class of models and consider the two fundamental steps of the ribosome’s biochemical cycle following a coarse-grained perspective. In order to achieve a better understanding of the underlying biological processes and compare the theoretical predictions with experimental results, we provide a description lying between the minimal ASEP-like models and the more detailed models, which are analytically hard to treat. We use a mean-field approach to study the dynamics of particles associated with an internal stepping cycle. In this framework it is possible to characterize analytically different phases of the system (high density, low density or maximal current phase). Crucially, we show that the transitions between these different phases occur at different parameter values than the equivalent transitions in a standard ASEP, indicating the importance of including the two fundamental steps of the ribosome’s biochemical cycle into the model. PMID:20866258

  6. Role of the particle's stepping cycle in an asymmetric exclusion process: A model of mRNA translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciandrini, L.; Stansfield, I.; Romano, M. C.

    2010-05-01

    Messenger RNA translation is often studied by means of statistical-mechanical models based on the asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP), which considers hopping particles (the ribosomes) on a lattice (the polynucleotide chain). In this work we extend this class of models and consider the two fundamental steps of the ribosome’s biochemical cycle following a coarse-grained perspective. In order to achieve a better understanding of the underlying biological processes and compare the theoretical predictions with experimental results, we provide a description lying between the minimal ASEP-like models and the more detailed models, which are analytically hard to treat. We use a mean-field approach to study the dynamics of particles associated with an internal stepping cycle. In this framework it is possible to characterize analytically different phases of the system (high density, low density or maximal current phase). Crucially, we show that the transitions between these different phases occur at different parameter values than the equivalent transitions in a standard ASEP, indicating the importance of including the two fundamental steps of the ribosome’s biochemical cycle into the model.

  7. Stability Analysis of a Turbocharger Rotor System Supported on Floating Ring Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Shi, Z. Q.; Zhen, D.; Gu, F. S.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    The stability of a turbocharger rotor is governed by the coupling of rotor dynamics and fluid dynamics because the high speed rotor system is supported on a pair of hydrodynamic floating ring bearings which comprise of inner and outer fluid films in series. In order to investigate the stability, this paper has developed a finite element model of the rotor system with consideration of such exciting forces as rotor imbalance, hydrodynamic fluid forces, lubricant feed pressure and dead weight. The dimensionless analytical expression of nonlinear oil film forces in floating ring bearings have been derived on the basis of short bearing theory. Based on numerical simulation, the effects of rotor imbalance, lubricant viscosity, lubricant feed pressure and bearing clearances on the stability of turbocharger rotor system have been studied. The disciplines of the stability of two films and dynamic performances of rotor system have been provided.

  8. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  9. Influence of rubbing on rotor dynamics, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.; Kingsley, Lori M.; Curry, Arthur E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of analytical and experimental research on rotor-to-stationary element rubbing in rotating machines are presented. A characterization of physical phenomena associated with rubbing, as well as a literature survey on the subject of rub is given. The experimental results were obtained from two rubbing rotor rigs: one, which dynamically simulates the space shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), and the second one, much simpler, a two-mode rotor rig, designed for more generic studies on rotor-to-stator rubbing. Two areas were studied: generic rotor-to-stator rub-related dynamic phenomena affecting rotating machine behavior and applications to the space shuttle HPFTP. An outline of application of dynamic stiffness methodology for identification of rotor/bearing system modal parameters is given. The mathematical model of rotor/bearing/seal system under rub condition is given. The computer program was developed to calculate rotor responses. Compared with experimental results the computed results prove an adequacy of the model.

  10. Performance Benefits for Wave Rotor-Topped Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.; Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits of wave rotor-topping in turboshaft engines, subsonic high-bypass turbofan engines, auxiliary power units, and ground power units are evaluated. The thermodynamic cycle performance is modeled using a one-dimensional steady-state code; wave rotor performance is modeled using one-dimensional design/analysis codes. Design and off-design engine performance is calculated for baseline engines and wave rotor-topped engines, where the wave rotor acts as a high pressure spool. The wave rotor-enhanced engines are shown to have benefits in specific power and specific fuel flow over the baseline engines without increasing turbine inlet temperature. The off-design steady-state behavior of a wave rotor-topped engine is shown to be similar to a conventional engine. Mission studies are performed to quantify aircraft performance benefits for various wave rotor cycle and weight parameters. Gas turbine engine cycles most likely to benefit from wave rotor-topping are identified. Issues of practical integration and the corresponding technical challenges with various engine types are discussed.

  11. Refined transition-state models for proline-catalyzed asymmetric Michael reactions under basic and base-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akhilesh K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-12-07

    The stereocontrolling transition state (TS) models for C-C bond formation relying on hydrogen bonding have generally been successful in proline-catalyzed aldol, Mannich, α-amination, and α-aminoxylation reactions. However, the suitability of the hydrogen-bonding model in protic and aprotic conditions as well as under basic and base-free conditions has not been well established for Michael reactions. Through a comprehensive density functional theory investigation, we herein analyze different TS models for the stereocontrolling C-C bond formation, both in the presence and absence of a base in an aprotic solvent (THF). A refined stereocontrolling TS for the Michael reaction between cyclohexanone and nitrostyrene is proposed. The new TS devoid of hydrogen bonding between the nitro group of nitrostyrene and carboxylic acid of proline, under base-free conditions, is found to be more preferred over the conventional hydrogen-bonding model besides being able to reproduce the experimentally observed stereochemical outcome. A DBU-bound TS is identified as more suitable for rationalizing the origin of asymmetric induction under basic reaction conditions. In both cases, the most preferred approach of nitrostyrene is identified as occurring from the face anti to the carboxylic acid of proline-enamine. The predicted enantio- and diastereoselectivities are in very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Mesoscale Modeling and Validation of Texture Evolution during Asymmetric Rooling and Static Recrystallization of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Stoica, Grigoreta M; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Specht, Eliot D; Kenik, Edward A; Muth, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the present research is to develop an integrated deformation and recrystallization model for magnesium alloys at the microstructural length scale. It is known that in magnesium alloys nucleation of recrystallized grains occurs at various microstructural inhomogeneities such as twins and localized deformation bands. However, there is a need to develop models that can predict the evolution of the grain structure and texture developed during recrystallization and grain growth, especially when the deformation process follows a complicated deformation path such as in asymmetric rolling. The deformation model is based on a crystal plasticity approach implemented at the length scale of the microstructure that includes deformation mechanisms based on dislocation slip and twinning. The recrystallization simulation is based on a Monte Carlo technique that operates on the output of the deformation simulations. The nucleation criterion during recrystallization is based on the local stored energy and the Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the growth of the nuclei due to local stored energy differences and curvature. The model predictions are compared with experimental data obtained through electron backscatter analysis and neutron diffraction.

  13. Superballistic wavepacket spreading in double kicked rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ping; Wang, Jiao

    2016-08-01

    We investigate possible ways in which a quantum wavepacket spreads. We show that in a general class of double kicked rotor system, a wavepacket may undergo superballistic spreading; i.e., its variance increases as the cubic of time. The conditions for the observed superballistic spreading and two related characteristic time scales are studied. Our results suggest that the symmetry of the studied model and whether it is a Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser system are crucial to its wavepacket spreading behavior. Our study also sheds new light on the exponential wavepacket spreading phenomenon previously observed in the double kicked rotor system.

  14. Higher harmonic rotor blade pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewans, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Tests of a model 'Reverse Velocity Rotor' system at high advance ratios and with twice-per-revolution cyclic pitch control were made under joint Navy-NASA sponsorship in the NASA, Ames 12 ft. pressure tunnel. The results showed significant gains in rotor performance at all advance ratios by using twice-per-revolution control. Detailed design studies have been made of alternative methods of providing higher harmonic motion including four types of mechanical systems and an electro-hydraulic system. The relative advantages and disadvantages are evaluated on the basis of stiffness, weight, volume, reliability and maintainability.

  15. Asymmetrical Capacitors for Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, Francis X.; Melcher, Cory; Winet, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetrical Capacitor Thrusters have been proposed as a source of propulsion. For over eighty years, it has been known that a thrust results when a high voltage is placed across an asymmetrical capacitor, when that voltage causes a leakage current to flow. However, there is surprisingly little experimental or theoretical data explaining this effect. This paper reports on the results of tests of several Asymmetrical Capacitor Thrusters (ACTs). The thrust they produce has been measured for various voltages, polarities, and ground configurations and their radiation in the VHF range has been recorded. These tests were performed at atmospheric pressure and at various reduced pressures. A simple model for the thrust was developed. The model assumed the thrust was due to electrostatic forces on the leakage current flowing across the capacitor. It was further assumed that this current involves charged ions which undergo multiple collisions with air. These collisions transfer momentum. All of the measured data was consistent with this model. Many configurations were tested, and the results suggest general design principles for ACTs to be used for a variety of purposes.

  16. Comparison of calculated and measured velocities near the tip of a model rotor blade at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.; Owen, F. K.; Langhi, R. G.; Palmer, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of the ROT22 code to predict accurately the transonic flow field in the crucial region around and beyond the tip of a high speed rotor blade was assessed. The computations were compared with extensive laser velocimetry measurements made at zero advance ratio and tip Mach numbers of 0.85, 0.88, 0.90, and 0.95. The comparison between theory and experiment was made using 300 scans for the three orthogonal velocity components covering a volume having a height of over one blade chord, a width of nearly two chords, and a length ranging from about 1 to 1.6 chords, depending on the tip speeds. The good agreement between the calculated and measured velocities established the ability of the code to predict the off blade flow field at high tip speeds. This supplements previous comparisons where surface pressures were shown to be well predicted on two different tips at advance ratios to 0.45, especially at the critical 90 deg azimuth blade position. These results demonstrate that the ROT22 code can be used with confidence to predict the important tip region flow field including the occurrence, strength, and location of shock waves causing high drag and noise.

  17. Simulation of rotor blade element turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.; Duisenberg, Ken

    1995-01-01

    A piloted, motion-based simulation of Sikorsky's Black Hawk helicopter was used as a platform for the investigation of rotorcraft responses to vertical turbulence. By using an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserved the statistical characteristics of the turbulence over the rotor disc, stochastic velocity components were applied at each of twenty blade-element stations. This model was implemented on NASA Ames' Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), and ten test pilots were used to establish that the model created realistic cues. The objectives of this research included the establishment of a simulation-technology basis for future investigation into real-time turbulence modeling. This goal was achieved; our extensive additions to the rotor model added less than a 10 percent computational overhead. Using a VAX 9000 computer the entire simulation required a cycle time of less than 12 msec. Pilot opinion during this simulation was generally quite favorable. For low speed flight the consensus was that SORBET (acronym for title) was better than the conventional body-fixed model, which was used for comparison purposes, and was determined to be too violent (like a washboard). For high speed flight the pilots could not identify differences between these models. These opinions were something of a surprise because only the vertical turbulence component on the rotor system was implemented in SORBET. Because of the finite-element distribution of the inputs, induced outputs were observed in all translational and rotational axes. Extensive post-simulation spectral analyses of the SORBET model suggest that proper rotorcraft turbulence modeling requires that vertical atmospheric disturbances not be superimposed at the vehicle center of gravity but, rather, be input into the rotor system, where the rotor-to-body transfer function severely attenuates high frequency rotorcraft responses.

  18. Vibration and Control of Flexible Rotor Supported by Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou

    1988-01-01

    Active vibration control of flexible rotors supported by magnetic bearings is discussed. Using a finite-element method for a mathematical model of the flexible rotor, the eigenvalue problem is formulated taking into account the interaction between a mechanical system of the flexible rotor and an electrical system of the magnetic bearings and the controller. However, for the sake of simplicity, gyroscopic effects are disregarded. It is possible to adapt this formulation to a general flexible rotor-magnetic bearing system. Controllability with and without collocation sensors and actuators located at the same distance along the rotor axis is discussed for the higher order flexible modes of the test rig. In conclusion, it is proposed that it is necessary to add new active control loops for the higher flexible modes even in the case of collocation. Then it is possible to stabilize for the case of uncollocation by means of this method.

  19. Dynamical localization of coupled relativistic kicked rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, Efim B.; Galitski, Victor

    2017-02-01

    A periodically driven rotor is a prototypical model that exhibits a transition to chaos in the classical regime and dynamical localization (related to Anderson localization) in the quantum regime. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. B 94, 085120 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.085120], A. C. Keser et al. considered a many-body generalization of coupled quantum kicked rotors, and showed that in the special integrable linear case, dynamical localization survives interactions. By analogy with many-body localization, the phenomenon was dubbed dynamical many-body localization. In the present work, we study nonintegrable models of single and coupled quantum relativistic kicked rotors (QRKRs) that bridge the gap between the conventional quadratic rotors and the integrable linear models. For a single QRKR, we supplement the recent analysis of the angular-momentum-space dynamics with a study of the spin dynamics. Our analysis of two and three coupled QRKRs along with the proved localization in the many-body linear model indicate that dynamical localization exists in few-body systems. Moreover, the relation between QRKR and linear rotor models implies that dynamical many-body localization can exist in generic, nonintegrable many-body systems. And localization can generally result from a complicated interplay between Anderson mechanism and limiting integrability, since the many-body linear model is a high-angular-momentum limit of many-body QRKRs. We also analyze the dynamics of two coupled QRKRs in the highly unusual superballistic regime and find that the resonance conditions are relaxed due to interactions. Finally, we propose experimental realizations of the QRKR model in cold atoms in optical lattices.

  20. A Sequential Shifting Algorithm for Variable Rotor Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Edwards, Jason M.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    A proof of concept of a continuously variable rotor speed control methodology for rotorcraft is described. Variable rotor speed is desirable for several reasons including improved maneuverability, agility, and noise reduction. However, it has been difficult to implement because turboshaft engines are designed to operate within a narrow speed band, and a reliable drive train that can provide continuous power over a wide speed range does not exist. The new methodology proposed here is a sequential shifting control for twin-engine rotorcraft that coordinates the disengagement and engagement of the two turboshaft engines in such a way that the rotor speed may vary over a wide range, but the engines remain within their prescribed speed bands and provide continuous torque to the rotor; two multi-speed gearboxes facilitate the wide rotor speed variation. The shifting process begins when one engine slows down and disengages from the transmission by way of a standard freewheeling clutch mechanism; the other engine continues to apply torque to the rotor. Once one engine disengages, its gear shifts, the multi-speed gearbox output shaft speed resynchronizes and it re-engages. This process is then repeated with the other engine. By tailoring the sequential shifting, the rotor may perform large, rapid speed changes smoothly, as demonstrated in several examples. The emphasis of this effort is on the coordination and control aspects for proof of concept. The engines, rotor, and transmission are all simplified linear models, integrated to capture the basic dynamics of the problem.

  1. Eigenvalue assignment strategies in rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, J. N.; Welzyn, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    The work done to establish the control and direction of effective eigenvalue excursions of lightly damped, speed dependent rotor systems using passive control is discussed. Both second order and sixth order bi-axis, quasi-linear, speed dependent generic models were investigated. In every case a single, bi-directional control bearing was used in a passive feedback stabilization loop to resist modal destabilization above the rotor critical speed. Assuming incomplete state measurement, sub-optimal control strategies were used to define the preferred location of the control bearing, the most effective measurement locations, and the best set of control gains to extend the speed range of stable operation. Speed dependent control gains were found by Powell's method to maximize the minimum modal damping ratio for the speed dependent linear model. An increase of 300 percent in stable speed operation was obtained for the sixth order linear system using passive control. Simulations were run to examine the effectiveness of the linear control law on nonlinear rotor models with bearing deadband. The maximum level of control effort (force) required by the control bearing to stabilize the rotor at speeds above the critical was determined for the models with bearing deadband.

  2. Getting Closer to Real Proteins: Asymmetric and Competing Interactions in Patchy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Fusco, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Patchy particle models have been proposed to describe protein crystal assembly. Previous analyses of these models typically assume homogeneous patch interactions and symmetric patch geometry, but recent studies suggest otherwise. Typical protein interactions have a wide range of strengths, and sterically competing interactions are the rule rather than the exception. More complex patchy models are thus needed to guide protein crystallization. We study the phase diagram and assembly kinetics of patchy models with varying interaction strength and spatial distribution asymmetry. The results rationalize George and Wilson's observation that proteins with a second virial coefficient within a specific range are easier to crystallize and provide guidelines to facilitate crystallization of recalcitrant proteins. In models with sterically competing patches we also observe distinct crystal forms (dimeric vs. monomeric) depending on the relative strength of the secondary patches. We acknowledge support from National Science Foundation Grant No. NSF DMR-1055586.

  3. A parametric study of harmonic rotor hub loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Chengjian

    1993-01-01

    A parametric study of vibratory rotor hub loads in a nonrotating system is presented. The study is based on a CAMRAD/JA model constructed for the GBH (Growth Version of Blackhawk Helicopter) Mach-scaled wind tunnel rotor model with high blade twist (-16 deg). The theoretical hub load predictions are validated by correlation with available measured data. Effects of various blade aeroelastic design changes on the harmonic nonrotating frame hub loads at both low and high forward flight speeds are investigated. The study aims to illustrate some of the physical mechanisms for change in the harmonic rotor hub loads due to blade design variations.

  4. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  5. Computations of Torque-Balanced Coaxial Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Chan, William M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics has been studied for counter-rotating coaxial rotors in hover. The effects of torque balancing on the performance of coaxial-rotor systems have been investigated. The three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved on overset grids using high-order accurate schemes, dual-time stepping, and a hybrid turbulence model. Computational results for an experimental model are compared to available data. The results for a coaxial quadcopter vehicle with and without torque balancing are discussed. Understanding interactions in coaxial-rotor flows would help improve the design of next-generation autonomous drones.

  6. Navier-Stokes analysis of radial turbine rotor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of flow through a radial turbine rotor using the three-dimensional, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code RVC3D is described. The rotor is a solid version of an air-cooled metallic radial turbine having thick trailing edges, shroud clearance, and scalloped-backface clearance. Results are presented at the nominal operating condition using both a zero-clearance model and a model simulating the effects of the shroud and scalloped-backface clearance flows. A comparison with the available test data is made and details of the internal flow physics are discussed, allowing a better understanding of the complex flow distribution within the rotor.

  7. Response to "Comments on 'A theoretical model of the pressure distributions arising from asymmetric intraglottal flows applied to a two-mass model of the vocal folds'" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 389-403 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Erath, Byron D; Peterson, Sean D; Zañartu, Matías; Wodicka, George R; Stewart, Kelley C; Plesniak, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Hirschberg [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 9-12 (2013)] presents a commentary and criticisms of the viscous flow model presented by Erath et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 389-403 (2011)] that solves for the asymmetric pressure loading on the vocal fold walls. This pressure loading arises from asymmetric flow attachment to one vocal fold wall when the glottal channel forms a divergent configuration. Hirschberg proposes an alternative model for the asymmetric loading based upon inviscid flow curvature at the glottal inlet. In this manuscript further evidence is provided in support of the model of Erath et al. and the underlying assumptions, and demonstrates that the primary criticisms presented by Hirschberg are unwarranted. The model presented by Hirschberg is compared with the model from the original paper by Erath et al., and it is shown that each model describes different and complementary aspects of divergent glottal flows.

  8. Performance and Vibratory Loads Data From a Wind-Tunnel Test of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With a Paddle-Type Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Noonan, Kevin W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to obtain data to permit evaluation of paddle-type tip technology for possible use in future U.S. advanced rotor designs. Data was obtained for both a baseline main-rotor blade and a main-rotor blade with a paddle-type tip. The baseline and paddle-type tip blades were compared with regard to rotor performance, oscillatory pitch-link loads, and 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads. Data was obtained in hover and forward flight over a nominal range of advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.425. Results indicate that the paddle-type tip offers no performance improvements in either hover or forward flight. Pitch-link oscillatory loads for the paddle-type tip are higher than for the baseline blade, whereas 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads are generally lower.

  9. A Novel Method for Reducing Rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glinka, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    One of the major hindrances to expansion of the rotorcraft market is the high-amplitude noise they produce, especially during low-speed descent, where blade-vortex interactions frequently occur. In an attempt to reduce the noise levels caused by blade-vortex interactions, the flip-tip rotor blade concept was devised. The flip-tip rotor increases the miss distance between the shed vortices and the rotor blades, reducing BVI noise. The distance is increased by rotating an outboard portion of the rotor tip either up or down depending on the flight condition. The proposed plan for the grant consisted of a computational simulation of the rotor aerodynamics and its wake geometry to determine the effectiveness of the concept, coupled with a series of wind tunnel experiments exploring the value of the device and validating the computer model. The computational model did in fact show that the miss distance could be increased, giving a measure of the effectiveness of the flip-tip rotor. However, the wind experiments were not able to be conducted. Increased outside demand for the 7'x lO' wind tunnel at NASA Ames and low priority at Ames for this project forced numerous postponements of the tests, eventually pushing the tests beyond the life of the grant. A design for the rotor blades to be tested in the wind tunnel was completed and an analysis of the strength of the model blades based on predicted loads, including dynamic forces, was done.

  10. Homeland Security and Information Control: A Model of Asymmetric Information Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Terrence A.

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes some of the activities the United States government has undertaken to control the dissemination of information since 2001. It also explores, through a conceptual model of information flows, potential impacts and discontinuities between policy purposes and outcomes. (AEF)

  11. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  12. Unsteady Simulation of the Viscous Flow About a V-22 Rotor and Wing in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    Results of an unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes simulation of a 0.658-scale V-22 rotor and wing configuration in hover are presented. All geometric components of the flapped-wing and rotor test rig, including rotor blades, are accurately modeled. Rotor motion and rotor/airframe interference effects are simulated directly using moving body overset grid methods. Tiltrotor hover aerodynamics are visualized via unsteady particle trace images. Wing download predictive ability is demonstrated. Simulation results are compared with experimental data.

  13. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 10-foot-diameter Gyroplane Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Bioletti, Carlton

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests on a model gyroplane rotor 10 feet in diameter. The rotor blades had zero sweepback and zero offset; the hub contained a feathering mechanism that provided control of the rotor rolling moment, but not of the pitching moment. The rotor was tested with 4 blades and with 2 blades. The entire useful range of pitch settings and tip-speed ratios was investigated including the phase of operation in which the rotor turned very slowly, or idled.

  14. An integrated optimum design approach for high speed prop rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Mccarthy, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop an optimization procedure for high-speed and civil tilt-rotors by coupling all of the necessary disciplines within a closed-loop optimization procedure. Both simplified and comprehensive analysis codes are used for the aerodynamic analyses. The structural properties are calculated using in-house developed algorithms for both isotropic and composite box beam sections. There are four major objectives of this study. (1) Aerodynamic optimization: The effects of blade aerodynamic characteristics on cruise and hover performance of prop-rotor aircraft are investigated using the classical blade element momentum approach with corrections for the high lift capability of rotors/propellers. (2) Coupled aerodynamic/structures optimization: A multilevel hybrid optimization technique is developed for the design of prop-rotor aircraft. The design problem is decomposed into a level for improved aerodynamics with continuous design variables and a level with discrete variables to investigate composite tailoring. The aerodynamic analysis is based on that developed in objective 1 and the structural analysis is performed using an in-house code which models a composite box beam. The results are compared to both a reference rotor and the optimum rotor found in the purely aerodynamic formulation. (3) Multipoint optimization: The multilevel optimization procedure of objective 2 is extended to a multipoint design problem. Hover, cruise, and take-off are the three flight conditions simultaneously maximized. (4) Coupled rotor/wing optimization: Using the comprehensive rotary wing code CAMRAD, an optimization procedure is developed for the coupled rotor/wing performance in high speed tilt-rotor aircraft. The developed procedure contains design variables which define the rotor and wing planforms.

  15. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  16. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations "interpolate" between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle "flavor" effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. "Flavor-sensitive" DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while "flavor-blind" interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  17. Analytical formulation of optimum rotor interdisciplinary design with a three-dimensional wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Chengjian; Peters, David A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical formulation of optimum rotor interdisciplinary design is presented. A finite-state aeroelastic rotor model, coupling generalized dynamic wake with blade finite elements, is applied to perform the optimum rotor blade design for improved aerodynamic performance and vehicle vibration, while a feasible direction nonlinear optimizer, CONMIN, provides the optimization algorithm. The approach features a systematic rotor aeroelastic model which offers an efficient analytical tool, and retains necessary aerodynamic and blade dynamic building blocks for a sufficient rotor dynamic response analysis. The formulation is well suited for an efficient design sensitivity computation without resorting to finite difference, and thus provides a practical design tool. The results show improved rotor aerodynamic performance and reduced hub vibratory loads for the optimized blade as compared to the advanced rotor of reference design.

  18. Variable camber rotor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L.; Cowan, J.; Mchugh, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Deployment of variable camber concepts on helicopter rotors was analytically assessed. It was determined that variable camber extended the operating range of helicopters provided that the correct compromise can be obtained between performance/loads gains and mechanical complexity. A number of variable camber concepts were reviewed on a two dimensional basis to determine the usefulness of leading edge, trailing edge and overall camber variation schemes. The most powerful method to vary camber was through the trailing edge flaps undergoing relatively small motions (-5 deg to +15 deg). The aerodynamic characteristics of the NASA/Ames A-1 airfoil with 35% and 50% plain trailing edge flaps were determined by means of current subcritical and transonic airfoil design methods and used by rotor performance and loads analysis codes. The most promising variable camber schedule reviewed was a configuration with a 35% plain flap deployment in an on/off mode near the tip of a blade. Preliminary results show approximately 11% reduction in power is possible at 192 knots and a rotor thrust coefficient of 0.09. The potential demonstrated indicates a significant potential for expanding the operating envelope of the helicopter. Further investigation into improving the power saving and defining the improvement in the operational envelope of the helicopter is recommended.

  19. Polygonal shaft hole rotor

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, John H.; Rose, John Scott; Meystrik, Jeffrey J.; White, Kent Lee

    2001-01-23

    A laminated rotor for an induction motor has a plurality of ferro-magnetic laminations mounted axially on a rotor shaft. Each of the plurality of laminations has a central aperture in the shape of a polygon with sides of equal length. The laminations are alternatingly rotated 180.degree. from one another so that the straight sides of the polygon shaped apertures are misaligned. As a circular rotor shaft is press fit into a stack of laminations, the point of maximum interference occurs at the midpoints of the sides of the polygon (i.e., at the smallest radius of the central apertures of the laminations). Because the laminates are alternatingly rotated, the laminate material at the points of maximum interference yields relatively easily into the vertices (i.e., the greatest radius of the central aperture) of the polygonal central aperture of the next lamination as the shaft is inserted into the stack of laminations. Because of this yielding process, the amount of force required to insert the shaft is reduced, and a tighter fit is achieved.

  20. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  1. The asymmetric reactions of mean and volatility of stock returns to domestic and international information based on a four-regime double-threshold GARCH model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cathy W. S.; Yang, Ming Jing; Gerlach, Richard; Jim Lo, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the asymmetric reactions of mean and volatility of stock returns in five major markets to their own local news and the US information via linear and nonlinear models. We introduce a four-regime Double-Threshold GARCH (DTGARCH) model, which allows asymmetry in both the conditional mean and variance equations simultaneously by employing two threshold variables, to analyze the stock markets’ reactions to different types of information (good/bad news) generated from the domestic markets and the US stock market. By applying the four-regime DTGARCH model, this study finds that the interaction between the information of domestic and US stock markets leads to the asymmetric reactions of stock returns and their variability. In addition, this research also finds that the positive autocorrelation reported in the previous studies of financial markets may in fact be mis-specified, and actually due to the local market's positive response to the US stock market.

  2. Neutrophil adhesion on endothelial cells in a novel asymmetric stenosis model: effect of wall shear stress gradients.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Leonie; Copland, Ian B; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Mongrain, Rosaire; Leask, Richard L

    2010-09-01

    Leukocytes play a pivotal role in the progression of atherosclerosis. A novel three-dimensional in vitro asymmetric stenosis model was used to better investigate the role of local hemodynamics in the adhesion of leukocytes to an established plaque. The adhesion of a human promyelocytic cell line (NB4) on a human abdominal aortic endothelial cell (EC) monolayer was quantified. NB4 cells were circulated over TNF-alpha stimulated and nonstimulated ECs for 1 or 6 h at 1.25 or 6.25 dynes/cm(2) and compared to static conditions. Cytokine stimulation increased significantly EC expression of intercellular adhesion molecule and vascular cell adhesion molecule. Under static conditions, neutrophils adhered overall more than under flow, with decreased adhesion with increasing shear. Adhesion was significantly higher in the recirculation region distal to the stenosis than in the inlet. Preshearing the ECs decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules in inflamed endothelium and significantly decreased adhesion. However, the ratio of adhesion between the recirculation zone and the inlet increased, hence exhibiting an increased regional difference. This work suggests an important role for neutrophil-EC interactions in the atherosclerotic process, especially in wall shear stress gradient regions. This is important clinically, potentially helping to explain plaque stability.

  3. Viscosity and Liquid Density of Asymmetric n-Alkane Mixtures: Measurement and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queimada, A. J.; Marrucho, I. M.; Coutinho, J. A. P.; Stenby, E. H.

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and liquid density measurements were performed, at atmospheric pressure, in pure and mixed n-decane, n-eicosane, n-docosane, and n-tetracosane from 293.15 K (or above the melting point) up to 343.15 K. The viscosity was determined with a rolling ball viscometer and liquid densities with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Pure component results agreed, on average, with literature values within 0.2% for liquid density and 3% for viscosity. The measured data were used to evaluate the performance of two models for their predictions: the friction theory coupled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state and a corresponding states model recently proposed for surface tension, viscosity, vapor pressure, and liquid densities of the series of n-alkanes. Advantages and shortcoming of these models are discussed.

  4. Molecular rotors as simple models to study amide NH-aromatic interactions and their role in the folding of peptide-like structures.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ignacio; Burguete, M Isabel; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V; Vigara, Laura

    2007-10-12

    The conformational behavior of designed macrocyclic naphthalenophanes (1a,b and 2a,b) derived from amino acids (Phe and Val) has been used for studying NH...pi interactions. The cycles having 16- and 17-membered rings showed a dynamic process within the NMR time scale, produced by the flipping of the aromatic naphthalene moiety with respect to the macrocyclic main plane. We used the temperature dependence of 1H NMR to obtain activation parameters of the energetic barrier for the process (variable temperature NMR and line shape analysis). The rate of the movement clearly depends on the macrocyclic ring size and, more interestingly, on the nature of the peptidomimetic side chain, the energetic barrier being higher for the compounds bearing aromatic side chains. A largely negative entropic contribution to the free energy of activation was observed, with clear differences due to the side chain nature. Molecular modeling studies suggest that the aromatic rings interact with intramolecularly H-bonded amide NH groups, protecting them from solvation and thus leading to a larger unfavorable activation entropy. This NH...pi interaction has been exploited for the preparation of new systems (1c and meso-1b) with designed conformational preferences, in which aromatic rings tend to fold over amide NH groups. Thus, these minimalistic molecular rotors have served us as simple model systems for the study of NH...pi interactions and their implication in the folding of peptide-like molecules.

  5. Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models: Virtue of Asymmetric Item Characteristic Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether the tradition of accepting point-symmetric item characteristic curves is justified by uncovering the inconsistent relationship between the difficulties of items and the order of maximum likelihood estimates of ability. In this context, proposes a family of models, called the logistic positive exponent family, that provides…

  6. Asymmetric author-topic model for knowledge discovering of big data in toxicogenomics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Hua; Wang, Yuping; Tang, Hailin; Zou, Wen; Basinger, John; Xu, Xiaowei; Tong, Weida

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high-throughput screening technologies facilitates the generation of massive amount of biological data, a big data phenomena in biomedical science. Yet, researchers still heavily rely on keyword search and/or literature review to navigate the databases and analyses are often done in rather small-scale. As a result, the rich information of a database has not been fully utilized, particularly for the information embedded in the interactive nature between data points that are largely ignored and buried. For the past 10 years, probabilistic topic modeling has been recognized as an effective machine learning algorithm to annotate the hidden thematic structure of massive collection of documents. The analogy between text corpus and large-scale genomic data enables the application of text mining tools, like probabilistic topic models, to explore hidden patterns of genomic data and to the extension of altered biological functions. In this paper, we developed a generalized probabilistic topic model to analyze a toxicogenomics dataset that consists of a large number of gene expression data from the rat livers treated with drugs in multiple dose and time-points. We discovered the hidden patterns in gene expression associated with the effect of doses and time-points of treatment. Finally, we illustrated the ability of our model to identify the evidence of potential reduction of animal use.

  7. A three-dimensional high Mach number asymmetric magnetopause model from global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-Q.; Lu, J. Y.; Wang, C.; Kabin, K.; Zhao, J. S.; Wang, M.; Han, J. P.; Wang, J. Y.; Zhao, M. X.

    2015-07-01

    The numerical results from a physics-based global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model are used to examine the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind dynamic pressure, and dipole tilt angle on the size and shape of the magnetopause. The subsolar magnetopause is identified using the plasma velocity and density, the cusps are identified using the thermal pressure, and the whole shape of the magnetopause is determined with the three-dimensional streamlines traced through the simulation domain. The magnetopause surface obtained from the simulations is fitted with a three-dimensional surface function controlled by ten configuration parameters, which provide a description of the subsolar magnetopause, the cusp geometry, the flaring angle, the azimuthal asymmetry, the north-south asymmetry, and the twisting angle of the magnetopause. Effects of the IMF, solar wind dynamic pressure, and dipole tilt angle on the configuration parameters are analyzed and fitted by relatively simple functions. It is found that the solar wind dynamic pressure mainly affects the magnetopause size; the IMF mainly controls the magnetopause flaring angle, azimuthal asymmetry, and twisting angle; and the dipole tilt angle mainly affects the magnetopause north-south asymmetry and the cusp geometry. The model is validated by comparing with available empirical models and observational results, and it is demonstrated that the new model can describe the magnetopause for typical solar wind conditions.

  8. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A.

    2015-02-14

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With four parameters per solvent, this “CANDLE” model simultaneously reproduces solvation energies of large datasets of neutral molecules, cations, and anions with a mean absolute error of 1.8 kcal/mol in water and 3.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile.

  9. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    A homopolar motor has a field rotor mounted on a frame for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor mounted for rotation on said frame within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor. The two rotors are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism, so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed. 7 figs.

  10. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    1998-01-01

    A homopolar motor (10) has a field rotor (15) mounted on a frame (11) for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor (17) mounted for rotation on said frame (11) within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor (15). The two rotors (15, 17) are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism (19), so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed.

  11. Analysis and modeling of flicker noise in lateral asymmetric channel MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Harshit; Kushwaha, Pragya; Gupta, Chetan; Khandelwal, Sourabh; Hu, Chenming; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, flicker noise behavior of lateral non-uniformly doped MOSFET is studied using impedance field method. Our study shows that Klaassen Prins (KP) method, which forms the basis of noise model in MOSFETs, underestimates flicker noise in such devices. The same KP method overestimates thermal noise by 2-3 orders of magnitude in similar devices as demonstrated in Roy et al. (2007). This apparent discrepancy between thermal and flicker noise behavior lies in origin of these noises, which leads to opposite trend of local noise power spectral density vs doping. We have modeled the physics behind such behavior, which also explain the trends observed in the measurements (Agarwal et al., 2015).

  12. 14 CFR 29.921 - Rotor brake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.921 Rotor brake. If there is a means to control the rotation of the rotor drive system independently of the engine, any limitations...

  13. Development of flexible rotor balancing criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, W. W.; Rieger, N. F.

    1979-01-01

    Several studies in which analytical procedures were used to obtain balancing criteria for flexible rotors are described. General response data for a uniform rotor in damped flexible supports were first obtained for plain cylindrical bearings, tilting pad bearings, axial groove bearings, and partial arc bearings. These data formed the basis for the flexible rotor balance criteria presented. A procedure by which a practical rotor in bearings could be reduced to an equivalent uniform rotor was developed and tested. It was found that the equivalent rotor response always exceeded to practical rotor response by more than sixty percent for the cases tested. The equivalent rotor procedure was then tested against six practical rotor configurations for which data was available. It was found that the equivalent rotor method offered a procedure by which balance criteria could be selected for practical flexible rotors, using the charts given for the uniform rotor.

  14. 14 CFR 27.921 - Rotor brake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.921 Rotor brake. If there is a means to control the rotation of the rotor drive system independently of the engine, any limitations...

  15. Modeling of asymmetric degradation based on a non-uniform electric field and temperature in amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In Kim, Jong; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Jung, Keum Dong; Park, Mun Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Seo, Mi Seon; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new local degradation model based on a non-uniform increase in donor-like traps (DLTs) determined by distributions of an electric field and measured device temperature in amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). A systematic investigation of the degradation model reveals that vertical field-dependent DLTs are essential for modeling of measured asymmetric electrical characteristics between the source and drain after positive gate and drain bias stressing. An increased temperature due to self-heating is found to play a role in intensifying the asymmetric degradation. From the individual simulation of measured transfer curves at different stress times, the model parameters and an asymmetry index as a function of stress time are extracted. It is expected that this novel methodology will provide new insight into asymmetric degradation and be utilized to predict the influence of electric field and heat on degradation under various bias-stress conditions in a-IGZO TFTs.

  16. Vibrational dynamics of a non-degenerate ultrafast rotor: The (C12,C13)-oxalate ion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Abdo, Mohannad; Chuntonov, Lev; Smith, Amos B.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular ions undergoing ultrafast conformational changes on the same time scale of water motions are of significant importance in condensed phase dynamics. However, the characterization of systems with fast molecular motions has proven to be both experimentally and theoretically challenging. Here, we report the vibrational dynamics of the non-degenerate (C12,C13)-oxalate anion, an ultrafast rotor, in aqueous solution. The infrared absorption spectrum of the (C12,C13)-oxalate ion in solution reveals two vibrational transitions separated by approximately 40 cm−1 in the 1500–1600 cm−1 region. These two transitions are assigned to vibrational modes mainly localized in each of the carboxylate asymmetric stretch of the ion. Two-dimensional infrared spectra reveal the presence and growth of cross-peaks between these two transitions which are indicative of coupling and population transfer, respectively. A characteristic time of sub-picosecond cross-peaks growth is observed. Ultrafast pump-probe anisotropy studies reveal essentially the same characteristic time for the dipole reorientation. All the experimental data are well modeled in terms of a system undergoing ultrafast population transfer between localized states. Comparison of the experimental observations with simulations reveal a reasonable agreement, although a mechanism including only the fluctuations of the coupling caused by the changes in the dihedral angle of the rotor, is not sufficient to explain the observed ultrafast population transfer. PMID:24182056

  17. Navier-Stokes flowfield computation of wing/rotor interaction for a tilt rotor aircraft in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejtek, Ian G.

    1993-01-01

    The download on the wing produced by the rotor-induced downwash of a tilt rotor aircraft in hover is of major concern because of its severe impact on payload-carrying capability. A method has been developed to help gain a better understanding of the fundamental fluid dynamics that causes this download, and to help find ways to reduce it. In particular, the method is employed in this work to analyze the effect of a tangential leading edge circulation-control jet on download reduction. Because of the complexities associated with modeling the complete configuration, this work focuses specifically on the wing/rotor interaction of a tilt rotor aircraft in hover. The three-dimensional, unsteady, thin-layer compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a time-accurate, implicit, finite difference scheme that employs LU-ADI factorization. The rotor is modeled as an actuator disk which imparts both a radical and an azimuthal distribution of pressure rise and swirl to the flowfield. A momentum theory blade element analysis of the rotor is incorporated into the Navier-Stokes solution method. Solution blanking at interior points of the mesh has been shown here to be an effective technique in introducing the effects of the rotor and tangential leading edge jet. Results are presented both for a rotor alone and for wing/rotor interaction. The overall mean characteristics of the rotor flowfield are computed including the flow acceleration through the rotor disk, the axial and swirl velocities in the rotor downwash, and the slipstream contraction. Many of the complex tilt rotor flow features are captured including the highly three-dimensional flow over the wing, the recirculation fountain at the plane of symmetry, wing leading and trailing edge separation, and the large region of separated flow beneath the wing. Mean wing surface pressures compare fairly well with available experimental data, but the time-averaged download/thrust ratio is 20-30 percent higher than the

  18. Applications of higher harmonic control to hingeless rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical formulation was developed to predict the vibratory hub loads of a helicopter rotor system in forward flight. This analysis is used to calculate the optimal higher harmonic control inputs and associated actuator power required to minimize these hub loads. The present formulation is based on a finite element method in space and time. A nonlinear time domain, unsteady aerodynamic model is used to obtain the airloads, and the rotor induced inflow is calculated using a nonuniform inflow model. Predicted vibratory hub loads are correlated with experimental data from a scale model rotor. Results of a parametric study on a hindgeless rotor show that blade flap, lag and torsion vibration characteristics, offset of blade center of mass from elastic axis, offset of elastic axis from quarter-chord axis, and blade thrust greatly affect the higher harmonic control actuator power requirement.

  19. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floros, Matthew W.; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, showing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. A notional elastic blade model of a teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5, independent of pitch frequency. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.

  20. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Floros, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, 5howing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. With an elastic blade model, the teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.